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Search results - "maximinus"
MAXIMIN1-1.jpg
32 viewsMaximinus I - Denarius - 235/236 AD.
Ob.: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG; Laureate and draped bust right
Rev.: PROVIDENTIA AVG; providentia standing left, holds cornucopia and wand pointed at globe at foot.
gs. 2,7 mm. 19,9
Cohen 77, RIC 13
Maxentius
MAXIMIN1-3.jpg
62 viewsMaximinus I - Sestertius - 236/238
Ob.: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM; Laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev.: SALVS AVGVSTI S C; Salus seated left, feeding from patera a serpent arising from altar.
gs. 18,6 mm 34
Cohen 92, RIC IV 85
1 commentsMaxentius
MAXIMINUS_I_-_AS,_Rev__SALUS_FEEDING_SNAKE.jpg
63 viewsMaximinus I AE Dupondius,Maximinus I AE Dupondius. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right / SALVS AVGVSTI S-C, Salus seated left, feeding out of patera a snake rising from altar. RIC 86, Cohen 94, BMC 178 sold :o(

3 commentsAntonivs Protti
maximinus_I_ric_IVb_19.jpg
18 viewsMAXIMINUS I
Denarius. 238 A.D.
22.3mm, 3.3 grams

OBV: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate draped bust right.
REV: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left with branch & sceptre.
RIC-IVb -19
ziggy9
Maximinus_II_a_jpg.png
23 viewsMaximinus II Æ Follis. Nicomedia, struck circa AD 311.
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right
/ HERCVLI VICTORI, Hercules standing right, leaning on club; * and B in left field; SMN in exergue.
RIC VI 68.

21mm, 3.92.
1 commentspaul1888
max207c.jpg
Maximinus II RIC 207c Siscia23 views
Maximinus II follis, 311 CE
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate bust right.
Reverse: GENIO AV-GVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on headn naked but for chlamys over shoulder, holding patera and cornucopia.
SIS in ex. Siscia mint. 25.3 mm., 6.9 g.
NORMAN K
Maximinus_I_RIC_12.jpg
31 Maximinus I11 viewsMAXIMINUS I
AR denarius. 235-6 AD

O: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right, seen from behind

R: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left with branch & sceptre.

RSC 31a, RIC 12, Sear 8310

Ex Harlan J. Berk
Sosius
Maximinus_I_RIC_16.jpg
31 Maximinus I22 viewsMAXIMINUS I
AR Denarius. 235-6 AD
(19mm. 3.53g)

IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped bust right / VICTORIA AVG, Victory running right.

RSC 99, RIC 16

Ex Artifact Man (vCoins)
Sosius
Max_Thrax_Sestertius.jpg
31 Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - Late May 238 A.D.36 viewsOrichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 43, Cohen 10, VF, 23.158g, 32.3mm, 30o, Rome mint, 235 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FIDES MILITVM S C, Fides standing half-left, military standard in each hand; well centered, nice patina, flan crack, typical squared flan

Purchased from FORVM
1 commentsSosius
001590_l.jpg
32 Gordian I Africanus31 viewsGORDIAN I AFRICANUS
AE Sestertius, Rome Mint
27-29 mm, 17.75 g
March 19 to April 9, 238 A.D.
IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind / VICTORIA AVGG, S-C, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm.
RIC IV, 2, p. 161, 12. Very rare. Good portrait and fully readable name. Very fine.
Ex-Auctiones

Gordian I, an 80-year-old senator, was proclaimed as emperor during a revolt in Africa but commited suicide after his son and co-ruler Gordianus II was defeated by Maximinus' legate. Their rule only lasted for 20 days, hence the rarity of their coins.
Sosius
Maximinus_II_RIC_VI_Antioch_164b.jpg
6 Maximinus II21 viewsMAXIMINUS II
AE Follis, Antioch, 312 AD

IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG, Laureate bust r. / GENIO-AVGVSTI, Genius stading left, holding head of Sol and cornucopia, star in l. field, epsilon I in right field, ANT in ex.

RIC VI Antioch 164b
Sosius
Maximian_Civic_Antioch.jpg
6 Maximinus II43 viewsANTIOCH
Semi-autonomous issue under Maximinus II, ca. 310 AD

GENIO ANTOCHENI - Genius of Antioch seated, facing; Orontes swimming below / APOLLONI SANCTO, Apollo standing left, holding patera and lyre.

'The last civic coinages and the religious policy of Maximinus Daza', J. van Heesch. c.310 (Antioch).
Sosius
RIC_VI_Nicomedia_55.jpg
6 Maximinus II25 viewsMAXIMINUS II
AE Follis, Nicomedia, 307-308 AD

GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, bust l. / GENIO CA-ESARIS CM[H], Genius with patera and cornucopia, SMN gamma in ex.

RIC VI Nicomedia 55
Sosius
sia_059~0.JPG
Maximinus I Thrax AE Sestertius, Pax, 235-238 A.D.89 viewsRef Maximinus I Thrax AE Sestertius, 235-238 A.D.
Maximinus I Thrax Æ Sestertius. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped bust right / PAX AVGVSTI S-C, Pax standing left with branch and scepter. Cohen 38, RIC 81, BMC 148. Rome mint.
29.8mm, 19.34gr. Green Patina.
Antonio Protti
mar67.jpg
Maximinus I, RIC 67 / BMC 13 viewsMaximinus, AE sestertius, struck early in his reign.
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG. Laureate and draped bust right, similar to that of Severus Alexander.
Reverse: VICTORIA AVG. Victory advancing right, holding wreath, S C at sides.
24.8 g, 31 mm diam.
NORMAN K
max207x.JPG
Maximinus II RIC 171B Siscia17 viewsMaximinus II quarter follis, 305-306 CE
Obverse: MAXIMINVS NOBC, laureate bust right.
Reverse: GENIO POP_VLI ROMANI , Genius standing left, modius on headn naked but for chlamys over shoulder, holding patera and cornucopia.
SIS in ex. Siscia mint. 19.1 mm., 2.0 g.
NORMAN K
MAX207C2.jpg
Maximinus II RIC 207C Siscia15 viewsMaximinus II follis, 311 CE
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG, laureate bust right.
Reverse: GENIO AV-GVSTI , Genius standing left, modius on headn naked but for chlamys over shoulder, holding patera and cornucopia.
SIS in ex. Siscia mint. 25,4 mm., 6.0 g.
NORMAN K
ZomboDroid_16092019093042.jpg
Maximinus II, as Caesar, 305-309. AE Follis. 27mm // 7,36g. Heraclea, 305-306.6 viewsObv.GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES Laureate head of Maximinus II to right.

Rev. GENIO CAESARIS/ HTD Genius, nude but for chlamys over his left shoulder, standing front, head to left, holding patera, from which liquor flows, in his right hand and a cornucopiae with his left
Canaan
Roman_Imperial_RIC164b.jpg
Roman Imperial: Maximinus II Daia (310-313) BI Follis, Antioch (RIC-164b)26 viewsObv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG; Laureate head right
Rev: GENIO AVGVSTI; Genius standing facing, holding head of Sol in right, cornucopia in left. ✶ / S in fields, ANT in exergue

SpongeBob
rjb_2009_09_06.jpg
Time of Maximinus II10 viewsAnonymous
Antioch mint
IOVI CONSERVATORI
Jupiter seated left
VICTORIA AVGG
Victory walking left holding wreath
-/E//SMA
van Heesch 2
mauseus
rjb_2009_09_05.jpg
Time of Maximinus II18 viewsAnonymous
Antioch mint
GENIO ANTIOCHENI
Antioch seated facing, Orontes swimming below
APOLLONI SANCTO
Apollo standing left holding patera and lyre
-/A//SMA
van Heesch 3
mauseus
005n.jpg
Δ and Six-pointed star291 viewsCILICIA. Ninica-Claudiopolis. Maximinus I. Æ 28. A.D. 235-238. Obv: IMPCSIVLVERMAXIMINVS. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; 2 countermarks: (1) before face, (2) on bust. Rev: NIN-C-CLAV. Colonist ploughing behind two oxen, in background vexillum. Ref: BMC 8. Axis: 360°. Weight: 9.86 g. CM (1): Δ containing dot, all within circle; circular punch, 6 mm. Howgego 669 (49 pcs). Not likely to be a denominational countermark. CM (2): Six-pointed star, incuse, 6 mm from point to point. Howgego 451 (45 pcs). Collection Automan.Automan
170.jpg
Δ containing dot215 viewsCILICIA. Ninica-Claudiopolis. Maximinus I. Æ 23. A.D. 235-238. Obv: (IMP)MAXIMINVΓPI. Laureate head right; Countermark on neck. Rev: NI-NI-CL-Ω-ΩΔ. Two vexilla. Ref: BMC -. Axis: 180°. Weight: 6.92 g.CM: Δ containing dot, all within circle; circular punch, 6 mm. Howgego 669 (49 pcs). Collection Automan.Automan
168.jpg
Δ, 6-pointed star and Nike188 viewsCILICIA. Ninica-Claudiopolis. Maximinus I. Æ 28. A.D. 235-238. Obv: (...MA)XIMINVΓP(A)UTΛ or similar. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; 4 countermarks: (1) before face, (2) on shoulder; (3) before chest, (4) behind neck. Rev: (C)-OLN-(I)NI-CLAUΔ. Colonist ploughing behind two oxen, in background vexillum, star before colonist. Ref: BMC 8 (var. obv. leg.). Axis: 210°. Weight: 10.70 g. CM(1): Six-pointed star, incuse, 6 mm from point to point. Howgego 451 (45 pcs). CM(2): Δ containing dot, all within circle; circular punch, 6 mm. . Howgego 669 (49 pcs). Note: Not likely to be a denominational countermark. CM(3-4): Nike right, in oval punch, c. 5 x 8 mm (not certain!). Howgego 262 (34 pcs). Note:The sequence of application appears to have been (1) Δ in circle (669), (2) six-pointed star (451), and (3) Nike (262). Collection Automan.Automan
013n~0.jpg
Δ, six-pointed star, eagle and Nike (6 cmks!)203 viewsCILICIA. Ninica-Claudiopolis. Maximinus I. Æ 27. A.D. 235-238. Obv: OIMPCSIVLVERMAXIMINVS. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; 6 countermarks: (1) to right, before bust, (2) on lower part of bust, (3) on neck, (4) behind and on back of head, (5) on upper part of head, (6) before head. Rev: NINIC-OL-CLA-UΔI, OPOLI in ex. Tetrastyle temple containing emperor, standing left, holding patera and spear. Ref: BMC 10; Sear GIC 3548 (same dies). Axis: 360°. Weight: 9.12 g. CM(1): Δ containing dot, all within circle; circular punch, 6 mm. Howgego 669 (49 pcs). Note: Not likely to be a denominational countermark. CM(2): Six-pointed star, incuse, 6 mm from point to point. Howgego 451 (45 pcs). CM(3): Eagle standing right with head left, in shaped punch, c. 4 x 7 mm. Howgego 338 (11 pcs). CM(4): Nike right, in oval punch, c. 5 x 8 mm. Howgego 262 (34 pcs). CM(5): Similar to CM(4). CM(6): Similar to CM(4). Note: The sequence of application appears to have been 669-451-262-338. Automan
max_thrax.jpg
(0235) MAXIMINUS I (THRAX)49 views235 - 238 AD
AE Sestertius 30X32mm 20.55 g
o:MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Laureate draped bust r
R: FIDES MILITVM S-C
Fides standing head left, holding military standard in each hand
laney
MAXIMINUS_NIKE_THESSALONIKA_RES.jpg
(0235) MAXIMINUS I THRAX40 views235 - 238 AD
AE 25 mm 7.97 g
O: AVGIOVOV- -MAXIMEINOC Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R: Nike standing left, holding palm branch and statue of Kabeiros.
Macedonia, Thessalonika; Varbanov 4502

laney
max_thrax_denarius_x.jpg
(0235) MAXIMINUS I THRAX14 views235 - 238 AD
Struck 236 AD--2nd emission
Silver denarius, 20.0 mm; 2.909 g
O: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right (no cuirass?), from behind;
R: PAX AVGVSTI (to the peace of the emperor), Pax standing facing, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left
Rome mint; RSC III 31b (no cuirass), RIC IV 12 var. (cuirassed), BMCRE VI 70 var. (same), Hunter III 8 var. (same), SRCV III 8310 var. (same)
(ex FORUM)
laney
max_thrax_denarius.jpg
(0235) MAXIMINUS THRAX15 views235 AD - 238 AD
AR Denarius 19.5 mm; 2.13 g
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: P M TR P P P, Maximinus standing left, holding spear and raising right hand, two standards at sides.
Rome, RIC 1
laney
maximinus_alexandria_a_res.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS--ALEXANDRIA25 views286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.,
Billon tetradrachm 19.5 mm 7.55 g
O: "MAXIMIANO"C C"EB", laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: ENATOY L (year 9), Homonoia standing left, raising right, double cornucopia in left, star in right field
ALEXANDRIA, ROMAN PROVINCIAL EGYPT
Milne 5126; Dattari 5936; BMC Alexandria p. 330, 2567

laney
MAXIMINUS.jpg
(0309) MAXIMINUS II DAIA30 viewsCaesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313 AD.
struck 309 - 313 AD
AE 21.5 mm 4.04 g
O: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
LAUR HEAD R
R: GENIO AVGVSTI
GENIUS STANDING L POURING FROM PATERS, HOLDING CORNUCOPIAE, EAGLE AT FEET, GAMMA IN R FIELD
SMNA IN EXE
NICOMEDIA
laney
MAXIMINUS_II_GENIO.jpg
(0309) MAXIMINUS II DAIA29 viewsCaesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313 AD.
struck 309 - 313 AD
AE 23 mm 6.41 g
O: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
LAUR HEAD R
R: GENIO IMPERITORIS
GENIUS STANDING L POURING FROM PATERA OVER ALTAR AND HOLDING CORNUCOPIA, STAR IN LEFT FIELD, I IN RIGHT FIELD, ANT IN EXE
ANTIOCH
laney
max_ii_gen_1_res.jpg
(0309) MAXIMINUS II DAIA15 viewsCaesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313 AD.
struck 305-308 AD
AE 23.5 mm 4.86 g
O: GAL VAL MIXIMINVS NOB CAES , Laureate bust right REVERSE: GENIO CAESARIS , Genius standing left holding patera and cornucopiae; SMNA in exe.
Nicomedia mint
laney
max_ii_gen_2_res.jpg
(0309) MAXIMINUS II DAIA14 viewsCaesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313
struck 308-309 AD
AE 24.5 mm 5.87 g
O: MAXIMINVS FIL AVGG laureate head right
R: GENIO CAESSARIS Genius standing left holding cornucopiae and patera; star in left field; D right field; SMTS in exe.
Thessalonica mint
laney
max_ii_iovi_res.jpg
(0309) MAXIMINUS II DAIA25 viewsCaesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313
struck 313 AD
AE 12 X 24 mm 3.21 g
O: IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG laureate cuirassed bust right
R: IOVI CONSERVATORI; Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe, eagle to left; A to right; SIS in exe
Siscia mint
laney
rjb_lon_6_209b_08_06.jpg
(VI)209b11 viewsMaximinus II
IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG
Laureate, cuirassed bust right
GENIO POP ROM
Genius standing left
-/star//PLN
RIC (VI) 209b
mauseus
1-Maximinus-I-RIC-06.jpg
01. Maximinus I / RIC 6.26 viewsDenarius, 238 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM / Laureate bust of Maximinus.
Reverse: P M TR P IIII COS P P / The emperor standing between two standards, holding spear and raising right hand.
2.62 gm., 19.5 mm.
RIC #6; Sear 8314.

This coin dates from January 1 to March 19, 238, at which time Gordian I was proclaimed emperor and the mint at Rome stopped coining for Maximinus. It was not until June 24, however, that he was murdered by his soldiers.
1 commentsCallimachus
031.jpg
025 MAXIMINUS I TRAX9 viewsEMPEROR: Maximinus I Trax
DENOMINATION: Denarius
OBVERSE: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust rt.
REVERSE: PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left with baton over a globe & cornucopiae
DATE: 235-238 AD
MINT: Roma
WEIGHT: 3.29
RIC: 20
Barnaba6
Personajes_Imperiales_5.jpg
05 - Personalities of the Empire49 viewsDiadumenian, Elagabalus, Julia Maesa, Julia Soaemias, Aquilia Severa, Annia Faustina, Severus Alexander, Julia Mamaea, Orbiana, Maximinus I, Paulina, Maximus and Gordian Imdelvalle
Personajes_Imperiales_5~0.jpg
05 - Personalities of the Empire61 viewsDiadumenian, Elagabalus, Julia Maesa, Julia Soaemias, Aquilia Severa, Annia Faustina, Severus Alexander, Julia Mamaea, Orbiana, Maximinus I, Paulina, Maximus and Gordian I1 commentsmdelvalle
62a.jpg
062a Maximinus I Thrax. AR denarius10 viewsobv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG laur. drp. bust r.
rev: PM TR P PP emperor in military dress std. l., two standards
leaning l. on spear and raising
hill132
62b.jpg
062b Maximinus I Thrax. AE sestertius11 viewsobv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG laur. drp. bust r.
rev: FIDES MILITVS fides std. facing head l. standard in each hand
fld: SC
hill132
Maximinus-I_axis-6h_18-19mm_3,07g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 003, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P II COS P P, Emperor standing front, #199 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 003, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P II COS P P, Emperor standing front, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- P-M-TR-P-II-COS-P-P, Emperor standing front, head left, between two standards, raising right hand and holding long sceptre.
exerg: , diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 3,07g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-03, p-, C-55
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_P-M-TR-P-II-COS-P-P_RIC-IV-3_C-55_Rome-235-AD_002_Q-002_7h_18,5-19mm_2,83g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 003, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P II COS P P, Emperor standing front, #263 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 003, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P II COS P P, Emperor standing front, #2
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- P-M-TR-P-II-COS-P-P, Emperor standing front, head left, between two standards, raising right hand and holding long sceptre.
exerg: , diameter: 18,5-19mm, weight: 2,83g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-03, p-, C-55
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC_7A,_RSC_7a,_001_Q-001_0h_18,5-19,5mm_2,86g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, #182 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
exerg: , diameter: 18,5-19,5mm, weight: 2,86g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-7A, p-, RSC-7a,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC_7A,_RSC_7a,_Q-002_7h_19,5-20,5mm_2,55g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, #262 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, #2
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
exerg: , diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 2,55g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-7A, p-, RSC-7a,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC_7A,_RSC_7a,_001_Q-003_6h_18-20mm_2,00ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, #370 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, #3
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
exerg: , diameter: 18-20mm, weight: 2,00g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-7A, p-, RSC-7a,
Q-003
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC_7A,_RSC_7a(anc-barb-imitation-fouree)_Q-003_6h_18,5-19mm_2,66ga-s~0.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!! #369 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!! #3
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
exerg: , diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 2,55g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: (RIC-IV-II-7A, p-, RSC-7a,) ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!!
Q-003
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC_7A,_RSC_7a(anc-barb-imitation-fouree)_Q-003_6h_18,5-19mm_2,66ga-s~1.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!! #364 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!! #3
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
exerg: , diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 2,55g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: (RIC-IV-II-7A, p-, RSC-7a,) ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!!
Q-003
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC_7A,_RSC_7a(anc-barb-imitation-fouree)_Q-003_6h_18,5-19mm_2,66ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!! #475 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!! #4
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
exerg: , diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 2,55g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: (RIC-IV-II-7A, p-, RSC-7a,) ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!!
Q-004
1 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_LIBERALITAS-AVG_RIC_10,_RSC_19,_BMC_45_Q-001_5h_18,5-19,5mm_2,09g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 010, Rome, AR-Denarius, LIBERALITAS-AVG, Liberalitas standing left, #168 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 010, Rome, AR-Denarius, LIBERALITAS-AVG, Liberalitas standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- LIBERALITAS-AVG, Liberalitas standing left, holding coin counter and cornucopiae..
exerg: , diameter: 18,5-19,5mm, weight: 2,09g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-10, p-, RSC-19, BMC-45,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PAX-A-VGVSTI_RIC_12,_RSC_31a,_BMC_68_001_Q-001_7h_19,5-20,5mm_3,63g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #181 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- PAX-A-VGVSTI, Pax standing left, with branch and scepter
exerg: , diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 3,63g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-12, p-, RSC-31a, BMC-68,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PAX-AVGVSTI_RIC_12,_RSC_31a,_BMC_68_Q-002_6h_19,5-20mm_3,10ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #263 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #2
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- PAX-AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, with branch and scepter
exerg: , diameter: 19,5-20mm, weight: 3,10g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-12, p-, RSC-31a, BMC-68,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PAX-AVGVSTI_RIC_12,_RSC_31a,_BMC_68_Q-003_7h_18,5-20,5mm_3,33g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #369 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #3
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- PAX-AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, with branch and scepter
exerg: , diameter: 18,5-20,5mm, weight: 3,33g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-12, p-, RSC-31a, BMC-68,
Q-003
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PAX-AVGVSTI_RIC_12,_RSC_31a,_BMC_68_Q-004_1h_18,5-21mm_2,98g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #467 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #4
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- PAX-A-VGVSTI, Pax standing left, with branch and scepter
exerg: , diameter: 18,5-21mm, weight: 2,98g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-12, p-, RSC-31a, BMC-68,
Q-004
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PAX-AVGVSTI_RIC_12,_RSC_31a,_BMC_68_Q-005_1h_19mm_3,60ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #566 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #5
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- PAX-A-VGVSTI, Pax standing left, with branch and scepter
exerg: , diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,60g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-12, p-, RSC-31a, BMC-68,
Q-005
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PROVIDENTIA-AVG_RIC_13,_RSC_77,_BMC_15_Q-001_0h_19,5-20mm_2,99g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 013, Rome, AR-Denarius, PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia satanding left, #262 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 013, Rome, AR-Denarius, PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia satanding left, #2
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, early portrait resembling Severus Alexander.
revers:- PROVIDENTIA-AVG , Providentia standing left, with cornucopiae and wand pointed at globe at foot.
exerg: , diameter: 19,5-20mm, weight: 2,99g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 235-236 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-13, p-141,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PROVIDENTIA-AVG_RIC-IV-II-13d_p-141_Q-001_axis-6h_20mm_2,65g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 013d, Rome, AR-Denarius, PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia satanding left, #1262 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 013d, Rome, AR-Denarius, PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia satanding left, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- PROVIDENTIA-AVG , Providentia standing left, holding wand over globe and cornucopia.
exerg: , diameter: 20mm, weight: 2,65g, axis:- 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235-236 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-13d, p-141,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_SALVS-AVGVSTI_RIC_14,_RSC_85a,_BMC_99_Q-001_6h_19,5-21mm_2,12ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #163 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- SALVS-AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding from patera a serpent arising from altar.
exerg: , diameter: 19,5-21mm, weight: 2,12g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-14, p-, RSC-85a, BMC-99,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_SALVS-AVGVSTI_RIC_14,_RSC_85a,_BMC_99_Q-002_5h_19,5mm_3,15g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #267 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #2
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- SALVS-AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding from patera a serpent arising from altar.
exerg: , diameter: 19,5mm, weight: 3,15g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-14, p-, RSC-85a, BMC-99,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_SALVS-AVGVSTI_RIC_14,_RSC_85a,_BMC_99_Q-003_6h_19,5-20,5mm_2,98g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #373 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #3
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- SALVS-AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding from patera a serpent arising from altar.
exerg: , diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 2,98g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-14, p-, RSC-85a, BMC-99,
Q-003
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_SALVS-AVGVSTI_RIC_14,_RSC_85a,_BMC_99_Q-004_6h_19,5mm_3,05g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #468 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #4
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- SALVS-AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding from patera a serpent arising from altar.
exerg: , diameter: 19,5mm, weight: 3,05g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-14, p-, RSC-85a, BMC-99,
Q-004
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_VICTORIA-AVG_RIC-IV-16_C-99_Rome-235-6-AD_001_Q-001_axis-6h_20mm_3,19g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 016, Rome, AR-Denarius, VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing right, #1436 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 016, Rome, AR-Denarius, VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing right, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- VICTORIA-AVG, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm.
exerg: , diameter: 20mm, weight: 3,19g, axis:- 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235-236 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-16, p-, C-99
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_VICTORIA-AVG_RIC-IV-16_C-99_Rome-235-6-AD_Q-002_6h_18,5-20mm_2,53g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 016, Rome, AR-Denarius, VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing right, #2122 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 016, Rome, AR-Denarius, VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing right, #2
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- VICTORIA-AVG, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm.
exerg: , diameter: 18,5-20mm, weight: 2,53g, axis:- 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235-236 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-16, p-, C-99
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM_P-M-TR-P-IIII-COS-P-P_S-C_RIC-IV-40_C-71_Rome-236-8-AD_Q-001_0h_29-30mm_19,40g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 040, Rome, AE-Sestertius, P M TR P IIII COS P P, Maximinus standing left, #183 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 040, Rome, AE-Sestertius, P M TR P IIII COS P P, Maximinus standing left, #1
avers:- MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- P-M-TR-P-IIII-COS-P-P, Maximinus standing left, right hand raised, holding spear in left; two standards behind to the left, one right.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 29-30mm, weight: 19,40g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-40, p-, C-71, BMC 221,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_S-C_RIC_43,_Cohen_13,__Rome-236-8-AD_001_Q-001_0h_29,5mm_19,2ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 043, Rome, AE-Sestertius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, #165 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 043, Rome, AE-Sestertius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, standard in each hand.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 29,5mm, weight: 19,2g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-44, p-, C-13, BMC 263,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PAX-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC_58,_Cohen_34,__Rome-235-6-AD_001_Q-001_11h_28,5-31mm_15,68ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 058, Rome, AE-Sestertius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #169 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 058, Rome, AE-Sestertius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- PAX-AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, with olive branch.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 28,5-31mm, weight: 15,68g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-58, p-, C-34, BMCRE 7,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_SALVS-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC_64,_Cohen_88,__Rome-236-8-AD_001_Q-001_0h_28-32mm_19,03ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 064, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #161 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 064, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- SALVS-AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding from patera a serpent arising from altar.
exerg: -/-//SC, diameter: 28-32mm, weight: 19,03g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-64, p-, C-88, BMCRE 100,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM_SALVS-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-IV-85_C-92_Rome-236-8-AD_001_Q-001_axis-1h_29-31mm_17,97g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 085, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS-AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #1135 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 085, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS-AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #1
avers:- MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM, Laureate, draped bust right.
revers:- SALVS-AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising from altar.
exerg: -/-//S-C, diameter: 29-31mm, weight: 17,97g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-85, p-, C-92
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM_SALVS-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-IV-85_C-92_Rome-236-8-AD_Q-002_0h_29-30,5mm_24,15g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 085, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS-AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #268 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 085, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS-AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #2
avers:- MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM, Laureate, draped bust right.
revers:- SALVS-AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising from altar.
exerg: -/-//S-C, diameter: 29-30,5mm, weight: 24,15g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-85, p-, C-92
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM_VICTORIA-GERMANICA_S-C_RIC_90,_Cohen_109,_BMC_191_Rome-236-8-AD_001_Q-001_0h_29-30mm_18,08g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 090, Rome, AE-Sestertius, VICTORIA GERMANICA, Victory standing left, #168 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 090, Rome, AE-Sestertius, VICTORIA GERMANICA, Victory standing left, #1
avers:- MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- VICTORIA-GERMANICA, Victory standing left with wreath and palm, captive seated before.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 29-30mm, weight: 18,08g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-90, p-, C-109, BMC-191,
Q-001
quadrans
RI 080a img.jpg
080 - Maximinus denarius - RIC 00161 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– P M TR P P P, Maximinus standing left between two standards, holding scepter and raising right hand in salute
Minted in Rome, April - Dec A.D. 235
Reference:– RIC 1, RSC 46
maridvnvm
RI 080c img.jpg
080 - Maximinus denarius - RIC 01342 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate draped cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing facing head left, holding wand over globe and cornucopiae
Minted in Rome, March A.D. 235 – January A.D. 236
Reference:– Van Meter 9, RIC 13, RSC 77a
maridvnvm
RI 080b img.jpg
080 - Maximinus denarius - RIC 01663 viewsObverse – Laureate head right
Reverse – Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm
Obverse Legend – IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
Reverse Legend – VICTORIA AVG
Minted in Rome, March A.D. 235 – January A.D. 236
References:- Van Meter 11, RIC 16, RSC 99
maridvnvm
RI_080d_img.jpg
080 - Maximinus Thrax - RIC 8654 viewsDupondius
Obv:– IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate draped cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising from altar
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– RIC 86
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_080i_img.jpg
080 - Maximinus Thrax denarius - RIC 02033 viewsObv:– MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left with baton over a globe & cornucopiae
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– RIC 20.
maridvnvm
IMG_3719~0.jpg
090. Maximinus I Thrax (235-238 A.D.)24 viewsAv.: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
Rv.: SALVS AVGVSTI / S-C

