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Index Of All Titles


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Ancient Coin Collecting 101
Ancient Coins & Modern Fakes
Ancient Counterfeits
Ancient Glass
Ancient Weapons
Ancient Wages and Prices
Ancient Weights and Scales
Anonymous Folles
Anonymous Follis
Anonymous Class A Folles
Armenian Numismatics Page
Brockage
Byzantine
A Cabinet of Greek Coins
A Case of Counterfeits
Clashed Dies
Coins of Pontius Pilate
Conditions of Manufacture
Denomination
Dictionary of Roman Coins
Doug Smith's Ancient Coins
Edict on Prices
ERIC
Facing Portrait of Augustus
Fel Temp Reparatio
Fertility Pregnancy and Childbirth
Fibula
Flavian
Fourree
Friend or Foe
Greek Alphabet
Greek Dates
Greek Mythology Link
Hellenistic Names & their Meanings
Helvetica's ID Help Page
Historia Numorum
Illustrated Ancient Coin Glossary
Latin Plurals
Latin Pronunciation
Library of Ancient Coinage
Life in Ancient Rome
Maps of the Ancient World
Military Belts
Mint Marks
Monogram
Nabataean Numerals
Not in RIC
Numismatic Bulgarian
Numismatic Excellence Award
Numismatic French
Numismatic German
Numismatic Italian
Numismatic Spanish
Parthian Coins
Patina
Paleo-Hebrew Alphabet
Phoenician Alphabet
Pi-Style Athens Tetradrachms
Roman Coin Attribution 101
Roman Names
romancoin.info
Scarabs
Serrated
Siglos
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum
Syracusian Folles
The Evolving Ancient Coin Market
The Sign that Changed the World
The Temple Tax Hoard
Travels of Paul
Tribute Penny
Tribute Penny Debate Continued (2015)
Tribute Penny Debate Revisited (2006)
Tyrian Shekels
What I Like About Ancient Coins
Widow's Mite

Mount Argaios (Latin: Argaeus)

Mount Erciyes, called Argaeus by the ancient Romans, is a massive stratovolcano located 25 km to the south of Kayseri in Turkey. Erciyes is the highest mountain in central Anatolia, with its summit reaching 3,916 metres (12,848 ft). It is considered to be the highest peak of the Anti-Taurus mountain range, a northeastern extension of the Taurus Mountains to the south, and belongs to the Alpide belt in Eurasia. The volcano is heavily eroded, but may have erupted as recently as 253 BC, as may be depicted on Roman era coins. Strabo wrote that the summit was never free from snow and that those few who ascended it reported seeing both the Black Sea to the north and the Mediterranean Sea to the south in days with a clear skyThe first documented successful climb was performed by William John Hamilton in 1837. There are, however, some historic writings and symbols on the rocks at the summit, indicating earlier human presence there. There are two caves near the summit tower, of which at least one must have been expanded by humans. It is supposed that monks in historic times have visited the summit several times. There are winter sports facilities on the mountain, usually accessed from nearby Kayseri.