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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Medieval & Modern Coins||View Options:  |  |  |   

Medieval and Modern Coins

Islamic, Ottoman Empire, Mustafa IV, 29 May 1807 - 28 July 1808

|Turkey|, |Islamic,| |Ottoman| |Empire,| |Mustafa| |IV,| |29| |May| |1807| |-| |28| |July| |1808||Kurush| |(Piastre)|
Mustafa ascended to the throne after his cousin Selim was deposed for introducing the manners of the infidels and intending to suppress the Janissaries. Selim swore fealty to his cousin as the new sultan, and attempted to commit suicide. Mustafa spared his life by smashing the cup of poison that his cousin attempted to drink. A year later, however, facing rebellion, to secure his position as the only possible ruler, Mustafa ordered both Selim and his younger brother Mahmud murdered. Selim's was killed but Mahmud hid in the furnace of a bath and survived. Mustafa was deposed by the rebels and his brother ascended to the throne. Three months later, Mustafa was killed on Mahmud's orders.
IS97943. Billon Kurush (Piastre), Jem Sultan 2666, Artuk 1929, Nuri Pere 733, SCWC KM 539 (notes 0.465 silver), VF, brassy tone with darker fields, centers a little weak, weight 12.126 g, maximum diameter 33.2 mm, die axis 0o, Qustantiniyah (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, regnal year 1, AH 1222; obverse Tugra, curve based: Mustafa, Lord, son of Abdul Hamid, the Ever Victorious; Arabic inscription below: struck in Constantinople / 1222; reverse Arabic inscription: Sultan of the two lands, and Lord of the two seas, the Sultan son of the sultan, 1 (regnal year) 3rd line on left; very rare; $1100.00 (€902.00)


Byzantine Empire, Theme of Chaldia (Trebizond), Theodore Gabras, c. 1075 - 1126 A.D., In the Name of Alexius I

|Empire| |of| |Trebizond|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Theme| |of| |Chaldia| |(Trebizond),| |Theodore| |Gabras,| |c.| |1075| |-| |1126| |A.D.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexius| |I||follis|
The general Theodore Gabras captured Trebizond and ruled it and the theme of Chaldia as a virtually autonomous state (c. 1081 - 1098). He was celebrated for his martial exploits, and was later venerated as a saint in the region. Following the dissolution of the Byzantine Empire by the Fourth Crusade in 1204, the region became the center of the new Empire of Trebizond which survived until falling to the Ottomans in 1461.
BZ95867. Bronze follis, Bendall Trebizond (NC 77), p. 133, issue 13B & pl. 7, 18; DOC IV p. 433, 13b; Schlumberger pl. ii, 5; Hendy -; Wroth BMC -; Ratto -, gF, overstruck on Michael IV follis, dark brown patina, obverse off center, light marks, weight 6.735 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 180o, Trebizond (Trabzon, Turkey) mint, c. 1092 - 1098 A.D.; obverse facing bust of Christ, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and himation, Gospels in right hand, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Ihsoús Xristós - Jesus Christ) across field; reverse Latin cross on three steps, a globule at the end of each arm, AΛBP (Greek: AΛεξιω Bασιλευϖ Pωμαιων - Alexius king of the Romans) in angles, Arab countermark 'Lillah" (For Allah); rare; $720.00 (€590.40)


Islamic, Ottoman Empire, Tripolitania, Mahmud II, 1808 - 1839

|Islamic|, |Islamic,| |Ottoman| |Empire,| |Tripolitania,| |Mahmud| |II,| |1808| |-| |1839||20| |para|NEW
Tripoli fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1551 and remained in their hands until it was occupied by the Italians in 1911. Under Ottoman rule, Barbary pirates from North Africa demanded tribute, and if refused, captured ships and cargo, enslaved and ransomed crew members, and even raided cities across the Mediterranean Sea. In the first Barbary War, Thomas Jefferson sent a US Naval fleet which bombarded numerous fortified cities in present-day Libya, Tunisia, and Algeria, ultimately extracting concessions of safe conduct from the Barbary states. Encouraged by Great Britain, piracy resumed during the War of 1812. In 1815, James Madison dispatched military forces against the Barbary states. Lasting only 3 days, the Second Barbary War ended further tributes by the US and significantly reduced piracy in the region. This coin was struck under the local Pasha Yusuf Pasha Qaramanli (ruled Tripolitania, 1796 - 1833).
IS97944. Billon 20 para, SCWC Libya KM168 (type B, with flower, without stars), Jem Sultan -, aMS, near full silvering, some weakness in center, weight 5.133 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, Tarabulus Gharb (Tripoli, Libya) mint, third standard, 1822 A.D.; obverse Arabic tungra, straight based: Mahmud, Lord, son of Abdul Hamid, the Ever Victorious; flower upper right; Arabic inscription in three lines below: struck in / Tripoli of the West / 1223 (accession year), boarder of beads outside of a linear circle; reverse Arabic inscription in four lines: Sultan of the two lands and Lord of the two seas, the Sultan son of the sultan, 15 (regnal year) in the 3rd line on left; boarder of beads outside of a linear circle; very rare; $600.00 (€492.00)