AE Sestertius Ø28-30 / 19.8g
RIC IV 64 Rome
Juancho
Personajes_Imperiales_10.jpg
10 - Personalities of the Empire44 viewsSeverus II, Maxentius, Romulus, Constantine I, Helena, Fausta, Alexander, Licinius I, Constantia, Maximinus II, Valerius Valens, Licinius II, Crispus and Martinianusmdelvalle
Personajes_Imperiales_10~0.jpg
10 - Personalities of the Empire43 viewsRomulus, Constantine I, Helena, Fausta, Licinius I, Constantia, Maximinus II, Licinius II, Crispus, Constantine II, Delmatius, Hanibalianus, Constans and Constantius II.

mdelvalle
110c.jpg
110c Maximinus Herculius. AE follis24 viewsobv: IMP C MA MAXIMIANVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO POPV_L_I ROMANI Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: HTA
hill132
116a.jpg
116a Maximinus II. AE follis 5.6gm35 viewsobv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO A_VGVSTI Genius l. holding patera and cornucopiae, eagle at feet
ex: -(delta)//SMHT
2 commentshill132
116b.jpg
116b Maximinus II. AE follis 6.0gm23 viewsobv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO IMP_ERATORIS Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: -(delta)/K-P//ALE
1 commentshill132
116c.jpg
116c Maximinus II. AE follis 6.6gm23 viewsobv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO AV_GVSTI CNH Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: SMN(EPSALON)
1 commentshill132
116d.jpg
116d Maximinus II. AE follis 5.0gm24 viewsobv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO A_VGVSTI Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: -A//SMN
hill132
Maximinus-II_AE-Follis_IMP-C-GAL-VAL-MAXIMINVS-P-F-AVG_GENIO-AVGVSTI_star-H_ANT_RIC-VI-164b-p-643_Antiochia_312-AD_Q-001_axis-0h_21mm_5,35g-s.jpg
128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Antioch, RIC VI 164b, AE-1, */H//ANT, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left,266 views128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Antioch, RIC VI 164b, AE-1, */H//ANT, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left,
avers:- IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, holding head of Sol and cornucopia.
exergo: */H//ANT, diameter: 21mm, weight: 5,35g, axis: 0h,
mint: Antioch, date: 312 A.D., ref: RIC VI 164b, p-643,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-II_AE-Follis_IMP-MAXIMINVS-P-F-AVG_GENIO-AVGVSTI_AQS_RIC-VI-130-p-327_Aquilea_312-3AD_Q-001_7h_21,5-22,0mm_4,14g-s.jpg
128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Aquilea, RIC VI 130, -/-//AQS, AE-1, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left,125 views128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Aquilea, RIC VI 130, -/-//AQS, AE-1, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left,
avers:- IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, sacrificing over tripod altar from patera, holding cornucopiae.
exergo: -/-//AQS, diameter: 21,5-22,0mm, weight: 4,14g, axis: 7h,
mint: Aquilea, date: 312-313 A.D., ref: RIC VI 130, p-327,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-II_AE-Quarter-Follis_GAL-VAL-MAXIMINVS-NOB-C_GENIO-POPV-LI-ROMANI_SIS_RIC-VI-170b-p475-4b-A-R_Siscia_305-6_AD_Q-001_axis-0h_19mm_2,34g-s.jpg
128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 170b, AE-Quarter-Follis, -/-//SIS, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, R!,131 views128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 170b, AE-Quarter-Follis, -/-//SIS, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, R!,
avers:- GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, Laureate head right.
revers:- GENIO POPV LI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia.
exergo: -/-//SIS, diameter: 18mm, weight: 2,47g, axis: 0h,
mint: Siscia, date: 305-06 A.D., ref: RIC VI 170b, p-475, R!,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-II_AE-Follis_GA-VAL-MAXIMINVS-NOB-C_PERPETV-ITASAVGG_VI_SIS-A_RIC-VI-184b-Not-in-This-off-A_p-476_Siscia_305-07-AD_Q-001_0h_27,5mm_9,25ga-s.jpg
128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 184b, AE-1, -/VI//SISA, PERPETVITAS AVG G, Roma, helmeted, seated left on shield, Not in RIC this Officina, Rare !!!101 views128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 184b, AE-1, -/VI//SISA, PERPETVITAS AVG G, Roma, helmeted, seated left on shield, Not in RIC this Officina, Rare !!!
avers:- GA VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, Laureate head right.
revers:- PERPETV ITAS AVG G, Roma, helmeted, seated left on shield, right hand holding Victory on globe, left leaning on spear or sceptre.
exergo: -/VI//SISA, diameter: 27,5mm, weight: 9,25g, axis: 0h,
mint: Siscia, date: 305-307 A.D., ref: RIC VI 184b, p-476,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-II__AE-Follis_MAXIMINVS-PF-AVG_IOVI-CONSE-RVATORI_wreath-B_dotSMdotTSdot_RIC-VI-50a-p-518_312-AD-Thessa_Q-001_axis-0h_23,5-24,5mm_4,15g-s.jpg
128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Thessalonica, RIC VI 050a, AE-1, wreath/B//•SM•TS•, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left,208 views128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Thessalonica, RIC VI 050a, AE-1, wreath/B//•SM•TS•, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left,
avers:- MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- IOVI CONSE RVATORI, Jupiter standing left,
exerg: wreath/B//•SM•TS•, diameter: mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Thessalonica, date:312 A.D., ref: RIC VI 50a, p-518,
Q-001
quadrans
12g-Constantine-Her-075.jpg
12g. Constantine: Heraclea follis.35 viewsFollis, 313 - 314, Heraclea mint.
Obverse: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG / Laureate bust of Constantine.
Reverse: IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG / Jupiter standing, chlamys over left shoulder, holding Victory on globe, leaning on sceptre. Eagle with wreath in its beak at his feet. E in right field.
Mint mark: SMHT
3.95 gm., 22 mm.
RIC #75 (vol VI) and #5 (vol VII); Sear #15958.

This coin seems to be listed twice in RIC: #75 in Volume VI, and #5 in Volume VII.

RIC Volume VI (page 541) assigns this coin to the year 313, just before Maximinus (Daza) occupied the city of Heraclea for a month or so, during which he issued his own different coinage.

RIC Volume VII (page 542) assigns the coin to the period of time just after Maximinus withdrew from Heraclea and into the year 314. Page 533 says the coinage from before Maximinus' occupation continued after his withdrawal "with exactly the same reverse as before the occupation."

I can not tell the difference between these two listings and have to conclude they are the same coin. Either way, it is a nice coin from turbulent times in the history of Heraclea. The original silvering is still under that patina.
Callimachus
14-Gordian-III-RIC-116.jpg
13. Gordian III / RIC 116.24 viewsDenarius, 240 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG / Laureate bust of Gordian.
Reverse: VIRTVTI AVGVSTI / Hercules standing, resting right hand on hip and left hand club set on rock; lion-skin beside club.
3.58 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #116; Sear #8684.

The chronology of the denarii coinage of Gordian III has been poorly understood because Roman Imperial Coinage (RIC) has it mixed up in its listings. For example, it will tell you that 5 denarii (Diana, Pietas, Salus, Securitas, and Venus) were issued in the summer of 241 to commemorate the marriage of Gordian and Tranquillina. Recent thinking tells another entirely different story. The following summary is based on a posting by Curtis Clay, November 25, 2011, on the Forum Ancient Coins Classical Numismatics Discussion Board.
Although antoniniani were issued for a while under Caracalla and Elagabalus, the denarius was the standard silver denomination throughout the reigns of Severus Alexander, Maximinus Thrax, and into the first part of the joint reign of Balbinus & Pupienus. (This, by the way, is when the PIETAS AVGG denarius of Gordian as Caesar was issued.) Sometime during the short reign of Balbinus & Pupienus, the antoninianus supplanted the denarius as the standard silver denomination. When Gordian III became emperor (July 238), his administration continued to follow the then current practice of issuing only antoniniani.

Early in 240, Gordian apparently decided to revert back to the traditional coinage of the Empire and began to issue only denarii. The denarii issued at this time were the following:

P M TR P III COS P P / Horseman
DIANA LVCIFERA
PIETAS AVGVSTI
SALVS AVGVSTI
SECVRITAS PVBLICA
VENVS VICTRIX

No antoniniani exist with these reverse types.

The next issue of denarii was issued in the summer of 240 after Gordian became COS II, and consists of these types:

P M TR P III COS II P P / Emperor standing
P M TR P III COS II P P / Apollo seated
AETERNITATI AVG
IOVIS STATOR
LAETITIA AVG N
VIRTVTI AVGVSTI

Within a short time, however, it was decided to go back to having the antoninianus as the standard silver denomination. Antoniniani were issued again, at first with the same reverse types as the second issue of denarii. That is why these reverse types exist on denarii and antoniniani even though they were not issued at the same time.

So the period the mint issued denarii rather than antoniniani as the standard silver denomination lasted from about March through August, 240. This was the last time denarii were issued for general circulation. The antoninianus lasted until Diocletian’s coinage reform of 295, after which Roman coinage was so vastly different that there was no question of returning to the denarius.

The 13 denarii of Gordian III are presented in this album in this order:
Gordian III as Caesar denarius - 1 coin.
First issue of denarii - 6 coins.
Second issue of denarii - 6 coins.
Callimachus
DiocleAnt.jpg
1301a, Diocletian, 284-305 A.D. (Antioch)93 viewsDIOCLETIAN (284 – 305 AD) AE Antoninianus, 293-95 AD, RIC V 322, Cohen 34. 20.70 mm/3.1 gm, aVF, Antioch. Obverse: IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Radiate bust right, draped & cuirassed; Reverse: CONCORDIA MILITVM, Jupiter presents Victory on a globe to Diocletian, I/XXI. Early Diocletian with dusty earthen green patina.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Diocletian ( 284-305 A.D.)

Ralph W. Mathisen
University of South Carolina


Summary and Introduction
The Emperor Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (A.D. 284-305) put an end to the disastrous phase of Roman history known as the "Military Anarchy" or the "Imperial Crisis" (235-284). He established an obvious military despotism and was responsible for laying the groundwork for the second phase of the Roman Empire, which is known variously as the "Dominate," the "Tetrarchy," the "Later Roman Empire," or the "Byzantine Empire." His reforms ensured the continuity of the Roman Empire in the east for more than a thousand years.

Diocletian's Early Life and Reign
Diocletian was born ca. 236/237 on the Dalmatian coast, perhaps at Salona. He was of very humble birth, and was originally named Diocles. He would have received little education beyond an elementary literacy and he was apparently deeply imbued with religious piety He had a wife Prisca and a daughter Valeria, both of whom reputedly were Christians. During Diocletian's early life, the Roman empire was in the midst of turmoil. In the early years of the third century, emperors increasingly insecure on their thrones had granted inflationary pay raises to the soldiers. The only meaningful income the soldiers now received was in the form of gold donatives granted by newly acclaimed emperors. Beginning in 235, armies throughout the empire began to set up their generals as rival emperors. The resultant civil wars opened up the empire to invasion in both the north, by the Franks, Alamanni, and Goths, and the east, by the Sassanid Persians. Another reason for the unrest in the army was the great gap between the social background of the common soldiers and the officer corps.

Diocletian sought his fortune in the army. He showed himself to be a shrewd, able, and ambitious individual. He is first attested as "Duke of Moesia" (an area on the banks of the lower Danube River), with responsibility for border defense. He was a prudent and methodical officer, a seeker of victory rather than glory. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube proclaimed the praetorian prefect Carus as emperor. Diocletian found favor under the new emperor, and was promoted to Count of the Domestics, the commander of the cavalry arm of the imperial bodyguard. In 283 he was granted the honor of a consulate.

In 284, in the midst of a campaign against the Persians, Carus was killed, struck by a bolt of lightning which one writer noted might have been forged in a legionary armory. This left the empire in the hands of his two young sons, Numerian in the east and Carinus in the west. Soon thereafter, Numerian died under mysterious circumstances near Nicomedia, and Diocletian was acclaimed emperor in his place. At this time he changed his name from Diocles to Diocletian. In 285 Carinus was killed in a battle near Belgrade, and Diocletian gained control of the entire empire.

Diocletian's Administrative and Military Reforms
As emperor, Diocletian was faced with many problems. His most immediate concerns were to bring the mutinous and increasingly barbarized Roman armies back under control and to make the frontiers once again secure from invasion. His long-term goals were to restore effective government and economic prosperity to the empire. Diocletian concluded that stern measures were necessary if these problems were to be solved. He felt that it was the responsibility of the imperial government to take whatever steps were necessary, no matter how harsh or innovative, to bring the empire back under control.

Diocletian was able to bring the army back under control by making several changes. He subdivided the roughly fifty existing provinces into approximately one hundred. The provinces also were apportioned among twelve "dioceses," each under a "vicar," and later also among four "prefectures," each under a "praetorian prefect." As a result, the imperial bureaucracy became increasingly bloated. He institutionalized the policy of separating civil and military careers. He divided the army itself into so-called "border troops," actually an ineffective citizen militia, and "palace troops," the real field army, which often was led by the emperor in person.

Following the precedent of Aurelian (A.D.270-275), Diocletian transformed the emperorship into an out-and-out oriental monarchy. Access to him became restricted; he now was addressed not as First Citizen (Princeps) or the soldierly general (Imperator), but as Lord and Master (Dominus Noster) . Those in audience were required to prostrate themselves on the ground before him.

Diocletian also concluded that the empire was too large and complex to be ruled by only a single emperor. Therefore, in order to provide an imperial presence throughout the empire, he introduced the "Tetrarchy," or "Rule by Four." In 285, he named his lieutenant Maximianus "Caesar," and assigned him the western half of the empire. This practice began the process which would culminate with the de facto split of the empire in 395. Both Diocletian and Maximianus adopted divine attributes. Diocletian was identified with Jupiter and Maximianus with Hercules. In 286, Diocletian promoted Maximianus to the rank of Augustus, "Senior Emperor," and in 293 he appointed two new Caesars, Constantius (the father of Constantine I ), who was given Gaul and Britain in the west, and Galerius, who was assigned the Balkans in the east.

By instituting his Tetrarchy, Diocletian also hoped to solve another problem. In the Augustan Principate, there had been no constitutional method for choosing new emperors. According to Diocletian's plan, the successor of each Augustus would be the respective Caesar, who then would name a new Caesar. Initially, the Tetrarchy operated smoothly and effectively.

Once the army was under control, Diocletian could turn his attention to other problems. The borders were restored and strengthened. In the early years of his reign, Diocletian and his subordinates were able to defeat foreign enemies such as Alamanni, Sarmatians, Saracens, Franks, and Persians, and to put down rebellions in Britain and Egypt. The easter frontier was actually expanded.

.
Diocletian's Economic Reforms
Another problem was the economy, which was in an especially sorry state. The coinage had become so debased as to be virtually worthless. Diocletian's attempt to reissue good gold and silver coins failed because there simply was not enough gold and silver available to restore confidence in the currency. A "Maximum Price Edict" issued in 301, intended to curb inflation, served only to drive goods onto the black market. Diocletian finally accepted the ruin of the money economy and revised the tax system so that it was based on payments in kind . The soldiers too came to be paid in kind.

In order to assure the long term survival of the empire, Diocletian identified certain occupations which he felt would have to be performed. These were known as the "compulsory services." They included such occupations as soldiers, bakers, members of town councils, and tenant farmers. These functions became hereditary, and those engaging in them were inhibited from changing their careers. The repetitious nature of these laws, however, suggests that they were not widely obeyed. Diocletian also expanded the policy of third-century emperors of restricting the entry of senators into high-ranking governmental posts, especially military ones.

Diocletian attempted to use the state religion as a unifying element. Encouraged by the Caesar Galerius, Diocletian in 303 issued a series of four increasingly harsh decrees designed to compel Christians to take part in the imperial cult, the traditional means by which allegiance was pledged to the empire. This began the so-called "Great Persecution."

Diocletian's Resignation and Death
On 1 May 305, wearied by his twenty years in office, and determined to implement his method for the imperial succession, Diocletian abdicated. He compelled his co-regent Maximianus to do the same. Constantius and Galerius then became the new Augusti, and two new Caesars were selected, Maximinus (305-313) in the east and Severus (305- 307) in the west. Diocletian then retired to his palace at Split on the Croatian coast. In 308 he declined an offer to resume the purple, and the aged ex-emperor died at Split on 3 December 316.

Copyright (C) 1996, Ralph W. Mathisen, University of South Carolina
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

1 commentsCleisthenes
DicletianConcordCyz.jpg
1301b, Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 March 305 A.D.57 viewsDiocletian. RIC V Part II Cyzicus 256 var. Not listed with pellet in exegrue
Item ref: RI141f. VF. Minted in Cyzicus (B in centre field, XXI dot in exegrue)Obverse:- IMP CC VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Reverse:- CONCORDIA MILITVM, Diocletian standing right, holding parazonium, receiving Victory from Jupiter standing left with scepter.
A post reform radiate of Diocletian. Ex Maridvnvm.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Diocletian ( 284-305 A.D.)

