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Search results - "statue"
PHILIP1-2.jpg
47 viewsPhilip I - Sestertius - 249 AD - Mint of Rome.
Ob.: IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG; laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev.: SAECVLVM NOVVM S C; Octastyle temple, statue of Rome within
gs. 16,4 mm. 28,2
Cohen 201
Maxentius
DenLMarcioFilippobis.jpg
20 viewsAR Denarius - L. MARCIVS PHILIPPVS - 113-112 BC. - Gens Μarcia - Mint of Rome
Obv.: Head of Philip V right wearing Macedonian helmet; ROMA monogram and simpulum behind, Φ forward
Rev.: Equestrian statue right, flower below horse; L. PHILIPPVS in a tablet. XVI (in monogram) in ex.
Gs. 3,6 mm. 18,3
Crawford 293/1; Sear RCV 170
Maxentius
Statues-9.JPG
27 viewsJerome Holderman
Statues-8.JPG
27 viewsJerome Holderman
Statues-7.JPG
24 viewsJerome Holderman
Statues-6.JPG
25 views1 commentsJerome Holderman
Statues-4.JPG
28 viewsJerome Holderman
Statues-3.JPG
28 viewsJerome Holderman
Statues-2.JPG
22 viewsJerome Holderman
Statues-1.JPG
25 viewsJerome Holderman
philip_I_temple_new.jpg
58 viewsPHILIP I. 244-249 AD. AR Antoninianus, Rome, struck 248 AD. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / Statue standing half-left within hexastyle temple. RIC IV 25b; RSC 198.
Ex. S. Beagle collection; Ex. Dorchester Hoard

This is a fairly common coin but difficult to find with both the obverse and reverse of good quality as well as having such good metal quality.
1 commentspaul1888
Roma_front_ionic_column_back_B_.jpg
51 viewsC. Augurinus, ca 135 B.C., Denarius.
Obverse: Roam right, X beneath chin.
Reverse: Ionic column surmounted by statue flanked by togate and grain ears.
EX: Laurion Numismatics Winter 1992 fixed price list - the first coin I purchased from a fixed price list.
3 commentspaul1888
001.JPG
25 viewsGreek statuette
Hollow moulded
c. 3rd-4th cent BC
mauseus
Trajan.jpg
67 viewsTrajan AR Denarius. Rome, AD 113-114. IMP TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate and draped bust right / COS VI P P SPQR, Trajan's column surmounted by statue of the emperor; at base, two eagles. RIC 307; BMCRE 522; RSC 115. 3.53g, 20mm, 6h.
Of all of the truly monumental buildings and commemorative structures which the emperor Trajan built, only one, the Columna Traiani, has survived in a reasonable state of completeness. Indeed, it appears almost identical in person as it does on coins, except that the statue of Trajan that originally surmounted it was replaced in 1588 with a statue of St. Paul. When completed, the column occupied a prominent place between two libraries, the Basilica Ulpia and the Temple of Trajan and Plotina. The column was massive: it was over 12 feet in diameter at its base, and rose to a height of nearly 130 feet. Its core was comprised of 34 blocks of Carrara white marble that were made hollow so as to accommodate a circular staircase of 185 steps. The most remarkable feature of the column, however, was its ornamentation, for the friezes on its exterior are some of the most inspiring works of art ever produced. Monumental in scope and execution, they record Trajan’s two Dacian campaigns, from 101-3 and 104-6. All told, there are more than 2,500 individually sculpted figures distributed among more than 150 scenes. The emperor himself is represented no less than fifty times – not a surprise considering his penchant for commemorative architecture and his pride in having added Dacia to the provinces of the empire. “ Source: NAC”

Ex Michael Kelly Collection of Roman Silver Coins
4 commentspaul1888
unknown~0.jpg
11 viewsPhrygia, Apameia Æ20. 133-148 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Cult statue of Artemis Anaïtis facing; AΠAMEΩN downwards to right, AΠOΛΛ downwards to left. SNG Copenhagen -, cf. BMC 63 (unlisted magistrate). 7.78g, 20mm, 12h.Pericles J2
rjb_2009_12_03.jpg
9820 viewsTrajan 98-117 AD
AR didrachm
Caesarea in Cappadocia
Laureate draped bust right
Statue on top of Mount Argaeus
Sydenham 157
mauseus
caes Tera.bmp
Trajan. 98-117 CE.272 views Caesarea Maritima. Trajan. 98-117 CE. Æ 32mm
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder / Statue of the Tyche of Caesarea within semi-circular tetrastyle shrine with Corinthian columns; half figure of river-god to right of statue, altar with horns
Ros-19
2 commentsamibosam
Ephesus_cult_statue_tessera.JPG
35 viewsIONIA, Ephesos
PB Tessera (17mm, 2.98 g, 7 h)
Diana Ephesia, uncertain legend around
Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm frond
Gülbay & Kireç -
Ardatirion
Lanz21.JPG
40 viewsIONIA, Ephesos
PB Tessera (19mm, 4.90 g)
Togate figure standing left, sacrificing at altar before tholos containing cult statue
Blank
Gülbay & Kireç -; Hirsch 279, lot 4922

The engraver of this die betrays no small skill in his execution of the obverse type; the circular shrine is shown in perspective, with the columns arranged so as to suggest distance while still leaving room for the statue to be visible. I was surprised to find that another specimen of this type from different, though equally elegant dies had recently sold in a Hirsch auction, there misidentified as a “bleiplombe,” or lead seal.
1 commentsArdatirion
faustina_ii_ankyra_artemis.jpg
(0145) FAUSTINA II16 views147 - 175 AD
Struck ca 161-175 AD
AE 17.5 mm; 4.45 g
O: Draped bust of Faustina Jr. to right
R: Cult Statue of Artemis Ephesia, stag on either side
Phrygia, Ancyra (Ankyra); Cop 142
laney
marcus_aurel_miletos_res_d.jpg
(0161) MARCUS AURELIUS25 views161-180 AD
AE 27 mm, 10.70 g
O: M AVP AV KAI ANTΩNЄINOC, laureate head right
R: ЄPI ΘЄMICTOKΛЄOU MIΛHCIΩN NЄOKOPΩN, archaic cult statue of Apollo Didymaios standing left, holding stag in right hand and bow in arrow in left
Miletos; Mionnet 3, 169f. 788
laney
temple_10_res.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS26 views218 - 222 AD
AE 24 mm; 11.06 g
O: Laureate, draped bust of Elagabalus right.
R: Statue of Marsyas standing right, holding wine skin over shoulder and extending arm, within arched gateway
Phoenicia, Berytus
laney
elagab_marsyas_2_res.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS23 views218 - 222 AD
AE 24 mm; 10.3 g
O: Laureate, draped bust of Elagabalus right.
R: Statue of Marsyas standing right, holding wine skin over shoulder and extending arm, within arched gateway
Phoenicia, Berytus
laney
MAXIMINUS_NIKE_THESSALONIKA_RES.jpg
(0235) MAXIMINUS I THRAX40 views235 - 238 AD
AE 25 mm 7.97 g
O: AVGIOVOV- -MAXIMEINOC Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R: Nike standing left, holding palm branch and statue of Kabeiros.
Macedonia, Thessalonika; Varbanov 4502

laney
titus_spes_blk_res.jpg
(11) TITUS29 views79-81 AD
AE Sestertius 34 mm, 21.85 g
O: laureate head right
R: S-C, Greek archaic statue of Spes (Elpis) walking left
Cohen 221.
laney
volusianpisidia.jpg
*Pisidia, Antioch. Volusian AE22. Roma with captive34 viewsRoma w/ helmet seated r., statue in each hand : in front of her a captive kneeling, imploring ; ANTIOCHI OCL A S R
SNG France 3, 1307 ; Krzyzanowska, VI/17.
ancientone
367Hadrian_RIC14.jpg
0002 Mule Hadrian Denarius Roma 117 AD Concordia73 viewsReference.
RIC-; C. -;

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA
Laureate, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front

Rev. DIVI NER NEP PM TRP COS CONCORD in exergue.
Concordia seated left, patera in right hand, resting left elbow on statue of Spes, cornucopiae under chair

3.19 gr
20 mm
6h

Note.
Obv. like RIC 9c or BMC 17
Rev. like RIC 14 or BMC 33
4 commentsokidoki
42Hadrian__RIC4c.jpg
0015 Hadrian Denarius Roma 117 AD Concordia41 viewsReference
Strack 3; RIC III, 15; C.250; RIC II, 4

Bust B1 with Balteus strap

Obv: IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIAN OPT AVG GER DAC.
Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, balteus strap over shoulder and across chest.

Rev: PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AVG F P M TR P COS P P in exergue CONCORD.
Concordia seated left, patera in right hand, resting left elbow on statue of Spes standing on cippus, cornucopiae under chair.

3.0 gr.
18 mm
12h
okidoki
0028.jpg
0028 - Denarius Antoninus Pius 158-9 AC19 viewsObv/ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P XXII, Antoninus Pius laureate head r.
Rev/TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST, octastyle temple in which are seated statues of Divus Augustus and Livia.

Ag, 17.0mm, 3.30g
Mint: Rome.
RIC III/290a [S] - RSC 804 - BMCRE 939
ex-Pars Coins (vcoins)
dafnis
0049~0.jpg
0049 - Denarius Aemilia 114-3 BC39 viewsObv/ Laureate female bust (Roma?) r., veiled and wearing diadem; before, ROMA; behind, crossed X.
Rev/ Three arches, on which stands equestrian status - horseman wears cuirass and wreath, and holds spear in r. hand; around, MN AEMILIO; between arches, L E P.

Ag, 18.5 mm, 3.85 g
Moneyer: Mn. Aemilius Lepidus
Mint: Rome
RRC 291/1 [dies o/r: 283/354 - BMCRR Italy 590
ex-Jesús Vico, auction 116, lot 3080
1 commentsdafnis
Fontius-Syd-724.jpg
005. Mn. Fonteius, Cf15 viewsDenarius, ca 85-84 BC, Auxiliary Italian mint.
Obverse: MN FONTEI CF / Bust of Vejovis with hair in loose locks; thunderbolt below; AP monogram under chin.
Reverse: Winged Cupid or Genius seated on goat; caps of the Dioscuri above; thyrsus with fillet below; all within a laurel wreath.
3.89 gm., 20 mm.
Syd. #724; RSC #Fonteia 9; Sear #271.

Vejovis was an ancient deity whose early function was forgotten. At his shrine in Rome, his statue portrayed him as a young beardless youth with a goat. By the time this coin was issued, he was identified with Pluto, the god of the underworld. He was probably a god of expiation since a goat was sacrificed to him once a year. We know from other sources that this goat sacrifice was expiatory in nature.
Callimachus
5514.jpg
005d. Agrippina II89 viewsLYDIA, Hypaepa. Agrippina Jr., mother of Nero. Augusta, 50-59 AD. Æ 14mm (2.33 gm). Draped bust of Agrippina right / Cult statue of Artemis. RPC I 2541; SNG Copenhagen -.

Julia Vipsania Agrippina Minor or Agrippina Minor (Latin for "the younger") (November 7, AD 15 – March 59), often called "Agrippinilla" to distinguish her from her mother, was the daughter of Germanicus and Agrippina Major. She was sister of Caligula, granddaughter and great-niece to Tiberius, niece and wife of Claudius, and the mother of Nero. She was born at Oppidum Ubiorum on the Rhine, afterwards named in her honour Colonia Agrippinae (modern Cologne, Germany).

Agrippina was first married to (1st century AD) Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus. From this marriage she gave birth to Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, who would become Roman Emperor Nero. Her husband died in January, 40. While still married, Agrippina participated openly in her brother Caligula's decadent court, where, according to some sources, at his instigation she prostituted herself in a palace. While it was generally agreed that Agrippinilla, as well as her sisters, had ongoing sexual relationships with their brother Caligula, incest was an oft-used criminal accusation against the aristocracy, because it was impossible to refute successfully. As Agrippina and her sister became more problematic for their brother, Caligula sent them into exile for a time, where it is said she was forced to dive for sponges to make a living. In January, 41, Agrippina had a second marriage to the affluent Gaius Sallustius Crispus Passienus. He died between 44 and 47, leaving his estate to Agrippina.

As a widow, Agrippina was courted by the freedman Pallas as a possible marriage match to her own uncle, Emperor Claudius, and became his favourite councillor, even granted the honor of being called Augusta (a title which no other queen had ever received). They were married on New Year's Day of 49, after the death of Claudius's first wife Messalina. Agrippina then proceeded to persuade Claudius to adopt her son, thereby placing Nero in the line of succession to the Imperial throne over Claudius's own son, Brittanicus. A true Imperial politician, Agrippina did not reject murder as a way to win her battles. Many ancient sources credited her with poisoning Claudius in 54 with a plate of poisened mushrooms, hence enabling Nero to quickly take the throne as emperor.

For some time, Agrippina influenced Nero as he was relatively ill-equipped to rule on his own. But Nero eventually felt that she was taking on too much power relative to her position as a woman of Rome. He deprived her of her honours and exiled her from the palace, but that was not enough. Three times Nero tried to poison Agrippina, but she had been raised in the Imperial family and was accustomed to taking antidotes. Nero had a machine built and attached to the roof of her bedroom. The machine was designed to make the ceiling collapse — the plot failed with the machine. According to the historians Tacitus and Suetonius, Nero then plotted her death by sending for her in a boat constructed to collapse, intending to drown Agrippina. However, only some of the crew were in on the plot; their efforts were hampered by the rest of the crew trying to save the ship. As the ship sank, one of her handmaidens thought to save herself by crying that she was Agrippina, thinking they would take special care of her. Instead the maid was instantly beaten to death with oars and chains. The real Agrippina realised what was happening and in the confusion managed to swim away where a passing fisherman picked her up. Terrified that his cover had been blown, Nero instantly sent men to charge her with treason and summarily execute her. Legend states that when the Emperor's soldiers came to kill her, Agrippina pulled back her clothes and ordered them to stab her in the belly that had housed such a monstrous son.

ecoli
6.jpg
006 Gaius Caesar. AE17 3.4gm APAMIA38 viewsobv: GAOIS KAISAR laur. head r.
rev: ROUFOS/MASONIOS/APAMEWN cult statue of artimis
"son of Agrippa and Julia"
hill132
0060.jpg
0060 - Denarius Minucia 134 BC31 viewsObv/Helmeted head of Roma r., behind crossed X.
Rev/TI MINVCI C F on l., RO MA above, AVGVRINI on r.; 2 togate figures, one holding a simpulum, the other a lituus, standing by statue on column.

Ag, 19.0mm, 3.93g
Moneyer: Ti. Minucius C.f. Augurinus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 243/1 [dies o/r: 76/95] - RCV 120 - Syd. 494 - RSC Minucia 9 - Calicó 1026.
ex-Jean Elsen et Fils, auction 95, lot 311 (ex-colln. A.Senden)
dafnis
0067~0.jpg
0067 - Denarius Marcus Aurelius 162 AC9 viewsObv/DIVVS ANTONINVS, head of Antoninus Pius r.
Rev/DIVO PIO, column surmounted by statue of Antoninus.

Ag, 17.9mm, 3.07g
Mint: Rome.
RIC III/439 [C] - BMCRE 67 - RCV 5195 - RSC Antoninus 353a.
dafnis
0068~0.jpg
0068 - Denarius Marcus Aurelius 162 AC13 viewsObv/DIVVS ANTONINVS, head of Antoninus Pius r., draped on l. shoulder.
Rev/DIVO PIO, column surmounted by statue of Anoninus.

Ag, 17.2mm, 2.79g
Mint: Rome.
RIC III/440 [C] - RSC Antoninus 353
dafnis
2100188.jpg
006b. Claudia Aug.37 viewsJUDAEA, Caesaraea Panias. Diva Poppaea and Diva Claudia. Died AD 65 and AD 63, respectively. Æ 20mm (6.00 g, 12h). Struck AD 65-68. Statue of Diva Poppaea seated left within distyle temple / Statue of Diva Claudia standing left within hexastyle temple. RPC I 4846; Meshorer, Caesarea, Pl. 7, H; SNG ANS 858; Hendin 578. Fine, dark green patina under light earthen deposits.

Ex-CNG
ecoli
0072~0.jpg
0072 - Denarius Trajan 112-14 AC24 viewsObv/IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM TR P COS VI PP, laureate bust of Trajan r., togate.
Rev/SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Trajan's column surmounted with statue of the emperor; at base, two eagles.

Ag, 20.2mm, 3.32g
Mint: Rome.
RIC II/292 [C]
ex-Pegasi Numismatics, auction XXIII, lot 477
1 commentsdafnis
242Hadrian__RIC_17.jpg
0079 Hadrian Denarius Roma 117 AD Concordia37 viewsReference.
Strack 26; RIC III, 79; C 251; RIC II 17

Bust A4

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate bare bust with drapery

Rev. P M TR P COS DES II in ex. CONCORD
Concordia seated left, patera in right hand, resting left elbow on statue of Spes standing on cippus, cornucopiae under chair.

2.87 gr
20 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
0092.jpg
0092 - Denarius Antoninus Pius 158-9 AC10 viewsObv/ ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS PIVS PP TR P XXII, laureate head of A.P. r.
Rev/ COS IIII, arched tetrastyle altar; statue inside, holding branch and standard.

Ag, 18.1 mm, 2.84 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC III/285
ex-G.Hirsch Nachfolger, auction 271, lot 2359
dafnis
0101.jpg
0101 - Denarius Marcia 82 AC34 viewsObv/ Laureate head of Apollo r.
Rev/ Marsyas walking l. bearing wine skin on shoulder; behind, statue of Victory on column: before, L CENSOR.

Ag, 17.5 mm, 3.78 g
Moneyer: L. Censorinus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 363/1d [dies o/r: ~197/~228] - Syd. 737 - RSC Marcia 24
ex-M.Iglesias Alvarez, march 2011 (ex - Jesús Vico, auction 125, lot 232)
1 commentsdafnis
139Hadrian__RIC39a.jpg
0108 Hadrian Denarius Roma 118 AD Concordia39 viewsReference.
Strack 33; RIC III, 108; C. 252

Bust A4

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG.
Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder, seen from front.

Rev. P M TR P COS II / in ex CONCORD.
Concordia seated left, patera in right hand, resting left elbow on statue of Spes standing on cippus, cornucopiae under chair.

3.08 gr
20 mm
6h
okidoki
Hadrian_denar1.jpg
012 - Hadrian (117-138 AD), denarius - RIC 39b41 viewsObv: IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate heroic bust right, draped on left shoulder.
Rev: P M TR P COS III and CONCORD in exe, Concordia seated left, holding patera, resting elbow on statue of Spes, cornucopia below throne.
Minted in Rome [119-122 AD?]

This coin has ben donated to Soderakra local historical society (Sweden) as there some years ago was found a denarius of this type in an Iron Age grave at this location. This enables the society to display a coin of the very same type even though the actual grave find is locked up in a central collection.
pierre_p77
0126.jpg
0126 - Denarius Marcia 56 BC104 viewsObv/ Diademed head of Ancus Marcius r.; behind, lituus and below, ANCVS.
Rev/ Equestrian statue standing on aqueduct, behind PHILIPPVS; at horse’s feet, flower. Below, AQVA MAR ligate within the arches of the aqueduct.

Ag, 20.0 mm, 3.37 g
Moneyer: L. Marcius Philippus.
Mint: Roma.
RRC 425/1 [dies o/r: 447/497] - Syd. 919 - Bab. Marcia 28
ex-J.B. González Redondo (denarios.org), jul 2011 (ex–CNG, auction e228, lot 274)
dafnis
Nero_AR-Den_NERO-CAESAR-AVGVSTVS_VESTA_RIC-I-62_p-153_C-335_Rome_65-66-AD_Rare_Q-001_6h_16-16,5mm_3,31g-s.jpg
014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0062, Rome, AR-Denarius, VESTA,100 views014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0062, Rome, AR-Denarius, VESTA,
avers: NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right,
revers: VESTA, hexastyle temple of Vesta with domed roof and statue of Vesta within.
exerg: , diameter: 16-16,5mm, weight: g3,31, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 65-66 A.D., ref: RIC I 0062, p-153, RSC-335, BMC-104,
Q-001
quadrans
16a.jpg
016a Aggrippina jr. AE14 2.1gm26 viewsobv: drp. bust r.
rev: cult statue of Artemis
"mother of Nero, doughter of germanicus,
sister of Caligula, wife of Claudius"
hill132
0180.jpg
0180 - Semis Roman Republic 42-36 BC41 viewsObv/Head of Minerva (?) r.
Rev/Statue standing l. on top of pedestal; (CV)-IN on both sides.

AE, 22.2 mm, 5.60 g
Moneyer: anonymous.
Mint: Carthago Nova.
APRH/151 - CNH/7 [R2]
ex-Ibercoin, auction 16.1, lot 2018
dafnis
19.jpg
019 Galba. AE AS 8.2gm36 viewsobv: SER GALBA IMP AVGVSTVS laur. head r.
rev: QVADRAGNS REMISSAE arch on r. surmounted by two equestrian statues,
to l. three captives, officer behind
1 commentshill132
106Hadrian__RIC118.jpg
0190 Hadrian Denarius Roma 119-23 AD Concordia41 viewsReference.
Strack 61; RIC II 118; BMCRE 258; RSC 255a; RIC III, 191

Bust A4

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate bare bust with drapery

Rev . P M TR P COS III, CONCORD in exergue,
Concordia seated left, resting her left arm on a statuette of Spes and holding a patera with her right hand

19 mm
2.89 gr
6h
okidoki
02_Octavian_RIC_I_266.jpg
02 Octavian RIC I 26633 viewsOctavian. AR Denarius. Italian Mint, possibly Rome. Autumn 30- summer 29 B.C. (3.45g, 19.8mm, 2h). Obv: Bare head right. Rev: IMP CAESAR on architrave of the Roman Senate House (Curia Julia), with porch supported by four short columns, statue of Victory on globe surmounting apex of roof, and statues of standing figures at the extremities of the architrave. CRI 421; RIC I 266; RSC 122.. Ex Andrew McCabe.1 commentsLucas H
569Hadrian_RIC118.jpg
0204 Hadrian Denarius Roma 119-23 AD Concordia28 viewsReference.
Strack 61 var.; RIC II 118; BMCRE 260; RSC 255a; RIC III, 204

Bust A4

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate bare bust with drapery

Rev . P M TR P COS III, CONCORD in exergue,
Concordia seated left, resting her left arm on a statuette of Spes and holding a patera with her right hand, Cornucopiae below.

3.39 gr
20 mm
9h
1 commentsokidoki
716Hadrian_RIC118var.jpg
0205 Hadrian Denarius Roma 119-23 AD Concordia with double cornucopiae19 viewsRIC III, 205 note this coin; Strack 61 var.; RIC II 118; BMCRE 260; RSC 255a.

Bust A4

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate bare bust with drapery

Rev . P M TR P COS III, CONCORD in exergue,
Concordia seated left on throne, holding patera and resting arm on statuette of Spes on globe; double cornucopiae below throne.

2.91 gr
18 mm
6h
okidoki
211Hadrian__RIC131.jpg
0312 Hadrian Denarius 119-22 AD Hadrian with officier and Libertas48 viewsReference.
RIC III, 312; Strack 71; RIC II, 131b; C 911

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG.
Laureate bust with drapery

Bust A2

Rev. P M TR P COS III / LIBERAL AVG (III In Ex.)
Hadrian seated left on writing at desk with pen; i the background stands statue? of Liberalitas holding up coin scoop. Citizen ascends the front steps of the platform, holding out the fold of his toga, while an attendant stands behind Emperor

2.75 gr
18 mm
h
1 commentsokidoki
Hadrian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-TRAIAN-HADRIANVS-AVG_P-M-TR-P-COS-DES-II_CONCORD_RIC-II-17c_119-122-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_18,5-20mm_3,32g-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0017c, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P COS DES II, CONCORD, Concordia seated left,222 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0017c, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P COS DES II, CONCORD, Concordia seated left,
avers:- IMP-CAESAR-TRAIAN-HADRIANVS-AVG, Laureate bust right.
revers:- P-M-TR-P-COS-DES-II, Concordia seated left, holding patera; beneath her chair is a cornucopia, beneath her elbow, a statue of Spes.
exerg: -/-//CONCORD, diameter: 18,5-20mm, weight: 3,32g, axes:6h,
mint: , date: , ref: RIC-II-17c, C-
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Hadrian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-TRAIAN-HADRIANVS-AVG_P-M-TR-P-COS-III_CONCORD_RIC-II-118_119-122-AD_Q-001_axis-7h_17,5-18,5mm_3,20g-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0118, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P COS III, CONCORD, Concordia seated left,182 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0118, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P COS III, CONCORD, Concordia seated left,
avers:-IMP-CAESAR-TRAIAN-HADRIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:-P-M-TR-P-COS-III, Concordia seated left, holding patera left; arm of chair is a statue of Spes.
exerg: -/-//CONCORD, diameter: 17,5-18,5mm, weight: 3,20g, axes: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 119-122 A.D., ref: RIC II 118,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Hadrian_AR-Den_HADRIANVS-AVGVSTVS_COS-III_RIC-II-172_C-328a_125-128-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_17-18mm_3,12g-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0172, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS III, Concordia seated left on throne,76 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0172, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS III, Concordia seated left on throne,
avers:-HADRIANVS-AVGVSTVS, Laureate head right.
revers:-COS-III, Concordia seated left on throne, holding patera & resting left arm on statuette of Spes on column at side of throne.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18mm, weight: 3,12g, axes: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC II 172, C-328a,
Q-001
quadrans
Hadrian_AR-Den_HADRIANVS-AVG-COS-III-P-P_VENERIS-FELICIS_RIC-II-280d-p-371_RSC-1449_134-138-AD_Q-001_5h_19-19,5mm_3,29g-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0280d, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENERIS FELICIS, Venus seated left,183 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0280d, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENERIS FELICIS, Venus seated left,
avers: HADRIANVS-AVG-COS-III-P-P, Laureate head right.
revers: VENERIS-FELICIS, Venus, mantled and diademed, seated left on throne, holding statuette of Cupid, and sceptre.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter:19-19,5mm, weight: 2,29g, axes: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 134-138 A.D., ref: RIC II 280d, p-371, RSC 1449,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
35.jpg
035 Marcus Aurelius. AR Denarius 26 viewsobv: IMP M AVREL ANTONINVS AVG bare headed bust r. drp. on l shoulder, as seen from behind
rev: CONCORD AVG TR P XVI Concordia seated l. holding patera and resting l. arm on statue of spes
hill132
Ant_Pius_DIVVS_ANTONINVS_CONSECRAIO_RIC-438(Marc-Avr)_BMC-60_C-164a_Rome-161-AD_Q-001_6h_16,4-17,7mm_2,57g-s.jpg
035a Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0438 (Marc. Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONSECRAIO, Funeral pyre,95 views035a Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0438 (Marc. Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONSECRAIO, Funeral pyre,
avers:- DIVVS-ANTONINVS, Bare-headed bust right, folds of cloak on front shoulder and wrapped around neck.
revers:- CONSECRAIO, Four tiered funeral pyre, decorated with garlands and statues, door in second tier, facing quadriga on top.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 16,4-17,7mm, weight: 2,57g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: Consecration issue, struck after Pius' death in 161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-(Marcus Aurelius)-438-p-247, C-164a, BMC-60,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Faustina_sen_Ag-Den_DIVA-FAVSTINA_AED-DIV-FAVSTINAE_RIC-III-AP-343_RSC-1_Rome_150-AD_Q-001_11h_17mm_2,95g-s~0.jpg
036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 0343 (A.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, AED DIV FAVSTINAE, Hexastyle temple,84 views036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 0343 (A.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, AED DIV FAVSTINAE, Hexastyle temple,
Wife of Antoninus Pius.
avers:- DIVA-FAVSTINA, Diademed and draped bust right.
revers:- AED-DIV-FAVSTINAE, Front view of temple of six columns on five steps, fencing before. Within is a statue of Faustina. Varying ornaments on temple.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17mm, weight: 2,95g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 150 A.D., ref: RIC-III-343 (Antoninus Pius)p- , RSC-191, BMCRE-306 (Pius),
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
39.jpg
039 Lucilla. AR Denarius 39 viewsobv: LVCILLAE AVG ATONINI AVG F drp. bust r.
rev" CONCORDIA Concordia seated l. holding patera and resting
her elbows on statue of Spes
"wife of L. Verus, doughter of M. Aurelius and Faustina Jr."
1 commentshill132
Lucilla_AR-Den_LVCILLAE-AVG-ANTONINI-AVG-F_CONCORDIA_RIC-III-(M_Aur)-758_RSC-6a_Rome_-AD_Q-001_0h_18-18,5mm_2,68g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0758 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, #1155 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0758 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, #1
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers: LVCILLAE-AVG-ANTONINI-AVG-F, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers: CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, holding patera and resting elbow on statuette of Spes.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18-18,5mm, weight: 2,68g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC-III-758 (Marc.Aur.), p-, RSC-6a.,
Q-001
quadrans
Lucilla_AR-Den_LVCILLAE-AVG-ANTONINI-AVG-F_CONCORDIA_RIC-III-(M_Aur)-758_RSC-6a_Rome_-AD_Q-002_11h_18-18,5mm_3,56g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0758 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, #2153 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0758 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, #2
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers: LVCILLAE-AVG-ANTONINI-AVG-F, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers: CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, holding patera and resting elbow on statuette of Spes.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18-18,5mm, weight: 3,56g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC-III-758 (Marc.Aur.), p-, RSC-6a.,
Q-002
quadrans
043_B_C_,_P_Accoleius_Lariscolus,_AR-den-Head-Diana-r_-P_ACCOLEIVS_–_LARISCOLVS_Triple-cult_Cr_486-1_Syd-1148_43-BC_Q-001_6h_17-18mm_3,74g-s.jpg
043 B.C., P.Accoleius Lariscolus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 486/1, Rome, Diana-Hecate-Selene facing, #1130 views043 B.C., P.Accoleius Lariscolus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 486/1, Rome, Diana-Hecate-Selene facing, #1
avers: Bust of Diana Nemorensis right draped, behind P•ACCOLEIVS upwards, before LARISCOLVS downwards, border of dots.
reverse: Triple cult statue of Diana Nemorensis (Diana-Hecate-Selene) facing, behind, cypress grove, border of dots.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5-17,5mm, weight: 3,74g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 43 B.C., ref: Crawford 486/1, Sydenham 1148, Sear Imperators 172, B. Accoleia 1.
Q-001
quadrans
RI_044s_img.jpg
044 - Hadrian Denarius - RIC 0004c19 viewsObv:- IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIAN OPT AVG GER DAC, Laureate cuirassed bust right, with drapery on far shoulder
Rev:- PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AVG P P M TR P COS P P, Concordia enthroned left holding patera, arm on statue of Spes, cornucopiae below, CONCORD in ex.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 117
Reference:– RIC 4c. RSC 250a.
maridvnvm
IMG_2890.JPG
050 Nero15 views Nero Denarius. NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / VESTA, hexastyle temple of Vesta with domed roof & statue of Vesta within. RIC 62, RSC 335, BMC 104Randygeki(h2)
RI_051k_img.jpg
051 - Marcus Aurelius denarius - RIC III 3528 viewsObv:– IMP M AVREL ANTONINVS AVG, Bare head right
Rev:– CONCORD AVG TR P XVI / COS III, Concordia seated left on low seat, holding patera and resting left elbow on statuette of Spes, cornucopia under seat.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 161-162
Reference:– BMCRE 177. RIC III 35. RSC 35
maridvnvm
053_Geta_(209-211_A_D_)_AE-17_Nikopolis_L-AVT-K-L-GETAC_NIKOPOLITON-PROC-I_Varbanov_4-column-Temple_Q-001_7h_16-18mm_3,52ga-s~0.jpg
053p Geta (209-211 A.D.), Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, HHJ-08.22.46.03, AE-17, NIKOΠOΛITΩN-ΠPOC-I,64 views053p Geta (209-211 A.D.), Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, HHJ-08.22.46.03, AE-17, NIKOΠOΛITΩN-ΠPOC-I,
avers:- Λ•AVP•KA-ΓETAC, Bare headed and draped of the younger Geta right.
revers:- ΝΙΚOΠO-ΛΙTΩN-ΠPOC-I, Front of tetrastyle temple, within statue of Asklepios with snake staff.
exe: -/-//ΠPOC-I, diameter: 16-18mm, weight: 3,52g, axis:7h,
mint: Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, date: 198-209 A.D., ref: HHJ-08.22.46.03,
Q-001
quadrans
059p_Annia_Faustina_(-221_A_D_),_RPC_IV_(T)_6277,_Pamphylia,_Aspendus,_AE-18,__________,_Q-001_6h_17-18mm_3,91g-s.jpg
059p Annia Faustina ( ?-221 A.D.), RPC IV (T) 6277, Pamphylia, Aspendus, AE-18, ΑСΠƐΝΔΙΩΝ, Front view of double-pediment temple, Rare !180 views059p Annia Faustina ( ?-221 A.D.), RPC IV (T) 6277, Pamphylia, Aspendus, AE-18, ΑСΠƐΝΔΙΩΝ, Front view of double-pediment temple, Rare !
avers: ΑΝΝΙΑΝ ΦΑΥϹΤƐΙΝΑΝ ϹƐΒ, Diademed and draped bust of Annia Faustina, right.
reverse: ΑСΠƐΝΔΙΩΝ, Front view of double-pediment temple enclosing a statue of Aphroditai Kastnietides each.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-18,0mm, weight: 3,91g, axis: 6 h,
mint: Pamphylia, Aspendus, date: 221 A.D., ref: RPC IV (T) 6277, Peus 388, 1 Nov. 2006, lot 1132, R !,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Philip-I-RIC-086a.jpg
08. Philip I.41 viewsAntoninianus, 248 AD, Antioch mint.
Obverse: IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG / Radiate bust of Philip I.
Reverse: SAECVLVM NOVVM / Hexastyle temple with seated statue of Roma.
4.25 gm., 21 mm.
RIC 86a.

This particular reverse type seems to be the only one of the Millennium types to have been minted in Antioch. Characteristics of the Antioch mint on this coin include a left-facing bust and the long obverse legend.
The temple is the Temple of Roma in Rome, begun by Hadrian and complete by Antoninus Pius in 141 AD.
1 commentsCallimachus
787Hadrian_RIC824.jpg
0824 Hadrian AS Roma 134-38 AD Roma standing51 viewsReference.
RIC 824; Strack 683

Obv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P.
Bare head right.

Rev. ROMA / S - C.
Roma standing left, holding spear and palladium, with shield on his back.

11.83 gr
25 mm
6h

Note.
In Greek and Roman mythology, the palladium or palladion was a cult image of great antiquity on which the safety of Troy and later Rome was said to depend, the wooden statue (xoanon) of Pallas Athena
3 commentsokidoki
Troas__Alexandria,_090p_Gallienus_AE_21,_IMP_LICIN_GALLIENVS,_COL_AVG_TROAD,_Marsyas_st_r_,_Bellinger_A460,_SNG_München_139,_253-268_AD,_Q-001,_1h,_21-22mm,_5,8g-s.jpg
090p Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Troas, Alexandria, BMC 182, AE-21, COL AVG TROAD, Statue of naked Marsyas standing right, #162 views090p Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Troas, Alexandria, BMC 182, AE-21, COL AVG TROAD, Statue of naked Marsyas standing right, #1
avers: IMP LICIN GALLIENVS, Laureate, draped bust right.
reverse: COL AVG TROAD, Statue of naked Marsyas standing right, carrying wineskin over the shoulder, raising a right hand holding a cup.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21,0-22,0mm, weight:5,80g, axes: 1h,
mint: Troas, Alexandria, date: 253-268 A.D., ref: Bellinger A460, BMC 182; SNG München 139,
Q-001
quadrans
Sulla_L_Manlius_den.jpg
0ab Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix24 viewsL Manlivs, moneyer
82-72 BC

Denarius

Head of Roma, right, MANLI before, PRO Q behind
Sulla in walking quadriga, crowned by Victory, L SVLLA IM in ex.

Seaby, Manlia 4

Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix (c. 138 BC – 78 BC) was a Roman general and conservative statesman. He had the distinction of holding the office of consul twice, as well as reviving the dictatorship. Sulla was awarded a grass crown, the most prestigious and rarest Roman military honor, during the Social War. He was the first man to lead an army to Rome to settle a political dispute, in this case with Marius. In late 81 BC, he stunned the world by resigning his near-absolute powers, restoring constitutional government. After seeing election to and holding a second consulship, he retired to private life and died shortly after.

As to the person, Plutarch wrote: LUCIUS Cornelius Sylla was descended of a patrician or noble family. . . . His general personal appearance may be known by his statues; only his blue, eyes, of themselves extremely keen and glaring, were rendered all the more forbidding and terrible by the complexion of his face, in which white was mixed with rough blotches of fiery red. . . . And when supreme master of all, he was often wont to muster together the most impudent players and stage-followers of the town, and to drink and bandy jests with them without regard to his age or the dignity of his place, and to the prejudice of important affairs that required his attention. When he was once at table, it was not in Sylla's nature to admit of anything that was serious, and whereas at other times he was a man of business and austere of countenance, he underwent all of a sudden, at his first entrance upon wine and good-fellowship, a total revolution, and was gentle and tractable with common singers and dancers, and ready to oblige any one that spoke with him. It seems to have been a sort of diseased result of this laxity that he was so prone to amorous pleasures, and yielded without resistance to any temptation of voluptuousness, from which even in his old age he could not refrain. He had a long attachment for Metrobius, a player. In his first amours, it happened that he made court to a common but rich lady, Nicopolis by name, and what by the air of his youth, and what by long intimacy, won so far on her affections, that she rather than he was the lover, and at her death she bequeathed him her whole property. He likewise inherited the estate of a step-mother who loved him as her own son. By these means he had pretty well advanced his fortunes. . . . In general he would seem to have been of a very irregular character, full of inconsistencies with himself much given to rapine, to prodigality yet more; in promoting or disgracing whom he pleased, alike unaccountable; cringing to those he stood in need of, and domineering over others who stood in need of him, so that it was hard to tell whether his nature had more in it of pride or of servility. As to his unequal distribution of punishments, as, for example, that upon slight grounds he would put to the torture, and again would bear patiently with the greatest wrongs; would readily forgive and he reconciled after the most heinous acts of enmity, and yet would visit small and inconsiderable offences with death and confiscation of goods; one might judge that in himself he was really of a violent and revengeful nature, which, however, he could qualify, upon reflection, for his interest.
Blindado
ANTOSE86a.jpg
1. Aeneas travels from Troy to Italy 47 viewsAntoninus Pius. 138-161 AD. Sestertius (24.15g, Ø 33mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev.: S C [left and right in field], Aeneas wearing a short tunic and cloac, advancing right, carrying Anchises on left shoulder and holding Ascanius by right hand. Anchises (veiled and draped) carries a box in left hand, Ascanius wears a short tunic and Phrygian cap and caries a pedum in left hand. RIC 627[R2], BMCRE 1292, Cohen 761; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali) 373 (4 specimens); Foss 57b.

This sestertius was issued in preparation of the 900th anniversary of Rome which was celebrated in A.D.147.
The scene depicts Aeneas leaving Ilium, as the Romans called Troy, with Ascanius and Anchises. According to Vergil (Aeneid, Book 2), Aeneas, the son of the goddess Venus and the Trojan Anchises, fled with some remnants of the inhabitants of Troy as it fell to the Greeks, taking with him his son, Ascanius, his elderly father, Anchises, and the Palladium, the ancient sacred statue of Athena. The Trojans eventually made their way west to resettle in Italy. There they intermarried with the local inhabitants and founded the town of Lavinium, and thereby became the nucleus of the future Roman people. One of the descendants of Aeneas' son Ascanius (known now as Iulus) was Rhea Silvia, mother of Romulus and Remus, founders of Rome. The mythological depictions on this coin reinforce the importance of Ilium, not only as the seedbed of the future Roman people, but also as the mother city of the future caput mundi.
Charles S
1158Sabina_RIC1037.jpg
1037 Sabina As Roma 128-136 AD Concordia63 viewsReference.
RIC 1037; BMC 1891; C. 19; Strack 863

Obv. SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P
Diademed and draped bust right

Rev. CONCORDIA AVG / S C.
Concordia seated left on throne, holding patera and resting elbow upon statue of Spes; cornucopia below throne.

11.13 gr
27 mm
6h
5 commentsokidoki
RI_108d_img.jpg
108 - Salonina - RIC 0058 viewsObv:- SALONINA AVG, diademed draped bust right on crescent
Rev:- DEAE SEGETIAE, Statue of Segetiae or Ceres, nimbate, standing facing in four-columned temple, both hands raised
Minted in Rome A.D. 258.
References:- RIC 5. Cohen 36. Elmer 96. Göbl 902c

4.00 gms, 24.76mm. 180 degrees.
maridvnvm
PhilippusRR.jpg
113/112 BC L. Marcius Philippus142 viewsL Marcius Philippus
ROMA monogram
Head of King Philip V of Macedon right, wearing helmet decorated with goat's horns, Φ below chin

L PHILIPPVS
Equestrian statue right on tablet with inscription. Horseman carrying laurel-branch flower at horses feet. (XVI monogram) below tablet.

Rome 113/112 BC

3.96g

Crawford 293/1. Sydenham 551. Marcia 12.

Ex Calgary-Coin

This is the first Roman coin to depict an historical person instead of a personification or deity. The money’s ancestor L. Marcius Q.f. Philippus negotiated a treaty between Rome and Philip V of Macedon.
5 commentsJay GT4
114-113_BC_Man_Aemilius_Lepidus_Denarius_ROMA_M_N_AEMILIO_LEP_Cr291-1,_Syd_554_Aemilia_7_Q-001_9h_18,2-18,4mm_3,81g-s.jpg
114-113 B.C., Man Aemilius Lepidus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford-291-1, Rome, MN•AEMILIO•, equestrian statue, -/-//LEP, #1179 views114-113 B.C., Man Aemilius Lepidus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford-291-1, Rome, MN•AEMILIO•, equestrian statue, -/-//LEP, #1
avers: Laureate, diademed head of Roma right, ROMA before, * behind.
reverse: MN•AEMILIO• (MN ligate), The equestrian statue on the triumphal arch, L E P between the arches.
exergue: -/-//LEP, diameter: 18,2-18,4mm, weight: 3,81g, axis: 9h,
mint: Rome, date:114-113 B.C.,, ref: Crawford 291-1, Syd 554, Aemilia 7,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
0010-080.jpg
1346 - L. Marcius Philippus, denarius161 viewsRome mint, 56 BC
[ANCVS] Head of Ancus Marcius right, lituus behind him
PHILIPVS AQUA MAR, Equestrian statue above a five arch aqueduct
3.66 gr
Ref : RCV #382, RSC, Marcia # 28
Potator II
135_BC,_C__Augurinus,_AR-Den,_ROMA,_Roma_head_r_,_X,_C_A_VG,_Ionic_column,_Cr242-1,_Syd_463,_Q-001,_0h,_17-18,7mm,_3,54g-s.jpg
135 B.C., C. Minucius Augurinus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 242/1, Rome, C•A/VG//--, Ionic column surmounted by the statue, #1131 views135 B.C., C. Minucius Augurinus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 242/1, Rome, C•A/VG//--, Ionic column surmounted by the statue, #1
avers: Helmeted head of Roma right, ROMA behind, X below the chin.
reverse: C•A-VG flanking Ionic column surmounted by the statue, at the base, two stalks of grain; on left, L. Minucius Augurinus standing right, holding patera, foot on modius; on right, M. Minucius Faesus standing left, holding lituus.
exergue: C•A/VG//--, diameter: 17,0-18,7mm, weight: 3,54g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 135 B.C., ref: Crawford 242/1, Sydenham 463, Minucia 3.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
antpius_RIC1039.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AE as - struck 159-160 AD38 viewsobv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXIII (laureate head right)
rev: COS IIII (Genius of the Senate standing on cippus within arched temple), S-C in ex.
ref: RIC III 1039 (S), Cohen337 (5frcs)
10.21gms, 23mm
Rare

According to Cohen this temple is a tetrastyle (four columns) design, but just the front columns with the Victories are visible on the coin's reverse. The statue on cippus is maybe Antoninus as personification of Genius?
berserker
antpius_RIC143d.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AR denarius - struck 158-159 AD64 viewsobv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP (laureate head right)
rev: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST COS IIII (octastyle temple [8 columns] in which the statues of Augustus and Livia reside)
ref: RIC III 143D (R), Cohen 809 (8frcs)
3.01 gms, 18mm,
Rare

History: The Temple of Divus Augustus was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia. It is known from Roman coinage that the temple was originally built to an Ionic hexastyle design (see my Caligula sestertius). During the reign of Domitian the Temple of Divus Augustus was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt and rededicated in 89/90 with a shrine to his favourite deity, Minerva. The temple was redesigned as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus.
It was restored again in the late 150s by Antoninus Pius, who was perhaps motivated by a desire to be publicly associated with the first emperor. The exact date of the restoration is not known, but the restored temple was an octostyle design with Corinthian capitals and two statues - presumably of Augustus and Livia - in the cella. The pediment displayed a relief featuring Augustus and was topped by a quadriga. Two figures stood on the eaves of the roof, that on the left representing Romulus and the one on the right depicting Aeneas leading his family out of Troy, alluding to Rome's origin-myth. The steps of the temple were flanked by two statues of Victory.
1 commentsberserker
faustina_I_RIC343.jpg
138-161 AD - FAUSTINA Senior AR denarius - struck 150 AD41 viewsobv: DIVA FAVSTINA (draped bust right)
rev: AED DIV FAVSTINAE (front view of temple of six columns on five steps, fencing before, statue of Faustina within)
ref: RIC III 343 (S) (AntPius), RSC 1 (10frcs), BMC 339
3.34gms, 18mm,
Scarce

This coin represents the aedes, or templum, with which, after her death, the elder Faustina was honoured by Antoninus Pius. According to Capitolinus, it was situated in the Via Sacra, and was at first dedicated to Faustina alone. But, after the decease of the husband, religious rites were paid therein to him also. A nice coin with an image of a building which still stands today in Rome.
berserker
faustinaI sest.jpg
138-161 AD - FAVSTINA Senior AE sestertius - struck after 141 AD67 viewsbv: DIVA FAVSTINA (diademed & draped bust right)
rev: - / S.C. (Vesta standing left, holding long torch & palladium {Pallas statue})
ref: RIC III 1151(AntPius) (S), C.268 (6fr.)
23.51gms, 30mm,

I think it's a rare piece.
SOLD
2 commentsberserker
539_P_Hadrian_RIC510.jpg
1386 Hadrian, Cistophorus SARDIS Lydia Cult statue of Kore standing53 viewsReference.
RIC II 510; Metcalf 47; RSC 279; RPC III, 1386

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P
Bare head Right.

