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Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, 300 - 264 B.C.

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In 278 B.C., envoys from the Sicilian cities of Agrigentum, Syracuse, and Leontini asked Pyrrhus for military aid to remove the Carthaginian dominance over that island. With an army of 20,000 infantry, 3,000 cavalry, 20 war elephants, and some 200 ships, Pyrrhus defeated the Carthaginian forces and captured the city-fortress of Eryx. Carthage sued for peace, but Pyrrhus demanded Carthage renounce its claims on Sicily entirely. Pyrrhus set his sights on conquering Carthage itself, and began outfitting an expedition. However, his ruthless treatment of the Sicilian cities and his execution of two Sicilian rulers led to such animosity that he was forced out of Sicily and abandoned his plan.
GI91726. Bronze AE 21, Viola CNP 252f, Alexandropoulos 57h, SNG Cop 164, Müller Afrique 276, VF, obverse flatly struck, off center, flan casting sprue remnant, weight 4.742 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 270o, Sardinian(?) mint, 300 - 264 B.C.; obverse head of Kore-Tanit left wearing barley wreath, triple-pendant earring, and necklace; reverse horse's head right, pellet before; $120.00 (€105.60)


Arse-Saguntum, Hispania Citerior, c. 170 - 130 B.C.

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Saguntum was built by Edetani Iberians in 5th century B.C. In 218 B.C., after enduring eight months of siege, the Saguntines' last defenses were finally overrun. Hannibal offered to spare the population if they were "willing to depart from Saguntum, unarmed, each with two garments." When they declined the offer and began to sabotage the town's wealth and possessions, every adult was put to death. Seven years later, the town was taken by Rome and made a Roman municipium. Saguntum grew to a city of about 50,000 inhabitants, with a great circus, a theater seating 8,000 and an amphitheater.
RP89711. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 1974, Alvarez-Burgos 2054, Villaronga CNH 33; SNG BM Spain 1112, aVF, green patina, slightly rough, scratches, weight 2.939 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 180o, Saguntum (Sagunto, Valencia, Spain) mint, c. 170 - 130 B.C.; obverse scallop shell; reverse dolphin right, crescent with horns upward above, Iberian A and three pellets below; $80.00 (€70.40)


Arse-Saguntum, Hispania Citerior, c. 170 - 130 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Saguntum was built by Edetani Iberians in 5th century B.C. In 218 B.C., after enduring eight months of siege, the Saguntines' last defenses were finally overrun. Hannibal offered to spare the population if they were "willing to depart from Saguntum, unarmed, each with two garments." When they declined the offer and began to sabotage the town's wealth and possessions, every adult was put to death. Seven years later, the town was taken by Rome and made a Roman municipium. Saguntum grew to a city of about 50,000 inhabitants, with a great circus, a theater seating 8,000 and an amphitheater.
RP89712. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 1974, Alvarez-Burgos 2054, Villaronga CNH 33; SNG BM Spain 1112, VF, green patina, reverse center weak, light marks, light deposits, weight 2.267 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 0o, Saguntum (Sagunto, Valencia, Spain) mint, c. 170 - 130 B.C.; obverse scallop shell; reverse dolphin right, crescent with horns upward above, Iberian A and three pellets below; $80.00 (€70.40)


Arse-Saguntum, Hispania Citerior, c. 170 - 130 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Saguntum was built by Edetani Iberians in 5th century B.C. In 218 B.C., after enduring eight months of siege, the Saguntines' last defenses were finally overrun. Hannibal offered to spare the population if they were "willing to depart from Saguntum, unarmed, each with two garments." When they declined the offer and began to sabotage the town's wealth and possessions, every adult was put to death. Seven years later, the town was taken by Rome and made a Roman municipium. Saguntum grew to a city of about 50,000 inhabitants, with a great circus, a theater seating 8,000 and an amphitheater.
RP89402. Bronze sextans, Villaronga-Benages 1979, Alvarez-Burgos 2064, Villaronga CNH 35; SNG BM Spain 1113 ff., VF, dark green patina, earthen deposits, reverse slightly off center, weight 1.774 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 180o, Saguntum (Sagunto, Valencia, Spain) mint, c. 170 - 130 B.C.; obverse scallop shell; reverse dolphin right, crescent with horns upward above, Iberian A and star below; $80.00 (€70.40)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RS93138. Silver drachm, RPC IV Online T6928 (8 spec.), Metcalf Cappadocia 120a, Sydenham Caesarea 299, BMC Galatia -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, aVF, toned, flow lines, reverse legend weak, bumps, scratches, edge cracks, weight 2.441 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 139 A.D.; obverse AVTOKP ANTWNEINOC CEBACTOC, bare head right; reverse VΠATOC B (Cos. 2), Mt. Argaios surmounted by statue of Helios standing facing, nude, globe in right hand, long scepter in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 (€70.40)


Roman, Lead Conical Bulla Seal, Early 4th Century A.D.

