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Author Topic: Re: Archaeological News  (Read 89726 times)

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Offline Pep

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Re: Archaeological News
« on: November 02, 2005, 04:54:40 pm »
http://www.radio.cz/en/article/70835

Czech archaeologists excavate Ancient Greek town flattened by Bohemian Celts
[20-09-2005] By Pavla Horakova

For twelve years, Czech archaeologists have been helping their Bulgarian colleagues in the excavations of an Ancient Greek market town in central Bulgaria. The twelve years of work has yielded valuable results, including a hoard of coins, and discovered a surprising connection between the ancient town and the Czech Lands.

The river port of Pistiros was founded in the 5th century BC by a local Thracian ruler. From the excavations we know that wine from Greece was imported to the town in large amphoras. Other pottery was found in and around the remnants of houses and also a hoard of treasure was unearthed from one of the ruins. Professor Jan Bouzek was head of the team.

"Well, it was a hoard of some 561 coins. They were buried just before the Celtic invasion which came there in 278 BC. They were put into a locally made jar, just in a hurry, because the Celts were apparently already attacking the city."

Over a thousand coins were unearthed on the site, minted in various Greek cities and bearing the portraits of many rulers, including Philip II, who caused considerable damage to Pistiros around the year 345 BC. The city was destroyed by Celtic invaders some fifty years later and never fully recovered. Interestingly, some of the attackers apparently came from what is now the Czech Republic.

"In the destruction we found several Celtic weapons which were partly burnt and most of them are not well preserved with the exception of one arrowhead. But we found in the ruins that at the time of the looting of the city they lost one of the typical fibulae (buckles) of the so-called Duchcov type which were especially well-known from a great hoard in Duchcov and which must have been made in this country. Some of the Celts from these parts apparently participated because they were also one of the four tribes which founded the kingdom of Galatia. They were Celts living in the northern part of this country."

The fruits of the 12-year Czech-Bulgarian joint research were first presented to the archaeological community last week in Prague at the Third International Congress on Black Sea Antiquities. As Professor Jan Bouzek says the beginnings of Czech-Bulgarian cooperation in archaeology date back to the 19th century.

"Well, the history is much longer. Both my professors who did archaeology epigraphy were working in Bulgaria. And 80 percent of the founders of Bulgarian archaeology were the Czechs. They were the Skorpil family, Professor Vaclav Dobrusky - who was actually the first person who had any knowledge of our site. Vaclav Dobrusky was the founder of the Bulgarian National Archaeological Museum and he discovered the first inscription on the [Pistiros] site. It was long forgotten and only discovered much later by my friend Mieczyslaw Domaradski who was Polish-born but lived and worked in Bulgaria. He really discovered the city much later."


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Offline GMoneti

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2005, 04:26:27 pm »
Here is something interesting regarding law and trade relations between Thracians and Greeks in Pistiros:

http://www.apaclassics.org/AnnualMeeting/05mtg/abstracts/Demetriou.html

Regarding the Czech article, it seems very unlikely that in this region wine was imported from Greece, as the area around Pistiros was (and still is) ideal for vineyards and wine was a very important product for the Thracians(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pistiros).  Dionysus, the god of wine, was a Thracian deity, adopted by the Greeks and the Romans

Georgi
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Offline Robert_Brenchley

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2005, 02:25:01 am »
<<After the fall of the Roman Empire, the art of brick manufacturing was lost in most of Europe, surviving only in Italy itself. Central Europe didn't rediscover the skill until the 18th century and England until the 1100s .>>

I've a feeling that the art reached Britain in the late 1400's. There's a very early brick castle at Kirby Muxloe near Leicester which was abandoned half-built when its owner had his head amputated by Richard III, but I haven't come across anything earlier. But I could be wrong.
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Offline LordBest

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2006, 02:48:49 am »
http://www.guardian.co.uk/turkey/story/0,,1694257,00.html

The great ports and docks of Constantinople found. Not a very good article to be honest, but its a find of immense importance. Not only that, they have found the first ever Byzantine military naval vessal ever recovered, with its Greek fire mechanisms intact, according to some preliminary reports. That and five other ships, some of which may also be military vessals. If its all the archaeologists working on it say its one of the most important finds in Late Roman/Byzantine archaeology in the last century.
                                             LordBest. 8)

Offline Pscipio

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2006, 02:52:13 am »
with its Greek fire mechanisms intact, according to some preliminary reports.

That would be a sensation, indeed!

