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Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 300 - 500 A.D.

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Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths

AL93918. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; 8.0 cm (3 1/8") long, near Choice, complete and intact, light encrustation, wear, c. 300 - 500 A.D.; pink-buff clay, mold made with incised decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, wide rim surrounds a large fill hole, incised herring-bone geometric wreath pattern on narrow convex shoulders, two incised lengthwise lines on the handle, incised lines between fill hold rim and nozzle; bi-lanceolate oil lamp similar condition to the lamp in the photo; $40.00 (€35.20)


Judaea, Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator Under Claudius and Nero, 52 - 60 A.D.

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Minted by Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator of Judaea, 52 - 60 A.D., in the names of Nero and Britannicus Caesars, the stepson and son respectively of the emperor Claudius.
JD91419. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1348, Meshorer TJC 340, SGICV 5626, RPC I 4971, aVF, tight flan, obverse a little off center, areas of light corrosion, weight 16.81 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 90o, Jerusalem mint, 54 A.D.; obverse NEPW KΛAV KAICAP (Nero Claudius Caesar), two oblong shields and two spears crossed; reverse BPIT (Britannicus), six-branched palm bearing two bunches of dates, L - I∆ / K-AI (year 14 of Caesar) in two divided lines flanking trunk; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $90.00 (€79.20)


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

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Grapes, the vine and wine were an important part of the ancient economy and ritual. Grapes were brought to the Temple as offerings of the first-fruits and wine was offered upon the altar. The vine and grapes decorated the sacred vessels in the sanctuary and a golden vine with clusters of grapes stood at its entrance.
JD91420. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1196, Meshorer TJC 73, SGICV 5539, RPC I 4917, VF, off center on a broad flan, weight 3.201 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 315o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HPω∆OY (of Herod), bunch of grapes, with leaf on left; reverse EΘNPCOY (Ethnarch), tall helmet with crest and neck straps viewed from the front, small caduceus in lower left field; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Amphora Coins (David Hendin); $90.00 (€79.20)


Judean Kingdom, John Hyrcanus I (Yehohanan), 134 - 104 B.C.

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John Hyrcanus was the son of Simon the Maccabee and nephew of the folk hero Judah Maccabee, the hero of the Hanukkah story. Soon after Hyrcanus assumed power, the Seleukid kingdom marched on Jerusalem. Antiochus VII and Hyrcanus I negotiated a treaty that left Hyrcanus a vassal to the Syrian king. John Hyrcanus was the first Jewish ruler to issue coins in his own name. The Paleo-Hebrew inscription reads, from right to left, as follows: YHW(HH)/NN (Yehohanan) H (the) KHN (Priest) / G[D]L (high) W (and) HB[R] (council) / Y[HWDM] (Jews). See Reading Judean Coins in NumisWiki.

JD91421. Bronze lepton, Hendin 1141, Meshorer TJC G, Meshorer AJC K, VF, full legend, obverse edge beveled, some porosity, tiny edge cracks, weight 1.848 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, Jerusalem mint, 134 - 104 B.C.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription: Yehonanan the High Priest and Head of the Council of the Jews, surrounded by wreath; reverse double cornucopia adorned with ribbons, pomegranate between horns; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $80.00 (€70.40)


Roman Palestina or Arabia, Nabataean Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 225 - 300 A.D.

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This lamp came to us in a group accumulated in Israel. The four Nabatean towns of Haluza, Mamshit, Avdat and Shivta, with their associated fortresses and agricultural landscapes linking them to the Mediterranean are in the Negev Desert, southern Israel today. In his, Nabataean Clay Lamps, an Analytical Study of Art and Myths, Nabil Khariy identifies lamps known from the Nabataean sites, especially Petra, which can be differentiated from Greek, Roman and Judaean parallels and identified specifically as Nabataean made. Khariy notes that although the Nabataeans lost their independence in 106 A.D., excavations clearly show aspects of Nabataean culture continued until late in the 6th century A.D. Khariy 66, similar to this lamp, is described as made with a local clay and cruder than similar lamps from non-Nabataean sites. Grawehr type J3, like this lamp, has a larger filling hole than most similar lamps. The larger filling hole is found on late examples of the type.
AL21908. Nabatean Oil Lamp; cf. Khariy 66; Grawehr J3 (Petra, 225-300 A.D.) Murray-Ellis p. 26, 16 (Petra, ND); Negev-Sivan p. 117, 129 (Mampsis, 75-200 A.D.), near Choice, intact, small chips in handle, c. 225 - 300 A.D.; reddish-brown clay, round body, small rounded nozzle, small knob handle, defined ridge separating shoulders from plain concave discus, ten stamped rosettes impressed around shoulders, very low ring base; $150.00 (€132.00)


Roman Palestina or Arabia, Nabataean Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 225 - 300 A.D.

