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Search results - "sacra"
Maximian_RIC_Aquileia_29b_tflip.jpg
2 Maximian42 viewsMAXIMIANUS
AE1 Follis. 300 AD
IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right / SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales & cornucopia, AQP in ex.
RIC Aquileia 29b
Sosius
con30abc.jpg
CONSTANTIUS I CHLORUS, FOLLIS RIC 30a Aquilia, 300 CE 19 viewsObverse: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right.
Reverse: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Monet standing left holding scales and cornucopia.
AQT in ex., 27.92mm., 9.4 g,
NORMAN K
RI_071ab_img.jpg
071 - Elagabalus denarius - RIC 14621 viewsDenarius
Obv:– IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing half-left, sacraficing over a patera over an altar and holds a branch. Star in left field
Minted in Rome. A.D. 222 onwards
Reference– BMC 232. RIC 146. RSC III 276.

Remanants of star in right field. The die having been re-engraved to place the star correctly in front of the emperor.
maridvnvm
106a.jpg
106a Diocletian. AE follis21 viewsobv: IMP DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR Moneta std. l. holding scales and cornucopia
ex: -V//AQS
hill132
RI_109a_img.jpg
109 - Valerian II - RIC 0097 viewsObv:– DIVO VALERIANO CAES, Radiate & draped bust right
Rev:– CONSACRATIO, Eagle flying right, bearing the deceased young Caesar to heaven.
Minted in Rome (Posthumous issue). A.D. 257-258
Reference(s) – RIC 9. RSC 5.

4.13 gms, 22.36mm. 180 degrees.
maridvnvm
110h.jpg
110h Maximianus Herculius. AE follis25 viewsobv: IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: SACRA MONETA VCC ET CAESS NOSTR Moneta l. holding scales and cornucopiae
ex: -V/AQP
hill132
111d.jpg
111d Galerius Maximianus. AE follis 48 viewsobv: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES laur. head r.
rev: SACRA MONETA VCC ET CAESS NOSTR Moneta holding scales ad cornucopiae
ex:*-A/SIS
hill132
Diocletianus_AE-27_IMP-DIOCLETIANVS-P-F-AVG_SACRA-MONET-AVGG-ET-CAESS-NOSTR_-V_AQP_Aquilea-RIC-VI-31a_p-_301-AD_Q-001_6h_26-27mm_7,73g-s.jpg
119a Diocletianus (284-305 A.D.), Aquilea, RIC VI 031a, AE-Follis, -/V//AQP, SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, #1125 views119a Diocletianus (284-305 A.D.), Aquilea, RIC VI 031a, AE-Follis, -/V//AQP, SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, #1
avers: IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: SACRA MONET AVG G ET CAES S NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia.
exergue: -/V//AQP, diameter: 26-27mm, weight: 7,73g, axis: 6h,
mint: Aquilea, date:301 A.D., ref: RIC VI 31a, p-,
Q-001
quadrans
Diocletianus_AE-27_Siscia-RIC-VI-134a_p-469_301-AD_Q-001_6h_27-29mm_8,58g-s.jpg
119a Diocletianus (284-305 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 134a, AE-Follis, */Γ/SIS, SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, #1102 views119a Diocletianus (284-305 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 134a, AE-Follis, */Γ/SIS, SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, #1
avers: IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: SACRA MONET AVG G ET CAES S NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia.
exergue: */Γ/SIS, diameter: 27-29mm, weight: 5,85g, axis: 6h,
mint: Siscia, date:301 A.D., ref: RIC VI 134a, p-469,
Q-001
quadrans
Diocletianus_AE-29_IMP-DIOCLETIANVS-P-F-AVG_SACRA-MONET-AVG-G-ET-CAES-S-NOSTR_-A_CrescSIS_Siscia-RIC-VI-138a_var__p-469_303-AD_Q-001_1h_28-29,5mm_9,56-s.jpg
119a Diocletianus (284-305 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 138a, AE-Follis, -/A/ᴗSIS, SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, #1130 views119a Diocletianus (284-305 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 138a, AE-Follis, -/A/ᴗSIS, SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, #1
avers: IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: SACRA MONET AVG G ET CAES S NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia.
exergue: -/A/ᴗSIS, diameter: 28,0-29,5mm, weight: 9,56g, axis: 1h,
mint: Siscia, date:303 (?) A.D., ref: RIC VI 138a, p-469,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Constantius-I_AE-Follis_CONSTANTIVS_NOB_CAES_SACRAMONET-AVGG-ET-CAESS-NOSTR_PTdot_RIC_VI_46a_p-286_Ticinum_300-303_AD_Q-001_axis-11h_25,5-26,5mm_8,60g-s.jpg
121 Constantius I. Chlorus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-306 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VI 046a, AE-1 Follis, SACRAMONET AVG G ET CAES S NOSTR, Moneta standing left, #1270 views121 Constantius I. Chlorus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-306 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VI 046a, AE-1 Follis, SACRAMONET AVG G ET CAES S NOSTR, Moneta standing left, #1
avers:- CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right.
revers:- SACRAMONET AVG G ET CAES S NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia.
exerg: -/-//PT•, diameter: 25,5-26,5mm, weight: 8,60g, axes: 11h,
mint: Ticinum, date:300-303 A.D., ref: RIC VI 046a,,
Q-001
quadrans
antpius-RIC70.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AR denarius - struck 140-143 AD26 viewsobv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III (bare head right)
rev: GENIVS POP ROMANI (Genius standing front, head right, with scepter & cornucopiae)
ref: RIC III 70, RSC 405 (6frcs), BMC 207
3.15gms, 18mm

The Roman genius, representing man's natural optimism, always endeavoured to guide him to happiness; that man was intended to enjoy life is shown by the fact that the Roman spoke of indulging or cheating his genius of his due according as he enjoyed himself or failed to do so, when he had the opportunity. The genius publicus Populi Romani - probably distinct from the genius Urbis Romae, to whom an old shield on the Capitol was dedicated, stood in the forum near the temple of Concord, in the form of a bearded man, crowned with a diadem, and carrying a cornucopiae and sceptre. In imperial times the genius of Augustus and of the reigning emperor, as part of the sacra of the imperial family, were publicly worshipped. The reverse probably commemorate this (the scepter as Genius attributum is unusual).
berserker
faustina_I_RIC343.jpg
138-161 AD - FAUSTINA Senior AR denarius - struck 150 AD41 viewsobv: DIVA FAVSTINA (draped bust right)
rev: AED DIV FAVSTINAE (front view of temple of six columns on five steps, fencing before, statue of Faustina within)
ref: RIC III 343 (S) (AntPius), RSC 1 (10frcs), BMC 339
3.34gms, 18mm,
Scarce

This coin represents the aedes, or templum, with which, after her death, the elder Faustina was honoured by Antoninus Pius. According to Capitolinus, it was situated in the Via Sacra, and was at first dedicated to Faustina alone. But, after the decease of the husband, religious rites were paid therein to him also. A nice coin with an image of a building which still stands today in Rome.
berserker
coins388.JPG
320. Carus21 viewsSMSXXI expands to SACRA MONETA SISCIENSIS (HOLY MONEY OF SISCIA) + XXI which is the "value mark" of antoniniani after Aurelian's monetary reform of 274 CE.

RIC V-II 111 R
ecoli
coin200.JPG
402. Maximianus53 viewsMarcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Herculius (c. 250 - July, 310), known in English as Maximian, was Roman Emperor (together with Diocletian) from March 1, 286 to 305.

Born to a poor family near Sirmium (city in Pannonia), Maximian made a career in the army until 285, when the new emperor Diocletian, a friend of his, made him caesar (sub-emperor) and the ruler of the western part of the empire. The next year Maximian became augustus next to Diocletian, and in 293, when Diocletian introduced the Tetrarchy, Constantius Chlorus became Maximian's caesar and married Maximian's daughter Flavia Maximiana Theodora.

During his reign, Maximianus had several military successes, against the Alemanni and Burgundians in northern Germany, against the Carpi on the Danube frontier and against Carausius, who had rebelled in Britain and declared himself emperor there. He also strengthened the frontier defenses in Africa.

On May 1, 305, Diocletian and Maximian retired together; it is clear that this was not a voluntary act of Maximian's, but that he was forced to do so by Diocletian. Galerius and Constantius Chlorus became the new emperors; Flavius Valerius Severus and Maximinus Daia became their caesars. When Constantius died the next year, Maximian's son Maxentius took the western emperorship, and named Maximian to be his augustus. Maximian resolved the conflicts around this emperorship by defeating Severus and Galerius in battle and bringing Constantius' son Constantine on his side by having Constantine marry his daughter Fausta.

However, in 308 Maximian rebelled against his own son, and marched upon Rome, but was beaten and forced to find refuge with Constantine in Gaul. In 310 he declared himself emperor for the third time, but was unable to defend himself against Constantine, who forced him to commit suicide.

For his own and his colleagues' victories, Maximian received the titles Germanicus Maximus V, Sarmaticus Maximus III, Armeniacus Maximus, Medicus Maximus, Adiabenicus Maximus, Persicus Maximus II, Carpicus Maximus, Britannicus Maximus.

Maximianus 286-305, Reform Follis - Siscia Mint
9.16g
Obv: Bust of Maximianus right "IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG"
Rev: Moneta standing left holding a scale and cornucopiae "SACRA MONET AVGG E CAESS NOSTR" "SIS" in the exergue.
RIC 134b
ecoli
47- Diocletian Follis.JPG
47-Diocletian Follis #2-S61 viewsAE Follis, 303-305 AD, Rome Mint.
Obv: IMP C DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG, Laureate head right.(Double struck).
Rev: SACRA MON VRB AVGG ET CAESS NN, Moneta standing with scales and cornucopia.
R(crescent)P in exergue.
27mm, 9.7gm
RIC 111a, Sear 3537
1 commentsjdholds
50- Maximianus-3.JPG
50-Maximianus-3-S40 viewsAE Follis, 286-305, Ticinum mint
Obv: IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR. Moneta.
standing with scales and cornucopia.
TT* in exergue
29mm 10.1gm
VM 43, RIC 47b
jdholds
51- Maximianus-4.JPG
51- Maximianus #4-S29 viewsAE Follis, 286-305 AD , Aquileia mint.
Obv: IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, Laureate head right
Rev: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR. Moneta.
standing with scales and cornucopia. Crescent left, III right.
AQP in exergue
26mm , 8.2gm
RIC 29b, VM43

jdholds
Valerian-II-RIC-9.jpg
52. Valerian II.17 viewsAntoninianus, 258 - 259 AD, Lugdunum mint.
Obverse: DIVO VALERIANO CAES / Radiate bust of Valerian II.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO / Eagle bearing Valerian to heaven.
2.76 gm., 21 mm.
RIC #9; Sear #10606.
Callimachus
arch of Titus.jpg
arch of Titus60 viewsPart of the Arch of Titus showing the spoils from the destruction of the Temple in JerusalemTitus Pullo
Clavdivs II consacratio.jpg
Claudius II CONSACRATIO222 viewsAntoninianus 21-23mm 3.59g 270 AD
OBV::DIVO CLAVDIO. Radiated head right with 1 pellet under head
REV::CONSACRATIO. Flaming altar with horned roof. 4 panels on altar each with single pellet
Cyzicus Mint
LaVenera Volume I (10924) ....( single coin listed )
Göbl 288a1 ( 15 specimen listed )

purchased 12/08/2007
1 commentsJohnny
4649_4650.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Antoninianus, CONSACRATIO7 viewsAE Antoninianus
Claudius II Gothicus
Augustus: 268 - 270AD
Issued Posthumously: 270AD
18.5 x 12.5mm
O: DIVO CLAVDIO; Radiate head, right.
R: CONSACRATIO; Lighted altar with four panels, dot in each panel.
Exergue: Obverse, (dot)(dot).
Cyzicus Mint
LaVenera Vol. 1 10924; Goebl 288a1.
Aorta: 498: B14, O17, R135, T4, M3.
aitorazpeitia 321138576406
6/12/13 3/6/17
Nicholas Z
DSCN6934.JPG
Claudius II, AE Antoninianus, 22mm6 viewsClaudius II, AE Antoninianus,