Ralph W. Mathisen
University of South Carolina


Summary and Introduction
The Emperor Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (A.D. 284-305) put an end to the disastrous phase of Roman history known as the "Military Anarchy" or the "Imperial Crisis" (235-284). He established an obvious military despotism and was responsible for laying the groundwork for the second phase of the Roman Empire, which is known variously as the "Dominate," the "Tetrarchy," the "Later Roman Empire," or the "Byzantine Empire." His reforms ensured the continuity of the Roman Empire in the east for more than a thousand years.

Diocletian's Early Life and Reign
Diocletian was born ca. 236/237 on the Dalmatian coast, perhaps at Salona. He was of very humble birth, and was originally named Diocles. He would have received little education beyond an elementary literacy and he was apparently deeply imbued with religious piety He had a wife Prisca and a daughter Valeria, both of whom reputedly were Christians. During Diocletian's early life, the Roman empire was in the midst of turmoil. In the early years of the third century, emperors increasingly insecure on their thrones had granted inflationary pay raises to the soldiers. The only meaningful income the soldiers now received was in the form of gold donatives granted by newly acclaimed emperors. Beginning in 235, armies throughout the empire began to set up their generals as rival emperors. The resultant civil wars opened up the empire to invasion in both the north, by the Franks, Alamanni, and Goths, and the east, by the Sassanid Persians. Another reason for the unrest in the army was the great gap between the social background of the common soldiers and the officer corps.

Diocletian sought his fortune in the army. He showed himself to be a shrewd, able, and ambitious individual. He is first attested as "Duke of Moesia" (an area on the banks of the lower Danube River), with responsibility for border defense. He was a prudent and methodical officer, a seeker of victory rather than glory. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube proclaimed the praetorian prefect Carus as emperor. Diocletian found favor under the new emperor, and was promoted to Count of the Domestics, the commander of the cavalry arm of the imperial bodyguard. In 283 he was granted the honor of a consulate.

In 284, in the midst of a campaign against the Persians, Carus was killed, struck by a bolt of lightning which one writer noted might have been forged in a legionary armory. This left the empire in the hands of his two young sons, Numerian in the east and Carinus in the west. Soon thereafter, Numerian died under mysterious circumstances near Nicomedia, and Diocletian was acclaimed emperor in his place. At this time he changed his name from Diocles to Diocletian. In 285 Carinus was killed in a battle near Belgrade, and Diocletian gained control of the entire empire.

Diocletian's Administrative and Military Reforms
As emperor, Diocletian was faced with many problems. His most immediate concerns were to bring the mutinous and increasingly barbarized Roman armies back under control and to make the frontiers once again secure from invasion. His long-term goals were to restore effective government and economic prosperity to the empire. Diocletian concluded that stern measures were necessary if these problems were to be solved. He felt that it was the responsibility of the imperial government to take whatever steps were necessary, no matter how harsh or innovative, to bring the empire back under control.

Diocletian was able to bring the army back under control by making several changes. He subdivided the roughly fifty existing provinces into approximately one hundred. The provinces also were apportioned among twelve "dioceses," each under a "vicar," and later also among four "prefectures," each under a "praetorian prefect." As a result, the imperial bureaucracy became increasingly bloated. He institutionalized the policy of separating civil and military careers. He divided the army itself into so-called "border troops," actually an ineffective citizen militia, and "palace troops," the real field army, which often was led by the emperor in person.

Following the precedent of Aurelian (A.D.270-275), Diocletian transformed the emperorship into an out-and-out oriental monarchy. Access to him became restricted; he now was addressed not as First Citizen (Princeps) or the soldierly general (Imperator), but as Lord and Master (Dominus Noster) . Those in audience were required to prostrate themselves on the ground before him.

Diocletian also concluded that the empire was too large and complex to be ruled by only a single emperor. Therefore, in order to provide an imperial presence throughout the empire, he introduced the "Tetrarchy," or "Rule by Four." In 285, he named his lieutenant Maximianus "Caesar," and assigned him the western half of the empire. This practice began the process which would culminate with the de facto split of the empire in 395. Both Diocletian and Maximianus adopted divine attributes. Diocletian was identified with Jupiter and Maximianus with Hercules. In 286, Diocletian promoted Maximianus to the rank of Augustus, "Senior Emperor," and in 293 he appointed two new Caesars, Constantius (the father of Constantine I ), who was given Gaul and Britain in the west, and Galerius, who was assigned the Balkans in the east.

By instituting his Tetrarchy, Diocletian also hoped to solve another problem. In the Augustan Principate, there had been no constitutional method for choosing new emperors. According to Diocletian's plan, the successor of each Augustus would be the respective Caesar, who then would name a new Caesar. Initially, the Tetrarchy operated smoothly and effectively.

Once the army was under control, Diocletian could turn his attention to other problems. The borders were restored and strengthened. In the early years of his reign, Diocletian and his subordinates were able to defeat foreign enemies such as Alamanni, Sarmatians, Saracens, Franks, and Persians, and to put down rebellions in Britain and Egypt. The easter frontier was actually expanded.

.
Diocletian's Economic Reforms
Another problem was the economy, which was in an especially sorry state. The coinage had become so debased as to be virtually worthless. Diocletian's attempt to reissue good gold and silver coins failed because there simply was not enough gold and silver available to restore confidence in the currency. A "Maximum Price Edict" issued in 301, intended to curb inflation, served only to drive goods onto the black market. Diocletian finally accepted the ruin of the money economy and revised the tax system so that it was based on payments in kind . The soldiers too came to be paid in kind.

In order to assure the long term survival of the empire, Diocletian identified certain occupations which he felt would have to be performed. These were known as the "compulsory services." They included such occupations as soldiers, bakers, members of town councils, and tenant farmers. These functions became hereditary, and those engaging in them were inhibited from changing their careers. The repetitious nature of these laws, however, suggests that they were not widely obeyed. Diocletian also expanded the policy of third-century emperors of restricting the entry of senators into high-ranking governmental posts, especially military ones.

Diocletian attempted to use the state religion as a unifying element. Encouraged by the Caesar Galerius, Diocletian in 303 issued a series of four increasingly harsh decrees designed to compel Christians to take part in the imperial cult, the traditional means by which allegiance was pledged to the empire. This began the so-called "Great Persecution."

Diocletian's Resignation and Death
On 1 May 305, wearied by his twenty years in office, and determined to implement his method for the imperial succession, Diocletian abdicated. He compelled his co-regent Maximianus to do the same. Constantius and Galerius then became the new Augusti, and two new Caesars were selected, Maximinus (305-313) in the east and Severus (305- 307) in the west. Diocletian then retired to his palace at Split on the Croatian coast. In 308 he declined an offer to resume the purple, and the aged ex-emperor died at Split on 3 December 316.

Copyright (C) 1996, Ralph W. Mathisen, University of South Carolina
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


Cleisthenes
MaxHercRIC5iiRome.jpg
1302a, Maximian, 285 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.47 viewsMaximianus AE Antoninianus. RIC V Part II 506 Bust Type C. Cohen 355; VF; Minted in Rome A.D. 285-286. Obverse: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right; Rverse: IOVI CONSERVAT AVGG, Jupiter standing left holding thunderbolt & scepter, XXIZ in exergue. Ex maridvnvm.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Maximian, 285-305, 306-308, and 310 A.D.

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Perhaps born ca. 249/250 A.D. in Sirmium in the area of the Balkans, Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus, more commonly known as Maximianus Herculius (Maximian), had been a soldier before he put on the purple. A fellow soldier with the Emperor Diocletian, he had served in the military during the reigns of Aurelian and Probus.

When the Emperor Diocletian determined that the empire was too large for one man to govern on his own, he made Maximian his Caesar in 285/6 and elevated him to the rank of Augustus in perhaps the spring of 286. While Diocletian ruled in the East, Maximian ruled in the West. In 293, in order to maintain and to strengthen the stability of the empire, Diocletian appointed Constantius I Chlorus to serve Maximian as a Caesar in the West, while Galerius did the same job in the East. This arrangement, called the "Tetrarchy", was meant not only to provide a stronger foundation for the two emperors' rule, but also to end any possible fighting over the succession to the throne once the two senior Augusti had left the throne--a problem which had bedeviled the principate since the time of the Emperor Augustus. To cement the relationship between Maximian and his Caesar, Constantius married Maximian's elder daughter Theodora. A decade later, Constantius' son Constantine would marry Maximia's younger daughter Fausta.

On 1 May 305 Diocletian, at Nicomedeia, and Maximian, at Mediolanum, divested themselves of the purple. Their resignations seem largely due to the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian seems to have forced his colleague to abdicate. In any case, Herculius had sworn an oath at the temple of Capitoline Jupiter to carry out the terms of the abdication. Constantius and Galerius were appointed as Augusti, with Maximinus Daia and Severus as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Diocletian's retirement was at Salonae in Dalmatia, while Herculius' retreat was either in Lucania or Campania.

Maximian's retirement, however, was of short duration because, a little more than a year later on 28 October 306, his son Maxentius was proclaimed emperor at Rome. To give his regime an aura of legitimacy, Maximian was forced to affirm his son's acclamation. When Galerius learned of Maxentius' rebellion, he sent Severus against him with an army that had formerly been under his father's command. Maxentius invested his father with the purple again to win over his enemy's troops, a ruse which succeeded. Perhaps to strengthen his own position, in 307 Maximian went to Gaul and married his daughter Fausta to Constantine. When Constantine refused to become embroiled in the civil war between Galerius and Maxentius, Maximian returned to Rome in 308 and attempted to depose his son; however, he did not succeed. When Maximian was unable to convince Diocletian to take up the purple again at a meeting in Carnuntum in late 308, he returned to his son-in-law's side in Gaul.

Although Maximian was treated with all of the respect due a former emperor, he still desired to be more than a figurehead. He decided to seize the purple from Constantine when his son-in-law least expected it. His opportunity came in the summer of 310 when the Franks revolted. When Constantine had taken a small part of his army into enemy territory, Maximian proclaimed himself again emperor and paid the soldiers under his command a donative to secure their loyalty. As soon as Constantine received news about Maximian's revolt in July 310, he went south and reached Arelate before his father-in-law could mount a defense of the city. Although Maximian fled to Massilia, his son-in-law seized the city and took Maximian prisoner. Although he was deprived of the purple, he was granted pardon for his crimes. Unable to endure the humiliation of his defeat, he attempted to have Constantine murdered in his bed. The plot failed because he tried to get his daughter Fausta's help in the matter; she chose to reveal the matter to her husband. Because of this attempt on his son-in-law's life Maximian was dead by the end of July either by his own hand or on the orders of his intended victim.

Eutropia was of Syrian extraction and her marriage to Maximian seems to have been her second. She bore him two children: Maxentius and Fausta. An older daughter, Theodora, may have been a product of her first marriage. Fausta became the wife of Constantine I , while her sister Theodora was the second spouse of his father Constantius I Chlorus . Eutropia apparently survived all her children, with the possible exception of her daughter Fausta who seems to have died in 326. Eutropia is also said to have become a Christian.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Max.jpg
1302b, Maximian, 285-305, 306-308, and 310 A.D., commemorative issued by Constantine the Great (Siscia)55 viewsMaximian, 285-305, 306-308, and 310 A.D., commemorative issued by Constantine the Great. Bronze AE3, RIC 41, VF, Siscia, 1.30g, 16.1mm, 0o, 317-318 A.D. Obverse: DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP, laureate and veiled head right; Reverse: REQVIES OPTIMO-RVM MERITORVM, Emperor seated left on curule chair, raising hand and holding scepter, SIS in exergue; scarce (R3).


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Maximian, 285-305, 306-308, and 310 A.D.

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Perhaps born ca. 249/250 A.D. in Sirmium in the area of the Balkans, Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus, more commonly known as Maximianus Herculius (Maximian), had been a soldier before he put on the purple. A fellow soldier with the Emperor Diocletian, he had served in the military during the reigns of Aurelian and Probus.

When the Emperor Diocletian determined that the empire was too large for one man to govern on his own, he made Maximian his Caesar in 285/6 and elevated him to the rank of Augustus in perhaps the spring of 286. While Diocletian ruled in the East, Maximian ruled in the West. In 293, in order to maintain and to strengthen the stability of the empire, Diocletian appointed Constantius I Chlorus to serve Maximian as a Caesar in the West, while Galerius did the same job in the East. This arrangement, called the "Tetrarchy", was meant not only to provide a stronger foundation for the two emperors' rule, but also to end any possible fighting over the succession to the throne once the two senior Augusti had left the throne--a problem which had bedeviled the principate since the time of the Emperor Augustus. To cement the relationship between Maximian and his Caesar, Constantius married Maximian's elder daughter Theodora. A decade later, Constantius' son Constantine would marry Maximia's younger daughter Fausta.

On 1 May 305 Diocletian, at Nicomedeia, and Maximian, at Mediolanum, divested themselves of the purple. Their resignations seem largely due to the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian seems to have forced his colleague to abdicate. In any case, Herculius had sworn an oath at the temple of Capitoline Jupiter to carry out the terms of the abdication. Constantius and Galerius were appointed as Augusti, with Maximinus Daia and Severus as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Diocletian's retirement was at Salonae in Dalmatia, while Herculius' retreat was either in Lucania or Campania.

Maximian's retirement, however, was of short duration because, a little more than a year later on 28 October 306, his son Maxentius was proclaimed emperor at Rome. To give his regime an aura of legitimacy, Maximian was forced to affirm his son's acclamation. When Galerius learned of Maxentius' rebellion, he sent Severus against him with an army that had formerly been under his father's command. Maxentius invested his father with the purple again to win over his enemy's troops, a ruse which succeeded. Perhaps to strengthen his own position, in 307 Maximian went to Gaul and married his daughter Fausta to Constantine. When Constantine refused to become embroiled in the civil war between Galerius and Maxentius, Maximian returned to Rome in 308 and attempted to depose his son; however, he did not succeed. When Maximian was unable to convince Diocletian to take up the purple again at a meeting in Carnuntum in late 308, he returned to his son-in-law's side in Gaul.

Although Maximian was treated with all of the respect due a former emperor, he still desired to be more than a figurehead. He decided to seize the purple from Constantine when his son-in-law least expected it. His opportunity came in the summer of 310 when the Franks revolted. When Constantine had taken a small part of his army into enemy territory, Maximian proclaimed himself again emperor and paid the soldiers under his command a donative to secure their loyalty. As soon as Constantine received news about Maximian's revolt in July 310, he went south and reached Arelate before his father-in-law could mount a defense of the city. Although Maximian fled to Massilia, his son-in-law seized the city and took Maximian prisoner. Although he was deprived of the purple, he was granted pardon for his crimes. Unable to endure the humiliation of his defeat, he attempted to have Constantine murdered in his bed. The plot failed because he tried to get his daughter Fausta's help in the matter; she chose to reveal the matter to her husband. Because of this attempt on his son-in-law's life Maximian was dead by the end of July either by his own hand or on the orders of his intended victim.

Eutropia was of Syrian extraction and her marriage to Maximian seems to have been her second. She bore him two children: Maxentius and Fausta. An older daughter, Theodora, may have been a product of her first marriage. Fausta became the wife of Constantine I , while her sister Theodora was the second spouse of his father Constantius I Chlorus . Eutropia apparently survived all her children, with the possible exception of her daughter Fausta who seems to have died in 326. Eutropia is also said to have become a Christian.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
GaleriusAugCyz.jpg
1303a, Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D.35 viewsGalerius, RIC VI 59, Cyzicus S, VF, Cyzicus S, 6.4 g, 25.86 mm; 309-310 AD; Obverse: GAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate bust right; Reverse: GENIO A-VGVS[TI], Genius stg. left, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera and cornucopiae. A nice example with sharp detail and nice brown hoard patina. Ex Ancient Imports.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Galerius (305-311 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University


Caius Galerius Valerius Maximianus, more commonly known as Galerius, was from Illyricum; his father, whose name is unknown, was of peasant stock, while his mother, Romula, was from beyond the Danube. Galerius was born in Dacia Ripensis near Sardica. Although the date of his birth is unknown, he was probably born ca. 250 since he served under Aurelian. As a youth Galerius was a shepherd and acquired the nickname Armentarius. Although he seems to have started his military career under Aurelian and Probus, nothing is known about it before his accession as Caesar on 1 March 293. He served as Diocletian's Caesar in the East. Abandoning his first wife, he married Diocletian's daugher, Valeria.

As Caesar he campaigned in Egypt in 294; he seems to have taken to the field against Narses of Persia, and was defeated near Ctesiphon in 295. In 298, after he made inroads into Armenia, he obtained a treaty from the Persians favorable to the Romans. Between 299-305 he overcame the Sarmatians and the Carpi along the Danube. The Great Persecution of the Orthodox Church, which was started in 303 by the Emperor Diocletian, was probably instigated by Galerius. Because of the almost fatal illness that he contracted toward the end of 304, Diocletian, at Nicomedeia, and Maximianus Herculius, at Mediolanum, divested themselves of the purple on 1 May 305. Constantius and Galerius were appointed as Augusti, with Maximinus Daia and Severus as the new Caesars. Constantius and Severus reigned in the West, whereas Galerius' and Daia's realm was the East. Although Constantius was nominally senior Augustus, the real power was in the hands of Galerius because both Caesars were his creatures.

The balance of power shifted at the end of July 306 when Constantius, with his son Constantine at his side, passed away at York in Britain where he was preparing to face incursions by the Picts; his army proclaimed Constantine his successor immediately. As soon as he received the news of the death of Constantius I and the acclamation of Constantine to the purple, Galerius raised Severus to the rank of Augustus to replace his dead colleague in August 306. Making the best of a bad situation, Galerius accepted Constantine as the new Caesar in the West. The situation became more complicated when Maxentius, with his father Maximianus Herculius acquiesing, declared himself princes on 28 October 306. When Galerius learned about the acclamation of the usurper, he dispatched the Emperor Severus to put down the rebellion. Severus took a large field army which had formerly been that of Maximianus and proceeded toward Rome and began to besiege the city, Maxentius, however, and Maximianus, by means of a ruse, convinced Severus to surrender. Later, in 307, Severus was put to death under clouded circumstances. While Severus was fighting in the west, Galerius, during late 306 or early 307, was campaigning against the Sarmatians.

In the early summer of 307 Galerius invaded Italy to avenge Severus's death; he advanced to the south and encamped at Interamna near the Tiber. His attempt to besiege the city was abortive because his army was too small to encompass the city's fortifications. Not trusting his own troops, Galerius withdrew. During its retreat, his army ravaged the Italian countryside as it was returning to its original base. When Maximianus Herculius' attempts to regain the throne between 308 and 310 by pushing his son off his throne or by winning over Constantine to his cause failed, he tried to win Diocletian and Galerius over to his side at Carnuntum in October and November 308; the outcome of the Conference at Carnuntum was that Licinius was appointed Augustus in Severus's place, that Daia and Constantine were denoted filii Augustorum, and that Herculius was completely cut out of the picture. Later, in 310, Herculius died, having been implicated in a plot against his son-in-law. After the Conference at Carnuntum, Galerius returned to Sardica where he died in the opening days of May 311.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University; Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Galerius was Caesar and tetrarch under Maximianus. Although a talented general and administrator, Galerius is better known for his key role in the "Great Persecution" of Christians. He stopped the persecution under condition the Christians pray for his return to health from a serious illness. Galerius died horribly shortly after. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.



Cleisthenes
Constantius1_silvered_follis.jpg
1304a, Constantius I, May 305 - 25 July 306 A.D.48 viewsSilvered follis, RIC 20a, S 3671, VM 25, gVF, Heraclea mint, 10.144g, 27.7mm, 180o, 297 - 298 A.D. Obverse: FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; Reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over shoulder, cornucopia in left, pouring liquor from patera, HTD in exergue; some silvering, nice portrait, well centered.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Constantius I Chlorus (305-306 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Constantius' Early Life and Marriage

Born March 31st, Emperor Flavius Valerius Constantius may have come into the world ca. 250. His family was from Illyricum. In the army he served as a protector, tribunus, and a praeses Dalmatiarum. During the 270s or the 280s, he became the father of Constantine by Helena, his first spouse. By 288 he was the Praetorian Prefect of the western emperor Maximianus Herculius.

Constantius' Reign as Caesar

On 1 March 293 Diocletian appointed Galerius as his Caesar (junior emperor) in the east and Constantius as the Caesar of Maximianus Herculius. Caesar in the west. Both Caesars had the right of succession. In order to strengthen the dynastic relationship between himself and Herculius., Constantius put aside his wife Helena and married Theodora, the daughter, or perhaps stepdaughter, of Maximianus Herculius.. The union was fruitful and of it there were six issue: Flavius Dalmatius, Julius Constantius, Hannibalianus, Constantia, Anastasia, and Eutropia. To strengthen his bond with Galerius and Diocletian in the east, Constantius allowed Galerius to keep his son Constantine as a hostage for his good behavior.

In the remainder of the time that he was a Caesar, Constantius spent much of his time engaged in military actions in the west. In the summer of 293 Constantius expelled the troops of the usurper Carausius from northern Gaul; after Constantius' attack on Bononia (Boulogne), Carausius was murdered. At the same time he dealt with the unrest of the Germans. In 296 he invaded Britain and put down the revolt of the usurper Allectus. Between 300 and 305 A.D. the Caesar campaigned successfully several times with various German tribes. It is worth noting in passing, that while his colleagues rigidly enforced the "Great Persecution in 303," Constantius limited his action to knocking down a few churches.

Constantius as Augustus and His Untimely Death

On 1 May 305 Diocletian, at Nicomedia, and Maximianus Herculius, at Mediolanum (Milan), divested themselves of the purple, probably because of the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian forced Maximianus to abdicate. They appointed as their successors Constantius and Galerius, with Severus and Maximinus Daia as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Constantius, as had his predecessor, ruled in the west, while Galerius and Daia ruled in the east. Almost as soon as he was appointed Augustus, he crossed to Britain to face incursions by the Picts where he died at York on 25 July 306 with his son (Constantine I, known to history as “The Great”) at his side.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Lcnius1.jpg
1308b, Licinius I, 308 - 324 A.D. (Siscia)59 viewsLicinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D. Bronze follis, RIC 4, F, Siscia, 3.257g, 21.6mm, 0o, 313 - 315 A.D. Obverse: IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; Reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and scepter, eagle with wreath in beak left, E right, SIS in exergue.