Rev. COS III
Cult statue of Kore standing facing; stalk of grain to left, stalk of grain and poppy to right.

9.98 gr
27 mm
12h
2 commentsokidoki
ANTOSE41r.jpg
144 AD: Antoninus Pius sestertius (rev. only) betrothal M.Aurelius and Faustina filia 187 viewsOrichalcum sestertius (28.4g, 35mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 144.
AN(TON)NVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laur. head right
CONCORDIAE [/] S C [in ex.] M. Aurelius & Faustina Jr. clasping hands; large statues of Antoninus & Faustina behind
RIC 601 [S], Cohen 146, BMC 1236-40, Foss (Roman Historic Coins) 127/45a
This type was issued on the occasion of the betrothal of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina, which probably took place during the Hilaria festival celebrated on 25 March 144 (see RIC). The reverse represents Marcus Aurelius, l. and Faustina filia, daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina mater, r., as small figures, clasping hands over altar and before large figures representing statues on pedestals of Antoninus Pius and the late Faustina mater (died A.D. 141). The statues also clasp hands, and the that of Antoninus holds a Victory figurine.
The marriage took place the following year in A.D.145.
2 commentsCharles S
1188_P_Hadrian_RPC--.jpg
1550B MYSIA. Lampsacus Hadrian, Priapus standing13 viewscf RPC III, -- 1550 Trajan; same SNG France 1272; BMC Mysia -, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop

Obv. AΔIANOC KAICAP
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian right

Rev. ΛΑΜΨΑΚΗΝωΝ
ithyphallic Priapus standing left, right hand raised, left hand on hip

1.55 gr
15 mm
6h

Note.
Priapus or Priapos was a minor rustic fertility god, protector of livestock, fruit plants, gardens and male genitalia. Priapus is marked by his absurdly oversized permanent erection, which gave rise to the medical term priapism. He became a popular figure in Roman erotic art and Latin literature, and is the subject of the often humorously obscene collection of verse called the Priapeia. Statues of Priapus were sometimes placed on boundaries and hung with signs which threatened sexual assault on trespassers.
FORVM coin
okidoki
Divus Verus RIC1507 - RR.jpg
161-169 AD - LUCIUS VERUS AE sestertius - struck 169 AD101 viewsobv: DIVVS VERVS (bare head of Divus Verus right)
rev: CONSECRATIO (elephant quadriga advancing left, atop car shrine containing statue of Divus Verus seated left, raising hand), S-C in ex.
ref: RIC III 1507 (M.Aurelius), C.53 (30frcs), BMCRE (Marcus) 1369
23.51gms, 30mm, bronze
Very Rare
History: In the end of 168 AD as Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus were returning home from the fontier of south Pannonia, Lucius suddenly became ill with symptoms attributed to food poisoning, and was dead at the age of 38 near Altinum (Altino). The older Emperor accompanied the body to Rome, where he offered games to honour his memory. After the funeral, the senate declared Verus divine to be worshipped as Divus Verus.
2 commentsberserker
M.Aurelius RIC662(commodus).jpg
161-180 AD - MARCUS AURELIUS AE sestertius - struck 180 AD39 viewsobv: DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS (Marcus Aurelius bare head right)
rev: CONSECRATIO (garlanded funeral pyre of four tiers surmounted by statue of Aurelius in facing quadriga), S-C in field
ref: RIC III 662 [Commodus], Cohen 98 (20frcs), BMC 399
21.14gms, 29mm
Rare

The Rogus, or Funeral Pile, as a mass of quadrangular shape, filled at the bottom with combustibles, on which again a second tier was placed of similar form and appearance, but narrower and furnished with openings; to this a third and a fourth were added, each gradually diminishing in size, till the whole resembled a watch-tower.
berserker
divomaurel_RIC661(Comm).jpg
161-180 AD - MARCUS AURELIUS AE sestertius - struck 180 AD65 viewsobv: DIVVS M ANTONINVS PIVS (Marcus Autrelius bare head right)
rev: CONSECRATIO (Statue of Aurelius in quadriga drawn by elephants), S-C in ex.
ref: RIC III 661 (Commodus), Cohen 95 (30 frcs)
18.31gms, 28mm
Very rare

The last ’Good Emperor’, Marcus Aurelius died at a military encampment at Bononia on the Danube on 17 March 180, possibly of the plague, leaving the Roman Empire to his nineteen-year-old son. Upon hearing of his father's death, Commodus made preparations for Marcus' funeral, made concessions to the northern tribes, and made haste to return back to Rome in order to enjoy peace after nearly two decades of war.
1 commentsberserker
1693.JPG
1693 - États de Vannes7 viewsLouis XIV
7,10g
28 mm
argent
LVDOVICVS. MAGNVS. REX.
"Louis le Grand roi"
Sur un piédestal, statue équestre de Louis XIV à droite
cheval au pas
à l’exergue signature T.B.
.IETONS. DES. ESTAZ. DE. BRETAGNE.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l’exergue : .1693.
Daniel 43
PYL
1695.JPG
1695 - États de Vannes7 viewsLouis XIV
6,77g
28 mm
argent
LVDOVICVS. MAGNVS. REX.
"Louis le Grand roi"
Sur un piédestal, statue équestre de Louis XIV à droite
cheval au pas
à l’exergue signature T.B.
.IETONS. DES. ESTAZ. DE. BRETAGNE.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l’exergue : .1695.
Daniel 44
PYL
31Hadrian__RIC172.jpg
172 Hadrian Denarius Roma 125-28 AD Concordia34 viewsReference.
Strack 167; RIC 172; C. 328

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Laureate head r., drapery on far shoulder.

Rev. COS III
Concordia seated l., holding patera and resting elbow on statue of Spes.

3.1 gr
20 mm
okidoki
StUrbainLeopoldILorraineBridge.JPG
1727. Leopold I: Reconstruction Of The Bridge In The Forest Of Haye. 71 viewsObv: Leopold to right, in peruke, wearing armor and the Order of the Golden Fleece LEOPOLDVS. I. D.G. DVX. LOT. BAR. REX. IER
Rev: A traveling horseman going over bridge toward Abundance in countryside. In background landscape a herm of Mercury PROVIDENTIA. PRINCIPIS
Exergue: VIAE. MVNITAE MDCCXXVII Signed: SV.
AE64mm. Ref: Forrer V, p. 309, #6; Slg. Florange 171; Molinari 40/120; Europese Penningen # 1739

Leopold Joseph Charles (Leopold I) (1679-1729), Duke of Lorraine and Bar (1697), was the son of Charles V, Duke of Lorraine and Bar. This medal commemorates further the many reconstruction projects that Leopold I, Duke of Lorraine and Bar, fostered during his reign, in this case, the reconstruction of the bridge in the forest of Haye. The reverse alludes to the fact that the bridge increased commerce (Mercury) in Lorraine and led to more abundance for its inhabitants.
A herm, referred to in this medal, is a statue consisting of the head of the Greek god Hermes mounded on a square stone post. Hermes is the god of commerce, invention, cunning and theft, who also serves as messenger and herald for the other gods.
LordBest
0030-0210.jpg
1749 - Octavian, Denarius272 viewsItalian mint, possibly Rome, 31-30 BC
Anepigraph, bare head of Octavian left
CAESAR - DIVI F, Victory standing right on globe, holding wreath
3.84 gr
Ref : HCRI # 408, RCV # 1552v, Cohen # 66, RIC # 255
The following comment is taken from CNG, sale 84 # 957 :
"Following his victory at Actium, Octavian ordered a golden statue of Victory, standing on a globe and holding a wreath and palm, to be set up on an altar in the Curia in Rome. This statue had been captured by the Romans from Pyrrhus in 272 BC, and it assumed a somewhat tutelary mystique, protecting the Roman state from dissolution. In AD 382, the emperor Gratian ordered its removal. Two years later, the senator and orator Symmachus urged Valentinian II to replace it, a request that was met with stiff opposition from the bishop of Milan, Ambrose. Though it was briefly returned to its place by the usurper Eugenius, it was again removed following his defeat. Petitions to Theodosius I for its subsequent replacement were refused, on grounds that the once-important symbol of the gods’ blessing on the Roman Empire was now nothing more than a piece of paganism"
11 commentsPotator II
13_-_1754_-_6,47g_-_D102.JPG
1754 - États de Rennes11 viewsLouis XV
6,47g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REDIVIVO ET TRIUMPHANTI.
"Louis XV ressuscité et triomphant"
Statue du roi sur un piédestal, vêtu à l’antique, derrière, des drapeaux ; à droite la Bretagne assise, devant, les armes de la province, derrière, une ancre sortant de la mer ; à gauche Hygie et un autel allumé .
Sur le piédestal on peut lire l'inscription :
LUDOVICO XV
REGI CHRISTIANISSIMO
REDIVIVO ET TRIUMPHANTI.
HOC AMORIS PIGNUS
ET SALUTATIS PUBLICAE MOMUMENTUM
COMITIA ARMORICA POSUERE
ANNO M DCC LIV
au revers :
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE 1754.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France, aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne, sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 102
PYL
1754_2.JPG
1754 - États de Rennes5 viewsLouis XV
6,55g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REDIVIVO ET TRIUMPHANTI.
"Louis XV ressuscité et triomphant"
Statue du roi sur un piédestal,
vêtu à l’antique, derrière, des drapeaux;
à droite la Bretagne assise,
devant les armes de la province,
derrière une ancre sortant de la mer;
à gauche Hygie et un autel allumé .
Sur le piédestal on peut lire l'inscription :
LUDOVICO XV
REGI CHRISTIANISSIMO
REDIVIVO ET TRIUMPHANTI.
HOC AMORIS PIGNUS
ET SALUTATIS PUBLICAE MOMUMENTUM
COMITIA ARMORICA POSUERE
ANNO M DCC LIV
au revers :
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE 1754.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 102
PYL
commodus sest-2.jpg
177-192 AD - COMMODUS AE sestertius - struck 181-182 AD29 viewsobv: M COMMODVS ANTONINVS AVG (laureate head right)
rev: TRP VII IMP IIII COS III PP / S.C. (Annona standing left, holding statuette over modius containing five grain ears, & cornucopiae; stern of ship, decorated with figure of Victory & containing two figures, behind)
ref: RIC III 325a, C.836
22.32gms, 28mm

The Annona holding figure holds patera and sceptre and is probably meant for Concordia (RIC III pp 405).
berserker
1791_HULL_HALFPENNY.JPG
1791 AE Halfpenny Token. Hull, Yorkshire.40 viewsObverse: GULIELMUS TERTIUS REX •. Equestrian statue of King William III facing right; in exergue, MDCLXXXIX.
Reverse: HULL HALFPENNY. Coat of Arms of Hull (a shield bearing three crowns vertically) between sprigs of oak, 1791 above.
Edge: PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE OF IONATHAN GARTON & Co • X •.
Diameter 29mm | Die Axis 6
Dalton & Hamer: 19

This token was issued by Jonathan Garton who was a linen draper with a business in the market place in Hull.
There is slight die damage, a common feature of 18th century tokens, visible at the horse's breast on the obverse.

The “three crowns” have been used as Hull’s coat of arms since the early 1400s. A depiction of the shield in stained glass in St Mary’s Church Lowgate dates from the reign of Richard III (1483-85) and is among the earliest versions to survive.
The equestrian statue of William III depicted on this token is one of Hull's key landmarks, it has been standing in the centre of the city square since 1734.
*Alex
1794_Chichester___Portsmouth_Halfpenny.JPG
1794 AE Halfpenny Token. Chichester and Portsmouth, Sussex.29 viewsObverse: IOHN HOWARD F•R•S PHILANTHROPIST•. Bust of John Howard facing left.
Reverse: CHICHESTER AND PORTSMOUTH • / HALFPENNY; Arms of the town of Portsmouth; the sun and moon over a triple-towered castle, with the arms of Chichester above the gateway below the central tower, 1794 in exergue.
Edge: PAYABLE AT SHARPS PORTSMOUTH AND CHALDECOTTS CHICHESTER.
Diameter 29mm | Die Axis 12
Dalton & Hamer: 19

This token was probably manufactured by Peter Kempson in Birmingham and the dies were engraved by Thomas Wyon. The issuers of this token were John Chaldecott, a silversmith and cutler in Chichester and Thomas Sharp, a mercer in Portsmouth. Chaldecott was also a partner in the Chichester Old Bank and the Portsmouth, Portsea and Hampshire Bank. The two men were probably relations or close friends and they issued joint tokens in both Portsmouth and Chichester in the 18th century.

This token was struck in the name of John Howard who was born in Lower Clapton, London the son of a wealthy upholsterer. After the death of his father in 1742, he received a sizeable inheritance. Since he was wealthy and had no true vocation, in 1748 Howard left England and began to travel. However, while in Hanover he was captured by French privateers and imprisoned. It was this experience that made him consider the conditions in which prisoners were held.
In 1758 Howard returned to England and settled in Cardington, Bedfordshire. As a landowner he was philanthropic and enlightened, ensuring that his estate housing was of good standard and that the poor houses under his management were well run.
In 1773 he became High Sheriff of Bedfordshire. On his appointment he began a tour of English prisons which led to two Acts of Parliament in 1774, making gaolers salaried officers and setting standards of cleanliness.
In April 1777, Howard's sister died leaving him £15,000 and her house. He used this inheritance and the revenue from the sale of her house to further his work on prisons. In 1778 he was examined by the House of Commons, who were this time inquiring into prison ships, or “hulks”. Two days after giving evidence, he was again travelling Europe, beginning in the Dutch Republic.
His final journey took him into Eastern Europe and Russia. Whilst at Kherson, in what is now Ukraine, Howard contracted typhus on a prison visit and died. He was buried on the shores of the Black Sea in a walled field at Dophinovka (Stepanovka), Ukraine. Despite requesting a quiet funeral without pomp and ceremony, the event was elaborate and attended by the Prince of Moldovia.
Howard became the first civilian to be honoured with a statue in St Paul's Cathedral, London. A statue was also erected in Bedford, and another one in Kherson. John Howard's bust can still be seen as a feature in the architecture of a number of Victorian prisons across the UK.
*Alex
1794_COVENTRY_CROSS_HALFPENNY.JPG
1794 AE Halfpenny Token. Coventry, Warwickshire.27 viewsObverse: PRO BONO PUBLICO. Lady Godiva riding side-saddle on horse to left; in exergue, 1794.
Reverse: COVENTRY HALFPENNY. Representation of Coventry's old town cross with COV CROSS in small letters at base.
Edge: PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE OF ROBERT REYNOLDS & CO.
Diameter 29.5mm | Axis 12
Dalton & Hamer: 249
RARE

This token was manufactured by William Lutwyche and the dies were engraved by William Mainwaring.
It was issued by Robert Reynolds & Co., who were ribbon weavers with a business in Coventry.

The original Coventry Cross stood at the place where Broadgate met Cross Cheaping, near Spicer Stoke, a very short row which led through from Broadgate to Butcher Row and Trinity church. Though it is likely that a cross had been standing in this place since the 13th century, the first actual record for the building of a cross was on 1st July 1423 when the Mayor, Henry Peyto, officially sanctioned that a new cross should be built. Although it was quite a substantial structure, within a century it was rather the worse for wear, and by 1506 discussions had begun about replacing it.
In 1541, the former mayor of London, Sir William Hollis, left £200 in his will toward the building of a new cross, and by 1544 the 57 foot high cross was completed. As well as being brightly painted, the cross was also covered with much gold and it was renowned for its fame and beauty. It was built in four sections, with statues in the top three storeys: the lower of these holding statues of Henry VI, King John, Edward I, Henry II, Richard I and Henry. Above these were Edward III, Henry II, Richard III, St Michael and St George. The top storey held statues of St Peter, St James, St Christopher and two monks, with representations of Liberty and Justice at the highest point. In 1608 repairs were carried out to the cross during which the figure of Christ was replaced with one of Lady Godiva. Possibly the obverse of this token is based on this statue since there is no record of there being any other Lady Godiva memorial statues before 1949.
After standing gloriously for two centuries, decay once more set into the cross and, in 1753 and 1755, the top two stages were removed to avoid the danger of collapse. By 1771 the cross was declared to be in too ruinous a state to retain, and it's demolition was authorised. The remains stood for a short while longer though, at least until after 1778 when a visitor to Coventry wrote that the decayed cross "...has no longer anything to please".
This token is dated 1794, but must depict the cross as it was in it's heyday before it was totally demolished and it's parts reused. Two of the statues from the cross now reside at St. Mary's Guildhall.
A modern replica of the cross was unveiled in 1976, it is situated about 100 metres away from the site of the original one.
*Alex
1795_John_Howard_Halfpenny.JPG
1795 AE Halfpenny, Portsmouth, Hampshire.73 viewsObverse: IOHN HOWARD F.R.S. PHILANTHROPIST •. Bust of John Howard facing left.
Reverse: RULE BRITANNIA. Britannia facing left, seated on globe, her right hand holding spear, her left arm holding laurel-branch and resting on shield at her side; in exergue, 1795.
Edge: “CURRENT EVERY WHERE ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦”
Diameter: 29mm
Dalton & Hamer: 57b

The dies for this token were likely engraved by Thomas Wyon and it was probably manufactured by Peter Kempson at his mint in Birmingham.
The Fitzwilliam Museum regards Liverpool as an alternative possibility for the place of issue.
These 18th century tokens are often generically referred to as “Conder” tokens, the name originating from James Conder, a linen draper from Tavern Street in Ipswich. Conder was an ardent collector of tokens and the author of the standard work on the subject until it was superseded by that of Atkins in 1892.

John Howard was born in Lower Clapton, London the son of a wealthy upholsterer. After the death of his father in 1742, he received a sizeable inheritance. Since he was wealthy and had no true vocation, in 1748 Howard left England and began to travel. However, while in Hanover he was captured by French privateers and imprisoned. It was this experience that made him consider the conditions in which prisoners were held.
In 1758 Howard returned to England and settled in Cardington, Bedfordshire. As a landowner he was philanthropic and enlightened, ensuring that his estate housing was of good standard and that the poor houses under his management were well run.
In 1773 he became High Sheriff of Bedfordshire. On his appointment he began a tour of English prisons which led to two Acts of Parliament in 1774, making gaolers salaried officers and setting standards of cleanliness.
In April 1777, Howard's sister died leaving him £15,000 and her house. He used this inheritance and the revenue from the sale of her house to further his work on prisons. In 1778 he was examined by the House of Commons, who were this time inquiring into prison ships, or “hulks”. Two days after giving evidence, he was again travelling Europe, beginning in the Dutch Republic.
His final journey took him into Eastern Europe and Russia. Whilst at Kherson, in what is now Ukraine, Howard contracted typhus on a prison visit and died. He was buried on the shores of the Black Sea in a walled field at Dophinovka (Stepanovka), Ukraine. Despite requesting a quiet funeral without pomp and ceremony, the event was elaborate and attended by the Prince of Moldovia.
Howard became the first civilian to be honoured with a statue in St Paul's Cathedral, London. A statue was also erected in Bedford, and another one in Kherson. John Howard's bust can still be seen as a feature in the architecture of a number of Victorian prisons across the UK.
*Alex
LouisXVIII1817HenriIVPontNeuf.JPG
1817. Louis XVIII. Dedication of the statue of Henri IV at Pont Neuf.161 viewsObv. Bust of Louis XVIII LVDOVICVS XVIII LAPIDEM AVSPICALEM POSVIT D XXVIII M OCT ANN MDCCCXVII REGNI XXIII, ANDRIEU F on truncation.
Rev. Statue of Henri IV at the Pont Neuf HENRICO MAGNO CIVIVM PIETAS RESTITVIT MDCCCXVII ANDRIEU FECIT.
AE50.
LordBest
LouisXVIII1822VenusdeMilo.JPG
1822. Louis XVIII. Discovery and presentatoin of Venus de Milo.140 viewsObv. Head of Louis XVIII to right LVDOVICVS XVIII FRANC ET NAV REX
Rev. Venus de Milo standing in front of Egyptian antiquities COLLECTIS EX AEGYPTO GREACIAQ MONVMENTIS / SVMTV REGIO BONARVM ARTVIM VTILITATI MDCCCXXII
AE50.

This medal commemorates the discovery and presentation of the statue Venus de Milo.
LordBest
998_P_Hadrian_RPC--.jpg
1926B AEOLIS. Aegae. Pseudo-autonomous under Hadrian Ae 18 statue of Apollo Chresterios10 viewsReference.
RPC --; RPC III, 1926B

Magistrate Oul. Polemôn (agô(nothete) (?))

Obv: IЄPA CVNKΛHTOC.
Laureate and draped youthful bust of the Senate right.

Rev: ЄΠI AΓΩ OVΛ ΠOΛЄMON / AI - ΓA.
Facing statue of Apollo Chresterios, with branch in hand.

3.84 gr
18 mm
12h

Note.
RPC III - (though cf. 1926 for a coin of Sabina from the same magistrate)

Agonothetes was a magistrate whose duty was the superintendence of games.

Aigai was the centre of the worshipping of Apollo Chresterios, meaning the foresayer, the prophet. It is known from an inscription that about 250 BC the inhabitants of Istros have sent a delegation to Aigai asking wether the oracle would tolerate the introducing of Serapis to Istros.
okidoki
rjb_2016_08_01.jpg
1983 viewsCaracalla 198-217 AD
AE 30mm
Neocaesarea in Pontus
Tetrastyle temple with internal brick structure visible and statue on pedestal
Rec Gen 22
mauseus
Manlia4.jpg
1aa Reign of SVLLA23 viewsL Manlivs, moneyer
82-72 BC

Denarius

Head of Roma, right, MANLI before, PRO Q behind
Sulla in walking quadriga, crowned by Victory, L SVLLA IM in ex.

Seaby, Manlia 4

Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix (c. 138 BC – 78 BC) was a Roman general and conservative statesman. He had the distinction of holding the office of consul twice, as well as reviving the dictatorship. Sulla was awarded a grass crown, the most prestigious and rarest Roman military honor, during the Social War. He was the first man to lead an army to Rome to settle a political dispute, in this case with Marius. In late 81 BC, he stunned the world by resigning his near-absolute powers, restoring constitutional government. After seeing election to and holding a second consulship, he retired to private life and died shortly after.

As to the person, Plutarch wrote: LUCIUS Cornelius Sylla was descended of a patrician or noble family. . . . His general personal appearance may be known by his statues; only his blue, eyes, of themselves extremely keen and glaring, were rendered all the more forbidding and terrible by the complexion of his face, in which white was mixed with rough blotches of fiery red. . . . And when supreme master of all, he was often wont to muster together the most impudent players and stage-followers of the town, and to drink and bandy jests with them without regard to his age or the dignity of his place, and to the prejudice of important affairs that required his attention. When he was once at table, it was not in Sylla's nature to admit of anything that was serious, and whereas at other times he was a man of business and austere of countenance, he underwent all of a sudden, at his first entrance upon wine and good-fellowship, a total revolution, and was gentle and tractable with common singers and dancers, and ready to oblige any one that spoke with him. It seems to have been a sort of diseased result of this laxity that he was so prone to amorous pleasures, and yielded without resistance to any temptation of voluptuousness, from which even in his old age he could not refrain. He had a long attachment for Metrobius, a player. In his first amours, it happened that he made court to a common but rich lady, Nicopolis by name, and what by the air of his youth, and what by long intimacy, won so far on her affections, that she rather than he was the lover, and at her death she bequeathed him her whole property. He likewise inherited the estate of a step-mother who loved him as her own son. By these means he had pretty well advanced his fortunes. . . . In general he would seem to have been of a very irregular character, full of inconsistencies with himself much given to rapine, to prodigality yet more; in promoting or disgracing whom he pleased, alike unaccountable; cringing to those he stood in need of, and domineering over others who stood in need of him, so that it was hard to tell whether his nature had more in it of pride or of servility. As to his unequal distribution of punishments, as, for example, that upon slight grounds he would put to the torture, and again would bear patiently with the greatest wrongs; would readily forgive and he reconciled after the most heinous acts of enmity, and yet would visit small and inconsiderable offences with death and confiscation of goods; one might judge that in himself he was really of a violent and revengeful nature, which, however, he could qualify, upon reflection, for his interest.
Blindado
Ephesus_AE_1_2_Unit_2d_Triumvirate_.jpg
1af2 Lepidus, Octavian, and Marc Antony30 views40-39 BC

Ephesus, AE 1/2 unit 19mm

Jugate bare heads of the Second Triumvirate members, right

ΑΡΧΙΕΡΕΥΣ ΓΡΑΜ ΓΛΑΥΚΩΝ ΕΦΕ ΠΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΣ, facing cult statue of Artemis (with supports)

RPC 2572A

Thanks to OldMoney for the attribution

5.0 grams

See the individual descriptions of my coins from Octavian, Marc Antony, and Lepidus for more historical information.
4 commentsBlindado
BrutusDenLictors.jpg
1ag Marcus Junius Brutus65 viewsTook his own life in 42 BC after being defeated at Philippi by Antony and Octavian

Denarius, issued as moneyer, 54 BC
Head of Liberty, right, LIBERTAS
Consul L. Junius Brutus between lictors, preceded by accensus, BRVTVS

Seaby, Junia 31

Plutarch wrote: Marcus Brutus was descended from that Junius Brutus to whom the ancient Romans erected a statue of brass in the capitol among the images of their kings with a drawn sword in his hand, in remembrance of his courage and resolution in expelling the Tarquins and destroying the monarchy. . . . But this Brutus, whose life we now write, having to the goodness of his disposition added the improvements of learning and the study of philosophy, and having stirred up his natural parts, of themselves grave and gentle, by applying himself to business and public affairs, seems to have been of a temper exactly framed for virtue; insomuch that they who were most his enemies upon account of his conspiracy against Caesar, if in that whole affair there was any honourable or generous part, referred it wholly to Brutus, and laid whatever was barbarous and cruel to the charge of Cassius, Brutus's connection and familiar friend, but not his equal in honesty and pureness of purpose. . . . In Latin, he had by exercise attained a sufficient skill to be able to make public addresses and to plead a cause; but in Greek, he must be noted for affecting the sententious and short Laconic way of speaking in sundry passages of his epistles. . . . And in all other things Brutus was partaker of Caesar's power as much as he desired: for he might, if he had pleased, have been the chief of all his friends, and had authority and command beyond them all, but Cassius and the company he met with him drew him off from Caesar. . . . Caesar snatching hold of the handle of the dagger, and crying out aloud in Latin, "Villain Casca, what do you?" he, calling in Greek to his brother, bade him come and help. And by this time, finding himself struck by a great many hands, and looking around about him to see if he could force his way out, when he saw Brutus with his dagger drawn against him, he let go Casca's hand, that he had hold of and covering his head with his robe, gave up his body to their blows.
2 commentsBlindado
TiberiusAsSC.jpg
1al Tiberius26 views14-37

As
Laureate head, left, TI CAESAR AVGVST F IMPERAT V
PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXIII SC

This is one of a series of 12 Caesars pieces that were local finds in Serbia. There are better coins out there, but I'll hang onto these because they really got me into the hobby.

RIC 469

Per Suetonius: Within three years, however, both Lucius Caesar and Gaius Caesar were dead [in AD2 and 4 respectively], and Augustus now adopted both their brother Agrippa Postumus, and Tiberius, who was first required to adopt his nephew Germanicus [in 4 AD]. . . .

From that moment onwards, Augustus did all he could to enhance Tiberius’ prestige, especially after the disowning and banishment of Postumus [ca 6 AD] made it obvious that Tiberius was the sole heir to the succession. . . .

Tiberius acted like a traditional citizen, more modestly almost than the average individual. He accepted only a few of the least distinguished honours offered him; it was only with great reluctance that he consented to his birthday being recognised, falling as it did on the day of the Plebeian Games in the Circus, by the addition of a two-horse chariot to the proceedings; and he refused to have temples, and priests dedicated to him, or even the erection of statues and busts, without his permission; which he only gave if they were part of the temple adornments and not among the divine images. . . .

Moreover, in the face of abuse, libels or slanders against himself and his family, he remained unperturbed and tolerant, often maintaining that a free country required free thought and speech. . . . He even introduced a species of liberty, by maintaining the traditional dignities and powers of the Senate and magistrates. He laid all public and private matters, small or great, before the Senate consulting them over State revenues, monopolies, and the construction and maintenance of public buildings, over the levying and disbanding of troops, the assignment of legions and auxiliaries, the scope of military appointments, and the allocation of campaigns, and even the form and content of his replies to letters from foreign powers. . . .

Returning to Capreae, he abandoned all affairs of state, neither filling vacancies in the Equestrian Order’s jury lists, nor appointing military tribunes, prefects, or even provincial governors. Spain and Syria lacked governors of Consular rank for several years, while he allowed the Parthians to overrun Armenia, Moesia to be ravaged by the Dacians and Sarmatians, and Gaul by the Germans, threatening the Empire’s honour no less than its security. Furthermore, with the freedom afforded by privacy, hidden as it were from public view, he gave free rein to the vices he had concealed for so long. . . .
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CaligulaAsVesta.jpg
1ao Caligula31 views37-41

As
Bare head, left, C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT
Vesta std, VESTA SC

RIC 38

The son of Germanicus, modern research suggests, was not as bad a ruler as history generally supposes, but the winners write the history, and Caligula had the dubious honor of being the first loser to die in the purple at the hand of assassins.

Suetonius recorded: Gaius Caesar (Caligula) was born on the 31st of August AD12, in the consulship of his father, Germanicus, and Gaius Fonteius Capito. The sources disagree as to his place of birth. Gnaeus Lentulus Gaetulicus claims it was Tibur (Tivoli), Pliny the Elder, says it was among the Treveri in the village of Ambitarvium, above Confluentes (the site of Koblenz) at the junction of the Moselle and Rhine. . . . His surname Caligula (‘Little Boot’) was bestowed on him affectionately by the troops because he was brought up amongst them, dressed in soldier’s gear.

Caligula accompanied his father, Germanicus, to Syria (in AD 19). On his return, he lived with his mother, Agrippina the Elder until she was exiled (in 29 AD), and then with his great-grandmother Livia. When Livia died (in 29 AD), he gave her eulogy from the rostra even though he was not of age. He was then cared for by his grandmother Antonia the Younger, until at the age of eighteen Tiberius summoned him to Capreae (Capri, in AD 31). On that day he assumed his gown of manhood and shaved off his first beard, but without the ceremony that had attended his brothers’ coming of age.

On Capraea, though every trick was tried to lure him, or force him, into making complaints against Tiberius, he ignored all provocation, . . . behaving so obsequiously to his adoptive grandfather, Tiberius, and the entire household, that the quip made regarding him was well borne out, that there was never a better slave or a worse master.

Even in those days, his cruel and vicious character was beyond his control, and he was an eager spectator of torture and executions meted out in punishment. At night, disguised in wig and long robe, he abandoned himself to gluttony and adulterous behaviour. He was passionately devoted it seems to the theatrical arts, to dancing and singing, a taste in him which Tiberius willingly fostered, in the hope of civilizing his savage propensities.

And came near to assuming a royal diadem at once, turning the semblance of a principate into an absolute monarchy. Indeed, advised by this that he outranked princes and kings, he began thereafter to claim divine power, sending to Greece for the most sacred or beautiful statues of the gods, including the Jupiter of Olympia, so that the heads could be exchanged for his own. He then extended the Palace as far as the Forum, making the Temple of Castor and Pollux its vestibule, and would often present himself to the populace there, standing between the statues of the divine brothers, to be worshipped by whoever appeared, some hailing him as ‘Jupiter Latiaris’. He also set up a special shrine to himself as god, with priests, the choicest sacrificial victims, and a life-sized golden statue of himself, which was dressed each day in clothes of identical design to those he chose to wear.

He habitually committed incest with each of his three sisters, seating them in turn below him at large banquets while his wife reclined above. . . . His preferred method of execution was by the infliction of many slight wounds, and his order, issued as a matter of routine, became notorious: ‘Cut him so he knows he is dying.’
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TitusProv.jpg
1ax Titus96 views79-81

AE, Ankyra, Galatia
Laureate head, right AY KAICAP TITOC CEBASTO. . .
Man standing, left, SEBASTHNWN TEKTOSAGWN

RPC 1620

By Suetonius' account: Titus, surnamed Vespasianus like his father, possessed such an aptitude, by nature, nurture, or good fortune, for winning affection that he was loved and adored by all the world as Emperor. . . . He was born on the 30th of December AD41, the very year of Caligula’s assassination, in a little dingy room of a humble dwelling, near the Septizonium. . . .

He was handsome, graceful, and dignified, and of exceptional strength, though of no great height and rather full-bellied. He had an extraordinary memory, and an aptitude for virtually all the arts of war and peace, being a fine horseman, skilled in the use of weapons, yet penning impromptu verses in Greek and Latin with equal readiness and facility. He had a grasp of music too, singing well and playing the harp pleasantly and with ability. . . .

As military tribune in Germany (c57-59AD) and Britain (c60-62), he won an excellent reputation for energy and integrity, as is shown by the large number of inscribed statues and busts of him found in both countries. . . . When his quaestorship ended, he commanded one of his father’s legions in Judaea, capturing the strongholds of Tarichaeae and Gamala (67AD). His horse was killed under him in battle, but he mounted that of a comrade who fell fighting at his side. . . . [Upon] Vespasian’s accession, his father left him to complete the conquest of Judaea, and in the final assault on Jerusalem (70AD) Titus killed twelve of the defenders with as many arrows. . . .

From then on, he acted as his father’s colleague and even protector. He shared in his Judaean triumph (of AD 71), the censorship (AD 73), the exercise of tribunicial power, and in seven of his consulships (AD 70, 72, 74-77, 79). . . .

He died at the same villa as his father, Vespasian, on the 13th of September AD81, at the age of forty-one, after a reign of two years, two months, and twenty days. The people mourned his loss as if he were a member of their own family.
2 commentsBlindado
ClaudiusAE28Caesar_Augustus.jpg
1bb Octavian's Succession of Julius Caesar10 viewsClaudius, Philippi, Macedon
Date unknown

AE 26

TI CLAVDIVS CAES AVG P M TR P IMP P P, Bare head left
COL AVG IVL PHILIP, Statue of Divus Julius being crowned by statue of Divus Augustus

I'm guessing this coin was meant to emphasize the succession of legitimacy from Julius Caesar to Augustus.

RPC 1654
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FaustinaSestVesta.jpg
1bi Faustina22 viewsWife of Antoninus Pius, died 141

Sestertius

Draped bust, right, DIVA FAVSTINA
Vesta stg, AVGVSTA SC

RIC 1178

The Historia Augusta recounts: On the death of his wife Faustina, in the third year of his reign, the senate deified her, and voted her games and a temple and priestesses and statues of silver and of gold. These the Emperor accepted, and furthermore granted permission that her statue be erected in all the circuses ; and when the senate voted her a golden statue, he undertook to erect it himself.
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AurelianusAntPietas.jpg
1dk Aurelian28 views270-275

Radiate, cuirassed bust, right, IMP AVRELIANVS AVG
Aurelian & Severina or priest standing facing each other, each holding short sceptre, sacrificing at altar between them, S in ex, PIETAS AVG

Zosimus recorded: Aurelianus, having regulated the empire, went from Rome to Aquileia, and from thence into Pannonia, which he was informed the Scythians were preparing to invade. For this reason he sent orders to the inhabitants of that country to carry into the towns all their corn and cattle, and every thing that could be of use to the enemy, in order to distress them with famine, with which they were already afflicted. The Barbarians having crossed the river into Pannonia had an engagement, the result of which was nearly equal. But the same night, the Barbarians recrossed the river, and as soon as day appeared, sent ambassadors to treat for peace. |25

The Emperor, hearing that the Alemanni and the neighbouring nations intended to over-run Italy, was with just reason more concerned for Rome and the adjacent places, than for the more remote. Having therefore ordered a sufficient force to remain for the defence of Pannonia, he marched towards Italy, and on his route, on the borders of that country, near the Ister, slew many thousands of the Barbarians in one battle. Several members of the senate being at this time accused of conspiring against the emperor were put to death ; and Rome, which before had no walls, was now surrounded with them. This work was begun in the reign of Aurelianus, and was finished by Probus. At the same time Epitimius, Urbanus, and Domitianus, were likewise suspected as innovators, and were immediately apprehended and punished. During these occurrences in Italy and Pannonia, the emperor prepared to march against the Palmyrenians, who had subdued all Egypt, and the east, as far as Ancyra in Galatia, and would have acquired Bithynia even as far as Chalcedon, if the inhabitants of that country had not learned that Aurelianus was made emperor, and so shook off the Palmyrenian yoke. As soon as the emperor was on his march thither, Ancyra submitted to the Romans, and afterwards Tuana, and all the cities between that and Antioch. There finding Zenobia with a large army ready to engage, as he himself also was, he met and engaged her as honour obliged him [an defeated the enemy. . . .

[Having crushed Palmyra and razed it] He then entered Rome in triumph, where he was most magnificiently received by the senate and people. At this period also be erected that sumptuous temple of the sun, which he ornamented with all the sacred spoils that he brought from Palmyra; placing in it the statues of the sun and Belus. After this he easily reduced Tatricus with his rebellious accomplices, whom he brought to signal punishment. He likewise called in all the counterfeit money, and issued new, to avoid confusion in trade. Besides which he bestowed on the people a gift of bread, as a mark of his favour; and having arranged all affairs set out on a journey from Rome. . . .

During his stay at Perinthus, now called Heraclea, a conspiracy was thus formed against him. There was in the court a man named Eros, whose office was to carry out the answers of the emperor. This man had been for some fault threatened by the emperor, and put in great fear. Dreading therefore lest the emperor should realize his menaces by actions, he went to some of the guard, whom he knew to be the boldest men in the court; be told them a plausible story, and shewed them a letter of his own writing, in the character of the emperor (which he had long before learned to counterfeit), and persuading them first that they themselves were to be put to death, [h]e endeavoured to prevail on them to murder the emperor. The deception answered. Observing Aurelianus to go out of the city with a small retinue, they ran out upon him and murdered him.

RIC 138
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CarusAntClementia.jpg
1dp Carus25 views282-283

AE antoninianus

Radiate draped bust, right, IMP C M AVR CARVS P F AVG
Emperor standing right, receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter standing left, G between, XXI in ex, CLEMENTIA TEMP

RIC 118

The Historia Augusta recorded: Let us, rather, pass on to Carus, a mediocre man, so to speak, but one to be ranked with the good rather than the evil princes, yet a better ruler by far, had he not left Carinus to be his heir. . . . In regard to Cams' birthplace there is such divergence of statement among the various writers that by reason of the very great difference among them I am unable to tell what it really was. . . . He, then, after rising through the various civil and military grades, as the inscriptions on his statues show, was made prefect of the guard by Probus, and he won such affection among the soldiers that when Probus, that great emperor, was slain, he alone seemed wholly worthy of the imperial power. I am not unaware that many have suspected and, in fact, have put it into the records that Probus was slain by the treachery of Carus. This, however, neither the kindness of Probus toward Carus nor Carus' own character will permit us to believe, and there is the further reason that he avenged the death of Probus with the utmost severity and steadfastness. . . .

[Zonaras adds: Another war against Galienus was incited by Macrinus, who, having two sons, Macrianus and Quintus, attempted a usurpation. Because he was lame in one leg, he did not don the imperial mantle, but clad his sons in it.]

And so. . . , as soon as he received the imperial power, by the unanimous wish of all the soldiers he took up the war against the Persians for which Probus had been preparing. He gave to his sons the name of Caesar, planning to despatch Carinus, with some carefully selected men, to govern the provinces of Gaul, and to take along with himself Numerian, a most excellent and eloquent young man. . . . [H]e conquered Mesopotamia and advanced as far as Ctesiphon; and while the Persians were busied with internal strife he won the name of Conqueror of Persia. But when he advanced still further, desirous himself of glory and urged on most of all by his prefect, who in his wish to rule was seeking the destruction of both Carus and his sons as well, he met his death, according to some, by disease, according to others, through a stroke of lightning.

Zonaras wrote: He was a Gaul by ancestry, but brave and accomplished in matters of warfare. The account of his death has been variously composed by those who have done historical research. Some say that, having campaigned against the Huns, he was killed there. Others say that he was encamped by the River Tigris and that there, in the place where his army had thrown up a palisade, his tent was struck by lightning, and they record that, along with it, he too was destroyed.
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MagnMaxAE2RepReip.jpg
1ew Magnus Maximus45 views383-388

AE2

Diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, D N MAG MAXIMVS P F AVG
Emperor standing left, raising kneeling female; mintmarks PCON, SCON and TCON known, REPARATIO REIPVB

RIC 26a

Zosimus reports: While the affairs of Thrace were, thus situated, those of Gratian were in great perplexity. Having accepted the counsel of those courtiers who usually corrupt the manners of princes, he gave a reception to some fugitives called Alani, whom he not only introduced into his army, but honoured with valuable presents, and confided to them his most important secrets, esteeming his own soldiers of little value. This produced among his soldiers a violent hatred against him, which being gradually inflamed and augmented incited in them a disposition for innovation, and most particulary in that part of them which was in Britain, since they were the most resolute and vindictive. In this spirit they were encouraged by Maximus, a Spaniard, who had been the fellow-soldier of Theodosius in Britain. He was offended that Theodosius should be thought worthy of being made emperor, while he himself had no honourable employment. He therefore cherished the animosity of the soldiers towards the emperor. They were thus easily induced to revolt and to declare Maximus emperor. Having presented to him the purple robe and the diadem, they sailed to the mouth of the Rhine. As the German army, and all who were in that quarter approved of the election, Gratian prepared to contend against Maximus, with a considerable part of the army which still adhered to him. When the armies met, there were only slight skirmishes for five days; until Gratian, |115 perceiving that the Mauritanian cavalry first deserted from him and declared Maximus Augustus, and afterwards that the remainder of his troops by degrees espoused the cause of his antagonist, relinquished all hope, and fled with three hundred horse to the Alps. Finding those regions without defence, he proceeded towards Rhaetia, Noricum, Pannonia, and the Upper Moesia. When Maximus was informed of his route, he was not negligent of the opportunity, but detached Andragathius, commander of the cavalry, who was his faithful adherent, in pursuit of Gratian. This officer followed him with so great speed, that he overtook him when he was passing the bridge at Sigidunus, and put him to death. . . .

The reign of Gratian being thus terminated, Maximus, who now considered himself firmly fixed in the empire, sent an embassy to the emperor Theodosius, not to intreat pardon for his treatment of Gratian, but rather to increase his provocations. The person employed in this mission was the imperial chamberlain (for Maximus would not suffer an eunuch to preside in his court), a prudent person, with whom he had been familiarly acquainted from his infancy. The purport of his mission was to propose to Theodosius a treaty of amity, and of alliance, against all enemies who should make war on the Romans, and on refusal, to declare against him open hostility. Upon this, Theodosius admitted Maximus to a share in the empire, and in the honour of his statues and his imperial title. . . .

Affairs being thus situated in the east, in Thrace, and in Illyricum, Maximus, who deemed his appointments inferior to his merits, being only governor of the countries formerly under Gratian, projected how to depose the young Valentinian from the empire, if possible totally, but should he fail in the whole, to secure at least some part. . . . he immediately entered Italy without; resistance, and marched to Aquileia. . . .

Theodosius, having passed through Pannonia and the defiles of the Appennines, attacked unawares the forces of Maximus before they were prepared for him. A part of his army, having pursued them with the utmost speed, forced their way through the gates of Aquileia, the guards being too few to resist them. Maximus was torn from his imperial throne while in the act of distributing money to his soldiers, and being stripped of his imperial robes, was brought to Theodosius, who, having in reproach enumerated some of his crimes against the commonwealth, delivered him to the common executioner to receive due punishment. Such was the end of Maximus and of his usurpation. Having fraudulently overcome Valentinian, he imagined that he should with ease subdue the whole Roman empire. Theodosius, having heard, that when Maximus came from beyond the Alps he left his son Victor, whom he had dignified with the title of Caesar, he immediately sent for his general, named Arbogastes, who deprived the youth both of his dignity and life.
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carnuntum_02a.JPG
2009-Austria - Carnuntum23 viewsEmperor Marcus Aurelius took advantage of Carnuntum's location in his wars against the Germanic tribes of Marcomanni and Quadi between 171 and 173 AD.
To the column at the arch planning a statue of Marcus Aurelius.
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2009-Austria - Carnuntum28 viewsBronze statuesberserker
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2009-Austria - Carnuntum34 viewsBronze statues - Herculesberserker
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2009-Austria - Carnuntum33 viewsNike and Pietas bronze statues.berserker
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2009-Austria - Carnuntum43 viewsPersonifications and alliterations. Capricorn and other statues, coins' reverses with gods and personifications.berserker
carnuntum_09.JPG
2009-Austria - Carnuntum28 viewsStone statues. The reclining old Danube.berserker
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2009-Austria - Carnuntum23 viewsReligion. Stone statues to the Mithras cult.berserker
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2009-Austria - Carnuntum24 viewsReligion. Stone statue to the Emperor cult.berserker
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2009-Austria - Carnuntum24 viewsReligion. Stone statues and reliefs to different cults.berserker
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2009-Austria - Carnuntum30 viewsBronze statues. Gods and personifications.berserker
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2009-Austria - Carnuntum33 viewsBronze statues. Gods and personifications 2.berserker
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2009-Austria - Carnuntum18 viewsBronze statues. Nike.berserker
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2009-Austria - Carnuntum19 viewsBronze statues. Fortuna.berserker
junlia_domna.JPG
201a. Julia Domna70 viewsIn Rome, when the worship of Cybele, as Magna Mater, was formally initiated in 203 BC, Rome was embroiled in the Second Punic War. The previous year, an inspection had been made of the Sibylline Books, and some oracular verses had been discovered that announced that if a foreign foe should carry war into Italy, he could be driven out and conquered if the Mater Magna were brought from Pessinos to Rome. Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica was ordered to go to the port of Ostia, accompanied by all the matrons, to meet the goddess. He was to receive her as she left the vessel, and when brought to land he was to place her in the hands of the matrons who were to bear her to her destination, the Temple of Victory on the Palatine Hill. The day on which this event took place, 12 April, was observed afterwards as a festival, the Megalesian. (Livy, History of Rome, circa AD 10)

In Rome, her Phrygian origins were recalled by Catullus, whose famous poem on the theme of Attis includes a vivid description of Cybele's worship: "Together come and follow to the Phrygian home of Cybele, to the Phrygian forests of the goddess, where the clash of cymbals ring, where tambourines resound, where the Phrygian flute-player blows deeply on his curved reed, where ivy-crowned maenads toss their heads wildly."

