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Author Topic: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze  (Read 48328 times)

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Offline Arados

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Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« on: December 27, 2013, 09:10:30 am »
Series AR-TPA (Duyrat SÉRIE 1)

I bought this coin recently from a reputable dealer who had listed it as a Phoenician Arados from the 3rd to 2nd century B.C - without Poseidon type. The only size given was 16mm (no weight), after studying the various photos i quickly came to the conclusion that the coin did indeed look post Alexandrine and could possibly be extremely scarce or perhaps one of a kind. Although i don't really like using the term one of a kind, this does appear to be the case in respect to the coins era date, Aradian year 35. This series of coins can be found in the most comprehensive study of Arados coins to date, we know this work has Duyrat 2005. On page 44 it states the following for this type;

2. BRONZES À LA TÊTE DE TYCHÉ/PROUE, ATHÉNA EN FIGURE DE PROUE (SÉRIE 1)
a. Attribution
La présence du monogramme d sur les premières émissions puis l’habitude de noter la date en phénicien rattachent sans difficulté ces bronzes aux séries aradiennes.

b. Catalogue 69
98 exemplaires
Au droit : tête de Tyché à droite. Grènetis.
Au revers : proue armée d’un éperon à gauche. Athéna combattante en figure de proue. Grènetis.

Roughly translated

2. Bronze, Head of Tyche / Prow, Athena Figure Head (Series 1)
a. attribution
The presence of the cities monogram and the unique style of Phoenician era dates gives us a clear indication that these coins can be easily related to the bronze Aradian series.


b. Catalogue 69
98 examples.
Right: head of Tyche right. border of dots.
On the reverse, prow armed with a spur to the left. Athena fighting figurehead. border of dots.



The weight, size and style of this coin all point to series 1 and cannot be attributed to any other series just for those reasons ! Has i mentioned earlier the era date is year 35. See below for closest dates in Duyrat 2005 which can be found on page 45;

An 29 (Aradian era date 29) (231/0 B.C), palmier, d et ’ dans le champ en haut (Palm, and daleph 'in field above)

1438 D32-R51, New York, ANS 1948 19 2144. 6,68 g, 21,0 mm, 12 h.
1439 *D33-R52, Beyrouth, AUB Museum, no 28.5,11g,21mm, 12 h.
1440 D33-R53, Berlin, SM, Rauch. 6,64 g, 19,4 mm, 12 h.
1441 D34-R54, Berlin, SM, Imhoof-Blumer (1900). 6,96 g, 20,0 mm, 9 h.
1442 *D34-R55, Milan, collection Di Brera no 3593. 7,07 g, 3 h.
1443 D34-R56, Munich. 5,80 g, 12 h.


An 30 ? (Aradian era date 30) (230/229 B.C), d et M ? dans le champ en haut (daleph and mem? in field above)

1444 D34-R57, Dombrowsky, Munster, 67, fév. 1976, no 239.
1445 *D34-R57, NewYork, ANS199254514 Lindgren.5,83g, 19,0 mm, 5 h.

Note: year 30 coins do appear to have a Palm tree between AP and Phoenician letter, although this is not mentioned by the author.


Has you can clearly see, there seems to have be a gap of eight years without coin production...until now !


An 38 (Aradian era date 38) (222/1 B.C), ’ ?, D dans le champ en haut

1446 *D35?-R58, Londres, BM, BMC 95. 5,43 g, 19,2 mm, 6 h. ’, N ? dans le champ en haut
1447 *D36-R59, New York, ANS 1971 193 54. 5,27 g, 11,1 mm.
[-]
1448 *D37-R60, Berlin, SM, C. R. Fox (1873). 5,08 g, 18,4 mm, 12 h.
1449 D37-R60, New York, ANS 1948 19 2148. 4,52 g, 16,7 mm, 6 h.