Obv. DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right
Rev. CONSACRATIO, Flaming altar with horned roof. 4 panels on altar, dot in each panel.
Lee S
consacratio_2.JPG
Cologne - consécration de Victorin par Tetricus Ier - (fin 271) - CONSACRATIO14 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO
tête radiée et buste nu à droite
CONSACRATIO
Aigle debout sur un globe et tenant une couronne
EG 289
Cunetio 2633
RIC 83
Elmer 785
AGK 1a
de Witte 18
Cohen (23)
PYL
consacratio.JPG
Cologne - consécration de Victorin par Tetricus Ier - (fin 271) - CONSACRATIO11 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO
tête radiée et buste cuirassé avec un pan du paludamentum sur l'épaule gauche
CONSACRATIO
Aigle debout sur un globe et tenant une couronne
EG 287
Cunetio ...
RIC ...
Elmer ...
AGK 1b
de Witte 17
Cohen (24)
PYL
Constance_Ier_Chlore_15.jpg
Constance Ier Chlore - 4299 viewsFL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
MONETA SACRA AVGG ET CAESS NN
*
ATR
RIC 429 (première Tétrarchie - 5e émission - 300/301)
inconnu pour cette officine
ZSCHUCKE 205c (6b émission - 301)
PYL
coin_4_quart.jpg
CONSTANS PF AVG / GLORIA EXERCITVS AE4 follis (337-350 A.D.)29 viewsCONSTANS - PF AVG, (laurel and?) rosette-diademed, draped (and cuirassed?) bust right / GLORI - A EXER - CITVS, two soldiers facing each other, holding spears and shields, with one standard between them, the device on banner difficult to discern, maybe a little dot or O. Mintmark: SMTSA or SMTSΔ in exergue.

AE4, 16mm, 1.37g, die axis 12 (medal alignment), material: bronze/copper-based alloy

P F AVG = Pius Felix Augustus = the pius (dutiful) and fortunate (happy) emperor. Gloria Exercitus (noun + genitive) "The Glory of the Army", SMTSA/Δ= Sacra Moneta Thessalonica, officina A or Δ (i. e. workshop #1 or #4).

CONSTANS - PF AVG legend and Thessalonica mint for a one standard design point at just a single type: RIC VIII Thessalonica 57, with both SMTSA and SMTSΔ mintmarks possible. Minting date listed for this type is late, 346-348 A.D.

Flavius Julius Constans Augustus. Born c. 323. The third and youngest son of Constantine the Great and his second wife Fausta. Caesar since Dec 333 (to his father, who was the only Augustus before his death in 337 -- and together with his brothers Costantine II (eldest) and Constantius II (middle), who were elevated to caesars earlier).

Augustus since Sept 337, also joint with his brothers (Constantius got the East while the other brothers shared the West). At first he was under guardianship of Constantine II, but that relationship was very quarrelsome. In 340 Constantine II was killed in an ambush during military operations against Constans' troops in Italy, and Constans inherited his portion (i.e. the whole West) of the Empire.

As an emperor Constans led a few successful military campaigns and was also known for his activity regarding religions: was tolerant to Judaism, promulgated an edict banning pagan sacrifices, suppressed Donatism in Africa and championed Nicene Orthodoxy against Arianism (which was supported by Constantius, this led to open warfare between the brothers). He was openly homosexual, which ultimately led to his downfall: the army was tired of the rule of Constans' favorites and barbarian bodyguards, of whom he was very fond of. Assassinated by usurper Magnentius, who led the army revolt, in Feb 350. His only remaining brother, Constantius later defeated Magnentius and consolidated the whole empire under himself.
Yurii P
ConstantineII.jpg
Constantine II27 viewsConstantine II as Caesar 317-337 ad
sone of Constantine the great
AE3
obv. Constantine II right, diademed and draped
CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C (junior noble caesar)
rev. millitary camp gate w/ 2 turrets
PROVIDENTIAE CAESS (for thought of the 2 caesars)
SMKD (sacra, moneta kyzikus delta)
randy h2
Constantine I- City of Constantinopolis Commemorative Victory.jpg
Constantine The Great- City of Constantinopolis Commemorative Victory132 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Obverse:
CONSTAN-TINOPOLI, Constantinopolis' helmeted bust left in imperial cloak and holding scepter across left shoulder

City of Constantinople Commemorative, 334 -335 A.D.

Reverse:
Victory standing left, foot on prow or ship, holding spear and shield. The Constantinopolis coin depicts the foot of Victory on a prow, which is the bow of a ship.

Domination: Silver, Size: 18 mm. Rare to see so much silvering on a Constantinopolis, but it always seems to be Alexandria that it survives on.

Mint: exergue is SMALB (Sacra Moneta ALexandria officina B second officina), which is Alexandria. RIC VII Alexandria 64 r1 A.D. 333-335.

Coin rated: Very Fine
4 commentsJohn Schou
coin11_quart.jpg
CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG (the 1st) / GLORIA EXERCITVS AE3 follis (306-337 A.D.) 23 viewsCONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, (laureate?) and rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields, facing each other, two standards between them, dots on banners. Mintmark SMKB in exergue

AE3, 17.5-19mm, 1.50g, die axis 12 (medal alignment), material: bronze/copper-based alloy

MAX AVG = Maximus Augustus, the Great Emperor, Gloria Exercitus (noun + genitive) "The Glory of the Army", SMKB = Sacra Moneta of Cyzicus (Κύζικος, now Erdek, Balıkesir Province, Turkey), officina #2

Because of the horrible surface it was very difficult to determine the type of this coin. And then I suddenly realized that the head breaks the obverse legend, and so even though it is mostly undecipherable, this immediately excludes all the ...IVN NOB C types of the three Constantine's sons. And thus we can be sure that it is a ...MAX AVG obverse of the father! By carefully looking at the second part of the legend and counting the letters I have confirmed that it is indeed NVS...AVG. Of course, the larger size and the general outlook of the head also points towards Constantine I.

The mintmark is, luckily, much more readable and with significant certainty one can see SMKB. Which points towards RIC VII Cyzicus 78 type. There is a good WildWinds example of a different officina of the same type: http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/ric/constantine/_cyzicus_RIC_vII_078.4.jpg The sources mention that this coin was minted on 330-335 A.D.

Constantine I the Great (reign 306-337), see more info at
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-147487
Yurii P
coin_5_quart.jpg
CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG (the 1st) / GLORIA EXERCITVS AE3/4 follis (306-337 A.D.)19 viewsCONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, (laurel and?) rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers standing inward facing each other, holding spears, shields and two standards between them, "dot" (clearly filled) on banners. Mintmark: SMNE (?) in exergue.

AE3/4, 16.5-17mm, 2.46g, die axis 12 (medal alignment), material: bronze/copper-based alloy

MAX AVG = Maximus Augustus, the Great Emperor, Gloria Exercitus (noun + genitive) "The Glory of the Army", SMNE = Sacra Moneta Nicomedia, "officina epsilon", i. e. workshop#5.

Limiting information to only what is known for sure: the legends with the particular breaks, two standards and four-letter mintmark starting with SM, we conclude that this is definitely Constantine I, and only 3 mints are possible: SMN... Nicomedia (RIC VII Nicomedia 188), SMH... Heraclea (RIC VII Nicomedia 111) and SMK... Cyzicus (RIC VII Cyzicus 76-79). All are minted in 330-335 A.D. If the mintmark is indeed SMN..., two variations are listed: rosette-diademed and laurel- and rosette-diademed (laurels typically designated by longish shapes and rosettes as squares with dots). Since the obverse is worn, it is difficult to judge which one is the case here. One can definitely see the rosettes, but as for laurels... probably, not. Officina may be E or S, but I think E fits better.

Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus, aka Constantine the Great, aka Saint Constantine, born 27 Feb c. 272 to Flavius Valerius Constantius (aka Constantius I), a Roman Army officer of Illyrian origins, and a Greek woman of low birth Helena (aka Saint Helena). His father became Caesar, the deputy emperor in the west, in 293 AD. Constantine was sent east, where he rose through the ranks to become a military tribune under Emperors Diocletian and Galerius. In 305, Constantius raised himself to the rank of Augustus, senior western emperor, and Constantine was recalled west to campaign under his father in Britannia (Britain). Constantine was acclaimed as emperor by the army at Eboracum (modern-day York) after his father's death in 306 AD, and he emerged victorious in a series of civil wars against Emperors Maxentius and Licinius to become sole ruler of both west and east by 324 AD. He did so many a great deed that there is no point to list them here. Best known for (having some sort of Christ-related mystical experience in 312, just before the decisive Battle of the Milvian Bridge with Maxentius) being the first Roman Emperor to convert to Christianity and for being a champion of this faith, in particular, he played an influential role in the proclamation of the Edict of Milan in 313, which declared religious tolerance for Christianity in the Roman empire, and called the First Council of Nicaea in 325 that produced the statement of Christian belief known as the Nicene Creed. Died 22 May 337, famously being baptized on his deathbed. Succeeded by his 3 sons: Constantine II, Constantius II and Constans.
Yurii P
TC-03.jpg
Constantius I (A.D. 305-306)25 viewsSilvered Follis, A.D. 302-303 (As Caesar), Rome, 30.1mm, 8.45g, 180°, RIC VI 104a.
Obv: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES. Laureate head right.
Rev: SACRA MON VRB AVGG ET CAESS NN. Moneta standing left, scale in right, cornucopia in left; star in field, RT in ex.
Joseph D5
Constantius_Moneta_T_club.jpg
Constantius I Chlorus - AE follis9 viewsRome
300-301 AD
laureate head right
CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
Moneta standing slightly left, holding scales and cornucopia
SACRA MON VRB AVGG ET CAESS NN
T club
RIC VI Rome 102a
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
201909098FKGAZ8VGvwQ5TfF_mwL0r_large.jpeg
Constantius I Chlorus as Caesar. AE Large Follis. 300-303 AD.8 viewsTicinum mint. (30 mm, 11.90 g).
Obv. CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right.
Rev. SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, right holding scales, left cornucopiae.
Ex. TT(dot).
RIC 46a
Ruslan K
Constantius I D 1.jpg
Constantius I Chlorus Follis52 viewsAE Follis. Obv.: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES ; Rev.: SACRA MON VRB AVGG ET CAESS NN ; Moneta stg. l.Tanit
Constantius I D 2.jpg
Constantius I Follis36 viewsAE Follis.
Obv.: CONSTANTINVS NOB CAES
Rev.: SACRA MON VRB AVGG ET CAESS NN ; Moneta stg. l.
Tanit
Const_13.jpg
Constantius I Follis37 viewsAE Follis
Obv: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
Rev: SACRA MON VRB AVGG ET CAESS NN ; Moneta stg. l.
Tanit
00diocaquileia.jpg
DIOCLETIAN 18 viewsAE follis. Aquileia , 301 AD. 10.18 gm. Laureate head right. IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG. / Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia. SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR. In exergue AQP.
RIC VI 31 a.
Ex Barry P. Murphy.
benito
00diocletianmonet.jpg
DIOCLETIAN35 viewsAE follis. Aquileia , 301 AD. 10.18 gm. Laureate head right. IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG. / Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia. SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR. In exergue AQP.
RIC VI 31 a.
benito
00diocletianmonet2.jpg
DIOCLETIAN21 viewsAE Follis. Ticinum 300-303 AD. 10,74 grs. Laureate head right . IMP C DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG. / Moneta standing left holding scales and cornucopiae. SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR. In exergue ST (dot)
RIC 45 a.
benito
diocletiansacrasisg.jpg
Diocletian 284-305, AE Follis Sisca27 views Obv. IMP DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG Laureate head right
Rev. SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales & cornucopia.
SIS in exergue
1 commentsSkyler
Diocletian_Aquileia.png
Diocletian Aquileia13 viewsDiocletian
Reigned 284-305

O: IMP DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG, Laureate bust right

