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Carinus, First Half 283 - Spring 285 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Carinus,| |First| |Half| |283| |-| |Spring| |285| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt|NEW
Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RX93110. Billon tetradrachm, Milne 4667; Curtis 1929; Geissen 3172; Dattari 5576; BMC Alexandria p. 317, 2448; Kampmann 115.3; Emmett 4012, VF, well centered, flow lines, light corrosion, slightly ragged edge, weight 6.239 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, as caesar, 29 Aug 282 - first half 283 A.D.; obverse AK M A KAPINOC K, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse Tyche standing left, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, LA (year 1) above left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $60.00 (€55.20)


Thourioi, Lucania, Italy, c. 443 - 410 B.C.

|Italy|, |Thourioi,| |Lucania,| |Italy,| |c.| |443| |-| |410| |B.C.|NEW
Nearly 70 years after Sybaris was destroyed by the Crotoniats, a new colony was founded on the site on the Gulf of Taranto. Soon after, on the advice of an oracle, the settlers moved a short distance away near a fountain named Thuria, after which the new city was named. The head of Athena is probably that of the sea-goddess Athena Skyletria. The bull may have been adopted from the archaic coins of Sybaris and symbolize the river Krathis or it may represent the rushing waters of the fountain Thuria from which the city took its name. This denomination is described as a stater, nomos or didrachm in various references and sales listings.
SH96811. Silver didrachm, cf. SNG ANS 876; SNG Cop 1412; HGC 1 1258 (R2); HN Italy 1775; Pozzi 221; Jörgensen p. 168, 3 & pl. VIII, 4, VF, high relief, attractive style, well centered on a tight flan, flow lines, die wear, graffito on reverse, weight 7.918 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 325o, Thourioi mint, c. 443 - 410 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Athenian helmet ornamented with an olive wreath, not control letter visible; reverse bull walking left with head lowered, ΘOYPIΩN above, tunny fish left in exergue, no control letter visible; very rare; $900.00 (€828.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |II,| |359| |-| |336| |B.C.|NEW
Philip II became the ruler of all Greece when he defeated the Athenians at the Battle of Chaeroneia in 338 B.C. Philip personally selected the design of his coins. His horse, on the reverse of this coin, won a race in the Olympic Games in 356 B.C., the year his son Alexander the Great was born.
SH96808. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Le Rider 114 (different obv. die, same rev. die: R91); SNG ANS 358,, VF, well centered obverse, attractive style, bumps and scratches, many shallow cuts on edge, weight 12.558 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 180o, Pella mint, c. 354 - 348 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, king riding left, wearing causia and cloak, raising right hand in salute, ∆ center below above exergue lines, star under raised right foreleg; ex Numismatic Fine Arts, Fall 1988 (12 October), lot 165; ex Dr. George Brauer Collection; rare; $950.00 (€874.00)


Gela, Sicily, 490 - 475 B.C.

|Gela|, |Gela,| |Sicily,| |490| |-| |475| |B.C.|NEW
In 485, Gelo, the tyrant of Gela, took advantage of an appeal by the descendants of the first colonist of Syracuse, the Gamoroi, who had held power until they were expelled by the Killichiroi, the lower class of the city, and made himself master of that city. He left his brother Hieron in control of Gela.
SH96810. Silver didrachm, Jenkins Gela, group I, 100 (O30/255); HGC 2 363 (S); SNG ANS IV/2 19; SNG Cop 257; BMC Sicily p. 67, 19, VF, attractive man faced bull, well centered, light corrosion, struck with a worn obverse die, small edge split, weight 8.377 g, maximum diameter 21.39 mm, die axis 90o, Gela mint, 490 - 475 B.C.; obverse horseman galloping right, nude, wearing pileus, brandishing spear overhead in right hand; reverse forepart of man-faced bull (river god) swimming right, long beard, dotted truncation, CEΛAΣ below, all within a round incuse; ex Numismatic Fine Arts, Fall 1988 (12 October), lot 98; ex Dr. George Brauer Collection; scarce; $1000.00 (€920.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia, Titus Reverse