An 38 ? (Aradian era date 38)

1450 *D38-R61, NewYork, ANS199254644 Lindgren.5,62g, 17,6 mm, 12 h. Style du droit proche de celui de D36.
1451 *D39-R?, NewYork, ANS199254645 Lindgren.An35+. 4,40 g, 16,6 mm, 12 h.


I am pleased to submit the following attribution for this previously unpublished Aradian coin of year 35, SÉRIE 1.

Final attribution

Phoenicia, Arados 225-224 B.C

AE 17.65mm (Thickness 3.83mm), weight 6.71g, die axis = 12h (0 degrees), denomination B.

Obverse: Turreted head of Tyche right, beading.

Reverse: Prow of galley left with (Ἀθηνᾶ Πρόμαχος) Athena Promachos figurehead fighting left, above AP Monogram, palm tree and Phoenician letter ayin (‘), Aradian era date 35.

Duyrat 2005 (Not published) Pg.45 between years 30-38 / No.1444-1446.



Reattributed to Karne 29 Feb. 2017

https://phoeniciancoins.wordpress.com/2015/03/29/ar-no-tpa-35p12-b-gf/

All the best
Arados

 

Offline Arados

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2013, 11:35:00 am »
Maybe a short introduction to this wonderful island city would be appropriate.  ;)

Arados, Arwad in Phoenician, is the main city in Northern Phoenicia. It is located on a tiny island with an excellent harbour 2.5 km from the coast, opposite modern day Tartous. Compared to other Phoenician cities of the southern shore, there was a lack of literary and archaeological excavations telling us about the history of this city. Yet the preserved ruins show that it was inhabited without interruption since days of Antiquity. There was also an abundant source of money regularly struck during the Hellenistic period. The Aradians used their privileged geographical location to full advantage and exploited the weaknesses of the Seleucid empire, becoming an essential buffer state within the Lagids’ territories of Syria and Phoenicia. During the 3rd and 2nd centuries, they showed an unwavering loyalty to the Seleucids to whom they delivered military supplies, mainly naval, for which they received autonomy, an official alliance, and sometimes major concessions as asylia during the war between Seleucus II and Antiochus Hierax (241-239 B.C). After the turn of the 2nd century, while the Seleucid dynasty was in decline Aradian regional ambitions increased: the city took the territory of its continental rival Marathos, meets the Tigranus army of Armenia crossing its peraia and gives help to Pompeius’ camp against Caesar and Antonius. This choice explains the blockade the island was subjected to over a period of several months, which led to starvation and disease and persuaded Aradians to surrender in 38 B.C. The submission of the city to the Roman Empire is officially engraved on its bronze coins showing Astarte with a small bust of the emperor in front of her.


Offline Robert_Brenchley

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Re: My Gallery Of Rare Arados Coins
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2013, 05:57:04 pm »
That's extraordinary. There's no way under the sun all the people in that town could have fed themselves off the island, so they were dependent on imported food. What were they trading? Or was it some sort of fortress town?
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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2013, 06:22:05 am »
That's extraordinary. There's no way under the sun all the people in that town could have fed themselves off the island, so they were dependent on imported food. What were they trading? Or was it some sort of fortress town?

Hello Robert,

Arados was indeed a fortress city with a powerful navy which flourished under Persian rule, along with Sidon and Tyre they had gained control of the entire southern coast. These cities had learnt how to exploit but also importantly how to develop and increase prosperity in the region. Archaeological surveys show that along the Phoenician coast the rural areas were heavily populated with many outlets. Each river mouth provided anchorage for merchant ships that provided the much needed supplies to the Aradians. Gerostratus was probably the most influential leader of the Aradians, he ruled between 350-332 B.C, building up a dominion extending over the northern part of Phoenicia, including the large and wealthy seaports of Marathus and Mariamme.
The Aradians did however change allegiance on a number of occasions. While serving under the Persian fleet, Gerostratus grow tired of this pact, deciding that the time was right for a change of sovereignty. What came to general knowledge was that Gerostratus offered to Alexander, allegiance from himself and his island city, in token of which he sent a present of a golden crown, which Straton, son of Gerostratus was allowed to place, in public, on Alexanders head, thus securing a new era of prosperity for his people.