Roman devotion to Cybele ran deep. Not coincidentally, when a Christian basilica was built over the site of a temple to Cybele, to occupy the site, it was dedicated as the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore.

The worship of Cybele penetrated as far as Mauretania, where, just outside Setif, the ceremonial "tree-bearers" and the faithful (religiosi) restored the temple of Cybele and Attis after a disastrous fire in AD 288. Lavish new fittings paid for by the private group included the silver statue of Cybele and the chariot that carried her in procession received a new canopy, with tassels in the form of fir cones. (Robin Lane Fox, Pagans and Christians, p 581.)

Today, a monumental statue of Cybele can be found in one of the principal traffic circles of Madrid, the Plaza de Cibeles (illustration, upper right).

In Roman mythology, Magna Mater deorum Idaea ("great Idaean mother of the gods") was the name for the originally Phrygian goddess Cybele, as well as Rhea.

Her cult moved from Phrygia to Greece from the 6th century to the 4th. In 205 BC, Rome adopted her cult.

Julia Domna Denarius. 212 AD. IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right / MATRI DEVM, Cybele standing left, leaning on column, holding drum & scepter, lion at foot. RSC 137. RIC 382
1 commentsecoli
868_P_Hadrian_RPC2028.JPG
2028 LYDIA, Hypaepa Hadrian Ae. 24 Artemis Anaitis17 viewsReference
RPC III, 2028;

Magistrate Ioulianos (strategos)

Obv. ΑΥ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., with drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. ΕΠΙ ΙΟΥΛΙΑΝΟΥ СΤΡ ΥΠΑΙΠΗΝΩΝ
Cult-statue of Artemis Anaitis

8.50 gr
24 mm
6h
okidoki
coins123.JPG
202a. Plautilla62 viewsVenus

The Roman goddess of love and beauty, but originally a vegetation goddess and patroness of gardens and vineyards. Later, under Greek influence, she was equated with Aphrodite and assumed many of her aspects. Her cult originated from Ardea and Lavinium in Latium. The oldest temple known of Venus dates back to 293 BCE, and was inaugurated on August 18. Later, on this date the Vinalia Rustica was observed. A second festival, that of the Veneralia, was celebrated on April 1 in honor of Venus Verticordia, who later became the protector against vice. Her temple was built in 114 BCE. After the Roman defeat near Lake Trasum in 215 BCE, a temple was built on the Capitol for Venus Erycina. This temple was officially opened on April 23, and a festival, the Vinalia Priora, was instituted to celebrate the occasion.

Venus is the daughter of Jupiter, and some of her lovers include Mars and Vulcan, modeled on the affairs of Aphrodite. Venus' importance rose, and that of her cult, through the influence of several Roman political leaders. The dictator Sulla made her his patroness, and both Julius Caesar and the emperor Augustus named her the ancestor of their (Julian) family: the 'gens Julia' was Aeneas, son of Venus and the mortal Anchises. Ceasar introduced the cult of Venus Genetrix, the goddess of motherhood and marriage, and built a temple for her in 46 BCE. She was also honored in the temple of Mars Ultor. The last great temple of Venus was built by the emperor Hadrianus near the Colusseum in 135 CE.

Roman statues and portraits of Venus are usually identical to the Greek representations of Aphrodite.

AR Denarius. PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple & palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet. RSC 25.
ecoli
452_P_Hadrian.JPG
2061 IONIA, Ephesus Hadrian, Artemis 33 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2061; BMC 229; vA 1885

Obv. ΑΥ ΚΑΙ ΤΡ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕ
Laureate head right

Rev: ΕΦΕ-СΙΩΝ
Tetrastyle temple within which cult statue of Artemis Ephesia with supports

8.2 gr
24 mm
h
okidoki
1247_P_Hadrian_RPC2074.jpg
2074 IONIA, Ephesus Hadrian, cult statue of Artemis6 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2074; SNG von Auock 7866; SNG Copenhagen 388; SNG München 128

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΑΙСΑΡ ΟΛΥΜΠΙΟС
Laureate head of Hadrian right

Rev. ΑΡΤΕΜΙС ΕΦΕСΙΑ
Cult statue of Artemis Ephesia with supports between two stags

18.08 gr
29 mm
6h
okidoki
89Hadrian__RIC82.jpg
218 Hadrian Denarius Roma 119-22 AD Concordia33 viewsReference.
Strack 110; RIC III, 218; C. 1149

Bust A4

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate bare bust with drapery

Rev. P M TR P COS III
Concordia seated left, holding out patera and resting on statuette of Spes

3.07 gr
19.5 mm
12h
okidoki
rjb_eleg_ber_04_08.jpg
218a17 viewsElagabalus 218-22 AD
AE 24 mm
Berytus in Phoenicia
Tetrastyle temple with curved arch containing a statue of Marsyas right
BMC 204, SNG Cop 116
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_2013_04_05.jpg
218a38 viewsElagabalus 218-22 AD
AE 29 mm
Tyre in Phoenicia
Hexastyle temple with curved arch containing a statue of Astarte left, palm tree and murex shell flanking an altar in the foreground
BMC 393, Rouvier 2363, countermark Howgego 359
1 commentsmauseus
22064.jpg
22064 Hadrian/Concordia4 viewsHadrian/Concordia
Obv:IMP CAES DIVI TRA PARTH F DIVI NER NEP TRAIANO HADRIANO AVG
Bust of Hadrian, laureate, draped, cuirassed, right
Rev:PONT MAX TR POT COS S C CONCORDIA
Concordia seated left, holding patera over altar and resting elbow on statuette of Spes at her side cornucopia below throne
RIC II Hadrian 540
Mint: Rome 33.8mm 19.1g




Blayne W
1148_P_Hadrian_RPC.jpg
2221A CARIA Euippe Hadrian, Artemis statue32 viewsReference.
RPC III -; apparently unpublished; AΔP c/m Howgego 511

Obv. [ ] AΔPIANOC [ ]?
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, right, with a radiated head right facing on Hadrian his bust

Rev. ЄVIΠΠЄΩN
Facing statue of Artemis Ephesia, with supports; to inner left and right, stag standing outward, facing

19.82 gr
31 mm
6h
okidoki
1148_P_Hadrian_RPC2221A~0.jpg
2221A CARIA Euippe Hadrian, Artemis statue3 viewsReference.
RPC III -; apparently unpublished; AΔP c/m Howgego 511

Obv. [ ] AΔPIANOC [ ]?
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, right, with a radiated head right facing on Hadrian his bust

Rev. ЄVIΠΠЄΩN
Facing statue of Artemis Ephesia, with supports; to inner left and right, stag standing outward, facing

19.82 gr
31 mm
6h
okidoki
mamaea sest.jpg
224 AD (?)- JULIA MAMAEA sestertius 31 viewsobv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA (diademed and draped bust right)
rev: VENVS FELIX (Venus seated left, holding statuette and scepter), S-C in ex.
ref: RIC 701, Cohen 69, BMC 197
21.35gms, 30mm
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1010_P_Hadrian_RPC2287.jpg
2287 CARIA, Cidramus Hadrian, cult statue of Artemis Ephesia9 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2287; vA 2587

Magistrate Pamphilos

Obv. ΑΥ ΚΑΙ ΤΡ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС
Laureate and draped bust of Hadrian, right, with paludamentum

Rev. ΔΙΑ ΠΑΜΦΙΛΟΥ ΚΙΔΡΑΜΗΝΩΝ
Facing cult statue of Artemis Ephesia.

3.16 gr
17 mm
6h
okidoki
249-3_Maenia.jpg
249/3. Maenia - quadrans (133 BC)13 viewsAE Quadrans (Rome, 132 BC)
O/ Head of Hercules right, wearing lion's skin; 3 pellets behind.
R/ P MAE ANT M F above prow right; 3 pellets before; ROMA below.
4.65g, 19mm
Crawford 249/3 (28 specimens in Paris)
- Ex-Thersites Collection (bought on 18 April 1986)
- Roma Numismatics, e-sale 33, lot 336.

* Publius Maenius M.f. Antiaticus:

Antiaticus belonged to the plebeian gens Maenia, but his relatives are not known. Other Maenii are recorded in the 2nd century, such as Titus, Gaius, and Quintus Maenius, Praetors respectively in 186, 180, and 170, or Publius Maenius, moneyer in 194-190. However, Antiaticus mentioned on his coins that he was the son of Marcus, who is not known, and none of the aforementioned Maenii shared his cognomen.

Antiaticus must have therefore belonged to another branch of the gens, which descended from Gaius Maenius, Consul in 338, Dictator in 320 and 314, who defeated the Volsci by taking their city of Antium in 338, thus putting an end to the Second Latin War and also the conquest of Latium. The cognomen Antiaticus comes from this victory, for which Gaius Maenius was also rewarded by a statue on the Forum, possibly at the top of a column (Cicero, Pro Sestio, 58; Livy, VIII, 13).

The life of Antiaticus is still very obscure, and it seems he did not hold other office. He is only known through his coins.

Eckel read ME at the end of this legend and conjectured that it might have been the first letters of an agnomen Megellus or Medulinus (V, p. 240-1), but it seems very unlikely that a moneyer could have received an agnomen so early in his career. Perhaps Eckhel could not see good examples of this type; in any case, the legend on this coin clearly reads as MF, for "Marcus filius".
Joss
1305_P_Sabina_RPC2501.jpg
2501 PHRYGIA, Cadi Sabina, cult statue of Artemis Ephesia standing20 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2501; SNG von Aulock 8388

Obv. ϹΑΒΕΙΝΑ ϹΕΒΑϹΤΗ
Draped bust of Sabina, right

Rev. ΚΑΔΟΗΝΩΝ
Cult statue of Artemis Ephesia with supports

3.41 gr
18 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
531_P_Hadrian_Pseudo_RPC2520.jpg
2520 PHRYGIA, Tiberiopolis Ae20 Pseudo-autonomous under Hadrian9 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2520; vA, Phryg. 1187-99; SNG Copenhagen 753; BMC 3
same die pair as nr 5 on RPC 2520

Magistrate T. Ailius Flavianus Sôsthenes (archon)

Obv. ΙΕΡΑ СΥΝΚΛΗΤΟС
Draped bust of Senate, right

Rev. ΕΠΙ CΩCΘΕΝΟΥC ΑΡΧΟΝΤΟC ΤΙΒΕΡΙ (missing character)
Cult statue of Artemis Ephesia with supports between two stags

3.92 gr
20 mm
6h
okidoki
rjb_val2_04_06.jpg
253a23 viewsValerian I 253-60 AD
AE 30 mm
Sagalassus in Pisidia
Cult statue in octastyle temple
Countermark of eaglestanding facing with head turned left, wreath in beak - Howgego 335
mauseus
147_P_Hadrian__BMC_23.jpg
2541 PHRYGIA, Ancyra Sabina Ae 18 † 136 AD Cult statue of Artemis27 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2541; BMC 23-24; SGICV 1308; Lindgren 885

Obv. CEBACTH CABINA
Draped bust of Sabina, right

Rev. ANKYPANΩN
Cult statue of Artemis Ephesia with supports flanked by two stags

4.76 gr
18 mm
12h
okidoki
1304_P_Sabina_RPC2555.jpg
2555 LYDIA, Gordus Julia Sabina, cult statue of Artemis Ephesia standing17 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2555; BMC 20-21; Wa 4975

Obv. ϹΑΒΕΙΝΑ ϹΕΒΑϹΤΗ
Draped bust of Sabina, right

Rev. ΙΟΥΛΙ ΓΟΡΔΗΝΩΝ
Cult statue of Artemis Ephesia, with supports, between two stags

3.90 gr
18 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
1011_P_Hadrian_RPC2577A.jpg
2577A PHRYGIA, Eumenea Hadrian Ae 25 Artemis Ephesia7 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2577A;

Obv. ΚΑΙϹΑΡ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС
Laureate bust of Hadrian

Rev. ΕΥΜΕΝΕΩΝ ΑΧΑΙΩΝ
Cult statue of Artemis Ephesia with supports, between two stags

10.65 gr
25 mm
6h
okidoki
911_P_hadrian_RPC2580.jpg
2580 PHRYGIA, Eumenea Hadrian Ae 26 Artemis Ephesia7 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2580; BMC 53

Obv. ΑΥ ΚΑΙ ΤΡ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕ
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian r., with aegis

Rev. ΕΥΜΕΝΕΩΝ ΑΧΑΙΩΝ
Cult statue of Artemis Ephesia with supports, between two stags

8.21 gr
26 mm
6h
okidoki
772_P_Hadrian_RPC2699var_.JPG
2705A PAMPHYLIA, Perga Hadrian AE 14 Artemis standing in temple17 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2705A; SNG Pfälzer IV, 278

Obv. [ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟ]C KAI
Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right

Rev. [ΠƐΡΓ]ΑΙΩΝ
Tetrastyle temple; within which cult statue of Artemis of Perga; eagle in pediment.

2.46 gr
14 mm
6h
okidoki
1060_P_Hadrian_RPV2706cf.jpg
2706 PAMPHYLIA, Perga Hadrian Ae after 128 AD Artemis of Perga in temple34 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2706 cf=Berlin 5296 cf weight

Issue Hadrian Olumpios

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΑΙСΑΡ ΟΛΥΜΠΙΟС
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., with drapery on l. shoulder, and over back of neck

Rev. ΑΡΤΕΜΙΔΟС ΠΕΡΓΑΙΑС
Hexastyle temple on podium within which cult statue of Artemis of Perga

25.88 gr
38 mm
6h

Note.
apparently there are two dominations this one being 25.88 gr and Berlin coin is 17.34 gr
2 commentsokidoki
990_P_Hadrian_RPC2719var_.JPG
2719var. PAMPHYLIA Aspendus Hadrian AE 15 Cult statues13 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2719 var.; BMC 79; SNG France 162 var.; SNG Pfalz 62-63 var.; Howgego 518

Obv. ΚΑΙСΑΡ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r., with paludamentum

Rev. ΑС(l.)-ΠΕΝ(r.)
Cult statues of the Aphroditai Kastnietides

3.66 gr
18 mm
5h
okidoki
39Hadrian__RIC280~0.jpg
280 Hadrian Denarius Roma 134-38 AD Venus37 viewsReference.
RIC 280a var Globe; C 1449 (no globe); Strack 276(no globe)

Obv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
laureate head right

Rev. VENERIS FELICIS
Venus, mantled and diademed, seated left on throne, holding statuette of Cupid, and sceptre,globe in exergue

3.04 gr
19 mm
12h
okidoki
rjb_repub_04_06.jpg
29127 viewsMn Aemilio Lep c.114/3 BC
AR denarius
Obv "ROMA"
Female bust (Roma?) right
Rev "MN AEMILIO LEP"
Equestrian statue on three arches (aqueduct?, the Aqua Marcia)
Rome mint
Crawford 291
mauseus
297-1b_Quinctia.jpg
297/1b. Quinctia - denarius (112-111 BC)31 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 112-111 BC)
O/ Bust of Hercules seen from behind, with head turned to left and club over shoulder.
R/ Desultor right, wearing cuirass; control-mark behind; rat right between TI Q below; D.S.S. incuse on tablet in exergue.
3.82g; 118mm
Crawford 297/1b (87 obverse dies/109 reverse dies)
- Naville Numismatics Live Auction 36, lot 534.

* Tiberius Quinctius:

The attribution of this issue to a Tiberius Quinctius is dubious as the few letters on the reverse could mean different things. Crawford rules out the possibility that the Q stands for Quaestor, so it should only be the first letter of a nomen, hence the attribution to a Quinctius. However a Quinctilius is also possible.

The significance of the rat below the horses is an enigma. It apparently cannot be related to any cognomen; Crawford may be right to reject previous attempts to link it to a name -- the solution is probably not as easy as simply translating "rat", "mouse" or "rodent" in Latin. Mus ("mouse") was nonetheless an attested cognomen, but the gens Decia that bore it was already extinct by the end of the 2nd century.

The reverse with the desultor was perhaps a statue, as the legend DSS stands for "de Senatus Sententia", usually found on public monuments.
2 commentsJoss
298-1_Caesia.jpg
298/1. Caesia - denarius (112-1 BC)15 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 112-111 BC)
O/ Bust of Apollo seen from behind, with head turned to left and thunderbolt in right hand; APO on right.
R/ Lares Praestites seated facing, with dog between, each holding staff in left hand; bust of Vulcan with tongs over shoulder above; LA on left; PRE on right; L CAESI in exergue.
3.79 g; 20mm
Crawford 298/1 (50 obverse dies/62 reverse dies)
- Collection of Walter Mirko Stoecklin, Winterthur, Switzerland, acquired prior to 1981. W. M. Stoecklin was the third member of a dynasty of coin collectors based in Switzerland.
- Obolos 9, lot 34.

* Lucius Caesius:

Our moneyer is the first known member of the minor gens Caesia, but the rest of his life is completely unknown. Mommsen (Monnaie Romaine, II, p.370) thought that he could have been the father of Lucius Caesius, praetor in 75 BC (Cicero, In Verrem, II, 1, 130), but there were other Caesii around this time, so they were not necessarily related.

The deity represented on the reverse could be Apollo, as shown by the monogram behind his head, or Vejovis, an obscure god with the attributes of both Apollo and Jupiter (especially the thunderbolt). The reverse depicts the Lares Praestites, the guardians of the city of Rome, whom Ovid described their statues with a dog between them (Ovid, Fasti, v. 129-145).

The bust of Vulcan and the tongs were possibly the emblems of the moneyers.
1 commentsJoss
480Hadrian_Mule_RIC172.jpg
3036 Hadrian Denarius 117-30 AD Concordia Eastern mint31 viewsReference.
RIC-; BMCR -; Strack- cf RIC172; RIC III, 3036

Bust A1

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS PP
Laureate bust

Rev. COS III
Concordia seated left holding patera and resting other arm on statue of Spes at side of throne

3.20 gr
17.3 mm
6h
okidoki
1166_P_Hadrian_RPC--.jpg
3159 CAPPADOCIA, Caesarea. Hadrian 124 AD Helios on Mt Argaeus35 viewsReference.
Cohen -, cf. 457 (laureate and without aegis). Henseler -, cf. X29a var. (without aegis). RIC -. RPC III -, cf. 3158-9 (differing bust types). Sydenham -, cf. 290a (laureate and without aegis). An unpublished variety of a very rare type.

Issue Bronze with latin legends and Mount Argaeus as reverse design

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Radiate head of Hadrian to right, with aegis on his left shoulder.

Rev. COS III
Mount Argaeus surmounted by statue of Sol-Helios, radiate, holding globe in his right hand and long scepter with his left.

4.81 gr
19 mm
6h

Note.
From the Collection of Sir A. J. Evans, Ars Classica XVII, 3 October 1934, 1400.

While usually being attributed to Caesarea, the style of the very rare small bronzes of Hadrian with Latin legends showing the Mount Argaios is clearly that of Rome. It is generally believed that the Rome mint shipped its dies to the East in such cases to have the coins struck on the spot, but the fact that RPC records an obverse die match between an Argaios-semis and a regular Rome mint piece in Vienna with a modius on the reverse (RPC III 3159.3 resp. BMC p. 442*) strongly indicates that all semisses were struck in Rome. The emergence of a local motive on a Roman Imperial coin is, in any case, very unusual and the coins may have been struck to commemorate Hadrian's visit to Cappadocia in 124 or 130/1.
1 commentsokidoki
1224_P_Hadrian_Pseudo_RPC3303.jpg
3303 CILICIA, Tarsus, Pseudo-autonomous under Hadrian, Perseus standing27 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3303; SNG BN 1437-41;

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΗϹ ΤΑΡϹΕΩΝ
Head of bearded Heracles r., crowned with oak-leaves, club on l. shoulder

Rev. ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΕΩϹ
Perseus, wearing winged sandals, standing, l., holding cult statue of Apollo holding wolves in r. hand, chlamys and harpe in l.; at his feet, lion, l., attacking bull kneeling, l.; in field, l., ΒΟΗ/ΘΟΥ disposed either vertically, either horizontally

16.01 gr
30 mm
12h
3 commentsokidoki
caligula dupondius RIC56.jpg
37-41 AD - AUGUSTUS memorial Æ dupondius - struck under Caligula 43 viewsobv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS (radiate head of Augustus left), dividing S C
rev: CONSENSV SENAT ET EQ ORDIN P Q R (laureate & togate statue of Gaius Caligula seated left on curule chair, holding branch)
ref: RIC I 56 (Gaius); BMCRE 88; C.87 (at Augustus-as struck Tiberius-4 frcs). BMC90
mint: Rome
15.80gms, 29mm
Rare

In reverse the whole text: CONSENSV. SENATus ET EQuestris ORDINis Populi Que Romani. This coin probably features an image of an actual statue of the Caligula. Dio Cassius notes, that the Senate ordered a guard to keep watch at each of Caligula's statues. (Dio Cassius LIX.26). Just a few coin has S-C on the obverse, like this.
berserker
caligula_RIC36-R.jpg
37-41 AD - CALIGULA AE sestertius - struck 37-38 AD80 viewsobv: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS P M TR POT (Pietas, veiled, seated left and holding patera, left elbow resting on small statue of Spes), PIETAS in exergue
rev: DIVO-AVG (Gaius sacrificing before garlanded hexastyle temple; one attendant leading bull to altar, the other holding a patera), S-C across field
ref: RIC I 36 (R), BMCRE 41, Cohen 9 (15frcs)
27.38gms, 33mm
Very rare

This issue commemorates Gaius Caligula's dedication of the Temple of the Divus Augustus and the young emperor's sense of pietas. The PIETAS beneath the figure of the emperor drives home the point that he is fulfilling his duty by dedicating the temple to his great-grandfather. Construction of the Temple of the Divus Augustus began under Tiberius and, perhaps, under the direction of Livia herself, in the general area behind the Basilica Julia (though the actual site remains unknown), and was subsequently dedicated by Caligula.
2 commentsberserker
Longus.jpg
42 BC L. Mussidius Longus132 viewsCONCORDIA
Veiled and diad. head of Concordia right star below chin

L. MVSSIDIVS LONGVS
Shrine of Venus Cloacina consisting of circular platform, inscribed CLOACIN, surmounted by two statues of the goddess

Rome
42 BC

3.42g
Sear 494, RRC 494/42

ex-Canadian Coin

In Roman mythology, Cloacina (Latin, cloaca: "sewer" or "drain") was the goddess who presided over the Cloaca Maxima the main sewer drain in Rome. The Cloaca Maxima is traditionally said to have beeen started by one of Rome's Etruscan kings, Tarquinius Priscus. Despite her Etruscan origins, she later became identified with Venus.

Titus Tatius, who reigned with Romulus, erected a statue to Cloacina as the spirit of the "Great Drain". As well as controlling sewers, she was also a protector of sexual intercourse in marriage. The Romans believed that a good sewage system was important for the success of Rome, as a good sewer system was necessary for the physical health of Roman citizens. Additionally, Romans worshipped Cloacina as the goddess of purity. Cloacina was worshipped as an aspect of Venus at the small Shrine of Venus Cloacina, located in front of the Basilica Aemilia in the Roman Forum and directly above the Cloaca Maxima. The depiction on the reverse of this coin is that shrine.

The image of Concordia could be interpreted to convey the thought of Unity between the triumvirs to defeat Brutus and Cassius. Venus Cloacina on the reverse conveys the thought of purification for the treacherous murder of the dictator Julius Caesar by men who claimed to be his friends.
4 commentsJay GT4
423-1_Servilia2.jpg
423/1. Servilia - denarius (57 BC)31 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 57 BC)
O/ Head of Flora right; lituus behind; FLORAL PRIMVS before.
R/ Two soldiers facing each other and presenting swords; C SERVEIL in exergue; C F upwards on right.
3.87g; 18mm
Crawford 423/1 (99 obverse dies/110 reverse dies)
- ROMA Numismatics, E-Sale 42, lot 484.
- Artemide Aste, 11-12 June 2016, lot 253.

* Gaius Servilius C.f. (Brocchus?):

The gens Servilia was originally patrician, but our moneyer was most likely a plebeian because at this time, the only remaining patrician branch of the gens was the Caepiones. The Servilii Gemini, likewise patricians at first, lost their status during the Second Punic War for an unknown reason and their descendants had erratic cognomina, making it difficult to reconstruct the genealogical tree of the gens. The one given by Crawford for RRC 239 is dubious, although possible.

Crawford also says that our moneyer was perhaps a brother of Marcus Servilius C.f., Tribune of the Plebs in 43 BC. He was possibly the Gaius Servilius Brocchus, son of Gaius, mentioned as Military Tribune by Flavius Josephus (Jewish Antiquities, xiv. 229), who tells that he served under the Consul L. Cornelius Lentulus Crus in Asia. It would match a career started in the 50, during which the Pompeian party was dominating, and continued as Pompey's supporter during the Civil War.

The meaning of his denarius has been debated. According to Crawford, the obverse legend refers to the priesthood of Flora, probably held by the gens, contradicting the view of Mommsen, who thought it was celebrating the establishment of the Ludi Florales in 173. This view has been in turn challenged by Robert Palmer, but without giving an explanation of his own*. It should also be mentioned that Pliny the Elder tells that there were statues of Flora, Triptolemus and Ceres by Praxiteles in the "Servilian gardens" (Natural History, xxxvi. 4), which obviously belonged to the gens, showing that Flora was of special importance for the Servilii.

The reverse reuses a common theme on Servilii's denarii: the duels of Marcus Servilius Pulex Geminus, Consul in 202, who was famous for his 23 victories in single combats (Plutarch, Aemilius Paullus, 31). The scene was depicted with variations on RRC 264 (horseback duel), RRC 327 (duel on foot), and RRC 370 (rider charging). It is also possible that RRC 239 shows another duel on horse, but disguised as the Dioscuri riding apart. The fact that our moneyer used this theme links him to the other direct descendants of Servilius Pulex Geminus, thus supporting Crawford's theory that he was a grandchild of Gaius Servilius, Praetor in 102.

* "Flora and the Sybil", in Ten Years of the Agnes Kirsopp Lake Michels Lectures at Bryn Mawr College, edited by Suzanne B. Faris, Lesley E. Lundeen, Bryn Mawr, 2006, pp. 58-70.
3 commentsJoss
rjb_repub2_04_06.jpg
42531 viewsL Marcius Pilippus c.56 BC
AR denarius
Obv "ANCVS"
Diademed head of Ancus Marcius right
Rev "PHILIPPVS AQVA MR"
Equestrian statue on the Aqua Marcia aqueduct
Rome mint
Crawford 425
mauseus
coin599.JPG
501. Constantine I Alexandria Posthumous26 viewsAlexandria

The city passed formally under Roman jurisdiction in 80 BC, according to the will of Ptolemy Alexander but after it had been previously under Roman influence for more than a hundred years. Julius Caesar dallied with Cleopatra in Alexandria in 47 BC, saw Alexander's body (quipping 'I came to see a king, not a collection of corpses' when he was offered a view of the other royal burials) and was mobbed by the rabble. His example was followed by Marc Antony, for whose favor the city paid dearly to Octavian, who placed over it a prefect from the imperial household.

From the time of annexation onwards, Alexandria seems to have regained its old prosperity, commanding, as it did, an important granary of Rome. This fact, doubtless, was one of the chief reasons which induced Augustus to place it directly under imperial power. In AD 215 the emperor Caracalla visited the city and for some insulting satires that the inhabitants had directed at him, abruptly commanded his troops to put to death all youths capable of bearing arms. This brutal order seems to have been carried out even beyond the letter, for a general massacre ensued.

Even as its main historical importance had formerly sprung from pagan learning, now Alexandria acquired fresh importance as a centre of Christian theology and church government. There Arianism was formulated and where also Athanasius, the great opponent of both Arianism and pagan reaction, triumphed over both, establishing the Patriarch of Alexandria as a major influence in Christianity for the next two centuries.

As native influences began to reassert themselves in the Nile valley, Alexandria gradually became an alien city, more and more detached from Egypt and losing much of its commerce as the peace of the empire broke up during the 3rd century AD, followed by a fast decline in population and splendour.

In the late 4th century, persecution of pagans by Christians had reached new levels of intensity. Temples and statues were destroyed throughout the Roman empire: pagan rituals became forbidden under punishment of death, and libraries were closed. In 391, Emperor Theodosius I ordered the destruction of all pagan temples, and the Patriarch Theophilus, complied with his request. It is possible that the great Library of Alexandria and the Serapeum was destroyed about this time. The pagan mathematician and philosopher Hypathia was a prominent victim of the persecutions.

The Brucheum and Jewish quarters were desolate in the 5th century, and the central monuments, the Soma and Museum, fell into ruin. On the mainland, life seemed to have centred in the vicinity of the Serapeum and Caesareum, both which became Christian churches. The Pharos and Heptastadium quarters, however, remained populous and left intact.

veiled head only
DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
RIC VIII Alexandria 32 C3

From uncleaned lot; one of the nicer finds.
ecoli
coins446.JPG
501. Constantine I Ostia Sol16 viewsOstia
Although Ostia was probably founded for the sole purpose of military defence — since through the Tiber's mouths armies could eventually reach Rome by water — in time the port became a commercial harbour, and a very important one too. Many of the goods that Rome received from its colonies and provinces passed through Ostia. In this role, Ostia soon replaced Pozzuoli (Puteoli, near Naples).

In 87 BC, the town was razed by Marius, and again in 67 BC it was sacked by pirates. After this second attack, the town was re-built and provided with protective walls by Cicero. The town was then further developed during the 1st century AD, mainly under the influence of Tiberius, who ordered the building of the first Forum. The town was also soon enriched by the construction of a new harbour on the northern mouths of the Tiber (which reaches the sea with a larger mouth in Ostia, Fiumara Grande, and a narrower one near to the current Fiumicino international airport). The new harbour, not surprisingly called Portus, was excavated from the ground at the orders of the emperor Claudius; it has an hexagonal form, in order to reduce the waves strength. The town was provided with all the services a town of the time could require; in particular, a famous lighthouse. Archaeologists also discovered the public latrinas, organised for collective use as a series of seats that lets us imagine today that the function was also a social moment. In addition, Ostia had a large theatre, public baths and a fire fighting service. You can still see the mosaic floors of the baths near today's entrance to the town.

Trajan too, required a widening of the naval areas, and ordered the building of another harbour, again pointing towards the north. It must be remembered that at a relatively short distance, there was also the harbour of Civitavecchia (Centum Cellae), and Rome was starting to have a significant number of harbours, the most important remaining Portus.

Ostia grew to 50,000 inhabitants in the 2nd century AD and in time focused its naval activities on Portus. With the end of the Roman Empire, Ostia fell slowly into decay, and was finally abandoned in the 9th century due to the fall of the Roman empire in combination with repeated invasions and sackings by Arab pirates; the inhabitants moved to Gregoriopolis. In the Middle Ages, bricks from buildings in Ostia were used for several other occasions. The Leaning Tower of Pisa was entirely built of material originally belonging to Ostia. A "local sacking" was carried out by baroque architects, who used the remains as a sort of marble store for the palazzi they were building in Rome. Soon after, foreign explorers came in search of ancient statues and objects. The Papacy started organising its own investigations with Pope Pius VII and the research still continues today. It has been estimated that two thirds of the ancient town have currently been found.

001. Constantine I Ostia

RIC VI Ostia 85 S

ecoli
coins209.JPG
502. Constantine II Siscia GLORIA EXERCITVS24 viewsSiscia

All that remains from prehistoric inhabitants on this area are small statues of idols and tools. Indigenous Illyrian tribes were conquered in the 4th century by the Celts. Celts ethically and culturally mixed with Illyric tribes and established on the right bank of the river Kupa a settlement called Segestica. Illyric and Celtic tribes succeeded in withstanding Roman pressures until the year 35 BC when Emperor Octavian with 12,000 soldiers conquered Segestica after a thirty - day siege.

After Romans had conquered Segestica, they built Siscia on the left bank of the river Kupa (right below the centre of today's Sisak). Siscia was the capital town of the Province of Pannonia Savia, where 40,000 inhabitants resided. The town had the forum, basilicas, temples, an empire mint, a theatre and two ports.
Christianity was spreading unstoppably and encompassed the town of Sisak. The first known Bishop of Sisak was Kvirin from 284 AD until his martyr's death, probably in the year 303 AD.
With gradual collapse of the Roman Empire, the importance of Sisak declined and the great migration brought to Sisak Huns, Gauls, Avars and Slavs. Slav tribes remained in this area and eventually the Slav language became dominant.

RIC VII Siscia 253 R3
ecoli
769Hadrian_RIC538b.jpg
538 Hadrian Dupondius 117 AD Concordia139 viewsReference.
RIC 538b; C. 260; BMC 1107; Strack 502

Obv. IMP CAES DIVI TRAIAN AVG F TRAIAN HADRIAN OPT AVG GER
Radiate, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front

Rev. DAC PARTHICO P M TR P COS P P S C
Concordia enthroned facing left, holding patera in right hand, left elbow resting on small statue of Spes on small column, cornucopiae below throne.

12.31gr
28 mm
12h
.
Note.
CNG Sale 11/09.
From the Estate Collection of Dr. Richard Doty
10 commentsokidoki
946_P_Hadrian_Emmett1061_8.jpg
5462 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Drachm 123-24 AD Triumphal arch 24 viewsReference.
Emmett 1061.8; RPC III, 5462; Cf. Dattari 1895-1898

Issue L H = year 8

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙ - ΑΔΡΙΑ СƐΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. L Η
Triumphal arch surmounted by Quadriga with statue of Emperor

17.51 gr
35 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
1005_P_Hadrian_RPC5568.jpg
5568 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Tetradrachm 125-26 AD Mars, wearing crested Corinthian helmet38 viewsReference.
RPC III, 5568; D1271 = Staffieri; Emmett 810.10

Issue L ΔΕΚΑΤΟΥ= year 10

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ - ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑ СƐΒ
Laureate draped and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r., seen from rear

Rev. L ΔΕΚΑΤΟΥ
Helmeted half-length nude bust left of Mars (Ares), seen from behind, wearing crested Corinthian helmet

12.87 gr
25 mm
12h

Note.
From the Giovanni Maria Staffieri Collection. Ex Münz Zentrum 29 (27 April 1977), lot 126; Giovanni Dattari Collection, no. 1271.

In the aforementioned article by Giovanni, he compares the reverse of this coin to the statue found at Hadrian’s villa (Fig. 7 in his article).
See G.M. Staffieri, ‘Sulla testimonianza di un Ares policleteo nella monetazione imperiale alessandrina’, NAC 22 (1993), pp. 187-99, where the design is compared to the statue found at Hadrian’s villa.
4 commentsokidoki
215_P_Hadrian__Emmett_848_13.jpg
5728 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Tetradrachm 128-29 AD Hands Clasped32 viewsReference.
Emmett 848.13; Dattari 1525; Milne 1274; RPC III, 5728

Issue L IΓ = year 13

Obv. AVT KAI TPAI AΔPIA CEB
Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, seen from back, with Paludamentum.

Rev. PATHR PATRIDOC (nobele vader)
Hands clasped, L IΓ

13.08 gr
25 mm
6h

note.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bust of Septimius Severus wearing a paludamentum
In Republican and Imperial Rome, the paludamentum was a cloak or cape fastened at one shoulder, worn by military commanders (e.g. the legionary Legatus) and rather less often by their troops. As supreme commander of the whole Roman army, Roman emperors were often portrayed wearing it in their statues (e.g. the Prima Porta Augustus) and on their coinage. After the reign of Augustus, the paludamentum was restricted to the Emperor.[citation needed] Children would also wear it sometimes, when there was bad weather and they needed protection.
The paludamentum was generally crimson, scarlet, or purple in colour, or sometimes white. It was fastened at the shoulder with a clasp, called a fibula, whose form and size varied through time. Putting on the paludamentum was a ceremonial act on setting out for war.
2 commentsokidoki
502_P_Hadrian_Emmett1002_18.jpg
5895 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Drachm 133-34 AD Isis Pharia standing42 viewsReference.
Emmett 1002.18; RPC III, 5895; Köln 1121-2; Dattari (Savio) 1768; K&G 32.588

Issue L IH = year 18

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СƐΒ
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.

Rev. L IH
Isis Pharia, holding billowing sail, sailing right before the Pharos of Alexandria, which is surmounted by a statue and two Tritons.

22.63 gr
33 mm
1 commentsokidoki
coin411.JPG
601. Eudoxia24 viewsAelia Eudoxia (d. 6 October 404) was the wife of the Eastern Roman emperor Arcadius.

The daughter of a certain Bauto, a Frankish magister militum serving in the Western Roman army during the 380s, Eudoxia owed her marriage to the youthful Emperor Arcadius on 27 April 395 to the intrigues of the eunuch of the palace, Eutropius. She had very considerable influence over her husband, who was of rather weak character and who was more interested in Christian piety than imperial politics.

In 399 she succeeded, with help from the leader of the Empire's Gothic mercenaries, in deposing her erstwhile benefactor Eutropius, who was later executed over the protests of John Chrysostom, the Patriarch of Constantinople.

John Chrysostom was already becoming unpopular at court due to his efforts at reforming the Church, and in 403 Eudoxia and Theophilus, Patriarch of Alexandria, succeeded in having the outspoken Patriarch condemned by a synod and then deposed. He was exiled to Armenia the next year after a brief return to power resulting from popular disgust at his fall and an earthquake which reinforced those feelings.

Eudoxia had a total of seven pregnancies, five of which were successful. Her final pregnancy ended in a miscarriage which led to her death on October 6, 404. One of her children was the future emperor Theodosius II.

In 403, Simplicius, Prefect of Constantinople, erected a statue dedicated to her on a column of porphyry. Arcadius renamed the town of Selymbria (Silivri) Eudoxiopolis after her, though this name did not survive.

Bronze AE 4, RIC 102, S 4241, VM 6, VF, 2.14g, 17.0mm, 180o, Nikomedia mint, 401-403 A.D.; obverse AEL EVDOXIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right with hand of God holding wreath over her head; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated on cuirass inscribing Christogram on shield, SMNA in ex; softly struck reverse; rare
ecoli
814_P_Hadrian_RPC6147.jpg
6145 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Drachm 136-37 AD Monumental Altar23 viewsReference.
RPC III, 6145; Dattari 1892; Emmett 910.21; Milne 1554

Issue L KA = year 21

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СƐΒ
laureate draped and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r., seen from rear

Rev, L ΚΑ
Monumental altar (of Caesareum) with six columns, surmounted with pyre, enclosing Eusebeia (?) in centre

23.40 gr
33 mm
12h

Note RPC.
Often described as altar of Agathodaemon (K; Bakhoum; Vogt, pp. 106-9; S. Handler, AJA 75 (1971), pp. 68-9); BMC said ‘enclosing statue of goddess facing; on her head, disc. (Altar of Caesareum).’ D just said: ‘Altare. Peristylium con sei colonne d’ordine Corintio, tra quelle di centro un personaggio in piede a s.; versa incense sopra altare. Sulla sommità una pyra e su ciascuna cantonata un aplustrum; le cantonate alle base hanno un ordine indecifrabile.’ Only clue is the aplustres. Some varieties have little altars between the columns (D1894). There are some round objects hanging up among the columns (e.g. D1894, Boston). The bases of the structure at l. and r. are in the form of the upper part of a human body. The same structure, with and without the central figure, also occurs on Antonine coins, which are often much better preserved than the Hadrianic pieces: see RPC IV online. J. McKenzie, The Architecture of Alexandria and Egypt (Yale, 2007), p. 187 describes it as a ‘distinctive but unidentified structure’, rejecting as unsatisfactory the identifications as the monumental altars in the Caesareum, the altar of Agathos Daimon or the altar of Alexander.
okidoki
1202_P_Hadrian_RPC6212_3.jpg
6212 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Drachm 136-37 AD Egyptian temple22 viewsReference.
RPC III, 6212.3; Dattari-Savio Pl. 97, 1975 (this coin); Emmett 996.21; Köln 1230 same die pair

Issue L KA = year 21

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СƐΒ
Bare head of Hadrian, left

Rev. L ΚΑ
Egyptian temple with pylons with statue of Isis, holding sceptre

21.50 gr
33 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
803_P_Hadrian_Emmett1103_21.jpg
6233 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Hemidrachm 136-37 AD Pharos lighthouse62 viewsReference.
Dattari-Savio Pl. 95, 1935 (this coin). RPC III, 6233.5; Emmett 1103.21

Issue L KA = year 21

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СƐΒ
Laureate draped and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r., seen from rear

Rev. L KA
Pharos lighthouse surmounted by two Tritons, each blowing a trumpet, between a lantern surmounted by a statue, holding situla and scepter; entryway below.

11.31 gr
30 mm
12h
2 commentsokidoki
TitusCommColosseum.jpg
711a, Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D. 114 viewsTITUS AUGUSTUS AR silver denarius. Struck at Rome, 80 AD. IMP TITVS CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG PM, laureate head right. Reverse - TRP IX IMP XV COS VIII PP, elephant walking left. Fully legible legends, about Very Fine, nice golden toning. Commemmorates the completion and dedication of the Colosseum and the opening of games. SCARCE. RCV 2512, valued at $544 in EF. 17mm, 3.1g. Ex Incitatus.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (A.D. 79-81)

John Donahue
College of William and Mary

Titus Flavius Vespasianus was born on December 30, 39 A.D. He was the oldest of the three children of the founder of the Flavian Dynasty, Vespasian. Beginning in the year 70 Titus was named Cæsar and coregent; he was highly educated and a brilliant poet and orator in both Latin and Greek. He won military fame during the Jewish Revolt of 69-70. In April, 70, he appeared before the walls of Jerusalem, and conquered and destroyed the city after a siege of five months. He wished to preserve the Temple, but in the struggle with the Jews who rushed out of it a soldier threw a brand into the building. The siege and taking of the city were accompanied by barbarous cruelties. The next year Titus celebrated his victory by a triumph; to increase the fame of the Flavian dynasty the inscription on the triumphal arch represented the overthrow of the helpless people as a heroic achievement. Titus succeeded his father as Emperor in 79.

Before becoming emperor, tradition records that Titus was feared as the next Nero, a perception that may have developed from his association with Berenice, his alleged heavy-handedness as praetorian prefect, and tales of sexual debauchery. Once in office, however, both emperor and his reign were portrayed in universally positive terms. The suddenness of this transformation raises immediate suspicions, yet it is difficult to know whether the historical tradition is suspect or if Titus was in fact adept at taking off one mask for another. What is clear, however, is that Titus sought to present the Flavians as the legitimate successors of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. Proof came through the issuing of a series of restoration coins of previous emperors, the most popular being Augustus and Claudius. In A.D. 80 Titus also set out to establish an imperial cult in honor of Vespasian. The temple, in which cult (the first that was not connected with the Julio-Claudians) was housed, was completed by Domitian and was known as the Temple of Vespasian and Domitian.
Legitimacy was also sought through various economic measures, which Titus enthusiastically funded. Vast amounts of capital poured into extensive building schemes in Rome, especially the Flavian Amphitheater, popularly known as the Colosseum. In celebration of additions made to the structure, Titus provided a grand 100-day festival, with sea fights staged on an artificial lake, infantry battles, wild beast hunts, and similar activities. He also constructed new imperial baths to the south-east of the Amphitheater and began work on the celebrated Arch of Titus, a memorial to his Jewish victories. Large sums were directed to Italy and the provinces as well, especially for road building. In response to the eruption of Vesuvius in A.D. 79, Titus spent large sums to relieve distress in that area; likewise, the imperial purse contributed heavily to rebuilding Rome after a devastating fire destroyed large sections of the city in A.D. 80. As a result of these actions, Titus earned a reputation for generosity and geniality. For these reasons he gained the honourable title of "amor et deliciæ generis humani" (the darling and admiration of the human race). Even so, his financial acumen must not be under-estimated. He left the treasury with a surplus, as he had found it, and dealt promptly and efficiently with costly natural disasters. The Greek historian of the third-century A.D., Cassius Dio, perhaps offered the most accurate and succinct assessment of Titus' economic policy: "In money matters, Titus was frugal and made no unnecessary expenditure." In other areas, the brevity of Titus' reign limits our ability to detect major emphases or trends in policy. As far as can be discerned from the limited evidence, senior officials and amici were well chosen, and his legislative activity tended to focus on popular social measures, with the army as a particular beneficiary in the areas of land ownership, marriage, and testamentary freedom. In the provinces, Titus continued his father's policies by strengthening roads and forts in the East and along the Danube.