De Imperatoribus Romanis : An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Licinius (308-324 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Licinius' Heritage

Valerius Licinianus Licinius, more commonly known as Licinius, may have been born ca. 265. Of peasant origin, his family was from Dacia. A close friend and comrade of arms of the Emperor Galerius, he accompanied him on his Persian expedition in 297. When campaigns by Severus and Galerius in late 306 or early 307 and in the summer of 307, respectively, failed to dislodge Maxentius who, with the luke warm support of his father Maximianus Herculius, was acclaimed princeps on 28 October 306, he was sent by the eastern emperor to Maxentius as an ambassador; the diplomatic mission, however, failed because the usurper refused to submit to the authority of his father-in-law Galerius. At the Conference of Carnuntum which was held in October or November of 308, Licinius was made an Augustus on 11 November 308; his realm included Thrace, Illyricum, and Pannonia.

Licinius' Early Reign

Although Licinius was initially appointed by Galerius to replace Severus to end the revolt of Maxentius , Licinius (perhaps wisely) made no effort to move against the usurper. In fact, his first attested victory was against the Sarmatians probably in the late spring, but no later than the end of June in 310. When the Emperor Galerius died in 311, Licinius met Maximinus Daia at the Bosporus during the early summer of that year; they concluded a treaty and divided Galerius' realm between them. It was little more than a year later that the Emperor Constantine defeated Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge on 28 October 312. After the defeat of the usurper, Constantine and Licinius met at Mediolanum (Milan) where Licinius married the former's sister Constantia; one child was born of this union: Valerius Licinianus Licinius. Licinius had another son, born of a slave woman, whose name is unknown. It appears that both emperors promulgated the so-called Edict of Milan, in which Constantine and Licinius granted Christians the freedom to practice their faith without any interference from the state.

As soon as he seems to have learned about the marital alliance between Licinius and Constantine and the death of Maxentius, who had been his ally, Daia traversed Asia Minor and, in April 313, he crossed the Bosporus and went to Byzantium, which he took from Licinius after an eleven day siege. On 30 April 313 the armies of both emperors clashed on the Campus Ergenus; in the ensuing battle Daia's forces were routed. A last ditch stand by Daia at the Cilician Gates failed; the eastern emperor subsequently died in the area of Tarsus probably in July or August 313. As soon as he arrived in Nicomedeia, Licinius promulgated the Edict of Milan. As soon as he had matters in Nicomedeia straightened out, Licinius campaigned against the Persians in the remaining part of 313 and the opening months of 314.

The First Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine

Once Licinius had defeated Maximinus Daia, the sole rulers of the Roman world were he and Constantine. It is obvious that the marriage of Licinius to Constantia was simply a union of convenience. In any case, there is evidence in the sources that both emperors were looking for an excuse to attack the other. The affair involving Bassianus (the husband of Constantius I's daughter Anastasia ), mentioned in the text of Anonymus Valesianus (5.14ff), may have sparked the falling out between the two emperors. In any case, Constantine' s forces joined battle with those of Licinius at Cibalae in Pannonia on 8 October 314. When the battle was over, Constantine prevailed; his victory, however, was Pyrrhic. Both emperors had been involved in exhausting military campaigns in the previous year and the months leading up to Cibalae and each of their realms had expanded so fast that their manpower reserves must have been stretched to the limit. Both men retreated to their own territory to lick their wounds. It may well be that the two emperors made an agreement, which has left no direct trace in the historical record, which would effectively restore the status quo.

Both emperors were variously engaged in different activities between 315 and 316. In addition to campaigning against the Germans while residing in Augusta Treverorum (Trier) in 315, Constantine dealt with aspects of the Donatist controversy; he also traveled to Rome where he celebrated his Decennalia. Licinius, possibly residing at Sirmium, was probably waging war against the Goths. Although not much else is known about Licinius' activities during this period, it is probable that he spent much of his time preparing for his impending war against Constantine; the latter,who spent the spring and summer of 316 in Augusta Treverorum, was probably doing much the same thing. In any case, by December 316, the western emperor was in Sardica with his army. Sometime between 1 December and 28 February 317, both emperors' armies joined battle on the Campus Ardiensis; as was the case in the previous engagement, Constantine' s forces were victorious. On 1 March 317, both sides agreed to a cessation of hostilities; possibly because of the intervention of his wife Constantia, Licinius was able to keep his throne, although he had to agree to the execution of his colleague Valens, who the eastern emperor had appointed as his colleague before the battle, as well as to cede some of his territory to his brother-in-law.

Licinius and the Christians

Although the historical record is not completely clear, Licinius seems to have campaigned against the Sarmatians in 318. He also appears to have been in Byzantium in the summer of 318 and later in June 323. Beyond these few facts, not much else is known about his residences until mid summer of 324. Although he and Constantine had issued the Edict of Milan in early 313, Licinius turned on the Christians in his realm seemingly in 320. The first law that Licinius issued prevented bishops from communicating with each other and from holding synods to discuss matters of interest to them. The second law prohibited men and women from attending services together and young girls from receiving instruction from their bishop or schools. When this law was issued, he also gave orders that Christians could hold services only outside of city walls. Additionally, he deprived officers in the army of their commissions if they did not sacrifice to the gods. Licinius may have been trying to incite Constantine to attack him. In any case, the growing tension between the two rulers is reflected in the consular Fasti of the period.

The Second Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine and Licinius' Death

War actually broke out in 321 when Constantine pursued some Sarmatians, who had been ravaging some territory in his realm, across the Danube. When he checked a similar invasion of the Goths, who were devastating Thrace, Licinius complained that Constantine had broken the treaty between them. Having assembled a fleet and army at Thessalonica, Constantine advanced toward Adrianople. Licinius engaged the forces of his brother-in-law near the banks of the Hebrus River on 3 July 324 where he was routed; with as many men as he could gather, he headed for his fleet which was in the Hellespont. Those of his soldiers who were not killed or put to flight, surrendered to the enemy. Licinius fled to Byzantium, where he was besieged by Constantine. Licinius' fleet, under the command of the admiral Abantus, was overcome by bad weather and by Constantine' s fleet which was under the command of his son Crispus. Hard pressed in Byzantium, Licinius abandoned the city to his rival and fled to Chalcedon in Bithynia. Leaving Martinianus, his former magister officiorum and now his co-ruler, to impede Constantine' s progress, Licinius regrouped his forces and engaged his enemy at Chrysopolis where he was again routed on 18 September 324. He fled to Nicomedeia which Constantine began to besiege. On the next day Licinius abdicated and was sent to Thessalonica, where he was kept under house arrest. Both Licinius and his associate were put to death by Constantine. Martinianus may have been put to death before the end of 324, whereas Licinius was not put to death until the spring of 325. Rumors circulated that Licinius had been put to death because he attempted another rebellion against Constantine.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
Licin1AEFolJupiAlex.jpg
1308c, Licinius I, 308-324 A.D. (Alexandria)66 viewsLicinius I, 308-324 A.D. AE Follis, 3.60g, VF, 315 A.D., Alexandria. Obverse: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG - Laureate head right; Reverse: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI AVGG - Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on a globe and scepter; exergue: ALE / (wreath) over "B" over "N." Ref: RIC VII, 10 (B = r2) Rare, page 705 - Hunterian Museum, Glasgow, Scotland.


De Imperatoribus Romanis : An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Licinius (308-324 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Licinius' Heritage

Valerius Licinianus Licinius, more commonly known as Licinius, may have been born ca. 265. Of peasant origin, his family was from Dacia. A close friend and comrade of arms of the Emperor Galerius, he accompanied him on his Persian expedition in 297. When campaigns by Severus and Galerius in late 306 or early 307 and in the summer of 307, respectively, failed to dislodge Maxentius who, with the luke warm support of his father Maximianus Herculius, was acclaimed princeps on 28 October 306, he was sent by the eastern emperor to Maxentius as an ambassador; the diplomatic mission, however, failed because the usurper refused to submit to the authority of his father-in-law Galerius. At the Conference of Carnuntum which was held in October or November of 308, Licinius was made an Augustus on 11 November 308; his realm included Thrace, Illyricum, and Pannonia.

Licinius' Early Reign

Although Licinius was initially appointed by Galerius to replace Severus to end the revolt of Maxentius , Licinius (perhaps wisely) made no effort to move against the usurper. In fact, his first attested victory was against the Sarmatians probably in the late spring, but no later than the end of June in 310. When the Emperor Galerius died in 311, Licinius met Maximinus Daia at the Bosporus during the early summer of that year; they concluded a treaty and divided Galerius' realm between them. It was little more than a year later that the Emperor Constantine defeated Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge on 28 October 312. After the defeat of the usurper, Constantine and Licinius met at Mediolanum (Milan) where Licinius married the former's sister Constantia; one child was born of this union: Valerius Licinianus Licinius. Licinius had another son, born of a slave woman, whose name is unknown. It appears that both emperors promulgated the so-called Edict of Milan, in which Constantine and Licinius granted Christians the freedom to practice their faith without any interference from the state.

As soon as he seems to have learned about the marital alliance between Licinius and Constantine and the death of Maxentius, who had been his ally, Daia traversed Asia Minor and, in April 313, he crossed the Bosporus and went to Byzantium, which he took from Licinius after an eleven day siege. On 30 April 313 the armies of both emperors clashed on the Campus Ergenus; in the ensuing battle Daia's forces were routed. A last ditch stand by Daia at the Cilician Gates failed; the eastern emperor subsequently died in the area of Tarsus probably in July or August 313. As soon as he arrived in Nicomedeia, Licinius promulgated the Edict of Milan. As soon as he had matters in Nicomedeia straightened out, Licinius campaigned against the Persians in the remaining part of 313 and the opening months of 314.

The First Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine

Once Licinius had defeated Maximinus Daia, the sole rulers of the Roman world were he and Constantine. It is obvious that the marriage of Licinius to Constantia was simply a union of convenience. In any case, there is evidence in the sources that both emperors were looking for an excuse to attack the other. The affair involving Bassianus (the husband of Constantius I's daughter Anastasia ), mentioned in the text of Anonymus Valesianus (5.14ff), may have sparked the falling out between the two emperors. In any case, Constantine' s forces joined battle with those of Licinius at Cibalae in Pannonia on 8 October 314. When the battle was over, Constantine prevailed; his victory, however, was Pyrrhic. Both emperors had been involved in exhausting military campaigns in the previous year and the months leading up to Cibalae and each of their realms had expanded so fast that their manpower reserves must have been stretched to the limit. Both men retreated to their own territory to lick their wounds. It may well be that the two emperors made an agreement, which has left no direct trace in the historical record, which would effectively restore the status quo.

Both emperors were variously engaged in different activities between 315 and 316. In addition to campaigning against the Germans while residing in Augusta Treverorum (Trier) in 315, Constantine dealt with aspects of the Donatist controversy; he also traveled to Rome where he celebrated his Decennalia. Licinius, possibly residing at Sirmium, was probably waging war against the Goths. Although not much else is known about Licinius' activities during this period, it is probable that he spent much of his time preparing for his impending war against Constantine; the latter,who spent the spring and summer of 316 in Augusta Treverorum, was probably doing much the same thing. In any case, by December 316, the western emperor was in Sardica with his army. Sometime between 1 December and 28 February 317, both emperors' armies joined battle on the Campus Ardiensis; as was the case in the previous engagement, Constantine' s forces were victorious. On 1 March 317, both sides agreed to a cessation of hostilities; possibly because of the intervention of his wife Constantia, Licinius was able to keep his throne, although he had to agree to the execution of his colleague Valens, who the eastern emperor had appointed as his colleague before the battle, as well as to cede some of his territory to his brother-in-law.

Licinius and the Christians

Although the historical record is not completely clear, Licinius seems to have campaigned against the Sarmatians in 318. He also appears to have been in Byzantium in the summer of 318 and later in June 323. Beyond these few facts, not much else is known about his residences until mid summer of 324. Although he and Constantine had issued the Edict of Milan in early 313, Licinius turned on the Christians in his realm seemingly in 320. The first law that Licinius issued prevented bishops from communicating with each other and from holding synods to discuss matters of interest to them. The second law prohibited men and women from attending services together and young girls from receiving instruction from their bishop or schools. When this law was issued, he also gave orders that Christians could hold services only outside of city walls. Additionally, he deprived officers in the army of their commissions if they did not sacrifice to the gods. Licinius may have been trying to incite Constantine to attack him. In any case, the growing tension between the two rulers is reflected in the consular Fasti of the period.

The Second Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine and Licinius' Death

War actually broke out in 321 when Constantine pursued some Sarmatians, who had been ravaging some territory in his realm, across the Danube. When he checked a similar invasion of the Goths, who were devastating Thrace, Licinius complained that Constantine had broken the treaty between them. Having assembled a fleet and army at Thessalonica, Constantine advanced toward Adrianople. Licinius engaged the forces of his brother-in-law near the banks of the Hebrus River on 3 July 324 where he was routed; with as many men as he could gather, he headed for his fleet which was in the Hellespont. Those of his soldiers who were not killed or put to flight, surrendered to the enemy. Licinius fled to Byzantium, where he was besieged by Constantine. Licinius' fleet, under the command of the admiral Abantus, was overcome by bad weather and by Constantine' s fleet which was under the command of his son Crispus. Hard pressed in Byzantium, Licinius abandoned the city to his rival and fled to Chalcedon in Bithynia. Leaving Martinianus, his former magister officiorum and now his co-ruler, to impede Constantine' s progress, Licinius regrouped his forces and engaged his enemy at Chrysopolis where he was again routed on 18 September 324. He fled to Nicomedeia which Constantine began to besiege. On the next day Licinius abdicated and was sent to Thessalonica, where he was kept under house arrest. Both Licinius and his associate were put to death by Constantine. Martinianus may have been put to death before the end of 324, whereas Licinius was not put to death until the spring of 325. Rumors circulated that Licinius had been put to death because he attempted another rebellion against Constantine.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
14-Maximinus-II-Lon-RIC-209b.jpg
14. Maximinus II.14 viewsFollis, 310-312, London mint.
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINUS P F AVG / Laureate bust of Maximinus II.
Reverse: GENIO POP ROM / Genius standing, holding patera and cornucopiae. Star in right field.
Mint mark: PLN
4.69 gm., 21 mm.
RIC #209b; PBCC #40; Sear unlisted.
Callimachus
RI_146dr_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius - RIC VI Antioch 112c34 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C M AVR VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO IMP-ERATORIS, Genius standing left holding patera and cornucopia
Minted in Antioch (_ | Theta / E //ANT Dot). Early to Later A.D. 309
Reference:– RIC VI Antioch 112c (R) (Citing Oxford; Apparently a rare issue for Maximianus Herculius and only issued from this officina)
 
6.39 gms. 26.19 mm. 0 degrees. Better than the RIC plate coin (reverse only illustrated).
 
From RIC Notes "A very remarkable innovation, peculiar to this issue, is the reappearance of Herculius (with the long legend Imp C M Aur Val Maximianus P F Aug matching those of Galerius and Licinus, and with cuirassed bust) on rare coins with Genio Imperatoris; this is parallelled at the same time (see RIC VI page 656). Expelled from Italy c. April 308, and rejected at the Carnuntum conference in November 308, Herculius had received ample share in the coinage of Constantine's mints, and it seems that Maximinus (now antagonisitc to both Galerius and Licinius) may have been momentarily willing to demontsrate his hostility by including the name of the man who might still play and anti-Galerian part in the west."
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 151f img.jpg
151 - Maximinus Daia - RIC VI Lugdunum 21526 viewsFollis
Obv:– GAL VAL MAXIMINVS N C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys at waist, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera over altar
Minted in Lugdunum (_ | N / PLC). Spring A.D. 307
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 215 (rated R). Bastien XI 396 (18 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI_151p_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 071 21 viewsFollis
Obv:– GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO CAESARIS, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys at waist, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in Alexandria (P / D | R // ALE). Mid A.D. 308.
Reference(s) – RIC VI Alexandria 71 (Common - this has one of the listed mintmark arrangements)
maridvnvm
RI_151q_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 099a17 viewsFollis
Obv:– GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO CAESARIS, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys at waist, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in Alexandria (K | S / P // ALE). Late A.D. 308 - A.D. 310
Reference(s) – RIC VI Alexandria 99a (Common)
maridvnvm
RI_151u_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 099a22 viewsFollis
Obv:– GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO CAESARIS, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys at waist, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in Alexandria (K | B / P // ALE). Late A.D. 308 - A.D. 310
Reference(s) – RIC VI Alexandria 99a (Common)

Weight 6.44g. 23.84mm. 180 degrees
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_151r_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 107c 26 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right (parallel wreath ties with rounded ends)
Rev:– GENIO IMPERATORIS, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys at waist, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in Alexandria (K | S / P // ALE).
Reference(s) – RIC VI Alexandria 107c (Common)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_151t_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 149b16 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENI-O AVGVSTI, Genius, naked but for chlamys fastened at his right shoulder and hanging from his left shoulder, standing facing, head left, wearing modius, holding head of Serapis, which faces him, in right hand and ornate cornucopia in left arm behind
Minted in Alexandria (X | A // ALE). A.D. 312
Reference(s) – RIC VI Alexandria 149b (Common)

5.10gms. 20.87 mm. 0 degrees.
maridvnvm
RI_151k_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 144b31 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GALER VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– BONO GENIO PII IMPERATORIS, Genius, naked but for chlamys fastened at his right shoulder and hanging from his left shoulder, standing facing, head left, wearing modius, holding patera in right hand and ornate cornucopia in left arm behind
Minted in Alexandria (Crescent / K | Gamma / X // ALE).
Reference(s) – RIC VI Alexandria 144b (Rated Common)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_151s_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 152b30 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right (parallel wreath ties with rounded ends)
Rev:– GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius, naked but for chlamys fastened at his right shoulder and hanging from his left shoulder, standing facing, head left, wearing modius, holding head of Serapis, which faces him, in right hand and ornate cornucopia in left arm behind
Minted in Alexandria (Crescent / X | B // ALE). A.D. 312
Reference(s) – RIC VI Alexandria 152b (Common)
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_151h_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 160b42 viewsAe Follis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius, naked but for chlamys fastened at his right shoulder and hanging from his left shoulder, standing facing, head left, wearing modius, holding head of Serapis, which faces him, in right hand and ornate cornucopia in left arm behind
Minted in Alexandria (* / N / Branch | B / ALE). A.D. 312-313
Reference:– RIC VI Alexandria 160b
maridvnvm
RI_151j_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 160b18 viewsObv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius, naked but for chlamys fastened at his right shoulder and hanging from his left shoulder, standing facing, head left, wearing modius, holding head of Serapis, which faces him, in right hand and ornate cornucopia in left arm behind
Minted in Alexandria (* / N / Branch | S // ALE).
Reference(s) – RIC VI Alexandria 160b
maridvnvm
RI_151m_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 160b20 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius, naked but for chlamys fastened at his right shoulder and hanging from his left shoulder, standing facing, head left, wearing modius, holding head of Serapis, which faces him, in right hand and ornate cornucopia in left arm behind
Minted in Alexandria (* / N / Branch | G // ALE).
Reference(s) – RIC VI Alexandria 160b
maridvnvm
RI_151i_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 162b 29 viewsObv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius, naked but for chlamys fastened at his right shoulder and hanging from his left shoulder, standing facing, head left, wearing modius, holding head of Serapis, which faces him, in right hand and ornate cornucopia in left arm behind
Minted in Alexandria (* / N / Branch | Z / Wreath // ALE).
Reference(s) – RIC VI Alexandria 162b
maridvnvm
RI_151g_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - Follis - RIC VI Antioch 164b 19 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys at waist, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding head of Sol
Minted in Antioch (* | AI / ANT). A.D. 312
Reference – RIC VI Antioch 164b
maridvnvm
RI_151l_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - Follis - RIC VI Antioch 164b 40 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys at waist, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding head of Sol
Minted in Antioch (* | E/D / ANT). A.D. 312
Reference(s) – RIC VI Antioch 164b

Flan flaw on eye of bust on pbverse otherwise a pleasing example
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_151n_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - Follis - RIC VI Antioch 167b30 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– SOLI IN-VICTO, Sol standing left in long robe, right hand raised, left hand holding head of Serapis
Minted in Antioch (A | * // ANT). A.D. 312
Reference(s) – RIC VI Antioch 167b
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_151o_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - Follis - RIC VI Nicomedia 71b 6 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys at waist, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, from which liquid is flowing, sacrificing over lighted altar
Minted in Nicomedia (_ | E // SMN).
Reference(s) – RIC VI Nicomedia 71b (Rated C)
maridvnvm
RI 151b img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - RIC Alexandria 099a111 viewsObv:– GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO CAESARIS, Genius standing left
Minted in Alexandria (K in left field, Δ over P in right field, ALE in exe), Group IV, 4th Officina between December 308 –310 A.D.
References:– RIC Alexandria 99a (Common)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 151d img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - RIC Cyzicus 04946 viewsObv:– GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, Laureate head right
Rev:– VIRTVTI EXERCITVS, Mars advancing right, naked but for floating chlamys, right hand holding a transverse spear with trophy over left shoulder
Minted in Cyzicus (Γ in left field, MKV in exe). December A.D. 308 – May A.D. 310
References:– RIC VI Cyzicus 49
maridvnvm
RI 151e img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - RIC London 209b39 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP ROM, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in London (_ | * / PLN). From mid A.D. 310, to Late A.D. 312
Reference:– RIC VI London 209b
maridvnvm
RI_155v_img.jpg
155 - Maximinus II - RIC VI Alexandria 099a19 viewsFollis
Obv:- GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right
Rev:- GENIO CAESARIS, Genius standing left
Minted in Alexandria, (K | D / P). Group IV. December A.D. 308 - 310
Reference(s) – RIC Alexandria 99a

Weight 7.43g. 23.83mm. 0 degrees
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_155w_img~0.jpg
155 - Maximinus II - RIC VI Alexandria 149b12 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius, naked but for chlamys fastened at his right shoulder and hanging from his left shoulder, standing facing, head left, wearing modius, holding head of Serapis, which faces him, in right hand and ornate cornucopia in left arm behind
Minted in Alexandria (X / G // ALE). Minted in A.D. 312
Reference(s) – RIC VI Alexandria 149b

Weight 4.53g. 22.72mm. 180 degrees
1 commentsmaridvnvm
IMG_4160~0.jpg
163. Maximinus Daia (305-313 A.D.)15 viewsAv.: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
Rv.: GENIO AVGVSTI
Left: star / Right: gamma I
Ex.: ANT

AE Follis Ø20 / 4.8g
RIC VI 164b Antioch
Juancho
SevAlexDenSevAlex.jpg
1ce Severus Alexander27 views222-235

Denarius

Laureate draped bust, right, IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG
Sev. Alex in armor, P M TR P III COS P P

RIC 74

Herodian recorded: [The soldiers] were more favorably disposed toward Alexander, for they expected great things of a lad so properly and modestly reared. They kept continual watch upon the youth when they saw that Elagabalus was plotting against him. His mother Mamaea did not allow her son to touch any food or drink sent by the emperor, nor did Alexander use the cupbearers or cooks employed in the palace or those who happened to be in their mutual service; only those chosen by his mother, those who seemed most trustworthy, were allowed to handle Alexander's food.

