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Author Topic: Caesarea Maritima, one more, Caracalla or Elagabalus Tyche in Temple  (Read 251 times)

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Offline v-drome

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Hi, all.  Here is another difficult one from Caesarea with Tyche in shrine.  The inscription is very strange, almost amateurish, starting with M AVP(sic) ANTON....., but the portrait is very nicely done.  Again, the only book I have is Kadman's volume.  I have called it Caracalla, Kadman 66v. but it looks quite different from the type in the plate, and really nothing at all like the one for Elagabalus, either (Kadman 80).  Also, is this a "cuirassed" bust?  None are listed as such in Kadman
Thanks for any insight!  V-drome.

BCC CM7
Roman Provincial
Caesarea Maritima
Caracalla 211-217C.E.
OBV: M AVP(sic) ANTO[..........]
Laureate, draped, cuirassed? bust right.
REV: [COL P F AV] F C - in ex. CAESA
Tyche standing left in tetrastyle temple with
two figures flanking.
22.5mm. 10.74gm. Axis:210
Kadman 66v. (obv. and rev. inscriptions, axis)
Surface find, Caesarea Maritima, 1977
(click for larger pic)

Offline Meepzorp

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Re: Caesarea Maritima, one more, Caracalla or Elagabalus Tyche in Temple
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2021, 10:43:03 am »
Hi vd,

I have the Elagabalus type (last coin):

https://www.forumancientcoins.com/meepzorp/rp_judaea_pt06.htm

As you can see from the dealer's tag, my example is Kadman 81. In my opinion, the portrait on my coin looks nothing like yours. Unfortunately, Caracalla and Elagabalus look a lot alike. And, depending on who carved the dies in antiquity, modern collectors can be easily confused.

Meepzorp

Offline v-drome

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Re: Caesarea Maritima, one more, Caracalla or Elagabalus Tyche in Temple
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2021, 01:46:19 am »
Hi Meep.  Your example is very nice.  I thought it would be interesting to note that when I was growing up at Caesarea and working in the excavations there in the 1970's, our team found large sections of a statue of Tyche which I believe could have formed the basis for this coin design.  The reassembled pieces, almost complete and slightly larger than life, are now on display at the local museum there.

Best regards, Jimi

Offline quadrans

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Re: Caesarea Maritima, one more, Caracalla or Elagabalus Tyche in Temple
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2021, 01:58:40 am »
Nice find, Jimi,  +++

Joe/Q.

Offline Altamura

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Re: Caesarea Maritima, one more, Caracalla or Elagabalus Tyche in Temple
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2021, 02:24:19 am »
There is a publication by Goussous, N.G., Alzuod, H.A. and Naghawy, A.M., "Inedited and Rare: Ancient, Classical and Byzantine Coins", Jordan 2014.
On page 67 number 3 they describe a coin quite similar to the one here and attribute it to Caracalla (but it is not clear why :-\):
https://ahli.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Ancient-Classical-And-Byzantine-Coins.pdf#page=81&zoom=100,-326,842

Perhaps that helps :).

Regards

Altamura

Offline v-drome

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Re: Caesarea Maritima, one more, Caracalla or Elagabalus Tyche in Temple
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2021, 04:20:59 am »
Hi, Joe and Altamura.  The Goussous example does match pretty well to either Kadman 66 (Caracalla) or Kadman 80 (Elagabalus).  The main difference I see in my coin is the more realistic portrait style, longer neck, and possible view slightly from behind.  The strange, almost barbaric inscription, with the Greek P instead of R, could be an error related to the fact that Greek was still the common language at Caesarea, for everything except coins and official government or military inscriptions.  Unfortunately, I don't have access to any of the newer publications such as Sofaer, Rosenberger, or SNP (ANS6), and so far I have not found any matches in the usual on-line sales archives.

Thanks, again, Jimi

 

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