France, Louis XV the Beloved, 1715 - 1774

|France|, |France,| |Louis| |XV| |the| |Beloved,| |1715| |-| |1774||Ecu|
France took 20 Sols de Navarre coins minted in 1719 and 1720, re-struck them as Sixth Ecu de France (between the years of 1720 and 1723) essentially creating a coin worth 1 livre. These re-struck coins, however, were eventually assigned the value of 18 Sols.
WO93952. Silver Ecu, SCWC KM 512.12, Duplessy 1680, Ciani 2122, Lafaurie 698, VF, nicely toned, weight 28.866 g, maximum diameter 41.5 mm, die axis 180o, Bayonne mint, 1771; obverse LVD•XV•D•G•FR•ET•NAV•REX (Louis XV, by the Grace of God, king of France and Navarre), young portrait left, laureate, two flowers (privy mark) below; reverse •SIT•NOMEN•DOMIN•BENEDICTVM*1771• (May the name of the Lord be blessed), crowned arms of France, crowned oval shield with three lis, surrounded by oak wreath; $360.00 (€295.20)


Lot of 29 Coins of Japan, China, Hong Kong, Etc.

|Medieval| |&| |Modern| |Bulk| |Lots|, |Lot| |of| |29| |Coins| |of| |Japan,| |China,| |Hong| |Kong,| |Etc.|
 
LT97475. Lot of 29 coins of Japan, China, Hong Kong, etc., ex Numismatik Naumann auction 96 (1 Nov 2020), lot 950; as-is, no returns; $325.00 (€266.50)


France, John II the Good, 1350 - 1364 A.D.

|France|, |France,| |John| |II| |the| |Good,| |1350| |-| |1364| |A.D.||Gros| |à| |la| |couronne|
When John II the Good (French: Jean le Bon) came to power, France faced many disasters: the Black Death killed nearly half its population, there were popular revolts, unemployed mercenaries plundered the country, and losses to the English, including the Battle of Poitiers of 1356, in which John was captured. While John was a prisoner in London, his son Charles had to suppress several rebellions. To liberate his father, in 1360 Charles concluded the Treaty of Brétigny, by which France surrendered territory and promised to pay an enormous ransom. In an exchange of hostages, including his son Louis, John was released from captivity to raise funds for his ransom. Upon his return in France, he created the franc to stabilize the currency. John tried to get rid of the mercenaries by sending them on a crusade, but Pope Innocent VI died shortly before their planned meeting in Avignon. After his son Louis escaped from captivity, John shocked and dismayed his people by announcing that for "good faith and honor" he would voluntarily return to captivity in England. John was greeted in London in 1364 with parades and feasts, however, a few months after his arrival he fell ill with an unknown malady and died. His body was returned to France, where he was interred in the royal chambers at Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son Charles V.
ME95905. Silver Gros à la couronne, Duplessy 305, Ciani 397, Roberts 2624, Lafaurie I 308, F, toning, weight 3.705 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 300o, 22 Aug - 30 Oct 1358; obverse outer legend: + BNDICTV: SIT: nOmE: DnI: nRI: DEI: IhV: XPI (the name of our Lord Jesus Christ be blessed), inner legend: + IOhAnnES DEI : GRA (John by the Grace of God, two flowers legend break); cross fleury, base dividing inner legend; reverse crown, FRANCO / RV : REX in two lines below crown (three pellet within annulet inscription break), border of twelve lis within annulets; ex Gordon Andreas Singer; $270.00 (€221.40)