Titus died in September, A.D. 81 after only 26 months in office. Suetonius recorded that Titus died on his way to the Sabine country of his ancestors in the same villa as his father. A competing tradition persistently implicated his brother and successor, Domitian, as having had a hand in the emperor's demise, but the evidence is highly contradictory and any wrongdoing is difficult to prove. Domitian himself delivered the funeral eulogy and had Titus deified. He also built several monuments in honor of Titus and completed the Temple of Vespasian and Titus, changing the name of the structure to include his brother's and setting up his cult statue in the Temple itself.

Titus was the beneficiary of considerable intelligence and talent, endowments that were carefully cultivated at every step of his career, from his early education to his role under his father's principate. Cassius Dio suggested that Titus' reputation was enhanced by his early death. It is true that the ancient sources tend to heroicize Titus, yet based upon the evidence, his reign must be considered a positive one. He capably continued the work of his father in establishing the Flavian Dynasty and he maintained a high degree of economic and administrative competence in Italy and beyond. In so doing, he solidified the role of the emperor as paternalistic autocrat, a model that would serve Trajan and his successors well. Titus was used as a model by later emperors, especially those known as the Five Good Emperors (Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius).

Copyright (C) 1997, John Donahue.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Catholic Encyclopedia, http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14746b.htm

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Titus_Colosseum_Commem_AR_denarius.jpg
711a, Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.142 viewsTitus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D. AR denarius, RCV 2512, aVF, struck at Rome, 80 A.D., 17.5mm, 3.4g. Obverse: IMP TITVS CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG PM, laureate head right; Reverse: TRP IX IMP XV COS VIII PP, elephant walking left. Fully legible legends; nice golden toning. This coin was struck in order to commemorate the completion and dedication of the Flavian Amphitheatre (the Colosseum) and its opening games. Very scarce. Ex Incitatus; photo courtesy Incitatus.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (A.D. 79-81)

John Donahue
College of William and Mary

Titus Flavius Vespasianus was born on December 30, 39 A.D. He was the oldest of the three children of the founder of the Flavian Dynasty, Vespasian. Beginning in the year 70 Titus was named Cæsar and coregent; he was highly educated and a brilliant poet and orator in both Latin and Greek. He won military fame during the Jewish Revolt of 69-70. In April, 70, he appeared before the walls of Jerusalem, and conquered and destroyed the city after a siege of five months. He wished to preserve the Temple, but in the struggle with the Jews who rushed out of it a soldier threw a brand into the building. The siege and taking of the city were accompanied by barbarous cruelties. The next year Titus celebrated his victory by a triumph; to increase the fame of the Flavian dynasty the inscription on the triumphal arch represented the overthrow of the helpless people as a heroic achievement. Titus succeeded his father as Emperor in 79.

Before becoming emperor, tradition records that Titus was feared as the next Nero, a perception that may have developed from his association with Berenice, his alleged heavy-handedness as praetorian prefect, and tales of sexual debauchery. Once in office, however, both emperor and his reign were portrayed in universally positive terms. The suddenness of this transformation raises immediate suspicions, yet it is difficult to know whether the historical tradition is suspect or if Titus was in fact adept at taking off one mask for another. What is clear, however, is that Titus sought to present the Flavians as the legitimate successors of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. Proof came through the issuing of a series of restoration coins of previous emperors, the most popular being Augustus and Claudius. In A.D. 80 Titus also set out to establish an imperial cult in honor of Vespasian. The temple, in which cult (the first that was not connected with the Julio-Claudians) was housed, was completed by Domitian and was known as the Temple of Vespasian and Domitian.
Legitimacy was also sought through various economic measures, which Titus enthusiastically funded. Vast amounts of capital poured into extensive building schemes in Rome, especially the Flavian Amphitheater, popularly known as the Colosseum. In celebration of additions made to the structure, Titus provided a grand 100-day festival, with sea fights staged on an artificial lake, infantry battles, wild beast hunts, and similar activities. He also constructed new imperial baths to the south-east of the Amphitheater and began work on the celebrated Arch of Titus, a memorial to his Jewish victories. Large sums were directed to Italy and the provinces as well, especially for road building. In response to the eruption of Vesuvius in A.D. 79, Titus spent large sums to relieve distress in that area; likewise, the imperial purse contributed heavily to rebuilding Rome after a devastating fire destroyed large sections of the city in A.D. 80. As a result of these actions, Titus earned a reputation for generosity and geniality. For these reasons he gained the honourable title of "amor et deliciæ generis humani" (the darling and admiration of the human race). Even so, his financial acumen must not be under-estimated. He left the treasury with a surplus, as he had found it, and dealt promptly and efficiently with costly natural disasters. The Greek historian of the third-century A.D., Cassius Dio, perhaps offered the most accurate and succinct assessment of Titus' economic policy: "In money matters, Titus was frugal and made no unnecessary expenditure." In other areas, the brevity of Titus' reign limits our ability to detect major emphases or trends in policy. As far as can be discerned from the limited evidence, senior officials and amici were well chosen, and his legislative activity tended to focus on popular social measures, with the army as a particular beneficiary in the areas of land ownership, marriage, and testamentary freedom. In the provinces, Titus continued his father's policies by strengthening roads and forts in the East and along the Danube.

Titus died in September, A.D. 81 after only 26 months in office. Suetonius recorded that Titus died on his way to the Sabine country of his ancestors in the same villa as his father. A competing tradition persistently implicated his brother and successor, Domitian, as having had a hand in the emperor's demise, but the evidence is highly contradictory and any wrongdoing is difficult to prove. Domitian himself delivered the funeral eulogy and had Titus deified. He also built several monuments in honor of Titus and completed the Temple of Vespasian and Titus, changing the name of the structure to include his brother's and setting up his cult statue in the Temple itself.

Titus was the beneficiary of considerable intelligence and talent, endowments that were carefully cultivated at every step of his career, from his early education to his role under his father's principate. Cassius Dio suggested that Titus' reputation was enhanced by his early death. It is true that the ancient sources tend to heroicize Titus, yet based upon the evidence, his reign must be considered a positive one. He capably continued the work of his father in establishing the Flavian Dynasty and he maintained a high degree of economic and administrative competence in Italy and beyond. In so doing, he solidified the role of the emperor as paternalistic autocrat, a model that would serve Trajan and his successors well. Titus was used as a model by later emperors, especially those known as the Five Good Emperors (Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius).

Copyright (C) 1997, John Donahue.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Catholic Encyclopedia, http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14746b.htm

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
3 commentsCleisthenes
1212Hadrian_RIC783.jpg
783 Hadrian Sestertius Roma 134-38 AD Decastyle Temple31 viewsReference.
RIC II 783; Strack 696; c. 1422; BMC 1554

Obv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
Laureate head right

Rev. [SPQR] S-C
Decastyle temple set on base; temple is flanked by two columns, each decorated with a statue on top columns surmounted by statues and set on pedestals on either side

22.71 gr
31 mm
12h

Note.
The great temple of Venus and Rome, was actually two temples that were built back-to-back. Dedigned by Hadrian, the temple of Venus faced the Flavian ampitheatre and that of Rome overlooked the Forum. Construction began in 121 AD, but was not completed until 141 AD under Antoninus Pius. The temple was destroyed by fire in 307 AD, and later rebuilt by Maxentius. Its remains can still be seen in Rome today.
3 commentsokidoki
train ric 49.jpg
98-117 AD Trajan Denarius Hercules171 viewsIMP CAES NERVA TRAIAN AVG GERM, laureate head right
P M TR P COS IIII P P, statue of Hercules holding club and lion skin, set on low base; mint luster, light toning,

Rome mint, 101-102 A.D, 3.54g, 18.6mm, 180o Reference:RIC 49, RSC 234, BMC 86.
exceptionally well struck reverse for the issue. Ex-Forum
1 commentsjimwho523
Silvanus.jpg
aa Mysia, Pergamum. M. Plautius Silvanus / Augustus Æ2023 viewsM. Plautius Silvanus, proconsul; Demophon, grammateus. Togate figure standing facing and holding phiale, being crowned by figure in military outfit / Statue of Augustus, standing facing and holding scepter, within distyle temple façade. RPC 2364; SNG France 2016-21.ancientone
demosAthena.jpg
Achaea, Cyclades, Melos. Demos / Palladium AE2435 viewsObv: DHMOC / Bearded bust of Demos r.
Rev: ΜΗΛΙΩΝ / Statue of Pallas Athena(Palladium) standing facing head r., holding spear aloft in right hand, preparing to strike, circular shield on left arm.
24mm., 12.2g.
Time of Nerva.
RPC Volume: III №: 404A
ancientone
Thelpusa.jpg
Achaea. Arcadia, Thelpusa. Septimius Severus AE17. Unpublished106 viewsPeloponnesus. Thelpusa, Arcadia. Septimius Severus bust rt., Θ Ε Λ in wreath. Obverse die and reverse type not listed in BCD. BCD Pelop. I -; BCD Pelop II -; SNG Cop -; BMC -.

Thelpusa or Thelpousa (Greek: Θέλπουσα, also known as Telphusa/Τέλφουσα or Thelphusa/Θέλφουσα) was an ancient city-state in Azania in Arcadia.

The city was built on the left bank of the Ladon and bounded with Kleitor and Psophis. The name comes from the nymph Thelpousa or Thelpusa, daughter of Ladon. The city contained the temple of Eleusinian Demeter, and nearby, a stone statue of the goddess of the daughter and Dionysus and Ongius, chief of Thelpousa and the son of Apollo, Asclepius' children with the memory of Trygon and the temple of the twelve gods. When Pausanias] visited the city, Thelpousa was abandoned and ruined for many years. In 352 BC, its city residents took part with the Lacedaemonians. It was a member of the Achaean League and was cut off from the rights of law. Thelpusa was the patriot of Asclepius and Artion.
ancientone
elagabalusberytos121026.jpg
AE26 Elagabalus Berytos24 viewsAE26 10.5 g
Tetrastyle temple with the statue of Marsyas
Berytos ( Phoenicia )
philippe B2
Hendin1240web.jpg
Agrippa I174 viewsAgrippa I. 37-44 AD. AE 23, 11.45g. Caesarea Paneas Mint, Year 5, 40/1 AD.
O: [ΓΑΙΩ ΚΑΙΣΑΡΙ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΩ ΓΕΡΜΑΝΙΚΩ] (For Gaius Caesar Augustus Germanicus), Laureate head of Caligula left.
R: [ΝΟΜΙΣΜΑ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΓΡΙΠΠΑ] (coin of King Agrippa). LE (Year 5=40/41) in exergue; Germanicus stands in triumphal quadriga in honor of his recovery of the standards lost by Varus, car decorated with Nike standing right.
- Hendin 1240. TJC 230-1,116. AJC II 2. RPC 4976.

One of the rarest coin types of Agrippa I (26 listed?).

The grandson of Herod I, Agrippa I, so-named in honor of the victor of Actium, spent much of his youth in the Roman imperial court. Popular with the imperial family, including the emperor Tiberius, Agrippa passed much of his time in the home of Antonia Minor, the mother of Germanicus and the future emperor Claudius.

There, the boys became great friends, and as an older man, Agrippa became attached to the future emperor Gaius, being appointed governor of the territories of Batanaea and Trachonitis upon Gaius’ accession. Unfortunately contemporary politics placed a significant strain on the relationship between the king and Rome.

In AD 39 Agrippa’s uncle, Antipas, was accused of plotting with the Parthians and was exiled. Agrippa’s loyalty gained him his uncle’s forfeited territories. In AD 40 renewed riots between Greeks and Jews broke out in Alexandria, and Gaius, clearly unhappy with his Jewish subjects, provocatively ordered the installation of a statue of himself within the Holy of Holies in Jerusalem.

Agrippa, who had been unsuccessfully involved in trying to quell similar riots in Alexandria before, sought to emphasize his loyalty to local Roman officials by striking coinage which commemorated his long-standing friendship with Gaius and, especially, Germanicus.

Based on the dupondii struck in honor of the emperor’s father Germanicus, this coin includes the great general riding in his triumphal car in honor of his recovery of the standards lost by Varus, rather than portraying Agrippa himself, an identification emphasized by the specific inclusion of the word NOMISMA (Coin) in the legend.

By avoiding self promotion, Agrippa hoped to successfully navigate the treacherous waters which might result in his own removal from power.
4 commentsNemonater
aigai_claudius_RPC2429.jpg
Aiolis, Aigai, Claudius, RPC 2429350 viewsClaudius, AD 41-54
AE 20, 5.04g
struck under magistrate Apollodoros Po.
obv. TI KLAVDIOC KAICAR CEBACTOC
Head, laureate, r.
re. EPI APOLLODWROV PO VIOV XALEOV TO B
cult-statue of Apollo Chresterios r.
RPC 2429
rare, F+

At the time of Britannicus there was a magistrate Chaleos. Apollodoros seems to be his son. Aigai was the centre of the worshipping of Apollo Chresterios, meaning the foresayer, the prophet. It is known from an inscription that the inhabitants of Istros about 250 BC have sent a delegation to Aigai asking wether the oracle would tolerate the introducing of Serapis to Istros.
Jochen
aigai_pseudoautonom_unbekannt.jpg
Aiolis, Aigai, pseudo-autonomous, unpublished37 viewsAE 19, 3.02g, 18.71mm, 345°
struck under the Agonothetes Ovl. Polemon
obv. IERA - CVNKLHTOC
Bust of the Senate, draped, laureate, r.
rev. EPI.AGW.OVL - [POLEMON]
Cult-statue of Apollo Chresterios, stg. frontal, both hands outstretched, holding branch(?) in l. hand and unknown small object(?) in r. hand
in l. and r. field AI - GA[I]
ref. SNG von Aulock 7674 (rev. legend only!); probably unpublished
very rare, about VF

There is a type for Sabina with the rev. legend EPI AGW OVL POLE, SNG von Aulock 7674, found by Archivum by ISEGRIM, thanks!

Agonothetes was a magistrate whose duty was the superintendence of games.
Jochen
Akarnania,_Leukas,_167-100_BC,_AR_Didrachm.jpg
Akarnania, Leukas, 87 BC, AR Didrachm47 viewsCult statue of the goddess Aphrodite Aeneias with stag standing right, holding aplustre, bird on standard behind; all within a laurel wreath.
ΛΕΥΚΑΔΙΩΝ ΦΙΛΑΝΔΡΟΣ (Leukadion Philandros) above prow of galley right.

de Callataÿ Didrachms of Leukas 195-212 dies O31/R2; BCD Akarnania 313-314; BMC 180, 101-103; Postolokas, Lambros 67, 688 var.

(23 mm, 7.90 g, 11h)
Forestier & Lambert.

Based on the study of de Callataÿ, Didrachms of Leukas, this coin was struck in the summer and autumn of 87 BC as a contribution to Sulla’s campaign against Mithrades Eupator. De Callataÿ connected it with the encampment of Sulla’s troops at Leukas that year and argued that the coinage is a pseudo-civic Greek coinage issued by and for for the Romans. This is reflected in the reverse iconography where the galley prow is distinctively Roman, identifieable as such by the wolf head on the prow, above the ram, a decorative element unknown on Greek vessels.

This coin was struck when the Hellenistic age was in advanced decline, succumbing to the expansionary drive of Rome. The coins of this issue were often struck from relatively crude dies in an advanced state of wear. Yet they retain a charm and aesthetic that in some sense seems to speak of the last gasps of a dying Hellenistic age. The obverse image is thought to depict the cult statue of Aphrodite Aeneias, whose sanctuary was situated near the town of Leukas, overlooking the shipping canal that separated the island from the mainland.
2 commentsn.igma
25.jpg
alex003a4 viewsElagabalus
Alexandria, Troas

Obv: [AV] M AV ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear.
Rev: COL AL-[EX]AN AVG, cult statue of Apollo Smintheus standing on basis, right, holding bow and patera over lighted tripod.
24 mm, 7.40 gms

Cf. RPC Online 3960; Cf. Bellinger A313; CNG 88, lot 889
Charles M
1595.jpg
alex003a_211 viewsElagabalus
Alexandria, Troas

Obv: AV [M AV ANTO]NINVS ΓIVS, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from front.
Rev: COL AL-EX AVG, cult statue of Apollo Smintheus standing on basis, right, holding bow and patera over lighted tripod.
22 mm, 6.60 gms

similar to RPC Online 3960
Charles M
2054.jpg
alex003a_31 viewsElagabalus
Alexandria, Troas

Obv: AV [M AV ANTO]NINVS ΓIVS, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from front.
Rev: COL AL-EX AVG, cult statue of Apollo Smintheus standing on basis, right, holding bow and patera over lighted tripod.
23 mm, 8.44 gms

similar to RPC Online 3960
Charles M
1950c.jpg
alex003b6 viewsElagabalus
Alexandria, Troas

Obv: IM C M AVR ANTONINVS, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear.
Rev: COL ALE-XAN AVG, cult statue of Apollo Smintheus standing on basis, right, holding bow and patera. No altar.
21 mm, 5.05 gms

RPC Online---; Gerhard Hirsch Nachfolger, Auction 346, Lot 2768.
Charles M
1888_Hirsch_Auction_352_lot_3068.jpg
alex003b_21 viewsElagabalus
Alexandria, Troas

Obv: IM C M AVR ANTONINVS, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear.
Rev: COL ALE-X AVG, cult statue of Apollo Smintheus standing on basis, right, holding bow and patera. No altar.
22 mm, 7.09 gms

RPC Online---; Gerhard Hirsch Nachfolger, Auction 346, Lot 2768; SNG Hunterian 28 (as Caracalla).

From Gerhard Hirsch Nachfolger, Auction 352, Lot 3068.
Charles M
LarryW2360.jpg
Alexander III, 336-323 BC; Corinth 310-290 BC22 viewsAR tetradrachm, 16.83g, Choice VF
Head Herakles right wearing lion skin knotted at neck / BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus seated left on throne ornamented with Nikai, holding eagle and sceptre; statue of Athena in left field, OΛ within wreath under throne. Rare.
Price 694; Noe, Sicyon 37
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
Hadrien Alexandrie.jpg
Alexandria - Bronze drachm of Hadrian59 viewsObv. legend out of flan ; laureate bust of Hadrian.
Rev. : Decorated front of Egyptian temple, the cultus statue is visible between the pylons.
1 commentsGinolerhino
amph_goats_pan.jpg
Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 168 - 149 B.C.62 viewsBronze AE 20, SGCV I 1394; (SNG Cop 62), weight 7.8 g, max. diameter 21.75 mm, Amphipolis mint, Roman rule, c. 168 - 149 B.C.; Obv. diademed head of Artemis Tauropolos right, bow and quiver at shoulder; Rev. ΑΜΦΙΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ, two goats on their hind legs, contending head to head. Green patina, very worn.

Artemis Tauropolos was an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshipped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians by Iphigenia. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis in Athens. - Wikipedia
Steve E
augustus_philippi.jpg
Amphipolis, Macedonia. AE 22; Augustus crowned by statue of Divus Julius28 viewsAugustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia. Leaded bronze AE 22, RPC I 1650, Fair, small flan for type, Philippi mint, 4.444g, 21.8mm, 0o, obverse COL AVG IVL PHIL IVSSV AVG, laureate head right; reverse AVG DIVI F DIVO IVL, statue of Divus Augustus in military dress crowned by statue of togate Divus Julius, both on middle of three bases. Ex FORVMPodiceps
1_bis_Statue_Osiris_Egypte.jpg
ANTIQUITIES, Egypt, Bronze statuette of Osiris with Isis on back58 viewsStatuette bronze Osiris Basse époque (700-400 avant J.C. ) avec Isis au dos.Roger D2
031313JSF020.jpg
ANTIQUITIES, Greek, Hellenistic period terracotta statue of a monkey15 viewsA very rare, genuine ancient Greek Hellenistic period terracotta statue of a monkey, dating to approximately 300 - 250 B.C.
The charming creaure is shown seated and clutching a cylindrical vessel under its left arm.
Possibly a votive piece which would have been dedicated at a temple or sanctuary, in thanks for, or in anticipation of a favor.
A fascinating and unusual piece of ancient Greek art.
Condition: Very good, age related encrustation, as shown. Unrestored.

Height: 3 3/4 inches

Provenance:

Ex. Collection of Mr. E. Ohly, United Kingdom.
superflex
philip_I_temple.jpg
Antoninianus; SAECVLVM NOVVM, Hexastyle temple; RIC 25b11 viewsPhilip I Antoninianus. 249 AD. IMP PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right / SAECVLVM NOVVM, Hexastyle temple with statue of Roma within. RIC 25b, RSC 198. Sear RCV III: 8963. 1 commentsPodiceps
apio1.jpg
ANTONINUS PIUS52 viewsAR denarius. 3.46 gr. Bare headed bust right, slight drapery on shoulders. DIVVS ANTONINVS. / Column surmounted by statue of Pius holding eagle and sceptre.Fencing in front. DIVO PIO. RIC III 440 (M.Aurelius). RSC 353.
CNG EA107, Lot 177. Coin Galleries (7 August 1985) lot 395.
1 commentsbenito
00apiocolumna~0.jpg
ANTONINUS PIUS42 viewsAR denarius. 3.46 gr. Bare headed bust right, slight drapery on shoulders. DIVVS ANTONINVS. / Column surmounted by statue of Pius holding eagle and sceptre.Fencing in front. DIVO PIO. RIC III 440 (M.Aurelius). RSC 353.
CNG EA107, Lot 177. Coin Galleries (7 August 1985) lot 395
benito
Augustus_temple_(800x387).jpg
Antoninus Pius 11 viewsAntoninus Pius Sestertius temple of Augustus and Livia
Catalog: Temple of Divus Augustus
weight 28,6gr. | bronze Ø 32mm.
obv. Laureate head right ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P XXII
rev. Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus, containing cult-statues of Augustus
and Livia TEMPLVM DIVI AVG REST COS IIII S C

The Temple of Divus Augustus was a major temple originally built to commemorate the deified first Roman emperor, Augustus. It was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia, on the site of the house that Augustus had inhabited before he entered public life in the mid-1st century BC. The temple′s construction took place during the 1st century AD, having been vowed by the Roman Senate shortly after the death of the emperor in AD 14. It is known from Roman coinage that the temple was originally built to an Ionic hexastyle design. However, its size, physical proportions and exact site are unknown. During the reign of Domitian the Temple of Divus Augustus was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt and rededicated in 89/90 with a shrine to his favourite deity, Minerva. The temple was redesigned as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus. It was restored again in the mid 150s by Antonius Pius, and that was the reason for this coinage. The last known reference to the temple was on 27 May 218 | at some point thereafter it was completely destroyed and its stones were presumably quarried for later buildings. Its remains are not visible and the area in which it lay has never been excavated.

Cohen 805 | RIC 1004 | BMC 2063 | Sear 4235 R
vf
1 commentsAncient Aussie
Roma.jpg
Antoninus Pius 33 views
Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Sestertius (32mm, 25.3g, 10h). Rome mint. Struck circa AD 141-143. Laureate head right / Decastyle temple, with statues on roof and in pediment. RIC II 622. Good Fine.

The great temple of Venus and Roma was actually composed of two temples back to back. The temple of Venus faced the Flavian ampitheatre and that of Rome overlooked the Forum - both were designed by Hadrian himself. Construction began in 121 AD and and remained unfinished on the emperor’s death in 138 AD. Work was at last completed in 141 AD under Antoninus Pius, the event commemorated on this coin. The temple would be destroyed by fire in 307 and later rebuilt by Maxentius, the remains of which can still be seen in Rome today.
Ancient Aussie
00458.jpg
Antoninus Pius (RIC 1269, Coin #458)18 viewsRIC 1269 (C), AE Sestertius, Rome, 179 - 180 AD.
Obv: DIVVS ANTONINVS Bare head right.
Rev: DIVO PIO S C Column surmounted by statue of Pius.
Size: 34.3mm 25.14gm
MaynardGee
Antoninus_1014v.jpg
Antoninus Pius - AE dupondius53 viewsRome
157-158 AD
radiate head right
ANTONINVS AVG__PIVS P P TR P XXI
distyle shrine with arched roof containing statue of the Genius of the Senate, togate, raising hand, holding eagle-tipped scepter, standing on pedestal
COS__IIII
S C
RIC 989
13,04g 24,5-23,5 mm
2 commentsJohny SYSEL
1420_Antoninus_Pius_Caesarea2.jpg
Antoninus Pius - Caesarea Cappadocia4 viewsAR Didrachm
139 AD
laureate head right
ANTΩNEINOC__CEBACTOC
Mount Argaeus, statue of Helios on top, holding globe and scepter, star below
YΠAT B ΠAT ΠATP
Sydenham 301c var. (reverse legend); Metcalf 124b
Johny SYSEL
Antonin denier.jpg
Antoninus Pius - denarius44 viewsANTONINVS AVG. PIVS P.P., laureate bust right
TEMPLVM DIVI AVG. REST. / COS. IIII, front-view of the Temple of Divine Augustus, with 8 columns and 2 statues inside.

The legend should be read as one single sentence, starting from the obverse : Antoninus Augustus Pius, Pater Patriae, templum Divi Augusti restituit consul IIII : Antoninus Augustus Pious, father of the country, 4 times consul, restored the temple of the Divine Augustus.
1 commentsGinolerhino
antoninus_pius_03.jpg
Antoninus Pius AE Sestertius20 viewsObv: DIVVS ANTONINVS - Bare head right.
Rev: DIVO PIO - Column of Antoninus, surmounted by statue of the emperor; S C across field.
Year: 162 AD
Ref: RIC III 1269
oa
Antoninus_Pius_AE_sestertius,_161_AD,_Rome.jpg
Antoninus Pius AE sestertius, 161 AD, Rome37 viewsDivus Antoninus Pius
AE sestertius – 30mm
Rome, 161 AD
DIVVS ANTONINVS
bare headed bust r.
DIVO PIO
column surmounted by statue of Antoninus Pius, holding eagle and sceptre, S C in fields
RIC III 1269 (Marcus Aurelius)
Ardatirion
apius01_publish.jpg
Antoninus Pius denarius44 viewsRIC 285 (3,4g, 18mm).
Mint of Rome, 159AD.

Pleasant specimen of rare type.

ANTONINUS STATUE
1 commentsneander
69.jpg
Antoninus Pius Denarius - Column (RIC 184)46 viewsAR Denarius
Rome 161 AD
3.29g

Obv: Bare bust of Antoninus (R)
DIVUS ANTONINUS

Rev: COLUMN surmounted by statue of emperor, DIVO PIO in exergue.
Minted under the reign of Pius' successor Marcus Aurelius.


RIC 440 RSC 353
Kained but Able
Antoninus_Pius_Denarius_Temple_of_Augustus_.jpg
Antoninus Pius Denarius Temple of Augustus64 viewsObv.
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII
Laureate head right

Rev.
TEMPL DIVI AVG REST
COS IIII
Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus and Livia, statues within
2 commentsancientdave
Antoninus Pius 1 D.jpg
Antoninus Pius Divvs Sestertius36 viewsAE Sestertius
Divus Antoninus Pius. Struck under Marcus Aurelius, 162 AD. DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right / DIVO PIO S-C, Column of Antoninus Pius surmounted by statue of the emperor.
BMC 880; Coh. 354; RIC 1269
Tanit
Antoninus.jpg
Antoninus Pius Divvs Sestertius24 viewsAE Sestertius
Divus Antoninus Pius. Struck under Marcus Aurelius, 162 AD. DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right / DIVO PIO S-C, Column of Antoninus Pius surmounted by statue of the emperor.
BMC 880; Coh. 354; RIC 1269
Tanit
antpius1~0.jpg
Antoninus Pius Divvs Sestertius9 viewsAE Sestertius
DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head of Antoninus Pius r.
DIVO PIO SC ; column of Antoninus Pius surmounted by statue of the emperor stg. l. , trellis-work fencing surrounding the base

RIC 1269
Tanit
antoninus_pius_439.jpg
Antoninus Pius RIC III, 43942 viewsAntoninus Pius, AD 138-161
AR - denarius, 3.41g, 17mm
Rome, AD 162 (under Marcus Aurelius)
obv. DIVVS ANTONINVS
Head, laureate, r.
rev. DIVO - PIO
Statue of the emperor on top of of columna rostrata with base with lattice-work, holding sceptre and globe
RIC III, (Marcus Aurelius) 439; C.435(a); BMC (Marcus Aurelius) 67
about VF/good F, toned
Jochen
Antoninus_Pius_Temple_of_Divus_Aug_and_Livia.jpg
Antoninus Pius Temple of Divus Aug and Livia52 viewsAntoninus Pius denarius, RIC III 290a, Rome, 3.197g, 16.8mm, die axis 180o, 158 A.D.;
OBV: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, laureate head right;
REV: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST COS IIII, statues of Divus Augustus and Livia seated in an octastyle temple, two statues in front of the outer columns, statue on pediment, two others and a quadriga on roof;
This interesting type commemorates the restoration of the temple of Divus Augustus and Livia.

EX: Forvm Ancient Coins

SCARCE
1 commentsRomanorvm
Antoninus_Pius_RIC_285.JPG
Antoninus Pius, 138 - 161 AD47 viewsObv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TRP XXII, laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.

Rev: COS IIII, distyle shrine with an ornate arched roof, containing a statue of the Genius of the Senate standing left on a low base.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 158 - 159 AD

3.27 grams, 19 mm, 180°

RIC III 285, RSC 331, S4077, VM 18/19
SPQR Coins
Antoninus_Pius_RIC_M442.JPG
Antoninus Pius, 138 - 161 AD (Posthumous issue)27 viewsObv: DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare headed bust of Antoninus Pius facing right.

Rev: DIVO PIO, cult statue of Antoninus Pius enthroned left, holding a branch and a scepter.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 162 AD

3.2 grams, 18 mm, 180°

RIC III M. Aurelius 442, RSC 352, S5194
SPQR Matt
Antoninus_Pius_RIC_440.JPG
Antoninus Pius, 138 - 161 AD (Posthumous issue)34 viewsObv: DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare-headed bust of Antoninus Pius facing right, drapery on left shoulder.

Rev: DIVO PIO, Column surmounted by a statue of the deified Antoninus Pius standing left, holding an eagle and a long scepter, trellis work balustrade around large base.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, c. 161 AD

3.4 grams, 18.1 mm, 180°

RIC III Marcus Aurelius 440, RSC II 353, S5195

Ex: FORVM
1 commentsMatt Inglima
Antoninus_Pius_RIC_M442~1.JPG
Antoninus Pius, 138 - 161 AD (Posthumous issue)11 viewsObv: DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare headed bust of Antoninus Pius facing right.

Rev: DIVO PIO, cult statue of Antoninus Pius enthroned left, holding a branch and a scepter.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 162 AD

3.46 grams, 19.2 mm, 180°

RIC III M. Aurelius 442, RSC 352, S5194

Ex: FORVM
Matt Inglima
Antoninus_Pius_RIC_III_1266.jpg
Antoninus Pius, AE Sestertius, Ustrinum, RIC III 12666 viewsAntoninus Pius
Augustus, 138 - 161 A.D.
AE (Orichalcum) Sestertius

Obverse: DIVVS ANTONINVS, Bare headed bust facing right.
Reverse: CONSE-CRATIO, a four tiered Ustrinum, decorated with Garlands and Statues, surmounted by Antoninus Pius in a Quadriga. S - C across the fields.

Weight: 22.05 g, Diameter: 31 x 31 x 4 mm, Die axis: 330°, Mint: Rome, posthumous issue, struck in 161 A.D. in the joint reigns of Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, Reference: RIC III 1266
Masis
ANTOSEf3.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 601, Sestertius of AD 144 (betrothal M. Aurelius & Faustina Jr.)36 viewsÆ Sestertius (24.28g, Ø32mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev.: CON-COR-DIAE around, [S C in ex.,] Marcus Aurelius & Faustina Jr. clasping hands before large statues of Antoninus & Faustina.
RIC 601; BMCRE 1236; Cohen 146 (fr.40); Strack 826 (4 coll.); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 60 (14 spec.); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 127/45a
Ex Künker Auction 262
2 commentsCharles S
ANTOSE41-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 601, Sestertius of AD 144 (betrothal M.Aurelius & Faustina)51 viewsÆ Sestertius (28.4g, Ø35mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: CON COR DIAE (around) S C (in ex.), Marcus Aurelius, left and Faustina Filia, daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Mater, right, as small figures, clasping hands over altar and before large statues on pedestals of Antoninus Pius and the Faustina Mater (died AD 141). The statues also clasp hands, and the that of Antoninus holds a Victory figurine.
RIC 601 (S); BMCRE IV 1236-40; Cohen 146; Strack 826 (5 collections); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 60 (14 spec.); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 127:45a; Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4158

This type was issued on the occasion of the betrothal of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina II, which probably took place during the Hilaria festival celebrated on 25 March 144. According to the Life of Marcus, ch. 6, the real betrothel took place as early as 139, but this may refer to the private arrangement, the coin to the public ceremony (see RIC).
Charles S
Antose18-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 601, Sestertius of AD 144 (betrothal M.Aurelius & Faustina) 55 viewsÆ Sestertius (22.3g, Ø33mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: CON COR DIAE (around) S C (in ex.), Marcus Aurelius, left and Faustina Filia, right, as small figures, clasping hands over altar and before large statues on pedestals of Antoninus Pius and the Faustina Mater (died AD 141). The statues also clasp hands, and that of Antoninus holds a Victory figurine.
RIC 601 (S); BMCRE IV 1236-40; Cohen 146; Strack 826 (5 collections); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 60 (14 spec.); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 127:45a; Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4158

This type was issued on the occasion of the betrothal of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina II, which probably took place during the Hilaria festival celebrated on 25 March 144. According to the Life of Marcus, ch. 6, the real betrothel took place as early as 139, but this may refer to the private arrangement, the coin to the public ceremony (see RIC).
1 commentsCharles S
AntoSee1.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 615a, Sestertius of AD 140-144 (Aeneas) 114 viewsÆ Sestertius (26.15g, Ø33mm, 11h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-44.
Obv/ ANTONINVS · AVGVSTVS PIVS, laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right, aegis on left shoulder.
Rev/ P P TR P COS III (in field) [S C (in ex.)], Aeneas wearing a short tunic and cloak, advancing right, looking back, carrying Anchises on his shoulder and holding Ascanius by the hand. Anchises (veiled and draped) carries a box in left hand, Ascanius wears a short tunic and Phrygian cap and caries a pedum (shepherd's crook) in left hand.
RIC 615a (R2), BMCRE 1264, Cohen 655 (80 Fr.), Strack 904 (3 specimens found); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 309 (same obv. and rev. dies, 3 specimens found).
ex Numphil (Paris, june 2014 auction)

This type is part of a series figuring scenes from ancient Roman legends. The scene depicts Aeneas leaving Troy with his son Ascanius and his father Anchises. According to the legend, Aeneas, son of Venus and the Trojan Anchises, fled by boat with some inhabitants of Troy as it fell to the Greeks, taking the Palladium - the ancient sacred statue of Athena - and eventually made their way west to resettle in Italy. They intermarried with the local inhabitants and founded the town of Lavinium, and became the nucleus of the future Roman people. One of the descendants of Aeneas'son Ascianus was Rhea Silvia, the mother of the twins Romulus and Remus.

Numismatic note: This issue has been struck from a single obverse die with the unique obverse legend "ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS PIVS" found nowhere else in the coinage of Antoninus Pius. This obverse die was used exclusively with two reverse dies with slightly different legends: the one in the photo above, and a similar one with the legend "P P TR POT COS III". The use of the aegis on the bust is not exclusive for this issue, but very rare for Antoninus Pius.
2 commentsCharles S
APiusSestRIC621.JPG
Antoninus Pius, RIC 621, Sestertius of AD 140-144 (Roma)163 viewsÆ Sestertius (28.4g, Ø 33-34mm, 12h) Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PI-VS P P TR P COS III, laurate head right
Rev.: ROMA AETERNA (around), S C (in ex.), Roma seated left on throne, holding palladium and spear; shield at side.
RIC 621; BMCRE 1276; C. 694; Strack 846; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 330 (7 spec.); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 24b; Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 1276
ex CNG Auction #29, lot 62687, May 2001

Issued to celebrate the completion in AD141 of the temple of Venus and Rome, designed and begun by Hadrian. This could also belong to the series of ancient Roman legends issued in this same period, as the Palladium held by Roma is the statue of Pallas Athena, stolen from Troy and brought to Italy by Aeneas. It was regarded by the Romans as guardian of their city.
2 commentsCharles S
AntoSe53-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 622, Sestertius of AD 141-144 (Temple of Venus and Roma)81 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.5g, Ø 33mm, 12h), Rome mint, struck AD 141-143.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laurate and draped bust of Antoninus Pius facing right
Rev.: ROMAE AETERNAE (around) S C (in field below) Decastyle temple with statues on roof and pediment.
RIC 622 (S); BMCRE 1279-82; Cohen 700 (Fr.12); Strack 848; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 333 var. (bust not draped); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:24a; Sear (Roman Coins & Their Values II) 4212.
ex Mike R. Vosper (UK, 2000)

Coin issued on the occasion of the completion of the temple of Venus and Rome, begun by Hadrian in AD 121. The temple was be destroyed by fire in 307 and later rebuilt by Maxentius. Remains of the temple can still be seen today.
Charles S
AntoSef0-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 622c, Sestertius of AD 140-144 (Temple of Venus & Roma)33 viewsÆ Sestertius (29,1g, Ø 33mm, 10h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head left.
Rev.: ROMAE AETERNAE (around) S C (ex.), decastyle temple on podium of four steps with statues on roof and in pediment.
RIC 622(c) (scarce); BMCRE 1345v. (hd. r.); Cohen 702 (12 fr.); Strack 848 (2 spec. for left-headed var.); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 335 (1 spec. w/o illustration); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4212v. (hd. r.)
Ex Guy BRAUN collection (France, 2015).
very rare left headed variety

The temple of Roma, designed by Hadrian in 121 and completed by Antoninus Pius in 141, facing the forum, was built back to back with the temple of Venus, which faced the Flavian Amphitheater. The building containing the two temples was referred to as the Temple of Venus and Roma ("Templum Veneris et Romae"). The remains are still visible and show that both temples consisted of ten colums. The coins suggest many decorative details.
Charles S
antose63~0.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 623, Sestertius of AD 141-144 (Temple of Venus and Roma)45 viewsÆ sestertius (25.11, 6h) Rome mint. Struck AD 141-144.
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
ROMAE AETERNAE (around) S C (in field below) ornamented dekastyle temple with the statue of Roma inside; tympanum adorned with high relief statues; quadriga (suggested) at top and statues at each side.
RIC 623 (scarce); Cohen 703 (12 Fr.); BMCRE 1279; Strack 849; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali III) 336 (4 spec.); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:24a
ex CNG EAuction 52 (2002)

The temple of Roma was designed by Hadrian (himself) in AD 121 and completed by Antoninus Pius in 141. It stood facing the forum, and was built back to back with the temple of Venus, which faced the Flavian Amphitheater. The two temples in one building were referred to as the Temple of Venus and Roma ("Templum Veneris et Romae"). Hadrian had to have the colossal statue of Nero removed in order to make room for the temples, which were built on the site of the vestibule of Nero's golden house. (He had Nero's statue placed near the entrance to the Ampitheater, and this provided the nickname, "Colloseum".) Their ruins prove both temples consisted of ten colums, and the coins suggest many decorative details.
Charles S
AntoSe63-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 623, Sestertius of AD 141-144 (Temple of Venus and Roma)35 viewsÆ sestertius (25.11g, 31.5mm 6h) Rome mint. Struck AD 141-144.
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
ROMAE AETERNAE (around) S C (ex.) ornamented dekastyle temple with the statue of Roma inside; tympanum adorned with high relief statues; quadriga (suggested) at top and statues at each side.
RIC 623 (scarce); Cohen 703 (12 Fr.); BMCRE 1279; Strack 849; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 336 (4 spec.); Sear(Roman Coins and their Values II) 4212 var. (rev. no figure of Roma); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:24a
ex CNG EAuction 52 (2002)

The temple of Roma was designed by Hadrian (himself) in AD 121 and completed by Antoninus Pius in 141. It stood facing the forum, and was built back to back with the temple of Venus, which faced the Flavian Amphitheater. The building with the two temples was referred to as the Temple of Venus and Roma ("Templum Veneris et Romae"). Hadrian had to have the colossal statue of Nero (Colossus) removed in order to make room for the temples, which were built on the site of the vestibule of Nero's golden house. (He had the Colossus placed near the entrance to the amphitheater, and this provided the nickname, "Colosseum".) The ruins show that both temples consisted of ten colums, and the coins suggest many decorative details.
1 commentsCharles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 651(b), Sestertius of AD 141-143 (Temple of Venus & Roma)44 viewsÆ Sestertius (25,45g, Ø 30mm, 7h). Rome mint. Struck AD 141-143.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate draped bust right.
Rev.: VENERI FELICI around, S C in ex., Decastyle temple with statues on roof and pediment; pellet between columns in the centre.
RIC 651(b); Cohen 1075 (4 fr.); Strack 864); Banti 504 (Paris spec.); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:23
Ex Roma Numismatics E-Sale 17 (April 2015).
2 commentsCharles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 652, Sestertius of AD 141-143 (Temple of Venus and Roma)25 viewsÆ sestertius (24.06g, 33, 12h). Rome mint struck AD 141-143.
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
VENERI FELICI (around) S C (in ex.) decastyle temple on podium of four steps; statue of seated figure (Venus) in center space between columns; in pediment three standing figures in the center flanked by reclining figures; on roof, seated figure in the center flanked by two smaller kneeling figures; on angles, Victories standing front, holding wreaths in both hands.
RIC 652 (rare); Cohen 1074 (12 fr.); BMCRE 1324 var. (no statue between columns); Strack III 865 (listed in 3 collections: Berlin, Paris, Vienna; plate X 864: same obv. & rev. dies); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 507 (3 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins & Their Values II) 4257; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:23
ex Nomisma auction 46 (2012)

This commemorates the completion in AD 141 of the celebrated double-temple of Venus and Roma designed by Hadrian and begun two decades before. The two sanctuaries were placed back to back and the complex formed the largest temple in Rome. A parallel issue depicts the other element of the structure, the temple of Roma.
Charles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 664, Dupondius of AD 141-144 (Temple of Venus and Roma)69 viewsÆ Dupondius (13.2g, Ø25mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 141-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, radiate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: ROMAE AETERNAE (around), S C (in ex.), decastyle temple with statues in pediment and on the roof.
RIC 664 (S); BMC 1345; Cohen 701; Strack 848

ex Artcoins Roma

In AD 141, Antoninus Pius completed the temple of Venus and Roma which had been designed by Hadrian (in person) twenty years earlier. A series of coins was issued to celebrate this event. The temple consisted actually of two temples built back to back to form a single building. The ruins, which can still be seen today, prove that both temples consisted of ten colums. The coins suggest many decorative details.
Charles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 755, Sestertius of AD 159 (Temple of Divus Augustus) 43 viewsÆ Sestertius (19.91g, Ø33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: AED DIVI AVG REST (around) COS IIII (below) S C (in field), Octastyle temple with statues of Divus Augustus and Livia inside.
RIC 755 (R); BMC 1652; Cohen 3 (20Fr.); Strack 1174.
ex Jean Elsen (Bruxelles) auction 97; ex coll. A.Senden: L'architecture des monnaies Romaines.
Charles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 780, Sestertius of AD 145-147 (Roma)45 viewsÆ Sestertius (24.43g, Ø32mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 145-147.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS IIII, laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: S C (in field), Helmeted Roma seated left, holding Victory statuette and spear, left arm resting on shield set on prow.
RIC 780; Cohen 753; BMC 1711; Strack 1006; Banti 365 (11 spec.)
ex Martí Hervera subasta 70
Charles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 935(b), As of AD 154-155 (Hercules)15 viewsÆ As (8.1g, Ø 25mm, 12h). Rome, AD 154-155.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVIII, laureate and draped bust right.
Rev.: COS IIII S C, Hercules standing right right holding club. left bow and arrow and lion skin on arm.
RIC 935(b) (S); BMC 1978; Cohen 210; Kankelfitz 153/73
Ex Ancient Times, Oxford, 1995.

The reverse depicts the statue of Hercules of the Theatre of Pompey, 2nd century, now in the round room area of Museo Pio-Clementino
Charles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 999, Sestertius of AD 158-159 (Statue in tetrastyle shrine) 43 viewsÆ sestertius (22.5g, Ø30mm, 12h), Rome mint, struck AD 158-159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII , laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: COS IIII (around) S C (in field), statue holding a branch and a standard standing on a short column in terastyle shrine.
RIC 999 (S); BMC 2053-57; Cohen 332; Foss (RHC) 132:87
found in Louth (Lines, UK).

According to Foss (Roman Historic Coins), this coin was issued at the twentieth anniversary of the reign when a statue of Antoninus Pius was dedicated. Jencek on the other hand argues that the statue is not the emperor but the Genius of the Senate, honoured by a ciborium or aedicula, a four columned open structure with a highly ornamented dome. This issue thus could perhaps commemorate the 900th anniversary of the Roman Senate, 10 years after the foundation of Rome.

(I'm looking for a more attractive example!)