|Cappadocia|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Caesarea,| |Cappadocia,| |Titus| |Reverse|NEW
Kayseri, originally called Mazaka or Mazaca, is in central Turkey on a low spur on the north side of Mount Erciyes (Mount Argaeus in ancient times). During Achaemenid Persian rule, it was the capital of a Satrapy on the crossroads of the Royal Road from Sardis to Susa and the trade route from Sinope to the Euphrates. It was conquered by Alexander's general Perdikkas, was ruled by Eumenes of Cardia, then passed to the Seleucid empire after the battle of Ipsus. It became the capital of the independent Cappadocian Kingdom under Ariarathes III, around 250 B.C. During Strabo's time it was also known as Eusebia, after the Cappadocian King Ariarathes V Eusebes, 163 – 130 B.C. The name was changed again to "Caesarea in Cappadocia" in honor of Caesar Augustus, upon his death in 14 A.D. The city passed under formal Roman rule in 17 A.D. In Roman times, it prospered on the route from Ephesus to the East. Caesarea was destroyed by the Sassanid King Shapur I after his victory over the Emperor Valerian I in 260 A.D. At the time it was recorded to have around 400,000 inhabitants. Arabic influence changed Caesarea to the modern name Kayseri. The city gradually recovered and has a population of almost 1 million people today. Few traces of the ancient city survive.
RP96735. Silver didrachm, RPC II 1650, Sydenham Caesarea 102, Metcalf Cappadocia 4, SNG Righetti 1761, VF, excellent portraits, flow lines, light deposits, light marks, reverse off center, weight 6.429 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 76 - 77 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPA KAICAP OYECΠACIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate bust of Vespasian right; reverse AYTO KAI OYECΠACIANOC CEBACTOY YIOC, laureate bust of Titus right; $600.00 (€552.00)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

|Domitian|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.|
The Flavian Palace, also known as Domus Flavia, was completed in 92 A.D. It was part of the vast residential complex of the Roman Emperors on the Palatine Hill in Rome. Well known for its grandeur, the Flavian Palace was more commonly used for purposes of state, while the Domus Augustana, an enormous, lavishly ornamented palace south of the Flavian Palace, was the Emperor's primary residence.Flavian Palace
JD97441. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 732 (C3); RSC II 272; BMCRE II 192; BnF III 178; Hunter I 80, SRCV I -, EF, light iridescent toning, broad flan, flow lines, die wear, weight 3.356 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1 Jan - 13 Sep 92 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI, laureate head right; reverse IMP XXI COS XVI CENS P P P, Minerva standing left, helmeted and draped, thunderbolt in right hand, spear vertical behind in left hand, grounded shield at feet behind; ex Numismatica Ars Classica auction 100 (30 May 2017), lot 1825; $270.00 (€248.40)


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.

|Domitian|, |Domitian,| |13| |September| |81| |-| |18| |September| |96| |A.D.|NEW
In 88 A.D., the First Dacian War ended. Decebalus became a client king of Rome, he received money, craftsmen and war machines and agreed to protect the borders (Limes) of the Roman Empire. For the remainder of Domitian's reign Dacia remained a relatively peaceful client kingdom, but Decebalus also used the Roman money to fortify his defenses against Rome.
JD97442. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 580, RSC II 234, BMCRE II 119, BnF III 116, Hunter I 45, cf. SRCV I 2737 (TR P XIIII), Choice VF, well centered, nice portrait, flow lines, areas of dark toning, scratches, weight 3.266 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1 Jan - 13 Sep 88 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, laureate head right; reverse IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P, Minerva standing left, helmeted and draped, thunderbolt in right hand, spear vertical behind in left hand, grounded shield at feet behind; $150.00 (€138.00)


Roman Republic, Sextus Pompey, Imperator and Prefect of the Fleet, Executed 35 B.C.