R: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae, AQS mintmark

RIC VI Aquileia 29a
Gao
2.jpg
Diocletian Billon Follis (300-301AD)36 viewsDiocletian Billion Follis circa 300-301AD
Ticinum mint 12.25gm
Obv: IMP C DIOCLETIANUS P F AVG
Laureate head (r)
Rev: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR
Moneta standing left holding scales and
Cornucopiae. ST in exgergue
Ric 43a
sean c2
diocl_follis.jpg
Diocletian Follis32 viewsAE Follis (Post-Reform)
Obv: IMP DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG
Rev: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR / TT dot in ex.; Moneta stg. l
Tanit
Diocletian~3.jpg
Diocletian Follis23 viewsAE Follis (Post-Reform)
Obv: IMP DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG
Rev: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR / PT dot in ex.; Moneta stg. l
Tanit
diocletian_103.jpg
Diocletian RIC VI, Ticinum 43(a)49 viewsDiocletian 284 - 305
AE - AE 2, 10.5g, 25mm
Ticinum 2. officina, ca. 300- 303
obv. IMP C DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG
laureate head r.
rev. SACRA MONET AVGG - CAESS NOSTR
Moneta standing l., r. holding scales, r. cornucopiae
exergue: ST dot
RIC VI, Ticinum 43(a); C.436
VF
added to www.wildwinds.com
1 commentsJochen
dio_new_com.JPG
Diocletian SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR RIC VI Ticinum 45a 52 viewsAE 28 mm 8.5 grams 300-303 AD
OBV :: IMP C DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG. Large Laureate head right
REV :: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing right holding scales and cornucopia
EX :: TT dot
REF :: RIC VI Ticinum 45a
Purchased 08/2010

new photo
1 commentsJohnny
diocletiansacrast.jpg
Diocletian, AE folis, Ticinum 38 views Obv. IMP C DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG, laureate head right
Rev. SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left holding scales and cornucopiae
STdot in exergue, RIC 45A, S
1 commentsSkyler
20190831z7MkpdS6lE193HYr_vfwfR_large.jpeg
Diocletian. AE Follis c. 300-303 AD.9 viewsTicinum (Pavia) mint,(27 mm, 11,3 g).
Obv. IMP C DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev. SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, right holding scales, left cornucopiae; ST· in exergue.
RIC VI Ticinum 43a.
Ruslan K
Diocletien_5.jpg
Dioclétien - 462a8 viewsIMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG
M SACRA AVGG ET CAESS NN
*
ATR
RIC 462a (première Tétrarchie - 5e émission - 300/301)
ZSCHUCKE 237a (7e émission - 301/302)
PYL
coin_7_ALL.jpg
DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG (the 2nd) / FEL TEMP REPARATIO AE3/4 follis (337-361 A.D.)36 viewsDN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right/ FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman in Phrygian helmet, who is reaching backwards. Mintmark SMHΔ (or A) in exergue.

AE3/4, 16-16.5+mm, 1.95g, die axis 12 (medal alignment), material: bronze/copper-based alloy

DN = Dominus Noster = Our Lord, P F AVG = Pius Felix Augustus = the pius (dutiful) and fortunate (happy) emperor, FELicium TEMPorum REPARATIO (or FELicis TEMPoris REPARATIO) = re-establishment of the happy times, SMH = Sacra Moneta Heraclea, officina #1 (alpha) or #4 (delta). Heraclea is now Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey.

Despite the second part of the obverse legend being almost lost, this can only be Constantius II: a Constans' coin would have had a break after DN CONSTA- and a Constantius Gallus' one wouldn't have had a pearl-diademed bust. Also, the last letters of the legend seem to be VG. Factoring in the Phrygian helmet and the reaching back stance of the horseman, very clear H in the mintmark (Heraclea) and absence of any field marks, we can conclude that this must be a variety of RIC VIII Heraclea 90 type. This type should be 17-19mm in size, which is also consistent with this coin. Some sources remark that the fallen horseman type was introduced by Constans and Constantius only in 348, so this coin can be dated 348-361 A.D.

Constantius II (caesar 324-, augustus 337-361), see more info at http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-147501
2 commentsYurii P
D281.jpg
Domitian RIC-28183 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.14g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: S C in exergue; Domitian stg. r., clasping hands over altar with officer stg. l.; behind officer, one soldier with standard and one soldier at r. with spear and shield
RIC 281 (R). BMC 301. BNC 321.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, June 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 182. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), acquired from the Heynen Collection; inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his greatest military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The Germanic triumph received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. This rare sestertius depicts a rather ambiguous scene showing Domitian, the much larger figure on the left, clasping hands with a legate over an altar while two legionaries stand by. What exactly is going on here is a mystery. Mattingly in BMCRE II believed it to be 'the taking of the sacramentum, the military oath'. Others have postulated the scene shows Domitian greeting Agricola upon his return from Britannia. The Agricola connection is highly unlikely. The type is struck for several more years, so it cannot be referring to one single 'event'. It's an intriguing scene in the context of the Germania Capta series, perhaps depicting a post victory ceremony. Whatever the meaning, the reverse strongly underscores Domitian's bond with the military.

This wonderful old cabinet toned piece is from the collection of the German portrait painter Fritz Reusing.

3 commentsDavid Atherton
EB0740_scaled.JPG
EB0740 Maximianus / Moneta16 viewsMaximianus 286-305, AE Follis, Aquileia 300.
Obverse: IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae. Mintmark AQP.
References: RIC VI Aquileia 29b; Sear 13300.
Diameter: 27mm, Weight: 10.111g.
EB
EB0845_scaled.JPG
EB0845 Valerian II / Flying9 viewsValerian II 253-255, Posthumous Antoninianus, 257-258 AD.
Obverse: DIVO VALERIANO CAES, radiate & draped bust right.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO, eagle flying right, bearing the deceased young Caesar to heaven.
References: RIC 9, Cohen 5.
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 2.676g.
EB
coin9_quart.jpg
FL CONSTANS NOB CAES / GLORIA EXERCITVS AE3/4 follis (333-350 A.D.) 26 viewsFL CONSTANS NOB CAES, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right / GLORI-A EXER-CITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with one standard between them, dot inside o on banner. Mintmark: SMT(SΔ) in exergue.

AE3/4, 16-17mm, 1.16g, die axis 6 (coin alignment), material: bronze/copper-based alloy.

FL = Flavius, NOB CAES = Nobilitas Caesar, Gloria Exercitus (noun + genitive) The Glory of the Army, SMTSΔ = Sacra Moneta Thessalonica, officina #4

Although only a part of the obverse legend is readable: FL CONSTANS...AES, reconstructing the rest is easy. And FL CONSTANS NOB CAES is not a very common legend, so that despite the fact that only the first letters of the mintmark are clearly identifiable: SMT..., it produces only one hit in the catalogs: RIC VII Thessalonica 226 with the mintmark SMTSΔ.

WildWinds have a good example of it: http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/ric/constans/_thessalonica_RIC_VII_226.jpg I think the style matches, with the same weird little device on the banner and exactly the same cuirass type. Too bad that the face on my coin is too damaged to see if it is really as strange-looking, but its outline seems to match. The notes indicate that it was minted in 335-341 A.D., which is a bit weird, because after 337 A.D. the usage of the Caesar title for Constans should have been discontinued...

Constans (caesar 333- , augustus 337-350), , see more info at
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-147486
Yurii P
Galere_14.jpg
Galère - 4319 viewsMAXIMIANVS NOBIL CAES
MONETA SACRA AVGG ET CAESS NN
*
ATR
RIC 431 (première Tétrarchie - 5e émission - 300/301)
ZSCHUCKE 198d (6e émission - 301)
PYL
Galere_17.jpg
Galère - 488b9 viewsMAXIMIANVS NOB CAES
M SACRA AVGG ET CAESS NN
*
ATR
RIC 488b (première Tétrarchie - 5e émission - 300/301)
ZSCHUCKE 237d (7e émission - 301/302)
PYL
galer.jpg
Galerius (305 - 311 A.D.)80 viewsÆ(S) Follis
O: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right.
R: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia, SIS in exergue, star in left field, B in right field.
Siscia 301 A.D.
10.08g
28mm
RIC VI 135b Siscia
5 commentsMat
galerius follis~0.jpg
GALERIUS (as Caesar) AE follis - 300-303 AD22 viewsobv:MAXIMIANVS.NOB.CAES (laureate head right, smaller portrait-head)
rev:SACRA.MONET.AVGG.-ET.CAESS.NOSTR (Moneta standing left holding scales & cornucopiae) / PT°
ref:RIC VI-Ticinum44b
9.16gms, 27mm
berserker
GAlerius1.jpg
Galerius - RIC VI 4a63 viewsTicinum 300-303 AD.
Galerius, as Caesar, AE Follis.
MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES Laureate head right /
SACRA MONETA AVGG ET CAESS NOSTRA, Moneta standing left, holding scales & cornucopiae,
PT• in ex.
2 commentsxokleng
Galerius_3.jpg
GALERIUS AE Follis8 viewsOBVERSE: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, laureate head right
REVERSE: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopiae in left, TT. in ex.
Struck at Ticinum 300-3 AD
12.3g, 27mm
RIC 46b
Legatus
Galerius1_opt.jpg
GALERIUS Follis, RIC 46b, Moneta34 viewsOBV: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, laureate head right
REV: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopiae in left, ST. in ex.
8.5g, 25mm

Minted at Ticinum, 300-3 AD
1 commentsLegatus
Galerius_Follis.jpg
Galerius Moneta Follis 104b18 viewsGalerius
Reigned as Caesar AD 293-305
Reigned as Augustus AD 305-311
Coin Struck AD 302-303
Silvered AE 1 Follis
Rome Mint
RIC VI Rome 104b

O: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, laureate bust right

R: SACRA MON VRB AVGG ET CAESS NN, Moneta standing left holding scales & cornucopiae, star in field, R Q in exergue
Gao
galerius_sacra.jpg
Galerius Sisca AE Follis 300 A.D.9 views Obv. MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, laureate bust right
Rev. SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta holding patera and cornucopiae.
star in left field,
starSIS in extruge, Gamma in right field, RIC 135b-G
Skyler
Galerius- Sacra Monet AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR.jpg
Galerius- Sacra Monet AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR49 viewsGalerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D.


Obverse:
Laurete head right

MAXIMIANVS NOB CAESS, Maximianus Noble Ceasar

MAXIMIANVS: Maximianus, in reality Galerius
NOB: Noble
CAESS: Caesar

Reverse:
SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, The emperors sacred money and our Caesars

SACRA : Sacred
MONET: Money
AVGG: Emperors
ET: And
CAESS: Caesars
NOSTR: Our

Moneta standing left holding scales in right and cornucopia in left. * in right field

Domination: Bronze Follis, size 27mm,

Mint: RQ in exe, Rome. * in right field. Dating to c. 302-3. RIC VI Rome 106b.



Explanation why this is Galerius, and not Maximianus. Doug Smith wrote a very good explanation, read this link: http://dougsmith.ancients.info/max.html
John Schou
05_IMG_1856q.JPG
Italy, Rome, Arch of Titus348 viewsThe Arch of Titus, on the Via Sacra, Rome, just to the south-east of the Roman Forum, was completed by Domitian in 96 A.D. to commemorate Titus' victories, including the Siege of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. The Arch of Titus has provided the general model for many of the triumphal arches erected since the 16th century—perhaps most famously it is the inspiration for the 1806 Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France, completed in 1836.1 commentsJohny SYSEL
RomaForoRomanoTempioAntoninoFaustina.JPG
Italy, Rome, Temple of Antoninus and Faustina, with the church of San Lorenzo in Miranda, view from Palatine Hill, May 2005.69 viewsTemple of Antoninus and Faustina, with the church of San Lorenzo in Miranda, view from Palatine Hill, May 2005. The Temple of Antoninus and Faustina is an ancient Roman temple in Rome, adapted as a Roman Catholic church, Chiesa di San Lorenzo in Miranda. It is in the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, opposite the Regia. The temple was begun by Antoninus Pius in 141 and was initially dedicated to his deceased and deified wife, Faustina the Elder. When Antoninus Pius was deified after his death in 161 AD, the temple was re-dedicated jointly to Antoninus and Faustina at the instigation of his successor, Marcus Aurelius. The ten monolithic Corinthian columns of its pronaos are 17 metres high. The rich bas-reliefs of the frieze under the cornice, of garlanded griffons and candelabri, were often copied from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_Antoninus_and_Faustina Photograph released to the public domain.
1 commentsJoe Sermarini
Panoramic 1.jpg
Italy, Rome, View from the Colosseum501 viewsOn the left the Palatine Hill, the Via Sacra and Titus' Arch.
On the right Maxentius' Basilica
Posted by Strength And Honour.
Photo taken by my friend Hebe.
Strength And Honour
Italy- Forum Romanum- The basilica of Majencius front and back.jpg
Italy- Forum Romanum- The basilica of Majencius front and back100 viewsThe Basilica of Maxentius (Basilica Maxentii) or the Basilica of Constantine (Basilica Constantini) was the last of the great civilian basilicas on the Roman Forum. The ruins of the basilica is located between the Temple of Amor and Roma and the Temple of Romulus, on the Via Sacra.