I hope that i was able to answer your question ?

All the best
Arados

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Re: My Gallery Of Rare Arados Coins
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2013, 07:18:41 am »
Wikipedia says that unlike today, a freshwater spring existed on Arados in antiquity, providing water supply to the inhabitants. A huge advantage over most other small islands in the Mediterranean, making it an obvious choice for a fortified trading post and certainly a major explanation for the city's prosperity, too!

Very interesting, I had not paid attention to the specific geographical Situation of Arados so far.

Lars
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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2013, 02:27:22 pm »
Wikipedia says that unlike today, a freshwater spring existed on Arados in antiquity, providing water supply to the inhabitants. A huge advantage over most other small islands in the Mediterranean, making it an obvious choice for a fortified trading post and certainly a major explanation for the city's prosperity, too!

Very interesting, I had not paid attention to the specific geographical Situation of Arados so far.

Lars

A very important commodity indeed Lars.

The inhabitants drew their water from a submarine source. Although the tradition has been lost now, the Aradians lowered a leather tube to which a lead funnel had been attached at one end. The fresh water was then pumped up through this funnel into the pipe and then collected and taken back to the city.

This is a more detailed explanation by Strabo…They obtain some of their water from cisterns filled by the rain, some from the mainland. In time of war they got their water from the straits a little landward of the city, where there is a fast flowing spring. A wide-mouthed vessel of lead contracting to a narrow base with a moderate hole is inverted and let down over this from the watering boat. A leather pipe (or one should say bellows) is fastened around the base to receive the water forced up from the spring through the vessel. The first water forced up is sea water, but they wait for the discharge of pure, drinkable water, catch as much as is needed in containers kept at the ready, and convey it to the city.

Arados

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2013, 09:49:39 am »
Series AR-TPA (Duyrat SÉRIE 1)

I have had my fair share of lady luck during the past week, here is another rarity from Series AR-TPA (Duyrat SÉRIE 1) that i picked up from the post office yesterday. I purchased this coin knowing which series it belonged to, but was unsure of the era date until i had a clearer look under the magnifying glass. With a beautiful orange patina and with minimal die wear, especially on the reverse side (slightly of flan) this coin has preserved well. Duyrat lists just two samples of this type with era date 30, showing only the photo/scan of the New York coin (Plate No.1445). 1445 appears to be a die match but has slight damage top right, resulting in palm tree and Phoencian letter being illegible.

Duyrat 2005
An 30 ? (Aradian era date 30) (230/229 B.C), d et M ? dans le champ en haut (daleph and mem? in field above)

1444 D34-R57, Dombrowsky, Munster, 67, fév. 1976, no 239.
1445 *D34-R57, NewYork, ANS199254514 Lindgren.5,83g, 19,0 mm, 5 h.


Final attribution

Phoenicia, Arados 230-229 B.C

AE 19.53mm (Thickness 2.75mm), weight 5.20g, die axis = 11h (330 degrees), denomination B.

Obverse: Turreted head of Tyche right, beading.

Reverse: Prow of galley left with  (Ἀθηνᾶ Πρόμαχος) Athena Promachos figurehead fighting left, above AP Mongram, Palm Tree and Phoenician letter ? ( ), Aradian era date 30.

Duyrat 2005 Pg.45, No.1444-1445. Duyrat states that Palm tree is possibly Mem ?

