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Antiquities
Cypriot Bichrome Ware Amphora, Iron Age, c. 1100 - 750 B.C.

|Pottery| |Antiquities|, |Cypriot| |Bichrome| |Ware| |Amphora,| |Iron| |Age,| |c.| |1100| |-| |750| |B.C.|
The referenced amphora in the British Museum, dated Early Iron Age, 1100 - 750 B.C., is very similar to this amphora. The most significant difference is only the concentric circle motifs are on the neck, vice shoulder. The geometric patterns on this amphora are also found on earlier Mycenaean pottery.
AP23892. cf. Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, BR. MUS. II C., pl. 2, 1, choice, complete and intact, scattered mineral deposits, rim warped, 26cm (approx. 10 1/4 inches) tall, c. 1100/900 - 750/500 B.C.; fired terracotta, flat base, ovoid body, broad neck, everted mouth, a pair of stirrup handles, pale buff slip with decoration in dull brown, ladder pattern on flat rim, encircling bands of varying width on neck and body, 4 concentric circle motifs on shoulder, one wavy band encircling body, base and handles brown; ex prominent NY Collector DK; $2500.00 (2375.00)


Byzantine Empire, Levante or Alexandria, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D., Jewish Menorah Lead Token

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Levante| |or| |Alexandria,| |c.| |5th| |-| |6th| |Century| |A.D.,| |Jewish| |Menorah| |Lead| |Token||token|
The purpose of Byzantine era lead tokens is unknown. Many appear closely related to seals differing only by the absence of a cord or channel for attachment to a container or document. Many late Roman and early Byzantine seals have a figural type on one side and a legend in two lines in Latin or Greek on the other side. Seals with a menorah are known, usually with a blank globular reverse, but some also have a name on the other side.
JD98657. Lead token, personal token of Rodanos(?); Roma e-sale 53 (7 Feb 2019), lot 504 (same dies), VF, highlighting earthen deposit desert patina, weight 3.077 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 180o, c. 5th - 6th century A.D.; obverse Menorah of seven branches, flanked by lulav on left and etrog on right; reverse PO∆A/NOY in two lines across field, palm frond above; ex CNG e-auction 435 (2 Jan 2019), lot 401; extremely rare; $1800.00 (1710.00)


Canaanite, Cypriot Imitative Lentoid Terracotta Pilgrim Flask, Late Bronze Age - Early Iron Age, c. 1400 - 1100 B.C.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Canaanite,| |Cypriot| |Imitative| |Lentoid| |Terracotta| |Pilgrim| |Flask,| |Late| |Bronze| |Age| |-| |Early| |Iron| |Age,| |c.| |1400| |-| |1100| |B.C.|NEW
This flask came to us identified as a Cypriot flask found in Israel. This form is from Cyprus but most Cypriot specimens are "red lustrous ware." Click here to see a superb Cypriot flask in the British Museum. Our specimen is red-orange clay with a buff or brown slip and clearly cruder than the Cypriot examples. It is imitative of the Cypriot type, almost certainly made locally in Canaan. The referenced Canaanite flask is discussed in Trude Dothan's (1979), Excavations at the cemetery of Deir El-Balah (available online). Deir El-Balah is in the central Gaza Strip. The cemetery's main period of use spans the 13th century B.C., with a possible beginning in the 14th and extension into the 12th. The flask was found in grave 116, cut into the sandstone, and containing an anthropoid coffin and burial gifts that indicate, like other similar burials in the cemetery, the dead was of high position, had an Egyptian cultural affiliation, and must have lived in the area. Dothan notes several similar flasks from other Canaanite excavations, one dated c. 1250 - 1200, and others found in a mixed Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age context.
BK23894. cf. Deir El-Balah (Qedem 10) p. 40, 29; see note 9 for a list of other finds; for Cypriot prototype see BM Online 1899-1229-102, Choice, complete and intact, slip worn, terracotta lentoid pilgrim flask, 19 cm (7 1/2") tall, red-orange clay with a buff-brown slip, asymmetrical lentoid body wheel made in two joined halves, long neck, mouth just slightly flared, single handle from shoulder to neck; ex Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art (Boca Raton FL); $1100.00 (1045.00)