Charles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 1003, Sestertius of AD 158-159 (Temple of Divus Augustus)25 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.4g, Ø32mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 158-159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, laureate head of Antoninus Pius right.
Rev.: TEMPL DIVI AVG REST (round) COS IIII (in ex.) S C (in field), Octastyle temple of with statues of Divus Augustus and Livia. Both statues in the centre, standing on a base, have the right arms raised. There are statues to the left near the foot of the steps and other statues of soldiers on pedestals at each side of the top step. In the roof is a quadriga in the centre, and statues at each corner; further statues in the pediment.
RIC 1003 (S); BMC 2063-66; Cohen 797; Foss (RHC) 132:88a
ex D. Ruskin, Oxford: found in Reigate (Surrey), 1864

Coin issued on the occasion of the restoration of the temple of Divus Ausustus and Diva Augusta (Livia) in AD 158.
Charles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 1003A, Sestertius of AD 158-159 (Temple of Divus Augustus) 17 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.4g, Ø32mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 158-159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, laureate head of Antoninus Pius right.
Rev.: TEMPL DIVI AVG REST (around) COS IIII (ex.) S C (field), Octastyle temple of with statues of Divus Augustus and Livia. Both statues in the centre, standing on a base, have the right arms raised. There are statues to the left near the foot of the steps and other statues of soldiers on pedestals at each side of the top step. In the roof is a quadriga in the centre, and statues at each corner; further statues in the pediment.
RIC 1003A (S); BMCRE 2063 var. (rev. legend TEMPLVM DIV); Cohen 797; Strack 1168; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 404 (2 specimens); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4235 var. (different rev. legend); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 132:88a
ex D. Ruskin, Oxford, 1995 ("found in Reigate (Surrey), 1864")

Coin issued on the occasion of the restoration of the temple of Divus Ausustus and Diva Augusta (Livia) in AD 158. he temple was probably situated in the valley between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia. No trace has survived.
Charles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 1004, Sestertius of AD 159 (Temple of Divus Augustus)47 viewsÆ Sestertius (22.23g, Ø30mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST (around) COS IIII (in ex.) S C (in field), Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus with statues of Divus Augustus and Livia in the centre.
RIC 1004 (S); BMCRE 2063; Cohen 805; Strack 1167; Banti 406.
ex Triton VI (2003)

The second temple of Divus Augustus was restored under Antoninus Pius in 158. The reliefs on the pediment cannot be identified with certainty, but the statuary on the roof can be identified as Augustus in quadriga flanked by Romulus on the left and Aeneas carrying Anchises on the right.
Charles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 1004, Sestertius of AD 159 (Temple of Divus Augustus)25 viewsÆ Sestertius (22.23g, Ø30mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST (around) COS IIII (in ex.) S C (in field), Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus with statues of Augustus and Livia. The temple stands on a podium of three steps. Both statues in the centre, standing on a base, have the right arms raised. There are statues to the left near the foot of the steps and other statues of soldiers on pedestals at each side of the top step. The statuary on the roof can be identified as Augustus in quadriga flanked by Romulus on the right and Aeneas carrying Anchises on the left. Unidentified statuary in the pediment.

RIC 1004 (S); BMCRE 2063; Cohen 805; Strack 1167; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 406; Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4235.
ex Triton VI (2003)

The second Temple of Divus Augustus, commenced under Tiberius and dedicated by Caligula in August AD 37, suffered during the great fire of 80 which began on the Capitoline Hill and spread into the Forum and onto the Palatine. It was possibly restored or rebuilt under Domitian, although it is not mentioned in the Chronographia, and it certainly received further restoration under Antoninus Pius in 158. The temple under Antoninus was Corinthian octastyle and contained the seated figures of Divus Augustus and Livia within, generally drawn on the coinage at an elevated level to suggest perspective.
Charles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 1017, Dupondius of AD 159 (Temple of Divus Augustus)44 viewsÆ Dupondius (14.77g, Ø25mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 159 .
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, radiate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST (around), COS IIII (in ex.) S C (in field), Octastyle temple with the statues of Augustus and Livia.
RIC 1017; Cohen 807; Strack 1167
ex Old Roman Coins

This type was issued to celebrate the restoration of the temple of Divus Augustus in AD 158.
This specimen is listed in Wildwinds
Charles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 1021, As of AD 158-15942 viewsÆ As (10.92g, Ø26mm, 7h). Rome mint. Struck AD 158-159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, laureate head right, draped left shoulder.
Rev.: AEDE DIVI AVG REST (around) COS IIII (in ex.) S C (in field), Octastyle temple with the statues of Divus Augustus and Livia inside; soldiers on pedestal left and right before outer columns; statuary in pediment; on roof, quadriga facing and standing figures on angles.
RIC 1021a (S); BMCRE IV p.355 *; Cohen 12; Strack 1162
ex Jean Elsen (Bruxelles), Auction 97; ex coll. A. Senden: l'architecture des monnaies Romaines

Issued to celebrate the completion of the restauration of the temple of Augustus and Livia
Charles S
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Antoninus Pius. Thrace, Philippopolis; 25 viewsAres

In Greek mythology, Ares ("battle strife") is the god of war and son of Zeus (king of the gods) and Hera. The Romans identified Mars, the god of war (whom they had inherited from the Etruscans) with Hellenic Ares, but among them, Mars stood in much higher esteem. Among the Hellenes, Ares was always mistrusted: his birthplace and true home was placed far off, among the barbarous and warlike Thracians (Iliad 13.301; Ovid); to Thrace he withdrew after he was discovered on a couch with Aphrodite ( Odyssey 8.361).

Although important in poetry, Ares was only rarely the recipient of cult worship, save at Sparta, where he was propriated before battle, and in the founding myth of Thebes, and he appeared in few myths (Burkert 1985, p.169). At Sparta there was a statue of the god in chains, to show that the spirit of war and victory was never to leave the city. At Sparta young dogs and even humans were sacrificed to him. The temple to Ares in the agora of Athens that Pausanias saw in the 2nd century AD had only been moved and rededicated there during the time of Augustus; in essence it was a Roman temple to Mars. The Areopagus, the "hill of Ares" where Paul preached, is sited at some distance from the Acropolis; from archaic times it was a site of trials. Its connection with Ares, perhaps based on a false etymology, may be purely etiological. Ares s throne at Mount Olympus is said to be covered with human skin.

Antoninus Pius AE18 of Philippopolis, Thrace. AVT AI ADRIA ANTWNEIN, bare head right / FILIPPOPOLEITWN, Ares standing left, holding spear in left hand, shield leaning against him at right. BMC 10.
ecoli
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Antoninus Pius/Temple AE Sestertius 50 viewsAntoninus Pius AE Sestertius, RIC 622, Cohen 699, BMC 1279
25.06 grams.
31 mm.
Antoninus Pius Æ Sestertius. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head right / ROMAE AETERNAE S-C, decastyle temple with statues on roof and in pediment
Antonio Protti
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Apameia, Phrygia93 views133-48 B.C.
Bronze Æ21
8.60 gm, 21 mm
Laureate head of Zeus right
Cult statue of Artemis Anaïtis facing; AΠAME to right
ATTA/BIAN (magistrates) in two lines to left
Sear 5121var.; BMC Phrygia pg. 80, 61;
SNG Copenhagen 172.
4 commentsJaimelai
Apameia_-_Artemis.jpg
Apameia, Phrygia 133-48 B.C.14 viewsApameia, Phrygia, c. 133 - 48 B.C. Apameia mint, Ae 18~20.6mm. 7.97g. Obv: Laureate head of Zeus right. Rev: AΠAME AΡTEMIΔ BABA, cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis standing facing, wearing long chiton, kalathos and veil, a taenia or support hanging from each extended hand; BMC Phrygia p. 77, 48
Artemis Anaïtis was a fusion of the Persian goddess Anahita and the Greek Artemis. Tacitus (Annals 62) refers to the syncretic deity simply as the “Persian Diana”, who had a temple in Lydia “dedicated in the reign of Cyrus” (presumably Cyrus the Great).
ddwau
Phygria_Apameia.jpg
Apameia, Phrygia 133-48 B.C.12 viewsApameia, Phrygia, c. 133 - 48 B.C. Apameia mint, Ae 17.2~18.5mm. 6.57g. Obv: Laureate head of Zeus right. Rev: AΠAME AΡTEMIΔ, cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis standing facing, wearing long chiton, kalathos and veil, a taenia or support hanging from each extended hand; BMC Phrygia p. 77, 48ddwau
Apameia.jpg
Apameia, Phrygia 133-48 B.C.12 viewsApameia, Phrygia, c. 133 - 48 B.C. Apameia mint, Ae 18~20.6mm. 7.97g. Obv: Laureate head of Zeus right. Rev: AΠAME AΡTEMIΔ, cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis standing facing, wearing long chiton, kalathos and veil, a taenia or support hanging from each extended hand; BMC Phrygia p. 77, 48ddwau
apameia_artemis.jpg
Apameia; Zeus/ Artemis Anaitis; AE 2216 viewsPhrygia, Apameia, 8.11 g. Æ22, 133-48 BC, Obv; Laureate head of Zeus right. / Rev: ARAMEW PTEMIA Cult-statue of Artemis Anaitis standing. SNG Cop. 171. Podiceps
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Aphrodite676 viewsMarble statue of a naked Aphrodite crouching at her bath1 commentsBacchus
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Aphrodite (standing figure of)222 viewsLYDIA. Tralles. Tranquillina. Æ 30. A.D. 241-244. Obv: ΦOY.CAB.T-PANKYΛΛINA. Draped bust right; countermark on lower front part of bust Rev: (…)ΩNΠ (…)I.KΛ.ΦIΛIΠΠON.KENTA(…). Inscription around oak-wreath; inside wreath TPAΛΛIA-ΠYθIA on either side of tripod, which is encircled by serpent . Ref: BMC -. Axis: 165°. Weight: 12.40 g. Note: Unpublished? CM: Cult statue of Aphrodite right, in oval punch, 6 x 8 mm. Howgego 228 (16 pcs). Note: The countermark of this coin was applied at Aphrodisias in Caria, where only foreign coins were countermarked to make them valid in that city. Collection Automan. Automan
Akarnania,_Leukas,_167-100_BC,_AR_Didrachm.jpg
Aphrodite Aeneias 166 viewsAkarnania, Leukas, 167-100 BC, AR Didrachm
Cult statue of the goddess Aphrodite Aeneias with stag standing right, holding aplustre, bird on standard behind; all within a laurel wreath. / ΛΕΥΚΑΔΙΩΝ ΦΙΛΑΝΔΡΟΣ (Leukadion Philandros) above prow of galley right.
BCD Akarnania 313-314; BMC 180, 101-103; Postolokas, Lambros 67, 688 var.
(23 mm, 7.90 g, 11h)

This coin was issued as the Hellenistic age was in decline, succumbing to the expansionary drive of Rome. The coins of this issue were often struck from relatively crude dies in an advanced state of wear. Yet they retain a charm and aesthetic that in some sense seems to speak of the last gasps of a dying Hellenistic age. The obverse image is thought to depict the cult statue of Aphrodite Aeneias, whose sanctuary was situated near the town of Leukas, overlooking the shipping canal that separated the island from the mainland.
Lloyd T
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Aphrodite of Aphrodiasis43 viewsStatue of Aphrodite of Aphrodisias, today in the Archaeological Museum of Aphrodisias, Caria. Depicted on coins from Aphrodisias.Jochen
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Apollo357 viewsDenarius 194 ; 1,97 g. ; 17 mm.
Obv:- L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP IIII His laureate head right.
Rev:- APOLLINI AVGVSTO Apollo draped standing in front, looking at left, holding a patera in the right hand and a lyre in the left.
Cohen 42, RIC 40.

This representation of apollo is probably a roman copy of a statue of Apollo citharede which we can see on Augustus and Antoninus Pius' coins too. This statue was in the temple on the Palatino.
septimus
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Apollo kitharoidos, Vatican Museum, a 2nd-century AD colossal marble statue by an unknown Roman sculptor.91 viewsAn Apollo Citharoedus is a statue or other image of Apollo with a Kithara (lyre). Among the best-known examples is this Apollo Citharoedus of the Vatican Museums, a 2nd-century AD colossal marble statue by an unknown Roman sculptor. Apollo is shown crowned with laurel and wearing the long, flowing robe of the Ionic bard. The statue was found in 1774, with seven statues of the Muses, in the ruins of Gaius Cassius Longinus' villa near Tivoli, Italy. The sculptures are preserved in the Hall of the Muses, in the Museo Pio-Clementino of the Vatican Museums. Joe Sermarini
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Apollo Lykeios49 viewsThe statue of Apollo Lykeios is a standard depiction on coins from Marcianopolis. It shows Apollo resting after defeating the Python snake. It is suggested that this statue was made by Praxiteles, but Euphranor is named too.

The name Lykeios is referring to the Lykeion, a famous grove in Athens, were the original statue was located. The original is lost but several Roman copies have survived.

Jochen
Apollo_Saurocton_Louvre.jpg
Apollo Sauroktonos43 viewsThe statue of Apollo Sauroktonos (the Lizard Killer) was a work of Praxiteles. The original is lost, but several Roman copies have been found. This one stands in the Louvre/Paris. Nikopolis ad Istrum will have had a copy too. Therefore it was depicted on many of its coins.
Jochen
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Apollonia Pontica Topalov 94 - Bronze Dichalk16 viewsBeginning of 2nd century B.C.
2.50 gm, 14 mm.
Obv: Naked Apollo, full-face, standing and holding a laurel tree in his right hand and a bow with arrows in his left hand.
Rev.: Upright anchor with large flukes and a rectangular stock. The letter A to left between fluke and the stock.
Topalov Apollonia p. 510, 1; p.620, 94 var., p.804-5;
SNG BM Black Sea 190

Topalov Type 94: Bronze coins of the type “Standing Apollo - Upright Anchor”, dichalk (?)
Obv.: Full-face naked Apollo, standing and holding a laurel tree and two arrows. The image represents the statue of Kalamis erected in the town.
Rev.: Upright anchor with large flukes and a rectangular stock. The letter A l. and the additional symbol of a crab r. viewed from above on the other side between flukes and the stock.
Jaimelai
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Arabia Petraea, Rabbathmoba. Septimius Severus AE28.46 viewsObv: AVT KAI L CE[P CEOVP CE]B, laureate head right.
Rev: RABBAQ M W NA.., cult statue of Ares(Greek god of war), standing facing, holding spear, shield, and sword, set upon basis set on plinth.
28mm, 9.9gms.
ancientone
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ARCH, Gordian III, AE26, Varbanov I 1945125 viewsGordian III
Augustus, 238- 244 A.D.

Coin: AE 26

Obverse: AVT K M ANT ΓOPΔIANOC / AVΓ, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian III, to the left, facing the draped bust of Serapis, wearing a Kalathos upon his head, to the right.
Reverse: VΠ MNOΦIΛ-O-V M-APKIANO / ΠOΛITΩ, a Triumphal Arch, with three portals, surmounted with three statues. E in the central portal.

Weight: 12.34 g, Diameter: 26.7 x 26.7 x 2.5 mm, Die axis: 40°, Mint: Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior, Consular Legate: Tullius Menophilus, Reference: Varbanov I 1945

Rated Rare (R6, 50 - 100 examples known)
Masis
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ARCH, NERO, (Lost Arch of Nero)1352 viewsOrichalcum sestertius, RIC 149, VF, 24.55g, 35.1mm, 45o, Rome mint, 64 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head right wearing aegis; reverse S C, triumphal arch surmounted by statue of Nero in quadriga, Victory on left holds wreath & palm, Pax on right holds caduceus & cornucopia, wreath in archway, Mars nude helmeted statue in niche4 comments
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Ariobarzanes III, Eusebes Philoromaios | Athena - Cappadocia, AR Drachm, 52-42 BC.58 views
Ariobarzanes III, Eusebes Philoromaios | Athena - Silver Drachm

Obv: Ariobazarnes' diademed and bearded head, right facing.
Rev: Athena standing left, holding statuette of Nike in extended right, spear and shield in her left hand; star in crescent in inner left field, monogram in inner right; (illegible date in) exergue off flan: BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIOBAPZANOY EYΣEB[OY KAI ΦIΛOPΩMAIOY], enclosing reverse in square pattern.

Exergue: Off flan: [KAI ΦIΛOPΩMAIOY] and regnal date.

Mint: Mazaka or Eusebeia
Struck: 52-42 BC.

Size: 16 mm.
Weight: 3.5 grm.
Die axis: 0°

Condition: As shown in photo.

Refs:*
Sear, 7304
Simonetta 3a
BMC Galatia, pg. 42, 4.
Tiathena
Ariobarzanes_Athena_2nd_4b.jpg
Ariobarzanes III, Eusebes Philoromaios | Athena - Cappadocia, AR Drachm, 52-42 BC.75 views
Ariobarzanes III, Eusebes Philoromaios | Athena - Silver Drachm

Obv: Ariobazarnes' diademed and beardless head, right facing.
Rev: Athena standing left, holding statuette of Nike in extended right, spear and shield in her left hand; star in crescent in inner left field, monogram in inner right; (illegible date in) exergue off flan: BAΣIΛEΩΣ AP[IOBAPZANOY] EYΣ[EBOY KAI ΦIΛOPΩMAIOY], enclosing reverse in square pattern.

Exergue: Off flan: [KAI ΦIΛOPΩMAIOY] and regnal date.

Mint: Mazaka or Eusebeia
Struck: 52-42 BC.

Size: 16.41 mm.
Weight: 3.5 grm.
Die axis: 0°

Condition: As shown in photo.

Refs:*
Sear, 7304
Simonetta 3a
BMC Galatia, pg. 42, 4.
Tiathena
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Artemis holding bow174 viewsCILICIA. Anemurium. Severus Alexander. Æ 31. A.D. 224/225 (year 3). Obv: ▪AV▪KAI▪M▪AV-(OVHPAΛEΞAN or similar)Δ, PON in field to left. Laureate head right; Countermark on neck. Rev: ETΓA-NE(MO)YPIEWN.Cult-Statue of Ephesian Artemis facing, single stag behind and to left. Ref: BMC -; SNG France 705 (var.). Axis: 180°. 13.22 g. CM: Artemis the huntress standing right, holding bow, in oval punch, 3.5 x 5.5 mm. Howgego - (?).There are no countermarked coins of Anemurium listed by Howgego. None of the (few) Artemis huntress groups noted matches this one. While 232 is similar, this coin is probably too late. Collection Automan.Automan
Diana_of_Ephesus_-_Claudius_AR_Tetradrachm.jpg
Artemis, (Diana of Ephesus), in her Temple141 viewsTI. CLAVD CAES AVG. Claudius bare head, facing left. / DIAN-EPHE Cult statue of Diana (Artemis) of Ephesus inside a tetra style temple, set on three tiered base; pediment decorated by figures flanking three windows.
RIC I 118; RPC I 2222; BMCRE 229; RSC 30; Sear Millennium 1839. Ephesus ca. 41-42 AD.
(25 mm, 11.14 g, 6h)

The statue of Artemis (Diana) at Ephesus was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Depicted on this coin, which was minted shortly after Claudius’ accession to the throne, there remains no trace of the statue, or the temple that housed it, other than some recently stacked column remnants to mark the location. Pliny The Elder described the temple as 115 meters in length, 55 meters in width, made almost entirely of marble; consisting of 127 Ionic style columns 18 meters in height. The original temple, which stood on the site from about 550 BC, was destroyed by arson in 356 BC. It was rebuilt around 330 BC in the form depicted on the coin, only to be destroyed by the Goths in 262 AD. Again rebuilt it was destroyed for the final time by Christians in 401 AD. The columns and marble of the temple were used to construct other buildings. Some of the columns found their way into the church of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople (Istanbul).

The site of the temple was rediscovered in 1869 by an expedition sponsored by the British Museum, but little remains to be seen today. A Christian inscription found at Ephesus reads Destroying the delusive image of the demon Artemis, Demeas has erected this symbol of Truth, the God that drives away idols, and the Cross of priests, deathless and victorious sign of Christ. This Christian zeal explains why so little remains of the site despite its repute in the ancient pre-Christian world.

This coin is rare with a few dozen examples known. In contrast to most examples, which show a four tiered temple base, the reverse of this coin shows a three-tiered temple base. The rectangles on the pediment of the temple are frequently identified as tables, or altars. However, it is more likely that these are windows in the pediment to facilitate lighting of the statue in the interior of the temple. The Ionic style of the columns, as described by Pliny, is clearly visible in the reverse image.
1 commentsLloyd T
G_307_Julia_Gordus_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Lydia, Iulia Gordus, Tyche, Artemis Ephesia31 viewsLydia, Iulia Gordus
Pseudo-autonomous issue
2nd century
Obv.: ΙΟVΛΙΑ ΓΟΡΔΟС, Turreted and draped bust of Tyche right.
Rev.: IΟVΛ ΓΟΡΔΗΝΩΝ, Facing statue of Artemis Ephesia, with supports.
Ae, 2.73g, 17mm
Ref.: RPC III 1261, SNG Copenhagen 157.
2 commentsshanxi
Marcus_Aurelius_3.jpg
Asia Minor, Lydia, Maionia, Marcus Aurelius, Artemis Ephesia 16 viewsMarcus Aurelius
Lydia, Maionia
AD 161-180
Obv.: M AVPЄΛIOC HPOC KAI, head right.
Rev.: : MAIO NΩN, statue of Artemis Ephesia
AE, 3.5g, 17.5mm
Ref.: BMC 39
shanxi
Pergamon_45.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Herakles, Athena12 viewsMysia, Pergamon
Diobol, 330-284 BC
Obv.: head of Herakles right, clad in lion's skin
Rev.: ΠEΡΓAM, cult statue of Athena standing facing, holding spear and shield
Ag, 1.27g, 11mm
Ref.: SNG Paris 1558
Ex Solidus Numsimatik, auction11, Lot 100
shanxi
Pergamon_10.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Herakles, Athena / mirrored reverse19 viewsMysia, Pergamon
Diobol, 330-284 BC
Obv.: head of Herakles right, clad in lion's skin
Rev.: mirrored !! - ΠEΡΓAM, cult statue of Athena standing facing, holding spear and shield
Ag, 1.23g, 11mm
Ref.: ---
shanxi
Augustus_02.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, RPC, Pergamon, Augustus23 viewsAugustus
Pergamon, Mysia, AD 1
Ae 21
Obv.: CEBACTON KE ΦA…, Statue of Augustus, standing facing and holding scepter, within distyle temple.
Rev.: ΠEPΓAMHNΩN KAI CAPΔIANΩN, Demos of Pergamon crowning Demos of Sardeis.
AE, 5.46g, 20.8x22.2mm
Ref.: RPC 2362, SNG Copenhagen 519.
ex Künker auction 83, lot 707
shanxi
R649_Augustus_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, RPC, Pergamon, Augustus, RPC I 23559 viewsAugustus
Pergamon, Mysia, 27 BC-AD 14
Ae 18
Obv.: ΠЄPΓAMHNOI CЄBACTON, Laureate head right; to right, capricorn right.
Rev.: AYTOKPATOPA KAICAPA, Tetrastyle temple, containing facing statue of Augustus.
AE, 18mm, 4.37g
Ref.: RPC I 2355
shanxi
Claudius_06.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, RPC, Pergamon, Claudius, Temple10 viewsClaudius
Pergamon, Mysia, AD 41-54
Ae 18
Obv.: KΛΑΥΔΙΟΝ ΚΑΙCΑΡΑ CEBACTON, Bare head right.
Rev.: CEBACTON / PERΓΑΜΕΝΟΙ, Statue of Augustus, holding spear, within tetrastyle temple.
AE, 6.01 g, 18 mm
Ref.: RPC 2370
shanxi
Commodus_1.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, RPC, Pergamon, Commodus, Telesphorus 17 viewsCommodus
Pergamon, Mysia, 175–177
Obv.: Λ ΑΥΡ ΑΙΛ ΚΟΜΜΟΔΟΣ, head of Commodus
Rev.: ΠΕΡΓΑΜΗΝΩΝ, shrine enclosing statue of Telesphorus
Ae, 21mm, 3.83g
Ref.: BMC 302 (same dies), Weisser 1080
Ex Hauck & Aufhäuser
shanxi
Trajan_06.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, RPC, Pergamon, Trajan, Temple16 viewsTrajan
Pergamon, Mysia
AE 18, AD 98-117
Obv: TPAIANOC CTPIΠΩΛΛIΩNOC, Tetrastyle temple containing cult statue standing facing; in pediment, pellet.
Rev: AVΓOVCTOC / ΠEPΓA, Tetrastyle temple containing statue of emperor standing facing; in pediment, capricorn.
AE, 4.59g, 18mm
Ref.: SNG France 2063
Ex Gitbud & Naumann, auction 39, lot 568
shanxi
Perge_01.jpg
Asia Minor, Pamphylia, Perge, Artemis Pergaia 22 viewsPerge
Asia Minor, Pamphylia
Obv.: Cult statue of Artemis Pergaia within distyle temple, eagle in pediment
Rev:: ΠEPΓAIAΣ, magistrate's name [A]PTEMIΔ[OΣ], bow and quiver
AE, 3.64g, 16mm
Ref.: BMC Pamphylia p. 121, 12
shanxi
Apameia_Phrygia_02.jpg
Asia Minor, Phrygia, Apameia, Zeus, Artemis15 viewsApameia
Asia Minor, Phrygia
AE20, 133-48 BC
Obv.: laureate head of Zeus right
Rev.: AΠAMEΩ / AΡTEMIΔ BABA, cult statue of Artemis Anaitis facing
AE, 8.59g, 20.2mm
Ref.: BMC Phrygia p. 77, 48
shanxi
G_289_Apameia_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Phrygia, Apameia, Zeus, Artemis6 viewsApameia
Asia Minor, Phrygia
AE19, 133-48 BC
Obv.: laureate head of Zeus right
Rev.: AΠAMEΩN HPAKΛEI EΓΛO, cult-statue of Artemis Anaitis seen from front.
AE, 8.14g, 19mm
Ref.: SNG München 123; SNG Tübingen 3967
shanxi
G_286_Traianopolis_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Phrygia, Traianopolis, Athena, Artemis Ephesia8 viewsTraianopolis
Asia Minor, Phrygia
Pseudo-autonomous issue
AE16
Time of Hadrian, AD 117-138
Obv: Helmeted bust of Athena right, wearing aegis.
Rev: ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ, Facing statue of Artemis Ephesia
AE, 16mm, 3.11g
Ref.: RPC III 2479; Lindgren I 1049.
shanxi
Asklepios_Phyromachos.jpg
Asklepios of Phyromachos44 viewsHead of Asklepios. Roman marble copy of the head of Asklepios made by Phyromachos, today in the Hermitage in St. Petersburg/Russia. The famous statue of Asklepios made by Phyromachos stood in the Asklepieion in Pergamon. Its head is found on several coins from Pergamon.

Phyromachos was the Pergamenian court sculptor. He has made too the Gigantomachy of the Pergamon Altar today in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin.
Jochen
Trajan_Aspendos.jpg
Aspendos, Pamphylia11 viewsObv: ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟΣ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ
Rev: ΑСΠΕΝΔΙΩΝ
Zeus to l. seated r., resting with his r. hand on sceptre and presenting, on his extended l. hand, cult statues of the Aphroditai Kastnietides to a goddess in front of him, seated l., holding patera in her extended r. hand and sceptre (or palm?) in l.

7.98g, 24mm
klausklage
054n.jpg
Athena (helmeted bust of)202 viewsTROAS. Ilium. Faustina Jr. Æ 25. A.D. 146-175. Obv: CEBAC-ΦAVCTINAAVΓ. Draped bust right; countermark on neck. Rev: IΛI-EΩ. To right bull suspended from tree, on back of bull sits male figure (Ilos), plunging knife into bull’s neck; to left statue of Athena Ilias on pedestal. Ref: BMC 53. Axis: 15°. Weight: 9.50 g. CM: Helmeted bust of Athena right, in oval punch, 6 x 7 mm. Howgego 186 (53 pcs). Collection Automan.Automan
Athena_Parthenos.jpg
Athena Parthenos228 viewsAttica, Athens, ca. 264-267 AD, Æ 21
Helmeted head of Athena right. / AΘHN-AIΩN Athena Parthenos standing left holding Nike, shield and spear.
Kroll, Agora, 284; Sv-pl 82, 5ff; SNG Copenhagen 384.
(21 mm, 4.98 g, 6h)

The statue of Athena depicted on the reverse of this coin is a representation of Phidias cult statue of Athena in the Parthenon on the acropolis of Athens. The statue is stood in the Parthenon until the Fifth century AD, when it was destroyed by fire.

This is amongst the last of the “Roman series” of coins issued from the mint in Athens. In 267 AD Germanic raiders sacked the city bringing to an end the operations of the Athenian mint.
Lloyd T
1342_Athens.jpg
Athens - AE7 views264-267 AD
draped bust of Athena right wearing crested helmet
mirror image of acropolis of Athens from northwest - Panathenaic way lead upward to the Propylaia; at summit, large statue of Athena Promachos standing right, Erechtheion to right; in center of rock, niche representing the Cave of Pan with his statue
AΘH_NAIΩN
Kroll 375 (same obv. die as 372b); Walker, Chronological 111–13a; Svoronos, Monnaies, pl. 98, 30–6
ex Galata
Johny SYSEL
new_style_k.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 165-42 BC 12 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 27mm, 16.6g, 12h, New Style. Socrates, Dionysodoros, and Zoilos, magistrates. Struck 116/5 BC.
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev.: A-ΘE / ΣOKΡ / ATHΣ / ΔIONΥ / ΣOΔΩ / MOY / ΣΩI; Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; in right field, facing cult statue of Apollo Delios, holding Three Graces and bow; B on amphora, ΣO below.
Reference: Thompson 616a / 17-47-601
1 commentsJohn Anthony
Octavian_RIC_271.JPG
Augustus, 27 BC - 14 AD34 viewsObv: No legend, laureate head of Octavian, as Apollo, facing right.

Rev: IMP - CAESAR, cloaked statue of Octavian standing, facing, holding a spear and a parazonium atop a rostral column.

Silver Denarius, uncertain Italian mint, 30 - 29 BC

3.4 grams, 19 mm, 270°

RIC I 271, RSC 124, S1559, VM 30
SPQR Coins
Octavian_RIC_267.JPG
Augustus, 27 BC - 14 AD109 viewsObv: No legend, bare head of Octavian facing right.

Rev: IMP CAESAR inscribed on architrave of the Actian arch, depicted as a single span surmounted by a statue of Octavian in a facing triumphal quadriga.

Silver Denarius, Uncertain Italian mint, 30 - 29 BC

3.4 grams, 20 mm, 270°

RIC I 267, RSC 123, S1558, VM 29
3 commentsSPQR Matt
Augustus, Magnesia ad Maeandrum, Nike Crowning.JPG
Augustus, Magnesia ad Maeandrum, Nike Crowning22 viewsAE17, Augustus or Possibly Caesar
Obverse: Laureate head right crowned by a small figure of Nike
Reverse: EYFHMOSEYFHMOY MAGNHTVN, Facing cult statue of Artemis Leukophrys with two supports.
RPC 2691
17mm, 3.1gm
Jerome Holderman
Barberini_Faun_front_Glyptothek_Munich_218_n2.jpg
Barberini Faun (Drunken Satyr) located in the Glyptothek in Munich, Germany226 viewsThe life-size marble statue known as the Barberini Faun or Drunken Satyr is located in the Glyptothek in Munich, Germany. A Faun is the Roman equivalent of a Greek Satyr. In Greek mythology, satyrs were human-like male woodland spirits with several animal features, often a goat-like tail, hooves, ears, or horns. Satyrs attended Dionysus. The position of the right arm over the head was a classical artistic convention indicating sleep. The statue is believed to have once adorned Hadrian's Mausoleum. The historian Procopius recorded that during the siege of Rome in 537 the defenders had hurled down upon the Goths the statues adorning Hadrian's Mausoleum. When discovered, the statue was heavily damaged; the right leg, parts of both hands, and parts of the head were missing. Johann Winckelmann speculated that the place of discovery and the statue's condition suggested that it had been such a projectile.
Joe Sermarini
barg.jpg
Bargylia, Karia10 views100 - 1 BC
AE12 (12.5 - 12.9 mm), 1.56 g
Forepart of Pegasos / Statue of Artemis Kindyas
SNGCop - 176
Pekka K
hostilian_tyche.jpg
BCC CM1364 viewsRoman Provincial
Caesarea Maritima
Hostilian 250-251 CE
Obv:HOSTILIANO QVINTO C
Radiate, (draped or cuirassed?) bust right.
Rev:COL P R FL AV FC CAES METROP
Tyche standing to left, holding bust, staff and rudder.
Her right foot rests on a prow, she steers the ship of state.
At her feet to her left, not so visible here, is a port worker,
perhaps a god, representing the harbor of Sebastos. He gazes
up at her in adoration for her protection of the city. Large parts
of the statue that I believe formed the model for this coin were
found in the 1970's by the Joint Expedition to Caesarea
Maritima, and are now on display in the museum there.
AE 24mm. 14.1g. Axis:0
Kadman #187 var. (radiate bust), very rare.
v-drome
lead_statue_BCC_L15.jpg
BCC L1525 viewsLead statuette
Caesarea Maritima
Greco-Roman Eastern, 1st-3rd century CE?
Youthful Herakles?(Hercules), or Hercules/Melkart?
nude, with lion skin? cloak, clasped at neck.
Another possible attribution could be Hermes?
The top of the head is slightly flattened, with
cracks, and may have sustained damage as a
result of an impact in antiquity. There is another
possible impact cut-mark on the left shoulder.
4.6cm x 3.2cm. x 1.3cm.
weight: 44.5gm.

click for higher resolution
v-drome
Zeus_H_BCC_LT25.jpg
BCC LT2543 viewsLead Tessera
Caesarea Maritima
1st to 4th Century CE
Obv:Cult statue of Artemis
Rev: Blank
12 x 8.5mm. 0.87gm.
cf. BCC LT26, LT35, LT72
cf. Hamburger #15 and #16
v-drome
BCC_LT26_Zeus_h2.jpg
BCC LT2631 viewsLead Tessera
Caesarea Maritima
Obv: Cult statue of Artemis, or
possibly Zeus Heliopolites?
Rev: Blank
A fragmentary cult statue of
the Artemis of Ephesus was
found at Caesarea, Raban,
Holum, 1996.
12 x 8mm. 0.54gm.
cf. BCC LT25, LT35, or LT9
cf Hamburger #15 and #16
v-drome
Lt35.jpg
BCC Lt3535 viewsLead Tessera
Late Roman 1st-4th cent.
Obv: Cult statue of the
Ephesian Artemis?, or other Eastern
mummiform deity, standing,
facing, stags? to right and left.
Rev: Blank.
11.5x10mm. 0.80gm.
cf. Hamburger, "Surface Finds form Caesarea
Maritima - Tesserae. Excavations at Caesarea
Maritima 1975, 1976, 1979 - Final Report
Levine, Netzer. #15 and #16.
Also, cf. BCC LT25, LT26, LT72
v-drome
BCC_72_Artemis_tessera.jpg
BCC LT7224 viewsLead Tessera
Caesarea Maritima
Late Roman 1st-4th cent.
Obv: Cult statue of Artemis
Rev: Blank.
10.75 x 9 x 1mm. 0.69gm.
cf. Hamburger, "Surface Finds
from Caesarea Maritima - Tesserae",
Excavations at Caesarea Maritima
1975, 1976, 1979 - Final Report,
Levine, Netzer. #15 and #16,
also cf. BCC LT25, LT26, and LT35.
This is the fourth example of six, in the
present collection, of a tessera from
Caesarea with this design. A
fragmentary cult statue of the
Ephesian Artemis was recovered at
Caesarea by archaeologists ca. 1962.
v-drome
BCC_LT81_Artemis_tessera.jpg
BCC LT819 viewsLead Tessera
Caesarea Maritima
Late Roman 1st-4th cent.
Obv: Cult statue of Artemis?,
facing, stags? to right and left.
Rev: Blank.
11x8.5x1mm. 0.66gm.
cf. Hamburger, "Surface Finds from
Caesarea Maritima - Tesserae Excavations
at Caesarea Maritima 1975, 1976,
1979 - Final Report, Levine, Netzer.
#15 and #16
cf. BCC LT25, LT26, LT35, LT72,
and LT82.
This collection of very small lead
pieces from Caesarea, a corpus of
around ninety objects, includes six
very similar tesserae which display
the image of an Eastern-style mummiform
diety. This is possibly the Artemis of Ephesus,
a fragmentary statue of which was found
at Caesarea in the 1960's.
v-drome
BCC_LT82_Artemis__Tessera.jpg
BCC LT8217 viewsLead Tessera
Caesarea Maritima
Late Roman 1st-4th cent.
Obv: Cult statue of Artemis?,
facing, stags? to right and left.
Rev: Blank.
9 x 8 x 0.75mm. 0.36gm.
cf. Hamburger, "Surface Finds from
Caesarea Maritima - Tesserae
Excavations at Caesarea Maritima
1975, 1976, 1979 - Final Report, Levine,
Netzer. #15 and #16
cf. BCC LT25, LT26, LT35, LT72, and LT81
v-drome
BCC_RGP52_Ptolemais_Gallienus.jpg
BCC RGP5220 viewsRoman Provincial
Ake-Ptolemais (Akko)
Gallienus 253-268 CE
Obv:IMP CAES LIC GALLIENVS
AVG Laureate head right.
Rev: COL PTOL (COL P / TOL)
Portable shrine containing statue
of deity (Zeus/Kronos?), standing
facing on a dome-shaped stone.
In right hand, Double Axe, in
left hand, Harpe?
AE26mm. 13.17gm. Axis:30
References: BMC 50v. (no "P"),
Kadman 256v., Rosenberger 86v.
(undraped head right). Surface
find, Caesarea Maritima, 1977
v-drome
Beirut_Mint,_Elagabalus_Bronze.jpg
Beirut Mint, Elagabalus Bronze Coin 218 - 222 AD 78 views23 mm 8.7 gram coin
BMC 202 Elagabalus AE 25mm of Phoenicia, Berytus. Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right / Tetrastyle temple with arched pediment, statue of Marsyas within. SNGCop 117; Lindgren I 2269.
http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/ric/elagabalus/_berytos_AE25_BMC_202.jpg
Antonivs Protti
Phil1NicomMerge1.JPG
Bithynia, Nicomedia. Philip I. SNG von Aulock 829.82 viewsÆ28. Bithynia, Nicomedia. Philip I (AD 244-249), radiate head, draped and cuirassed bust to r. M • IOVΛIOC • ΦIΛI-Π-Π[OC AVG] (VG ligate) or “Marcus Julius Philippus Augustus.” Countermark CAP/Γ in round punch (Howgego 560) or "Sardis, 3 assaria." Rev., Nude statue of Heracles stg. atop girlanded cippus, head to r, holding lionskin in l. arm, and supported by club with r. hand. NIKOMH[ΔE]ΩN - ΔIC NEΩK[OP] (ΩN ligate). SNG von Aulock 829. Ex Marcus Gruss 8-25-2009.

Same dies as Jochen’s example:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-32987
1 commentsMark Fox
nikomedia_philippI_SNGaulock829.jpg
Bithynia, Nikomedeia, Philip I, SNG von Aulock 82946 viewsPhilip I., AD 244-249
AE 28, 11.90g
obv. M IOVLIOC. FILIPPOC AVG (VG ligate)
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. NIKOMHDEWN - DIC NEWKOR (WN ligate)
Statue of Herakles, nude, stg. facing on a small girlanded cippus, head r.,
holding lionskin in l. arm and resting with r. hand on his club
SNG von Aulock 829
rare, F+/about VF, green patina

The special feature of this rev. depiction is that Herakles is shown standing as a real statue on a cippus. You can see that the club has the function to stabilize the statics of the statue.
Jochen
518.jpg
bmc1926 viewsElagabalus
Berytos, Phoenicia

Obv: IMP CAES M AVR ANTONINVS AVG, Laureate cuirassed bust right.
Rev: COLIV L A VGFEL→BER, tetrastyle temple surmounted by statue of figure riding panther to right, Maryas under central arch.
31 mm, 15.66 gms


BMC 192, SNG Cop 116
Charles M
1115.jpg
bmcx5 viewsElagabalus
Berytos, Phoenicia

Obv: Laureate draped cuirassed bust right.
Rev: Tetrastyle temple containing baitylos in center and two cult statues on both sides within the intercolumniation; stairs leading to the baitylos in center.
25 mm, 8.13 gms


BMC---, SNG Cop---, Numismatik Naumann Auction 23, lot 633
Charles M
Bramsen 0280.JPG
Bramsen 0280. La Venus de Medicis, 1803.154 viewsObv. Head of Napoleon.
Exergue, JEUFFROY FECIT 1803. DENON DIR. G.D. MUSÉE C. D. ARTS
Rev. the antique statue of the Venus de Medicis.
Legend, AUX ARTS LA VICTOIRE. L'AN IV DU CONSULAT DE BONAPARTE.

Depicts the Venus de Medici in the Louvre, and the occasion of Napoleons visit to the museum. The legend "Aux arts la victoire" is a reference to Napoleon's philosophy of "To the victors belong the spoils" . 1803.
LordBest
Sullis Minerva.jpg
Britain, Bath, Aquae Sulis, Bust of Sullis Minerva67 viewsDisplayed in the Baths.

This is a wonderful gilt bronze head of Sullis Minerva and is probably from the cult statue of the deity which would have stood within her Temple beside the Sacred Spring. Found in A.D. 1727.
maridvnvm
Ornamental Pediment.jpg
Britain, Bath, Aquae Sulis, The Temple31 viewsThe Temple at Bath is one of only two truly classical temples known from Roman Britain. It was where the the cult statue of the goddess Sulis Minerva was thought to have been housed. Parts of the ornamental pediment survives and are displayed in the Baths Museum.maridvnvm
Phyrigia.jpg
Bronze coin from Phrygia13 viewsA Bronze AE21 minted in Apamea, Phrygia, minted between 133-48 BC. 20.9 mm, 6.884 g.

Obverse: Head of Zeus right, wearing wreath of oak and laurel leaves

Reverse: A\\\\\\\\APAME - BIANO / MANT, cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis facing, wearing kalathos and veil, taenia hanging from each hand

Attribution: SNG Cop 173; BMC Phrygia p 80, 65; SGCV II 5121
chuy1530
Clipboard2~3.jpg
Bronze Thespian Helm statue53 views120mm x 50mm.1 commentsancientone
0129.jpg
C. Censorin, As13 viewsC. Censorin, As

RRC 346/4
88 b.c.
14,31 gr

Av: Heads of Numa Pompilius (bearded) uand of Ancus Marcius to right. ("NVMA POMPILI", "ANCVS MARCI")
Rv: Two ships (in Ostia harbour?), behind column with statue of Victoria. Above: "C CENSO / ROMA "

Ex Kricheldorf Auct 49, 20.02.2017, Lot 199
Norbert
rep_2.jpg
C. Censorinus. 88 BC. Æ As.10 viewsC. Censorinus. 88 BC. Æ As. Semuncial standard. Rome mint. Jugate heads of Numa Pompilius and Ancus Marcius / Two arches; beneath left arch, a spiral column surmounted by statue of Victory; protruding from right arch, prow right; crescent above prow. Crawford 346/3 (citing 20 specimens in Paris); Sydenham 716. Podiceps
Cloelius_Caldus.jpg
C. Coelius Caldus - AR denarius7 viewsRome
²52 BC
¹51 BC
head of Coelius Caldus (moneyer's grandfather) right; standard inscribed HIS (Hispania) behind, standard in the form of a boar (emblem of of Clunia, Hispania) before
C·COEL·CALDVS
COS
statue of god seated left between two trophies of arms, all on a high lectisternium with front inscribed L·CALDVS / VII·(VIR)·EP(VL) (Lucius Caldus Septemvir Epulo)
C/·/C/A/L/D/V/S on left
I/MP/·/(AV)/·/X (Imperator, Augur, Decemvir) on right
C(ALD)VS III VIR below
¹Crawford 437/2a, Sydenham 894, RSC I Coelia 7, BMCRR II 3837, SRCV I 404
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Aurea

scarce

Coin commemorates three moneyer's ancestors.

The first, moneyer's grandfather C. Coelius Caldus, was consul in 94 BC. In 107 BC, he was elected tribune of the plebs and passed a lex tabellaria, requiring a secret ballot to determine the verdict in cases of high treason. He was a praetor in 100 or 99 BC, and proconsul of Hispania Citerior the following year. This is represented by standard on the obverse along with emblem of the conquered town Clunia. He was also moneyer in 104 BC.

The second, L. Coelius Caldus, was member of septemviri epulones who prepared lectisternium - propitiatory ceremony, consisting of a meal offered to gods and goddesses (depicted on the reverse). He was responsible for sacrificial feast (epulare sacrificium) during Plebeian games (Ludi Plebeii) in Rome.

The third, C. Coelius Caldus, was augur, member of decemviri sacris faciundis, and governor who gained the title Imperator. The trophies on the reverse commemorates his military campains.
Johny SYSEL
776_C__Minucius_Augurinus.jpg
C. Minucius C.f. Augurinus - AR denarius6 viewsRome
²134 BC
¹135 BC
helmeted head of Roma right
ROMA
X
Ionic column surmounted by statue; at base, two stalks of grain; on left, L. Minucius Augurinus standing right,
holding patera, foot on modius; on right, M. Minucius Faesus standing left, holding lituus.
C·A_VG
¹Crawford 242/1, SRCV I 119, Sydenham 463, RSC I Minucia 3,
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,7g
ex Aurea Numismatika

Reverse depicts a commemorative bronze column - Columna Minucia which was erected in front of the gate, Porta Trigemina, in memory of L. Minucius Augurinus who as Praefectus Annonae supplied Rome with grain during famine in 439 BC. On the right there is Marcus Minucius Faestus who was elected Augur as the first plebeian in 300 BC.
Johny SYSEL
Sulpicius~0.jpg
C. Sulpicius C.f. (Galba) - AR denarius serratus11 views³moneyer probably not belonged to the patrician Galba family but to a Plebeian branch
³Sardinia or Massalia region
¹Rome
²103 BC
¹106 BC
2 jugate laureate heads of Dii Penates Publici left
D · P · P
Two soldiers (or Dii Penas Publici) standing facing each other, holding spears and pointing at sow which lies between them
C
C·SV(LP)ICI·C·F
¹Crawford 312/1, RSC I Sulpicia 1, SRCV I 189, Sydenham 572
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
³Mark Passehl
3,96g
ex Aurea numismatika

The Sulpicii came from Lavinium and both sides of coin are related to it.