Offline Sam

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Re: My Gallery Of Rare Arados Coins
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2013, 10:14:56 am »
Maybe a short introduction to this wonderful island city would be appropriate.  ;)

Arados, Arwad in Phoenician, is the main city in Northern Phoenicia. It is located on a tiny island with an excellent harbour 2.5 km from the coast, opposite modern day Tartous. Compared to other Phoenician cities of the southern shore, there was a lack of literary and archaeological excavations telling us about the history of this city. Yet the preserved ruins show that it was inhabited without interruption since days of Antiquity. There was also an abundant source of money regularly struck during the Hellenistic period. The Aradians used their privileged geographical location to full advantage and exploited the weaknesses of the Seleucid empire, becoming an essential buffer state within the Lagids’ territories of Syria and Phoenicia. During the 3rd and 2nd centuries, they showed an unwavering loyalty to the Seleucids to whom they delivered military supplies, mainly naval, for which they received autonomy, an official alliance, and sometimes major concessions as asylia during the war between Seleucus II and Antiochus Hierax (241-239 B.C). After the turn of the 2nd century, while the Seleucid dynasty was in decline Aradian regional ambitions increased: the city took the territory of its continental rival Marathos, meets the Tigranus army of Armenia crossing its peraia and gives help to Pompeius’ camp against Caesar and Antonius. This choice explains the blockade the island was subjected to over a period of several months, which led to starvation and disease and persuaded Aradians to surrender in 38 B.C. The submission of the city to the Roman Empire is officially engraved on its bronze coins showing Astarte with a small bust of the emperor in front of her.



Have you been there ? ;)
Sam Mansourati

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2013, 01:26:16 pm »
In answer to your question Sam,

I am slowly putting together a travel plan taking into account my numismatic areas of interest but has you can imagine the logistics of such a trip will be very challenging indeed. Especially if you take into account that all the cities of interest to me, happen to be situated in three different countries. However my first port of call would definitely be Ashkelon (Ascalon) in Israel, keeping a promise to pay Yashin´s family a visit and hopefully receive a guided tour of Erez-Israel Museum in Ramat-Aviv, where Chaim Yashin´s collection is to be found. My points of interest within Lebanon would be of Baalbek and the temple of Bacchus which is the best preserved ancient temple in the world. Not forgetting the Cities of Sidon, Tyre and Beirut (Berytos) and if i´m lucky, finding some local coin dealers with a rare coin or two for sale. Although i am a little concerned about visiting Lebanon, the recommendation for time being is that non-essential travel is inadvisable due to heightened tensions and crime.

Has you have read Sam, i have numerous interests in this region so for me it would be a golden opportunity to try and fit in has many of these wonderful cities as possible.

Finally, regrettably, i have not had the privilege of visiting Arados, but maybe one day when the hostilities end and it is safe to travel within Syria, then Arwad will be high on my agenda, hopefully this will come to fruition sooner than later.


All the best
Arados

Offline Sam

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Re: My Gallery Of Rare Arados Coins
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2013, 01:34:08 pm »
In answer to your question Sam,

I am slowly putting together a travel plan taking into account my numismatic areas of interest but has you can imagine the logistics of such a trip will be very challenging indeed. Especially if you take into account that all the cities of interest to me, happen to be situated in three different countries. However my first port of call would definitely be Ashkelon (Ascalon) in Israel, keeping a promise to pay Yashin´s family a visit and hopefully receive a guided tour of Erez-Israel Museum in Ramat-Aviv, where Chaim Yashin´s collection is to be found. My points of interest within Lebanon would be of Baalbek and the temple of Bacchus which is the best preserved ancient temple in the world. Not forgetting the Cities of Sidon, Tyre and Beirut (Berytos) and if i´m lucky, finding some local coin dealers with a rare coin or two for sale. Although i am a little concerned about visiting Lebanon, the recommendation for time being is that non-essential travel is inadvisable due to heightened tensions and crime.

Has you have read Sam, i have numerous interests in this region so for me it would be a golden opportunity to try and fit in has many of these wonderful cities as possible.

Finally, regrettably, i have not had the privilege of visiting Arados, but maybe one day when the hostilities end and it is safe to travel within Syria, then Arwad will be high on my agenda, hopefully this will come to fruition sooner than later.