|Pompeians|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Sextus| |Pompey,| |Imperator| |and| |Prefect| |of| |the| |Fleet,| |Executed| |35| |B.C.|NEW
Struck by Sextus Pompey after his victory over Salvidienus and relates to his acclamation as the Son of Neptune. The inscription PRAEF CLAS ET ORAE MARIT abbreviates Praefectus Classis et Orae Maritimae, which translates Commander-in-Chief of the Fleet and the Sea Coasts. This title was held by both Pompey the Great and his son Sextus Pompey. Although Sextus Pompey was the supreme naval commander, Octavian had the Senate declare him a public enemy. He turned to piracy and came close to defeating Octavian. He was defeated by Marcus Agrippa at the naval battle of Naulochus on 3 September 36 B.C. and was executed by order of Mark Antony in 35 B.C.
RR96733. Silver denarius, Crawford 511/2a, RSC I Sextus Pompey 1b, Sydenham 1347, BMCRR Sicily 15, Sear CRI 333, SRCV I 1391, aVF, toned, tight flan cutting off much of legends, a little flatly struck, bumps, scratches, banker's marks, weight 3.561 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, Sicilian mint, 42 - 40 B.C.; obverse MAG PIVS IMP ITER, diademed head of Neptune right, long hair and beard, trident over shoulder; reverse PRAEF CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C (AE and MAR ligate), naval trophy of captured arms placed on anchor, trident head above, components of the trophy include helmet, cuirass, stem of prow and apluster for arms, the heads of Scylla and Charybdis at base; scarce; $500.00 (€460.00)


Perperene, Mysia, 4th Century B.C.

|Other| |Mysia|, |Perperene,| |Mysia,| |4th| |Century| |B.C.|NEW
Perperene or Perperena was a city of ancient Mysia on the south-east of Adramyttium, in the neighborhood of which there were copper mines and good vineyards. It was said by some to be the place in which Thucydides had died. Stephanus of Byzantium calls the town Parparum or Parparon, but he writes that some called the place Perine. Ptolemy calls it Perpere or Permere. According to the Suda, Hellanicus of Lesbos, a 5th-century B.C. Greek logographer, died at Perperene at age 85. At a later date it was given the name Theodosiopolis or Theodosioupolis. It is located near Asagi Beykoy, on the Kozak plateau near Bergama in the Izmir province of Turkey in western Anatolia.
GA95888. Bronze AE 8, cf. SNG BnF 2309; SNG Cop 520; BMC Mysia p. 168, 2; SNG Tübingen -; Waddington - (none of the reference coins with this style or ethnic arrangement), F, dark patina, flatly struck centers, corrosion, weight 0.581 g, maximum diameter 8.1 mm, Perperene (near Bergama, Turkey) mint, 4th Century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΠEPΠE, grape bunch on vine; this is the very first coin of Perperene handled by FORVM; very rare; $100.00 (€92.00)


Roman Republic, Sextus Pompey, Imperator and Prefect of the Fleet, Executed 35 B.C., Portrait of Pompey the Great

|Pompeians|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Sextus| |Pompey,| |Imperator| |and| |Prefect| |of| |the| |Fleet,| |Executed| |35| |B.C.,| |Portrait| |of| |Pompey| |the| |Great|NEW
The inscription PRAEF CLAS ET ORAE MARIT abbreviates Praefectus Classis et Orae Maritimae, which translates Commander-in-Chief of the Fleet and the Sea Coasts. This title was held by both Pompey the Great and his son Sextus Pompey. Although Sextus Pompey was the supreme naval commander, Octavian had the Senate declare him a public enemy. He turned to piracy and came close to defeating Octavian. He was defeated by Marcus Agrippa at the naval battle of Naulochus (3 September 36 B.C.) and was executed by order of Mark Antony in 35 B.C.
RR96734. Silver denarius, Crawford 511/3a, RSC I Pompey the Great 17, Sydenham 1344, BMCRR Sicily 7, Sear CRI 334, SRCV I 1392, aVF, attractive iridescent toning, obverse off center, tight flan, reverse strike weak on right, weight 3.822 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 135o, Sicilian mint, 42 - 40 B.C.; obverse MAG PIVS IMP ITER, head of Pompey the Great right, between capis and lituus (augural symbols); reverse Neptune standing left, right foot on prow, nude but for chlamys on left arm, holding apluster, flanked by the Catanaean brothers, Anapias and Amphinomus, running in opposite directions with their parents on their shoulders, PRAEF above, CLAS ET ORAE / MARIT EX S C in two lines in exergue; scarce; $900.00 (€828.00)




  







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