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FORVM`s Classical Numismatics Discussion Board  |  Numismatic and History Discussions  |  Ancient Coin Webmasters (Moderator: Sorin Teodor)  |  Topic: Yet another cleaning how-to, this time its my own... 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Yet another cleaning how-to, this time its my own...  (Read 4022 times)
Scotvs Capitis
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« on: October 07, 2006, 01:40:31 am »

I just finished the initial version of my how to article on cleaning uncleaned ancient coins with the traditional soak/brush method. If it is useful, it is posted on my blog, the link is:

http://scotvscapitis.blogspot.com/2006/10/step-by-step-cleaning-and-attributing.html

Comments, critiques and suggestions welcomed. Yes, I linked to the FORVM many times, after all it is the primary bastion of knowledge of the topic of ancient coins  Wink
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SCOTVS CAPITIS - Hovstonoplis Tex
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« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2006, 05:14:20 pm »

Ave Scott!

The comments I read on the above are just sweet, my friend. Terse, cogent and from the heart. Your's is without doubt, one the the best - and concise- treatises on common methods of cleaning ancient coins that I have ever read.

Kudos!

If you don't mind, could you link this to my shop? It's much better and well thought out than what I have presented.

Very best regards,

Kevin
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« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2006, 08:06:13 am »

Scott, I have to agree with Kevin here. Simply outstanding work, and extremely useful. Thank you.

John
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andrejsi
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« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2006, 09:15:56 am »

Hello Scott!

Very good article indeed! I'm still a beginner in cleaning coins and very much appreciate detailed step-by-step instructions.

Thanks for sharing your knowledge!  Smiley
Andrej
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« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2006, 09:59:43 am »

yup, been cleaning coins for a while now but this taught me a few things, if you dont mind I would like to link to if from my site.
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« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2006, 11:35:54 am »

 I read you article(really scanned),but I failed to see if you used a stereoscopic microscope for cleaning around the lettering.Do you?
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Darryl Fortunato
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« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2006, 12:04:44 pm »

Thank you Scott, I'm just getting started and have already made a number of bad mistakes.  This will be a great guide for me and my son to follow.

Best Regards,

Darryl
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« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2006, 01:37:38 pm »

thank you for the article.  It's anwered a lot of questions that I had and made me realize some of the mistakes that I have been doing.  For the past two months, I've been experimenting mostly with oil but I'll try the DW route for my next batch and I promise myself I won't overdo it with the brass bristle brushes anymore.
Where can you get the wax that you like?
Raymond
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« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2006, 06:57:14 pm »


If you don't mind, could you link this to my shop?

A little late in answering, sorry about that. But yes, by all means link all you want. I linked YOU after all, and Forum of course.

Thanks for the kind remarks. I am a coin cleaning junkie and love the basic soak method, so hopefully others will enjoy it too.
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SCOTVS CAPITIS - Hovstonoplis Tex
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« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2006, 07:00:47 pm »

Where can you get the wax that you like?


Raymond, you can find the paste wax at most hardware stores. It is pretty much the same as Renwax, and certainly not harmful to the coin, and a whole lot cheaper. Some people use an acrylic spray, I think it is harder to remove acrylic spray should yuou need to treat bronze disease later, wax can be soaked off with acetone or boiled off with a little soapy water with no trouble at all. The benefit to acrylic sealers however, is you can get a matte finish acrylic that gives the coin an evem photography-friendly surface.

Wax seems more traditional to me, and I like the process.  Smiley
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« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2006, 07:33:56 pm »

I read you article(really scanned),but I failed to see if you used a stereoscopic microscope for cleaning around the lettering.Do you?

If I do I use a magnification, its is a visor I that I borrow from my scale modeling hobby or a cheap magnifying desk lamp that clamps to my workspace. I rarely need it though, usually I use magnification when attributingh a coin and trying to decipher the remnants of mint marks. I use a printer's loupe for that.
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« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2006, 10:39:54 am »

A printer's loupe!  Didn't even know these things existed!  And I've been holding in a shaking hand a tiny fold-out magnifying lens that I reverse inherited from my son, ripping my eyeballs out and cursing at the tiny letters coming in and out of focus.
Re the DW treatment: on green patinaed coins, (very aesthetic, looks like Chinese jade) it would be safe to keep them soaking and give them a light brush until all of the dark areas dissolve?
Raymond
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« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2006, 02:41:01 pm »

Re the DW treatment: on green patinaed coins, (very aesthetic, looks like Chinese jade) it would be safe to keep them soaking and give them a light brush until all of the dark areas dissolve?
Raymond

This is only my experience, I don't speak for others who might have much better ideas, BUT

The jade green patinas are indeed beautiful. There have been perhaps three major types of dark coating on these green smooth patinas that I have found, of course there is a lot of crossover and this is generalization, but-
1. The hardened tar-like clay layer- these have visible volume, i.e. they are thick enough to detect that they are more than a surface coat. They will eventually come off with brushing on the high areas, you will need to use manual tools to get the layer off the recessed areas.
2. The dark stain, worst of all dark areas on otherwise good patina. This I usually find under the #1 dark area, so it is often hard to tell where the thick tar like dark stuff ends. It is easy to scrub through the stained patina because I believe the stain is integrated into the patina itself. Maybe someone else can offer some suggestions.
3. Crusty or bulky dark areas. These are good news because they can be picked off little by little, weakening them with distilled water soaks. This is not the same as mineralization or corrosion, this is mostly dirt, bonded to itself and lightly to the coin. These can usually be picked off easily or even brushed off.

I don't know what other dark areas on a jade green patina you might be talking about so perhaps that helped???
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SCOTVS CAPITIS - Hovstonoplis Tex
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« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2008, 10:54:10 am »

I just finished the initial version of my how to article on cleaning uncleaned ancient coins with the traditional soak/brush method. If it is useful, it is posted on my blog, the link is:

http://scotvscapitis.blogspot.com/2006/10/step-by-step-cleaning-and-attributing.html

Comments, critiques and suggestions welcomed. Yes, I linked to the FORVM many times, after all it is the primary bastion of knowledge of the topic of ancient coins  Wink
good job sir
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