Lot of 15 Islamic Silver Coins, Mongols, Golden Horde, Various Khans, c. 14th - 15th Century A.D.

|Islamic|, |Lot| |of| |15| |Islamic| |Silver| |Coins,| |Mongols,| |Golden| |Horde,| |Various| |Khans,| |c.| |14th| |-| |15th| |Century| |A.D.||Lot|
The Golden Horde, self-designated as Ulug Ulus, lit. 'Great State' in Turkic, was originally a Mongol and later Turkicized khanate (political entity ruled by a khan, khagan, etc.) established in the 13th century and originating as the northwestern sector of the Mongol Empire. With the fragmentation of the Mongol Empire after 1259 it became a functionally separate khanate.
ME97092. Silver Lot, Unattributed to ruler, c. 1.5g, c. 16mm diameter, VF, the actual coins in the photograph, no flips or tags, as-is, no returns; $260.00 (€213.20)


Bulgaria, Ivan Alexander and Mikhail Asen, 1331 - 1355 A.D.

|Bulgaria|, |Bulgaria,| |Ivan| |Alexander| |and| |Mikhail| |Asen,| |1331| |-| |1355| |A.D.||half| |grosch|NEW
Ivan Alexander met Byzantine and Serbian threats, and led economic recovery and a cultural renaissance. But later he was overwhelmed by Ottoman and Hungarian invasions, and the Black Death. In an ill-fated effort to combat these problems, he divided the country between his two sons. Bulgaria would face the imminent Ottoman conquest weakened and divided.
BZ93562. Silver half grosch, Radushev-Zhekov 1.13.6 (R7), EF, slight double strike on reverse, edge a little ragged, weight 0.700 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Veliko Turnovo mint, 1331 - 1355 A.D.; obverse Christ, nimbate, enthroned, facing, with both hands raised in benediction, monogram either side; reverse Ivan and Mikhail standing facing, holding standard in center, two stars inner fields, monogram in outer fields; from the Errett Bishop Collection, zero sales of this very rare HALF grosch type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $200.00 (€164.00)


German States, Mansfeld-Eisleban, 1620 - 1622

|Germany|, |German| |States,| |Mansfeld-Eisleban,| |1620| |-| |1622||3| |dreier|NEW
 
ME92771. Copper 3 dreier, SCWC KM 23, VF, die wear, die break (inside orb), obverse a little off center, weight 0.909 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 210o, Leimbach mint, 1621; obverse imperial orb, 3 (mark of value) within, L - S upper left and right, three crescents around; reverse St. George on horseback right, slaying a dragon, Z-1 (21) upper left and right; ex Manfred Olding-Münzhandl (Osnabrück, Germany); rare; $140.00 (€114.80)


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, William of Villehardouin, 1246 - 1278

|Crusaders|, |Crusaders,| |Frankish| |Greece,| |Principality| |of| |Achaea,| |William| |of| |Villehardouin,| |1246| |-| |1278||denier| |tournois|
William of Villehardouin became Prince of Achaea when his brother Geoffrey II died in 1246. He conquered the remaining Peloponnese territory and built the fortress of Mistra near Sparta. In 1249 he accompanied Louis IX of France on the Seventh Crusade, joining him in Cyprus with 400 knights and 28 ships. Louis gave him a license to mint coins in the style of royal French money. William defeated Venice in the War of the Euboeote Succession and defeated the Duke of Athens in 1258, reaffirming his power over the duchy. In 1259 he formed an alliance with the Byzantine Despotate of Epirus against Nicaea. He led the Achaean forces against the Nicaeans, but the Epirote army deserted and William was defeated. He fled and hid under a haystack, but was captured. He remained captive until 1262 and permanently lost all his power.Arms_of_Achaea
CR96932. Billon denier tournois, Metcalf Crusaders pl. 39, 940; Malloy Crusaders 10a; Tzamalis Frankish GV224; Schlumberger pl. XII, 12, F, uneven strike with part of obverse legend weak, light marks and deposits, slightly off center, tiny edge splits, weight 0.735 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 235o, Corinth mint, 1246 - 1278; obverse +:G:PRINCE ACh', cross pattée within inner border; reverse DCLARENTIAV, castle tournois, spire in the form of Λ, surmounted by cross dividing legend; from the Louis G Estate; $130.00 (€106.60)




  







Catalog current as of Friday, July 23, 2021.
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