Roman, Eastern Mediterranean, Glass Bottle, c. 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

|Glass| |Antiquities|, |Roman,| |Eastern| |Mediterranean,| |Glass| |Bottle,| |c.| |1st| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|
Our specimen is weathered making it in part iridescent and making the original color difficult to determine. Iridescence is a beautiful effect of ancient glass weathering, which distorts the original color and transparency of the glass with rainbow-like colors. The referenced Hermitage Collection bottle is described as clear pink-violet glass. It does appear this piece might have been the same color.
AG23897. cf. Hermitage Collection 355, Ontario Museum 222, Corning I 197,, Choice, very tiny chip on rim, areas of encrustation, weathering, iridescent areas, probably 1st century A.D.; glass unguentarium, 8.8 cm (3 1/2") tall, free-blown, violet(?) glass, squat piriform body, long cylindrical neck widening to body, rim everted and then folded in, flat bottom with no pontil mark; ex Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art (Boca Raton FL); $700.00 (665.00)


Roman Syria-Palestina, Jewish, Lead Bulla Seal, 7 Branched Menorah, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.

|Seals|, |Roman| |Syria-Palestina,| |Jewish,| |Lead| |Bulla| |Seal,| |7| |Branched| |Menorah,| |c.| |5th| |-| |6th| |Century| |A.D.||bulla| |(tag| |seal)|
A bulla (plural, bullae) is a lump of clay or lead molded around a cord and stamped with a seal that identifies the sender. With a bulla in place, a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, revealing the tampering. Bullae depicting a menorah are known but very rare and not well documented. Dattari-Savio p. 327, 3 is a 1901 rubbing of a very similar menorah sealing. Michael Still lists two menorah sealings in his thesis on Roman seals, 1696 with a Latin inscription reverse, 1765 with a Hebrew inscription reverse. The recently published catalogue of the Vossen collection by Gert Boersema and Bill Dalzell, has two Menorah seals, numbers 181 and 182, both with blank reverses. There are also a few examples known from auctions. A FORVM member posted a bulla of this exact type from his collection on the Classical Numismatic Discussion on the Forum Ancient Coins website. We received three examples of this type on consignment, all with the same fire damage, suggesting they were found together.
JD98655. Lead bulla (tag seal), VF, chip on reverse, light earthen deposits, raised bumps from exposure to an ancient fire that heated and expanded air bubbles within the lead, weight 4.679 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, c. 5th - 6th century A.D.; obverse seven branched menorah with tripod base; reverse lulav, uncertain Syriac inscription; very rare; $670.00 (636.50)


Roman-Byzantine, Syro-Palestinian, Glass Dropper Flask, c. Late 1st - Early 5th Century A.D.

|Glass| |Antiquities|, |Roman-Byzantine,| |Syro-Palestinian,| |Glass| |Dropper| |Flask,| |c.| |Late| |1st| |-| |Early| |5th| |Century| |A.D.|
Thick enamel-like weathering, as seen on this piece, is common on glass found in the Levant and this piece is certainly from the Levante. This flask is, however, a bit of a mystery. There is nothing very similar in the large library of ancient and medieval glass references held by Forum. It resembles an aryballos, but lacks the handles which define that type. It probably was used like an aryballos, to store and dispense scented oil which was rubbed on the skin and then scraped off to clean the body. The date is uncertain. Weathering obscures the original color, making another mystery, but the only other a similar flasks we know are described as opaque black glass.
AG20822. Isings -, et al. -; apparently unpublished but two similar pieces are known from the market (priced $2,500 - $3,000!), Choice, complete and intact, thick tan and brown enamel-like weathering, dropper flask, free-blown, amber(?) glass, 12.0 cm (4 3/4") tall, 8.5 cm maximum diameter, piriform body, very short narrow neck, broad flat folded in rim, round bottom with large pontil mark, not designed to stand on its own we will include a stand; from the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years; very rare form; $500.00 (475.00)


Roman Egypt, Antinoopolites Nome, Portrait of Antinous, c. 30 Oct 130 - 300 A.D.

