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Henry Clay Lindgren

The Lindgren Collection of Roman Provincial Coins is published in three volumes.  Not part of the SNG series, the descriptions are spartan, it is a general work, and it publishes only single collection; but the three Lindgren books cover so many types and are so useful that Lindgren has become a standard reference.  All of the volumes have excellent indexing and coins are easy to find quickly.  At present they are among the best, affordable, catalogues of Roman provincial coins in the areas covered.  Some areas have been surpassed since more recent publications have been issued (e.g. Marcianopolis Ė which is actually quite light in these volumes)  but there are few other publications which give so much detail over such a wide area.

Lindgren I

Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coinage of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).

Contents
5 pages of contents
2 pages of forward
3 pages of abbreviations
186 pages of coin descriptions (2628 coins  + 46 pages of addendum with about 12 coins per page).  Total = 3289 coins
1 page errata
5 pages of geography index
5 pages of rulers
14 pages of general index
135 pages of plates

Descriptions consist of;
Obverse description (and any letters)
Reverse description (and any letters)
Weight
Relevant other references (few and far between)

The book is softbound and is reasonably well put together though my copy has one of the last pages coming loose.  It is not quite A4 format being about an inch short.  Again I am not a fan of having all the descriptions at the start with all the plates at the end.

It covers the regions of Asia Minor as well as examples from Seleucia and Pieria, Phoenicia, Decapolis, Samaria, Judea, Arabia and Mesopotamia.   There is no one area which gets an exhaustive coverage by any means but there are enough examples there to cover a lot of coins.

The photos in the plates are serviceable.  Some of the actual coin examples were not that good to start with and some of the photos are a bit dark but overall there would be very few that you could not use as a guide or reference point.

Lindgren II

Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).

Contents
1 page Preface
2 pages of abbreviations
3 pages of geography index
1 page of rulers
8 pages of general index
89 pages of coin descriptions with corresponding plates (1,840 coins)

The book is hardback and is well put together in A4 format.  Thankfully in this volume the plates are on the opposite page from the descriptions.

Descriptions consist of;
Obverse description (and any letters)
Reverse description (and any letters)
General date
Size
Weight
Relevant other references (usually one per coin)


Again it the the volume of material here which makes the book useful.  This book is also still a valuable reference for Roman Provincial coins from these areas though the book does contain many Greek coins as well.  A very rough estimate would say, 25% provincials.  This volume covers Spain, Italy, Sicily, Samartia, Moesia Inferior, Moesia Superior, Thrace, Macedon, Thessaly, Illyricum and the main areas of Greece and surrounding Islands.

The photos in the plates are again serviceable being of similar quality to the first volume (maybe slightly worse) but still largely usable.  There is probably a higher percentage of the coins in this part of the collection which are of poor quality Ė leading to poor photos but even that would probably be less than 5%.

Lindgren III

Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (Quarryville, 1993).

Contents
2 pages Preface
3 pages of abbreviations
3 pages of geography index
2 pages of rulers
6 pages of general index
102 pages of coin descriptions with corresponding plates (1681 coins plus about another 200 in the addendum)
3 pages of errata

The book is hardback and is well put together in A4 format.  Again the better format of  plates and descriptions on the opposite page is followed

Descriptions consist of;
Obverse description (and any letters)
Reverse description (and any letters)
General date
Weight
Relevant other references (usually two per coin)

I donít know why the size of the coin was not included in the descriptions as in the case of volume two.  It is possible to determine it from the illustrations but this may not be entirely accurate but a mil. here or there probably wonít matter too much.

This book covers coins acquired by Mr Lindgren since the first two volumes were published so it adds additional examples to the areas set by the previous two volumes, though it is more similar to the first volume in that most of the coins are from Asia Minor.

The photos in the plates are again serviceable being of similar quality to the first volume. Again about 5% of photos are difficult to use due to the worn nature of the coin.