Di Penates Publici were taken from Troy together with Palladium by Aeneas. When Aeneas fled from Troy Helenus, a son of Priamos, has predicted Aeneas, that he would built a new city where a white sow would cast 30 piglets. Aeneas prepared to sacrifice a pregnant white sow he has brought in his ship for this purpose, but the sow escaped and fled 24 stadiums in the inland, layed down under an oak-tree (or ilex-tree) and casted 30 white piglets. Because of that Aeneas knew that this prophecy too became true and he should built a city here. He sacrificed the 30 piglets and erected a shrine at this place. The new city he called Lavinium referring to Lavinia, daughter of king Latinus. The 30 piglets represented 30 years only after which his successors became the real owners of the new land.

At the same time story of white sow predicts foundation of another town:
River god Tiber speak to Aeneas in a dream:
"....
A sow beneath an oak shall lie along,
All white herself, and white her thirty young.
When thirty rolling years have run their race,
Thy son Ascanius, on this empty space,
Shall build a royal town, of lasting fame,
Which from this omen shall receive the name.
..."
Alba Longa was founded just 30 years after Lavinium and so the prophecy was fulfilled here too. The name Alba Longa is said to be derived from the white sow (meaning the long white). So Lavinium was the mothertown of Alba Longa and finely of Rome itself. On the Forum of Lavinium stood a bronze statue of the sow, its body was conserved by the priests in pickle.
(Jochen's coins of mythological interests)
Johny SYSEL
1755_Roma_#1.jpg
caesarea0711 viewsElagabalus
Caesarea, Samaria

Obv: ...ANTON. Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: [COL...] →CAES. Tyche standing facing within tetrastyle temple, holding bust and sceptre, resting foot on harbour-god; statues between the temple's columns.
17 mm, 5.32 gms

Sofaer 71, Kadman 80-81, Roma Numismatics E-Sale 60, Lot 480 (this coin)
Charles M
CaraPlaLaodicea.jpg
CAG and COL195 viewsCaracalla and Plautilla, 202 - 22 January 205 A.D., Laodicea ad Mare, Syria
9074. Bronze AE 32, SNG Cop 367, S -, Lindgren -; c/m Howgego 581 (116 pcs) & 586 (88 pcs), F, Laodicea ad Mare mint, 25.64g, 32.3mm, 0o, obverse legend illegible and unknown from references, ]PET[, jugate heads right of Caracalla, radiate, draped, and cuirassed, and Plautilla, draped, countermarks; reverse [SEPT LLVDIC COLONE METROPLI] (illegible), statue of Artemis Brauronia right, stag behind; all inscriptions are illegible on the SNG Copenhagen coin as well; scarce; $180.00
The countermarks, CAG in rectangular 5 x 3 mm punch (Howgego 581, 116 pcs) and COL in rectangular 6.5 x 3 mm punch (Howgego 586, 88 pcs), were applied after the city became a colony in 197/198, allowing older coins to circulate alongside newer coins with Latin legends. (Although the countermark was also applied to coins Such as this one with Latin inscriptions). All coins countermarked COL also bear CAG. Forum catalog.
whitetd49
Vlasto_68~1.jpg
CALABRIA, Taras. Circa 510-500 BC. AR Incuse Nomos11 views8,03 g; 24 mm; 11 h
Phalanthos riding dolphin right, extending left arm, holding dolphin with right hand; crowning Nike to left; shell below
Rv. Incuse of obverse, but ethnic in relief.
HNItaly 826; Vlasto 68. The first issue of Tarentine coinage. Very rare. Lightly toned and in fine archaic style, extremely fine.

I got this great piece from an auction last fall and it was the most important acquisition for me.
Taras incuse stater is more compact and thicker than Kaulonia and Sybaris incuse stater. It was dibble (or triple) striked and the details were hard to detect. We can found slight trace on the Taras’s head and his left hand. I believe this is the reason that the pattern looks very sharp while the high points (such as dolphin’s eyes and tail ) are flat.

Dating from the late sixth century, this nomos shows Phalantus naked, riding a dolphin, expressing a motif destined for popular success in the coins of Taras: the dolphin brings Phalantus safe and sound across the sea (also evidenced by the presence of a pecten in the lower field of the coin), and conveys him to Italy, according to the dictate of the Delphic oracle. We learn from the Periegesis of Greece of Pausania (II cent. A.D.) that statues of Taras, Phalantus, and Phalantus’ dolphin (cf. Paus. X 13) were among the votive offerings (anathemata) presented to Delphi by the Tarantines with a fifth of the spoils taken from the Peucetii and the Iapygians. The reverse has the same representation as the obverse, in incuse, using a well-known technique of early coinage that was deployed at many other Southern Italian cities besides Taras
Leo
rJ9P3Sacy7Cs4EiHGtB6K8d96G5jb2.jpg
CALIGULA & DIVUS AUGUSTUS AE dupondius. Statue of Caligula, bust of Divus Augustus, SC flanking.29 viewsCALIGULA & DIVUS AUGUSTUS AE dupondius. Struck 37-41 AD. CONSENSV SENAT ET EQ ORDIN P Q R, laureate & togate Caligula seated left on curule chair, holding branch. Reverse - DIVVS AVGVSTVS S-C, radiate head of Divus Augustus left. RCV 1811. Very Scarce. 29mm, 15.1g.1 commentsAntonivs Protti
Caligula_Divo.jpg
Caligula AE Sestertius, Pietas / Divo Avg RIC 3698 viewsObv: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS P M TR POT, PIETAS in exergue, Pietas seated left on stool, holding patera in extended left hand and resting right forearm on small draped figure standing facing on basis
Rev: DIVO AVG above S C across field, Gaius, toga draped over his head, standing left, holding patera over garlanded altar; victimarius standing facing, holding bull for sacrifice; second attendant standing behind Gaius, holding a patera on either side; garlanded hexastyle temple of Divus Augustus in background, pediment decorated with sacrificial scene; triumphal quadriga and Victories as acroteria, statues of Romulus and Aeneas along roof line.
RIC I 36; BMCRE 41; BN 51; Cohen 9. aF/aVF, dark brown patina, with brassy highlights. Numerous light scratches and bumps on obverse, some pitting, reverse near VF with great details. RARE and important architectural type.
This coin commemorates the dedication of the temple of Divus Augustus, completed in 37 AD, with a remarkable scene of Gaius Caligula in his role of pontifex maximus leading the sacrificial ceremonies.
2 commentsmattpat
Caligula_RIC56.jpg
Caligula for Divus Augustus - Dupondius - RIC 5611 viewsObv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS S-C, radiate head of Divus Augustus left
Rev: CONSENSV SENAT ET EQ ORDIN P Q R, laureate & togate statue of Gaius Caligula seated left on curule chair, holding branch
Size: 28 mm
Weight: 13,2 g
Mint: Rome
Date: 37-39 AD
Ref: RIC I 56 (Caligula), Cohen 87 (Augustus), BMC 88
vs1969
Caligula_Sestertius_Pietas-Caligula_Sacrificing_at_Temple_of_Augustus.jpg
Caligula Sestertius Pietas-Caligula Sacrificing at Temple of Augustus163 viewsObv.
C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS P M TR POT
PIETAS in ex
Pietas, veiled, seated left and holding patera, elbow resting on statue

Rev.
DIVO AVG S-C
Gaius sacrificing before hexastyle temple; attendants with bull and patera at sides
6 commentsancientdave
caesarea_lucius_verus_Met716.jpg
Cappadocia, Caesarea, Lucius Verus Met. 716130 viewsLucius Verus AD 161-169
AR - Didrachm, 6.71g
struck AD 161-166 (as COS II)
obv. AYTOKR OYHROC CEBACTOC
bare head, r.
rev. YPA - TOS B
Agalma of Mt. Argaios, on summit man standing frontal with sceptre in l. hand (mountain god?)
Met. 716
Scarce, about EF, light toned

The Mount Argaios (Lat. Mons Argaeus) was the highest mountain in Asia Minor. Today it is Erciyes Dagi, 3916m and volcanic. This mountain was sacred since the time of the Hittits. Agalma is an item for decoration, a word, a sentence, but then too a cult statue, or a votive gift for the gods, then an idole.

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
4 commentsJochen
Lg006GreekLarge_quad_sm~1.jpg
Caracalla AE provincial, Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior (Nikyup, Bulgaria) (211 - 212 AD)19 viewsΑΥ Κ Μ ΑΥΡ – [ANTΩNINOC], laureate, draped bust right / Y ΦΛ OYΛΠIAN – NIKOΠOΛIT + ΠΡOC I in exergue, Nemesis-Aequitas standing left, holding scales in extended right hand and measuring rod (whip? sceptre?) in the crook of left arm, wheel at foot left.

Ӕ, 26 mm, 9.22 g, die axis 8h (turned coin)

I do not have access to any of the relevant provincial catalogs and cannot check any entries, but based on other similar coin descriptions on this site some numbers that may be close to this type are: AMNG I/1 1576-77, 1877-78; Varbanov (engl.) 3134, 3148, 3248; Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (HrHJ) No. 8.18.35.4-5, 8.18.35.8

AY[TOKPATΩΡ] K[AICAP] = Imperator Caesar, Μ[ΑΡΚΟC] ΑΥ[ΡΗΛΙΟC] ANTΩNINOC = Marcus Aurelius Antoninus aka "Caracalla". NIKOΠOΛIT[ΩN] PROC I[CTPΩN] ("πρός"="toward", but also "near to", like Latin "ad"; Istros = the lower Danube). ΦΛ OYΛΠIAN = Flavius Ulpianus, who was Roman governor of Lower Moesia (Moesia Inferior) starting from 210 to about 213. Before 211 Septimius Severus was still in charge; Caracalla visited the city in 211-212, was displeased with it and closed the mint (it was reopened only after his death), so the likely minting years are 211-212. All governors of Lower Moesia had titles on coins of either ΗΓ[ΕΜΟΝΑΣ] (governor of equestrian rank) or ΥΠ[ΑΤΕΥΟΝΤΟΣ] of the province (ΤΗΣ ΕΠΑΡΧΕΙΑΣ) (consular legate of senatorial rank). Y before the name of Flavius Ulpianus indicates the latter.

Aequitas = justice, equality, conformity, symmetry. Nemesis was originally understood as honest distributor of fortune, neither bad nor good, but in due proportion. Later it gained aspects of justice and divine retribution, but in Nemesis-Aequitas her qualities of honest dealing is emphasized. It symbolizes honesty, equality and justice of the emperor towards his subjects. The scales here mean honest measure rather than justice, the long stick she carries is most probably a measuring rod, but may also be a whip (symbol of punishment) or a sceptre (symbol of imperial power). The wheel may be the Wheel of Fortune (Rota Fortunae), but may also just symbolize equality.

CARACALLA, *4 April 188 Lugdunum (Lyon, France) † 8 April 217 (aged 29) road between Edessa and Carrhae ‡ 26 Dec 211 – 8 Apr 217 (not counting joint rule with his father and brother)

His birth name was Lucius Septimius Bassianus, then he was renamed Marcus Aurelius Antoninus at the age of 7 as part of his father's attempt at union with the families of Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. He got the agnomen "Caracalla" after a Gallic hooded tunic that he habitually wore and made fashionable. He was also referred to as Tarautas, after a famously diminutive and violent gladiator of the time. The firstborn of the famous imperial couple Septimius Severus and Julia Domna, he was groomed to be emperor together with his brother Geta. They both were given titles of Caesars and even full Augusti before their father's death. But it was not going to happen, since the brothers hated each other. In 202 Caracalla was forced to marry the daughter of Gaius Fulvius Plautianus, Fulvia Plautilla, he immediately grew to hate them both. By 205 Caracalla had succeeded in having Plautianus executed for treason, probably fabricating the evidence of the plot himself. Then he banished his wife together with his own baby daughter first to Sicily and then to the largest of the Aeolian islands, Lipari. As soon as his father died, Caracalla ordered to strangle them both.

Septimius Severus died on 4 February 211 at Eboracum (present day York) while on campaign in Caledonia, north of Roman Britannia. Caracalla and Geta jointly ended the campaign by concluding a peace that returned the border to the line demarcated by Hadrian's Wall. During the journey back to Rome they continuously argued and finally decided to divide the empire, Caracalla was to rule in the west and Geta -- the east. They were persuaded not to do this, but their hostility was only increasing. On 26 December 211, at a reconciliation meeting arranged by their mother, Caracalla had Geta assassinated by members of the Praetorian Guard loyal to himself, Geta dying in his mother's arms. Caracalla then persecuted and executed most of Geta's supporters and ordered a damnatio memoriae pronounced by the Senate against his brother's memory. Geta's image was removed from all paintings, coins were melted down, statues were destroyed, his name was struck from papyrus records, and it became a capital offence to speak or write Geta's name. In the aftermath of the damnatio memoriae, an estimated 20,000 people were massacred. Those killed were Geta's inner circle of guards and advisers, friends, and other military staff under his employ.

In 213, about a year after Geta's death, Caracalla left Rome never to return. He went north to the German frontier to deal with restless Germanic tribes through wars and diplomacy. While there, Caracalla strengthened the frontier fortifications of Raetia and Germania Superior, collectively known as the Agri Decumates, so that it was able to withstand any further barbarian invasions for another twenty years. Then it became evident that he was preoccupied with Alexander the Great. He began openly mimicking Alexander in his personal style and started planning an invasion of "Persia", the Parthian Empire. He even arranged 16,000 of his men in Macedonian-style phalanxes, despite this foration being obsolete for centuries. Caracalla's mania for Alexander went so far that he persecuted philosophers of the Aristotelian school based on a legend that Aristotle had poisoned Alexander. This was a sign of Caracalla's increasingly erratic behaviour. When the inhabitants of Alexandria heard of Caracalla's claims that he had killed his brother Geta in self-defence, they produced a satire mocking this as well as Caracalla's other pretensions. So in 215 Caracalla travelled to Alexandria and responded to this insult by slaughtering the deputation of leading citizens who had unsuspectingly assembled before the city to greet his arrival, before setting his troops against Alexandria for several days of looting and plunder. Following the massacre at Alexandria, Caracalla moved east into Armenia. By 216 he had pushed through Armenia and south into Parthia and pursued a series of aggressive campaigns in the east against the Parthians, intended to bring more territory under direct Roman control. In the following winter, Caracalla retired to Edessa (Şanlıurfa, south-east Turkey) and began making preparations to renew the campaign by spring. On 8 April 217 Caracalla was travelling to visit a temple near Carrhae (Harran, southern Turkey), where in 53 BC the Romans had suffered a defeat at the hands of the Parthians. After stopping briefly to urinate, Caracalla was approached by a soldier, Justin Martialis, and stabbed to death. Martialis had been incensed by Caracalla's refusal to grant him the position of centurion, and the Praetorian Guard Prefect Macrinus, Caracalla's successor, saw the opportunity to use Martialis to end Caracalla's reign. In the immediate aftermath of Caracalla's death, his murderer, Martialis, was killed as well. Three days later, Macrinus declared himself emperor with the support of the Roman army.

Caracalla's reign was marked by domestic instability, the massacres he enacted against the people of Rome and elsewhere in the empire, and external invasions from the Germanic people. Surprisingly for such a brute, Caracalla was also notable for some statesmanship, perhaps due to some help of his mother, who stayed in Rome and performed many administrative duties in her son's absence. The most famous is the Antonine Constitution (Constitutio Antoniniana), aka the Edict of Caracalla, which granted Roman citizenship to nearly all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. The edict gave all the enfranchised men Caracalla's adopted praenomen and nomen: "Marcus Aurelius". Domestically, Caracalla was known for the construction of the Baths of Caracalla, which became the second-largest baths in Rome, and building a temple to Serapis, Graeco-Egyptian god of healing, whom he thought to be his divine patron, on the Quirinal Hill. The numismatists will always remember him because of the introduction of a new Roman coin denomination, currently designated "antoninianus" after him. The reduced silver purity of the new coins caused people to hoard the old denarii and thanks to this now we can enjoy lots of well-preserved early Roman silver coins.

Caracalla was one of the cruellest and most tyrannical Roman emperors. That was why in the 18th century Caracalla's memory was revived in the works of French artists trying to draw the parallels between him and King Louis XVI. But there were also other narratives surrounding his name: in the 12th century, Geoffrey of Monmouth started the legend of "Bassianus" as the king of Britain, who won the kingship by fighting his brother over it.
Yurii P
Caracalla_Iulia_Domna_Makrianopolis_Varbanov_1049.jpg
Caracalla Markianopolis32 viewsAE 29 (13,28g)
obv. ΑΝΤΩΝΙΝOC ΑVΓOVCΤΟC ΙΟVΑ[ΙΑ ΔΟM]NA
Laureate bust of Caracalla right facing draped bust of Julia Domna left
rev. VΠ ΚVΝΤΙΛΙΑΝΟV ΜΑΡΚΙΑΝΟΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ
Tetrastyle temple with horned roof containing statue of Serapis standing left with right hand raised. Pellet in pediment. E in left field
Varbanov 1049
HG
caracalla_39.jpg
Caracalla RIC IV, 39(a) corr.129 viewsCaracalla, AD 198 - 217
AR - Denar, 3.67g, 19mm
Rome AD 199 - 201
obv. ANTONINVS - AVGVSTVS
bust draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate head r., youthful portrait
rev. RECTOR - ORBIS
Caracalla as Alexander the Great, naked, standing frontal, laureate head l.,
Chlamys over l. shoulder, wears sword in scabbard suspended from
belt over shoulder, holding globe r. and reversed spear l.
RIC IV, 39(a) corr.; C.542; BMC 165 corr.
EF, mint luster

The rev. is usually called Caracalla as Sol. But there are some oddities: The figure is not radiate but laureate, and a sword in a scubbard is hanging over the r. shoulder. That doesn't match the attributes of Sol. Curtis Clay: It is Caracalla as Alexander the Great! Probably it resembles the statue of Lysipp 'Alexander with spear'.

CHLAMYS, cloak, if the context suggest civilian rather than military use
PALUDAMENTUM, used to describe the cloak worn with a cuirass by emperors on late Roman coins. So the garment on the obv. is a paludament, that on the rev. a chlamys!
3 commentsJochen
coins_084.JPG
Caracalla, Æ30 of Trajaniopolis, Thrace.38 views13.51 grams.
29 mm.
AugustaTraiana
Moushmov 3079 Caracalla, Æ30 of Trajaniopolis, Thrace. AVT K M AVP CEVH ANTWNEINOC Mature laureate head right. / []CTHC TPAI ANHC, tetrastyle temple of Apollo, shield in pediment, statue of the god, standing left, between central columns.
Antonio Protti
2012-02-26_coins20123.jpg
Caracalla, Stobi84 viewsMACEDON, Stobi
Caracalla 198-217 AD.
Æ 23mm; 7.03g

Laureate head right

Statue standing right on cippus, between reclining figures of Axius and Erigon Rivers; reeds beneath.

Josifovski 286 (V3, R3), same as CNG69L911Cf.
Boric-Breskovic, Stobi, pl. V, 25.2; AMNG III -; SNG Copenhagen -. VF.
2 commentsRobin Ayers
aphrodisias_gordianIII_SNGaulock2461cf.jpg
Caria, Aphrodisias, Gordian III, MacDonald Type 187 var. 21 viewsGordian III, AD 238-244
AE 30 (2 assaria), 14.09g, 30.48mm, 165°
struck AD 238-341 (see MacDonald below)
obv. AV KM ANT - GORDIANOC (1st N reversed)
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. AFROD. - EI[CIE]EWN
Cult statue of Aphrodite Aphrodisias in ependytes and with kalathos, stg. r. on plinthe, head flanked by
crescent and star, both hands outstretched forwards; l. beside her small priestress std. with raised hand
on sella r., r. beside her a fountain with arched cover.
ref. MacDonald Type 187 var., 0234 var., R432 var.; cf. SNGF von Aulock 2461; not in Leypold, Keckmann,
Sammlung Karl, BMC
rare, F+, some deposits of sand-patina

MacDonald: Types 187-189 are an exception to the rule that the portrait of the emperor appears only on the largest denominations of Aphrodisias. The reason is fairly obvious. The portraits of 0234-0236 are distinctly juvenile, and early in the reign of Gordian III there were no other members of the imperial family whose portraits might be put on the coins. When Gordian III married Tranquillina, her portrait appeared on this denomination, Types 190-192
Jochen
aphrodisias_pseudoautonom_MacDonald145.jpg
Caria, Aphrodisias, pseudo-autonomous, MacDonald 14510 viewsCaria, Aphrodisias, pseudo-autonomous, c.AD 225-250
AE 22, 4.90g, 22.39mm, 180°
obv. [IEROC] - DEMOC
Head of Demos,laureate, r.
rev. [A]FROD - E - I - CIEWN
Cult statue of Aphrodite Aphrodisias, in ependytes and with kalathos, stg. r., holding
unknown object in extended hands; l. behind her small priestress std. r., r. before her
fountain with oval cover; in upper l. field star, in upper r. field crescent
ref. MacDonald type 145 (O203/R376); BMC 34; SNG Copenhagen 107
rare, F+, flan break-out at 10h

O203 is the only die where Demos is called "holy". Regarding its style this type is later than
the types 133-144. The increase of the module suggests the time around AD 250 (MacDonald)
Jochen
getamylasa2.jpg
Caria, Mylasa. Geta AE38 Medallion. Cult statue of Artemis 85 viewsCARIA, Mylasa. GETA. As Caesar, 198-209 AD. AE Medallion (22.95 gm; 38 mm). Bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Tetrastyle temple of Zeus Labraundus, cult statue of Artemis within, holding labrys and spear; tresses hanging from each hand. Round shield with two supporters in pediment.
Akarca 90; BMC 38; Price & Trell 442.
ancientone
GRK_Rhodes_S_5074.JPG
Carian Islands, Rhodes17 viewsSear 5074 var., SNG Copenhagen 750-751 & 858-9, SNG Helsinki 384-392 var., SNG Keckman 384-421, SNG von Aulock 2796-2797 var., BMC Caria pg. 238-239, 74ff var., Laffaille 503 var.

AE 10, circa 350-300 B.C.

Obv: Diademed head of Rhodos right, hair rolled.

Rev: P-O in lower field, rose with bud to the right, H to the left.

In 408 B.C., the cities on the island of Rhodes united to form one territory and built the city of Rhodes, as their new capital on the northern end of the island. The Peloponnesian War had so weakened the entire Greek culture that it lay open to invasion. In 357 B.C., the island was conquered by the king Mausolus of Caria, then it fell to the Persians in 340 B.C., and in 332 B.C. became part of the empire of Alexander the Great. Following the death of Alexander, his generals vied for control of his empire. Rhodes formed strong commercial and cultural ties with the Ptolemies of Egypt, and together formed the Rhodo-Egyptian alliance that controlled trade throughout the Aegean in the 3rd century B.C. The city developed into a maritime, commercial and cultural center, and its coins circulated nearly everywhere in the Mediterranean. In 305 B.C, Antigonus directed his son, Demetrius, to besiege Rhodes in an attempt to break its alliance with Egypt. Demetrius created huge siege engines, but despite this engagement, in 304 B.C., he relented and signed a peace agreement, leaving behind a huge store of military equipment. The Rhodians sold the equipment and used the money to erect a statue of their sun god, Helios, which became known as the Colossus of Rhodes.

In Greek mythology, Rhodos was the goddess of the island of Rhodes and wife of Helios. She was the daughter of Aphrodite and Poseidon.
Stkp
trajse29.jpg
CAST COPY OF: Trajan, RIC 577, Sestertius of AD 107 (Octastyle temple flanked by porticoes)82 viewsCast copy of
Æ Sestertius (26.4g, Ø33mm, 7h). Rome mint. Struck AD 107.
Obv/ IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P laureate bust of Trajan facing right.
Rev/ S·P·Q·R· OPTIMO PRINCIPI [around] S C [in ex.], Octastyle temple with porticoes on either side with steps between them leading to the central temple; A seated cult figure in centre of the temple; tympanon with seated figure in the centre flanked by reclining figures; on the roof top a central figure flanked by winged Victories on the corners.
RIC 577 [R]; Cohen 549 (20 Fr.); BMC 863; Strack 393; Foss 102:44
(Netherlands, 2001)

In the absence of any specific reverse legend, it is difficult to know for sure which temple is depicted on this coin. According to Clive Foss (1990) it is the temple of Venus Genetrix of the Forum of Julius Caesar. Since the statue in the centre of the building appears to be that of Jupiter, most assume that it is the temple of Jupiter Victor. In that case, this issue could celebrate the restoration of that temple by Trajan which event was celebrated in conjunction with the tenth anniversary of his reign. Later this temple was rededicated to Divus Traianus, and later still by Elegabalus to Sol-Elagabal. Strack however carefully studied all evidence and examined the best preserved specimens of this and related issues and concludes that the best guess is that the central figure represents the Genius Augusti and that the temple is dedicated to Divus Nerva.
3 commentsCharles S
Celtic_Ring_Money.jpg
Celtic Bronze Ring Proto-Money 48 viewsAttribution: Quiggin, page 281, Plate 28, Hungary
Date: 800-500 BC
Size: 22.8 mm
(Marble statue of injured Gallic/Celtic warrior: Louvre, Paris)

Before the Celts settled in Wales, Scotland, Brittany, and Ireland, their territory extended to most of Europe. Although ancient Roman historians say the barbarian Celts had no coined money, there is evidence that they had ring-money made of bronze, silver, and gold. The rings vary in weight, but they are all exact multiples of a standard unit, showing the uniform principle regulated their size. This points to their use as current coinage.
Noah
Ceres.jpg
Ceres123 viewsStatue of Ceres, in the Louvre Museum. Photo taken by me in May 2014.1 commentsMasis
chinese_charm_pan.jpg
Chinese Charm with coin inscription from Later Zhou Dynasty 951 - 960 A.D.87 viewsCast Bronze Chinese Charm, Weight 8.8g, Max diameter 26.8mm, Obv. 周 元通宝 zhou yuan tong bao "Zhou First Currency", Rev. Dragon on left, Warrior with sword on right (depicting "Zhou Chu killing the dragon"), Rich brown patina.

Background info courtsey Primaltrek.com

In addition to official coinage, China also has a long history of producing "coin-like" charms, amulets and talismans.

Coins, as a form of money, represent power. Coin-shaped charms are, therefore, a very compact form of power. They are filled with symbolism and are believed by the multitude of Chinese to have vast powers.

Cast throughout the centuries, these ancient charms, informally referred to by the Chinese as "ya sheng coins" (压胜钱), "flower coins" (huaqian 花钱) or "play coins" (wanqian 玩钱), were not used as money but rather to suppress evil spirits, bring "good luck", "good fortune" and to avert misfortune.

For the most part, all these old charms,...were privately cast and their quantities and dates are almost impossible to determine. Nevertheless, they serve as important cultural artifacts from the life of the common Chinese throughout the centuries.

Emperor Shizong did cast coins in earnest beginning in 955 AD, the second year of his Xiande (显德) reign, with the inscription zhou yuan tong bao (周 元通宝). To obtain the copper to make the coins, Emperor Shizong ordered the confiscation of bronze statues from 3,336 Buddhist temples. He also mandated that citizens turn in to the government all bronze utensils with the exception of bronze mirrors.

Zhou yuan tong bao coins are very well made and still exist in large quantities. Because the coins were made from Buddhist statues, they are considered to have special powers. For example, it was believed that the zhou yuan tong bao coin could cure malaria and help women going through a difficult labor.

Because of the common belief that the coin has special powers, the zhou yuan tong bao became very popular as the basis for charms and amulets. There are many charms with the inscription zhou yuan tong bao on the obverse and a dragon and phoenix on the reverse. Images of the Buddha, zodiac animals, and other auspicious objects can also be found on the reverse sides of zhou yuan tong bao charms.

The theme of this charm is "Zhou Chu killing the dragon".

A folk story about Zhou Chu appeared in the 430AD book "A New Account of the Tales of the World" and proved to be very popular. The story claims that Zhou Chu was such a hot-headed bully in his younger days that he was called one of the "Three Scourges" by the villagers in his hometown (in today's Yixing), along with a dragon and a tiger. Upon hearing the term, Zhou Chu went on to kill the tiger and the dragon. After he and the dragon disappeared for 3 days fighting in Lake Tai, the villagers celebrated wildly, just when Zhou Chu returned with the dragon's head. That was when he realized that he was the last scourge that the villagers feared. Determined to mend his old ways, he sought out Eastern Wu generals Lu Ji and Lu Yun, and received encouragement. Eventually he became an accomplished general beloved by his people~Wikipedia
3 commentsSteve E
valerianI_anemeurion_ lev513.jpg
Cilicia, Anemourion, Valerian I SNG Lev. 513105 viewsValerian I, AD 253-260
AE - AE 28, 11.71g
Anemourion (Anamurium), Year 2 = AD 254/5
obv. AVK PO LI OYALEPIANON
bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. ET B ANE - MOY - REWN
Cult-statue of Artemis standing facing on pedestal, with great veil, both hands
outstretched, holding r. branch(?) and l. sistrum, crescent on left below
SNG Levante 513
good F
added to www.wildwinds.com

It seems to be an unknown local cult-statue in the style of the Artemis of Ephesos. Her body is completely covered with rows of breasts denoting her fertility. Another interpretation: That may be testicles of castrated adherants.
3 commentsJochen
Cilicia_Mallos_1.PNG
Cilicia, Mallos 31-30 B.C5 viewsCilicia, Mallos 31-30 B.C

Obverse: Turreted, veiled head of Tyche right, M over shoulder.

Reverse: Cult statue of Athena Magarsis, holding spear and coiled serpent, standing facing; stars flanking head, MAI ? left and AWTWN(Athena) on the right.

17mm
Macedonian Warrior
syedra_marc_aurelius_Ziegler121(rev).jpg
Cilicia, Syedra, Marcus Aurelius, Ziegler Kilikien, 121 (rev. only), unpublished?30 viewsMarcus Aurelius, AD 161-180
AE 30, 14.04g
obv. AVT KAI M A - VR ANTWNINOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, lautreate, r.
c/m AK in rectangular incus (Howgego 514) before
rev. C - V - E - DRE / WN
Ares, helmeted and wearing suit of armour, stg. l. between Dike, in long garment, stg. r., and Hermes, nude, with kerykeion in l. arm and wearing winged boots.
Ziegler, Kilikien, - (rev. same dies like #121 for Lucius Verus)
very rare, about VF/F

'A wonderful mythological type from the oracle given by Apollo to the people of Syedra. Ares, the war god and killer of men, stands bound in iron chains of Hermes and is judged for its crimes by Dike (justice). The Syedrians were told to erect a statue to this end so this could be very well a visual of the statue erected.' For more information please take a look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'.
Jochen
tarsos_GIC5672.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, civic-issue ANG BN 1333-133434 viewsAE 21, 6.54g
struck 1st century BC
obv. Bust of the city-goddess (Tyche), veiled and turreted, r.,
on the face c/m in the shape of a male radiate head (Helios?) in circular incus.
rev. Pyre of Sandan in pyramidal shape, crowned by an eagle with spread wings, stg. r. on a small round base; within cult statue of Sandan wearing polos and holding double axe, stg. r. on a winged and horned lion, r. hand raised; besides l. and r. a baetylus; altogether on a round base decorated with garlandes.
in the r. field from top TAR[C]EWN
in the l. field from top AR / AR / DI / Q
Ref.: SNG BN 1333-1334; Sear GIC 5672
about VF, slight roughness

For more informations please look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'.
Jochen
Cilicia_Tarsos_Heracles_AE29_10_68g.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, Heracles, AE2945 views29mm, 10.68g
obv: A∆PIANHC TAPCOY, bearded head of Herakles right, club across shoulder
rev: ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΕΩC; Perseus left holding harpa and small statue of Apollo holding wolves, lion bringing down bull at feet, ΒΟΗ/ΘΟΥ in field
1 commentsareich
tarsos_trajan_decius_SNGparis1757_1.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, Trajan Decius, SNG Paris 175716 viewsTrajan Decius, AD 240-251
AE 35, 27.29g
obv. AV KAI G MEC KVIN.DEKIOC TRAIANO
in l. and r. field P- P
rev. TARCO - V MHTROPOLEWC GB
in l. and r. field A/M - K
Perseus, nude except chlamys over l. shoulder, stg. l., holding harpa in l. arm, head of Medusa in l. hand
and in extended r. hand cult-statue of Apollo stdg. frontal on omphalos and holding in each hand a dog
with head up.
ref. SNG Paris 1757; not in SNG Levante
rare, F+/about VF, oliv-green patina, usual roughness

Perseus was the suggested founder of Tarsos. Apollo here is often called Apollo Lykeios in error. For the correct mythology please take a look at the article 'Apollo Lykeios - or rather not' in the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'
Jochen
Trajse28-4.JPG
CIRCUS MAXIMUS, Trajan144 viewsÆ Sestertius (24.27g, Ø32.95mm, 5h). Rome mint. Struck AD 103-104.
Obv.: IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P laureate bust of Trajan right with aegis.
Rev.: SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI around, S C in ex., bird's-eys view on the Circus Maximus in Rome, as seen from the Forum Boarium, showing portico in foreground with eleven arched entrances and monumental gate surmounted by quadriga on right, two additional arches, each surmounted by quadriga behind the portico at both ends, the central spina adorned with tall obelisk of Rameses II at center flanked by equestrian statue of Trajan on left and shrine of Cybele on right , the two metae (turning posts) placed at the extremities; at the far side of the Circus, a curved wall incorporating a tetra-style shrine of Sol.
RIC 571 [R] and pl. x, 187 (rev. only); Cohen 546 (Fr.60); Strack 391; BMC 856; Banti 275 (4 spec.); MIR 175c and pl. 28 (citing 20 examples of this variety; same obv. die as plate 175c1; same rev. die as 175a3); RCV 3208 var. (different bust type).

ex G. Henzen (Netherlands, 2000)

The reverse of this sestertius commemorates the completion in AD 103 of a major restoration of the Circus Maximus, following a great fire that had severely damaged the famous arena in the time of the Flavian emperors. The origin of the Circus Maximus, situated in the Murcia valley between the Palatine and Aventine hills, is quite obscure. An enclosure for chariot racing, it had parallel sides and one semicircular end, all fitted with seats for spectators, and an axial rib (spina) marked at each end by turning-posts (metae) dividing the arena into two runs. At the open end were the curved stables (carceres) sufficient to accommodate twelve teams of horses. Traditionally founded by King Tarquinius Priscus, it does not seem to have become a permanent structure until 329 BC (Livy viii. 20.1). In later times, it was much embellished, notably by Augustus who erected on the spina the great Egyptian obelisk of Rameses II from Heliopolis (it now stands in the Piazza del Populo). The vast arena was frequently damaged by the fires that afflicted the imperial capital; on several occasions, there was loss of life when structural failure occurred under the weight of the huge crowds that attended the events. Trajan was himself an ardent fan of the Circus so it is scarcely surprising that he took on the task of restoring the arena. The present specimen is a good example of the rare issue that commemorated the completion of this undertaking. More than a century later (AD 213), the Emperor Caracalla issued a similar type to record his own restoration work on the Circus Maximus. The last recorded games in this celebrated arena took place under the Ostrogothic king Totila in AD 550.
1 commentsCharles S
max pagan com.JPG
Civic Issue under Maximinus II 23 viewsAE 14.8 mm 1.33 grams 310-312 AD
1/4 Nummus
OBV :: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI. Zeus sitting left on throne holding scepter in left and glode in right hands
REV :: VICTOR-IA AVGG. Nike walking left holding wreath in right hand, palm in left. Delta in left , Epsilon in right fields
EX :: unknown
Minted in Antioch ?
Vagi 2955, Sear ( under Julian II) 4080
purchased 04/2008

Note: The Civic Issues of Antioch, Alexandria and Nicomedia were thought to have been produced by Julian II when RIC VI was written, therefore the entire series is missing. This series was produced during the period of Christian persecution by Maximinus II, Diocletian and Galerius and the Antioch issues portray important local statues: the Tyche erected by Eutychides (a pupil of Lysippus), the Apollo by Bryaxis of Athens and possibly the Zeus Nikephoros of the Temple of Apollo at Daphne which Antiochos IV commissioned for his great festival of 167 BC.

Historical information taken from Coinage of the Roman Empire, Vol II, p.516 by David Vagi
Johnny
civic issue.jpg
Civic Issue under Maximinus II49 viewsAnonymous Civic Issue during the time of Maximinus II, AE Quarter Follis, c.310-312, Antioch, Officina 10
GENIO AN_TIOCHENI
Tyche, turreted and veiled, seated facing on rock, river-god Orontes swimming in front
APOLLONI-SANCTO
Apollo standing facing, head left, patera in right hand, lyre in left
I in right field
SMA in exergue
16mm x 17mm, 1.65g
RIC VI, --; Vagi 2954
purchased 09/09/2007
Note: The Civic Issues of Antioch, Alexandria and Nicomedia were thought to have been produced by Julian II when RIC VI was written, therefore the entire series is missing. This series was produced during the period of Christian persecution by Maximinus II, Diocletian and Galerius and the Antioch issues portray important local statues: the Tyche erected by Eutychides (a pupil of Lysippus), the Apollo by Bryaxis of Athens and possibly the Zeus Nikephoros of the Temple of Apollo at Daphne which Antiochos IV commissioned for his great festival of 167 BC.

Historical information from Coinage of the Roman Empire, Vol II, p.516 by David Vagi
Johnny
Claudius_Arch.jpg
Claudius Sestertius, Triumphal arch RIC 9839 viewsClaudius AE Sestertius. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P, laureate head right / NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMAN IMP SC, triumphal arch surmounted by equestrian statue of Nero Claudius Drusus galloping right. Ref RIC 98, Cohen 48, BMC 121, RCV 1851mattpat
clause01-2.jpg
Claudius, RIC 98, Sestertius of AD 4239 viewsÆ sestertius (27.5g, Ø34mm, 6h), Rome mint, struck AD 42.
Obv.: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, laureate head of Claudius facing right.
Rev.: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMAN IMP (around) S C (in field), Triumphal arch surmounted by equestrial statue right, between two trophies.
RIC 98 (S); Cohen 48; Sear 2000 (RCV) 1851; Foss (RHC) 63:9

This issue honours Nero Claudius Drusus, the father of Claudius
Charles S
Medaille_Artemis_04_fac.jpg
Clémencin, Artemis9 viewsMedal by François André Clémencin
1878-1950
Ca. 1940

A student of Jules Coutan, Clémencin exhibited at the Salon des artistes français in 1907 and received an honourable mention that year. In 1921, he won a silver medal.

He is responsible for sensual or erotic bronze statuettes, monuments to the dead and medals. (wikipedia)

Obv: Artemis running left, holding bow, dog behind
Rev: CONSEIL SUPERIEUR DE LA CHASSE – FEDERATION DEPARTEMENTALE MORLON, laurel and oak leaves
AE, 52mm, 87g
Ref.:
shanxi
cleopatraVII.jpg
Cleopatra VII hemiobol29 viewsLaureate head of Zeus

Statue of Zeus Salaminos standing, holding stalks of grain, star above


Paphos mint c. 35 BC

3.15g

Nicolaou, Paphos II, 469-509; Cox, Exc. at Curium 128; Museum of the History of Cypriot Coinage ch. 11, 35

Notes from Forum:

While not noted in Svoronos, this type is fairly common on Cyprus and many have been found in the excavations at Neopaphos. The lack of a central depression indicates they were struck after 96 B.C. Recent Cypriot numismatic publications date them to the time when Cleopatra VII of Egypt was the ruler of the island


Sold Forum Auction March 2019
1 commentsJay GT4
Nil_Vatikan_1892.jpg
Colossal statue of the river Nile281 viewsThe new wing of the Vatican Museums, Museo Pio-Clementine, is home to Colossus of the Nile the river god, identified by the sphinxes and crocodiles, is represented as a dispenser of blessings. The 16 boys are thought to be an allusion to the number of cubits the level of the Nile rises when it floods, fertilizing the region which it crosses. The reliefs on the base represent life on the banks of the river. It is a 1st century A.D. Roman work most likely based on a Hellenistic original. Jochen
apio55.jpg
COLUMN, Antoninus Pius196 viewsAR denarius. 3.46 gr. Bare headed bust right, slight drapery on shoulders. DIVVS ANTONINVS. / Column surmounted by statue of Pius holding eagle and sceptre.Fencing in front. DIVO PIO. RIC III 440 (M.Aurelius). RSC 353
The column of Antoninus Pius was raised by his successors M.Aurelius and L.Verus in the Campus Martius. The column and statue no longer exists but the base with a dedicatory inscription,two sides with a funerary Decursio,and the last side representing the ascent of the Emperor and his wife Faustina to heaven can be seen in the Vatican.

benito
Commodo_BRIT_denario_Paolo.jpg
Commodus (177-192 A.D.), denarius, D/COMM ANT AVG P BRIT14 viewsCommodus, denarius (184-185 A.D.), Rome mint,
AR, 3.264 gr, 17.7 mm, 180° F
D/ COMM ANT AVG P BRIT, laureate head right
R/ ANN P M TR P VIIII IMP VII COS IIII P P, Annona standing left, statuette of Concordia holding patera and scepter in right, cornucopia in left, at feet left modius, right two persons on ship
RIC III 95, RSC II 17, BMCRE IV 144
Provenienza: FAC (october 2012)
paolo
Commode annone.jpg
Commodus - sestertius38 viewsM. COMMODVS ANTO NINVS AVG. PIVS , laureate and draped bust right
ANNO. AVG. TR.P. VIIII IMP. VII COS. IIII P.P. / S C , Annona standing left holding statuette and cornucopiae, at her feet modius with corn-ears, behind her the rear-part of a ship with sailors.
Ginolerhino
commode.jpg
Commodus - sestertius54 viewsMCOMMODVS ANTONINVSAVG
TRP VIII IMP IIII COS III P P / S C - Annona standing left, holding statue of Concordia and cornucopia; modius to left with 5 grain ears, stern to right with 2 figures on deck and Victory on side.
181-182 AD
1 commentsGinolerhino
commodus.jpg
Commodus as Hercules694 viewsThis magnificent statue depicts the Emperor Commodus as Hercules. Currently on display at the Musei Capitolini in Rome. Commodus also minted coins with him as Hercules.Titus Pullo
Commodus2.jpg
Commodus Sestertius34 viewsCommodus Æ Sestertius. Struck 181-182 AD.
Laureate head right, seen from behind / Annona standing left, holding statuette over modius containing five grain ears, & cornucopiae; stern of ship, decorated with figure of Victory & containing two figures, behind.

RIC III 325a; MIR 18, 541-6/30; cf. Cohen 836.
Tanit
Commodus,_Antioch,_Men,_AE22.JPG
Commodus, Antioch, Men, AE 228 viewsCommodus, Antioch, Men, AE22. 22mm, 4.21g. Obverse: COMMODVS ANTONINVS; laureate head left. Reverse: ANTIOCHAE COLONEIAE; Men standing, holding statue of Nike on globe; foot on Bukranion; l. rooster. Attribution: Krzyzanovska 'Monnaies coloniales d’Antioche de Pisidie' 145, IX, 12. Ex areich; photo credit areichPodiceps
Constantin,_RIC_64_Ant.jpg
Constantin RIC 64 Ant.18 viewsFollis, 337-347
Obv: DV CONSTANTINVS P T AVGG
Constantin veiled.
Rev: IVST VEN MEM - SMANA
Aequitas (Justitia?) dr., standing l., holding balance in r. hand.
15mm, 2.09g

The scale, today a regular attribute of every Justitia statue, was originally reserved for Aequitas. The first emperor who combined Justitia with a scale was Pescennius Niger on a Denarius.

klausklage
Constantine II- VOT V.jpg
Constantine II- VOT V56 viewsConstantine II , 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Obverse:
Laureate bust right.

CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C

CONSTANTINVS: Constantine
IYN: Junior
NOB: Noble
C: Caesar


Reverse:
CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, our emperor

CAESARVM: Emperor
NOSTRORVM: Our
VOT V in wreath, Vows of the five years


Domination: Bronze AE 3, size 19 mm

Exe: The most common of them would be from Siscia, RIC VII Siscia 163, with ASIS* through to ESIS* in exe. RIC 163

In the Id- section there was a small funny discussion about Constantine being nude, and here is the final answer:

The conventional usage had better be kept, and is as Robert says. Sculpture shows that from the mid-1st century onward, a 'head' showing the naked shoulders (or after c. 100 the pectorals as well), is the 'short' equivalent to a nude or semi-nude (half-draped) statue: i.e., it is at least vaguely divinized. Often, both on the coins and on the sculptures, there was a bit of drapery on one shoulder, which would be the 'short' version of semi-nude. The point is that real, live Romans didn't go around that way; they even wore a tunic under the toga, and we know what they thought about bare feet!
But Head to r. is shorter than Heroic Bust to r. (which many wouldn't understand, anyhow) in listing coins. In discussing a coinage, of course, one may need to discuss some in terms of divinizing or heroizing, but in lists the 'Head' usage is established, more than established; besides, for the Republic it is accurate: family portraits were just heads with little more than the neck.
Pat L.
John Schou
w4~0.JPG
Constantinople CONSS66 viewsConstantine had altogether more ambitious plans. Having restored the unity of the empire, now overseeing the progress of major governmental reforms and sponsoring the consolidation of the Christian church, Constantine was well aware that Rome had become an unsatisfactory capital for several reasons. Located in central Italy, Rome lay too far from the eastern imperial frontiers, and hence also from the legions and the Imperial courts. Moreover, Rome offered an undesirable playground for disaffected politicians; it also suffered regularly from flooding and from malaria.

It seemed impossible to many that the capital could be moved. Nevertheless, Constantine identified the site of Byzantium as the correct place: a city where an emperor could sit, readily defended, with easy access to the Danube or the Euphrates frontiers, his court supplied from the rich gardens and sophisticated workshops of Roman Asia, his treasuries filled by the wealthiest provinces of the empire.

