Maps of the Ancient World
  Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And GEOGRAPHY Of Coins!!! Use Our Maps To Learn The Geography Of The Ancient World Locate The Boundaries Of Ancient Kingdoms And Empires See The Expansion Of Rising Rome And Its Division, Fade, And Fall Find The Sites Of The Ancient Cities And Mints That Struck Your Coins Our Maps Are Part Of Forum's Effort To Share The Joy Of Ancient Coin Collecting We Hope These Maps Make Your Ancient Coins More Fun For You!!! Please Visit Our Shop And Find A Coin You Love Today!!!

Maps Home | Add a Map | Last Added | Last Comments | Favorite Maps | Search Maps
Home > Chronological > Roman

Map - The Battle of Cannae 215 BC
The Romans, hoping to gain success through sheer strength and weight of numbers, raised a new army of unprecedented size, estimated by some to be as large as 100,000 men, but more likely around 50-80,000. Resolved to confront Hannibal, they marched southward to Apulia. They eventually found Hannibal on the left bank of the Aufidus River, and encamped six miles (10 km) away. On this occasion, the two armies were combined into one, the consuls having to alternate their command on a daily basis. Varro, who was in command on the first day, was a man of reckless and hubristic nature, and was determined to defeat Hannibal. Hannibal capitalized on the eagerness of Varro and drew him into a trap by using an envelopment tactic, which eliminated the Roman numerical advantage by shrinking the combat area. Hannibal drew up his least reliable infantry in a semicircle in the center with the wings composed of the Gallic and Numidian horse. The Roman legions forced their way through Hannibal's weak center, but the Libyan mercenaries on the wings, swung around by the movement, menaced their flanks. The onslaught of Hannibal's cavalry was irresistible, and Maharbal, Hannibal's chief cavalry commander, who led the mobile Numidian cavalry on the right, shattered the Roman cavalry opposing them. Hannibal's Iberian and Gallic heavy cavalry, led by Hanno on the left, defeated the Roman heavy cavalry, and then both the Carthaginian heavy cavalry and the Numidians attacked the legions from behind. As a result, the Roman army was hemmed in with no means of escape. Due to these brilliant tactics, Hannibal, with much inferior numbers, managed to surround and destroy all but a small remnant of his enemy. Depending upon the source, it is estimated that 50,000-70,000 Romans were killed or captured. Among the dead were the Roman Consul Lucius Aemilius Paullus, as well as two consuls for the preceding year, two quaestors, twenty-nine out of the forty-eight military tribunes and an additional eighty senators (at a time when the Roman Senate comprised no more than 300 men, this constituted 25%Ė30% of the governing body). This makes the battle one of the most catastrophic defeats in the history of Ancient Rome, and one of the bloodiest battles in all of human history (in terms of the number of lives lost within a single day). After Cannae, the Romans were very hesitant to confront Hannibal in pitched battle, preferring instead to weaken him by attrition, relying on their advantages of interior lines, supply, and manpower. As a result, Hannibal fought no more major battles in Italy for the rest of the war.
asia_minor_roman_power~0.jpg Battle_cannae_destruction~0.gif Battle_of_lake_trasimene~1.gif
Picture information
Filename:
Battle_cannae_destruction~0.gif
Atlas name:
Source:
Author, Date printed:
Frank Martini. Cartographer, Department of History, United States Military Academy
Permission granted by:
Public domain - work prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that personís official duties under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code.
Authorized use:
Public domain - work prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that personís official duties under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code.
File Size:
22 KB
Date added:
Dec 11, 2013
Dimensions:
737 x 567 pixels
Displayed:
663 times
URL:
Favorite Maps:
All coins are guaranteed for eternity