Numismatic and History Discussions > Medieval, Islamic and Crusader Coins

Mameluk Coinage

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Istinpolin:
Hi Levon

Yes, I remember these coins. A big discussion was going on about them quite some time ago. The place was the ICG (Islamic Coins Group). The discussion was between Fawzan Barrage (in my eyes an expert of Mamluk, Umayyad coins etc) and Haroon Tareen. Let me know if I can be of any help.

There are some coins of the Mamluks imitating Armenian coins I think, but I am not an expert in this field.

Best wishes,
Burak

lv88:
Hi Burak,

Also, I was wondering if you can provide a link to the discussion between Fawzan and Haroon, I might find it useful.

For now, the paper is going slowly, I have lots of other work. At this point, I have finished the historical background, and almost finished comments on the hoard.

In a little bit I hope to ask you for help specifically for attribution.



--- Quote from: Istinpolin on June 07, 2005, 01:21:54 pm ---
There are some coins of the Mamluks imitating Armenian coins I think, but I am not an expert in this field.


--- End quote ---

Interesting, I have never heard of these.  What is mentioned about Mamluk and Armenian related coins in Balog ?

I am aware of the following issues:

-Surcharge takvorins, with host coins of Oshin, and Levon IV. ( Recently I saw online auctions and databases which further identified surcharge takvorins to Levon III and Gosdantin III, though this cannot be confirmed.)

-Coins struck in Tarsus by the Emir of Aleppo in the Name of the Sultan of Egypt.


Levon

 





Istinpolin:
Hi Levon

Sorry for my ignorance. Like I said I am no expert on this field, but consulting my Balog I saw that these coins are not imitations but rather Armenian Trams overstruck. This is what Balog says:

"Around the middle of the nineteenth Century, numismatists noticed the existance of Armenian silver-coins, overstruck with an Arabic legend. [...] ...they were already correctly attributed to al-Nasir Muhammad. In 714-715AH al-Nasir Muhammad attacked and invaded Cicilia, a second invasion followed in 716AH. "

Then in 721AH the Armenian endured an attack by the Mongols but right after it was attacked by the Mamluks again and in 722AH and 723AH Sis fell to the Mamluks, they plundered the treasury of Leon IV and an annual tribute of 1.2 Million Trams was imposed.

So Balog presents couple of coins in his book under number 213
AR Tram of Oshin
AR Tram of Levon IV
AR Tram (kings name is illegible)

(Balog P. (1964), The Coinage of the Mamluk Sultans of Egypt and Syria, The American Numismatic Society, New York, page 146)

So this was the Mamluks. Whats more interesting if of course the coins minted by the Umayyad Empire. Like Arab-Byzantine there are also Arab-Armenian coins.

Stephen Album in his check list does mention them. There are 2 extremly rare pieces.
#E97
In the name of Muhammad (unidentified), AR zuzun
He says: With Arabic muhammad before bust, waf in margin. The denomination zwzwn (Aramaic for Drachm) appears on the reverse where the mint signature is normally placed, and has been miscontrued as Zouzan, a locality in Khorasan. Nikitin believes that the type dates to circa 80AH.

#F97
AR zuzun, similar but Pahlavi MHMT before bust, Arabic muhammad in margin.

These are series of early Islamic coins types struck by the standard of the Sassanian Empire. Some coins have the word ARM and ARMAN which is referrig to Armenia, consistent with known find posts.

(Album S. (1998), A Checklist of Islamic Coins, Stephen Album, Santa Rosa, page 19)


Looking at Ottoman Coins minted in Yerevan (Modern Armenia) we can see this

In Turkish Yerevan is Revan, and on Ottoman coins is was written as Rwan

These are the coins minted there

982AH Murad III Dirhem
1003AH Mehmet III Sahi
1115AH Ahmet III, Esrefi, Abasi, Sahi


I hope this will help you further. This was real hard work

Best wishes,
Burak

lv88:
Hi Burak,

Thank you for the plentiful references, you have greatly increased my knowledge of the topic Burak.
--- Quote from: Istinpolin on June 08, 2005, 11:56:05 am ---
So this was the Mamluks. Whats more interesting if of course the coins minted by the Umayyad Empire. Like Arab-Byzantine there are also Arab-Armenian coins.


I hope this will help you further. This was real hard work


--- End quote ---

This helps a lot. Thanks    :)
Interestingly, right before I read your post, I saw the following on Zeno:

http://www.zeno.ru/showphoto.php?photo=16942&cat=611

Right on time for a discussion : ))

So basically, these were struck by the earliest of caliphs (Ummayyads), referring in script to demonination of drachm and struck in Arm,or the mint of Armenia, but were not struck by Armenians themselves ? Also, is the script used Arabic or Persian ?

Best,
Levon

Istinpolin:
Hi Levon

Well Zeno #16942 is basically an Armenian local imitation of Sassanid coinage. Then the local Arabs have started to imitate coins that were issued later with Arm, Arman, or Inm which were Sassanid coins minted in Armenia. Then, the Arab-Sassanid coins emerged from that.

This is really hard to explain because you also need to know the history. We are talking about the break of pre islamic middle east and the emerge of Islam. This is exactly this time. When we say Arab-Byzantine, Arab-Sassanid, Arab-Armenia, Arab-Bukhara etc we mean the local Arabs in this region. These are not necessarily Umayyad. It is very complicated. Arabs lived there before Islam too, you know, and they were Arabs too, just not muslims. When Prophet Muhammad left Mecca in 623AD then it was 0AH for the Muslims. The Umayyads developed very fast and grew very fast. Back then comunities came together without fighting. Some coins of the Umayyad Empire can be attributed as Arab-Byzantine or Arab-Sassanid if it bears the picture or name of Abd al Malik on them. The Umayyad Caliphate was an empire at first, then it bacame the Caliphate. In about 60 to 70 AH the coin reform was adopted and the Umayyad Empire were minting their own coins. All copper coins though are anonymous whereas gold and silver had mints and rulers names on them. So in about 60AH the reform had started. So we are talking about these 60 years.

What happened there. Well, the Umayyad Empire was growing, no one really knows who actually minted Arab-Armenian coins but they were Arabs who imitated the local coinage and after a couple decades they became part of the Umayyad Empire.

Best wishes,
Burak

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