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This lamp came to us in a group accumulated in Israel. The four Nabatean towns of Haluza, Mamshit, Avdat and Shivta, with their associated fortresses and agricultural landscapes linking them to the Mediterranean are in the Negev Desert, southern Israel today. In his, Nabataean Clay Lamps, an Analytical Study of Art and Myths, Nabil Khariy identifies lamps known from the Nabataean sites, especially Petra, which can be differentiated from Greek, Roman and Judaean parallels and identified specifically as Nabataean made. Khariy notes that although the Nabataeans lost their independence in 106 A.D., excavations clearly show aspects of Nabataean culture continued until late in the 6th century A.D. Khariy 66, similar to this lamp, is described as made with a local clay and cruder than similar lamps from non-Nabataean sites. Grawehr type J3, like this lamp, has a larger filling hole than most similar lamps. The larger filling hole is found on late examples of the type.
AL93928. Nabatean Oil Lamp; cf. Khariy 66; Grawehr J3 (Petra, 225-300 A.D.) Murray-Ellis p. 26, 16 (Petra, ND); Negev-Sivan p. 117, 129 (Mampsis, 75-200 A.D.), Choice, complete and intact, interesting root marks in the bottom of the interior, c. 225 - 300 A.D.; buff clay, round body, small rounded nozzle, small knob handle, defined ridge separating shoulders from plain concave discus, 16 stamped rosettes impressed around shoulders, very low ring base; $160.00 (€140.80)


China, Eastern Han Dynasty, Usurper Dong Zhuo, 190 - 192 A.D.

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Wu-Shu (5 zhu) denomination was issued from 118 B.C. to 220 A.D., with additional varieties perhaps as late as 600 A.D. Dated molds have been found, and the calligraphy and other features changed over time, making it possible to more precisely date some examples. During the time of Dong Zhuo, small coins were officially cast using many different old filed or clipped coins. Many coins appeared featureless due to poor casting or casting from poor quality mother coins.
CH89264. Bronze 5 zhu, Gratzer-Fishman Wu Zhu B4.343 - 345, cf. Hartill 10.31, F, deposits and heavy encrustations, inner hole flaw, casting sprue, weight 1.983 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, 190 - 192 A.D.; obverse Wu Zhu (5 zhu); reverse plain; $5.00 (€4.40)


China, Western Han Dynasty, 206 B.C. - 25 A.D.

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Wu-Shu (5 zhu) denomination was issued from 118 B.C. to 220 A.D., with additional varieties perhaps as late as 600 A.D. Dated molds have been found, and the calligraphy and other features changed over time, making it possible to more precisely date some examples. Many clipped and filed coins have been found attributed to the Western Han period. It is thought that they were produced as an adjustment for inflationary periods. Gratzer-Fishman distinguishes filed from cut/clipped coins. Filed are round, cut are square in shape. These come in all sizes, filed to varying degree. Surviving molds show some coins were cast this way.
CH89385. Bronze 5 zhu, Filed edge Wu Zu; Gratzer-Fishman Wu Zhu B1.64, cf. Hartill 10.28, aVF, concave shape, blue-green patina, deposits and encrustations, weight 1.987 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, 118 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse Wu Zhu (5 zhu); reverse plain; $4.00 (€3.52)


China, Western Han Dynasty, 206 B.C. - 25 A.D.

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Wu-Shu (5 zhu) denomination was issued from 118 B.C. to 220 A.D., with additional varieties perhaps as late as 600 A.D. Dated molds have been found, and the calligraphy and other features changed over time, making it possible to more precisely date some examples. Many clipped and filed coins have been found attributed to the Western Han period. It is thought that they were produced as an adjustment for inflationary periods. There are many sizes found, filed to varying degrees. Gratzer-Fishman distinguishes filed from cut/clipped coins. Filed are round, cut are square in shape. Surviving molds show some coins were cast this way.
CH89387. Bronze 5 zhu, Filed edge Wu Zu; Gratzer-Fishman Wu Zhu B1.64, cf. Hartill 10.28, F, green patina, encrustations and deposits, weight 2.007 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, 118 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse Wu Zhu (5 zhu); reverse plain; $4.00 (€3.52)


China, Western Han Dynasty, 206 B.C. - 25 A.D.

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Wu-Shu (5 zhu) denomination was issued from 118 B.C. to 220 A.D., with additional varieties perhaps as late as 600 A.D. Dated molds have been found, and the calligraphy and other features changed over time, making it possible to more precisely date some examples. Many clipped and filed coins have been found attributed to the Western Han period. It is thought that they were produced as an adjustment for inflationary periods. There are many sizes found, filed to varying degrees. Gratzer-Fishman distinguishes filed from cut/clipped coins. Filed are round, cut are square in shape. Surviving molds show some coins were cast this way.
CH89388. Bronze 5 zhu, Filed edge Wu Zu; Gratzer-Fishman Wu Zhu B1.64 (b); cf Hartill 8.8, aVF, deposits and encrustations, reverse scratches, weight 2.546 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, 118 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse Wu Zhu (5 zhu), raised rim above inner hole; reverse plain; $5.00 (€4.40)




  







Catalog current as of Saturday, December 14, 2019.
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