All the best
Arados

Hello there


The reason I asked , I have been there a while ago .. the whole island smells like a big dead fish
and the services are terrible. Simply it is a damaged negligence to everything there , I remember the castle full of garbage on the ground everywhere
HOWEVER , It is not a good time to visit there NOW.

Good luck.


Sam
Sam Mansourati

Offline John Anthony

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Re: My Gallery Of Rare Arados Coins
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2013, 01:38:23 pm »
A most excellent and informative thread!

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2014, 06:14:31 am »
Saddening to hear of this historical city's demise. I am of course aware of the slum conditions, not really surprising due to the General Department of Antiquity declaring the whole island a historical site and in the process banning any form of construction or restoration which prevents the inhabitants from restoring their crumbling homes. This unfortunate bureaucratic stalemate has been ongoing for the last 32 years with no solution in sight, lets hope that common sense prevails and the ban is lifted. If Arwad is to be restored to it´s former glory, not only for historical reasons but also for the future generations of Aradians, then funding will have to be forthcoming soon before the damage to all buildings and structures is irreparable.

Thanks for your input Sam and your support John.

Offline Lee S

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Re: My Gallery Of Rare Arados Coins
« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2014, 04:41:28 pm »
Interesting thread indeed my Friend! I hope 2014 brings you more lucky finds!!!

Offline Arados

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2014, 01:20:55 pm »
Series AR-ZP (Duyrat Série 15)

Little did i know when helping a fellow FORVM member with the identification of this coin that i would have the very good fortune of owning it at a later date.
Thanks again Pendrakon for giving me the opportunity of adding this rare and wonderful coin to my collection.  +++

https://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=93039.msg577068#msg577068



Duyrat lists the coin has Série 15 and only received six of it´s type for which only two were photographed for the publication of Duyrat 2005.

Below are the six coins that can be found in various museums and one now residing in Stockholm.

Au droit : tête de Zeus laurée à droite. Grènetis.
Au revers : proue de navire armée d’un éperon à gauche. Lettres grecques dans le champ en haut. Date en grec à l’exergue, lettre phénicienne au-dessous.

Obverse: Laureate head of Zeus right, Beading.
Reverse: Prow of a ship with Greek letters in the field above, Date in Greek with Phoenician letter below .


My apologies for the poor translation, French was never my strong point.  ???
 

An 176 (Aradian era date 176=POς) : POς (84/3), lettres grecques dans le champ en haut : ΘPA ; lettre phénicienne : D (Greek letters above and Phoenician letter daleth below)

4622 D1-R1, Berlin, SM, Löbbecke (1906). 2,82 g, 13,8 mm, 12 h.

4623 D1-R1, New York, ANS 1944 100 70684 Newell. 2,40 g, 12,1 mm, 12 h.

4624 *D1-R1, Paris, BNF, H. Seyrig Y28883,34. 2,25 g, 14,2 mm, 12 h.

4625 D1-R2, Beyrouth, AUB Museum, no 195. 2,41 g, 13 mm, 12 h.

An 177 (Aradian era date 177=POZ) : POZ (83/2), lettres grecques dans le champ en haut : OΔO ; lettre phénicienne : B (Greek letters above and Phoenician letter beth below)

4626 D2-R3?, collection Lindgren, no 1344. 2,72 g.

4627 *D2-R3, Paris, BNF, H. Seyrig Y28883,35. 2,62 g, 12,7 mm, 12 h.


Final attribution;

Phoenicia, Arados 84-83 B.C

AE 13.02mm (Thickness 2.89mm), weight 2.54g, die axis = 12h (0 degrees), denomination D.

Obverse: Laureate head of Zeus right.

Reverse: Prow of Galley left, ΘΠA above, Aradian era date 176 (POς ) & Phoenician letter daleth (D) below.

Duyrat Pg.113 No.4622-4627 / HGC10: Pg.25 95.