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Roman| |Egypt,| |Antinoopolites| |Nome,| |Portrait| |of| |Antinous,| |c.| |30| |Oct| |130| |-| |300| |A.D.||tessera|
Antinous probably joined Hadrian's entourage when it passed through Bithynia about 124 A.D. He became Hadrian's constant companion and lover. In October 130 Antinous drowned in the Nile. Hadrian's grief knew no bounds; he enrolled him among the gods, erected a temple, and on 30 October 130, Hadrian founded the city of Antinoopolis on the very bank of the Nile river where Antinous drowned. It was the capital of a new nome, Antinoopolites. Perhaps the date is from the founding of Antinoopolis. There began a Cult of Antinous. Artists vied with each other in immortalizing his beauty. Temples and statues dedicated to him were erected all over the Empire.
AG97755. Glass tessera, Dattari (Savio) (but cf. 6551-6551 for other glass tesserae of different types), green hue, manufacturing flaw at 12h, otherwise intact., weight 1.67 g, maximum diameter 18 mm, Antinopolis Nome mint, c. 30 Oct 130 - 300 A.D.; obverse draped bust of Antinos right, wearing hem-hem crown, crescent before; reverse blank; ex CNG e-sale 481 (25 Nov 2020), lot 280; rare; $500.00 (475.00)


Lot of 100 Bronze Ancient Trilobate Arrowheads, Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D.

|Metal| |Arrowheads|, |Lot| |of| |100| |Bronze| |Ancient| |Trilobate| |Arrowheads,| |Hellenistic| |-| |Byzantine,| |c.| |300| |B.C.| |-| |1000| |A.D.|
 
LT96894. Lot of 100 bronze trilobate arrowheads, mostly or all Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D., c. 12 - 28 mm, some complete and intact, some with chips or bends, unattributed to type, no tags, from the same larger lot as the arrowheads in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $450.00 (427.50)


Lot of 100 Bronze Ancient Trilobate Arrowheads, Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D.

|Metal| |Arrowheads|, |Lot| |of| |100| |Bronze| |Ancient| |Trilobate| |Arrowheads,| |Hellenistic| |-| |Byzantine,| |c.| |300| |B.C.| |-| |1000| |A.D.|
LT96895. Lot of 100 bronze trilobate arrowheads, mostly or all Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D., c. 12 - 28 mm, some complete and intact, some with chips or bends, unattributed to type, no tags, from the same larger lot as the arrowheads in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $450.00 (427.50)


Roman Syria-Palestina, Jewish, Lead Bulla Seal, 7 Branched Menorah, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D.

|Seals|, |Roman| |Syria-Palestina,| |Jewish,| |Lead| |Bulla| |Seal,| |7| |Branched| |Menorah,| |c.| |5th| |-| |6th| |Century| |A.D.||bulla| |(tag| |seal)|
A bulla (plural, bullae) is a lump of clay or lead molded around a cord and stamped with a seal that identifies the sender. With a bulla in place, a container cannot be violated without visible damage to either the bulla or the cord, revealing the tampering. Bullae depicting a menorah are known but very rare and not well documented. Dattari-Savio p. 327, 3 is a 1901 rubbing of a very similar menorah sealing. Michael Still lists two menorah sealings in his thesis on Roman seals, 1696 with a Latin inscription reverse, 1765 with a Hebrew inscription reverse. The recently published catalogue of the Vossen collection by Gert Boersema and Bill Dalzell, has two Menorah seals, numbers 181 and 182, both with blank reverses. There are also a few examples known from auctions. A FORVM member posted a bulla of this exact type from his collection on the Classical Numismatic Discussion on the Forum Ancient Coins website. We received three examples of this type on consignment, all with the same fire damage, suggesting they were found together.
JD98656. Lead bulla (tag seal), VF/Fair, light earthen deposits, raised bumps from exposure to an ancient fire that heated and expanded air bubbles within the lead, c. 5th - 6th century A.D.; obverse seven branched menorah with tripod base; reverse lulav, uncertain Syriac inscription (obscure); very rare; $340.00 (323.00)











Catalog current as of Monday, August 15, 2022.
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