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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Resources  |  Identification Help (Moderators: Varangian, Arados)  |  Topic: Help to ID Roman medallion 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Help to ID Roman medallion  (Read 1486 times)
Ancientboy
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« on: December 07, 2014, 06:22:53 am »

Good day to all !
Please, help us to ID Roman medallion which found in the Ukraine. size 40 мм weight 28 gr.
Thanks
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Mark Fox
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« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2014, 02:38:34 pm »

Dear Ancientboy and Board,

The obverse is die-linked to these two bronzes of Acrasus, struck under Commodus:

http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/1164/

http://catalogue.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/cb417829818/PUBLIC

This doesn't necessarily mean the coin was issued for this city, however, so I decided to browse through the plates in Kraft, but without finding even the above two coins (although they could be mentioned in the text).  Even so, on Tafel 87, there are several bronzes, minted for Lydian and Mysian mints, with very similar portraits of Commodus, some possibly by the same hand as the piece under study.  So it is possible the Commodus die we are interested in was shared by Acrasus and one or more other mints (e.g. Silandus, Thyatira, Adramyteum, Attaea, etc.). 

Then again, a look on RPC IV Online and under several cities in Münsterberg did not turn up any matches for the name of the magistrate on the mystery coin's reverse.  I think I can read ЄΠΙ CΤΡΑ ΑΥΡΗ [...] and then presumably the ethnic in the exergue which is frustrating to read (Κ[?]Ν[?]ΤΩΝ)!  It is worth keeping in mind that the ethnic may actually begin around the coin's rim and end in the exergue

Hopefully this will give you and others a push in the right direction.


Best regards,

Mark Fox
Michigan
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Sam
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« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2014, 02:50:14 pm »

Bravo ! Bravo !   Mark.
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Sam Mansourati
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« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2014, 01:08:21 am »

...
 So it is possible the Commodus die we are interested in was shared by Acrasus and one or more other mints (e.g. Silandus, Thyatira, Adramyteum, Attaea, etc.). 
...
In this case, Pionia is also possible, as it was located at approximately the same distance from the Akrasus as Adramyteum, Attaea, Silandus... And more than, as I mentioned above, in that time there was a magistrate with matching name (ЄΠΙ CΤΡΑ ΑΥΡΗ [...]).
http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/77/
http://www.asiaminorcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=346&pid=2761#top_display_media
And, I think, exergue could be read as [...]ΟΝΙΤΩΝ - rather close to ΠΙΟΝΙΤΩΝ

Best regards,
Alex / sagit
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Mark Fox
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« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2014, 10:56:53 pm »

Dear Alex and Board,

I see what you mean.  That is a good suggestion on several levels, but for me, I can't comfortably reconcile the cognomen "ΡΟΥΦΟΥ" in "Μ ΑΥΡΗ ΡΟΥΦΟΥ" with the fragmentary lettering I see on Ancientboy's coin (~1 to 4 o'clock).  If indeed from Pionia, then we are likely dealing with a different person which I do not find very hard to accept.  So much about these cities remains unknown which is one of many reasons why their coins fascinate me.    

One other difficulty I have concerns the possible 'Κ' in the ethnic.  Perhaps there was a small chip in the die that made an iota look that way, or maybe it really is a kappa, in which case Pionia is out.  

I am fairly certain we will be able to get to the bottom of all this with more research.  Thank you again for your thoughts!


Best regards,

Mark Fox
Michigan
  
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