Numismatic and History Discussions > Uncleaned Ancient Coin Discussion

How to Clean Silvered (not Silver) Coins

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Mayadigger:
Ave!

The very first thing when it comes silvered coins is to determine whether it's "silver plated" or "silver tinned".

The first example is a Silver Plated fourree; Note how the obverse has buckled up. Too easy to see.

The next example features a pair of Vine Leaf vessel adornments. Looks like silver but it just simply solder used to attach it to a copper alloy wine vessel.

Is it gold plated or just oxidized silvering? Yes, in this case the artifact was gold plated.

Too many coin cleaners have a bit of confusion when it comes silver tinned coins. In most cases the silvering appears just a bit dull, as seen in the next example below.
All the yellow-looking bits are the silvering. 

Mayadigger:
Ave!

The very first thing when it comes silvered coins is to determine whether it's "silver plated" or "silver tinned".

The first example is a Silver Plated fourree; Note how the obverse has buckled up. Too easy to see.

The next example features a pair of Vine Leaf vessel adornments. Looks like silver but it just simply solder used to attach it to a copper alloy wine vessel.

Is it gold plated or just oxidized silvering? Yes, in this case the artifact was gold plated.

Too many coin cleaners have a bit of confusion when it comes silver tinned coins. In most cases the silvering appears just a bit dull, as seen in the next example below.
All the yellow-looking bits are the silvering. 

Best to all,

Kevin

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