Mamaea secretly distributed money to the praetorians to win their good will for her son; it was to gold that the praetorians were particularly devoted. . . . . Maesa, the grandmother of them both, foiled all his schemes; she was astute in every way and had spent much of her life in the imperial palace. As the sister of Severus' wife Julia, Maesa had always lived with the empress at the court. . . .

When Alexander received the empire, the appearance and the title of emperor were allowed him, but the management and control of imperial affairs were in the hands of his women, and they undertook a more moderate and more equitable administration. . . . At any rate, he entered the fourteenth year of his reign without bloodshed, and no one could say that the emperor had been responsible for anyone's murder. Even though men were convicted of serious crimes, he nevertheless granted them pardons to avoid putting them to death, and not readily did any emperor of our time, after the reign of Marcus, act in this way or display so much concern for human life.

In the fourteenth year, however, unexpected dispatches from the governors of Syria and Mesopotamia revealed that Artaxerxes, the Persian king, had conquered the Parthians and seized their Eastern empire, killing Artabanus [IV], who was formerly called the Great King and wore the double diadem. Artaxerxes then subdued all the barbarians on his borders and forced them to pay tribute. He did not remain quiet, however, nor stay on his side of the Tigris River, but, after scaling its banks and crossing the borders of the Roman empire, he overran Mesopotamia and threatened Syria.

Traveling rapidly, he came to Antioch, after visiting the provinces and the garrison camps in Illyricum; from that region he collected a huge force of troops. While in Antioch he continued his preparations for the war, giving the soldiers military training under field conditions. . . . The Romans suffered a staggering disaster; it is not easy to recall another like it, one in which a great army was destroyed, an army inferior in strength and determination to none of the armies of old.

Now unexpected messages and dispatches upset Alexander and caused him even greater anxiety: the governors in Illyria reported that the Germans [the Alamans] had crossed the Rhine and the Danube rivers, were plundering the Roman empire. . . . Although he loathed the idea, Alexander glumly announced his departure for Illyria. . . . Alexander undertook to buy a truce rather than risk the hazards of war. . . .

The soldiers, however, were not pleased by his action, for the time was passing without profit to them, and Alexander was doing nothing courageous or energetic about the war; on the contrary, when it was essential that he march out and punish the Germans for their insults, he spent the time in chariot racing and luxurious living. . . . They plotted now to kill Alexander and proclaim Maximinus emperor and Augustus. . . . Alexander's troops deserted him for Maximinus, who was then proclaimed emperor by all. . . . Maximinus sent a tribune and several centurions to kill Alexander and his mother, together with any of his followers who opposed them.
Blindado
MaximinusDenPax.jpg
1ch Maximinus51 views235-238

Denarius

Laureate draped bust, right, IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
Pax stg, PAX AVGVSTI

RIC 12

Herodian recorded: There was in the Roman army a man named Maximinus whose half-barbarian family lived in a village in the most remote section of Thrace. They say that as a boy he was a shepherd, but that in his youthful prime he was drafted into the cavalry because of his size and strength. After a short time, favored by Fortune, he advanced through all the military ranks, rising eventually to the command of armies and the governing of provinces.

Because of his military experience, which I have noted above, Alexander put Maximinus in charge of training recruits for the entire army; his task was to instruct them in military duties and prepare them for service in war. By carrying out his assignments thoroughly and diligently, Maximinus won the affection of the soldiers. He not only taught them their duties; he also demonstrated personally to each man what he was to do. . . .

He won their devotion by giving them all kinds of gifts and rewards. Consequently, the recruits, who included an especially large number of Pannonians, praised the masculinity of Maximinus and despised Alexander as a mother's boy. . . . The soldiers were therefore ready for a change of emperors. . . . They therefore assembled on the drill field for their regular training; when Maximinus took his position before them, either unaware of what was happening or having secretly made prior preparations for the event, the soldiers robed him in the imperial purple and proclaimed him emperor. . . .

When he assumed control of the empire, Maximinus reversed the situation, using his power savagely to inspire great fear. He undertook to substitute for a mild and moderate rule an autocracy in every way barbarous, well aware of the hostility directed toward him because he was the first man to rise from a lowly station to the post of highest honor. His character was naturally barbaric, as his race was barbarian. He had inherited the brutal disposition of his countrymen, and he intended to make his imperial position secure by acts of cruelty, fearing that he would become an object of contempt to the Senate and the people, who might be more conscious of his lowly origin than impressed by the honor he had won. . . .

[A]fter Maximinus had completed three years as emperor, the people of Africa first took up arms and touched off a serious revolt for one of those trivial reasons which often prove fatal to a tyrant. . . . The entire populace of the city quickly assembled when the news was known, and the youths proclaimed Gordian Augustus. He begged to be excused, protesting that he was too old. . . .

[In Rome], the senators met before they received accurate information concerning Maximinus and, placing their trust for the future in the present situation, proclaimed Gordian Augustus, together with his son, and destroyed Maximinus' emblems of honor. . . . Embassies composed of senators and distinguished equestrians were sent to all the governors with letters which clearly revealed the attitude of the Senate and the Roman people. . . . The majority of the governors welcomed the embassies and had no difficulty in arousing the provinces to revolt because of the general hatred of Maximinus. . . .


Blindado
MaximusSestPrinc.jpg
1ci Maximus15 viewsCaesar 235-238

Sestertius

Bare-headed draped bust, right, MAXIMVS CAES GERM

Maximus stg. w/ spear & rod, PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS SC

Son of Maximinus, he died with dad.

RIC 13
Blindado
BalbinusSestFelicit.jpg
1cj Balbinus20 views238

Sestertius

Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust, right, seen from front, right, IMP CAES D CAEL BALBINVS AVG
Felicitas standing facing, head left, holding caduceus in right hand, PM TR P COS II PP SC

RIC 18

Herodian wrote, continuing the story of the rebellions against Maximinus: When the death of the elder Gordian was reported at Rome, . . . the senate therefore thought it best to meet and consider what should be done. Since they had already cast the die, they voted to issue a declaration of war and choose two men from their own ranks to be joint emperors. . . . Other senators received votes, but on the final count [Pupienus] Maximus and Balbinus were elected joint emperors by majority opinion. . . .

[Pupienus] had held many army commands; appointed prefect of Rome, he administered the office with diligence and enjoyed among the people a good reputation for his understanding nature, his intelligence, and his moderate way of life. Balbinus, an aristocrat who had twice served as consul and had governed provinces without complaint, had a more open and frank nature. After their election, the two men were proclaimed Augusti, and the Senate awarded them by decree all the imperial honors.

While these actions were being taken on the Capitoline Hill, the people, whether they were informed by Gordian's friends and fellow countrymen or whether they learned it by rumor, filled the entire street leading up to the Capitol. The huge mob was armed with stones and clubs, for they objected to the Senate's action and particularly disapproved of [Pupienus]. The prefect ruled the city too strictly for the popular taste, and was very harsh in his dealings with the criminal and reckless elements of the mob. In their fear and dislike of [Pupienus], they kept shouting threats to kill both emperors, determined that the emperor be chosen from the family of Gordian and that the title remain in that house and under that name.

Balbinus and [Pupienus] surrounded themselves with an escort of swordsmen from the young equestrians and the discharged soldiers living in Rome, and tried to force their way from the Capitol. The mob, armed with stones and clubs, prevented this until, at someone's suggestion, the people were deceived. There was in Rome at that time a little child, the son of Gordian's daughter, who bore his grandfather's name.

The two emperors ordered some of their men to bring the child to the Capitol. Finding the lad playing at home, they lifted him to their shoulders and brought him to the Capitol through the midst of the crowd. Showing the boy to the people and telling them that he was the son of Gordian, they called him "Gordian," while the mob cheered the boy and scattered leaves in his path. The senate appointed him caesar, since he was not old enough to be emperor. The mob, placated, allowed the imperial party to proceed to the palace.

Blindado
PupineusSestPax.jpg
1ck Pupienus30 views238

Sestertius

Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust, right, IMP CAES PVPIEN MAXIMVS AVG
Pax seated left with branch & scepter PAX PVBLICA SC

RIC 22b

Herodian, continuing the story of the rebellion against Maximinus, wrote: [Pupienus] led most of these soldiers out to attack Maximinus; the rest remained behind to guard and defend the city. . . . In the meantime, having completed his march, Maximinus was poised on the borders of Italy; after offering sacrifices at all the boundary altars, he advanced into Italy. . . . When no opposition was offered, they crossed the Alps without hindrance. . . . While the army was in the plain, the scouts reported that Aquileia, the largest city in that part of Italy, had closed its gates and that the Pannonian legions which had been sent ahead had launched a vigorous attack upon the walls of this city. In spite of frequent assaults, they were completely unsuccessful. . . .

As time passed, the army of Maximinus grew depressed and, cheated in its expectations, fell into despair. . . . As Maximinus rode about, the [people of Aquileia] shouted insults and indecent blasphemies at him and his son. The emperor became increasingly angry because he was powerless to retaliate. . . . The emperor's soldiers were. . . in need of everything. There was scarcely even sufficient water for them. . . .

Without warning, the soldiers whose camp was near Rome at the foot of Mount Alba, where they had left their wives and children, decided that the best solution was to kill Maximinus and end the interminable siege. . . . [T]he conspirators went to Maximinus' tent about noon. The imperial bodyguard, which was involved in the plot, ripped Maximinus' pictures from the standards; when he came out of his tent with his son to talk to them, they refused to listen and killed them both. . . .

For the rest of the time the two emperors governed in an orderly and well-regulated manner, winning approval on every hand both privately and publicly. The people honored and respected them as patriotic and admirable rulers of the empire. . . . It so happened that the two men were not in complete accord: so great is the desire for sole rule and so contrary to the usual practice is it for the sovereignty to be shared that each undertook to secure the imperial power for himself alone. Balbinus considered himself the more worthy because of his noble birth and his two terms as consul; [Pupienus] felt that he deserved first place because he had served as prefect of Rome and had won a good reputation by his administrative efforts. Both men were led to covet the sole rule because of their distinguished birth, aristocratic lineage, and the size of their families. This rivalry was the basis of their downfall. When [Pupienus] learned that the Praetorian Guard was coming to kill them, he wished to summon a sufficient number of the German auxiliaries who were in Rome to resist the conspirators. But Balbinus, thinking that this was a ruse intended to deceive him (he knew that the Germans were devoted to [Pupienus]), refused to allow [Pupienus] to issue the order. . . . While the two men were arguing, the praetorians rushed in. . . . When the guards at the palace gates deserted the emperors, the praetorians seized the old men and ripped off the plain robes they were wearing because they were at home. Dragging the two men naked from the palace, they inflicted every insult and indignity upon them. Jeering at these emperors elected by the senate, they beat and tortured them. . . . When the Germans learned what was happening, they snatched up their arms and hastened to the rescue. As soon as the praetorians were informed of their approach, they killed the mutilated emperors.
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1cx Valerian38 views253-260

Antoninianus

Radiate draped and cuirassed bust, right, IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS AVG
Victory standing left, holding wreath and palm, VICTORIA AVGG

RIC 125

Persians surrounded Valerian's army in the East in 260 and took the emperor prisoner. He died on an unknown date in captivity.

Zosimus noted: The nations subject to the Romans being unable to endure [Maximinus'] monstrous cruelty, and greatly distressed by the ravages he committed, the Africans proclaimed Gordianus and his son, of the same name, emperors, and sent ambassadors to Rome, one of whom was Valerianus, a man of consular rank, who afterwards himself became emperor. . . .

Aemilianus advanced with great speed into Italy, and the armies were very near to each other, when the soldiers of Gallus, reflecting that his force was much inferior to the enemy both in number and strength, and likewise that he was a negligent indolent man, put him and his son to death, and going over to the party of Aemilianus, appeared to establish his authority. But Valerianus brought into Italy from beyond the Alps a vast army, with which he deemed himself secure of conquering Aemilianus. The soldiers of Aemilianus, who saw that his conduct was more like that of a private sentinel than of an emperor, now put him to death as a person unfit for so weighty a charge.

By these means Valerianus became emperor with universal consent, and employed himself in the regulation of affairs. But the excursions of the Scythians, and of the Marcomanni, who made an inroad into all the countries adjacent to the empire, reduced Thessalonica to extreme danger; and though they were with muct difficulty compelled to raise the siege by the brave defence of those within, yet all Greece was in alarm. The Athenians repaired their walls, which they had never thought worth their care since Sylla threw them down. The Peloponnesians likewise fortified the Isthmus, and all Greece put itself upon its guard for the general security.

Valerianus, perceiving the empire in danger on every side, associated his son Gallienus with himself in the government! and went himself into the east to oppose the Persians. He entrusted to his son the care of the forces in Europe, thus leaving him to resist the Barbarians who poured in upon him in every direction. . . .

Valerianus had by this time heard of the disturbances in Bithynia, but his district would not allow him to confide the defence of it to any of his generals. He therefore sent Felix to Byzantium, and went in person from Antioch into Cappadocia, and after he had done some injury to every city by which he passed, he returned homeward. But the plague then attacked his troops, and destroyed most of them, at the time when Sapor made an attempt upon the east, and reduced most of it into subjection. In the mean time, Valerianus became so effeminate and indolent, that he dispaired of ever recovering from the present ill state of affairs, and would have concluded the war by a present of money; had not Sapor sent back the ambasadors who were sent to him with that proposal, without their errand, desiring the emperor to come and speak with him in person concerning the affairs he wished to adjust; To which he most imprudently consented, and going without consideration to Sapor with a small retinue, to treat for a peace, was presently laid hold of by the enemy, and so ended his days in the capacity of a slave among the Persians, to the disgrace of the Roman name in all future times.
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1dm Tacitus28 views275-276

AE antoninianus

Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust, right, IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG
Mars stg, MARTI PACIF

RIC 145

A rare emperor nominated by the Senate after the death of the widely revered Aurelianus.

Zonaras recorded: Tacitus, an elderly man, succeeded him. For it is written that he was seventy-five years old when he was chosen for monarchy. The army recognized him, though he was absent, for he was then residing in Campania. When he received the decision there, he entered Rome in private dress and, with the consent of the Senate and the People, donned the imperial garb.

The Scythians, having crossed Lake Maeotis and the Phasis River, attacked Pontus, Cappadocia, Galatia, and Cilicia. Tacitus, who had joined battle with them, and Florianus, who was prefect, slew many, and the remainder sought safety in flight. Tacitus appointed Maximinus, one of his kinsmen, as governor of Syria. But, when he behaved badly in his office, he was killed by his soldiers. Those who had killed him, frightened that the emperor would not leave them unpunished, set out after him too and killed him, not yet seven months after he had assumed sovereignty, but according to some not quite two years.

Zosimus, however, recorded, "Upon [Aurelianus'] death the empire fell into the hands of Tacitus, in whose time the Scythians crossed the Palus Maeotis, and made incursions through Pontus even into Cilicia, until he opposed them. Partly in person, and partly by Florianus, prefect of the court, whom he left in commission for that purpose, this emperor completely routed and destroyed them. He himself was going into Europe, but was thus circumvented and killed. He had committed the government of Syria to his cousin Maximinus, who treated the nobility of that country with such austerity, that he caused them both to hate and fear him. Their hatred became so excessive, that at length conspiring with the murderers of Aurelianus, they assaulted Maximinus, and having killed him, fell on and slew Tacitus also as he was upon his departure."
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1du Constantius I17 views305-306

Quarter Follis

Laureate head, right, IMP CONSTANTIVS P F AVG
Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera and cornucopiae. Mintmark: SIS, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI

Also known as Constantius Chlorus.

RIC 167

After being names Caesar, according to Eutropius: A battle was fought by Constantius Caesar in Gaul, at Lingonae, where he experienced both good and had fortune in one day; for though he was driven into the city by a sudden onset of the barbarians, with such haste and precipitation that after the gates were shut he was drawn up the wall by ropes, yet, when his army came up, after the lapse of scarcely six hours, he cut to pieces about sixty thousand of the Alemanni. . . .

CONSTANTIUS and GALERIUS were made emperors; and the Roman world was divided between them in such a manner, that Constantius had Gaul, Italy, and Africa; Galerius Illyricum, Asia, and the East; two Caesars being joined with them. [Zosimus adds: Three years after Dioclesian died, and the reigning emperors, Constantius and Maximianus Gallerius declared Severus and Maximinus (who was nephew to Gallerius), the Caesars, giving all Italy to Severus, and the eastern provinces to Maximinus.] Constantius, however, content with the dignity of emperor, declined the care of governing Africa. He was an excellent man, of extreme benevolence, who studied to increase the resources of the provinces and of private persons, cared but little for the improvement of the public treasury, and used to say that "it was better for the national wealth to be in the hands of individuals than to be laid up in one place of confinement." So moderate was the furniture of his house, too, that if, on holidays, he had to entertain a greater number of friends than ordinary, his dining-rooms were set out with the plate of private persons, borrowed from their several houses. By the Gauls1 he was not only beloved but venerated, especially because, under his government, they had escaped the suspicious prudence of Diocletian, and the sanguinary rashness of Maximian. He died in Britain, at York, in the thirteenth year of his reign, and was enrolled among the gods.
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1dy Maximinus II22 views309-313

Quarter Follis

Laureate head, right, MAXIMINVS NOB C
Genius standing left, naked except for modius on head & chlamys over shoulder, holding patera & cornucopiae, SIS in ex, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI.

RIC 170b

According to Eutropius: Galerius, a man of excellent moral character, and skilful in military affairs, finding that Italy, by Constantius's permission, was put under his government, created two Caesars, MAXIMIN, whom he appointed over the east, and SEVERUS, to whom he committed Italy. He himself resided in Illyricum. . . . LICINIUS, a native of Dacia, was made emperor by Galerius, to whom he was known by old companionship, and recommended by his vigorous efforts and services in the war which he had conducted against Narseus. The death of Galerius followed immediately afterwards. The empire was then held by the four new emperors, Constantine and Maxentius, sons of emperors, Licinius and Maximian, sons of undistinguished men. Constantine, however, in the fifth year of his reign, commenced a civil war with Maxentius, routed his forces in several battles, and at last overthrew Maxentius himself (when he was spreading death among the nobility by every possible kind of cruelty,4) at the Milvian bridge, and made himself master of Italy. Not long after, too, Maximin, after commencing hostilities against Licinius in the east, anticipated the destruction that was falling upon him by an accidental death at Tarsus.
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1ea Licinius16 views308-324

Follis

Laureate head, right, IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG
Jupiter standing left with thunderbolt and sceptre, eagle at foot with wreath in its beak, A over μ (Mu) over dot in right field, dot SIS dot in ex, IOVI CONSERVATORI

RIC 225a var

According to Zonaras: Maximinus took as colleague in his rule Licinius, who derived his lineage from the Dacians and was the brother-in-law of Constantine the Great. After he had made him colleague in his sovereignty and left him in Illyricum to defend the Thracians, who were being plundered by barbarians, he himself proceeded to Rome, to battle against Maxentius. Then, being suspicious of his own soldiers and fearing lest they desert to the enemy, he desisted from battle and departed. He regretted his appointment of Licinius, first plotted secretly against him, and then openly joined battle with him. He attacked him, was repulsed, defeated, and fled, and in his flight did away with himself. . . .

Eutropius adds: CONSTANTINE, being a man of great energy, bent upon effecting whatever he had settled in his mind, and aspiring to the sovereignty of the whole world, proceeded to make war on Licinius, although he had formed a connexion with him by marriage, for his sister Constantia was married to Licinius. And first of all be overthrew him, by a sudden attack, at Cibalae in Pannonia, where he was making vast preparations for war; and after becoming master of Dardania, Maesia, and Macedonia, took possession also of several other provinces.

There were then various contests between them, and peace made and broken. At last Licinius, defeated in a battle at Nicomedia by sea and land, surrendered himself, and, in violation of an oath taken by Constantine, was put to death, after being divested of the purple, at Thessalonica.
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2012 Highlights87 views A few favorites from 2012

1: Lucania, Metapontum didrachm, c. 350 - 330 BC

2: Julius Caesar denarius, 44 BC

3: Publius Fonteius P.f. Capito denarius, c. 55 - 54 BC

4: Tiberius, denarius, 15 - 16 AD

5: Titus, Antioch denarius, 72 - 73 AD

6: Asia Minor, Carian Islands drachm, c. 88 - 84 BC

7: Tiberius, Olba, Cilicia Æ 24, c. 14 - 16 AD

8: Caius Fonteius denarius, 114 - 113 BC

9: Severus Alexander denarius, 231 AD

10: Maximinus I, Alexandria tetradrachm, 235 - 236 AD
4 commentsSPQR Coins
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201452 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
CLICK ON A COIN FOR ITS DETAILS

*Alex
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205 Maximinus I 29 viewsMaximinus I Denarius. 236 AD. 2.81g
IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. / P M TR P II COS P P, Maximinus standing between two legionary standards RIC 3, RSC 55, BMC 77
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
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23527 viewsMaximinus I 235-8 AD
AE 28mm
Anchialus in Thrace
Apollo standing left leaning on lyre on top of a short column
mauseus
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23538 viewsMaximinus I 235-8 AD
AE 24 mm
Thessalonica in Macedon
Kabeiros standing left holding rhyto and hammer
Lindgren II 1234, BMC 111v, SNG Cop 425v
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_2012_02_01.jpg
23517 viewsMaximinus I 235-8 AD
AR denarius
Obv "IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "FIDES MILITVM"
Fides standing left holding two standards
Rome mint
RIC 7a
1 commentsmauseus
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235 AD - Maximinus I - 235-236 AD - Pax Denarius341 viewsIMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right;
PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left holding branch and scepter;

Silver denarius, RIC 12, choice EF, 2.62g, 20.6mm, 0o, Rome mint, 235-236 A.D. nicely centered, flat area on obverse drapery ex Scott Collection; from Forum
4 commentsjimwho523
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236_Maximinus_Dupondius_RIC_65note_110 viewsMaximinus I (235 – 238 AD)
AE Dupondius, Rome, 236
IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG;
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SALVS AVGVSIT, SC in exergue;
Salus seated left, feeding serpent rising from altar
11,11 gr, 24 mm
RIC IVb, 65 note; BMC VI, 102 var. (rev. legend misspelled); C. 90 var. (same)
ga77
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236_Maximinus_Dupondius_RIC_65note_28 viewsMaximinus I (235 – 238 AD)
AE Dupondius, Rome, 236
IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG;
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SALVS AVGVSIT, SC in exergue;
Salus seated left, feeding serpent rising from altar
8,83 gr, 24 mm
RIC IVb, 65 note; BMC VI, 102 var. (rev. legend misspelled); C. 90 var. (same)
ga77
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27 Maximinus I RIC 337 viewsMaximinus I 235-238 AD. Rome Mint. 236 AD. (3.08g, 20mm, 1h) Obv: IMP MAXIMINUS PIUS AUG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Rev: PM TRP II COS PP, Emperor standing left between two signa, raising hand and holding spear.
RSC 55; BMC 77; RIC 3

Ex. Roma Numismatics
Paddy
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30 Maximinus I75 viewsDenarius. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate bust right / VICTORIA GERM, Victory standing right with wreath & palm, captive at feet. RIC 23, RSC 107, BMC 186. Weight 3.69 g. Die axis 12 hr. Max Dia 19 mm.