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The ancients did not all agree on the attributes of Serapis. A passage in Tacitus affirms that many recognized in this god, Aesculapius, imputing healing to his intervention; some thought him identical with Osiris, the oldest deity of the Egyptians; others regarded him as Jupiter, possessing universal power; but by most he was believed to be the same as Pluto, the "gloomy" Dis Pater of the infernal regions. The general impression of the ancients seems to have been that by Serapis, was to be understood the beginning and foundation of things. Julian II consulted the oracle of Apollo for the purpose of learning whether Pluto and Serapis were different gods; and he received for an answer that Jupiter-Serapis and Pluto were one and the same divinity.
AS83610. Lead seal, aEF, weight 8.022 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, early 4th Century A.D.; obverse diademed, draped, bearded, bust of Serapis right, kalathos(?) on head; reverse conical back, pierced for cord; $160.00 (€140.80)


Roman, Lead Conical Bulla Seal, Aristanetos, Early 4th Century A.D.

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The portrait indicates an early 4th century date. It is the personal seal of Aristanetos, as the Greek genitive legend indicates. Many personal seals from the late Roman and Byzantine eras feature the owner's portrait.
AS85926. Lead seal, cf. Münzzentrum auction 157 (2011), lot 552, aVF, weight 9.060 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, early 4th Century A.D.; obverse APICT-ANETOV, draped bust of a slightly balding middle-aged man with sideburns; reverse conical back, pierced for cord; $100.00 (€88.00)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), Second Reign, 145 - 116 B.C.

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Ptolemy VIII and his older brother Ptolemy VI ruled jointly from 170 to 164 B.C. Porphyry notes, "The 36th year of [Ptolemy VI] Philometor was the 25th of [Ptolemy VIII] Euergetes II." The reverse die has a date that could be read as 11 years earlier. Instead, this is an issue for Ptolemy VIII, Year 25. This year was the same as Ptolemy VI, Year 36. Ptolemy VI died in July of 145 BC, and his Year 36 became Year 25 of Ptolemy VIII.
GP88181. Silver tetradrachm, Paphos I Alexandria pl. XVIII 10 (Ptolemy VIII), SNG Cop 323 (VI), Svoronos 1437 (VI), Noeske 228 (VI), SNG Cop -, Weiser -, VF, toned, centered, some obverse die wear, closed crack, pitting, weight 13.233 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, Jul - Aug 145 B.C.; obverse diademed bust of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings closed, LKE∆ (year 25) left, ΠA right; $500.00 (€440.00)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus

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Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references.
GP89287. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); SNG Cop 649; Weiser -, aVF/F, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, reverse off center, weight 1.386 g, maximum diameter 11.6 mm, die axis 0o, Paphos mint, 51 - 30 B.C.; obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY - BAΣIΛEΩΣ, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; $155.00 (€136.40)


Kyrene, Kyrenaika, N. Africa, Revolt of Magas, c. 282 - 261 B.C.

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Silphium, which is now extinct, was so critical to the Kyrenian economy that most of their coins depict it. The plant was used as a spice and to treat all kinds of maladies including cough, sore throat, fever, indigestion, pain, and warts. It was so widely used as a contraceptive that it was worth its weight in denarii. The traditional heart shape, the symbol of love, is probably derived from the shape of the silphium seed due to the use of silphium as a contraceptive.

"By the next day this maiden and all her girlish apparel had disappeared, and in the room were found images of the Dioscuri, a table, and silphium upon it." - Description of Greece, Pausanias 3.16.3, 2nd Century A.D.
GB91337. Bronze AE 19, Asolati 45; BMC Cyrenaica p. 60, 290 - 291; Müller Afrique 238 - 240; Buttrey Cyrene p. 41, 192, VF, well centered, corrosion, tiny edge split, weight 4.847 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Kyrene (near Shahhat, Libya) mint, c. 282 - 261 B.C.; obverse head of Libya(?) right, wearing diadem, hair falling in straight spiral curls and covering the neck; reverse silphium plant, seen from side, KY-PA across field; very rare; $300.00 (€264.00)




  







Catalog current as of Friday, January 17, 2020.
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