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Phoenicia Arados - Bronze

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Arados:

--- Quote from: Pscipio on December 28, 2013, 07:18:41 am ---Wikipedia says that unlike today, a freshwater spring existed on Arados in antiquity, providing water supply to the inhabitants. A huge advantage over most other small islands in the Mediterranean, making it an obvious choice for a fortified trading post and certainly a major explanation for the city's prosperity, too!

Very interesting, I had not paid attention to the specific geographical Situation of Arados so far.

Lars

--- End quote ---

A very important commodity indeed Lars.

The inhabitants drew their water from a submarine source. Although the tradition has been lost now, the Aradians lowered a leather tube to which a lead funnel had been attached at one end. The fresh water was then pumped up through this funnel into the pipe and then collected and taken back to the city.

This is a more detailed explanation by Strabo…They obtain some of their water from cisterns filled by the rain, some from the mainland. In time of war they got their water from the straits a little landward of the city, where there is a fast flowing spring. A wide-mouthed vessel of lead contracting to a narrow base with a moderate hole is inverted and let down over this from the watering boat. A leather pipe (or one should say bellows) is fastened around the base to receive the water forced up from the spring through the vessel. The first water forced up is sea water, but they wait for the discharge of pure, drinkable water, catch as much as is needed in containers kept at the ready, and convey it to the city.

Arados

Arados:
Series AR-TPA (Duyrat SÉRIE 1)

I have had my fair share of lady luck during the past week, here is another rarity from Series AR-TPA (Duyrat SÉRIE 1) that i picked up from the post office yesterday. I purchased this coin knowing which series it belonged to, but was unsure of the era date until i had a clearer look under the magnifying glass. With a beautiful orange patina and with minimal die wear, especially on the reverse side (slightly of flan) this coin has preserved well. Duyrat lists just two samples of this type with era date 30, showing only the photo/scan of the New York coin (Plate No.1445). 1445 appears to be a die match but has slight damage top right, resulting in palm tree and Phoencian letter being illegible.

Duyrat 2005
An 30 ? (Aradian era date 30) (230/229 B.C), d et M ? dans le champ en haut (daleph and mem? in field above)

1444 D34-R57, Dombrowsky, Munster, 67, fév. 1976, no 239.
1445 *D34-R57, NewYork, ANS199254514 Lindgren.5,83g, 19,0 mm, 5 h.


Final attribution

Phoenicia, Arados 230-229 B.C

AE 19.53mm (Thickness 2.75mm), weight 5.20g, die axis = 11h (330 degrees), denomination B.

Obverse: Turreted head of Tyche right, beading.

Reverse: Prow of galley left with  (Ἀθηνᾶ Πρόμαχος) Athena Promachos figurehead fighting left, above AP Mongram, Palm Tree and Phoenician letter ? ( ), Aradian era date 30.

Duyrat 2005 Pg.45, No.1444-1445. Duyrat states that Palm tree is possibly Mem ?

Sam:

--- Quote from: Arados on December 27, 2013, 11:35:00 am ---Maybe a short introduction to this wonderful island city would be appropriate.  ;)

Arados, Arwad in Phoenician, is the main city in Northern Phoenicia. It is located on a tiny island with an excellent harbour 2.5 km from the coast, opposite modern day Tartous. Compared to other Phoenician cities of the southern shore, there was a lack of literary and archaeological excavations telling us about the history of this city. Yet the preserved ruins show that it was inhabited without interruption since days of Antiquity. There was also an abundant source of money regularly struck during the Hellenistic period. The Aradians used their privileged geographical location to full advantage and exploited the weaknesses of the Seleucid empire, becoming an essential buffer state within the Lagids’ territories of Syria and Phoenicia. During the 3rd and 2nd centuries, they showed an unwavering loyalty to the Seleucids to whom they delivered military supplies, mainly naval, for which they received autonomy, an official alliance, and sometimes major concessions as asylia during the war between Seleucus II and Antiochus Hierax (241-239 B.C). After the turn of the 2nd century, while the Seleucid dynasty was in decline Aradian regional ambitions increased: the city took the territory of its continental rival Marathos, meets the Tigranus army of Armenia crossing its peraia and gives help to Pompeius’ camp against Caesar and Antonius. This choice explains the blockade the island was subjected to over a period of several months, which led to starvation and disease and persuaded Aradians to surrender in 38 B.C. The submission of the city to the Roman Empire is officially engraved on its bronze coins showing Astarte with a small bust of the emperor in front of her.



--- End quote ---

Have you been there ? ;)

Arados:
In answer to your question Sam,

I am slowly putting together a travel plan taking into account my numismatic areas of interest but has you can imagine the logistics of such a trip will be very challenging indeed. Especially if you take into account that all the cities of interest to me, happen to be situated in three different countries. However my first port of call would definitely be Ashkelon (Ascalon) in Israel, keeping a promise to pay Yashin´s family a visit and hopefully receive a guided tour of Erez-Israel Museum in Ramat-Aviv, where Chaim Yashin´s collection is to be found. My points of interest within Lebanon would be of Baalbek and the temple of Bacchus which is the best preserved ancient temple in the world. Not forgetting the Cities of Sidon, Tyre and Beirut (Berytos) and if i´m lucky, finding some local coin dealers with a rare coin or two for sale. Although i am a little concerned about visiting Lebanon, the recommendation for time being is that non-essential travel is inadvisable due to heightened tensions and crime.

Has you have read Sam, i have numerous interests in this region so for me it would be a golden opportunity to try and fit in has many of these wonderful cities as possible.

Finally, regrettably, i have not had the privilege of visiting Arados, but maybe one day when the hostilities end and it is safe to travel within Syria, then Arwad will be high on my agenda, hopefully this will come to fruition sooner than later.


All the best
Arados

Sam:

--- Quote from: Arados on December 31, 2013, 01:26:16 pm ---In answer to your question Sam,

I am slowly putting together a travel plan taking into account my numismatic areas of interest but has you can imagine the logistics of such a trip will be very challenging indeed. Especially if you take into account that all the cities of interest to me, happen to be situated in three different countries. However my first port of call would definitely be Ashkelon (Ascalon) in Israel, keeping a promise to pay Yashin´s family a visit and hopefully receive a guided tour of Erez-Israel Museum in Ramat-Aviv, where Chaim Yashin´s collection is to be found. My points of interest within Lebanon would be of Baalbek and the temple of Bacchus which is the best preserved ancient temple in the world. Not forgetting the Cities of Sidon, Tyre and Beirut (Berytos) and if i´m lucky, finding some local coin dealers with a rare coin or two for sale. Although i am a little concerned about visiting Lebanon, the recommendation for time being is that non-essential travel is inadvisable due to heightened tensions and crime.

Has you have read Sam, i have numerous interests in this region so for me it would be a golden opportunity to try and fit in has many of these wonderful cities as possible.

Finally, regrettably, i have not had the privilege of visiting Arados, but maybe one day when the hostilities end and it is safe to travel within Syria, then Arwad will be high on my agenda, hopefully this will come to fruition sooner than later.


All the best
Arados

--- End quote ---

Hello there


The reason I asked , I have been there a while ago .. the whole island smells like a big dead fish
and the services are terrible. Simply it is a damaged negligence to everything there , I remember the castle full of garbage on the ground everywhere
HOWEVER , It is not a good time to visit there NOW.

Good luck.


Sam

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