The construction of the basilica was initiated by Maxentius in 308 CE, and finished by Constantine after he had defeated Maxentius in the battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312 CE. As other similar buildings, it was destined for commercial and administrative activities. It is likely that the basilica housed the offices of the Prefect of the City, the highest imperial official in late antiquity.

The site chosen for the basilica was on the Velia, a low ridge connecting the Esquiline Hill and the Palatine Hill. Large parts of the Velia was levelled in preparation for the construction of the basilica. Literary sources tell that earlier the site was occupied by the Horrea Piperatica, the central market and storage facility for pepper and spices, built in the time of Domitian. Also on the site was a sanctuary of the penates publici which had to be moved.

The Basilica of Maxentius is built with arches, which is very atypical. All the other public basilicas had flat ceilings supported by wooden beams. The construction techniques used borrowed more from the great imperial baths than from the traditional basilica.
The basilica is one of the most impressive buildings on the Forum Romanum. The ground plan is rectangular, oriented E.-W., covering an area of 100×65m divided into a central nave and to lateral aisles and an atrium on the E. side where the original entrance was.

The central nave measured 80×25m and was covered by three groin vaults with a maximum height of 35m, supported by eight monolithic Corinthian columns of 14.5m. Each of the two aisles was made up of three interconnected coffered vaults, 20.5m wide and 24m high, communicating with the central nave by three huge openings.

Light was provided by two rows of three large windows in five of the six lateral vaults, and by windows in the sides of the now collapsed cross vaults over the central nave. The windows in two of the vaults in the surviving N. side of the building give a good idea of the amount of light inside the building.

The floor in both the central and the lateral spaces were a geometric pattern of squares with circles and lozenges of multi-coloured marble, similar to the floor in the Pantheon.

The walls were in opus latericium, originally with a marble veneer. The vaults were in opus caementicium with a gilded stucco finish. The roof was covered with gilded bronze tiles.

The entrance of the original project of Maxentius was to the east, from a branch of the old Via Sacra behind the Temple of Amor and Roma. It lead into an elongated atrium, connected to the central nave and the lateral aisles by five gateways.

In the W. end was a huge apse, 20m in diameter, where a colossal seated statue of Maxentius stood. This statue was later changed to look like Constantine. The statue was an acrolith (the head, hands and feet were of marble, while the rest was of other materials), and the remains of the statue were found in 1486 in the apse.

Constantine changed the plan when he took over the unfinished basilica. He had a another entrance added on the S. side, on the Via Sacra, where a monumental stairway led to a porch of four porphyry columns and via three double doorways into the central part of the S. aisle. In front of this new entrance, in the central vault of the N. aisle, another apse was added, smaller than the apse in the W. end. In back of this apse a niche held a standing statue of Constantine, and smaller, square-headed niches, two rows of four niches on each side, which might have housed a gallery of Constantine's relatives and lieutenants. This room could be closed by wooden doors, and it is likely the central part of the office of the Prefect of the City was there.

Of the original building only the three vaults of the N. aisle remain, devoid of all decorations. The vaults of the S. and central nave probably collapsed under an earthquake in c. 847. The floor plan is clearly visible, however, and the remaining structures give a vivid impression of the grandeur of the original edifice.

The remains of the Colossal Statue of Constantine I are in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori on the Campidoglio, and one of the columns from the central nave was moved to the Piazza Santa Maria Maggiore in 1614. The remaining columns have disappeared. The bronze tiles from the roof were reused for the first Basilica of Saint Peter.

John Schou
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and the Basilica of Majencio.jpg
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and the Basilica of Majencio38 viewsThe Basilica of Maxentius (Basilica Maxentii) or the Basilica of Constantine (Basilica Constantini) was the last of the great civilian basilicas on the Roman Forum. The ruins of the basilica is located between the Temple of Amor and Roma and the Temple of Romulus, on the Via Sacra.

The construction of the basilica was initiated by Maxentius in 308 CE, and finished by Constantine after he had defeated Maxentius in the battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312 CE. As other similar buildings, it was destined for commercial and administrative activities. It is likely that the basilica housed the offices of the Prefect of the City, the highest imperial official in late antiquity.

The site chosen for the basilica was on the Velia, a low ridge connecting the Esquiline Hill and the Palatine Hill. Large parts of the Velia was levelled in preparation for the construction of the basilica. Literary sources tell that earlier the site was occupied by the Horrea Piperatica, the central market and storage facility for pepper and spices, built in the time of Domitian. Also on the site was a sanctuary of the penates publici which had to be moved.

The Basilica of Maxentius is built with arches, which is very atypical. All the other public basilicas had flat ceilings supported by wooden beams. The construction techniques used borrowed more from the great imperial baths than from the traditional basilica.
The basilica is one of the most impressive buildings on the Forum Romanum. The ground plan is rectangular, oriented E.-W., covering an area of 100×65m divided into a central nave and to lateral aisles and an atrium on the E. side where the original entrance was.

The central nave measured 80×25m and was covered by three groin vaults with a maximum height of 35m, supported by eight monolithic Corinthian columns of 14.5m. Each of the two aisles was made up of three interconnected coffered vaults, 20.5m wide and 24m high, communicating with the central nave by three huge openings.

Light was provided by two rows of three large windows in five of the six lateral vaults, and by windows in the sides of the now collapsed cross vaults over the central nave. The windows in two of the vaults in the surviving N. side of the building give a good idea of the amount of light inside the building.

The floor in both the central and the lateral spaces were a geometric pattern of squares with circles and lozenges of multi-coloured marble, similar to the floor in the Pantheon.

The walls were in opus latericium, originally with a marble veneer. The vaults were in opus caementicium with a gilded stucco finish. The roof was covered with gilded bronze tiles.

The entrance of the original project of Maxentius was to the east, from a branch of the old Via Sacra behind the Temple of Amor and Roma. It lead into an elongated atrium, connected to the central nave and the lateral aisles by five gateways.

In the W. end was a huge apse, 20m in diameter, where a colossal seated statue of Maxentius stood. This statue was later changed to look like Constantine. The statue was an acrolith (the head, hands and feet were of marble, while the rest was of other materials), and the remains of the statue were found in 1486 in the apse.

Constantine changed the plan when he took over the unfinished basilica. He had a another entrance added on the S. side, on the Via Sacra, where a monumental stairway led to a porch of four porphyry columns and via three double doorways into the central part of the S. aisle. In front of this new entrance, in the central vault of the N. aisle, another apse was added, smaller than the apse in the W. end. In back of this apse a niche held a standing statue of Constantine, and smaller, square-headed niches, two rows of four niches on each side, which might have housed a gallery of Constantine's relatives and lieutenants. This room could be closed by wooden doors, and it is likely the central part of the office of the Prefect of the City was there.

Of the original building only the three vaults of the N. aisle remain, devoid of all decorations. The vaults of the S. and central nave probably collapsed under an earthquake in c. 847. The floor plan is clearly visible, however, and the remaining structures give a vivid impression of the grandeur of the original edifice.

The remains of the Colossal Statue of Constantine I are in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori on the Campidoglio, and one of the columns from the central nave was moved to the Piazza Santa Maria Maggiore in 1614. The remaining columns have disappeared. The bronze tiles from the roof were reused for the first Basilica of Saint Peter.

John Schou
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and the temple of Vesta and the Basilica of Majencio.jpg
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum The Basilica of Majencio and the temple of Castors46 viewsThe Basilica of Maxentius (Basilica Maxentii) or the Basilica of Constantine (Basilica Constantini) was the last of the great civilian basilicas on the Roman Forum. The ruins of the basilica is located between the Temple of Amor and Roma and the Temple of Romulus, on the Via Sacra.

The construction of the basilica was initiated by Maxentius in 308 CE, and finished by Constantine after he had defeated Maxentius in the battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312 CE. As other similar buildings, it was destined for commercial and administrative activities. It is likely that the basilica housed the offices of the Prefect of the City, the highest imperial official in late antiquity.

The site chosen for the basilica was on the Velia, a low ridge connecting the Esquiline Hill and the Palatine Hill. Large parts of the Velia was levelled in preparation for the construction of the basilica. Literary sources tell that earlier the site was occupied by the Horrea Piperatica, the central market and storage facility for pepper and spices, built in the time of Domitian. Also on the site was a sanctuary of the penates publici which had to be moved.

The Basilica of Maxentius is built with arches, which is very atypical. All the other public basilicas had flat ceilings supported by wooden beams. The construction techniques used borrowed more from the great imperial baths than from the traditional basilica.
The basilica is one of the most impressive buildings on the Forum Romanum. The ground plan is rectangular, oriented E.-W., covering an area of 100×65m divided into a central nave and to lateral aisles and an atrium on the E. side where the original entrance was.

The central nave measured 80×25m and was covered by three groin vaults with a maximum height of 35m, supported by eight monolithic Corinthian columns of 14.5m. Each of the two aisles was made up of three interconnected coffered vaults, 20.5m wide and 24m high, communicating with the central nave by three huge openings.

Light was provided by two rows of three large windows in five of the six lateral vaults, and by windows in the sides of the now collapsed cross vaults over the central nave. The windows in two of the vaults in the surviving N. side of the building give a good idea of the amount of light inside the building.

The floor in both the central and the lateral spaces were a geometric pattern of squares with circles and lozenges of multi-coloured marble, similar to the floor in the Pantheon.

The walls were in opus latericium, originally with a marble veneer. The vaults were in opus caementicium with a gilded stucco finish. The roof was covered with gilded bronze tiles.

The entrance of the original project of Maxentius was to the east, from a branch of the old Via Sacra behind the Temple of Amor and Roma. It lead into an elongated atrium, connected to the central nave and the lateral aisles by five gateways.

In the W. end was a huge apse, 20m in diameter, where a colossal seated statue of Maxentius stood. This statue was later changed to look like Constantine. The statue was an acrolith (the head, hands and feet were of marble, while the rest was of other materials), and the remains of the statue were found in 1486 in the apse.

Constantine changed the plan when he took over the unfinished basilica. He had a another entrance added on the S. side, on the Via Sacra, where a monumental stairway led to a porch of four porphyry columns and via three double doorways into the central part of the S. aisle. In front of this new entrance, in the central vault of the N. aisle, another apse was added, smaller than the apse in the W. end. In back of this apse a niche held a standing statue of Constantine, and smaller, square-headed niches, two rows of four niches on each side, which might have housed a gallery of Constantine's relatives and lieutenants. This room could be closed by wooden doors, and it is likely the central part of the office of the Prefect of the City was there.

Of the original building only the three vaults of the N. aisle remain, devoid of all decorations. The vaults of the S. and central nave probably collapsed under an earthquake in c. 847. The floor plan is clearly visible, however, and the remaining structures give a vivid impression of the grandeur of the original edifice.

The remains of the Colossal Statue of Constantine I are in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori on the Campidoglio, and one of the columns from the central nave was moved to the Piazza Santa Maria Maggiore in 1614. The remaining columns have disappeared. The bronze tiles from the roof were reused for the first Basilica of Saint Peter.