P.S Lee, thanks for your support and indeed 2014 has got of to a good start.  ;)


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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #14 on: February 25, 2014, 03:04:51 am »
FORVM friends,

Please do not hesitate in contributing to this post if you have any fascinating knowledge about this historical island fortress or if you happen to be the lucky owner of a rare bronze that you would like to share with us all. I started this post for the benefit of all who share my passion for Aradian coins and for those who may just have a passing interest but want to find out more about this diverse and once powerful culture.

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2014, 07:04:30 am »
You might like to see this piece, Arados.  I'm sure you know much more about it than I do!

I think it is quite rare and I was lucky enough to find it in a large group lot of Phoenician and Seleukid coins:

AE 20, Phoenicia, Arados, 1st cent. B.C. Obv: Radiate head of Helios facing right. Rev: ΑΡΑΔΙΩΝ with basket containing grapes, vine leaves, and two barely ears. Dark green patina with some hints of red, about F. Lindgren I, 1346, B.M.C.347-9, Cop. 74.5.57, Hoover HGC 10, 83 (R3).

I know Lindgren had one and I've seen one or two others (I think).  I find it interesting because it doesn't look anything like any of the other Phoenician coins I have.

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2014, 01:26:34 pm »
You might like to see this piece, Arados.  I'm sure you know much more about it than I do!

I think it is quite rare and I was lucky enough to find it in a large group lot of Phoenician and Seleukid coins:

AE 20, Phoenicia, Arados, 1st cent. B.C. Obv: Radiate head of Helios facing right. Rev: ΑΡΑΔΙΩΝ with basket containing grapes, vine leaves, and two barely ears. Dark green patina with some hints of red, about F. Lindgren I, 1346, B.M.C.347-9, Cop. 74.5.57, Hoover HGC 10, 83 (R3).

I know Lindgren had one and I've seen one or two others (I think).  I find it interesting because it doesn't look anything like any of the other Phoenician coins I have.


Nick, you have my full attention and i have to be honest i´m slightly envious of your gem of a coin. It is has you said quite rare and very sort after, especially by this collector.  :P

I would date it at circa 352 or 92-93 A.D purely because your coin has ΑΡΑΔΙΩΝ from top to bottom in left field and what appears to be a BNT to the right (see attached photo), sorry for the poor attempt at highlighting.

Duyrat received 16 coins of this type of which only five were similar and later submitted for publication.


Series AR-HBVG (Duyrat Série 13)


An 166 : PΞς (94/3), B, G
4603 *D1-R1,Paris,BNF, H.Seyrig1973239.3,85g,18,9mm, 12 h.
4604 D2-R2, collection Lindgren, no 1345. 6,55 g.

An 231 : CΛA (29/8), ’, M, H
4605 *D3-R3, Berlin, SM, Löbbecke (1906). 5,63 g, 21,5 mm,12 h.

An 233 ? : [Ç]ΛΓ (27/6), ’, M, Y, Q.
4606 *D4-R4, Paris, BNF, Waddington. 7,23 g, 22,7 mm, 12 h.

An 273 ? : ΣOΓ (13/14 de notre ère), Q. Légende à la verticale dans le champ gauche : ΑΡΑΔΙΩΝ
4607 D5-R5, Berlin, SM, C. R. Fox (1873). 5,61 g, 21,1 mm, 12 h.
4608 *D5-R5, Berlin, SM, Löbbecke (1906). 8,04 g, 21,2 mm, 12 h.

N dans le champ droit. Date illisible
4609 *D6-R6, Berlin, SM, Imhoof-Blumer (1900). 8,35 g, 20,3 mm, 12 h.
4610 D6-R7, New York, ANS 1953 171 1645.

An 281 : AΠΣ (21/22 de notre ère), Q
4611 *D7-R8, Berlin, SM, Löbbecke (1906). 6,39 g, 22,8 mm,12 h.