Constantine laid out the expanded city, dividing it into 14 regions, and ornamenting it with great public works worthy of a great imperial city. Yet initially Constantinople did not have all the dignities of Rome, possessing a proconsul, rather than a prefect of the city. Furthermore, it had no praetors, tribunes or quaestors. Although Constantinople did have senators, they held the title clarus, not clarissimus, like those of Rome. Constantinople also lacked the panoply of other administrative offices regulating the food supply, police, statues, temples, sewers, aqueducts or other public works. The new program of building was carried out in great haste: columns, marbles, doors and tiles were taken wholesale from the temples of the empire and moved to the new city. Similarly, many of the greatest works of Greek and Roman art were soon to be seen in its squares and streets. The emperor stimulated private building by promising householders gifts of land from the imperial estates in Asiana and Pontica, and on 18 May 332 he announced that, as in Rome, free distributions of food would be made to citizens. At the time the amount is said to have been 80,000 rations a day, doled out from 117 distribution points around the city.

Constantinople was a Greek Orthodox Christian city, lying in the most Christianised part of the Empire. Justinian ordered the pagan temples of Byzantium to be deconstructed, and erected the splendid Church of the Holy Wisdom, Sancta Sophia (also known as Hagia Sophia in Greek), as the centrepiece of his Christian capital. He oversaw also the building of the Church of the Holy Apostles, and that of Hagia Irene.

Constantine laid out anew the square at the middle of old Byzantium, naming it the Augusteum. Sancta Sophia lay on the north side of the Augusteum. The new senate-house (or Curia) was housed in a basilica on the east side. On the south side of the great square was erected the Great Palace of the emperor with its imposing entrance, the Chalke, and its ceremonial suite known as the Palace of Daphne. Located immediately nearby was the vast Hippodrome for chariot-races, seating over 80,000 spectators, and the Baths of Zeuxippus (both originally built in the time of Septimius Severus). At the entrance at the western end of the Augusteum was the Milion, a vaulted monument from which distances were measured across the Eastern Empire.

From the Augusteum a great street, the Mese, led, lined with colonnades. As it descended the First Hill of the city and climbed the Second Hill, it passed on the left the Praetorium or law-court. Then it passed through the oval Forum of Constantine where there was a second senate-house, then on and through the Forum of Taurus and then the Forum of Bous, and finally up the Sixth Hill and through to the Golden Gate on the Propontis. The Mese would be seven Roman miles long to the Golden Gate of the Walls of Theodosius.

Constantine erected a high column in the middle of the Forum, on the Second Hill, with a statue of himself at the top, crowned with a halo of seven rays and looking towards the rising sun.

RIC VII Constantinople 61 C1
ecoli
LarryW2247.jpg
Corinthia, Corinth 405-345 BC81 viewsAR stater, 21mm, 8.44g, gVF
Pegusus with long body and forelegs streched out, koppa and rose below / head Athena right in Corinthian helmet. EΛ and archaic statue of Zeus holding staff and tied ribbon behind. Scarce variety.
Ex: Forvm Ancient Coins
Pegasi I 192; Ravel 715v; BMC Corinth 338v
Consigned to Glenn Woods
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
GRK_Corinth_stater.JPG
Corinthia, Corinth.28 viewsSear 2631 var., Ravel 1083; Calciati (Pegasi) I pg. 270, 459.

AR Stater (8.03 gr., 25 mm), struck ca. 345-307 B.C.

Obv: Pegasos with pointed wings flying left, koppa beneath.

Rev: Head of Athena wearing Corinthian helmet and leather cap facing left, Δ-I flanking and statuette of Athena holding shield and spear facing left, behind.
2 commentsStkp
_T2eC16V,!)QE9s3HFdodBQhF6YhUgQ~~60_57.JPG
Countermark on coin of Septimius Severus904 viewsSeptimius Severus AE45 medallion of Acrasus, Lydia. 43.5 gr.

AYT KAI L CEP CEOYHROC PER, laureate, draped cuirassed bust
right, countermark of Artemis Ephesia standing facing (Howgego 234.)
EPI CTRA ONHCIPFOROY APOLL TO B AKRACIWTWN (or [2] EPI CTR
FILODHMOY NOYMERIANOY AKRACIWTWN), Biga of stags right
with statue of Artemis Ephesia standing half right with supports.

SNG von Aulock 2883; Hirsch Collection 1571; [2] SNG Cop 6.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection
2 commentsSam
663aa192combo.jpg
Cr 293/1 AR Denarius L. Philippus25 views113 to 111-ish BCE
o: Head of Philip of Macedon right, wearing royal Macedonian helmet; under chin, Φ; behind, ROMA monogram
r: Equestrian statue right, base inscribed L. PHILIPPVS; below horse, flower; in exergue, XVI [mono]
Marcia 12. 3.92 gm 21.00 mm
The obverse oddly depicts Philip V of Macedon, sometime ally and sometime opponent of Rome, and seems to point to an earlier claim by the Marcii Philippi to a connection to the Macedonian dynasty. The reverse likely depicts a statue of another Marcius in the Roman Forum. There are monograms, flowers, and other elements to round out an array of meanings. The bronze issues, a quadrans and uncia, are also a bit busy and a bit scarcer.

This is a really nice coin, with a bit of deposit at 9:00 obverse, but I just can't get enthusiastic about the type.
3 commentsPMah
822KMK544503.jpg
Cr 489/6 AR Quinarius M. Antonius6 viewsQuinarius, Lugdunum ? 42 BCE 1.78 gm
o: [III·VIR·] R·P·C around head of Victory (with features of Fulvia?)
r: [A]NTONI Lion walking r.; at sides, [A] – XL[I]. In exergue, IMP.
Usually said to be Antony's third wife, Fulvia and as giving his age of 41. The idea that the portrait is Fulvia is a bit of a stretch, and Crawford does not mention or attribute it as such in RRC. Nor is "Victoria" obvious, as the wings, if that is what is visible in FDC examples, are tiny even compared to full statuette forms. In every example I have seen, the portrait is poorly-executed and hardly a tribute to either Victory or Fulvia herself. Fulvia seems to have been a formidable person, and so the non-standard style would be perhaps consistent, but the uninspired portrait would then have been a significant failure.
The attribution of Antony's age as "41", which certainly fits some chronologies, nonetheless does not have a better explanation than that it seems that Julius Caesar put his age at "52" on a coin. There is debate about the dating and meaning of such age references, but, from my perspective, neither age matters as an absolute number -- both Antony and particularly Caesar had already legally been through the cursus, including Consul. Antony was Consul for 44 BCE. (Otherwise, as to Antony, we would have heard from Cicero at excruciating length.) Perhaps these are "birthday" issues, but a sad, lonely and pathetic birthday it would reflect. Antony's later coins with Octavia are more persuasive.
Antonia 32. Sydenham 1163. Sear Imperators 126.
PMah
Republik_15.jpg
Cr. 242/1., Republic, 135 BC, C. Minucius Augurinus24 viewsC. Minucius Augurinus
AR Denarius, 135 BC, Rome
Obv: Helmeted head of Roma right, below chin, X, behind, ROMA.
Rev: C•A – VG Ionic column surmounted by statue, holding staff in r. hand; on either side, togate figure. Togate figure on left holding loaves in both hands, togate figure on right holding lituus. Column decorated with forepart of lion on either side at the base and two bells at the top, grain ears behind each of the lions.
Ag, 18mm, 3.69g
Ref.: Sydenham 463, Crawford 242/1.

This column is the first architectural structure on a Roman coin (the first building comes 57 years later). It honors L. Minucius Augurinus, who, as prefect, introduced price controls on grain and thus fought a famine.
shanxi
10142v.jpg
Crawford 312/1, Roman Republic, C. Sulpicius Galba, Denarius serratus87 viewsRoman Republic (Rome mint 106 BC.), C. Sulpicius Galba.
AR Denarius serratus (3.90 g, 18-19 mm).
Obv.: D.P.P (abbreviation of Dei Penates Publici) , before jugate, laureate heads of Dei Penates l. .
Rev.: C. SVLPICI. C. F. Two male figures (the Dei Penates) standing facing each other, each holding spear in l. hand and with r. hand pointing at sow which lies between them; above, control mark C.
Crawford 312/1 . Syd. 572 . Bab. Sulpicia 1 .

Crawford interprets this type as Aeneas landing in Lanuvium (home of Sulpicia gens) with the Penates and the subsequent miracle of the white sow that foretold the founding of Alba Longa. (David Sear, RCV 2000).

The reverse of this coin shows the sow that led Aeneas to the place, where he founded Lavinium, the mother city of Alba Longa. The cult of the Penates was closely connected with Lavinium as the Romans believed that these godheads were brought first to Lavinium by Aeneas before they came to Rome. The Penates belonged to the original gods of Rome and were not imported from the Etruscans or Greeks. The original Roman religion personified all events connected with growing, harvesting and processing the products of the field. The Penates were responsible for protecting the larder in the house of every family. There also existed Penates for the whole of Rome. They were kept at the temple of Vesta together with the palladium, the statue of Athena coming from Troy, and the holy fire. Only once a year, on June 9, the married women in Rome were allowed to see them. They came barefoot on that day to sacrifice fruits and cake.

my ancient coin database
2 commentsArminius
IMG_3611.JPG
Croatia, Split - Diocletian's palace, temple of Jupiter282 viewsinterior with modern statue
Temple was converted to babtistery later.
Johny SYSEL
Cybele_formiae.jpg
Cybele, Marble statue of Cybele from Formia in Lazio, circa 60 BCE21 viewsMarble statue of Cybele from Formia in Lazio, circa 60 BCE. From the collection of the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek. Item number IN 480.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cybele_formiae.jpg
Photo by ChrisO, 26 August 2008
Joe Sermarini
1933c.jpg
cyrrhus0014 viewsElagabalus
Cyrrhus, Northern Seleucis

Obv: [AVT KA] M AVP ANTΩ[NЄINOC CЄB], laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
Rev: ΔΙΟC ΚATЄ-ΒΑΤ-ΟV →ΚΥΡΗCΤΩΝ, hexastyle temple within which seated statue of Zeus Kataibates left, holding thunderbolt and sceptre; eagle at his feet, bull running left above temple .
26 mm, 14.71 gms

Butcher 20 (page 444); Roma Numismatics Limited, E-Live Auction 2, Lot 463.
Charles M
DemetriosIII.JPG
Demetrios III21 viewsDemetrios III, AE18. Obv: Demetrios III facing right. Rev: Naked statue of Hermes on pedestal. SNG Spaer 2876. 96-87 BC.

Ex. David Connors.
Molinari
di.jpg
Demetrios III Eukairos26 viewsSELEUKID KINGS of SYRIA. Demetrios III Eukairos. 97/6-88/7 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 15.87 g, 12h). Damaskos mint. Dated SE 224 (89/8 BC). Diademed head right, pellet on nose / Cult statue of Atargatis standing facing, flowers in hands, grain ears on shoulders; N above monogram to outer left, AIε (date) and monogram in exergue; all within wreath. SC 2451.11; HHV 98 (A23/P91); HGC 9, 1305; DCA 304. 1 commentsecoli
Macedonian_Kingdom_1c_img.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Macedonian Kingdom, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, Newell p. 97, 9176 viewsObv:– Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity
Rev:– BASILEOS DEMETRIOY, Poseidon standing left, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander), monogram left
Minted in Pella, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C.
Reference:– Newell p. 97, 91 and pl. VIII, 12, SNG Cop 1179 var.
17.0192g, 29.3mm, 45o

Ex-Harlan Berk. Ex-Forvm, where it was described as gVF, superb portrait, tight flan.
4 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1c_img~0.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Macedonian Kingdom, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, Newell p. 97, 9164 viewsObv:– Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity
Rev:– BASILEOS DEMETRIOY, Poseidon standing left, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander), monogram left
Minted in Pella, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C.
Reference:– Newell p. 97, 91 and pl. VIII, 12, SNG Cop 1179 var.
17.0192g, 29.3mm, 45o

Ex-Harlan Berk. Ex-Forvm, where it was described as gVF, superb portrait, tight flan.

Updated image of an old coin from my collection.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1c_img~1.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Macedonian Kingdom, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, Newell p. 97, 9156 viewsObv:– Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity
Rev:– BASILEOS DEMETRIOY, Poseidon standing left, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander), monogram left
Minted in Pella, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C.
Reference:– Newell p. 97, 91 and pl. VIII, 12, SNG Cop 1179 var.
17.0192g, 29.3mm, 45o

Ex-Harlan Berk. Ex-Forvm, where it was described as gVF, superb portrait, tight flan.

Updated image using new photography setup.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Nero_den.jpg
Denarius, AVGVSTVS GERMANICVS giant statue of Nero, RIC 19417 viewsNero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D. Silver denarius, Rome 64-65 A.D. RIC I 47; BMCRE I 60, RSC II 45, Sear RCV I: 1941, Fair, Rome mint, 2.404g, 17.7mm, 180o, 64 - 68 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR, laureate head right; reverse AVGVSTVS GERMANICVS, Nero radiate and togate, standing facing, branch in right, Victory on globe in left; rare. The giant radiate statue of Nero was modeled on the Colossus of Rhodes. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Diocletian_Tetra~0.jpg
Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt.36 viewsBillon tetradrachm, Geissen 3243; Dattari 5624; Milne 4915; Curtis 1956; SNG Cop 994; BMC Alexandria p. 326, 2530; Kampmann -, VF, crowded flan cuts off right side of obverse legend, Alexandria mint, 7.290 grams, 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, 29 Aug 288 - 28 Aug 289 A.D.; obverse and#913; and#922; and#915; and#927;and#933;and#913;and#923; and#8710;and#921;and#927;and#922;and#923;and#919;and#932;and#921;and#913;and#925;and#927;C Cand#917;and#914;, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Alexandria standing left, turreted, head of Serapis in right, long scepter vertical in left, L - E (year 5) flanking across field, star right.

Ptolemy Soter integrated Egyptian religion with that of the Hellenic rulers by creating Serapis, a deity that would win the reverence of both groups. This was despite the curses of the Egyptian priests against the gods of previous foreign rulers (i.e Set who was lauded by the Hyksos). Alexander the Great had attempted to use Amun for this purpose, but Amum was more prominent in Upper Egypt, and not as popular in Lower Egypt, where the Greeks had stronger influence. The Greeks had little respect for animal-headed figures, and so an anthropomorphic statue was chosen as the idol, and proclaimed as the equivalent of the highly popular Apis. It was named Aser-hapi (i.e. Osiris-Apis), which became Serapis, and was said to be Osiris in full, rather than just his Ka (life force). Ptolemy`s efforts were successful - in time Serapis was held by the Egyptians in the highest reverence above all other deities, and he was adored in Athens and other Greek cities.


EX; FORVM Ancient Coins.

*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.
Sam
1683c.jpg
diumvarb34870 viewsElagabalus
Dium, Macedonia

Obv: IMP C M AVP ANTONINVS PIV, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
Rev: COL-I-VL-DIEN →SIS, distyle temple containing statue of Aesculapius standing facing and resting on long staff entwined with serpent. D - D across field within temple.
26 mm, 9.34 gms

Varbanov 3487
Charles M
FSr27.jpg
DIVA FAVSTINA61 viewsAR 17mm after 141AD
Obv - DIVA FAVSTINA - draped bust right
Rev - AED DIV FAVSTINAE - hexastyle temple with statue of Faustina
Reference - RIC III (Antoninus Pius) 343
Mint - Rome
aragon6
AP_sest_column.jpg
Divus Antoninus Pius (Marcus Aurelius, 161-180)37 viewsÆ Sestertius, 34mm, 23.1g, 12h; Rome, post AD 161.
Obv.: DIVVS ANTONINVS; Bare head right.
Rev.: DIVO - PIO; Column surmounted by statue of Antoninus Pius; / S - C.
Reference: RIC III 1269, p. 315 / 17-146-181
3 commentsJohn Anthony
Antose83-2~0.jpg
Divus Antoninus, RIC (Marcus Aurelius) 1266, sestertius of AD 16138 viewsOrichalcum sestertius (21.73, 31mm, 12h). Rome mint, Struck under Marcus Aurelius, AD 161.
Obv.: DIVVS ANTONINVS, bear head of Antoninus Pius facing right
Rev.: CONSECRATIO (around) S C (field) Four tiered funeral pyre or rather an ustrinum surmounted by a statue of Antoninus in a quadriga, facing. The lowest tier is hung with wreaths, the second has a door in the centre with two niches at each side with a statue in each; the third has six niches each with a statue; the fourth is hung with draperies and flanked by torches.
RIC (M. Aurelius) 1266; BMC (M. Aurelius) 872; Cohen 165; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 74 (31 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins & Their Values II) 5198; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 136:15
ex Roma Numismatics; ex Künker

Minted under Marcus Aurelius in joint reign with Verus, in honour of the funeral and deification of Antoninus Pius. Traditionally the structure on the reverse is called a Funeral Pyre, but there are good arguments to believe this is in fact a stone pyramide building called "ustrinum" where the ashes were kept: see an article at BeastCoins.
Charles S
AntoSe26-scan.jpg
Divus Antoninus, RIC (Marcus Aurelius) 1266, Sestertius of AD 161 (Funeral pyre)16 viewsÆ Sestertius (23.8g, Ø32mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161 (under Marcus Aurelius in joint reign with Lucius Verus).
Obv.: DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right.
Rev.: CONSE-CRATIO around edge; S C in ex., Pyre of four tiers surmounted by a statue of the emperor in quadriga. Third tier has three niches with figures.
RIC (M. Aurelius) 1266; BMCRE (M. Aurelius) 872; Cohen 165; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 73 (15 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 5198; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 136/15
Ex D.Ruskin (Oxford, 1995).
Charles S
AntoSe46-scan.jpg
Divus Antoninus, RIC (Marcus Aurelius) 1269, Sestertius of AD 161-169 (Column)19 viewsÆ Sestertius (23.6g, Ø 33-34mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161-169 (under Marcus Aurelius).
Obv.: DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right.
Rev.: DIVO PIO / S C, Column, set on base, within fence, surmounted by statue of Divus Antoninus standing l., holding eagle right and scepter left.
RIC (M. Aurelius) 1269; BMCRE (M. Aurelius) 880-884; Cohen 354; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 144 (74 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 5199; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 136/18
Ex D.Ruskin (Oxford, 1997).
Charles S
Divus_Augustus_Sestertius.jpg
Divus Augustus Sestertius161 viewsObv.
DIVO AVGVSTO S P Q R
Statue of the deified Augusts riding left in Quadriga pulled by four elephants, who each have their own mahout

Rev.
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST P M TR POT XXXVI
Large SC

Struck by Tiberius 34-35 A.D. in honour of the deified Augustus
3 commentsancientdave
sx.jpg
Divus Augustus. Died AD 14. Æ Sestertius (33mm, 25.61 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck under Tiberius, circa AD 36-37. Statue of Augustus seated left on throne, holding laurel branch and scepter, set on ornate car drawn by four elephants44 viewsDivus Augustus. Died AD 14. Æ Sestertius (33mm, 25.61 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck under Tiberius, circa AD 36-37. Statue of Augustus seated left on throne, holding laurel branch and scepter, set on ornate car drawn by four elephants, each with its own mahout / Legend around large S C. RIC I 68 (Tiberius). ANYONE MAY USE A LONG AS CREDIT IS GIVEN.2 commentsJoe Geranio
1395_Domitia_Kilbianoi2.jpg
Domitia - Kilbianoi Superiores4 views82-96 AD
draped bust right
ΔΟΜΙΤΙΑ CΕΒΑCΤΗ
facing cult statue of Artemis Ephesia, wearing polos and veil
KΙΛΒΙΑΝΩΝ ΤΩΝ ΑΝΩ
RPC II 1062; BMC 1-2; Sear GIC 913; Kurth, Kilbiani 303
5,4g 21mm
ex Savoca
Johny SYSEL
Domitian_RSC_590A_(fourree).JPG
Domitian (as Caesar), 69 - 81 AD68 viewsObv: CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII, laureate head of Domitian facing right.

Rev: TRP VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII PP, radiate statue atop a rostral column.

Plated Denarius, Type of Rome mint, c. 80 - 81 AD

3 grams, 19.5 mm, 180°

By looking at this coin accuracy wasn't important to ancient counterfeiters. The obverse is a Domitian as Caesar whereas the reverse is taken from a coin of his brother Titus as Augustus.

A similar hybrid is listed in Roman Silver Coins as Domitian 590b with slightly different inscriptions.
SPQR Coins
domit.jpg
Domitian Denarius - Rev: Temple81 viewsDOMITIAN, 81-96 Silver Denarius.
Obv: DOMITIANVS AVG GERM, Bare head of Domitian right.
Rev: Frontal view of hexastyle temple on base with four steps; within is a statue of Jupiter, seated, flanked by statues of Juno and Minerva (= the Capitoline triad); on the central part of the pediment is a seated figure holding spear, with two additional figures on either side; on the apex of the roof is a facing quadriga with figures on either side; an eagle stands at each of the upper corners; IMP CAESAR is inscribed on the architrave.
RIC II².1 815; RIC II 207; BMC 242.
4 commentsOldMoney
D703a.jpg
Domitian RIC-70341 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25.05g
Rome mint, 90-91 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XV CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in exergue; Domitian stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear, crowned by Victory, stg. l.
RIC 703 (C). BMC 443. BNC 477.
Acquired from iNumis, December 2019.

In 85 AD Domitian rolled out a new set of reverse designs for the bronze coinage, most of which would be repeatedly struck over the next decade. The Victory crowning Domitian was a particular favourite for the sestertius. It copies a similar type struck for Vespasian's aurei with one key difference - throwing modesty aside, Domitian is holding Jupiter's thunderbolt, an unprecedented divine attribute for a living emperor 'which has no doubt been given to him by his patroness Minerva' (BMCRE p. xciv). It brings to mind Suetonius' anecdotes concerning Domitian's megalomania of wishing to be addressed as 'Lord and God' and having statues of himself erected only in gold or silver, itself a divine attribute (Dom. 13.2). The Flavian historian Brian Jones speculated 'Domitian was both intelligent and committed to the traditional religion. He obviously knew that he was not a God, and, whilst he did not ask or demand to be addressed as one, he did not actively discourage the few flatterers who did' (Jones 1992). This coin's reverse seems to contradict Jones' generous explanation. It shows a concious decision to depict the emperor in a divine light. It's a decision that could only have come from the top. Perhaps Jones is correct and Domitian did not directly order people to address him as 'Lord and God', however, the numismatic evidence at the very least shows that he was very open to it. Mattingly in BMCRE sums up Domitian's coinage thus - 'The one ugly feature is the vanity that leads Domitian to take over for himself a divine attribute - the thunderbolt' (p. xcv).

This example from 90-91 is likely a generic Victory type perhaps celebrating the recent double triumph over the Chatti and the Dacians in late 89. A fairly large number of the type were struck for the COS XV issue. Because Domitian did not renew the consulship in 91, these COS XV sestertii cannot be precisely dated and were likely struck for an extended period of time.

A gorgeous coin in fine style, struck on a large flan.

NB: RIC cites Paris 447, it is actually 477.
4 commentsDavid Atherton
D772d.JPG
Domitian RIC-770164 viewsAR Denarius, 3.27g
Rome mint, 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 770 (C2). BMC 222. RSC 288. BNC 199.
Ex Dionysos Numismatik, eBay, April 2014.

Domitian took the consulship for the seventeenth time in 95, so this coin can be dated between 1 January and 13 September of that year. Many of the portraits from this issue and the following one show Domitian with slightly raised 'eyes toward heaven' - as seen on this example. Mattingly postulated this as 'lofty aspirations' or even that it is modelled upon the great Equus Domitiani statue erected in 91! Whatever the reason for the portait style, it is indeed a remarkable feature of the late issues and is either the image Domitian wished to project or the product of one or more talented die engravers producing these unique portraits without any direction from above.

A fairly common coin in fine late period style.
David Atherton
D841.JPG
Domitian RIC-841152 viewsAR Cistophorus, 9.81g
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG P M COS VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 841 (C). BMC 251. RSC 23. RPC 864 (8 spec.). BNC 221.
Acquired from Tom Cederlind, February 2013.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. It being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. Domitian completed the structure the following year and it was said no expense was spared. The building Domitian dedicated was a lavish structure, magnificent in appearance featuring Pentelic marble, gold plated doors, and a roof of gilded bronze.

This cistophorus minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor commemorates the new Temple of Jupiter Domitian bestowed on Rome. Curiously, although the building featured six columns, only four are seen here. Statues of the deities Juno, Jupiter (seated) and Minverva can be seen between the columns.

A most wonderful coin in hand.
8 commentsDavid Atherton
Domitian_RPC_1672.jpg
Domitian, 81 - 96 AD32 viewsObv: AYT KAI ΔOMITIANOC CЄBACTOC ГЄPM, laureate head of Domitian facing right.

Rev: ЄTO - IГ (Reginal year 13), Mt. Argaeus surmounted by a statue of Helios.

Silver Didrachm, Cappadocia, Caesarea, 93 - 94 AD

6.7 grams, 19.92 mm, 180°

RPC 1672, Metcalf 26, Syd. 128
SPQR Matt
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Dyrrachium, Illyria, Drachm, DYP AYKIΣKOY10 viewsAR Drachm
Greek Provincial Dyrrhachium, Illyria
Magistrate Meniskos
Issued: After 229BC
18.0mm 3.21gr
O: MENIΣKOΣ; Cow standing right, looking left, calf suckling left; statue of diety, right.
R: DYP AYKIΣKOY; Double stellate pattern within double linear square with sides curved inwards.
Mionnet 122; BMC 94 - 95; Ceka 325.
alexandra.numismatics 111470669741
7/30/14 4/23/17
Nicholas Z
086n.jpg
Eagle190 viewsPHRYGIA. Ancyra. Sabina. Æ 20. A.D. 117-137. Obv: CA(BEINA)-CEBACTH. Draped bust right, elaborate hairdo; countermark on head. Rev: ANKYP-ANΩN.Cult-Statue of Ephesian Artemis facing, flanked by two stags. Ref: BMC 23-24; Sear GIC 1308. Axis: 180°. Weight: 3.18 g. CM: Eagle standing, head left, wings spread, E.C.H between wings and legs, in circular punch, 6 mm. Howgego -. Collection Automan.Automan
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EB0217 Zeus / Statue of Artemis4 viewsApameia, PHRYGIA, AE 20, 133-48 BC.
Obverse: Laureate head of Zeus right.
Reverse: AΠAME AΛEXAN AΠTEMI, cult statue of Artemis Anaïtis standing facing.
References: SG 5121; SNG Cop 170; BMC 33ff.
Diameter: 20.5mm, Weight: 6.412g.
EB
EB0289b_sclaed.JPG
EB0289 Boule / Leto and twins4 viewsTripolis, Lydia, AE 28, Imperial times.
Obverse: IEΡA BOYΛH, veiled bust of Boule right.
Reverse:TΡIΠOΛEITΩN, Temple with four columns; within: a statue of Leto running left, carrying her twins.
References: Weber 6960; BMC 36.
Diameter: 28.5mm, Weight: 10.709g.
EB
EB0559_scaled.JPG
EB0559 Gordian III / Antiochia16 viewsGordian III, AE 32 of Pisidia, Antioch, 238-244 AD.
Obv: IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, laureate head right.
Rev: CAESAN TIOC HCOL, emperor standing right holding statue of the genius of the colony and clasping hands with Antiochia standing left holding sceptre, altar between them, SR in exergue.
References: SNGCop 62; SNGvA 4951, BMC 76.
Diameter: 34mm, Weight: 26.78 grams.
EB
EB0566_scaled.JPG
EB0566 Gallus and Volusian / portable shrine12 viewsTrebonianus Gallus and Volusian, AE 33 of Antioch, Syria 251-253 AD.
Obv: ΑΥΤΟΚ Κ Γ ΟΥΙΒ ΤΡƐΒ ΓΑΛΛΟϹ ΚΑΙ Ο[ΥΟΛΟΥϹϹΙΑ]ΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gallus, r., seen from rear, facing radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Volusian, l., seen from front.
Rev: ΑΝΤΙΟΧƐΩΝ ΜΗΤΡΟ ΚΟΛΩΝ, Δ Ɛ above, SC in exergue, portable shrine with four columns enclosing statue of Tyche seated, facing, with river god (Orontes) facing, at her feet; above, ram running r.; carry-bars at the base of the shrine.
References: RIC IX 1853.
Diameter: 33mm, Weight: 22.495 grams.
EB
EB0696_scaled.JPG
EB0696 Commodus / Statue of Artemis8 viewsCommodus 177-192, AEZANIS, Phrygia, AE 18, c. 184-192.
Obverse: ΑV (ΚΑΙ) ΚΟΜΟΔΟС, laureate head of Commodus (with traces of drapery) right.
Reverse: ΑΙΖΑΝƐΙΤΩΝ, cult statue of Artemis of Ephesus standing, facing, wearing kalathos, having supports.
References: vA Aezani 68, BMC 124-5, Cop 103.
Diameter: 17.5mm, Weight: 3.08g.
EB
EB0719_scaled.JPG
EB0719 Septimus Severus and Caracalla / Temple8 viewsSeptimus Severus 193-211, PHOENECIA , Berytos.
Obverse: Confronted busts of Severus and young Caracalla.
Reverse: tetrastyle temple with stairs, statue of Astarte within, facing, right hand holding standard, left hand holding folds of dress, being crowned by Nike on small column to right.
References: BMC 122ff, SNG 1948.19.2251.
Diameter: 22.5mm, Weight: 6.82g.
EB
EB0721_scaled.JPG
EB0721 Philip I / Temple8 viewsPhilip I, NESIBI, Mesopotamia, AE 26.
Obverse: AUTOK K M IOULI FILIPPOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: IOY CEΠ KOΛΩ NECIBI MHT, tetrastyle temple with twisted columns; within arched central bay statue of Tyche seated facing, ram leaping right above, river-god swimming right below.
References: BMC Arabia p. 122, 17 var.
Diameter: 25.5mm, Weight: 8.36g.
EB
EB1028_scaled.JPG
EB1028 Augustus / Caligula10 viewsCaligula & Divus Augustus Æ Dupondius. 37-41 AD.
Obverse: DIVVS AVGVSTVS S-C, radiate head of Divus Augustus left (tooled).
Reverse: CONSENSV SENAT ET EQ ORDIN P Q R, laureate & togate statue of Gaius Caligula seated left on curule chair, holding branch.
References: RIC 56 [Caligula], Cohen 87 [Augustus], BMC 88.
Diameter: 30mm, Weight: 17.41g.
EB
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EGYPT -- PTOLEMY III EUERGETES15 viewsEGYPT -- PTOLEMY III EUERGETES -- (246-221 BC) AE20. Paphos Mint, Cyprus, Horned head of Zeus-Ammon right / ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ , facing cult statue of Aphrodite. Reference: Svoronos 1007.
dpaul7
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EGYPT, Alexandria, Antoninus Pius36 viewsEGYPT, Alexandria, Antoninus Pius, A.D. 138-161, Æ Drachm , Dated RY 15 (AD 151/2) Agathodaimon Temple

bv: Laureate and draped bust right
Obv: Statue of Agathodaimon standing facing within tetrastyle façade; akroterion decorated with aphlasta flanking central figure of Mt. Argaeus.

Köln 1673; Milne 2164; Emmett 1449 (15)
ecoli
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Eirene with infant Plutos35 viewsRoman copy of the famous statue made by Kephisodotos, father of Praxiteles, today in the Glyptothek in Munich/GermanyJochen
pjimage_(24).jpg
Elagabalus10 viewsAE22, Tripolis, Phoenicia
Dated local year 532, AD 220-221
Obverse: (AYT K M AVR ANTWNINOC), laureate head right.
Reverse: (TRIPOLITWN), Temple of Astarte, consisting of central arch and two wings with four columns; statue of Astarte under arch.
Exergue: [date]
References: BMC 120, Rouvier 1764; Babelon 1964; Mionnet V 456
Justin L
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Elagabalus Zeus Hagios Temple16 viewsElagabalus Æ 26mm of Phoenicia, Tripolis, 218 - 222 AD
OBV: Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / Tetrastyle shrine of Zeus Hagios, with central altar flanked by statues of Sol and Luna.
REV: Tetrastyle shrine of Zeus Hagios, with central altar flanked by statues of Sol and Luna.
BMC Phoenicia pg. 222, 110; Lindgren I 2355

RARE
Romanorvm
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Elephants, Divus Augustus Sestertius237 viewsObv.
DIVO AVGVSTO S P Q R
Statue of the deified Augusts riding left in Quadriga pulled by four elephants, who each have their own mahout

Rev.
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST P M TR POT XXXVI
Large SC

Struck by Tiberius 34-35 A.D. in honour of the deified Augustus
2 commentsancientdave
60319LG.jpg
Elis, Olympia192 viewsOlympia (Greek: Ολυμπία Olympí'a or Ολύμπια Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. Both games were held every olympiad (i.e. every four years), the Olympic Games dating back possibly further than 776 BC. In 394 emperor Theodosius I, or possibly his grandson Theodosius II in 435, abolished them because they were reminiscent of paganism.

The sanctuary itself consists of an unordered arrangement of various buildings. To the north of the sanctuary can be found the prytaneion and the Philippeion, as well as the array of treasuries representing the various city states. The metroon lies to the south of these treasuries, with the Echo Stoa to the East. To the south of the sanctuary is the South Stoa and the Bouleuterion, whereas the West side houses the palaistra, the workshop of Pheidias, the Gymnasion and the Leonidaion. Enclosed within the temenos are the temples of Hera and Zeus, the Pelopion and the area of the altar, where the sacrifices were made. The hippodrome and later stadium were also to the East.

Olympia is also known for the gigantic ivory and gold statue of Zeus that used to stand there, sculpted by Pheidias, which was named one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World by Antipater of Sidon. Very close to the temple of Zeus (see photo of ruins below) which housed this statue, the studio of Pheidias was excavated in the 1950s. Evidence found there such as sculptor's tools, corroborates this opinion.

Excavation of the Olympia temple district and its surroundings began with a French expedition in 1829. German archaeologists continued the work in the latter part of the 19th century. The latter group uncovered, intact, the Hermes of Praxiteles statue, among other artifacts. In the middle of the 20th Century, the stadium where the running contests took place was excavated.

The Olympic flame of the modern-day Olympic Games is lit by reflection of sunlight in a parabolic mirror at the restored Olympia stadium and then transported by a torch to the place where the games are held.

When the modern Olympics came to Athens in 2004, the men's and women's shot put competition was held at the restored stadium.

The ancient ruins sits north of the Alfeios River and lies next to Cronius or Kronios hill (the hill of Kronos, or Saturn). Kladeos, a tributary of Alfeios, flows around the area.

The town has a school and a square (plateia). Tourism is popular throughout the late-20th century. The city has a train station and is the easternmost terminus of the line of Olympia-Pyrgos (Ilia). The train station which the freight yard is west of it is about 300 m east of the town centre.

It is linked by GR-74 and the new road was opened in the 1980s, the next stretch N and NE of Olympia will open in around 2005. Distance from Pyrgos is 20 km E(old: 21 km), about 50 km SW of Lampeia, W of Tripoli and Arcadia and 4 km north of Krestena and N of Kyparissia and Messenia. The highway passed north of the ancient ruins.

A reservoir is located 2 km southwest damming up the Alfeios river and has a road from Olympia and Krestena which in the late-1990s has been closed.

The area is hilly and mountainous, most of the area within Olympia is forested.

Elis, Olympia. After ca. 340/30-late 3rd century B.C. Æ unit (20 mm, 5.99 g). Laureate head of Zeus right / FA above, horse trotting right; [L]U below. BCD 339.3 (this coin). Near VF, dark brown patina.
Ex BCD Collection. Ex-John C Lavender G18
ecoli73
Emèse Julia Domna.jpg
Emesa (Homs, Syria) - Julia Domna26 viewsIOV[ΛIA] ΔOMNA [AVΓ]. , bust of Julia Domna right
[EMICΩ]N KOΛΩNIAC / ZKΦ : year 527 sel. = 215-216 AD. , monumental cubic altar on three steps, with 2 storeys ornamented with 3 niches with statues, small lighted altar on top.
24 mm

This kind of monumental cubic altar is well-known in Roman Syria. There was one much like it in front of Jupiter's Temple in Heliopolis (Baalbek, Lebanon), not far from Emesa ; it has been excavated and partially restored by a Swiss mission. A structure f the same kind has been recently restored by Jacques Seigne in Gerasa (Jerash, Jordan) in front of Zeus Temple. We know no trace of any ancient sanctuary in today's Homs, but this altar, depicted on this coin, was probably in front of the Elagabal Temple. The High-Priest (future emperor Elagabalus) is said to have been "dancing around the altars" : this was in fact the circumambulatio, exactly like today's Muslims turn around the Cube (Kaaba) in Mekka.
Ginolerhino
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Emmett 1449 - Antoninus Pius drachm , Altar of Agothodaimon w. statue39 viewsEGYPT, Alexandria. Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Drachm (22.46 g, 11h). Dated RY 15 (AD 151/2). Laureate and draped bust left / Statue of Agathodaimon standing facing within tetrastyle façade; akroterion decorated with aphlasta flanking central figure of Mt. Argaeus. Köln 1673 (same obv. die); cf. Dattari 2999 bis; cf. Milne 2164; Emmett 1449. G. 1673 Kampmann-Ganschow 35.534 mattpat
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England, London (Londinium) - city walls435 viewsmodern bronze statue of Trajan

next to Tower Hill - station of London underground
Johny SYSEL
19th_century_photograph_of_the_Roman_Baths,_Bath_.jpg
England, Roman Baths, Bath (1)163 viewsThese celebrated Roman Baths were unknown until, in 1880, sewer workers uncovered the first glimpse of Roman structures under the Georgian Spa. This led to the discovery of the Roman Baths and their treasures.

The walls, columns and parapet that surround the Great Bath today were built in the Victorian period, and the "Roman" statues that gaze down upon the pool from the upper walkway are also Victorian.

This photograph was taken in the 19th century not long after the Baths were discovered and before the Victorian structures we see today were built.
*Alex
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Ephesian Artemis88 viewsI took this photo while visiting the ancient city of Ephesus, Turkey, in August of 2013. Along one of the avenues was this relief of one of Ephesus' most unique symbols: the Ephesian Artemis. Large cult statues of this goddess would be placed in the Artemis Temple just outside the city. Ephesian Artemis can occasionally be found on the reverse sides of Seleucid coins.ThatParthianGuy
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Ephesos Hadrian, 117-138 AD6 viewsEphesos Hadrian, 117-138 AD.

Obverse.bust, laureate, right

REVERSE.cult statue of the Ephesian Artemis standing facing with outstretched arms; 2 stags at her feet right and left.

17mm
Macedonian Warrior
Antonin Ephèse.jpg
Ephesus - Antoninus Pius38 viewsReverse : ΔIC NEOKOPΩN / EΦECIΩN , Temple of Artemis with Statue of Ephesian Artemis inside.

This temple was considered one of the 7 wonders of the Hellenistic world.
Ginolerhino
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Ephesus Antoninus Pius 10 viewsEphesus Antoninus Pius with three temples and Artemis central. 35.6mm, 19gm, RPC Online, Volume IV, 8474. Rare.
Obverse inscription Τ ΑΙΛ ΚΑΙСΑΡ ΑΝΤΩΝƐΙΝΟС
Obverse design laureate head of Antoninus Pius, r.
Reverse inscription ƐΦƐСΙΩΝ ΔΙС ΝƐΩΚΟΡΩΝ
Reverse design temple with four columns enclosing statue of Artemis of Ephesus standing, facing, wearing kalathos, having supports; between two temples, each in perspective, with two frontal columns and an enclosed imperial statue
Ancient Aussie
1886__Numismatik_Naumann,_Auction_82_lot_241.jpg
ephesus006a3 viewsElagabalus
Ephesus, Ionia

Obv: ΑΥΤ Κ Μ ΑΥΡ ΑΝΤΩΝƐΙΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear.
Rev: ΔΟΓΜΑΤΙ ϹΥΝ/ΚΛΗΤΟΥ →ƐΦƐϹΙΩΝΟΥ/TOΙ ΝΑΟΙ, frontal view of two distyle temples between two distyle temples seen in perspective, each holding cult-statue; the central ones having Artemis of Ephesus, to left, and the Emperor, to right.
36 mm, 20.82 gms

RPC Online 4867; Karwiese 680

From Numismatik Naumann Auction 82, lot 241.
Charles M
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ephesus006b0 viewsElagabalus
Ephesus, Ionia

Obv: ΑΥΤ Κ Μ ΑΥΡ ΑΝΤΩΝƐΙΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ; laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear.
Rev: [ΠΡΩ]ΤΩΝ ΑϹΙΑϹ, →ƐΦƐϹΙΩΝ, in middle field Δ/ΝƐ/Ω/Κ; frontal view of two distyle temples, above, and two distyle temples seen in perspective, below, each holding cult-statue; the ones above having Artemis of Ephesus, to left, and the Emperor, to right.
34 mm, 20.20 gms

RPC Online 4875; Karwiese 683

From Solidus Numismatik, Auction 46, lot 219.
Charles M
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Eros of Parium25 viewsA Roman copy of the statue Eros of Parium made by Praxiteles, found in Nicopolis a Istrum, today in the Archaeological Museum Sofia/Bulgaria. Depicted on coins from Parium.Jochen
399px-Eros_bow_Musei_Capitolini_MC410_n2.jpg
Eros Stringing his Bow43 viewsThis statue is made by Lysipp. The original ist lost, but several Roman cipies are found. This one is located in the Musei Capitolini in Rom. Depictions of this statue are found on coins of Philippopolis and Nikaia (NIcaea).Jochen
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FAUSTINA I30 viewsAR denarius. c.146 AD. 3.60 g, 6h. Draped bust right. DIVA FAVSTINA. / Hexastyle temple; with figure within; surmounted by a central facing quadriga, winged Victories on corners; statues on lower left and right; fencing in front. AED DIV FAVSTINAE. RIC III 343 (A.Pius). RSC 1.
CNG 763820.
benito
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FAUSTINA I48 viewsAR denarius. c.146 AD. 3.60 g, 6h. Draped bust right. DIVA FAVSTINA. / Hexastyle temple; with figure within; surmounted by a central facing quadriga, winged Victories on corners; statues on lower left and right; fencing in front. AED DIV FAVSTINAE. RIC III 343 (A.Pius). RSC 1.
CNG 763820.

benito
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Faustina I12 viewsDiva Faustina I. Died A.D. 140/1. AR denarius (18.5 mm, 2.90 g, 5 h). Rome mint, Dated A.D. 150. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / AED DIV FAVSTINAE, hexastyle temple with statue of Faustina within. RIC 343; RSC 1; BMCRE 339. Toned VF.ecoli
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Faustina Junior, Funeral Pyre67 viewsDIVAE FAVSTIN AVG MATR CASTROR
Draped and veiled bust right

CONSE - CRATIO
Funerary monument of four stories, ornamented with garlands and statues

BMC698, C77, RIC747
2.75g; 17-19mm
1 commentsarizonarobin
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Faustina Junior, Neapolis50 viewsFaustina Junior
Samaria, Neapolis

FAVCTEINA CEB EY CE CEBAQUIGA
draped bust right

F L NEACPOLEW CYPIAC PALACT
Facing cult statue of Artemis Ephesia, holding two scepters topped with doves,
flanked by stags
date across L and R field

BMC 62, Ae 23-24mm; 6.84g
1 commentsarizonarobin
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Faustina Senior AR Denarius, wife of Antoninus Pius, Rome 135-140 AD 43 viewsRef Faustina Sr AR Denarius, RIC 343, RSC 1, BMC 339
Diva Faustina Sr 3.36 gr. AR Denarius. 150 AD. DIVA FAVSTINA, diademed & draped bust right / AED DIV FAVSTINAE, front view of temple of six columns on five steps, fencing before, statue of Faustina within. RIC 343, RSC 1. sear5 4573

Antonivs Protti
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Faustina Sr, RIC (A. Pius) 1129A, Sestertius of AD 145 (Concordia)18 viewsÆ Sestertius (31,79g, Ø 33mm, 12h). Rome, AD 145.
Obv.: [DIVA A]VGVSTA FAVST[INA], draped bust right with hair waived & coiled on top head.
Rev.: CONCORDIA around,, S C in ex., Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Jr. clasping hands over altar, between large statues - also clasping hands - on pedestal of Antoninus, holding Fortuna statuette, and Faustina Sr. holding sceptre.
RIC (A. Pius) 1129A (R3); BMCRE p.230/*; Cohen 161; Strack 1232; Banti 51 (2 spec.)
Ex Künker, Auction 270.
1 commentsCharles S
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Faustina Sr, RIC (A. Pius) 1140, Sestertius of AD 14250 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.74g, Ø31mm, 11h). Rome mint. Struck AD 142.
Obv.: DIVA AVGVSTA FAVSTINA, veiled and draped bust of Diva Faustina Maior facing right
Rev.: EX·S·C·(in ex.), Statue of Faustina, holding grain ears, seated on top of a triumphal chariot drawn by two elephants with riders.
RIC (A. Pius) 1140 (rare); BMCRE 1435; Cohen 202 (25 fr.); Strack 685 (3 collections for veiled bust type); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali III-1) 71 (6 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4627; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:25b
ex CNG 85 lot 918 (2010)

Commemorating the funeral of Faustina in A.D. 141
1 commentsCharles S
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Faustina Sr, RIC (A. Pius) 1141, sestertius of AD 145 (carpentum) 30 viewsÆ Sestertius (23,53g, Ø 31mm, 12h). Rome, AD 145.
Obv.: DIVA AVGVSTA FAVSTINA, draped bust right with hair waived & coiled on top head.
Rev.: EX S C in ex., ornamented carpentum drawn right by two mules.
RIC Antoninus Pius 1141 (R2); Cohen 199 (40 fr.); Strack 683 (P (carpentum w. 5 statues)); Banti 66 (2 spec.)
Ex Boule (Paris), Mail Bid Auction 107, Oct. 2015.
Portrait tooled
1 commentsCharles S
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Faustina Sr, RIC (A. Pius) 1168, As of AD 145-ca.15523 viewsÆ As (13,94g, Ø 28mm, 6h). Rome, AD 145-ca.155.
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right.
Rev.: AETER-NITAS l. & r. around, S C in ex., Hexastyle temple on podium with steps; in front lattice-work; in centre, seated figure holding sceptre; on roof center, quadriga and Victories on angles left and right; in front of outer columns, statues on pedestals right and left.
RIC (A. Pius) 1168; BMCRE 1562; Cohen 66; Strack 1259
Ex Naville Numismatics Auction 15, June 2015
Charles S
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FAUSTINA Sr. (138 - 141 AD)33 viewsAR Denarius
O: DIVA FAVSTINA, Draped bust right.
R: AED DIV FAVSTINAE, Hexastyle temple of diva faustina, containing seated statue of the deity, trellis-work fencing in foreground at foot of steps.
Rome
3.31g
17mm
RIC 343 (Scarce)
2 commentsMat
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Faustina, Ankyra, cultus-statue of Ephesian Artemis, AE1925 viewsBronze AE 19, SNG Cop 139, aVF, 4.331g, 21.2mm, 225o, Ankyra mint, obverse FAVCTEINA CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse ANKURANWN, cultus-statue of Ephesian Artemis

ex FORVM
areich
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FAVCTEINA CEBACTH - lifetime issue31 viewsAE 19mm 3.22 grams 139-141AD
Obv - FAVCTEINA CEBACTH - draped bust right
Rev - ANKYP/ANON - cult statue of Artemis
Reference - COP139
Mint - Ancyra, Phrygia
aragon6
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FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL / Ӕ As or Dupontius (156-161 A.D.)20 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half

Ӕ, 22.5-24+mm, 9.56g, die axis 11h

There may be a countermark across the front part of the face on obverse, but due to its location it is difficult to be sure and identify it.

