Classical Numismatics Discussion
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1
Roman Coins / Re: RIC VII helmeted bust types
« Last post by Heliodromus on Today at 09:25:06 am »
Quote
The tassels noticed hanging at the back of the helmet need certainly not be of a laureate crown as is shown by the last coin from rome, where the crest itself ends in two strands of cloth(?)

Yes, although obviously tassels can't be explained as being part of a crest unless there is a crest.
2
Roman Coins / Re: RIC VII helmeted bust types
« Last post by Frans Diederik on Today at 09:19:18 am »
Just some helmets from Arles, both normal with crest and high-crested. The tassels noticed hanging at the back of the helmet need certainly not be of a laureate crown as is shown by the last coin from rome, where the crest itself ends in two strands of cloth(?)

Frans
3
Roman Coins / Re: Hadrian Sestertius Roma 130-38 AD Diana
« Last post by Frans Diederik on Today at 08:56:14 am »
Nice find, Eric!

Frans
4
Roman Coins / Re: Constantine I. not in RIC
« Last post by Frans Diederik on Today at 08:55:04 am »
What we should not forget is the tradition in Gaul and in Germania of imitating coins in a lightweight version. This tradition already commenced at the end of Postumus' reign and I think there are more imitative issues of Tetricus and Victorinus than official ones. So obviously there was a local demand of very lightweight coins in the region. There are imitative issues from Trier (or thereabouts) all during Constantine's reign and thereafter. A mint like Trier simply provided in the local demand.

Frans
5
Oil Lamps / Re: Roman period ?
« Last post by Mario T on Today at 08:52:58 am »
Many thanks for the reply and  the links (I hope that the lamp it is authentic as it has been viewed and purchased by a renowned auction house)
6
Roman Coins / Re: Constantine I. not in RIC
« Last post by Heliodromus on Today at 07:48:37 am »
Quote
I could propose another theory.

Constantine had the "SAPIENT PRINCIP" published after defeating of Maxentius.
He traveled back to Trier via Rome. And threw out his coins in both cities as a sign of victory.

His first stop after Rome was Milan, to meet with Licinius, and he wasn't in Arles (solidus most likely struck while he was there) until later in the year.

Quote
At the same time, Licinius defeated the common enemy Maximinus Daia.
Wouldn't it be possible for him, to get the "SAPIENTIA PRINCIPIS" variant after defeating Maxentius Daia?!
As a sign of victory.

Licinius didn't issue any coins celebrating his victory over Maximinus, so it would be extremely odd if Constantine did it on his behalf instead !

Finally, the SAPIENTIA and PROVIDENTISSIMI claims hardly seem appropriate to celebrate an occasion when Licinius was caught with his pants down, unless we suppose Constantine was making a mockery of his new brother-in-law !  ;)
7
As suggested, I would first weigh the coin with another scale. The big auction outfits rarely mis-describe their coins.

If you know the house, auction and lot number, look up the catalogue and check their description to see if matches the actual coin.
8
A wonderful collection of British and related coins. 

I really like your virtual tray.  Don't worry about the first two holes.  There are only 3 known coins of Beorhtric and they are all in museums.  None in private hands.  Also, Aethelbald did not issue any coins in his name. 

Your Anglo-Viking coin in the name of "Eltangerht" is a tremendous rarity, and I really like your Edward the Martyr penny, among others of course.
9
A bo to jest rzadki beznumerkowy medalion (podwójny solidus). Gnecchi też go nie zna. Gdybym robił Not in RIC X, z pewnością odnotowałbym go na honorowym miejscu.
Tak myślałem :-) Kto wie, może w roku 2134 ktoś znajdzie egzemplarz monety wymyślonej przez panią Herrin?
10
Roman Coins / Re: Constantine I. not in RIC
« Last post by Laurentius on Today at 04:58:32 am »
Quote
Maybe the question should be reformulated: why not?

Till First Civil War all coins in Rome are minted for Constantine and Licinius who is recognized as a legitimate ruler.

Ok, this argument is a basic requirement for the release of the part-pieces. Or what you can call these pieces.
There are many names for. Zschucke divides these into two categories, for example. Divided into 2 weight classes.
The larger types have a diameter of approx. 20-15mm and a weight of 3.0-1.5g.
The smaller types have a diameter of 15-10mm and a weight of 1.5-1.0g.
In both categories, the coins that were minted earlier are usually also the larger ones.
He describes the larger pieces as "Show-Denarii" and the smaller ones as "Show-Quinarii."
Bastien refers to the immediately preceding pieces from the Lugdunum mint by the way.

@ Heliodromus

The Edict of Milan would of course also be a good reason for issuing these ones.
What could fit better, than a coin with the same message on it.
At this point in time, Constantine and Licinius were really close friends, including the family.
Like brothers. Unfortunately, they got injured later.

I could propose another theory.

Constantine had the "SAPIENT PRINCIP" published after defeating of Maxentius.
He traveled back to Trier via Rome. And threw out his coins in both cities as a sign of victory.

At the same time, Licinius defeated the common enemy Maximinus Daia.
Wouldn't it be possible for him, to get the "SAPIENTIA PRINCIPIS" variant after defeating Maxentius Daia?!
As a sign of victory.

best regards
Ralph


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