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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Coins Under $50||View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins and Antiquities Under $50

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Selge, Pisidia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Kprcay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB62868. Bronze AE 17, SNG BnF 1983; SNGvA 5291; BMC Lycia p. 261, 43 (no spear); SNG Cop -, VF, weight 2.936 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 270o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse older bearded head of Herakles right; reverse unstrung bow above C-E divided by triskeles, thunderbolt below; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RA73268. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 844 (S), Webb 940, Hunter IV -, SRCV IV -, aF, well centered, nice green patina, weight 3.971 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain British mint, c. mid 286 - 287; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P AVG, radiate and draped bust right, early reign "moustache" portrait; reverse MARS VICTOR (Mars the Victor), Mars advancing right, nude except for helmet and cloak tied in belt at waist and flying behind, transverse spear in right hand, trophy of captured arms over left shoulder in left hand, no field marks, nothing in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; scarce; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Kprcay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86923. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, F, mottled patina, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 2.738 g, maximum diameter 13.7 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Kprcay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86925. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, VF, some patina flaking, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 3.495 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Byzantine Empire, Maurice Tiberius, 13 August 582 - 22 November 602 A.D.

|Maurice| |Tiberius|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Maurice| |Tiberius,| |13| |August| |582| |-| |22| |November| |602| |A.D.||follis|
Tiberius II and Maurice each issued folles of this type. The only difference is Tiberius has a cross on his crown; Maurice has a trefoil ornament.

The obverse legend on this coin is completely blundered illiterate nonsense, as is typical for the type.
BZ93512. Bronze follis, DOC I 155, Wroth BMC 89 (Tiberius II), Ratto 964 (Tiberius), Tolstoi 61, Hahn MIB II 95b, SBCV 532, Sommer 7.62.2, Morrisson BnF -, F, light scraping, minor porosity, die shift on reverse, weight 12.330 g, maximum diameter 32.3 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch as Theoupolis (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 585 - 586 A.D.; obverse nTINOC - [...]PPIV (blundered), bust facing, crown with trefoil ornament, consular robes, mappa in right, eagle-tipped scepter in left; reverse large M (40 nummi) between A/N/N/O and II/II (regnal year 4), cross above, THEUP' in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Byzantine Empire, Constantine VII, 6 June 913 9 November 959 AD

|Constantine| |VII|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Constantine| |VII,| |6| |June| |913| || |9| |November| |959| |AD||follis|
In 945 Romanus I was deposed by his sons who wanted the throne. Instead Constantine VII took control. Finally, when he was 39 years old, he finally had sole rule and real power. Later that year he made Romanus II, his son and grandson of Romanus I, his co-emperor.
BZ93543. Bronze follis, DOC III-2 26, Morrisson BnF 37/Cp/AE/55, Wroth BMC 45, Ratto 1900, SBCV 1761, Sommer 36.17, F, struck on a small flan, earthen deposits, weight 5.339 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 945 - c. 950 AD; obverse + COnST bASIL ROM' (Constantine King of the Romans), half-length bust of Constantine VII facing, bearded, wearing modified loros and crown with cross, akakia in right hand, globus cruciger in left; reverse + COnSt/EnΘEO bA/SILEVS R/OmEOn (Constantine King of the Romans) in four lines; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Byzantine Empire, Isaac II Angelus, 12 September 1185 - 8 April 1195 A.D.

|Isaac| |II| |Angelus|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Isaac| |II| |Angelus,| |12| |September| |1185| |-| |8| |April| |1195| |A.D.||aspron| |trachy|
The pallium was an open vestment used by the Greeks, Romans, and Byzantines as a cloak, or exterior garment. Some writers say it was of a round, others of a semi-circular form. It was so worn (and much nicety was displayed in its proper adjustment) as to be capable of covering the other habiliments, and even to envelop the whole person. On coins the figures of Jesus Christ, the Virgin Mary, saints, emperors and gods, sometimes appear clothed in the pallium.
BZ93557. Billon aspron trachy, DOC IV-1 3; CLBC I 7.3.1; Grierson 1130; SBCV 2003; Sommer 65.5; Morrison BnF 64/Cp/(B)/01; Wroth BMC 19 ff.; Ratto 2184 ff., F, not fully struck, scyphate, weight 2.956 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 12 Sep 1185 - 8 Apr 1195 A.D.; obverse MP-ΘV, the Virgin enthroned facing, nimbate, wears pallium and maphorium, holds before Her nimbate head of infant Christ; reverse I/CAA/KI/OC - ∆εC/ΠO/TH/C, Isaac standing facing facing, wearing crown, divitision, loros, and sagion, cruciform scepter in left, akakia in right, crowned by hand of God above right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Kprcay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB93765. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, VF, centered on a tight flan, green patina, earthen deposits, coppery high spots, scratches, weight 2.353 g, maximum diameter 13.0 mm, die axis 180o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Mars is usually depicted nude and Virtus in military garb, but this figure is identified as Mars because it appears to be male.
RA94172. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 636a, RSC IV 1322, Cunetio 1278, Normanby 264, SRCV III 10416, RIC V-1 S330 (S) corr. (obv. leg.), Hunter IV - (p. lxiv), aVF, tight flan cutting off much of legend, ragged edge, weight 1.953 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, 10th offficina, Rome mint, 261 - 262 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse VIRTVS AVGVSTI (to the valor of the Emperor), Mars (or Virtus) standing left, helmeted, right foot on helmet, wearing military garb, olive branch in right hand, inverted spear in left, foot on helmet, X left; scarce; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|
This coin was dedicated to Jupiter the protector. Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored emperors and kings, those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RA94173. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 626a, RSC IV 361, Hunter IV S60, RIC V-1 S210 var. (N left), SRCV III -, gVF/gF, full legends on a broad flan, sharp attractive portrait, reverse die wear, edge cracks and splits, weight 2.367 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 260 - 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVAT (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, thunderbolt in right, long scepter in left hand, N right; $50.00 SALE PRICE $45.00




  



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