Numismatic and History Discussions > Books and References

electronically available reference works

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quadrans:
I hope it is more cheeper if you ordered all of DVD- format because it is available on the Arcanum hompage:

https://adtplus.arcanum.hu/hu/collection/Numizmatika_Kiadvanyok/

but sorry all in Hungarian :(, but more than 20000 page...

Q.

vrtsprb:

--- Quote from: quadrans on March 13, 2017, 12:12:59 pm ---I hope it is more cheeper if you ordered all of DVD- format because it is available on the Arcanum hompage:

https://adtplus.arcanum.hu/hu/collection/Numizmatika_Kiadvanyok/

but sorry all in Hungarian :(, but more than 20000 page...

--- End quote ---

The DVD is 40000 forints = USD $139.34

So while that is a good resource, 20 Euro is a good deal if one only needs some of the material from NK.
By the by, not all in Hungarian. E.g most of Alföldi's stuff is in German, actually.

But if someone offered me a DVD of all of the Numismatische Zeitschrift at that price, I'd buy it.


G/<

helvetica:
Ulla Westermarks terrific article - complete with plates - about the Coinage of Acragus online at the University of Uppsala

https://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:1189867/FULLTEXT03.pdf

Edessa:
The following book is available in pdf format as a free Opensource download from the Brill Publishing website:

Rory Naismith (Editor): Money and Coinage in the Middle Ages
https://brill.com/view/title/38646?rskey=gGnkfW&result=1

Also, Brill is having a 40% off summer sale using the discount code 71276 (from the Brill Facebook page).

John Wilson Betlyon: The Coinage and Mints of Phoenicia: The Pre-Alexandrine Period
https://brill.com/view/title/39168?rskey=fTTm4k&result=1

is available for $20.40 in pdf version. A paperback version is also available plus shipping.

This is the 1982 Scholars Press Edition and is a standard reference for Phoenician mints in the period before Alexander's conquest. The quality of the plates in the pdf version appears to be reasonably good.

Anaximander:
The online reference, if it can be called that, Historia Numorum Online (hno.huma-num.fr) has been cited a score of times in FAC's coin identification boards. Credit Altamura, Pekka K, and others for citing it. 

Don't confuse the online reference with FAC's own online publication of the Barclay Head's magnum opus in its 1911 edition.  The online site is a re-imagined database of coin types, much as the paper-based work of Keith Rutter, Historia Numorum Italy from 2001.

The online version is, to be sure, a 'work in progress' and not yet in print.
 
The first "volume" covers Caria, the second will cover  Sicily.

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