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SPES PVBLICA

Latin: The hope of the public.


DICTIONARY OF ROMAN COINS








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    SPES PVBLICA.----Hope standing.----Silver of Diadumenianus.----Hope, as goddess of youth (says Vaillant), is represented on the coins of Caesars, as if for the purpose of exciting the feeling of Good Hope (Bonae Spei) in the breasts of these young princes; each heir of an emperor being regarded, like Marcellus by Virgil, Magna Spes altera Romae. So Diadumenianus is made, by Lampridius, to say to the soldiery of his father, Macrinus, Ego autem elaborabo, ne desim nomini Antoniorum.

    SPES PVBLICA.----Hope advancing towards three military figures, extends in her right

 
hand towards the foremost and principal, who may be considered as the emperor himself, a figure of Victory. The obverse exhibits the laureate head and bust of Severus Alexander in armour; in his left hand he holds a baton; in his right, a figure of Victory bearing a trophy. Brass medallion in the cabinet of Mr. Roach Smith.
    SPES PVBLICA.----A serpent, on which stands the labarum, inscribed with the monogram of Christ. Small brass of Constantine.
    SPES PUBLICA.----A figure in military garb stands with right hand raised, opposite to which stands a female with flower in right hand, &c.; a star between them.----On a rare and elegant silver coin of Saloninus. There we see Hope, the usual companion of the Caesars, presenting herself to Saloninus, who is clothed as a soldier to denote his having just embarked in a war with the incursive barbarians. The goddess holds out a flower to the young prince, as if to assure him of victory.

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