John Schou
Italy- Rome- The Arch of Constantine The Great.jpg
Italy- Rome- The Arch of Constantine The Great71 viewsArch of Constantine
The Arch of Constantine is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected to commemorate Constantine's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312 AD. Dedicated in 315 AD, it is the latest of the extant triumphal arches in Rome, from which it differs by the extensive re-use of parts of earlier buildings.

General Description
The arch is 21 m high, 25.7 m wide and 7.4 m deep. It has three archways, the central one being 11.5 m high and 6.5 m wide, the lateral archways 7.4 m by 3.4 m each. The lower part of the monument is built of marble blocks, the top (called attic) is brickwork revetted with marble. A staircase formed in the thickness of the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, in the end towards the Palatine Hill. The general design with a main part structured by detached columns and an attic with the main inscription above is modelled after the example of the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Forum Romanum. It has been suggested that the lower part of the arch is re-used from an older monument, probably from the times of the emperor Hadrian (Conforto et al., 2001; for a defence of the view that the whole arch was constructed in the 4th century, see Pensabene & Panella). The arch spans the Via Triumphalis, the way taken by the emperors when they entered the city in triumph. This route started at the Campus Martius, led through the Circus Maximus and around the Palatine Hill; immediately after the Arch of Constantine, the procession would turn left and march along the Via Sacra to the Forum Romanum and on to the Capitoline Hill, passing both the Arches of Titus and Septimius Severus. During the Middle Ages, the Arch of Constantine was incorporated into one of the family strongholds of ancient Rome. Works of restoration were first carried out in the 18th century; the last excavations have taken place in the late 1990s, just before the Great Jubilee of 2000.

Decoration
The decoration of the arch heavily uses parts of older monuments, which are given a new meaning in the context of the Constantinian building. As it celebrates the victory of Constantine, the new "historic" friezes illustrating his campaign in Italy convey the central meaning: the praise of the emperor, both in battle and in his civilian duties. The other imagery supports this purpose: decoration taken from the "golden times" of the Empire under Trajan, Hadrian and Marcus Aurelius places Constantine next to these "good emperors", and the content of the pieces evokes images of the victorious and pious ruler. Another explanation given for the re-use is the short time between the start of construction (late 312 at the earliest) and the dedication (summer 315), so the architects used existing artwork to make up for the lack of time to create new one. As yet another possible reason, it has often been suggested that the Romans of the 4th century lacked the artistic skill to produce acceptable artwork and therefore plundered the ancient buildings to adorn their contemporary monuments. This interpretation has become less prominent in more recent times, as the art of Late Antiquity has been appreciated in its own right. It is, of course, possible that a combination of two or all three of those explanations are correct, as they are not mutually exclusive.

Attic
Above the middle archway, the main inscription (see below) takes the most prominent place of the attic. It is identical on both sides of the arch. Flanking the inscription on both sides, there are pairs of relief panels above the minor archways, 8 in total. They were taken from an unknown monument erected in honour of Marcus Aurelius, and show (north side, left to right) the emperor's return to Rome after the campaign (adventus), the emperor leaving the city and saluted by a personification of the Via Flaminia, the emperor distributing money among the people (largitio), the emperor interrogating a German prisoner, (south side, left to right) a captured enemy chieftain led before the emperor, a similar scene with other prisoners, the emperor speaking to the troops (adlocutio), and the emperor sacrificing pig, sheep and bull. Together with three panels now in the Capitoline Museum, the reliefs were probably taken from a triumphal monument commemorating Marcus Aurelius' war against the Sarmatians from 169 - 175, which ended with his triumphant return in 176. On the largitio panel, the figure of Marcus Aurelius' son Commodus has been eradicated after the latter's damnatio memoriae. On top of each of the columns stand marble statues of Dacian prisoners from the times of Trajan, probably taken from the Forum of Trajan. From the same time date the two large (3 m high) panels decorating the attic on the small sides of the arch, showing scenes from the emperor's Dacian Wars. Together with the two reliefs on the inside of the central archway, they came from a large frieze celebrating the Dacian victory. The original place of this frieze was either the Forum of Trajan, as well, or the barracks of the emperor's horse guard on the Caelius.

Main Section
The general layout of the main facade is identical on both sides of the arch. It is divided by four columns of Corinthian order made of Numidian yellow marble (giallo antico), one of which has been transferred into the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano and was replaced by a white marble column. The columns stand on bases showing victory figures on front, and captured barbarians and Roman soldiers on the sides. The spandrels of the main archway are decorated with reliefs depicting victory figures with trophies, those of the smaller archways show river gods. Column bases and spandrel reliefs are from the times of Constantine. Above each lateral archway are pairs of round reliefs dated to the times of emperor Hadrian. They display scenes of hunting and sacrificing: (north side, left to right) hunt of a boar, sacrifice to Apollo, hunt of a lion, sacrifice to Hercules, (south side, left to right) departure for the hunt, sacrifice to Silvanus, hunt of a bear, sacrifice to Diana. The head of the emperor (originally Hadrian) has been reworked in all medaillons: on the north side, into Constantine in the hunting scenes and into Licinius or Constantius I in the sacrifice scenes; on the south side, vice versa. The reliefs, c. 2 m in diameter, were framed in porphyry; this framing is only extant on the right side of the northern facade. Similar medaillons, this time of Constantinian origin, are placed on the small sides of the arch; on the eastern side, showing the Sun rising, and on the western side, the Moon, both on chariots. The main piece from the time of Constantine is the "historical" relief frieze running around the monument under the round panels, one strip above each lateral archway and at the small sides of the arch. These reliefs depict scenes from the Italian campaign of Constantine against Maxentius which was the reason for the construction of the monument. The frieze starts at the western side with the "Departure from Milan". It continues on the southern, "outward" looking face, with the siege of a city, probably Verona, which was of great importance to the war in Northern Italy; also on that face, the Battle of Milvian Bridge with Constantine's army victorious and the enemy drowning in the river Tiber. On the eastern side, Constantine and his army enter Rome; the artist here has avoided to use the imagery of the triumph, as Constantine probably did not want to be shown triumphant over the Eternal City. On the northern face, looking "towards" the city, two strips with the emperor's actions after taking possession of Rome: Constantine speaking to the citizens on the Forum Romanum, and distributing money to the people.

Inner Sides of the Archways
In the central archway, there is one of the large panels of Trajan's Dacian War on either wall. Inside the lateral archways, eight portraits busts (two on each wall), destroyed to such an extent that it is not possible to identify them any more.

Inscriptions
The main inscription reads:

IMP · CAES · FL · CONSTANTINO · MAXIMO · P · F · AVGUSTO · S · P · Q · R · QVOD · INSTINCTV · DIVINITATIS · MENTIS · MAGNITVDINE · CVM · EXERCITV · SVO · TAM · DE · TYRANNO · QVAM · DE · OMNI · EIVS · FACTIONE · VNO · TEMPORE · IVSTIS · REM-PUBLICAM · VLTVS · EST · ARMIS · ARCVM · TRIVMPHIS · INSIGNEM · DICAVIT

Which means in English:

To the Emperor Caesar Flavius Constantinus, the greatest, pious, and blessed Augustus: because he, inspired by the divine, and by the greatness of his mind, has delivered the state from the tyrant and all of his followers at the same time, with his army and just force of arms, the Senate and People of Rome have dedicated this arch, decorated with triumphs.

The words instinctu divinitatis ("inspired by the divine") have been much commented. They are usually read as sign of Constantine's shifting religious affiliation: The Christian tradition, most notably Lactantius and Eusebius of Caesarea, relate the story of a vision of the Christian god to Constantine during the campaign, and that he was victorious in the sign of the cross at the Milvian Bridge. The official documents (esp. coins) still prominently display the Sun God until 324 AD, while Constantine started to support the Christian church from 312 on. In this situation, the vague wording of the inscription can be seen as the attempt to please all possible readers, being deliberately ambiguous, and acceptable to both pagans and Christians. As was customary, the vanquished enemy is not mentioned by name, but only referred to as "the tyrant", drawing on the notion of the rightful killing of a tyrannical ruler; together with the image of the "just war", it serves as justification of Constantine's civil war against his co-emperor Maxentius.

Two short inscriptions on the inside of the central archway transport a similar message: Constantine came not as conqueror, but freed Rome from occupation:

LIBERATORI VRBIS (liberator of the city) - FUNDATORI QVIETIS (founder of peace)

Over each of the small archways, inscriptions read:

VOTIS X - VOTIS XX SIC X - SIC XX

They give a hint on the date of the arch: "Solemn vows for the 10th anniversary - for the 20th anniversary" and "as for the 10th, so for the 20th anniversary". Both refer to Constantine's decennalia, i.e. the 10th anniversary of his reign (counted from 306), which he celebrated in Rome in the summer of 315 AD. It can be assumed that the arch honouring his victory was inaugurated during his stay in the city.




John Schou
Italy- Rome- The Arch of Vespasian.jpg
Italy- Rome- The Arch of Tito50 viewsThe Arch of Titus (Arcus Titi) is a triumphal arch that commemorates the victory of the emperors Vespasian and Titus in Judea in 70 CE, which lead to the conquest of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Jewish temple there, and the triumphal procession the two held in Rome in 71 CE. It is situated at the E. entrance to the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, south of the Temple of Amor and Roma, close to the Colosseum.

The arch was definitely erected sometimes after after the death of Titus in 81 CE, since Titus is referred to as Divus in the inscription. The deification of an emperor only happened posthumously after decision by the senate. It was most probably erected by emperor Domitian who succeeded his brother Titus in 81 CE, but it has also been suggested that it was built later, by Trajan, because of stylistic similarities with the Arch of Trajan at Benevento.

The Arch of Titus is a single arch, measuring 15.4m in height, 13.5m in width and 4.75m in depth, originally constructed entirely in Pantelic marble, with four semi-columns on each side. The external decorations include figures of Victoria with trophies on the spandrels and images of Roma and the Genius of Rome on the two keystones.

The inscription on the E. side is the original dedication of the arch by the senate. It reads:

Senatus
Populusque Romanus
divo Tito divo Vespasiani f(ilio)
Vespasiano Augusto

The senate
and people of Rome
to the divine Titus, son of the divine Vespasian,
Vespasianus Augustus

The inside the archway the monument is decorated with reliefs in marble. The S. side shows the beginning of the triumphal entry into Rome of the victorious emperor and his troops. The soldiers, walking left to right, are carrying the spoils of war, which include the seven armed candelabrum and the silver trumpets from the temple of Jerusalem. The signs carried by some soldiers displayed the names of the conquered cities and people. To the right the procession is entering the city through the Porta Triumphalis.

The N. side of the arch is decorated with a relief of the emperor in the triumphal procession. The emperor is riding a quadriga, which is lead by the goddess Roma, and he is crowned by Victoria flying above him. The lictors are walking in front of the chariot with their long ceremonial axes. After the emperor follow as a young man, who represents the Roman people, and an older man in toga, representing the senate. In the middle, under the vault a small relief shows the apotheosis of Titus, flying to the heavens on the back of an eagle.
John Schou
Italy- Rome- The arch of Tito and inside the arches.jpg
Italy- Rome- The arch of Tito and inside the arches47 viewsThe Arch of Titus (Arcus Titi) is a triumphal arch that commemorates the victory of the emperors Vespasian and Titus in Judea in 70 CE, which lead to the conquest of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Jewish temple there, and the triumphal procession the two held in Rome in 71 CE. It is situated at the E. entrance to the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, south of the Temple of Amor and Roma, close to the Colosseum.

The arch was definitely erected sometimes after after the death of Titus in 81 CE, since Titus is referred to as Divus in the inscription. The deification of an emperor only happened posthumously after decision by the senate. It was most probably erected by emperor Domitian who succeeded his brother Titus in 81 CE, but it has also been suggested that it was built later, by Trajan, because of stylistic similarities with the Arch of Trajan at Benevento.