An 352 ? : BNT (92/3 de notre ère), Q. Légende à la verticale dans le champ gauche : ΑΡΑΔΙΩΝ

4612 D8-R9, Berlin, SM, Löbbecke (1906). 5,94 g, 20,6 mm, 12 h.
4613 D8-R10?, collection Lindgren, no 1346. 5,57 g.
4614 D8-R10?, Munich, no 22. 5,12 g, 6 h.
4615 *D8-R10, Paris, BNF, collection Delepierre no 16. 7,50 g,19,7 mm, 12 h. Closest match to your coin.
4616 D8-R11, collection Weber, no 8027. 5,24 g.

Date et coins non identifiés. B et N dans le champ droit
4617 D9-R12, New York, ANS 1944 100 70720.

Finally, i noticed just one minor mistake and that is your coin can be found in Lindgren III not I.  ;)

Duyrat 2005 Pg.112 No.4615, Lindgren III 1346, B.M.C.347-9, Cop. 74.5.57, Hoover HGC 10, 83.

Thanks for sharing Nick.

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2014, 03:51:12 pm »
Interesting info. I'll try and take better photos/examine it in hand to determine if that date is correct!

Thanks,

Nick

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #18 on: March 15, 2014, 08:16:20 am »
Series AR-HBVG (Duyrat Série 13)

I recently added this beautiful coin to my Aradian bronze collection, it has a wonderful green patina with elements of good preservation and has retained most of its detail especially on the reverse side. Although struck slightly of flan obliterating to a degree the exact date on the reverse, i am pretty sure that when taking into account, style, general appearance and most importantly a very close match to Duyrat 4615 (see paragraph below). I can then confidently date my coin to 352 or 92-93 A.D, which remarkably is the same date has Nick´s coin we previously discussed hear in an earlier post.

However, it needs to be noted that my coin falls into the same weight bracket has Duyrat 4616 D8-R11, which is a part of the Weber collection baring the number No. 8027. Unfortunately for me, i can not seem to find a photograph of this coin in any references. So i will have to be content in knowing that although my coin is slightly under weight compared to Duyrat 4615, for all intents and purposes, it is a pretty good match.


Final attribution,

Phoenicia, Arados 92-93 A.D

AE 21.35mm (Thickness 2.55mm), weight 5.55g, die axis = 12h (0 degrees), denomination B.

Obverse: Radiate bust of Helios, border of dots.

Reverse: Small basket containing two ears of barley and branch of vine with bunches of grapes, ΑΡΑΔΙΩΝ from top to bottom in left field, between ears of barley Phoenician letter qoph (Q) monogram, Aradian era date in right field 352 (BNT).


Molinari´s Coin (Previous post)

Further conclusive prove of your coins date Nick can be seen in the edited photos at the bottom of this post. The monogram between, two ears of barley can be clearly seen on your coin and on mine (see photo 1). The monogram in question can only be found on these era dates mentioned in the paragraph below.

Duyrat states that the letter qoph (Q) appears on all coins dating from 233 (27-26 B.C) to 352 (92-93 A.D). The forming of this letter does vary in style, which of course is to be expected over time. I would like to state that on our coins the letter resembles in some way the letter resh (R), i am not totally convinced that our coins have in fact the letter qoph on them and will be keeping an open mind regarding this.

Now moving on to the era date (see photo 2), when viewing both coins close up, it does appear that i need to correct my previous post regarding the positioning of the era date. The date can in fact be found further up above what is now clearly the curl of the grape vine. When holding my coin in hand and examining it under a magnifying glass, i can just make out the letters N & T with just a faint trace of the first letter B above. Your coin is much clearer than mine in this respect, when you have a spare moment, please post a close up of your coins date, thanks.

P.S Nick, i can not seem to find any reference stating the weight of your coin. This would help to determine whether your coin is a Duyrat 4615 or 4616 ?


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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #19 on: March 15, 2014, 08:44:09 am »
I have to agree that the monogram doesn't look like qof. In fact, it's clearly rosh to me. It would be instructive to see a study of the changes in the script over time - did qof resemble rosh at some point?