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301. Maximinus37 viewsMaximinus Thrax

The first of the "soldier-emperors," Gaius Julius Verus Maximinus spent all three years of his reign on campaign. Although Rome's senatorial elite was eventually able to bring about the downfall of this non-aristocratic emperor, the victory was only a temporary check on the rising importance of the military in the third century. The historical tradition has been universally unkind to Maximinus. His arrival on the throne was similar to that of Macrinus, the only previous emperor who had not been a member of the senatorial class at the time of his accession. Yet unlike Macrinus, Maximinus was a career soldier from a backwards province who had little or no formal education. Maximinus came to be described as a ruthless, semi-barbarian tyrant, and by late antiquity he was regularly referred to with the ethnic epithet Thrax, "the Thracian."

Denarius. IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped bust right / VICTORIA AVG, Victory running right. RIC 16, RSC 99
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301b. Paulina53 viewsDiva Paulina. Died before AD 235. Æ Sestertius (21.22 g, 12h). Struck under Maximinus I, circa AD 236. Veiled and draped bust right / Paulina holding sceptre and raising hand, seated left on peacock flying right to heaven. RIC IV 3; Banti 1. From the Douglas O. Rosenberg Collection. Ex-CNG printed auction 72, 550/300

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305-308 AD - Maximinus II Daia as Caesar - RIC VI Siscia 170b var - GENIO POPVLI ROMANI28 viewsCaesar: Maximinus II Daia (Caes. 305-308 AD)
Date: 305-306 AD
Condition: Fine/aEF
Denomination: Quarter-Follis

Obverse: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C
Galerius Valerius Maximinus Noble Caesar
Head right; laureate

Reverse: GENIO POPV-LI ROMANI
To the Genius of the Roman Public.
Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera in right hand, cornucopiae in left hand.
Exergue: SIS (Siscia mint, no officina mark)

RIC VI Siscia 170b var (P-V listed); VM 14
2.05g; 18.3mm; 180°
Pep
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309-313 AD - Maximinus II Daia - RIC VI Cyzicus 101a - GENIO AVGVSTI25 viewsEmperor: Maximinus II Daia (r. 309-313 AD)
Date: ca. 312-313 AD
Condition: Fine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG
Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximinus Wise and Dutiful Emperor
Bust right; laureate

Reverse: GENIO AV-GVSTI
Genius of the Emperors.
Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys (falling low) over left shoulder, right holding patera (from which liquor flows), left cornucopiae; altar to left.
"S" in right field
Exergue: SMK (Cyzicus mint, sixth officina)

RIC VI Cyzicus 101a; VM 8
3.47g; 21.9mm; 30°
Pep
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309-313 AD - Maximinus II Daia - RIC VI Nicomedia 074b - GENIO AVGVSTI27 viewsEmperor: Maximinus II Daia (r. 309-313 AD)
Date: ca. 312 AD (later)
Condition: VF/Fine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG
Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximinus Wise and Dutiful Emperor
Bust right; laureate

Reverse: GENIO A-VGVSTI
Genius of the Emperors.
Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, right holding patera (from which liquor flows), left cornucopiae; to left, altar.
"*" over "A" in right field
Exergue: SMN (Nicomedia mint, 1st officina)

RIC VI Nicomedia 74b; VM 8
4.21g; 21.3mm; 180°
Pep
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314. Claudius II37 viewsMarcus Aurelius Claudius Gothicus (May 10, 213/214 - January, 270), more often referred to as Claudius II, ruled the Roman Empire for less than two years (268 - 270), but during that brief time, he was so successful and beloved by the people of Rome that he attained divine status.

His origin is uncertain. Claudius was either from Syrmia (Sirmium; in Pannonia Inferior) or from Dardania (in Moesia Superior). Claudius was the commander of the Roman army that defeated decisively the Goths at the battle of Naissus, in September 268; in the same month, he attained the throne, amid charges, never proven, that he murdered his predecessor Gallienus. However, he soon proved to be less than bloodthirsty, as he asked the Roman Senate to spare the lives of Gallienus' family and supporters. He was less magnanimous toward Rome's enemies, however, and it was to this that he owed his popularity.

Claudius, like Maximinus Thrax before him, was of barbarian birth. After an interlude of failed aristocratic Roman emperors since Maximinus's death, Claudius was the first in a series of tough soldier-emperors who would eventually restore the Empire from the Crisis of the third century.

At the time of his accession, the Roman Empire was in serious danger from several incursions, both within and outside its borders. The most pressing of these was an invasion of Illyricum and Pannonia by the Goths. Not long after being named emperor (or just prior to Gallienus' death, depending on the source), he won his greatest victory, and one of the greatest in the history of Roman arms.

At the Battle of Naissus, Claudius and his legions routed a huge Gothic army. Together with his cavalry commander, the future Emperor Aurelian, the Romans took thousands of prisoners, destroyed the Gothic cavalry as a force and stormed their chariot laager (a circular alignment of battle-wagons long favored by the Goths). The victory earned Claudius his surname of "Gothicus" (conqueror of the Goths), and that is how he is known to this day. More importantly, the Goths were soon driven back across the Danube River, and a century passed before they again posed a serious threat to the empire.

While this was going on, the Germanic tribe known as the Alamanni had crossed the Alps and attacked the empire. Claudius responded quickly and swiftly, routing the Alamanni at the Battle of Lake Benacus in the late fall of 268, a few months after the battle of Naissus. He then turned on the "Gallic Empire", ruled by a pretender for the past 15 years and encompassing Britain, Gaul and Spain. He won several victories and soon regained control of Spain and the Rhone river valley of Gaul. This set the stage for the ultimate destruction of the Gallic Empire under Aurelian.

However, Claudius did not live long enough to fulfill his goal of reuniting all the lost territories of the empire. Late in 269 he was preparing to go to war against the Vandals, who were raiding in Pannonia. However, he fell victim to an epidemic of plague and died early in January of 270. Before his death, he is thought to have named Aurelian as his successor, although Claudius' brother Quintillus briefly seized power.

The Senate immediately deified Claudius as "Divus Claudius Gothicus", making him one of the few Roman emperors of the period to be so honored.

Historia Augusta reports Claudius and Quintillus having another brother named Crispus and through him a niece. Said niece Claudia reportedly married Eutropius and was mother to Constantius Chlorus. Historians however suspect this account to be a genealogical fabrication by Constantine the Great.

Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus. Cyzicus mint. IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped bust right / FORTUNA REDUX, Fortuna standing left with rudder & cornucopiae. RIC 234, Cohen 88.
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402. Maximianus53 viewsMarcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Herculius (c. 250 - July, 310), known in English as Maximian, was Roman Emperor (together with Diocletian) from March 1, 286 to 305.

Born to a poor family near Sirmium (city in Pannonia), Maximian made a career in the army until 285, when the new emperor Diocletian, a friend of his, made him caesar (sub-emperor) and the ruler of the western part of the empire. The next year Maximian became augustus next to Diocletian, and in 293, when Diocletian introduced the Tetrarchy, Constantius Chlorus became Maximian's caesar and married Maximian's daughter Flavia Maximiana Theodora.

During his reign, Maximianus had several military successes, against the Alemanni and Burgundians in northern Germany, against the Carpi on the Danube frontier and against Carausius, who had rebelled in Britain and declared himself emperor there. He also strengthened the frontier defenses in Africa.

On May 1, 305, Diocletian and Maximian retired together; it is clear that this was not a voluntary act of Maximian's, but that he was forced to do so by Diocletian. Galerius and Constantius Chlorus became the new emperors; Flavius Valerius Severus and Maximinus Daia became their caesars. When Constantius died the next year, Maximian's son Maxentius took the western emperorship, and named Maximian to be his augustus. Maximian resolved the conflicts around this emperorship by defeating Severus and Galerius in battle and bringing Constantius' son Constantine on his side by having Constantine marry his daughter Fausta.

However, in 308 Maximian rebelled against his own son, and marched upon Rome, but was beaten and forced to find refuge with Constantine in Gaul. In 310 he declared himself emperor for the third time, but was unable to defend himself against Constantine, who forced him to commit suicide.

For his own and his colleagues' victories, Maximian received the titles Germanicus Maximus V, Sarmaticus Maximus III, Armeniacus Maximus, Medicus Maximus, Adiabenicus Maximus, Persicus Maximus II, Carpicus Maximus, Britannicus Maximus.

Maximianus 286-305, Reform Follis - Siscia Mint
9.16g
Obv: Bust of Maximianus right "IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG"
Rev: Moneta standing left holding a scale and cornucopiae "SACRA MONET AVGG E CAESS NOSTR" "SIS" in the exergue.
RIC 134b
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405. CONSTANTIUS I, as Caesar53 viewsBorn March 31st, Emperor Flavius Valerius Constantius may have come into the world ca. 250. His family was from Illyricum. In the army he served as a protector, tribunus, and a praeses Dalmatiarum. During the 270s or the 280s, he became the father of Constantine by Helena, his first spouse. By 288 he was the Praetorian Prefect of the western emperor Maximianus Herculius.

On 1 March 293 Diocletian appointed Galerius as his Caesar (junior emperor) in the east and Constantius as the Caesar of Maximianus Herculius. Caesar in the west. Both Caesars had the right of succession. In order to strengthen the dynastic relationship between himself and Herculius., Constantius put aside his wife Helena and married Theodora, the daughter, or perhaps stepdaughter, of Maximianus Herculius. The union was fruitful and of it there were six issue: Flavius Dalmatius, Julius Constantius, Hannibalianus, Constantia, Anastasia, and Eutropia. To strengthen his bond with Galerius and Diocletian in the east, Constantius allowed Galerius to keep his son Constantine as a hostage for his good behavior.

In the remainder of the time that he was a Caesar, Constantius spent much of his time engaged in military actions in the west. In the summer of 293 Constantius expelled the troops of the usurper Carausius from northern Gaul; after Constantius' attack on Bononia (Boulogne), Carausius was murdered. At the same time he dealt with the unrest of the Germans. In 296 he invaded Britain and put down the revolt of the usurper Allectus. Between 300 and 305 A.D. the Caesar campaigned successfully several times with various German tribes. It is worth noting in passing, that while his colleagues rigidly enforced the "Great Persecution in 303," Constantius limited his action to knocking down a few churches.

On 1 May 305 Diocletian, at Nicomedia, and Maximianus Herculius, at Mediolanum (Milan), divested themselves of the purple, probably because of the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian forced Maximianus to abdicate. They appointed as their successors Constantius and Galerius, with Severus and Maximinus Daia as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Constantius, as had his predecessor, ruled in the west, while Galerius and Daia ruled in the east. Almost as soon as he was appointed Augustus, he crossed to Britain to face incursions by the Picts where he died at York on 25 July 306 with his son at his side.


CONSTANTIUS I, as Caesar. 293-305 AD. Æ Follis (9.24 gm). Lugdunum mint. Struck 301-303 AD. CONSTANTIVS NO[B CAE]S, laureate and draped bust right, holding spear over right shoulder and shield at left / [GENIO POPV]LI ROMANI; altar-B/PLC. RIC VI 136a. VF, brown patina, some silvering. Ex CNG
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406. Galerius40 viewsChristians had lived in peace during most of the rule of Diocletian. The persecutions that began with an edict of February 24, 303, were credited by Christians to the influence of Galerius. Christian houses of assembly were destroyed, for fear of sedition in secret gatherings.

Detail of the Arch of Galerius in Thessaloniki.In 305, on the abdication of Diocletian and Maximian, he at once assumed the title of Augustus, with Constantius his former colleague, and having procured the promotion to the rank of Caesar of Flavius Valerius Severus, a faithful servant, and (Maximinus II Daia), his nephew, he hoped on the death of Constantius to become sole master of the Roman world. Having Constantius' son Constantine as guest at Galerius' court in the east helped to secure his position.

His schemes, however, were defeated by the sudden elevation of Constantine at Eboracum (York) upon the death of his father, and by the action of Maximianus and his son Maxentius, who were declared co-Augusti in Italy.

After an unsuccessful invasion of Italy in 307, he elevated his friend Licinius to the rank of Augustus, and moderating his ambition, he retired to the city Felix Romuliana (near present day Gamzigrada,Serbia/Montenegro)built by him to honor his mother Romula, and devoted the few remaining years of his life "to the enjoyment of pleasure and to the execution of some works of public utility."

It was at the instance of Galerius that the last edicts of persecution against the Christians were published, beginning on February 24, 303, and this policy of repression was maintained by him until the appearance of the general edict of toleration, issued from Nicomedia in April 311, apparently during his last bout of illness, in his own name and in those of Licinius and Constantine. Lactantius gives the text of the edict in his moralized chronicle of the bad ends to which all the persecutors came, De Mortibus Persecutorum ("On the Deaths of the Persecutors", chapters 34, 35). This marked the end of official persecution of Christians.

Galerius as Caesar, 305-311AD. GENIO POPVLI ROMANI reverse type with Genius standing left holding scales and cornucopia
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406a. Galeria Valeria24 viewsGaleria Valeria was Diocletian's daughter and, to cement the alliance between Diocletian and Galerius, Valeria was married to Galerius. It appears that this was not a very happy marriage. Galeria Valeria was sympathetic towards Christians during this time of severe persecution and it is possible that she was actually a Christian herself. The imperial couple were not blessed with any children during their eighteen year marriage. After Galerius died in A. D. 311, Galeria Valeria and her mother went to live at the court of Maximinus Daia, the caesar who became emperor of the East upon the death of Galerius.

Maximinus proposed marriage to Valeria soon afterward. He was probably more interested in her wealth and the prestige he would gain by marrying the widow of one emperor and the daughter of another than he was in Valeria as a person. She refused his hand, and immediately Maximinus reacted with hatred and fury. Diocletian, by now an old man living in a seaside villa on the Dalmatian coast, begged Maximinus to allow the two women to come home to him. Maximinus refused and had Valeria and her mother banished to live in a village in Syria.

During the civil war that erupted between Maximinus and Licinius, Valeria and Prisca disguised themselves and escaped, trying to reach the safety of Diocletian's villa. In the meantime, Diocletian had died, leaving the women without a haven of safety to which to run. For fifteen months the two royal fugitives traveled from one city to another, always living in fear of being discovered and in search of a little peace.

Finally, they were recognized by someone in the Greek city of Salonika. They were hastily taken to a square in the city and beheaded before a crowd of citizens who had once revered them as empresses. The bodies of Valeria and her mother were afterwards thrown into the sea.

Galeria Valeria Follis. AD 308-311. GAL VAL-ERIA AVG, Diademed & draped bust right / VENERI V-ICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding apple & scepter, * to left, G to right, (dot)SM(dot)TS(dot) in ex.
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407. Severus II35 viewsFlavius Valerius Severus was of humble origin and from Illyricum. Early in his career he had held a military command. When Diocletian, at Nicomedeia, and Maximianus Herculius, at Mediolanum, divested themselves of the purple (Milan) on 1 May 305, they appointed Constantius I and Galerius as Augusti in their place, with Severus and Maximinus Daia as the new Caesars. Both Caesars were Galerius' creatures and received their appointment at his hands. Constantius I and Severus ruled the west, while Galerius and Daia controlled the east.

When Galerius learned of the death of Constantius I in August 306 and the acclamation of Constantine to the purple, he raised Severus to the rank of Augustus to replace the dead Augustus. Matters went from bad to worse for Galerius when Maxentius, the son of Maximianus Herculius, was proclaimed emperor at Rome on 28 October 306. Galerius was disturbed when he heard the news of Maxentius' revolt because the usurper seized Rome, then part of Severus' realm. Galerius sent Severus from Mediolanum (Milan) to fight the enemy. Severus took a large field army which had formerly been that of Maximianus and proceeded toward Rome.

When Maxentius learned about the advance of Severus, he sent his own father the purple and offered to make him Augustus again to win Severus' army to his side; Maximianus accepted his offer. Meanwhile, Severus and his army reached Rome and began to besiege the city; Maxentius, however, bribed Severus' soldiers and, at a set signal, the Augustus' forces joined the usurper. Severus fled ro Ravenna with a few remaining soldiers. Maximianus went to Ravenna and, with false promises of safety, convinced Severus to surrender. He took this action because he realized that Severus' position was impregnable. Under house arrest Severus was brought to Rome and imprisoned at Tres Tabernae. Severus was put to death in 307 under clouded circumstances, when Galerius invaded Italy

Severus II AD 305-306 AE Follis "Genius Serdica" "The genius of the people of Rome." Obv: FL VAL SEVERVS NOB C - Laureate head right Rev: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI - Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia. Exe: SIS Siscia mint: AD 305-306 = RIC VI, p. 475, 170a Rare (r)
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409. Maximinus II Daza37 viewsCaius Valerius Galerius Maximinus, more commonly known as Maximinus Daia or Daza, was from Illyricum and was of peasant origin. He was born 20 November perhaps in the year 270. Daia was the son of Galerius' sister and had served in the army as a scutarius, Protector, and tribunus. He had been adopted by Galerius ; his name had been Daia even before that time. He had a wife and daughter, whose names are unknown, while his son's name was Maximus. When Diocletian and Maximianus Herculius resigned their posts of emperor on 1 May 305, they were succeeded by Constantius I Chlorus and Galerius as Augusti; their new Caesars were Severus and Maximinus Daia respectively. Constantius and Severus ruled in the West, whereas Galerius and Daia served in the East. Specifically, Daia's realm included the Middle East and the southern part of Asia Minor.[[1]]

Immediately after his appointment to the rank of Caesar, he went east and spent his first several years at Caesarea in Palestine. Events of the last quarter of 306 had a profound effect on the Emperor Galerius and his Caesar Daia. When Constantius I Chlorus died in July 306, the eastern emperor was forced by the course of events to accept Constantius' son Constantine as Caesar in the West; on 28 October of the same year, Maxentius , with the apparent backing of his father Maximianus Herculius, was acclaimed princeps. Both the attempt to dislodge Maxentius by Severus, who had been appointed Augustus of the West by Galerius after the death of Constantius in late 306 or early 307, and the subsequent campaign of Galerius himself in the summer of 307 failed. Because of the escalating nature of this chain of events, a Conference was called at Carnuntum in October and November 308; Licinius was appointed Augustus in Severus's place and Daia and Constantine were denoted filii Augustorum. Daia, however, unsatisfied with this sop tossed to him by Galerius, started calling himself Augustus in the spring of 310 when he seems to have campaigned against the Persians.[[2]] Although, as Caesar, he proved to be a trusted servant of Galerius until the latter died in 311, he subsequently seized the late emperor's domains. During the early summer of that year, he met with Licinius at the Bosporus; they concluded a treaty and divided Galerius' realm between them. Several yea rs later, after the death of Daia, Licinius obtained control of his domain. Like his mentor the late emperor, Daia had engaged in persecution of the Christians in his realm.[[3]]

In the autumn of 312, while Constantine was engaged against Maxentius, Daia appears to have been campaigning against the Armenians. In any case, he was back in Syria by February 313 when he seems to have learned about the marital alliance which had been forged by Constantine and Licinius. Disturbed by this course of events and the death of Maxentius, who had been his ally, Daia left Syria and reached Bythinia, although the harsh weather had seriously weakened his army. In April 313, he crossed the Bosporus and went to Byzantium, garrisoned by Licinius' troops; when the city refused to surrender, he took it after an eleven day siege. He moved to Heraclea, which he captured after a short siege; he then moved his forces to the first posting station. With only a small contingent of men, Licinius arrived at Adrianople while Daia was besieging Heraclea. On 30 April 313 the two armies clashed on the Campus Ergenus; in the ensuing battle Daia's forces were routed. Divesting himself of the purple and dressing like a slave, Daia fled to Nicomdeia. Subsequently, Daia attempted to stop the advance of Licinius at the Cilician Gates by establishing fortifications there; Licinius' army succeeded in breaking through, and Daia fled to Tarsus where he was hard pressed on land and sea. Daia died, probably in July or August 313, and was buried near Tarsus. Subsequently, the victorious emperor put Daia's wife and children to death.

Maximinus II Daza. 309-313 AD. ? Follis. Laureate head right / Genius standing left holding cornucopiae.
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410. Licinius I43 viewsFlavius Galerius Valerius Licinianus Licinius (c. 250 - 325) was Roman emperor from 308 to 324.

Of Dacian peasant origin, born in Moesia Superior, Licinius accompanied his close friend the Emperor Galerius on the Persian expedition in 297. After the death of Flavius Valerius Severus, Galerius elevated Licinius to the rank of Augustus in the West on November 11, 308. He received as his immediate command the provinces of Illyricum, Thrace and Pannonia.

On the death of Galerius, in May 311, Licinius shared the entire empire with Maximinus Daia, the Hellespont and the Bosporus being the dividing line.

In March 313 he married Flavia Julia Constantia, half-sister of Constantine, at Mediolanum (now Milan), the occasion for the jointly-issued "Edict of Milan" that restored confiscated properties to Christian congregations though it did not "Christianize" the Empire as is often assumed, although it did give Christians a better name in Rome. In the following month (April 30), Licinius inflicted a decisive defeat on Maximinus at Battle of Tzirallum, after Maximinus had tried attacking him. He then established himself master of the East, while his brother-in-law, Constantine, was supreme in the West.

In 314 his jealousy led him to encourage a treasonable enterprise in favor of Bassianus against Constantine. When his actions became known, a civil war ensued, in which he was first defeated at the battle of Cibalae in Pannonia (October 8, 314), and next some 2 years later (after naming Valerius Valens co-emperor) in the plain of Mardia (also known as Campus Ardiensis) in Thrace. The outward reconciliation left Licinius in possession of Thrace, Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt, but he later added numerous provinces to Constantine's control.

In 324 Constantine, tempted by the "advanced age and unpopular vices" of his colleague, again declared war against him, and, having defeated his army at the battle of Adrianople (July 3, 324), succeeded in shutting him up within the walls of Byzantium. The defeat of the superior fleet of Licinius by Flavius Julius Crispus, Constantine’s eldest son, compelled his withdrawal to Bithynia, where a last stand was made; the battle of Chrysopolis, near Chalcedon (September 18), resulted in his final submission. He was interned at Thessalonica under a kind of house arrest, but when he attempted to raise troops among the barbarians Constantine had him and his former co-emperor Martinianus assassinated.

