Numismatic and History Discussions > Coin Photography, Conservation and Storage

Waxing Coins After Cleaning?

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Greg W:
I have read that once ancient coins have been cleaned that some collectors coat the coins with Beeswax. Is this a common practise?

Ron C2:

--- Quote from: Greg W on August 04, 2021, 08:07:08 am ---I have read that once ancient coins have been cleaned that some collectors coat the coins with Beeswax. Is this a common practise?

--- End quote ---

I would not call the use of beeswax to be a common practise today. 

The majority of collectors who wax coins today use Renaissance Wax, which you will often see referred to as "Ren Wax" on the internet.  It's a micro-crystalline wax polish, made in England, that is popular with museum conservators.  The British Museum uses is on many artifacts, including ancient coins.  It dries quickly, does not leave finger prints,and will not damage patina. 

Waxing a coin can slightly change its appearance, giving it a dull sheen.  For these reasons, the collecting community is divided on its use - a lot of people use it, a lot also do not.  Realistically it will nto harm a coin and can be removed if preferred.

Most oftenly, Ren Wax would be used on copper and copper alloy coins like bronze, orichalcum, etc. because it can help prevent new corrosion.  You don't often see it used on silver or gold coins.

otlichnik:
Beeswax is used by some people, primarily in central and eastern Europe. 

Total pain in the A.  Too thick.  Not easy to remove, etc.

SC

Dominic T:
A few decades ago many collectors used cerumen to protect their coins, especially in countries where the humidity level is high (like in the tropical area). It is known to be effective against bronze desease but the main drawback is that it gives a yellowish color to your coins.
DT

Greg W:
Thank you all for the information

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