Classical Numismatics Discussion
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Author Topic: unusually shaped Roman Provincial  (Read 140 times)

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Offline Dave S3

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unusually shaped Roman Provincial
« on: September 25, 2021, 10:12:46 pm »
Today I have a fairly distinctive shaped Roman Provincial coin.

The obverse looks to have a Severan styled portrait, I'd guess Caracalla or Severus Alexander?

The reverse depicts Tyche turreted I think. I think to the right the inscription reads something like "MAVΩΓC". The left may start with "CЄ".

The most interesting aspect is the flan shape, it is quite distinctive with what look to be pour burrs to the top and near the bottom.

The coin is 18mm wide and weighs 3.2g.

Any guesses appreciated :)


regards
Dave

Offline Dominic T

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Re: unusually shaped Roman Provincial
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2021, 10:26:33 pm »
It's probably a casting sprue. These coins were struck on cast flan.
DT

Offline Dave S3

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Re: unusually shaped Roman Provincial
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2021, 10:38:34 pm »
Thats the term I was trying to think of! Thank you :)

Any suggestions on some common regions that used that technique? I'll go browse their coins!


regards
Dave

Offline otlichnik

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Re: unusually shaped Roman Provincial
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2021, 09:57:41 am »
The casting of flans was a widespread practice and you are unlikely to be able to narrow it down through that route.

Very nice example of manufacturing evidence.  Not only is there remains of a casting sprue, but you can seen on one side that the two halves of the flan mould were no aligned perfectly.  As a result, the coin looks like two half coins that have slid apart slightly in a lateral direction.

I have been looking at the close up pics.  I think the coin is struck, but I am not 100% certain it is not entirely cast.  There is a ridge between the top of the wreath of the obverse/male bust and the flan sprue.  That could be a casting flaw or sign that the die was larger than the flan.  The details are consistent with a worn strike or a fairly good cast.

SC
SC
(Shawn Caza, Ottawa)

Offline Dave S3

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Re: unusually shaped Roman Provincial
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2021, 06:50:56 pm »
Thank you SC!  To me it is in an interesting looking coin, different in technical design that I'm keen to understand the city and era it was produced.

With what you have both pointed out I'll re-consider some coins I've looked at, with the thought that this one may be a relatively standard coin, just produced differently.


Dave

Offline Mark Fox

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Re: unusually shaped Roman Provincial
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2021, 01:13:57 am »
Dear Dave, Shawn, and Board,

A very quick reply.  This coin was almost certainly issued for one of the Mesopotamian cities.  Based on the specific style and the fact that Caracalla appears to be at least cuirassed, Edessa seems like a good possibility.  Consider these examples in the British Museum for comparison:

https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/C_1908-0110-2087

https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/C_1913-1115-25

https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/C_1918-1104-9

Hope this helps a little!


Best regards,

Mark Fox
Michigan
 

Offline Dave S3

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Re: unusually shaped Roman Provincial
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2021, 01:44:29 am »
Nailed it, thank you Mark! The lettering fairly closely matches with:
https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/C_1918-1104-9

Good enough for me, I don't think this can be taken any closer to a sure match :)


regards
David



 

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