The Arch of Titus is a single arch, measuring 15.4m in height, 13.5m in width and 4.75m in depth, originally constructed entirely in Pantelic marble, with four semi-columns on each side. The external decorations include figures of Victoria with trophies on the spandrels and images of Roma and the Genius of Rome on the two keystones.

The inscription on the E. side is the original dedication of the arch by the senate. It reads:

Senatus
Populusque Romanus
divo Tito divo Vespasiani f(ilio)
Vespasiano Augusto

The senate
and people of Rome
to the divine Titus, son of the divine Vespasian,
Vespasianus Augustus

The inside the archway the monument is decorated with reliefs in marble. The S. side shows the beginning of the triumphal entry into Rome of the victorious emperor and his troops. The soldiers, walking left to right, are carrying the spoils of war, which include the seven armed candelabrum and the silver trumpets from the temple of Jerusalem. The signs carried by some soldiers displayed the names of the conquered cities and people. To the right the procession is entering the city through the Porta Triumphalis.

The N. side of the arch is decorated with a relief of the emperor in the triumphal procession. The emperor is riding a quadriga, which is lead by the goddess Roma, and he is crowned by Victoria flying above him. The lictors are walking in front of the chariot with their long ceremonial axes. After the emperor follow as a young man, who represents the Roman people, and an older man in toga, representing the senate. In the middle, under the vault a small relief shows the apotheosis of Titus, flying to the heavens on the back of an eagle.
John Schou
Italy- Rome- The entrance to Forum and the arch of Tito.jpg
Italy- Rome- The entrance to Forum and the arch of Tito40 viewsThe Arch of Titus (Arcus Titi) is a triumphal arch that commemorates the victory of the emperors Vespasian and Titus in Judea in 70 CE, which lead to the conquest of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Jewish temple there, and the triumphal procession the two held in Rome in 71 CE. It is situated at the E. entrance to the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, south of the Temple of Amor and Roma, close to the Colosseum.

The arch was definitely erected sometimes after after the death of Titus in 81 CE, since Titus is referred to as Divus in the inscription. The deification of an emperor only happened posthumously after decision by the senate. It was most probably erected by emperor Domitian who succeeded his brother Titus in 81 CE, but it has also been suggested that it was built later, by Trajan, because of stylistic similarities with the Arch of Trajan at Benevento.

The Arch of Titus is a single arch, measuring 15.4m in height, 13.5m in width and 4.75m in depth, originally constructed entirely in Pantelic marble, with four semi-columns on each side. The external decorations include figures of Victoria with trophies on the spandrels and images of Roma and the Genius of Rome on the two keystones.

The inscription on the E. side is the original dedication of the arch by the senate. It reads:

Senatus
Populusque Romanus
divo Tito divo Vespasiani f(ilio)
Vespasiano Augusto

The senate
and people of Rome
to the divine Titus, son of the divine Vespasian,
Vespasianus Augustus

The inside the archway the monument is decorated with reliefs in marble. The S. side shows the beginning of the triumphal entry into Rome of the victorious emperor and his troops. The soldiers, walking left to right, are carrying the spoils of war, which include the seven armed candelabrum and the silver trumpets from the temple of Jerusalem. The signs carried by some soldiers displayed the names of the conquered cities and people. To the right the procession is entering the city through the Porta Triumphalis.

The N. side of the arch is decorated with a relief of the emperor in the triumphal procession. The emperor is riding a quadriga, which is lead by the goddess Roma, and he is crowned by Victoria flying above him. The lictors are walking in front of the chariot with their long ceremonial axes. After the emperor follow as a young man, who represents the Roman people, and an older man in toga, representing the senate. In the middle, under the vault a small relief shows the apotheosis of Titus, flying to the heavens on the back of an eagle.

John Schou
3350497.jpg
Marcus Aurelius27 viewsMarcus Aurelius. AD 161-180. Æ As (26mm, 9.49 g, 5h). Rome mint. Struck AD 175. Laureate head right / Tiber reclining left, resting hand on boat. RIC III 1142; MIR 18, 290-9/30. VF, dark brown patina.

The chief river in central Italy, the Tiber rises as a small southwestern flow in the Apennines near Arretium, separating Etruria from Umbria and Latium. It flows 250 miles to the Mediterranean Sea at Ostia, joined by the Nar river after 110 miles, where its swift current is navigable but dangerous, and by the Teverone river 70 miles further on, where it becomes truly navigable, three miles north of Rome. Inside Rome, 22 miles from the coast, the Tiber is about 300 feet wide, 12-18 feet deep, and swift-moving, regularly overflowing its banks with heavy rains. Augustus created the office of curatores riparum et alvei Tiberis to deal with this recurring problem (Suetonius, Vita Divi Augusti 37). Muddy from the silt it carried (the Roman poets called it flavus tiberis), it formed Tiber Island at one bend in Rome and Insula Sacra, an island sacred to Venus 4 miles from the coast at Ostia,which was the ancient source of salt deposits.

The Tiber River is the symbolic father of Rome, guiding Aeneas in a dream to the future site of Rome (Vergil, AEN. VIII. 31-67), bearing the infant twins Romulus and Remus to safety, and serving as a safe and profitable pathway for early Roman commerce.
ecoli
0621-310.jpg
MAUSOLEUM or SHRINE, Romulus, Posthumous follis256 viewsFollis struck in Ostia, 1st officina
DIVO ROMVLO N V BIS CONS, Bare head of Romulus right
AETERNAE MEMORIAE, Temple with domed roof surmounted by eagle, M OST P at exergue
7.35 gr
RC #3786 var, Cohen #4

The Temple of Divus Romulus is a circular building with a concave facade preceded by columns on the Via Sacra. It was probably a temple for Romulus, the son of emperor Maxentius, but it has also been identified as the Temple of Jupiter Stator and as the sanctuary of the penates publici. The building is located between the Temple of Antoninus and Faustina and the Basilica of Maxentius.

When emperor Maxentius' son Romulus died in 307 CE, he was deified and hence a temple was built in his honour. Coins commemorating Romulus often depict a round building with a varying number columns in front. Some of them probably show the round mausoleum of Romulus on the Appian Way, others might portray the temple, which has led to the identification of the rotunda on the Via Sacra with the Temple of Divus Romulus. The location would be likely, given Maxentius' building activities nearby.
Explanations are copied from : http://sights.seindal.dk/sight/176_Temple_of_Romulus.html
5 commentsPotator II
00344-maximian.jpg
Maximian40 viewsMaximian Follis
28.2 mm 8.979 gm
O: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG
Laureate head right
R: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR
Moneta standing left, scales in right, cornucopia in left, VI right, AQS in ex;
4 commentsKoffy
Maximian RIC 23b.jpg
Maximian - follis RIC 23b22 viewsFollis, RIC 23b, 9.26g; minted in Aquileia, 300 A.D.; obverse: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse: SACRA MONET AVG G ET CAESS NOSTR, aequitas standing, holding scales & cornucopia, AQG(Gamma) in ex. Priscian
MaximianHerculiusAquileiaMonetaFollis1_Close.jpg
Maximian Herculius, first reign, Æ follis, Aquileia mint. RIC 31b.16 viewsMaximian Herculius, first reign (AD 286–305). Æ follis, 28mm, 10.47 g., 6h. Aquileia mint, 2nd officina. Struck AD 301.
Obverse: IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing and facing with head left, holding scales in right hand and cornucopia in left arm; V//AQS.
References: RIC VI Aquileia 31b (C)
Ex Martyn Bodkin, 3-22-2013. Reportedly found 30 years ago, possibly at Aylesford, in Kent, England.

Mark Fox
Maximianus1.jpg
Maximianus42 viewsfr: IMP C MAXIMIANUS PF AUG
re: SACRAMONET AUGG ET CAESS NOSTR
pax
maximianus.jpg
Maximianus AE Follis23 viewsOBV: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES
laureate head right
REV: SACRA MONET AVGG-ET CAESS NOSTR
Moneta standing left holding scales & cornucopiae, AQG in ex.
Date: 300 A.D. Aquileia Mint
RIC VI Aquileia 30b, rated C2
27.2mm, 9.99g
miffy
Maximien_sacra_moneta.jpg
Maximianus Follis8 viewsGinolerhino
Maximianus_Herculius.jpg
Maximianus Herculeus, Augustus 286-305, 307-308, and 310 A.D.5 viewsMaximianus (Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Herculius Augustus), Ae 25.3~27.0mm. 7.60g. Follis, Rome, 302-303 AD. Obv: IMP C MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, Laureate head right. Rev: SACRA MON VRB AVGG ET CAESS NN, Moneta standing right, holding scales and cornucopia. Star in right field. Mintmark RS. RIC VI Rome 103b.ddwau
maximfollis.jpg
Maximianus Herculius (286-305 AD) Silvered AE Follis ca. 300AD31 viewsOBV. Maximian's Laureate head right. IMP MAXIMIANUS PF AVG
REV: Moneta standing left holding scales and cornucopia. SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR with star in left field and G(amma) in right. SIS in exergue

A common coin but nicely silvered. Moneta was the representation of the mint which conferred many benefits and was justly managed. The "sacred money of our Augusti and Caesars" referring to the two Augusti, Diocletian and Maximian, and their two Caesars, Constantius and Galerius. Minted at Siscia
RIC 134
Diameter ~ 26 mm, weight 10.1 gm
daverino
Follis_Ticinum.jpg
Maximianus Herculius, Follis, Ticinum55 viewsFollis, 300-303 AD, Ticinum
26 mm, 9.83 g
obv: IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laueate head right
rev: SACRA MONET AVGG - ET CAESS NOSTR / PT•; Moneta with scales and cornucopia facing, head left
1 commentsareich
0570-310np_noir.jpg
Maximianus, Follis73 viewsAquilea mint, 1st officina, AD 301
IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, Laureate head of Maximianus right
SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding cornucopia and scales. AQP at exergue, V in right field
10.35 gr
Ref :RCV # 13300 (100), Cohen #504, RIC VI # 29b
Potator II
Maximien_Hercule_10.jpg
Maximien Hercule - 4209 viewsIMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG
MONETA SACRA AVGG ET CAESS NN
*
ATR
RIC 420 (première Tétrarchie - 5e émission - 300/301)
ZSCHUCKE 208b (6e émission - 301)
PYL
Maximien_Hercule_8.jpg
Maximien Hercule - 4598 viewsIMP MAXIMIANVS P FEL AVG
M SACRA AVGG ET CAESS NN
*
BTR
RIC 459 (première Tétrarchie - 5e émission - 300/301)
ZSCHUCKE 241b (7e émission - 301/302)
PYL
MHerculesFollis sacra mon.jpg
Maximien Hercules, Follis34 viewsAE 26 mm, 300/305 A.D., Siscia (Croatia)
Obv: Maximianus PF Aug
Rev: Sacra Monet Augg Et Caess Nostr, gamma
Ex: (half moon)+ SIS
Ref: CMIR, Vol III, Juan R. Cayon, p. 1788 # 376
Jean Paul D
IMG_0424.jpg
MINT II Normanby 1453 212 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO, Radiate head right.
CONSACRATIO, Eagle standing right, head left, wreath in beak.
Normanby 1453.
Weight 2.54g.
Adrianus
Mithras_slaying_the_bull.jpg
Mithras slaying the Bull159 viewsFamous statue in the Musei Vaticani. But I couldn't find any information about its origin.
'Today the Vatican stands where the last sacrament of the Phrygian taurobolium was celebrated.'
( S. Angus, The Mystery Religions, p235)
Jochen
markianopolis_macrinus_diadum_HJ6_24_35_2(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Markianopolis, 24. Macrinus & Diadumenian, HrJ (2013) 6.24.34.02 (plate coin)46 viewsMacrinus & Diadumenian, AD 217-218
AE 27, 12.57g, 26.64mm, 15°
struck under governor Furius Pontianus
obv. AVT K OPEL CEV MAKREINOV AVT KM OPEL ANTWNEINOC
Confronting heads of Macrinus, laureate, r., and of Diadumenian, bare, l.
rev. VP PONTIANO - V M - ARKIANOPOLI / TWN
Male figure in himation stg.l., holding an unknown long bent rod in l. arm and in r.
hand patera over burning altar
in r. field E
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 777, pl. XIX, 12, same rev. die (1 ex., Paris)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1279 corr. (has CEVH)
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No.6.24.34.2 (plate coin)
very rare, about VF