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #20 on: March 15, 2014, 11:33:16 am »
Sorry for the delay, and thanks for all the work you've done on my piece.  Unfortunately, the weight will have to wait until Monday when I bring it to work.

However, here are two much better images.  It's really a much nicer coin than the first set of pictures (which I took when I first started collecting) indicate.  Looking through my gallery, I have a lot of photo updates ahead of me!

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #21 on: March 15, 2014, 01:15:28 pm »
Sorry for the delay, and thanks for all the work you've done on my piece.  Unfortunately, the weight will have to wait until Monday when I bring it to work.

However, here are two much better images.  It's really a much nicer coin than the first set of pictures (which I took when I first started collecting) indicate.  Looking through my gallery, I have a lot of photo updates ahead of me!

My pleasure,

I am extremely grateful that you took the time time to re-photograph your coin, now there is absolutely no mistaking the disputed letter between the two ears of barley (see edited image). Who would have guessed that we would see such a vast improvement in image quality, apart from you that is.  ;)

You have by far the best coin of this type i have seen, much better than the coin published in Duyrat 2005.

Thanks for sharing.

Edit: disputed letter, confirmed has qoph (Q).


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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #22 on: March 16, 2014, 05:09:11 am »
Hi Molinari,

I took the liberty of merging your last post, it can now be found in "Phoenician Marathos - Bronze".


Your reply from yesterday´s discussion regarding attribution.  +++

Quote:
AE 20, Phoenicia, Arados, 92-93 AD. Obv: Radiate head of Helios facing right. Rev: ΑΡΑΔΙΩΝ to left, basket containing grapes, vine leaves, and two barely ears in center, BNT to right, Q above. Dark green patina with some hints of red. Lindgren III, 1346, B.M.C.347-9, Cop. 74.5.57, Hoover HGC 10, 83 (R3).  

Here is my final attribution based on the info you gave me.  Once I get the weight I'll ask you to help narrow down the Duyrat attribution.
;).

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #23 on: March 16, 2014, 12:53:08 pm »
Thanks, I realized later that I had posted a coin from Marathos in the Arados thread.  To make up for my mistake, I post this piece, which I believe is the finest known and I'm submitting it to the BOT gallery.  I think combined with its beautiful patina and slight orange highlights it can't be beat!  However, it is such a common piece I may have many challengers.

AE 15, 3.51g, Phoenicia, Arados, 164/3 B.C. Obv: Zeus facing right. Rev: Triple-pointed ram of galley, inscription above, Aradian era date 96 (164/3 BC) below. Light green patina, XF. S 6001, B.M.C. 26.17, 111-12, Hoover HGC 10, 88 (C).

https://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-107824

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Re: Phoenicia Arados - Bronze
« Reply #24 on: March 17, 2014, 09:42:02 am »
Thanks, I realized later that I had posted a coin from Marathos in the Arados thread.  To make up for my mistake, I post this piece, which I believe is the finest known and I'm submitting it to the BOT gallery.  I think combined with its beautiful patina and slight orange highlights it can't be beat!  However, it is such a common piece I may have many challengers.

AE 15, 3.51g, Phoenicia, Arados, 164/3 B.C. Obv: Zeus facing right. Rev: Triple-pointed ram of galley, inscription above, Aradian era date 96 (164/3 BC) below. Light green patina, XF. S 6001, B.M.C. 26.17, 111-12, Hoover HGC 10, 88 (C).

https://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-107824

So, can i assume that you have thrown down the gauntlet, i have possibly three Aradian coins of this type that i feel can challenge yours for the honour of BOT. I will photograph these coins and choose a worthy challenger.

"May the best coin win"  :laugh:

Responding to your comment about this type being common, that of course depends solely on the coins era date.

When studying them more closely, one can see the subtle facial changes in Zeus and the slight varations of the tripple pointed ram. Also, the diversity and style of the Phoenician letters varies through the years of minting.

 

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