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National Archaeological Museum of Naples (MANN)

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PtolemAE:
This museum is spectacular, housing much of what was excavated at Pompeii including sculpture, many large statues, mosaics, sections of painted walls and *coins*. The numismatic collection is only open on Saturday and Sunday for half the day. Pretty interesting collection. I attach here pictures of just *one* of their cases of Aes Grave (with the legend). The largest square coin in the case is about 4" to guage the sizes and the little paper tags about 1/4 - 3/8". There are hundreds and hundreds of Greek (Magna Graecia from many Italian city mints, Sicilian and others) and Roman (Republic and Imperial and Byzantine) coins in gold, silver, and bronze. Also some hoards shown completely. Unfortunately the collection seems to suffer from a bit of neglect and I gathered there is no curator for just the coins nor a catalog of their holdings which would probably merit its own SNG. Afaik none of these items are on any web site or easily seen any other way than by visiting the MANN. Worth the trip. Their collection of ancient objects exceeds expectations.

Pics aren't the best but you'll get the idea. Pretty sure this group is from a collection formed by Count Stephan Borgia centuries ago. Another collection of over 40,000 coins was also donated to the museum long ago. Lots of very high quality rare coins like Roman medallic bronzes and Aes Grave coins in superb condition.

Their collection of Magna Graecia pottery and other objects is in rooms with floors that are actual mosaics taken from Pompeii - and you wear shoe-covering booties to protect the floors. When you see Pompeii you see ruins, when you visit the MANN you see the treasures that were found there. I took lots of photos and can post more if there is interest.

PtolemAE



Altamura:
So you had a successful trip, I am a bit jaleous :).

You can see a bit of the collection (only a tiny fraction of what they have) here: https://www.numismaticadellostato.it/web/pns/patrimonio/vetrine/napoli/medagliere?codMuseo=3

There is also a catalogue from the 19th century:  https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100931273?type%5B%5D=all&lookfor%5B%5D=Catalogo%20del%20Museo%20Nazionale%20di%20Napoli&ft= (but at a first glance without any plates  :( )
and a book about the Santangelo collection: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=gri.ark:/13960/t4zh1hh7f&view=1up&seq=5&skin=2021

But you are right, these treasures should be published in an appropriate modern way.

Regards

Altamura

Molinari:
Great pic!  Glad you had a nice trip.

PtolemAE:

--- Quote from: Altamura on September 28, 2022, 03:48:09 am ---So you had a successful trip, I am a bit jaleous :).

You can see a bit of the collection (only a tiny fraction of what they have) here: https://www.numismaticadellostato.it/web/pns/patrimonio/vetrine/napoli/medagliere?codMuseo=3
...

But you are right, these treasures should be published in an appropriate modern way.

Regards

Altamura

--- End quote ---

Thank you very much for the additional links. The collection could be a much more valuable research resource if  published in full - either in print (always good) and/or online or both.

PtolemAE

PtolemAE:

--- Quote from: Molinari on September 28, 2022, 06:19:01 am ---Great pic!  Glad you had a nice trip.

--- End quote ---

The trip began with six days in Warsaw to attend (and deliver a presentation in a session on Ptolemaic coinage) at the International Numismatics Congress, held at Warsaw University. That was fantastic. Weather wasn't so great but Warsaw was fun and the INC went off with few hitches. Always good to renew contact with colleagues and the leading scholars of ancient numismatics and meet new ones including very smart younger numismatists giving presentations related to their Ph.D. research, etc. One of the highlights of making a new contact for me was getting to meet Ed Snible. There was also a special visit to the Royal Castle's coin cabinet on my last day there. The National Museum in Warsaw is an *astonishing* art collection and even has some Ptolemaic coins, too.

Followed that with five days in Rome, the first few spent walking about the usual sights of ruins and absorbing the spectacular Vatican Museums (which includes a visit to the Sistine Chapel), walking up over 300 steps to the very top of the dome of St. Peter's on a clear sunny day, and culminating with a visit to the coin collection of the Apostolic Library of the Vatican to view and record data on many of their Ptolemaic coins, hosted by invitation of the curator, Eleanora Giampiccolo.

The last leg was another five days in the Naples area which included the archaeological excavation sites of Pompeii and Herculaneum and then into the city to see the MANN, the Duomo, and 'subterranean' Naples, a complex of ancient underground aqueducts and cisterns.

After almost three weeks traveling it's good to be back home but I'd be happy to return to any of those places as there would be plenty more to do and see. The most surprising city was Warsaw, which exceeded my expectations.

And I took a *lot* of pictures :) I will be putting more pictures of highlights of the trip onto my instagram. Rather than post that link in this report please just message me here if you wish to check it out.

PtolemAE

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