Lars
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Offline GMoneti

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2006, 08:08:31 pm »
The remains of an ancient Greek cargo ship that sank more than 2,300 years ago have been uncovered with a deep-sea robot, archaeologists announced today.

The ship was carrying hundreds of ceramic jars of wine and olive oil and went down off Chios and the Oinoussai islands in the eastern Aegean Sea sometime around 350 B.C.

 Archeologists speculate that a fire or rough weather may have sunk the ship. The wreckage was found submerged beneath 200 feet (60 meters) of water.

 The researchers hope that the shipwreck will provide clues about the trade network that existed between the ancient Greek and their trading partners.

...

http://www.livescience.com/history/060202_greek_shipwreck.html

Georgi
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Offline Ecgþeow

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2006, 02:36:12 pm »
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11252094/


First new tomb discovered in the Valley of the Kings since the 1922 Tutankhamun discovery.

EDIT: sorry, werong link, I fixed it

Offline AlexB

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2006, 08:32:11 pm »
'Never has so much been owed, to so many, by so few' - Mervyn King, Governor, Bank of England, 20th Oct 2009

Offline Jochen

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2006, 06:09:02 am »
<<After the fall of the Roman Empire, the art of brick manufacturing was lost in most of Europe, surviving only in Italy itself. Central Europe didn't rediscover the skill until the 18th century and England until the 1100s .>>

I've a feeling that the art reached Britain in the late 1400's. There's a very early brick castle at Kirby Muxloe near Leicester which was abandoned half-built when its owner had his head amputated by Richard III, but I haven't come across anything earlier. But I could be wrong.

Sorry, I have read this post but now. The art of brick making was known in Norther Germany, Polen, Scandinavia and the Baltic provinces from the beginning of the 12th century. A stile was created called 'Backsteingotik' something like 'Brick Gothic' which dominates the cities of the Hansa from Lübeck to Riga.
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backsteingotik

Best regards

Offline rjohara

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2006, 03:09:19 pm »
I know it's before the time of coins, but it's interesting nevertheless....

This week's issue of Science (28 April 2006) carries two papers and a news story on the dating of early Aegean civilizations through radiocarbon. There has been a controversy (the story says) centering on the date of the eruption of Thera (modern Santorini) which may have been responsible for the destruction of Minoan civilization. (I think the tsunami angle is most likely myself -- imagine what an event like the recent Indonesian tsunami would have done to a bronze-age culture living on the shoreline.)

The controversy has been between those who would put the eruption of Thera in the 1600s BC, and those who would place it a century later in the 1500s. New radiocarbon dating puts the reuption within the 1627-1600 BC range. The Egyptologists, who favor the later dating, are not amused. They had tended to see the Minoan zenith as correlated with the New Kingdom zenith in the 1500s. The new dates suggest that the Minoan zenith may have been coincident with the less creative Hyksos culture in Egypt, thought to have been derived from Anatolia (where there was also some Minoan influence).

Offline whitetd49

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #10 on: May 04, 2006, 04:22:41 pm »
This one is going to ripple through archeology.  It also roughly corresponds to the decline of Mycaenae.
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Offline Retrospectator

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2006, 07:45:23 am »
2000 Roman coins discovered near Carmarthen, Wales:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/5089504.stm
I am something of an Inglese Italianato.

Offline PLINIUS

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Offline *Alex

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2006, 12:09:37 pm »
Story and picture in case the link goes down.

Alex.

  A unique ancient statue of the goddess Artemis, considered one of the most exquisite artifacts found in the Thessaly province of central Greece, was unearthed by archaeologists at the site of an ancient theater near the modern city of Larissa, where restoration works are underway.
 The 80cm-tall fragment of the statue -- only the torso was found -- depicts Artemis, in Greek mythology the virgin goddess of the hunt and the moon, the daughter of Zeus and Leto and the twin sister of Apollo. The artifact is tentatively dated back to the mid 1st Century BC. Athanassios Tzafalias, the head of the search team in Larissa said the original statue measured more than 1,60m and he held out hopes of finding other parts of the statue as the dig goes on.





Offline Numerianus

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #14 on: August 05, 2006, 04:58:17 am »
Theseus ring is authentic
A gold ring dating from the 15th century BC which was allegedly found near the Acropolis during building work some 60 years ago is a genuine artifact, Greece’s Central Archaeological Council (KAS) said yesterday.

