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Author Topic: pottery  (Read 146 times)

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Offline Vladimir B2

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pottery
« on: November 21, 2021, 01:50:08 pm »
greek its a illyrian field it seems to have been painted

Offline otlichnik

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Re: pottery
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2021, 05:44:56 pm »
You may have more luck with other photos - e.g. inside.  But we don't have many pottery experts here.

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Offline Virgil H

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Re: pottery
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2021, 02:01:56 am »
We definitely need more pictures of all angles, bottom, inside, etc. The Greeks went through various phases with pottery styles over a period of centuries and there was a lot of overlap. There was proto-geometric, geometric, black figure, and red figure, roughly in that order. Just because this one you have posted has black predominantly on what we can see doesn't tell us for sure what style it might be. I am not a Greek pottery expert but have studied it some as I at one time was trying to make pottery in the Greek styles. It may be of interest that the potters and pottery painters were usually separate people, at least when the designs became more complicated. The workshops had both, with potters making the items, the painters decorating them, and other workers working the kilns. I will say that what you posted looks Greek.

Virgil

Offline Vladimir B2

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Re: pottery
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2021, 09:34:39 am »
here im not home so i hope this will help thanks

Offline otlichnik

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Re: pottery
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2021, 05:02:03 pm »
I would start looking under Greek Red Figure Lekythos.

Not certain, but my initial guess is it is the bottom of one of those.

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Offline Vladimir B2

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Re: pottery
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2021, 09:16:11 am »
thanks sir

Offline Virgil H

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Re: pottery
« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2021, 03:16:42 pm »
I am not sure that I will be very helpful, but I grabbed my Athenian Vase Construction: A Potter's Analysis by Toby Schreiber book. I also ran a couple Internet searches. My comments reflect this and what I know about pottery in general.

-the foot of this example is a key to identification. Various pottery items have different types of feet or, in some cases, no feet at all. This item is not large like a typical amphora, but it strikes me as a storage vessel rather than a polished serving piece, although it could be a cup (but see next item). This foot looks like an echinus foot to me, that is a guess from the pictures. The following I have seen with feet like these: Some amphora, some hydria, Deianeira-type Lekythos, Sixth century Lekythos, Oinochoe Shape 10 (maybe).

-The interior looks rough. That could be because of earthen encrustations or it may have been made that way. If it was made rough, it indicates a storage vessel probably with a rather small opening. Finishing these smoothly, especialy inside, was not as important as for a nice serving dish like a kylix.

-Finally, the thing that most puzzles me is the flat side. Pure conjecture on my part, but I wonder if it was made to hang on a wall or something. Usually, or always, pottery would not become flattened like this after it had been fired and completed. It would rather break at that point. I have not found any vessels with flat sides, but that doesn't mean there aren't any. We also don't know what the item looks like all the way to the top.

I am not an expert, but have done some study, so I went ahead and posted this in hopes it might be helpful in some way.

Regards,
Virgil

Offline Vladimir B2

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Re: pottery
« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2021, 10:43:12 am »
any opinion is helpful thanks virgil

Offline Ron C2

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Re: pottery
« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2021, 11:23:45 am »
Virgil, I don't think there is a flat side.  I think a crescent-shaped break gives the illusion that one side was flat in the photos shot from above the vessel.  I believe the entire vessel to be round in circumference.
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Offline Virgil H

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Re: pottery
« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2021, 06:00:57 pm »
Ron,
Thanks for that comment, you are probably correct and I was seeing it as flat. If it is actually round, that makes things easier. Certainly the rest of the pictures look round.

Regards,
Virgil

 

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