A mysterious rev.: Himation and attitude would match Zeus. But the youthful and unbearded portrait is unusual. HrJ mention Diadumenian! And until now the meaning or function of the long bent object is not known. But similar objects on coins from Ankyra suggest that it is a sacral attribute.
3 commentsJochen
nikopolis_caracalla_AMNG_unbekannt_.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 18. Caracalla, HrHJ (2018) 8.18.54.0276 viewsCaracalla AD 198-217
AE 27, 11.5g, 26.77mm, 45°
struck 218(?)
obv. AV KM AVR - ANTWNINOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. EVTV / XWC TOIC / KVRIOIC / NIKOPOL / PROC I
legend in 5 lines all within laurel wreath
ref. a) not in AMNG
b) Varbanov (engl.) 2911
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No.8.18.54.2 (same dies)
rare (R5), about VF

The term 'kyrios' is used mainly in the sacral area (see 'kyrie eleison') and appears only rarely on coins. Here 'kyriois' refers not to gods but to the emperors Septimius Severus and Caracalla. The inscription is a congratulation of the city of Nikopolis to the rulers on the occasion of the elevation of Caracalla to Augustus (AMNG p.346). This type is known for Septimius and Geta too.
2 commentsJochen
diocletian_ticinum_43a.jpg
Moneta219 viewsDiocletian 284 - 305
AE - AE 2, 10.5g, 25mm
Ticinum 2. officina, ca. 300- 303
obv. IMP C DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG
laureate head r.
rev. SACRA MONET AVGG - CAESS NOSTR
Moneta standing l., r. holding scales, r. cornucopiae
exergue: ST dot
RIC VI, Ticinum 43(a); C.436
VF

MONETA, appears first as a title of Juno. 344 BC a temple was dedicated to JUNO MONETA on the Capitoline hill. The origin of this name from lat. monere = warning is doubtful. Because the first Mint of Rome stands near this temple MONETA became the personification of the Mint itself. Her attributes are like those of Aequitas: Scales and a Cornucopiae.
SACRA MONETA means: Mint of the emperor(s).
1 commentsJochen
Maximianus_02.jpg
RIC 6, p.469, 134b - Maximianus, Moneta22 viewsMaximianus, AD 286-305
Æ Follis Siscia mint, AD 301
Obv.: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right
Rev.. SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; *-B, SIS in ex
RIC VI 134b
AE, 9.64g, 28.5mm
shanxi
claudius_ii_gothicus_divo_claudio.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus22 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus (AD 268-270) AE Antoninianus. Obv: DIVO CLAVDIO - Radiate head right Rev: CONSECRATIO is normal legend -- this LOOKS like a scarce variety reading CONSACRATIO (better seen in the hand) – Altar. Exe: P -- Listed in RIC as Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, now known to be Siscia. AD 270 = RIC Vi, p. 233, 261K, 2.16 g. dpaul7
VALERIAN II.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - VALERIAN II57 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC 9 (Lugdunum), VF, Koln mint, 3.779g, 23.1mm, 0o, 258 - 259 A.D.; obverse DIVO VALERIANO CAES, radiate and draped bust right; reverse CONSACRATIO (sic), eagle bearing Caesar to heaven; toned, weak reverse strike
dpaul7
CLAUDIUS_II_DIVO_USTRINUM.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS. Commemorative AE Antoninianus of Cyzicus. Struck A.D.270 - 271, probably under Aurelian20 viewsObverse: DIVO CLAVDIO. Radiate head of Claudius II Gothicus facing right, three pellets below.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO. Ustrinum or pyre of three storeys, arch in lowest storey, uppermost storey flanked by two statues, flames (or perhaps an eagle) rising from summit.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 2.9gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC V : 267
RARE
*Alex
constantius_rate_qq22.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantius I Chlorus -- SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR853 viewsObv: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
Rev: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR
Exe: ST.
RIC Ticinum 46a
8 commentsroscoedaisy
Constantin_Chlorus_.JPG
Roman Empire, Constantius I Chlorus, Follis50 viewsConstantius Chlorus, als Cäsar, 293-305 n.C.
AE-Follis - Ticinum.

Vs.: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES Bel. Büste des Kaisers nach rechts.
Rs.: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR Moneta steht nach links, hält Waage und Füllhorn, im Feld Stern, im Abschnitt ST.
Maße: 11,32g, 26-29mm.
Kamp.: 121.42.
1 commentsM. V. Celerinus
cstii~0.jpg
Roman Empire, CONSTANTIUS I CHLORUS, FOLLIS RIC 30a Aquileia, 300 CE 76 viewsObverse: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right.
Reverse: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Monet standing left holding scales and cornucopia.
AQT in ex. 9.4 g, 36 mm
2 commentsNORMAN K
domicos11.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Domitian, Denarius75 viewsSilver denarius,20.5mm, 3.5g, Rome late 85 A.D., RIC-, BMC-, RSC-, Carradice- (85.6)
IMP·CAES·DOMIT·AVG·GERM·P·M·TR·P·V· laureate head right
IMP·XI·COS·XI·CENS·P·P·P·, Minerva 2

IMP number change caused by the victory of Agricola in Britain or perhaps an uncertain victory in Germania. Also, this is the period when the Dacians crossed the frozen Danube and defeated the governor Oppius Sabinus.

The current references list only two Minerva reverse types for this date: Minerva 1 and Minerva 4. The type in the picture appeared for the first time in the Sacra Moneta-Galata sale from September 1987 - different dies . The coin here is the second known to T.V. Buttrey, Ian Carradice and David Sear. Within this issue the last usual Minerva type (Minerva 3) is yet to be discovered.

FORVM AUCTIONS
normal_Galerius_sacra_moneta~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Galerius Follis292 viewsIMP C MAXIMIANVS PF AVG
laureate head right

SAC MON VRB AVGG ET CAESS NN
R wreath S in ex.
Moneta standing left with scales and cornucopiae

EF
Scarce
Rome 306 AD
Rome RIC VI 132b
See notes below

This is the Wildwinds example

Notes: RIC lists these types as being produced in two periods,
the second period (coins are identical in all respects) being struck in Autumn 306, and also listed as RIC 158a and
159a.
3 commentsJay GT4
moneta 453.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Maximianus, Aquileia - RIC VI 2952 viewsMaximian Follis
obv: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG. Laureate head right.
rev: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR. Aequitas standing left, holding scales and cornucopia.
exergue: AQS
Struck 301 A.D. at Aquileia
RIC VI 29b
Van Meter 43
Jericho
Valerian_2_Consecratio_eagle~0.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, VALERIAN II CAESAR. Commemorative AR Antoninianus of Lugdunum. Struck A.D.255 - 256 under Gallienus11 viewsObverse: DIVO VALERIANO CAES. Radiate and draped bust of Valerian II facing right.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO. Valerian II being borne to heaven seated on the back of an eagle flying right.
Diameter: 20mm | Weight: 2.4gms | Die Axis: 2
RIC V i : 9
*Alex
Divo_Victorino_Pio_Consacratio~0.JPG
Roman Empire, VICTORINUS. Commemorative AE antoninianus of Cologne. Struck A.D.271 under Tetricus I.48 viewsObverse: DIVO VICTORINO PIO. Radiate head of Victorinus facing right.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO. Eagle facing right, head turned left, standing on globe and holding wreath in beak.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 2.4gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC Vii : 85 | AGK 1 | Elmer 785 | Cunetio 2633
VERY RARE

A.D.271
Early in this year Victorinus was assassinated by Attitianus, an actuarius (regimental quartermaster), reportedly for reasons of personal revenge but more likely part of an officer coup. The most likely interpretation of the evidence is that Domitianus II was involved in this officer coup and, having presumably been hailed as Emperor by some of the troops, managed to secure temporary control of one of the 'Gallic' mints. However, those forces favouring Tetricus I as the new Emperor were able to assert themselves so swiftly and decisively that Domitianus’s elevation was unlikely to have lasted more than a few days. This coin, deifying Victorinus, was struck by Tetricus I towards the end of the year.
This year too, Aurelian, the central emperor, pushed the Vandals back from Pannonia and forced them to withdraw over the Danube. He also pursued the Alamanni who had entered Lombardy, closed the passes in the Alps and encircled the invaders near Pavia. The Alamanni were destroyed and Aurelian received the title Germanicus Maximus.
Also this year, Felicissimus, financial minister of the state treasury, led an uprising of mint workers in Rome against Aurelian but he was defeated and killed on the Caelian Hill.
3 comments*Alex
bararbous-consecratio.jpg
Roman Imperial Barbarous Radiate20 viewsRoman Imperial, Imitative Barbarous Radiate Antoninianus, 0.6g, 11mm

Obverse: Radiate head right.

Reverse: Altar with horned roof, cross above. Five dots on altar, one panel. Dot to left, right and below.

Reference: None

Ex: Holding History Coins +photo

Similar to the official CONSACRATIO issues for Claudius II. Obverse portrait looks like Tetricus I.
Gil-galad
Maximian_RIC-29b.jpg
Roman Imperial: Maximian (286-305 CE) Æ Follis, Aquileia (RIC-29b; RCV 13300)6 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG; Laureate head of Maximian right
Rev: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR; Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia; V in right field; AQP in exergue
Quant.Geek
Lucius_Caesius.jpg
RRC 298/1 (L. Caesius)36 viewsObv. Diademed bust of young Veiovis left, viewed from behind, hurling thunderbolt, behind monogram (Roma, Apollo or Argento Publico, banker’s marks
Rev. Two Lares Praestites seated right, dog between them; (bust of Vulcan and thongs above, LA on left, ER on right), L. CAESI in exergue
18-19 mm, 3,3 g
Rome, 112-108 B.C.
References: RCC 298/1, Sear 175, RSC Caesia 1, Sydenham 564

There is much debate about the nature of Vejovis, some of it going back to Roman times: Aulus Gellius sees this deity as an anti-Jupiter (NA 5.12). Why he appears on coins is, to my knowledge, not clear. The reverse shows the Lares Praestites, protectors of the city strongly associated with dogs: they were clad in dog skins, and had a dog as their companion "the dog is terrible for strangers (...) but well-disposed and kind to those who live with them” but the Lares were also avenging deities who chased down evil doers (Plutarch, Quest. Rom 5.51, Ovid, Fastes 5.140-142) Ovid also mentions a statue of the “twin gods”, apparently lost by his time: it has been suggested that this coin represents this cult image, found in the temple at the Via Sacra (Ovid, Fastes 5.145-6).

According to Sydenham, the Lares portrayed on this coin are those of Rhegium, the monogram reading LA[res] RE[gienses]; for Palmer, RE reads regionum (quoted in D. G. Orr, ANRW, ‘Roman Domestic Religion’:1567n54), Freeman and Sear read “PRE”.

Thanks to Amadis for pointing out an inscription (the "Bronce de Alcántara") mentioning a L. Caesius as a propraetor (?) in Hispania Ulterior in 104 B.C. It is conceivable this was indeed the moneyer of this coin.

