VICTORIOSO SEMPER

Probus, in military dress, standing between four captives; below, a wreath. Obv. IMP. PROBVS P. F. AVG. Bust of Probus to l., laureate, sometimes with Ægis. N. (500 frcs.)


VICTORIOSO SEMPER
Turreted female to 1., presenting a wreath to Constantine l., who is crowned by Victory; in the exergue SMT. (Signata Moneta Thessaloicae.) Obv CONSTANTINVS P. F. AVG. Bust of Constantine I., facing with nimbus, raising a hand and holding a globe. AV. (Autrefois, Cab. Des médailles, Paris, 400 frcs.) Several other medallions and coins of Constantine I., or his wife Fausta and of his sons Crispus, Constantine II. and Constantius II. Give representations of the nimbus. After Constantine’s death his sons continued to strike coins representing him with this symbol, and they themselves very soon adopted it, a custom continued under their successors, and especially on the gold medallions of Valens preserved at Vienna (Madden, Christian Emblems on the coins of Constantine I, &c., in the Num. Chon. N.S. 1878, vol xviii, pp 9-15). The late Cavedoni thought that the numbus was assumed by Constantine I. in imitation of the “face of Moses which shone” (Ex xxxiv., 29, cf. 2 Cor. Iii., 7) to whom he is comparedby Eusebins (Vit. Const. I. c. 12), but whether this be the case or not, some of the heads of the Roman Emperors earlier than the time of Constantine are decorated with this symbol, notably Claudius, Trajan and Antoninus Pius (Æ. l. with leg. COS III, see Nimbus), so that it would be difficult to affirm that the presence of the nimbus gives direct proof of the Christianity of Constantine, though it was doubtless adopted in the sense (Madden op. cit.)


View whole page from the |Dictionary Of Roman Coins|