Numismatic and History Discussions > History and Archeology

Re: Archaeological News

<< < (3/59) > >>

whitetd49:
This one is going to ripple through archeology.  It also roughly corresponds to the decline of Mycaenae.

Retrospectator:
2000 Roman coins discovered near Carmarthen, Wales:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/5089504.stm

PLINIUS:
Archeologists say it's likely Alexander the Great tomb found in Alexandria

(in italian)
http://www.ilsole24ore.com/fc?cmd=art&codid=20.0.1943392189&chId=30&artType=Articolo&DocRulesView=Libero

*Alex:
Story and picture in case the link goes down.

Alex.

  A unique ancient statue of the goddess Artemis, considered one of the most exquisite artifacts found in the Thessaly province of central Greece, was unearthed by archaeologists at the site of an ancient theater near the modern city of Larissa, where restoration works are underway.
 The 80cm-tall fragment of the statue -- only the torso was found -- depicts Artemis, in Greek mythology the virgin goddess of the hunt and the moon, the daughter of Zeus and Leto and the twin sister of Apollo. The artifact is tentatively dated back to the mid 1st Century BC. Athanassios Tzafalias, the head of the search team in Larissa said the original statue measured more than 1,60m and he held out hopes of finding other parts of the statue as the dig goes on.



Numerianus:
Theseus ring is authentic
A gold ring dating from the 15th century BC which was allegedly found near the Acropolis during building work some 60 years ago is a genuine artifact, Greece’s Central Archaeological Council (KAS) said yesterday.

Experts spent six months studying the signet ring, which weighs some 20 grams, amid fears that it was a fake. The artifact has become known as the “Theseus ring” as it has an engraving of a leaping bull, recalling the myth of Theseus and the Minotaur.

The Culture Ministry confirmed yesterday that the majority of experts thought the ring was genuine and, as a result, its owner will be paid 75,000 euros so that the ancient piece of jewelry can be put on display at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.

The owner of the ring said it was discovered by her father-in-law but he kept it hidden until his death.
 
 
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100014_03/08/2006_72807

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version