O: IMP LICINIVS AVG; Emperor, facing left, wearing imperial mantle, holding mappa and globe.
R: IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG; Jupiter standing left holding Victory; palm to left, epsilon in right field, SMN in exergue. Sear 3804, RIC Nicomedia 24 (Scarce), Failmezger #278. Remarkable detail on this nicely silvered Late Roman bronze, ex Crisp Collection.

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55. Maximinus I year I.12 viewsDenarius, 235 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG / Laureate bust of Maximinus.
Reverse: P M TR P P P / The emperor standing between two standards, holding spear, and raising right hand.
2.33 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #1; Sear #8331.
Callimachus
Maximinus-I-RIC-3.jpg
57. Maximinus I year II.14 viewsDenarius, 236 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG / Laureate bust of Maximinus.
Reverse: P M TR P II COS P P / The emperor standing between two standards, holding spear, and raising right hand.
3.50 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #3; Sear #8312.

Maximinus had a great victory over the Germans sometime in the late Fall of 235 at which time he took the title Germanicus. This coin from 236 does not have GERM in the obverse legend, indicating it was minted before the news of this victory reached Rome. Once this news reached Rome, a different obverse legend was used, which then remained unchanged for the rest of the reign.
Callimachus
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59-Maximinus II-S40 viewsAE Follis, 310-311 AD , Heraclea mint
Obv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINO PF INV AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI , Jupiter standing left with globe and spear, eagle at feet with wreath in beak.
HT(delta) in exergue.
24mm, 7.0gm
Unlisted in RIC 64 Variant ? (possibly unrecorded)
jdholds
Maximinus-I-RIC-5.jpg
59. Maximinus I year III.10 viewsDenarius, 237 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM / Laureate bust of Maximinus.
Reverse: P M TR P III COS P P / The emperor standing between two standards, holding spear and raising right hand.
2.35 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #5; Sear #8313.
Callimachus
Maximinus-I-RIC-6.jpg
60. Maximinus I year IIII.15 viewsDenarius, 238 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM / Laureate bust of Maximinus.
Reverse: P M TR P IIII COS P P / The emperor standing between two standards, holding spear and raising right hand.
2.62 gm., 19.5 mm.
RIC #6; Sear 8314.

This coin dates from January 1 to March 19, 238, at which time Gordian I was proclaimed emperor and the mint at Rome stopped coining for Maximinus. It was not until June 24, however, that he was murdered by his soldiers. The coins of Maximinus' last few months are considerably scarcer than those from earlier years.
Callimachus
Sestercio_Maximino_I_RIC_33.jpg
62 - 10 - MAXIMINO I (235-238 D.C.)52 viewsÆ Sestercio (27mm - 17.39 g)

Anv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG - Busto laureado con coraza y paludamentum (capote militar) a derecha, visto por detrás
Rev: P M TR P II COS P P, S-C - Emperador estante a izq. levantando su mano der., portando cetro en izquierda. Dos estandartes militares delante y uno detrás.

Acuñada: 236 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: Comun

Referencias: RIC IVb #33 Pag.143 - BMCRE #80 - Cohen IV #58 Pag.511 - SRCV III #8336 var. Pag.82 -

mdelvalle
Sestercio_Maximino_I_RIC_81.jpg
62 - 12 - MAXIMINO I (235-238 D.C.)76 viewsÆ Sestercio (30,10 mm - 20,30 g)

Anv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Busto laureado con coraza y paludamentum (capote militar) a derecha, visto por detrás
Rev: PAX AVGVSTI, S-C - Pax estante a izq. levantando su mano der., portando rama de olivo en mano der. y cetro oblícuo en izq.

Acuñada: 3ra. Emisión 236/7 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: Comun

Referencias: RIC IVb #81 - BMCRE V #148/52
mdelvalle
Denario MAXIMINO I RIC 14_1.jpg
62-02 - MAXIMINO I "El Tracio" (235 - 238 D.C.)54 viewsAR Denario 20 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG" - Busto laureado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SALVS AVGVSTI" - Salus (La Salud) sentada en un trono a izquierda, porta una patera en su mano derecha, con la que alimenta a una serpiente que sube desde un altar a sus piés.

Acuñada 235 - 236 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte II #14 Pag.141 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #8316 - BMCRE #99 - Cohen Vol.IV #85 Pag.513 - RSC Vol. III #85a Pag.154 - DVM #10 Pag.219
mdelvalle
RIC_14_Denario_Maximino_I.jpg
62-02 - MAXIMINO I "El Tracio" (235 - 238 D.C.)17 viewsAR Denario 20 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG" - Busto laureado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SALVS AVGVSTI" - Salus (La Salud) sentada en un trono a izquierda, porta una patera en su mano derecha, con la que alimenta a una serpiente que sube desde un altar a sus piés.

Acuñada 235 - 236 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte II #14 Pag.141 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #8316 - BMCRE #99 - Cohen Vol.IV #85 Pag.513 - RSC Vol. III #85a Pag.154 - DVM #10 Pag.219
mdelvalle
RIC_1d_Denario_Maximino_I.jpg
62-04 - MAXIMINO I "El Tracio" (235 - 238 D.C.)17 viewsAR Denario 20 mm 1.9 gr.

Anv: "IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG" - Busto laureado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "P M TR P P P" - Emperador vestido militarmente, estante a izq., entre dos estandartes militares, tocando uno de ellos con mano der. y portando lanza en izquierda.

Acuñada 235 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.IVb #1D Pag.138 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #8311 Pag. 79 - BMCRE #11/12 Pag. - Cohen Vol.IV #85 Pag.513 - RSC Vol. III #46 Pag. - DVM #10 Pag.219 - MIR #8-3
mdelvalle
RIC_7A_Denario_Maximino_I.jpg
62-06 - MAXIMINO I "El Tracio" (235 - 238 D.C.)13 viewsAR Denario 20 mm 2.2 gr.

Anv: "IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG" - Busto laureado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FIDES MILITVM" - Fides (La Fidelidad) estante de frente, viendo a izq. portando sendos estandartes militares en sus manos.

Acuñada 235-236 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.IVb #7A Pag.140, Sear RCTV Vol.III #8307 var. (Ley. anverso) Pag. 79 - BMCRE #1 Pag. - Cohen Vol.IV #7 Pag.506 - RSC Vol. III #7 Pag. - DVM #2 Pag.219
mdelvalle
RIC_33_Sestercio_Maximino_I.jpg
62-10 - MAXIMINO I (235-238 D.C.)18 viewsÆ Sestercio (27mm - 17.39 g)

Anv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG - Busto laureado con coraza y paludamentum (capote militar) a derecha, visto por detrás
Rev: P M TR P II COS P P, S-C - Emperador estante a izq. levantando su mano der., portando cetro en izquierda. Dos estandartes militares delante y uno detrás.

Acuñada: 236 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: Comun

Referencias: RIC IVb #33 Pag.143 - BMCRE #80 - Cohen IV #58 Pag.511 - SRCV III #8336 var. Pag.82
mdelvalle
RIC_81_Sestercio_Maximino_I.jpg
62-12 - MAXIMINO I (235-238 D.C.)17 viewsÆ Sestercio (30,10 mm - 20,30 g)

Anv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Busto laureado con coraza y paludamentum (capote militar) a derecha, visto por detrás
Rev: PAX AVGVSTI, S-C - Pax estante a izq. levantando su mano der., portando rama de olivo en mano der. y cetro oblícuo en izq.

Acuñada: 3ra. Emisión 236/7 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: Comun

Referencias: RIC IVb #81 - BMCRE V #148/52 - Cohen IV #38 - Sear RCTV III #8332 - DVM #17 - MIR #22/5
mdelvalle
38-Maximinus-II-Ser-45.jpg
81 Maximinus II as Caesar: Serdica follis.13 viewsFollis, 307 - 308 AD, Serdica mint.
Obverse: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C / Laureate bust of Maximinus.
Reverse: VIRTVTI EXERCITVS / Virtus advancing, holding spear, trophy over left shoulder; star in left field; B in right field.
Mint mark: . SM . SD .
5.66 gm., 25 mm.
RIC #45; Sear #14792.
Callimachus
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83 Maximinus II as Augustus: London follis.13 viewsFollis, 310 - 312AD, London mint.
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG / Laureate bust of Maximinus.
Reverse: GENIO POP ROM / Genius standing, holding patera and cornucopiae. Star in right field
Mint mark: PLN
4.69 gm., 21 mm.
RIC #209b; PBCC #40; Sear unlisted.
Callimachus
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84 Maximinus II as Augustus: Alexandria follis.19 viewsFollis, 311 AD, Alexandria mint.
Obverse: IMP C GAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG / Laureate bust of Maximinus.
Reverse: GENIO IMPERATORIS / Genius standing, chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera and cornucopiae. Cresent and K in left field; B and P in right field.
Mint mark: ALE
7.12 gm., 24 mm.
RIC #139b; Sear #14853; LRBC #1181.
Callimachus
Maximinus-I-RIC-78.jpg
85. Maximinus I sestertius.17 viewsSestertius, 236-37 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM / Laureate bust of Maximinus.
Reverse: FIDES MILITVM / Fides standing, holding standard in each hand. S C in field.
16.92 gm., 30 mm.
RIC #78.
Callimachus
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92. Maximinus FIDES MILITVM denarius110 viewsRome Mint, 235-236 CE
Obv: IMP MAXIMINUS PIUS AUG laureate bust right, draped (much finer in hand)
Ecgþeow
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92.1 Maximinus FIDES MILITVM denarius66 viewsRev: FIDES MILITVM Fides standing left, a standard held vertically in each hand

Ecgþeow
Cuarto_Follis_Maximino_II_Antioch_Vagi_2955.jpg
A116-30 -Acuñacion Civica Anonima Semi-Autonoma (311 - 312 D.C.)39 viewsAE15 ¼ de Follis o Nummus 19 x 15 mm 1.2 gr.
Moneda tradicionalmente atribuida a Julian II hasta que J.Van Heesch en su artículo “The last Civic Coinages and the Religious Police of Maximinus Daza”, publicado en el Numismatic Chronicle vol.153 Pags. 66 y subsiguientes (1993), realiza un detallado estudio de este tipo de acuñación cívica anónima del cuarto siglo, donde demuestra que estas monedas se acuñaron bajos los auspicios de Maximino II Daya conmemorando “La Gran Persecución” de los Cristianos y por consiguiente la Victoria Pagana, al honrar con ellas a los antiguos dioses grecorromanos Júpiter, Apolo, Tyche, y Serapis. Recordemos que en dicha persecución (desde finales del 311 a finales del 312 D.C.) se cerraron Iglesias, encarcelando y/o desterrando a los cristianos. Esta campaña fue particularmente fuerte en Nicomedia, Antioquia y Alejandría, los tres centros principales del Imperio de Oriente. Estas persecuciones menguaron al año siguiente posiblemente como resultado de la preocupación de Maximino II al provocar abiertamente a los Emperadores Asociados de Occidente Constantino I y Licinio I.

Anv: "IOVI CONS - ERVATORI" – Júpiter semidesnudo, sentado en un trono a izquierda, portando globo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y largo cetro vertical en la izquierda.
Rev: "VICTOR - IA AVGG" – Victoria avanzando a izquierda, portando guirnalda en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y hoja de palma en la izquierda. "ANT" en exergo y "B" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 311 - 312 D.C.
Ceca: Antiochia (Off. 2da.)

Referencias: Cohen Vol.VIII #53 Pag.49 (Julián II) (10f) - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7952 Pag.94 – Vaggi #2955 - J.Van Heesch “The last Civic Coinages and the Religious Police of Maximinus Daza (1993)” #2.
mdelvalle
maximinusII AElaureate.jpg
AE laureate MAXIMINUS II (DAIA) - 305-306 AD49 viewsobv:GAL.VAL.MAXIMINVS.NOB.C
rev:GENIO.POPVLI.ROMANI (Genius of the Roman People standing holding a cornucopia and pouring a sacrifice from a patera) / SIS
ref:RIC VI-Siscia170b (R)
1.92gms, 18mm
Rare
berserker
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AE Sestertius of Maximinus I (Thrax) 138-135 AD19 viewsOBV: Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed; IMP MAXIMINUS PIVS AVG
REV: Victory advancing right bearing wreath and palm, VICTORIA AVG S-C

RIC 67, Cohen 100. A Classic Roman profile
wt 18.9 gms
daverino
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Alexander Severus Silver Denarius 39 views59850. Silver denarius, SRCV II 7923, RIC IV 252, RSC III 508a, BMCRE VI 813, VF, scratches, 3.143g, 19.8mm, 0o, Rome mint, 231 - 235 A.D.;

obverse IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG, laureate bust right with drapery on left shoulder;

reverse PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia (or Annona) standing left, stalks of grain in right over modius, anchor in left

Annona with a modius and anchor suggests the arrival of grain by sea from the provinces, especially from Africa, and its distribution to the people. When Severus Alexander was away on his Persian and German campaigns (231-235) he continuously struck Annona types. With the legend PROVIDENTIA AVG, "The Foresight of the Emperor," he assured that, though he was away, he would be carefully monitoring Rome's grain supply!
1 commentsColby S
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Anchialus, Maximinus I23 viewsMaximinus I AE19 of Anchialus, Thrace. AVT MAZIMINOC AV, laureate bust left holding sheild / AGCIALEWN, Hercules wrestling the Namean Lion right, bow to left. ecoli
antiochia_maximinusII_Vagi2954.jpg
Anonymous Civic Issue of Antiochia, Vagi 295453 viewsAE 16, 1.87g
Antiochia 7th officina, struck in the time of Maximinus I., AD 310-312(?)
obv. GENIO AN - TIOCHEINI
Tyche of Antiochia, veiled and turreted, seated frontal on rocks, river-god
Orontes swimming before
rev. APOLLONI (sic!) - SANCTO
Apollo Musagetes, in stola, stg. l., holding patera and lyra
Z in r. field
in ex. SMA
Vagi 2954; not in RIC
rare, about VF, nice sand-patina

The obv. shows the famous Tyche of Antiochia made by Eutychides of Sikyon 2nd half of 4th century BC. The rev. could be the Apollo of Antiochia made my Bryaxis 400-350 BC.
Jochen
antiochia_maximinusII_Vagi2955_2.jpg
Anonymous Civic Issue of Antiochia, Vagi 295526 viewsAE 15, 0.80g (1/4 Follis)
Antiochia 1st officina, struck in the time of Maximinus I., AD 310-312(?)
obv. IOVI CONS - ERVATORI
Jupiter seated l., holding globus and sceptre
rev. VICTOR - IA AVGG
Victoria stg. l., holding wreath and palm
A in r. field
in ex. ANT
Vagi 2955; not in RIC
rare, VF+

The obv. could be the Zeus Nikephoros of the Temple of Apollo at Daphne (near Antiochia) which Antiochos IV commissioned for his great festival of 167 BC.
Jochen
Maximinus PIUS D 3~0.jpg
Antoninus Pius Dupondus43 viewsDupondius, 145-161 AD, Rome.
Obv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P, radiate head right.
Rev: COS IIII / S - C, Salus standing left, feeding snake coiled around altar and holding rudder on globe.
RIC III, 798
Tanit
Maximinus_II_AE16,_APOLLONI_SANCTO.JPG
APOLLONI SANCTO. GENIO ANTIOCHENI, Tyche of Antioch/ Apollo15 viewsMaximinus II, Antioch, 310-311 AD. 16mm, 1.6g. Obverse: GENIO ANTIOCHENI; Tyche of Antioch, turreted, wearing cloak and veil, seated facing on rock; at her feet, river god Orontes. Reverse: APOLLONI SANCTO, Apollo standing left holding patera and lyre, D in field, SMA in exergue. Vagi 2954, Van Heesch, NC 1993, 66, 3a. ex areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
maximian_II_antioch.jpg
APOLLONI SANCTO. GENIO ANTIOCHENI, Tyche of Antioch/ Apollo8 viewsMaximinus II Daia (309-313 AD), 16mm, 1.3g. APOLLONI SANCTO. GENIO AN-TIOCHENI, Tyche of Antioch, turreted, wearing cloak and veil, seated facing on rock; at her feet, river god Orontes swimming right / APOLLONI – SANCTO / G / SMA Apollo, wearing long dress and himation, standing facing, head turned left, holding cithara with his left hand, patera in his right hand, C. 1 (Julianus II). Van Heesch, NC 1993, 66, 3a. Minted ca.310-311 A.D. Ex David LiebertPodiceps
l2~0.JPG
Aquileia AQS33 viewsAquileia

A former city of the Roman Empire, situated at the head of the Adriatic, on what is now the Austrian sea-coast, in the country of Goerz, at the confluence of the Anse an the Torre. It was for many centuries the seat of a famous Western patriarchate, and as such plays and important part in ecclesiastical history, particularly in that of the Holy See and Northern Italy.

The site is now known as Aglar, a village of 1500 inhabitants. The city arose (180 B.C.) on the narrow strip between the mountains and the lagoons, during the Illyrian wars, as a means of checking the advance of that warlike people. Its commerce grew rapidly, and when Marcus Aurelius made it (168) the principal fortress of the empire against the barbarians of the North and East, it rose to the acme of its greatness and soon had a population of 100,000. It was pillaged in 238 by the Emperor Maximinus, and it was so utterly destroyed in 452 by Attila, that it was afterwards hard to recognize its original site. The Roman inhabitants, together with those of smaller towns in the neighbourhood, fled to the lagoons, and so laid the foundations of the city of Venice. Aquileia arose again, but much diminished, and was once more destroyed (590) by the Lombards; after which it came under the Dukes of Friuli, was again a city of the Empire under Charlemagne, and in the eleventh century became a feudal possesion of its patriarch, whose temporal authority, however, was constantly disputed and assailed by the territorial nobility.

002. CONSTANTINOPOLIS Aquileia

RIC VII Aquileia 129 R4

Ex-Varangian
ecoli
R680_Maximinus_I_artemis.jpg
Artemis, Phyrgia, Eucarpia6 viewsPhyrgia, Eucarpia
Rev.: ƐΥΚΑΡΠƐΩΝ, Artemis standing facing, looking l., holding bow and placing hand on quiver; stag left, looking right; priestess right

for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
R680_Maximinus_I_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Phyrgia, Eucarpia, Maximinus, Artemis12 viewsMaximinus
Phyrgia, Eucarpia
Obv.: ΑΥΤ Κ Γ ΙΟΥ ΟΥΗΡ ΜΑΞΙΜƐΙΝΟС, laureate and cuirassed bust of Maximinus, r.
Rev.: ƐΥΚΑΡΠƐΩΝ, Artemis standing facing, looking l., holding bow and placing hand on quiver; stag left, looking right; priestess right
AE, 26 mm, 7,22 g
Ref.: SNG Cop. 372, RPC VI, № 5604 (temporary)
1 commentsshanxi
maximinusII.jpg
Bronze coin of Maximinius II16 viewsA Roman bronze coin of Maximinius II, minted in Siscia between 309-310 AD. 25 mm, 5.08 g.

Obverse: MAXIMINVS FIL AVGG, laureate head right

Reverse: GENIO A-VGVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on head, holding patera and cornucopiae, crescent in left field, G in right field, SIS in ex

chuy1530
Maximus_V_5521.JPG
Caius Julius Verus Maximus (as Caesar), 235 - 238 AD18 viewsObv: Γ IOVΛ OVHP MA(ΞIMOC KA)IC, bare head of Maximus (son of Maximinus I) facing right.

Rev: MHPO ΠON TO(MEΩC), Nike advancing left holding a wreath and a palm; Γ in left field.

Æ 24, Tomis, Moesia Inferior mint

8.7 grams, 24 mm, 180°

Varbanov I 5521
SPQR Coins
charibert-1.jpg
Charibert II23 viewsTremissis of Charibert II, king of Aquitaine 629-632
Mint: Banassac
Moneyer: Maximinus
Belfort 697
O: MAXIMIN VS M.
R: CHARIBERTVS REX

Merovingian inscribed tremissis of the short-reigned Charibert II, king of Aquitaine, part of the Merovingian kingdom. Merovingian France was made up of four large districts, which sometimes became kingdoms themselves: Austrasia, Neustria, Burgundy, and Aquitaine. Merovingian royalty frequently divided the large and somewhat unwieldy kingdom between male heirs, and Charibert's half brother Dagobert I received the lion's share. Things went on for a few years, but Charibert probably got greedy, and not content with Aquitaine set his sights on Neustria. This led to conflict with his half-brother, and most likely led to his death by assassination.

Royal coinage inscribed in the names of Merovingian monarchs are very rare. The more common (if you can call them that) ones include coins made in Banassac for Charibert II and Sigebert III. Coins are also known depicting the names of Theodebert, Dagobert, Childebert, and others.

