Numismatic and History Discussions > Biblical & Judean Coins

jewish war shekels in near perfect condition

<< < (3/6) > >>

Robert_Brenchley:
I don't see any problem with the fact that some (a few; how do you explain the rarity of wartime shekels of Tyre) continued to be minted; some Jews supported the Romans, and would hardly have been likely to use shekels of Israel!

Howard Cole:
Again, this comes down to what the priest at the temple would accept as temple tax.  If I remember from the Bible (and my memory may not be that good), the temple priest were supporters of Rome.  Of course, these passages in the Bible do have a pro-Roman biase.

As for rarity, both types of shekels seem to be rare.  Didn't Rome sack the temple and carry off the treasures?  Couldn't they have melted down the Tyrian shekels?  More likely the Tyrian shekels from this period were never minted in large numbers anyway (just enough for temple tax).  It must be remembered that Jerusalem was under siege at this time, and I believe the temple's revenues were greatly reduced!  Less demand, less minted.

So far, all of this has been speculation, but very interesting speculation.  ;)

EcgĂľeow:
It seems to me that the war shekel is most definitely for the temple tax.  "Jerusalem the Holy" and the fact that it was silver imply that it was minted for its nationalistic value.  The Temple was the pride and glory of the Jews, so the most practical nationalist symbol had to have involved the Temple. 
As for doubts about the purity of the shekel: if the shekel was being minted right there in Jerusalem, then the Temple would probably have some influence over the minting, ensuring that the coin's purity was up to par. 

Howard Cole:

--- Quote from: Zam on May 01, 2005, 01:24:29 am ---It seems to me that the war shekel is most definitely for the temple tax.  "Jerusalem the Holy" and the fact that it was silver imply that it was minted for its nationalistic value.  The Temple was the pride and glory of the Jews, so the most practical nationalist symbol had to have involved the Temple. 
As for doubts about the purity of the shekel: if the shekel was being minted right there in Jerusalem, then the Temple would probably have some influence over the minting, ensuring that the coin's purity was up to par. 


--- End quote ---

Again what proof do you have?  Just making statements without proof gets us no where.  All authorities on the Jewish shekel state it is not known who made it (Hendin and Kindler so far, not sure what Meshorer has to say, but would be very interested in hearing his words on this issue).  The solgan could have just been a rallying call among the different Jewish fractions against the Romans.  You have provided no evidence that it is related to the temple in any way and I have not read any in my sources.

As for the purity of the shekel, give me some test results or quite talking about it. 

Again, we don't know if the priest at the Temple were involved in the minting of the Jewish shekel or not.  I sort of doubt it because they had not been envolved in the minting of coins in the past, just the stating of what is acceptable or not acceptable for temple tax, which all of my sources say was the shekel of Tyre during this time period.

Robert_Brenchley:
I am actually doing my best to find out what the fineness of the shekel of Israel was. The sources about the shekel of Tyre being the coin for the tax are post-bar Kochba, when the Jews wanted to live in peace with Rome, and had well and truly distanced themselves from the rebels. So it's worth looking into, and I'm glad it's come up.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version