Experts spent six months studying the signet ring, which weighs some 20 grams, amid fears that it was a fake. The artifact has become known as the “Theseus ring” as it has an engraving of a leaping bull, recalling the myth of Theseus and the Minotaur.

The Culture Ministry confirmed yesterday that the majority of experts thought the ring was genuine and, as a result, its owner will be paid 75,000 euros so that the ancient piece of jewelry can be put on display at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.

The owner of the ring said it was discovered by her father-in-law but he kept it hidden until his death.
 
 
http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100014_03/08/2006_72807

Offline Numerianus

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2006, 03:23:51 pm »

Offline irish

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #16 on: August 25, 2006, 01:11:52 pm »
Detritus, detritus, detritus...ad infinitum...

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #17 on: August 30, 2006, 12:03:06 pm »
Ancient gold coins found in Kyrgyz mountain lake
 16:34 30/ 08/ 2006
   
 
BISHKEK, August 30 (RIA Novosti) - Possibly the world's most ancient gold coin has been discovered in a high mountain lake in Kyrgyzstan, the chief of an archeological expedition said Wednesday.
Academic Vladimir Ploskikh said an expedition from the Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University found a 70-gram octagonal gold artifact on the northern side of Lake Issuk-Kul.
"This is probably the earliest form of metal money found in Central Asia, and may have served as an archetype for later gold coins," he said. "If this [hypothesis] is confirmed, the find will have a unique worldwide historical and cultural significance as a prototype for gold money."
The archeologists also recovered from the lake bronze daggers, sickles and hatchets, as well as household implements and jewelry dating back to approximately 1,000 BC.
Ploskikh said the finds could mark a "new page in history."

Link: http://en.rian.ru/world/20060830/53329092.html

Sadly no pic available

Bohemond  ;)

Offline Robert_Brenchley

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #18 on: August 30, 2006, 04:08:13 pm »
It claims that the find is 'possibly the world's most ancient gold coin' but there's no date given, which you'd surely expect even in a popular article. Then what makes it a coin, rather than some other form of artefact?
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Offline TLP

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #19 on: September 18, 2006, 05:25:38 pm »
For day by day news I found Archaeology.org....

(also a good magazine)

http://www.archaeology.org/online/news/index.html

azelismia

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #20 on: October 08, 2006, 12:43:40 am »
http://www.archaeologica.org/NewsPage.htm

this is the page I follow daily. It seems to be a bit more up to date than the archaeology magazine site.

Offline Retrospectator

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #21 on: October 10, 2006, 11:32:40 am »
I am something of an Inglese Italianato.

Offline awl

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Bohemond

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #23 on: November 14, 2006, 01:36:04 pm »
AMSTERDAM, Netherlands - Dutch archeologists have discovered an estimated 200 silver Roman coins, several jewels, an armband and a ring hidden in a clay pot, the city overseeing the dig said Monday.
 
The city of Cuijk, near the Maas river, 80 miles southeast of Amsterdam, said archeologists found the cache while excavating in an area where new housing is to be built.
So far, most of the treasure in the pot has only been examined with x-rays.
The first coin to be removed and cleaned bears the emblem of the eccentric Roman emperor Elagabalus, who reigned from 218-222 A.D., the city said.
"During the uncovering of the pot, it became apparent that it was placed precisely at the spot where a bolt of lighting struck," a statement by the city said. "Further study will have to determine whether ... the pot could have been buried as an offering, or if the inhabitants by chance had left these valuables hidden in this spot for fear of theft."
The area, known as "De Nielt," shows signs of Stone Age settlements. Romans first arrived in the area under Julius Caesar around 53 B.C., but the Netherlands south of the Rhine river wasn't firmly under Roman control until nearly a century later.
The people who lived there would likely have belonged to the Dutch tribe known as the Batavians. By the end of the third century A.D., De Nielt was colonized by German tribes from outside the empire — or at least parts of the settlement adopted the German building style.
The area fell into disuse, was inhabited again briefly in the early Middle Ages, and was again abandoned.
The company leading the dig, Becker & Van de Graaf, said its field excavation of the Roman-era settlement was complete, and it expects the remaining work will take about three months

[BROKEN LINK REMOVE BY ADMIN]

Bohemond  ;)

Offline Jochen

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Re: Archaeological News
« Reply #24 on: December 02, 2006, 08:57:47 am »
Hi Jim!

Your article is about the Antikythera mechanism. We have a long thread about that. Please take a look at https://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=22906.0

best regards

 

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