AVGVSTI PII FIL(ia) = daughter of August Antoninus Pius, points out to the ruling of Fausta's father Antoninus Pius rather than her husband Marcus Aurelius. Reverse: Unlike Greek Aphrodite, in addition to her other aspects Roman Venus was also a goddess of victory, this embodied in her representation as Venus Victrix (Victorious) or Victris (of Victory), like in this case: she offers a little winged representation of victory, resting on defensive military attributes (as a female goddess, she represented passive, defensive aspects of war, active ones being the domain of male Mars). SC = [Ex] Senatus Consulto (Senatus is genitive, Consulto is ablative of Consultum) = by decree of the Senate, i. e. the authority of the Senate approved minting of this coin (necessary to justify issue of copper alloy coins for which the intrinsic value was not obvious).

Of two Ӕ coins with the same legends and Venus with shield, RIC 1367 and 1389a, the first is a sestertius and its typical dimensions are characteristic of the type: 30+ mm and 20+g. This one is definitely smaller. Material seems reddish, so this one is more likely an as. Minted in Rome. Some sources give issue dates as 156-161 (the end of Faustina's father's reign), others as 145-146 (her marriage).

Annia Galeria Faustina Minor (Minor is Latin for the Younger), Faustina Minor or Faustina the Younger (born probably 21 September c. 130 CE, died in winter of 175 or spring of 176 CE) was a daughter of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius and Roman Empress Faustina the Elder. She was a Roman Empress and wife to her maternal cousin Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius. She was held in high esteem by soldiers and her own husband and was given divine honours after her death. Faustina, named after her mother, was her parents' fourth and youngest child and their second daughter; she was also their only child to survive to adulthood. She was born and raised in Rome. Her great uncle, the emperor Hadrian, had arranged with her father for Faustina to marry Lucius Verus. On 25 February 138, she and Verus were betrothed. Verus’ father was Hadrian’s first adopted son and his intended heir; however, when Verus’ father died, Hadrian chose Faustina’s father to be his second adopted son, and eventually, successor. Faustina’s father ended the engagement between his daughter and Verus and arranged for Faustina's betrothal to her maternal cousin, Marcus Aurelius; Aurelius was also adopted by her father.

In April or May 145, Faustina and Marcus Aurelius were married, as had been planned since 138. Since Aurelius was, by adoption, Antoninus Pius' son, under Roman law he was marrying his sister; Antoninus would have had to formally release one or the other from his paternal authority (his patria potestas) for the ceremony to take place. Little is specifically known of the ceremony, but it is said to have been "noteworthy". Coins were issued with the heads of the couple, and Antoninus, as Pontifex Maximus, would have officiated. Marcus makes no apparent reference to the marriage in his surviving letters, and only sparing references to Faustina. Faustina was given the title of Augusta on 1 December 147 after the birth of her first child, Galeria Faustina (or Domitia? sources differ which of them was born in 147 and was the first child).

When Antoninus died on 7 March 161, Marcus and Lucius Verus ascended to the throne and became co-rulers. Faustina then became empress. Unfortunately, not much has survived from the Roman sources regarding Faustina's life, but what is available does not give a good report. Cassius Dio and the Augustan History accuse Faustina of ordering deaths by poison and execution; she has also been accused of instigating the revolt of Avidius Cassius against her husband. The Augustan History mentions adultery with sailors, gladiators, and men of rank; however, Faustina and Aurelius seem to have been very close and mutually devoted.

Faustina accompanied her husband on various military campaigns and enjoyed the love and reverence of Roman soldiers. Aurelius gave her the title of Mater Castrorum or ‘Mother of the Camp’. She attempted to make her home out of an army camp. Between 170–175, she was in the north, and in 175, she accompanied Aurelius to the east.

That same year, 175, Aurelius's general Avidius Cassius was proclaimed Roman emperor after the erroneous news of Marcus's death; the sources indicate Cassius was encouraged by Marcus's wife Faustina, who was concerned about her husband's failing health, believing him to be on the verge of death, and felt the need for Cassius to act as a protector in this event, since her son Commodus, aged 13, was still young. She also wanted someone who would act as a counterweight to the claims of Tiberius Claudius Pompeianus, who was in a strong position to take the office of Princeps in the event of Marcus’s death. The evidence, including Marcus's own Meditations, supports the idea that Marcus was indeed quite ill, but by the time Marcus recovered, Cassius was already fully acclaimed by the Egyptian legions of II Traiana Fortis and XXII Deiotariana. "After a dream of empire lasting three months and six days", Cassius was murdered by a centurion; his head was sent to Marcus Aurelius, who refused to see it and ordered it buried. Egypt recognized Marcus as emperor again by 28 July 175.

Faustina died in the winter of 175, after a somewhat suspicious accident, at the military camp in Halala (a city in the Taurus Mountains in Cappadocia). Aurelius grieved much for his wife and buried her in the Mausoleum of Hadrian in Rome. She was deified: her statue was placed in the Temple of Venus in Rome and a temple was dedicated to her in her honor. Halala’s name was changed to Faustinopolis and Aurelius opened charity schools for orphan girls called Puellae Faustinianae or 'Girls of Faustina'. The Baths of Faustina in Miletus are named after her.

In their thirty years of marriage, Faustina bore Marcus Aurelius thirteen children, of whom 6 reached adulthood and were significant in history. The best known are emperor Commodus and the closest to him sister Lucilla (both depicted in a very historically inaccurate movie "Gladiator" and, together with their parents, in a much more accurate 1st season "Reign of Blood" of the TV series "Roman Empire").
Yurii P
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Fecunditas, goddess of fertility268 viewsFaustina Junior, wife of Marcus Aurelius. Augusta, 147-175/6 CE.
AR Denarius (19mm, 3.16g), Rome mint, 161-175 CE.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, a double band of pearls around her head.
Rev: FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, holding scepter & child.
RIC 677; RSC 99; BMC 91; Sear 5252; Cohen 99.

Although many coin reference books classify Fecunditas as a personification of fertility rather than as an actual deity, Fecunditas was recognized as a Roman divinity by Nero, who erected a statue to her. Tacitus notes that upon the birth of Claudia Neronis, the senate decreed the construction of a temple of Fertility to be built at Antium.

Fecunditas is always portrayed as a female figure holding a child, or children and often a scepter, cornucopia, palm branch or caduceus. Sometimes the children are depicted standing at her feet. Coins portraying her usually advertise the fertility of the imperial family who issued the coin.
EmpressCollector
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Flavius Magnus Magnentius, 350 - 353 AD21 viewsObv: IM CAE MAGNENTIVS AVG, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust of Magnentius facing right.

Rev: FELICITAS REIPVBLICAE, Magnentius standing left, holding a globe surmounted by a statue of Victory in his right hand and a labarum in his left; A in right field; TRP in exergue.

Copper Centenionalis, Trier mint, 351 - 353 AD

4.9 grams, 23 mm, 180°

RIC VIII Trier 264
SPQR Coins
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Fortuna, Personification of good luck294 viewsFaustina Junior, wife of Marcus Aurelius, Augusta 147-175/6 C.E.
AR Denarius (18.5 mm), Rome mint, 161-175 C.E.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Bare-headed & draped bust r.
Rev: FORTVNAE MVLIEBRI, Fortuna enthroned left, holding rudder and cornucopiae.
RIC-683; Sear-5253; BMC-96; Cohen-107.

This legend, unique to this empress, dedicates the type 'to the Fortune of Women'. Festus speaks of a statue of this goddess at the fourth milestone from Rome.

Fortuna personifies good fortune, luck and prosperity. She is usually depicted holding a rudder or cornucopiae; she sometimes holds a wheel at her side.
EmpressCollector
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FRANCE - Krauwinkel-Style Jeton120 viewsFRANCE - Krauwinkel-Style Jeton, Brass. Obv.: Bare head with long pony tail and ties, bust left in decorated dress. LUD . XVI . D . G . FR . N . REX Rev.: Statue of mounted figure left; OPTIMO PRINCEPS Date 1790 in exergue. dpaul7
Jeton-1790.jpg
FRANCE -- Louis XVI (1774-1792) 251 viewsFRANCE -- Louis XVI (1774-1792) Jeton, Brass. Obv.: Bare head with long pony tail and ties, bust left in decorated dress. LUD . XVI . D . G . FR . N . REX Rev.: Statue of mounted figure left; OPTIMO PRINCEPS Date 1790 in exergue. Reference: Hennin #177.1 commentsdpaul7
Nîmes_-_Arena.JPG
France, Nemausus - Amphitheatre241 viewsThe Roman amphitheatre of the Colonia Nemausus still stands. On the top, holed stones for holding the velum can be seen. The "Arènes" are still in use today, mainly for bull fights as the more modern statue in front shows. Syltorian
France_370_Nimes_Jardins_de_la_Fontaine.JPG
France, Nimes - Jardins de la Fontaine184 viewsDecorated with vases and statues, the Jardins de la Fontaine count as one of the major public gardens in Europe. They were laid out in the eighteenth century on the site of the ancient spring, an area that includes the Tour Magne and the Temple of Diana.vacationchick
France_368_Nimes_Jardins_de_la_Fontaine.JPG
France, Nimes - Jardins de la Fontaine176 viewsDecorated with vases and statues, the Jardins de la Fontaine count as one of the major public gardens in Europe. They were laid out in the eighteenth century on the site of the ancient spring, an area that includes the Tour Magne and the Temple of Diana.vacationchick
France_371_Nimes_Jardins_de_la_Fontaine.JPG
France, Nimes - Jardins de la Fontaine161 viewsDecorated with vases and statues, the Jardins de la Fontaine count as one of the major public gardens in Europe. They were laid out in the eighteenth century on the site of the ancient spring, an area that includes the Tour Magne and the Temple of Diana.vacationchick
France_447_St_Romain_en_Gal_Statue.JPG
France, St Romain-en-Gal188 viewsstatuevacationchick
JET_France_Louis_XVI_statue_Bordeauz_Feur_9221.jpg
France. Statue of Louis XV in Bordeaux2 viewsFeuardent 9221
Jeton, minted in Nuremberg; brass, 24.05 mm, max., 0°

Obv: LUD • XVI D • G -- FR • N • REX, bust of Louis XVI facing left.

Rev: OPTIMO -- PRINCIPI (= to the best of princes), equestrian statue of Louis XV at Bordeaux, by Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne II (erected 1743) on pedestal, 1792 in exergue.
Stkp
JET_Louis_XVI_Optimo_Principi.jpg
France. Statue of Louis XV in Bordeax25 viewsFeuardent 9219 var.; Hennin 177 Plate 20 var.; Fayolle

Jeton, silvered brass; minted in 1790 by Johann Christian Reich (active 1758-1814) in Nuremburg; 24 mm., 0°, dated 1790

Obv: LVD • XVI • D • G • -- FR • N • REX, bust of Louis XVI facing left.

Rev: OPTIMO -- PRINCIPI (= to the best of princes), equestrian statue of Louis XV at Bordeaux, by Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne II (erected 1743), 1790 in exergue.
Stkp
JET_Louis_XV_statue_1744.jpg
France. Statue of Louis XV in Bordeax8 viewsFeuardent 9213 var.; Hennin 182 var.; Carde 19; Fayolle 16-17, 19 var.

Jeton, minted in Nuremberg in 1744; brass, 24 mm, 180°

Obv: LUD • XV D G • FR• -- ET • NAV • REX •, bust of Louis XV facing left.

Rev: OPTIMO -- PRINCIPI (= to the best of princes), equestrian statue of Louis XV at Bordeaux, by Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne II (erected 1743), MDCCXLIIII (= 1744) in exergue.
Stkp
JET_Louis_XV_statue_MDCCXLIIII_dog.jpg
France. Statue of Louis XV in Bordeax9 viewsFeuardent 9213 var.; Hennin 182 var.; Carde 19; Fayolle 16-17, 19 var.

Jeton, minted in Nuremberg in 1744; brass, 24 mm, 180°

Obv: LUD • XV • D • G • FR• -- ET • NAV • REX •, bust of Louis XV facing left.

Rev: OPTIMO -- PRINCIPI (= to the best of princes), equestrian statue of Louis XV at Bordeaux, by Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne II (erected 1743) on taller pedestal, MDCCXLIIII (= 1744) in exergue, dog[?] mark beneath.
Stkp
JET_Louis_XV_statue_MDCCLXXVI_R.jpg
France. Statue of Louis XV in Bordeax8 viewsFeuardent 9216 var., Carde 43

Jeton, minted in 1776 by Johann Christian Reich (active 1758-1814) in Nuremburg; brass, 24 mm, 0°

Obv: LUD XVI D G FR -- ET NAV REX •, bust of Louis XVI facing left. R below.

Rev: OPTIMO -- PRINCIPI (= to the best of princes), equestrian statue of Louis XV at Bordeaux, by Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne II (erected 1743) on pedestal, MDCCLXXVI (= 1776) in exergue.
Stkp
JET_France_Louis_XV_MDCCXLIII.jpg
France. Statue of Louis XV in Bordeax6 viewsFeuardent 9212; Fayolle 14-15

Jeton, minted in Nuremberg in 1743; brass, 23.84 mm, max., 180°

Obv: LUD • XV • D G • FR• -- ET • NAV • REX •, bust of Louis XV facing left.

Rev: OPTIMO -- PRINCIPI (= to the best of princes), equestrian statue of Louis XV at Bordeaux, by Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne II (erected 1743) on pedestal, MDCCXLIII (= 1743) in exergue.
Stkp
Calise04-2.jpg
Gaius ("Caligula"), RIC 44, Sestertius of AD 3920 viewsÆ Sestertius (28.5g, Ø 35.5mm, 6h) Rome mint, struck AD 39.
Obv.: C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON P M TR P III P P around, PIETAS in ex., Pietas, veiled and draped, seated left, holding patera and resting left arm on small statue on pedestal.
Rev.: DIVO AVG / S C (in two lines in field left & right of the temple), Hexastyle guirlanded temple, surmounted with quadriga and statues, before which Gaius, veiled and togate, standing left, sacrifices with patera over garlanded altar; at left, an attendant leading bull to altar; at right, another attendant holding patera.
RIC 44 (R); Sear (Roman Coins & their Values I) 1802; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 60:2a
ex G.Henzen (1999).

Explanation of the legend: obverse: CAIVS CAESAR DIVI AVGVSTI PRONEPOS AVGVSTVS PONTIFEX MAXIMVS TRIBVNICIA POTESTATE III PATER PATRIAE : Gaius Caesar, great-grandson of Divine Augustus, emperor, High Priest, with tribunician power for the third time, father of the fatherland. reverse: DIVO AVGVSTO SENATVS CONSVLTO: to Divine Augustus by decree of the Senate.
This architectural type commemorates the dedication of the temple to Divus Augustus in August, 37 AD. There were two temples in Rome honoring Augustus, one on the Palatine, the other of uncertain location, possibly behind the Basilica Julia in the depression between the Palatine and the Capitoline Hills. The latter, built under Tiberius, was the one dedicated by Caligula in 37 AD.
Charles S
Galbas03-2.jpg
Galba, RIC 79, As of Sept-Dec. 68, Spanish mint (Tarraco?)18 viewsÆ As (10,5g, Ø 18mm, 10h). Spanish mint (Tarraco?), struck Sept-Dec. 68 AD.
Obv.: SER GALBA IMP AVGVSTVS, laureate head left, globe at point of bust.
Rev.: QVADRAGENS REMISSAE, around, S C in ex., triumphal arch with two equestrian statues to left, three prisoners with hands tied behind their backs, advancing right, the foremost under the arch, second and third walking towards the arch, followed by officer.
RIC 079 (S); BMC 205 var. (obv. legend); BNC 40 var. (obv. legend); RCV 2136; RHC 75:20
Ex John Jencek, Oct., 2002
Charles S
GalbAs04-2.jpg
Galba, RIC 81, As of Sept-Dec. 68, Spanish mint (Tarraco?), 15 viewsÆ As (9.7g, Ø 18mm, 6h). Spanish mint (Tarraco?). Struck Sept-Dec. 68 AD.
Obv.: SER GALBA IMP [...AVGVSTVS?], laureate head right, globe at point of bust.
Rev.: QVADRAGENS REMISSAE around, S C in ex., triumphal arch with 2 equestrian statues, 3 prisoners followed by officer below.
RIC 81 (R) (in Wildwinds.com as RIC 80 var.)
Ex Walter C. Holt, April 2003

This is apparently an extremely rare coin. The portrait on this coin has suffered some damage, probably as damnatio memoriae following his murder at the hands of the Praetorians.

The reverse legend on this coin refers to the abolition of the 2½% (1/40th of 100) customs duty, a reward to Gaul and Spain for their support. According to Walter Holt, The relationship between captives and the remission of a tax is unclear. The identities of the captives on this type are unknown but they may refer to his predecessor Nero, Clodius Macer, his rival for the purple, and the fallen rebel Vindex, though their depiction as captives (as all are dead by now) causes some problems.
According to Clive Foss ("Roman Historical Coins"), the captives probably represent financial officials of Nero who plundered the province and denounced Galba.
Charles S
IMG_2085.jpg
GALILEE, Tiberias. Hadrian. 117-138 CE. Æ 24mm Dated CY 101 (119/20 CE).50 viewsGALILEE, Tiberias. Hadrian. 117-138 CE. Æ 24mm (. Dated CY 101 (119/20 CE). Laureate and cuirassed bust right / TIBEP KLAVD, E TAP in exergue, tetrastyle temple set on two-tiered platform; within, statue of Zeus seated left. Hendin 914; SNG ANS 1110.1 commentsMaritima
Gallienus.jpg
Gallienus AR antoninianus, 257 AD35 viewsGallienus
AR antoninianus – 22mm, 3.08g
Lugdunum (RIC) or Cologne (Zschucke), 257 AD
radiate, cuirassed bust r.
IMP GALLIENVS P AVG
Statue of Jupiter standing facing, head left, vertical spear (scepter?) in left hand, Victory in right, surmounting cippus inscribed IMP / C E S
IOVI VICTORI
RIC Va 21, Zschucke 18
ex Beast

Note: IMP CES stands for Imperator Cum Exercitvs Svo. Coin is of good silver.
1 commentsArdatirion
gallienus_467var.jpg
Gallienus, Göbl 116871 viewsGallienus AD 253-268, sole reign 260-268
AE - Antoninianus, 2.8g, 20.2mm
Mediolanum, 257-259
obv. GALLIENVS AVG
bust, radiate, r.
rev. [APOLL]O CONSERV
Apollo stg. frontal, head r., holding r. arm above head, holding with r. hand
lyre, set on column on which is laying his chlamys
RIC V/1, (Mediolanum) 467; C.92; Göbl 1168 (Curtis Clay)
about VF

RIC describes the rev. wrongly as Apollo stg. looking r., holding lyre on rock. The statue should be the Apollo of Timarchides Athen. (Alex)
2 commentsJochen
Gallienus_Syedra_JudgementOfAres_13_77g_28-29mm_LG.jpg
Gallienus, Syedra, judgement of Ares, AE2949 viewsGallienus, 253-268 AD, Syedra, Cilicia
29mm, 13.77g
Obv: AVT K ΠO ΛIK ΓAΛΛIHNOC CEB / IA; laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
Rev: CVEΔPEΩN, Ares, cuirassed and helmeted, standing left between Dike, standing to left, head right, and Hermes, standing to right, holding Kerykeion and wearing winged shoes, holding the arms of Ares
SNG PFPS VI 1239 (same dies)

ex Rutten & Wieland (seller's picture)

'CNG notes on a similar coin:

Ares slew Halirrhothios, son of Poseidon, for assaulting Ares' daughter, Alcippe. The site where Ares came before the gods for judgement, escorted by Dike (Justice) and the herald Hermes, became the Areopagus (Hill of Ares) in Athens, the location of the Athenian law courts. Ares was absolved of murder. It is unknown why this event had such import for Syedra, but the scene appears frequently on its 3rd century coinage.

In fact, as Johannes Nollé and Margret Karola pointed out*, it is known why Syedra issued coins with this scene: In late Hellenistic times the inhabitants of Syedra suffered from repeated assaults of pirates. In these dangerous times, the people of Synedra contacted the oracle of Klaros for help and received the advice to erect a statue of Ares bound by Hermes and being judged by Dike in their city. This statue would protect them against the assaults of the pirates. The base of the statue with the inscription of this action was found during the excavation of Syedra.

*Götter, Städte, Münzen: Kleinasiatische Münzen der Römischen Kaiserzeit, Begleitheft zu einer Ausstellung von Münzen der Pfälzer Provatsammlungen, Münzen 1994, o. 23 f.'
areich
IMG_4829.JPG
German Notgeld: Nürnberg – Fürther Strassenbahn20 viewsCity: Nürnberg – Fürther Strassenbahn
State: Bavaria
Denomination: 20 Pfennig
Obverse: NÜRNBERG – FÜRTHER STRASSENBAHN, 20 PFENNIG within circle in center.
Reverse: PETER HEN-LEIN, Statue of watchmaker Peter Heinlein, standing, looking at a pocket watch.
Date: No Date
Grade: UNC
Catalog #:
Matt Inglima
IMG_4783.JPG
German Notgeld: Nürnberg – Fürther Strassenbahn14 viewsCity: Nürnberg – Fürther Strassenbahn
State: Bavaria
Denomination: 20 Pfennig
Obverse: NÜRNBERG – FÜRTHER STRASSENBAHN, 20 PFENNIG within circle in center.
Reverse: HANS SACHS, Statue of Hans Sachs, seated, holding a quill and a book.
Date: No Date
Grade: AU
Catalog #:
Matt Inglima
Germanicus_Dupondius.jpg
Germanicus Dupondius166 viewsStruck by Caligula 37-41 A.D. in honor of his late father, Germanicus.

Obv: GERMANICUS CAESAR
Germanicus carrying scepter in triumphal Quadriga to right

Rev: SIGNIS RECEPT DEVICTIS GERM SC
Germanicus in curaiss walking left, bearing recovered military standard


The obverse of this coin likely depicts Germanicus' military triumph, an event that must have made quite an impression on young Caligula. The reverse depicts Germanicus (or a statue dedicated to him) walking left, bearing one of two standards that he recovered from Germanic tribes which were taken from General Varus in 9 A.D.
5 commentsancientdave
Geta_Temple_Serdica.JPG
Geta Temple Serdica22 viewsGeta, Serdica, 30.30mm, 19.1g, Ruzicka 473 (1 specimen in Budapest), a bust variety of Varbanov 2596
OBV: AVT K Π CEΠTI ΓETAC, Laureate head right
REV: OVΛΠIAC CEPΔIKHC, Tetrastyle temple with cult-statue of Asklepios standing,
holding serpent entwined staff. Snake in pediment.
Not illustrated by either Varbanov or Ruzicka, but the breaks in the rev. legend, given by Ruzicka,
correspond with this piece. According to Ruzicka the rev. of the Budapest piece shows
Asclepios with snake-wreathed staff in the temple, also a snake in the pediment,
details which seem to be largely worn away on this specimen.
The obv. die may be the same as Varbanov 2545,
there with rev. Asclepios seated (not in temple).

RARE
Romanorvm
Geta_Hypaipa_AE21_4_96g.jpg
Geta, Hypaipa, cult-statue of Artemis Anaïtis AE2138 viewsAE21, 4.96g
obv: Π CE ΓETAC, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right
rev: EΠ KHPINT[...] YΠAIΠANΩN, cult-statue of Artemis Anaïtis facing

SNG von Aulock - , SNG Cop - , BMC - , Lindgren - , SNG Leypold - (cf 1003, same obv. die, same Magistrate (Kerinthos))

ex H D Rauch summer auction 2009, Lot 984
areich
Geta_Rabbatmoba_CultStatueOfAres_AE28_14.4g.jpg
Geta, Rabbatmoba, cult statue of Ares, AE2855 viewsBronze AE 28, Spijkerman, p. 272 and Plate 61, #32; Hendin -, Fair, 14.37g, 28.5mm, 0o, Rabbathmoba-Areopolis mint, year 105 = 210 - 211 A.D.; obverse AUT•K•P-EP•GETAC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PABAQ-MUBA, cult statue of Ares in military dress, sword erect in right, spear and round shield in left, on decorated base with torch-like flaming altars on right and left

ex FORVM
1 commentsareich
glykon_statuette_constanta.jpg
Glykon Snake37 viewsStatuette of Glykon Snake, today in Museum of Constanta/Romania. Depicted on many coins from Thrace and Moesia inferior.Jochen
Gnaeus_Plancius.jpg
Gnaeus Plancius - AR denarius5 viewsRome
²54 BC
¹55 BC
head of Macedonia or Diana Planciana right wearing causia
CN·PLANCIVS / AED·CVR·S·C
agrimi standing right, bow and quiver left
¹Crawford 432/1, SRCV I 396, Sydenham 932, RSC I Plancia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,1g
ex Aureo & Calicó

The agrimi is the wild goat of Crete. This moneyer used symbols of Macedonia and Crete on his coinage because these were places where he had spent some time during his career. If the obverse depicts Diana Planciana than it commemorates temple of Diana Planciana with statue which was paid by moneyer in 55 BC. The temple stood between Quirinal and Viminal.
Johny SYSEL
Gordian_III_Temple_wAsklepios.JPG
Gordian III Temple wAsklepios14 viewsGordian III Nicopolis AE 26 Temple of Asklepios MOESIA INFERIOR. Nicopolis ad Istrum mint. AE 26 mm, 13.34 g. Obv.: Radiate, draped
bust right. Legend in Greek. Rev.: Temple with statue of Asklepios inside or possibly Herakles according to H/J 8.36.46.6 Legend in Greek.
Romanorvm
Gordian_III_Temple_wTyche.jpg
Gordian III Temple wTyche26 viewsBronze AE 26, OBV: laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right;
REV: Tetrastyle temple containing statue of Tyche with rudder in right and cornucopia in left; nice style and grade; Varbanov II 3856-7 var (obv legend)
25.4mm, 9.455g

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins

RARE
1 commentsRomanorvm
gordian_k.jpg
Gordian III, AD 238-2445 viewsAE30, 13.9g, 12h; Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior
Obv.: AVT K M ANT ΓOPΔΙΑNOC AVΓ; laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right, from behind.
Rev.: VΠ CAB MOΔΕCTOV NIKOΠΟΛEITΩN ΠΡΟC ICTPON; Tetrastyle temple with turreted statue of Tyche within holding rudder and cornucopia, spear and shield on pediment.
Reference: Varbanov I 4230, p. 339; from the Collection of JBGood.
John Anthony
Gordian_temple.jpg
GORDIAN III. DEULTUM THRACE6 viewsGORDIAN III. DEULTUM THRACE AE 23 Cult statue of Aphrodite & vase within tetrastyle temple viewed in perspective. Varbanov 2277.Ancient Aussie
ANCIENT_GREEK_Apollonia_Pontica.jpg
Gorgon, Greek, Apollonia Pontica355 viewsSilver Drachm
Obverse : Gorgon Facing with tongue protruding.
Reverse :Upturned anchor, crayfish and A to either side.
Apollonia Pontica Mint , 450 - 404 BC ( Before Christ ).

XF , Max Dia 14mm , 2.9 gr. scarce.
References : SNG 160f

Historical & Numismatic Note:
This is a scarce and interesting authentic ancient silver drachm from Apollonia Pontika.
Apollonia Pontika was a Greek colony on the Black sea in Thrace. It was settled around 600 B.C., and was first called Antheia before being renamed after the town's most prominent feature, a Temple dedicated to Apollo centering around a colossal statue of the Greek God. The city's name means, literally, “City Of Apollo On The Black Sea.” This coin features a spectacular image of Medusa on the obverse side. In ancient Greek mythology, if you gazed at Medusa's face you would immediately turn to stone. Perseus overcame this obstacle, slaying Medusa and using her head to adorn the face of his shield. And despite it's frightening visage, the image of Medusa was used as a protection talisman in many of these ancient Greek societies. The reverse of this coin shows the city's connection with the Black Sea, and displays an anchor turned upside down, flukes up, as if it were hanging off the edge of a ship. There is a crawfish to the right and an A, for Apollonia Pontika, to the left.


Mrs. Amy Savasta - Gauthier Collection.

EX The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
The_Lion_of_Amphipolis.jpg
Greece, Amphipolis: The Lion of Amphipolis182 viewsThe first pieces of this rather grand monument were discovered near the banks of the River Strymon in 1912 by Greek soldiers during the Second Balkan War. Further finds were made in 1916 and in 1930-32 during the creation of Lake Kerkini. The Lion was restored (and partly reconstructed) in 1937.

The sculpted Lion itself is 5.3m tall, on its base it stands over 8m high. It is plausibly dated to the late 4th century BCE. Recent work on the Kasta Tomb, which is about 4km distant, has revealed further fragments also apparently belonging to the Lion and it may be the case that the Lion originally surmounted that tomb and was only later moved to its present location.

Nobody knows what or who the monument commemorates; perhaps ongoing work on the Kasta Tomb will illuminate matters. A quite similar, somewhat smaller, statue, the “The Lion of Chaeronea”, honours the Sacred Band of Thebes, which was wiped out at the battle of Chaeronea in 338 BCE. But while several ancient sources (including Pausanias and Strabo) mention the Chaeronea lion and the circumstances of its construction, there is no ancient record of the Amphipolis lion.
1 commentsAbu Galyon
DSC00767.jpg
Greece, Delphi - The Charioteer of Delphi281 viewsThe life-size statue of a chariot driver was found in 1896 at the Sanctuary of Apollo in Delphi. It is now in the Delphi Archaeological Museum.

The statue was erected at Delphi in 474 BC, to commemorate the victory of a chariot team in the Pythian Games, which were held at Delphi every four years in honor of Pythean Apollo.

The beauty of this work is breathtaking.
1 commentsLloyd T
Charioteer_of_Delphi_resized.JPG
Greece, Delphi - The Charioteer of Delphi213 viewsThe life-size statue of a chariot driver was found in 1896 at the Sanctuary of Apollo in Delphi. It is now in the Delphi Archaeological Museum.

The statue was erected at Delphi in 474 BC, to commemorate the victory of a chariot team in the Pythian Games, which were held at Delphi every four years in honor of Pythean Apollo.
Lloyd T
Head_of_the_Charioteer_of_Delphi_resized.JPG
Greece, Delphi - The Head of the Charioteer of Delphi240 viewsThe life-size statue of a chariot driver was found in 1896 at the Sanctuary of Apollo in Delphi. It is now in the Delphi Archaeological Museum.

The statue was erected at Delphi in 474 BC, to commemorate the victory of a chariot team in the Pythian Games, which were held at Delphi every four years in honor of Pythean Apollo.
Lloyd T
81874q00.jpg
Greek14 viewsAR diobol, Pergamon, Mysia 330-284 B.C.
Ob. Head of young Herakles clad in lions scalp.
Rev. Cult statue of Athena facing, calathus on head, drapery over the arms, spear in right, shield wuth hanging fillet in left.
nathan s2
Phrygia.jpg
Greek - Phrygia, Apameia3 viewsMetal/Size: AE22; Weight: 7.1 grams; Denomination: Drachm; Mint: Apameia, Phrygia; Date: 133-48 BCE; Obverse: Laureate head of Zeus head right. Reverse: Cult statue of Artemis Anaitis facing - Eglogistes (magistrate's) name: ANΔPON/ AΛKIOY to right (son of Alkios, magistrate)- ΑΠΑΜ[ΕΩ]/ to left. References: Sear #5121; SNG Cop. #177; BMC Phrygia p. 77, 48; HGC Vol. 7 #672.museumguy
003.JPG
Greek statuette19 viewsGreek statuette
Hollow moulded crude Tangara,
c. 3rd-4th cent BC
mauseus
youth.jpg
Greek Youth - British Museum634 viewsGreek statue of a youth with a 'bowl' haircut2 commentsBacchus
Alexander_III_the_Great_-_I_with_statue.png
Greek, Alexander III the Great - Tetradrachm - Amphipolis, Macedon586 viewsDate: 332-326 BC (lifetime)
Size: 25 mm
Weight: 17.4 g
Obv: Head of Herakles wearing lion's scalp right
Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, legs open, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right; amphora in left field
Price 13
5 commentsViriathus
Mysia_Pergamon_Diobol_Herakles_Athena_Q-001_h,_1,25_g,_10_mm-s.jpg
Greek, Mysia, Pergamon, (Early 3rd Cent. B.C.), AR-Diobol, McClean 7668, ΠERΓAMH, Cult statue of Athena facing,192 viewsMysia, Pergamon, (Early 3rd Cent. B.C.), AR-Diobol, McClean 7668, ΠERΓAMH, Cult statue of Athena facing,
avers: Head of young beardless Herakles right.
revers: ΠERΓAMH, Cult statue of Athena facing, brandishing spear and holding shield.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: 10mm, weight: 1,25g, axes: 10h,
mint: Mysia, Pergamon,
date: Early 3rd Cent. B.C., ref: McClean 7668
Q-001
quadrans
KINGS_of_PERGAMON__Attalos_I_to_Eumenes_II__241-159_BC.jpg
Greek, Philetairos, Kings of Pergamon, Attalos I to Eumenes II.473 viewsKINGS of PERGAMON. Attalos I to Eumenes II. 241-159 BC. AR Tetradrachm (29mm, 16.70 g, 12h). Struck circa 225/15-189/8. Laureate head of Philetairos right / Athena seated left, with spear at side, supporting shield with right hand and resting left elbow on small statuette on sphinx; ivy leaf above knee, bow to outer right, A on throne. Westermark Group III, dies V.XXIX/R?; SNG France 1609 (same obv. die). XF, porous. CNG auction.

Photo and Description , courtesy of Classical Numismatic Group, Inc.

Sam Mansourati Collection / EX CNG
7 commentsSam
Apameia.jpg
GREEK, Phrygia, Apameia, Zeus / Cult statue of Artemis Anaitis, 133-48 B.C.113 viewsBronze Æ21
8.60 gm, 21 mm
Laureate head of Zeus right
Cult statue of Artemis Anaïtis facing; AΠAME to right
ATTA/BIAN (magistrates) in two lines to left
Sear 5121var.; BMC Phrygia pg. 80, 61;
SNG Copenhagen 172.
2 commentsJaimelai
Rhodessta1.JPG
GREEK, Rhodes, AR Drachm58 viewsSilver drachm minted in the city of Rhodes, under magistrate Stasion.

Circa 205 - 190 B.C.

The obverse with a beautiful facing head portrait of the famous patron deity of the City, Helios. He is shown with wind blown hair and facing slightly right.

The reverse with a blossoming rose, thunder bolt in left field, tendrils in right.

The legend above bearing the magistrates name and reading:

ΣTAΣIΩN

"Of Stasion"

The island nation of Rhodes, just off the Turkish mainland was a highly successful commercial centre in antiquity. The Island also boasted one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, the Colossus of Rhodes. The Colossus was a monstrous statue, standing over 98 feet tall, that stood at the entrance to the city's harbour and depicted the island's patron god, Helios.

The widely traded coinage of Rhodes also proudly displayed the image of their god on the obverse. While the reverse employs a visual pun on the City name, as the Greek word for Rose is Rhodon.

Diameter: 15 mm.

Weight: 2.60 g
1 commentssuperflex
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GREEK, Thrace. Apollonia Pontika.53 viewsApollonia Pontika was a colony of Miletos, the city boasted a fine temple of Apollo with a statue by the sculptor Kalamis. Circa 450-400 BC, AR drachm. Obv.: upturned anchor, crayfish to left, A to right. Rev.: Gorgoneionseleukoy
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GREEK. Ephesos AR Tetradrachm. Hecatomnus Hoard (1977).111 viewsCirca 405-390 BC (21mm, 14.95 g, 12h). Aristainetos, magistrate. Hecatomnus 53b (O11/R48 – this coin); SNG Kayhan –; Winterthur 2904 (same obverse die). Obverse: bee with curved wings. Reverse: forepart of stag right, head left; palm tree to left (off flan), APIΣTAINETO[Σ] to right. Toned, VF. Struck on a tight flan.

Ex Hecatomnus Hoard (CH V, 17; CH VIII, 96; and CH IX, 387). Ex CNG Electronic Auction 338, lot 85.

The bee, palm tree and the stag are emblems of Ephesos. This city was an important center of worship of the Greek goddess Artemis, and the images on Ephesian coinage represent her. Ephesos also used the bee on its coins since it was a producer of honey, so the bee advertised their most famous product. The bee was also mythologically connected to Ephesos because, according to Philostratos, the colonizing Athenians were led to Ephesos in Ionia by the Muses who took the form of bees. Ephesos occupied the alluvial plain of the lower Cayster, but it owed its chief wealth and renown less to the produce of its soil than to the illustrious sanctuary of the old Anatolian nature-goddess, whom the Ionian Greeks identified with Artemis, the Goddess of Hunt. It is noteworthy that the high-priest of the temple of Artemis was called Ηεσσην, ‘the king bee,’ while the virgin priestesses bore the name of “melissai” or Honey-Bees. The stag was regarded as sacred to her and stag figures were said to have flanked the cult statue of Artemis in her temple at Ephesos. The palm tree alludes to Artemis’ birthplace, the island of Delos, where the goddess Leto gave birth to Artemis and her twin brother Apollo underneath a palm tree. Therefore, the coin might represent the city’s origin as well.

The earlier type tetradrachmae of Ephesos could be identified by the curved pair of wings of the bee on the obverse side of these coins. It is roughly estimated that a total of about less than a hundred of these tetradrachmae exist as compared to the straight wing bee variant of later emissions, which are believed to be seven to eight times more common than the former. These estimates are based on the findings and studies made after the discoveryof the Hecatomnus and Pixodarus hoards in 1977 and 1978, respectively. Prior to their discovery, there were only about 35 of these curved wing tetradrachmae recorded in existence.
1 commentsJason T
1428_Hadrian_Sardis2.jpg
Hadrian - Sardis13 viewsAR Cistophoric tetradrachm
128-138 AD
head right
HADRIANVS__AVGUSTVS P P
facing cult statue of Kore, headdress with plume, stiff robe falling to feet and veil draped over wrists; grain ear on both sides
COS__III
RIC 510; RSC 279; Metcalf Typ 47.

overstruck over cistophoric tetradrachm of Augustus

ex Savoca
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
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Hadrian AR Denarius17 viewsObv: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS - Laureate head right, slight drapery on left shoulder.
COS III - Concordia seated left on throne, holding patera and resting left arm on statuette of Spes on column at side of throne.
Date: 125 - 128 AD
Mint: Rome
Ref: RIC II 172, RSC II 328
oa
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Hadrian Cistophoric Tetradrachm - Statue of Kore (RIC 510)117 viewsAR Cistophoric Tetradrachm struck over earlier Cistophorus,
likely of Augustus.
Sardis mint, c.128 CE
10.40g

Obv: Bare head of Hadrian (R)
HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P

Rev: Cult statue of Kore facing,
between wheat stalk on left & wheat stalk & poppy on right.
COS III

RIC510(R5), RSC279, BMC1075

Ex. D Hendy collection
7 commentsKained but Able
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Hadrian Denarius42 viewsHadrian, AR denarius (3.09g) IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG Laureate heroic bust right, drapery on far shoulder. / P M TR P COS II Concordia seated left, holding patera, and resting on statue of Spes, CONCORD in exergue.

RSC 328a. RIC 39b

2 commentsTanit
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Hadrian Denarius44 views
Hadrian Denarius. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate, heroic bust right, drapery on far shoulder / P M TR P COS II, Concordia seated left holding patera, resting elbow on statue of Spes, cornucopaie below throne, CONCORD in ex. RSC 252a. RIC 39b 3.15 gr. _sold
1 commentsAntonio Protti
Hadrian_Denarius_Concordia.jpg
Hadrian Denarius Concordia82 viewsObv.
IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIAN OPT AVG GER DAC
Laureate & Cuirassed bust right


Rev.
PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AVG P P M TR P COS P P
CONCORD in ex.
Concordia enthroned left holding patera, arm on statue of Spes, cornucopiae below

Minted in first year of the reign, 117 A.D.

18mm 3.3g

Curtis Clay says,


"The earliest issue of Hadrian's reign, notable for giving him five honorary titles of Trajan, namely Optimus, Germanicus, Dacicus, Parthicus, and Pater Patriae, all of which however disappeared from his second issue of coins.

Obviously the Senate, upon hearing of Trajan's death in Cilicia and Hadrian's accession at Antioch, voted Hadrian these titles, and the mint immediately put them on the coins, but Hadrian modestly refused the titles, causing them to disappear from the coinage. It would have taken a month or so for news of the Senatorial awards to reach Hadrian in Antioch, and then for news of Hadrian's rejection of the titles to get back to Rome."
5 commentsancientdave
Hadrian_Denarius_Concordia_2.jpg
Hadrian Denarius Concordia 2100 viewsObv.
IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIAN OPT AVG GER DAC
Laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder


Rev.
PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AVG P P M TR P COS P P
CONCORD in ex.
Concordia enthroned left holding patera, arm on statue of Spes, cornucopiae below

Minted in first year of the reign, 117 A.D.

19mm 3.60g


Curtis Clay says,


"The earliest issue of Hadrian's reign, notable for giving him five honorary titles of Trajan, namely Optimus, Germanicus, Dacicus, Parthicus, and Pater Patriae, all of which however disappeared from his second issue of coins.

Obviously the Senate, upon hearing of Trajan's death in Cilicia and Hadrian's accession at Antioch, voted Hadrian these titles, and the mint immediately put them on the coins, but Hadrian modestly refused the titles, causing them to disappear from the coinage. It would have taken a month or so for news of the Senatorial awards to reach Hadrian in Antioch, and then for news of Hadrian's rejection of the titles to get back to Rome."
4 commentsancientdave
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Hadrian RIC II, 39409 viewsHadrian 117- 138
AV - Aureus, 7.15g, 19mm
Rome 118
obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
bust draped and cuirassed, laureate head r.
rev. PM TRP COS II
Concordia sitting l., holding patera in extended r. hand and
leaning with l. ellbow on statuette of Spes; cornucopiae under throne
exergue: CONCORD
RIC II, 39(a); C.232; BMCR.59
about VF, traces of attachment (?)

CONCORDIA, personification of concord and harmony, worshipped as a goddess (first temple at Rome 367 BC). The symbolism of her attributes (cornucopiae, patera, sceptre, olive branch, flower, ears of corn, sometimes a statuette of Spes) suggests the benefits Concordia brings, and indicates a relationship between Concordia, Pax and Fides.




4 commentsJochen
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Hadrian, 117 - 138 AD34 viewsObv: IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA, laureate, cuirassed bust of Hadrian facing right, drapery on far shoulder.

Rev: PARTH F NER NEP PM TRP COS around, CONCORD in exergue; Concordia seated left on a throne holding a patera in her right hand, her left elbow rests on a statue of Spes facing left atop a short column; below the throne is a cornucopia.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 117 AD

3 grams, 19 mm, 180°

RIC II 9c, RSC 248a, VM 37/1
2 commentsSPQR Coins
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Hadrian, Ephesus26 viewsIONIA, Ephesus. Hadrian. AD 117-138. Æ (23mm, 10.25 g, 6h). Laureate head right / Cult statue of Artemis Ephesia within tetrastyle temple.Obv. ΑΥT ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕ Laureate head right Rev: ΕΦΕ-СΙΩΝ tetrastyle temple within which cult statue of Artemis Ephesia with supports RPC III 2061. BMC 229; SNG von Aulock 1885. good fine, pale green patina,
Ancient Aussie
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Hadrian, RIC 561a, Sestertius of AD 119 (Jupiter Victor)26 viewsÆ Sestertius (23.9g, Ø 33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 119.
Obv.: IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG, laureate bust of Hadrian facing right, drapery on far shoulder.
Rev.: PONT MAX TR POT COS III (around) S C (in ex.), Jupiter seated left holding Victory statuette and sceptre.
RIC 561; BMCRE 1146; Cohen 1185; Strack 533; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-2) 599 (30 spec.).
ex G. Henzen (1994).

This issue is connected with the suppression of a revolt in Britain in AD 117 (see Strack p.70 : Expeditio Britannica)
Charles S
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Hadrianus (117-138) denarius (AR)42 viewsObv.: IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG (Heroic, laureate bust right) Rev.: P M TR P COS III (Concordia std. left, patera in right hand, left elbow resting on statue of Spes, cornucopiae under seat) Exergue: CONCORD Diameter: 18.52 mm. Weight: 3.40 g. RIC 118b

Gift from my girlfriend.
1 commentsNick.vdw