1 commentsSyltorian
diocle_follis_ticinum.jpg
SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, RIC 45a Ticinum11 viewsDiocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 March 305 A.D. Bronze follis, RIC VI 45a, VF, Ticinum mint, 8.627g, 26.5mm, 300 - 303 A.D.; obverse IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, scales in right, cornucopia in left, mintmark •[?] in ex. Ex FORVMPodiceps
galerius_3711.jpg
SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, SRCV 3711 5 viewsGalerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D. Bronze follis, SRCV 3711, Fair, 10.007g, 29.2mm, 0o, obverse MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left holding scales in right, cornucopia in left, mintmark in ex (obscured). Ex FORVMPodiceps
83187q00_Maximian_RIC_VI_43b,_VF,_rough,_Ticinum.jpg
SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESSS NOSTR, TT• in ex; RIC VI 43b, Ticinum18 viewsMaximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D. Bronze follis, RIC VI 43b, Ticinum mint, 8.424g, 27.0mm, 0o, 300 - 303 A.D.; obverse IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESSS NOSTR, Moneta standing left holding scales and cornucopia, TT• in ex. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Sacrate_Cow.JPG
SACRED COW! 187 viewsHorseman right, holding banner; Nagari Bhi in the upper left, Adl (?) in Arabic in the upper right / śri samanta deva in Nagari, recumbent zebu bull to left with symbol on rump; to left, star above pellet above crescent. Uncertain mint in (Kabul or Ohind?). 19mm, 2.98 grams. Tye #21. SKU 42564

Samanta Deva just meant "The Feudatory Chief" - it was the title assumed by the Kabul Shahi and their Islamic successors, and was probably not a personal name. Hundreds of types of jitals inscribed "Samanta Deva" (in imitation of this type) were struck by numerous dynasties in the later period. The Kabul Shahi dynasties also called Shahiya ruled the Kabul Valley (in eastern Afghanistan) and the old province of Gandhara (northern Pakistan) during the Classical Period of India, from the decline of the Kushan Empire in the 3rd century to the early 9th century. They are split into two eras the Buddhist-Shahis and the later Hindu-Shahis with the change-over occurring around 870. These coins are of full size and weight, but were probably not minted by Samanta Deva but can be considered anonymous issues of his successors

800-1026 AFGHANISTAN SILVER DRACHM _2600
3 commentsAntonivs Protti
Sicily_Selinus_SNG-ANS4_691_gf.jpg
Selinos4 viewsSicily, Selinos. 450-440 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.84 gm). Artemis driving quadriga l., Apollo drawing bow. ΣΕΛΙΝ-ΟΝΤ-ΙΟΝ. / River god Selinos with lustral branch and patera over sacraficial altar, rooster at left, bull on basis & selinon leaf behind. ΣΕΛΙͶΟΣ above. gVF. Pegasi XI #86. SNG ANS 4 #691 (same dies); HGC 2 #1220 (same dies); Schwabacher 1925 #10; SNG Lloyd 1227 (same rev. die). Anaximander
notgeldC.JPG
Sternberg, 100 Pfenning133 viewsSternberg, Jews refusing the sacrament of communion from St. Peter, holding gold instead.Molinari
Valerian_2_Consecratio_eagle.JPG
Struck A.D.255 - 256 under Gallienus. DIVUS VALERIAN II CAESAR. Commemorative AR Antoninianus of Lugdunum31 viewsObverse: DIVO VALERIANO CAES. Radiate and draped bust of Valerian II facing right.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO. Valerian II being borne to heaven seated on the back of an eagle flying right.
Diameter: 20mm | Weight: 2.4gms | Die Axis: 2
RIC V i : 9
3 comments*Alex
CLAUDIUS_II_DIVO_USTRINUM_(Pyre).JPG
Struck A.D.270 - 271, probably under Aurelian. DIVUS CLAUDIUS II. Commemorative AE Antoninianus of Cyzicus13 viewsObverse: DIVO CLAVDIO. Radiate head of Claudius II Gothicus facing right, three pellets below.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO. Ustrinum or pyre of three storeys, arch in lowest storey, uppermost storey flanked by two statues, flames or smoke (or possibly an eagle) rising from circular opening at summit.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 2.9gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC V i : 267 (RIC mentions only two pellets, but this might simply be an error)
VERY RARE
1 comments*Alex
Victorinus_Divus_Consacratio.JPG
Struck A.D.271 under Tetricus I. DIVUS VICTORINUS. Commemorative AE antoninianus of Cologne5 viewsObverse: DIVO VICTORINO PIO. Radiate head of Victorinus facing right.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO. Eagle facing right, head turned left, standing on globe and holding wreath in beak.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 2.4gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC Vii : 85 | AGK 1 | Elmer 785 | Cunetio 2633
VERY RARE

Early in A.D.271 Victorinus was assassinated by Attitianus, an actuarius (regimental quartermaster), reportedly for reasons of personal revenge but more likely part of an officer coup. The most likely interpretation of the evidence is that the enigmatic usurper Domitianus II was involved in this coup and, having presumably been hailed as Emperor by some of the troops, managed to secure temporary control of one of the 'Gallic' mints. However, those forces favouring Tetricus I as the new Emperor were able to assert themselves so swiftly and decisively that Domitianus’s elevation was unlikely to have lasted more than a few days. This coin, deifying Victorinus, was struck by Tetricus I towards the end of the year.
*Alex
Galerius_as_Caesar_Follis_ST.JPG
Struck A.D.300 - 303. GALERIUS as Caesar. AE Follis of Ticinum8 viewsObverse: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES. Laureate head of Galerius facing right.
Reverse: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR. Moneta standing facing left, holding scales and cornucopiae; in exergue, ST•.
Diameter: 27mm | Weight: 8.4gms | Die Axis: 12
RIC VI : 46b
*Alex
heliopolis_valerianI_BMC28.jpg
Syria, Coele-Syria, Heliopolis, Valerian I, BMC 2850 viewsValerian I, AD 253-260
AE 28, 16.0g
obv. IMP CAES P LIC VALERIANVS PF AVG
Bust, draped and cuirassd, laureate, r.
rev. COL IVL AVG FEL HEL
Price-urn with two palmbranchs between two price-urns with one palm-branchs
in ex. CERT.SACR / CAP.OECV / ISE.HEL (in 3 lines)
BMC 28; SNG Copenhagen 440; Lindgren III, 1284
rare, VF

The solution of the ex. is Certamina Sacra Capitolina Oecumenica Iselastica Heliopolitana. In total this inscription describes the holy games (certamina sacra) held at Heliopolis (heliopolitana) in honor of Jupiter Capitolinus (capitolina). The ludi iselastica were games in which the victors had the privilege of a triumphal entry into their home cities. Baalbek-Heliopolis was famous for its temple of Jupiter.
2 commentsJochen
1336670268_ef89303ac7_b.jpg
The Temple of Divus Romulus on the Via Sacra Adjoining the Basilica Maxentius131 viewsLeft unfinished at the time of the usurper Maxentius' downfall in AD 312, both structures were completed under Constantine, the temple presumably was dedicated to the founder of the city rather than to Maxentius' son. Joe Sermarini
CLAUDIUS_II_USTRINUM.JPG
USTRINUM (PYRE), CLAUDIUS II66 viewsCommemorative AE Antoninianus of Cyzicus, struck A.D.270 - 271, probably under Aurelian.
Obverse: DIVO CLAVDIO. Radiate head of Claudius II Gothicus facing right, three pellets below.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO. Ustrinum or pyre of three storeys, arch in lowest storey, uppermost storey flanked by two statues, flames rising from circular opening at summit.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 2.9gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC V i : 267
(RIC mentions only two pellets, but this might simply be an error)
*Alex
Valerian_II_1_opt.jpg
VALERIAN II Antoninianus, RIC 9, Caesar Riding Eagle23 viewsOBV: DIVO VALERIANO CAES, radiate & draped bust right
REV: CONSACRATIO, eagle flying right, bearing the deceased young Caesar to heaven
3.2, 23mm

Posthumous, 257-8 AD
Legatus
Valerian_II_antoninianus.jpg
Valerian II AR antoninianus, 258-259 AD, Colonia Agrippinensis62 viewsValerian II
AR Antoninianus
Colonia Agrippinensis, 2nd emission, 258-259 AD
DIVO VALERIANO CAES
Radiate, draped bust r.
CONSACRATIO
Eagle flying right on which rides Valerian II, holding scepter in left hand and raising right hand
RIC V 9; MIR 36, 911e
1 commentsArdatirion
0442-210np_noir.jpg
Valerian II, Antoninianus - 008573 viewsCologne mint, AD 258
DIVO VALERIANO CAES, radiate and draped bust right
CONSACRATIO (sic), Valerian II raising hand and holding sceptre on an eagle flying right
1.70 gr
Ref : Cohen # 5, RCV # 10606

Peu courant, belle patine
2 commentsPotator II
Valerian_II_black1.png
Valerian II. Posthumous Antoninianus.11 viewsValerian II. Posthumous Antoninianus.

257-258 AD.

21mm., 2.69g.

DIVO VALERIANO CAES, radiate & draped bust right

CONSACRATIO, eagle flying right, bearing the deceased young Caesar to heaven

RIC 9; Cohen 5.

AAHZ
RL
Valérien_II_-_consacratio.JPG
Valérien II - CONSACRATIO a10 viewsDIVO VALERIANO CAES
CONSACRATIO
Valérien II chevauchant un aigle
Trèves - 1ere Émission - automne 258
Bourdel 367
Göbl 911e
Eauze 1527
Elmer 68
PYL
valerien_II_-_consacratio.JPG
Valérien II - CONSACRATIO a15 viewsDIVO VALERIANO CAES
CONSACRATIO
Valérien II chevauchant un aigle
Trèves - 1ere Émission - automne 258
Bourdel 367
Göbl 911e
Eauze 1527
Elmer 68
PYL
Valrien_II_-_Consacratio_-_foudre.jpg
Valérien II - CONSACRATIO a variante18 viewsDIVO VALERIANO CAES
CONSACRATIO
Valérien II chevauchant un aigle qui tient un foudre
PYL
Valérien_II_-_consacratio_2.JPG
Valérien II - CONSACRATIO b8 viewsDIVO VALERIANO CAES
CONSACRATIO
Trèves - 1ere Émission - automne 258
Bourdel 370
Göbl 910e
Eauze 1531
Elmer 104
PYL
Valérien_II_-_consacratio_4.JPG
Valérien II - CONSACRATIO b13 viewsDIVO VALERIANO CAES
CONSACRATIO
Aigle debout à gauche, détournant la tête à droite et regardant vers les cieux.
Trèves - 1ere Émission - automne 258
Bourdel 370
Göbl 910e
Eauze 1531
Elmer 104
PYL
Valérien_II_-_consacratio_3.JPG
Valérien II - CONSACRATIO b16 viewsDIVO VALERIANO CAES
CONSACRATIO
Aigle debout à gauche, détournant la tête à droite et regardant vers les cieux.
Trèves - 1ere Émission - automne 258
Bourdel 370
Göbl 910e
Eauze 1531
Elmer 104
PYL
Valérien_II_-_Consacratio~0.JPG
Valérien II - CONSACRATIO c14 viewsDIVO VALERIANO CAES
CONSACRATIO
Aigle debout sur un globe, détournant la tête à droite et regardant vers les cieux.
Trèves - 1ere Émission - automne 258
Bourdel 371
Göbl 912e
Eauze 1529
Elmer 102
PYL
IMG_0418.jpg
Victorinus (deified reverse), MINT II Normanby - 21 viewsIMP C VICTORINVS P F AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust right.
CONSACRATIO, Eagle standing right, head left, wreath in beak.
A very rare mule with a lifetime obverse and a posthumous reverse.
Weight 1.69g.
Adrianus
IMG_0422.jpg
Victorinus (deified) MINT II Normanby 1454 212 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO, Radiate cuirassed bust right.
CONSACRATIO, Eagle standing right, head left, wreath in beak.
Normanby 1454.
Posthumous issue.
Weight.
Adrianus
IMG_0430.jpg
Victorinus (deified), MINT (Irregular after MINT II) copying Normanby 145418 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO, Radiate cuirassed bust right.
CONSACRATIO, Eagle standing right, head left, wreath in beak.
An irregular issue copying Normanby 1454.
Weight 2.49g.
Adrianus
IMG_0408.jpg
Victorinus (deified), MINT II Normanby 1453 1 20 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO, Radiate head right
CONSACRATIO Eagle standing right, head left, wreath in beak
Normanby 1453
Posthumous issue.
Ex Cottenham hoard.
Weight
Adrianus
IMG_0426.jpg
Victorinus (deified), MINT II Normanby 1454 114 viewsDIVO VICTORINO PIO, Radiate cuirassed bust right.
CONSACRATIO, Eagle standing right, head left, wreath in beak.
Normanby 1454.
Weight.
Adrianus
 
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