Charibert was not considered a very successful king, and probably only a teenager or young adult at the time of his death. On this coin, his name appears on the reverse, while the moneyer is on the obverse, a possible slight to the monarch. His coinage is a small glimpse of an otherwise highly obscured period in medieval history

Ex- CNG 100 (lot 457), Dr. Lawrence A. Adams, M. Louis Teller
Nap
Coropissos_maximinusI_SNGfrance770.jpg
Cilicia, Coropissos, Maximinus I SNG Paris 77091 viewsMaximinus I AD 235-238
AE 32, 15.62g
obv. AVT KG IOVH - MAXIMEINOC
bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, r.
rev. KOROPICCEWN THC KHTWN MHTROPOLEW
Perseus, nude except chlamys, stg. l., holding harpe and head of Medusa in his
l. hand, clasping hands with Andromeda, stg. r. in long chiton, holding with her
l. hand fold of her garment under her chin; below the sea-monster Ketos.
SNG Levant 590; SNG Levante Supp. 157 (this ex.); SNG Paris 770; this obv. die was used in Philadelphia too, see SNG Levante 580
rare, about VF, brown-green patina

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
4 commentsJochen
claudiopolis_maximiusI_SNGfrance791.jpg
Cilicia, Ninica-Claudiopolis, Maximinus I, SNG Levante Supp. 170 (plate coin)142 viewsMaximinus I AD 235-236
AE 30 mm, 14.59 g
obv. IMP.CAES.SA.IVL.VER.MAXI / MINVS
Bust, draped and cuirassed, bare-headed, r.
behind bust c/m Howgego 338 eagle r., head l.
rev. NINIC COL CLA / VDIOPO / L
She-wolf standing right under Ruminal fig tree, head l., suckling the twins
Remus and Romulus
SNG Levante 618 (same dies); SNG Levante Supp. 170 (this coin); SNG Paris 791 (same dies); SNG von Aulock 5775 (same dies)
Choice EF, nice olive-brown patina, rare this nice.
published on www.wildwinds.com

The fig tree was sanctified to the goddess Rumina. Later the twins were found by the shepherd Faustulus. The rest is well-known!
The legend is in Latin because the city was a Roman colonia. The she-wolf looks a bit like a horse!
6 commentsJochen
maximinI_tarsos_BMC230.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, Maximinus I BMC 23066 viewsMaximinus I AD 235-238
AE 37, 21.89g
obv. AYT.K.G.IOY.OYH.MAXIMEINOC C
bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
in field P-P
rev. TARCOY T - HC MHTROPOLEWC
Nike, on globe, advancing l., holding palmbranch and cilicarch crown with four
imperial heads
in left field AM/K
in right field G/B
SNG Levante var. 1092; SNG Paris 1594-5 (both same dies); BMC 230
rare, nice VF
added to www.wildwinds.com

The Cilicarch was the High Priest in Cilicia, the chief priest of the provincial temple or the temples of the imperial cults.
3 commentsJochen
maximinusI_tarsos.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, Maximinus I SNG Lev. 109957 viewsMaximinus I AD 235-238
AE 37, 19.31g
obv. AVT.K.G.IOV.OVH.MAXIMEINOC
P-P in l. and r. field
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. TARCOV THC MHTROPOLEW
Apollo Lykeios, nude, laureate, standing frontal, holding a dead wolf in each
hand.
AMK in l. field, G.B in r.field
SNG Levante 1099 (this coin); SNG Paris 1590 (same dies)
(attribution by Barry Murphy)
Rare, about VF

AMK stands for 'the First, the Biggest, the most Beautiful', granted to the city AD 215 upon Caracalla's campaign against the Parths.
G.B = 3.2, capital of three provinces, keeper of two neocorates (Curtis Clay)
For the Lykios there is a very different interpretation too:
The two animals are not wolfes but dogs, symbolizing Mopsus and Amphilochus, called 'the dogs of Apollo' by Lychopron, a 3rd century poet. (Pat Lawrence)

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
Jochen
tarsos_maximinusI_SNG france1591.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, Maximinus I, SNG Paris II, 159139 viewsMaximinus I, AD 235-238
AE 30, 21.49g
obv. AVT.K.G.IOV.[OVH.MAZIMEI]NOC /P - P
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. TARCOV THC MHTROPOLE[WC]
Apollo, stg. facing on omphalos, head. l., holding bow and arrow in l. hand and
in lowered r. hand dog on fore-legs
in l field A / M / K
in upper r. field G, in lower r. field B
SNG Paris II, 1591 (Thanks to Luigi!)
extremly rare, good F, brown-green patina

Most often this Apollo is named Apollo Lykeios. But this is not correct! Please look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'.
Jochen
max pagan com.JPG
Civic Issue under Maximinus II 23 viewsAE 14.8 mm 1.33 grams 310-312 AD
1/4 Nummus
OBV :: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI. Zeus sitting left on throne holding scepter in left and glode in right hands
REV :: VICTOR-IA AVGG. Nike walking left holding wreath in right hand, palm in left. Delta in left , Epsilon in right fields
EX :: unknown
Minted in Antioch ?
Vagi 2955, Sear ( under Julian II) 4080
purchased 04/2008

Note: The Civic Issues of Antioch, Alexandria and Nicomedia were thought to have been produced by Julian II when RIC VI was written, therefore the entire series is missing. This series was produced during the period of Christian persecution by Maximinus II, Diocletian and Galerius and the Antioch issues portray important local statues: the Tyche erected by Eutychides (a pupil of Lysippus), the Apollo by Bryaxis of Athens and possibly the Zeus Nikephoros of the Temple of Apollo at Daphne which Antiochos IV commissioned for his great festival of 167 BC.

Historical information taken from Coinage of the Roman Empire, Vol II, p.516 by David Vagi
Johnny
civic issue.jpg
Civic Issue under Maximinus II49 viewsAnonymous Civic Issue during the time of Maximinus II, AE Quarter Follis, c.310-312, Antioch, Officina 10
GENIO AN_TIOCHENI
Tyche, turreted and veiled, seated facing on rock, river-god Orontes swimming in front
APOLLONI-SANCTO
Apollo standing facing, head left, patera in right hand, lyre in left
I in right field
SMA in exergue
16mm x 17mm, 1.65g
RIC VI, --; Vagi 2954
purchased 09/09/2007
Note: The Civic Issues of Antioch, Alexandria and Nicomedia were thought to have been produced by Julian II when RIC VI was written, therefore the entire series is missing. This series was produced during the period of Christian persecution by Maximinus II, Diocletian and Galerius and the Antioch issues portray important local statues: the Tyche erected by Eutychides (a pupil of Lysippus), the Apollo by Bryaxis of Athens and possibly the Zeus Nikephoros of the Temple of Apollo at Daphne which Antiochos IV commissioned for his great festival of 167 BC.

Historical information from Coinage of the Roman Empire, Vol II, p.516 by David Vagi
Johnny
0640-325np_noir.jpg
Constantine the Great, Follis - *206 viewsNicomedia mint, 2nd officina, c. AD 311
IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG; Laureate head right
VIRTVTIE-XERCITVS Mars/Virtus advancing right in military dress, holding transverse spear and shield ; trophy over shoulder. B in right field. SMN in exergue.
4.88 gr, 22 mm
RIC-, C-, Roman coins -
RIC lists this type only for Licinius and Maximinus . "Iovi Conservatori and Virtuti Exercitus both appear for Licinius and Maximinus, emissions for the former being the more scarce: coinage for Constantine is extremely rare. Date, c. 311". Coin should be listed after NICOMEDIA 70c.
Please see Victor Clarks website for further information at :http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/unlisted/
3 commentsPotator II
maxmin13.jpg
Countermark Crazy! :)126 viewsMaximinus I --AE33, Ninica-Claudiopolis. Draped bust of Maximinus R/Draped bust of Maximus R.. SNG France 2, 796. Multiple c/m.4 commentsfeatherz
Deulteum AE 19 of Maximinus Thrax,.JPG
Deultum AE 20 of Maximinus I, 235-238 AD40 viewsMaximinus I
AE 20 – 20mm
Deultum, 235-238 AD
IMP MAXIMINVS AVG
laureate draped bust r.
C F P D
beehive
Moushmov 3641
Ardatirion
169.jpg
Eagle and Δ containing dot134 viewsCILICIA. Ninica-Claudiopolis. Maximinus I. Æ 25. A.D. 235-238. Obv: I-MPMAXIMINVΓPI. Laureate head right; Countermark (1) on head.Rev: COL(N)-INICAU. Turreted and draped bust of Tyche/City right; Countermark (2) on bust. Ref: BMC 11-12 (var. rev. leg.). Axis: 180°. Weight: 8.93 g. CM(1): Eagle standing right with head left, in shaped punch, c. 4 x 6 mm. Howgego 338 (11 pcs). CM(2): Δ containing dot, all within circle; circular punch, 6 mm (not certain). Howgego 669 ? (49 pcs). Collection Automan.Automan
EB0510_scaled.JPG
EB0510 Maximinus I / Salus13 viewsMaximinus Thrax, AR Denarius, 236-238 AD.
Obv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate draped bust right.
Rev: SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising up from altar.
References: RIC IV 21; RSC 91.
Diameter: 22mm, Weight: 3.388 grams.
EB
EB0511_scaled.JPG
EB0511 Maximinus I / Fides27 viewsMaximinus I Denarius. AD 235-236.
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped bust right
Rev: FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
References: Sear'88 2337, RIC 7A, RSC 7a.
Diameter: 20.5mm, Weight: 3.504 grams
EB
EB0512_scaled.JPG
EB0512 Maximinus I / Pax9 viewsMaximinus I, AE Sestertius, 235-236 AD.
Obv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped bust right.
Rev: PAX AVGVSTI S-C, Pax standing left with branch and scepter.
References: RIC IV 81, Cohen 38, BMC 148.
Diameter: 31.5mm, Weight: 21.5 grams.
EB
EB0689_scaled.JPG
EB0689 Maximinus I / Nike7 viewsMaximinus 235-238, Thessalonica, Macedon, AE 26.
Obverse: AV K Γ IOV OVH MAΞIM[EINOC], laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: ΘECCAΛONЄIKEΩN, Nike advancing left, carrying Kabieros and palm branch.
References: Moushmov 6786.
Diameter: 26.5mm, Weight: 12.012g.
EB
EB0758_scaled.JPG
EB0758 Maximinus II / Mars13 viewsMaximinus II as Caesar 305-308, AE Follis, Cyzicus 308-309.
Obverse: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, laureate head right.
Reverse: VIRTVTI E-XERCITVS, Mars walking right holding spear, shield and trophy over shoulder, MKV in exergue, Γ in left field.
References: RIC VI 52.
Diameter: 27mm, Weight: 8.229g.
EB
EB0759_scaled.JPG
EB0759 Maximinus II / Sol Invicto11 viewsMaximinus II 310-313, AE Follis, Nicomedia 311-313 AD.
Obverse: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: SOLI INVICTO, Sol standing left in long robe, with raised right hand and holding up head of Serapis in left, A to left, star to right, [mintmark SMN].
References: Cf. RIC VI 77b (star over A to left).
Diameter: 22.5mm, Weight: 3.669g.
EB
EB0875_scaled.JPG
EB0875 Maximinus II / Carthage6 viewsMaximinus II, AE Follis, Carthage 305-306 AD.
Obverse: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right.
Reverse: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing left, holding fruits and corn-ears. I in left field. Mintmark Δ.
References: RIC VI Carthage 40b; Sear 14763.
Diameter: 28mm, Weight: 9.114g.
EB
EB0876_scaled.JPG
EB0876 Maximinus II / Genius6 viewsMaximinus II 309-313, AE Follis, Alexandria, 312 AD.
Obverse: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: GENIO-AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on head, holding head of Serapis and cornucopiae, X-B across fields, crescent in upper left, Mintmark ALE.
References: Cf. RIC VI Alexandria 149b.
Diameter: 23mm, Weight: 5.116g.
EB
Maximinus_Thrax_001.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 235, Maximinus I Thrax, Roma12 viewsMaximinus I Thrax 235-238
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: AYTO MAΞIMINOC EVC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: L – A, year 1, AD 235, Roma standing left, raising hand and holding spear.
Billon, 12.47g, 23.8mm
Ref.: Kampmann/Ganschow 65.2, G 2548, D4591, Emmett 3294.
Ex Pecunem 10, Lot 327

shanxi
Emperor_Severus_Alexander_Denarius.jpg
Emperor Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.124 viewsThis coin was struck in the last months of Alexander's reign, and is the sole dated type among those of his last issue.
Rare last issue of reign.

Silver denarius, RSC 453a, BMCRE VI 962, SRCV II 7917, RIC IV 125 var. (no cuirass), Hunter III -, Choice EF, excellent portrait, excellent centering and strike, slightly irregular flan, tiny edge cracks, Rome mint, weight 3.48g, maximum diameter 19.9mm, die axis 180o, Jan - Mar 235 A.D., (18th emission); obverse IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse P M TR P XIIII COS III P P, Sol advancing left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, left arm and flying behind, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise.
EX FORVM ; *With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

By the time Alexander and his mother arrived to face his German enemies, the situation had settled, and so his mother convinced him that to bribe the Germans and avoid violence was the more sensible course. Though they were not yet expected to personally fight in battle during Alexander's time, emperors were increasingly expected to display general competence in military affairs. Alexander's taking of his mother's advice, his dishonorable method of dealing with the Germanic threat, and the relative failure of his earlier military campaign against the Persians were all deemed highly unacceptable by the soldiers. Alexander was assassinated on 19 March 235, together with his mother, in a mutiny of the Legio XXII Primigenia at Moguntiacum (Mainz) while at a meeting with his generals. The assassinations secured the throne for Maximinus.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
4 commentsSam
V10105TN~0.jpg
Fides Militum (Maximinus denarius)225 viewsFIDES MILITUM - "The Loyal Military"
Rome Mint, AD 235-236
Zam
011.JPG
France - Gévaudan- Banassac - Monétaire Maximinus 620/64027 viewsTriens, or, 1,23 g.
A/ MAXIMINVS MON, tête diadémée à droite. La petite croix au sommet du diadème sert de croisette de début de légende. Diadème retombant sur le cou en deux rubans perlés. Tranche de cou perlé. Couronne de feuillage au pourtour.
R/ DANNACIACO FIIT, calice à deux anses surmonté d'une croix. Couronne de feuillage au pourtour.
Réfs : Vente Trampitsch n°12 (même coin) ; Mirmand 2006, n°82.
Gabalor
Severus_Alexander_35.jpg
G162 viewsSeverus Alexander Denarius

Attribution: RIC 212, RSC 556
Date: AD 228-231
Obverse: IMP SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate head r.
Reverse: VICTORIA AVG, Victory stg. l., holding wreath and palm
Size: 19.4 mm
Weight: 3.30 grams
(Bust of Severus Alexander: Louvre, Paris)

After being granted the title of Caesar in AD 221, Severus Alexander was elevated to Augustus a year later upon the murder of Elagabalus. To be sure, however, the true power of Alexander’s reign did not lie in his hands, but rather in the cunning of his mother, Julia Mamaea. So much influence and persuasion did she have over her feeble son, that she arranged his marriage to a patrician girl named Orbiana, and then, fearing her father, had her exiled to North Africa and had her father killed. Although Alexander cared for his wife, he did nothing to oppose his mother. Throughout his entire reign, military unrest was a constant. Nevertheless, Alexander needed the military to face a resurging foe, the Persians. In AD 226, Persian king Ardashir or Artaxerxes, rose up against and defeated the Parthian king Artabanus. The great Persian Empire had returned and placed its attention on the territories recently conquered by the Romans in northern Mesopotamia. Alexander launched a campaign to fend off the invading Persians. The Persian War in AD 232 saw heavy losses on both sides and was not viewed as a great victory. No sooner had Alexander returned to Rome when he was brought news of the Germans breaching the Rhine frontier in numerous places. In AD 234, he mustered his troops to confront this new invasion. Alexander preferred diplomacy tried to bribe the Germans into leaving. His troops saw him as a coward and further despised him for limiting their pay and bonuses. They sought new leadership in a Thracian soldier named Maximinus. One morning in AD 235, Maximinus exited his tent and was adorned with the purple imperial cloak over his shoulders and declared emperor by the army. He pretended to be surprised, but this was a staged performance carefully planned out to shift power. Alexander was encamped nearby at Vicus Britannicus and became enraged at the news. Upon the approach of Maximinus and his troops the next day, Alexander’s troops abandoned him and changed sides. “Trembling and terrified out of his wits, Alexander just managed to get back to his tent. There, the reports say, he waited for his executioner, clinging to his mother and weeping and blaming her for his misfortunes…They burst into the tent and slaughtered the emperor, his mother, and all those thought to be his friends or favorites.” – Herodian VI.9
8 commentsNoah
Maximinus_S8378.JPG
Gaius Julius Verus Maximinus I "Thrax," 235 - 238 AD38 viewsObv: AVTO MAΞIMINOC EVC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Maximinus facing right.

Rev: Nike advancing right, wreath in left hand, palm over right shoulder; LB (reginal year 2) in right field.

Billon Tetradrachm, Alexandria mint, 235 - 236 AD

11.95 grams, 22.2 mm, 0°

S8378

Ex: FORVM
1 commentsSPQR Coins
galeria valeria-.jpg
GALERIA VALERIA follis AD308-30910 viewsobv:GAL.VALERIA.AVG (diademed & draped bust right)
rev:VENERI.VICTRICI / Δ / MKV (Venus standing left, holding up apple in right hand & raising drapery over shoulder with left)
ref:RIC VI-Cyzicus46
mint:Cyzicus, 5.63g, 24mm
Diocletian's daughter and Galerius's wife. They married in June 293, and Valeria followed her husband to East provinces. When Galerius died (312 AD) she was banished by Maximinus II (Daza). After hidden for years she (and her mother) was captured and brutally executed at Thessalonica in 315 AD.
berserker
Coin1001_quad_sm.jpg
Galerius Concordia Militum Ӕ post-reform radiate fraction (295 - 299), Cyzicus mint5 viewsGAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, radiate, draped (?) and cuirassed bust right / CONCORDIA MI-LITVM + KB in lower centre, Prince (the left figure) standing right in military dress, holding parazonium or baton of imperium, receiving small Victory with a wreath and palm branch on globe from naked Jupiter (the right figure) standing left holding tall scepter.

Ӕ, 20mm, 2.36g, die axis 6h, base metal seems red, high copper content.

Galerius ruled as Caesar from 293 to 305, but most sources give minting years for this type of coin as 295-299.

RIC VI Cyzicus 19b (18b?), Sear 3713. 19b has cuirassed and draped bust, 18b -- only cuirassed. I think the edge of the military cape on the shoulder means it is draped in this case, but distinction seems very vague to me. Looking at coins identified as 18b and 19b I cannot see any clear pattern, it seems that many are confused in this respect just like myself.

GALerius VALerius MAXIMIANUS NOBilitas CAESar (in this era the title of "junior" emperor while Augustus was a "senior" one), CONCORDIA MILITVM = [Dedicated to] harmony with the soldiers, K = Kysikos (Cyzicus) mint, B = officina Beta (workshop #2). The figure to the right is naked except for a cape, so it is a god, the sceptre points to him being Jupiter, the ruler of gods. Jupiter is also typically associated with Victory, he was often depicted with Victory in the right hand and sceptre in the left. The line across his head probably designates a wreath, also a common feature of Jupiter. Victory holds her common attributes, the triumphal wreath and a palm branch, the orb she stands on represents the world (thus meaning dominion over it). Round Earth was a firmly established concept in Roman times. The left figure, the prince (Galerius in this case) is identified by his full battle dress and the hand-held short elongated shape, which is either the ivory baton of imperium (the high command) or, more likely, a parazonium, a long triangular dagger, typically cradled in the bearer's left arm. A Roman parazonium blade tended to be leaf shape and approximately 15"-19" long. It was a ceremonial weapon, a mark of high rank, used to rally the troops.

GALERIUS, * c. 250, near Serdica, Dacia Ripensis (Sofia, Bulgaria) or in a Dacian place later called Felix Romuliana (Gamzigrad, Serbia) † late Apr or early May 311 (aged ~60), Serdica, Dacia Ripensis (Sofia, Bulgaria) ‡ 1 Mar or 21 May 293 – 1 May 305 (as Eastern Caesar, under Diocletian), 1 May 305 – late Apr or early May 311 (as Eastern Augustus with many co-emperors).

Galerius was born of humble parentage and had a distinguished military career. On March 1, 293, he was nominated as Caesar by Diocletian, the supreme ruler of the empire, to help him govern the East. Galerius divorced his wife and married Diocletian’s daughter, Valeria. After ruling from Egypt from 293 to 295, Galerius assumed command of defensive operations against the Sasanians in 297. After being defeated, he then won a decisive victory that increased his influence with Diocletian. Galerius next proceeded to the Balkans and won numerous victories in the region. A staunch pagan, he persuaded the emperor to initiate the persecution of the Christians at Nicomedia in 303.

When Diocletian abdicated on May 1, 305, Galerius became Augustus of the East, ruling the Balkans and Anatolia. Since Galerius had arranged the appointment of two of his favourites, Maximinus (his nephew) and Flavius Valerius Severus, to be Caesars in both East and West, he was in effect the supreme ruler. When Constantius Chlorus died in 306, Galerius insisted that Severus govern the West as Augustus, but he grudgingly conceded the subordinate title of caesar to Chlorus’s son, Constantine, who was correctly suspected of Christian sympathies. Galerius’s supremacy was, however, short-lived. Severus was soon overthrown (306) and killed by Maxentius (son of the former emperor Maximian). Galerius invaded Italy but was forced to retreat. In 308 he induced Diocletian and Maximian to meet him at Carnuntum on the Danube and to declare Maxentius a usurper. On November 11, Galerius proclaimed as Augustus of the West his friend Licinius, who had effective control only in the region of the Danube.

A ruthless ruler, Galerius imposed the poll tax on the urban population and maintained the persecution of the Christians. In the winter of 310–311, however, he became incapacitated with a horrible disease. Fearing, perhaps, that his illness was the vengeance of the Christian God, he issued on April 30, 311, an edict grudgingly granting toleration. Shortly afterward he died. He was succeeded by his nephew Maximinus Daia.

Diocletian's money reform of 293.

Trying to fight the runaway inflation that he did not understand and to return people's faith in Roman coins, Diocletian did a complete overhaul of the Roman monetary system. He introduced a new theoretical base monetary unit called the denarius communis or d.c. (only rarely represented by actual coins, one example being old pre-Aurelian antoniniani still in circulation, valued now at 1 d. c., another – minted only on a small scale 1.5g coin with the reverse legend VTILITAS PVBLICA, "for public use"). Then he started minting new types of coins including a gold aureus of new purity and weight standard (1/60 pound of pure gold), a quality silver coin, argenteus, roughly similar to the early imperial denarius in size and weight, a new billon coin, of a copper alloy but with a small fraction of silver mostly in the form of coating, roughly similar to the old antoninianus when it was just introduced, however bearing now a laureate rather than a radiate bust. This type of coin is now commonly referred to as a follis or a nummus. Finally, a new radiate bronze coin, now referred to as a "radiate fraction" or a radiatus was introduced, similar to the early imperial aes in value, but much smaller in weight and size. There were also rare issues of ½ and ¼ nummus coins, mostly in connection to some celebration. Interestingly, the obverses of these new coins were chosen to represent some identical "generic" image of a "good emperor" independent of the actual likeness of the August or Caesar in whose name they were issued, thus affirming the unity of all the tetrarchy rulers. Very roughly one may think of a new radiatus as a price of one loaf of bread, a new argenteus as a very good daily wage, and a new aureus as a price of a good horse. An approximate relationship between these units was as follows: 1 aureus ≈ 20 argentei ≈ 1000 d.c. (some scholars prefer 25 argentei and 1250 d.c.); 1 argenteus ≈ 5 nummi ≈ 50 d.c.; 1 nummus ≈ 5 radiati ≈ 10 d.c.; 1 radiatus ≈ 2 d.c. Of course we know that this reform was ineffective and inflation continued, so all these values were constantly shifting due to changing markets. Diocletian himself stopped minting argenteus in c. 305, and Constantine in his monetary reforms only re-established a new and highly successful gold standard, solidus (1/72 pound of pure gold, surprisingly actually first introduced also by Diocletian in 301, but only as a pilot version). As for billon and bronze coins, "folles" or "nummi", they were minted in all shapes and sizes all over the 4th century, often horribly debased by inflation, and their values at each point can only be guessed. It seems that in later times up to 1000 small bronze coins were sealed in a leather pouch to produce a reasonable unit of payment, thus giving rise to the name follis (lit. "bag" in Latin), which is now anachronistically applied to many billon and bronze coins of the late 3d and 4th century.
Yurii P
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GENIO AVGVSTI CMH, RIC VI 77a Cyzicus7 viewsMaximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D. Silvered follis, RIC VI 77a, VF, flat strike, Cyzicus mint, 8.031g, 26.1mm, 0o, 311 A.D; obverse IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO AVGVSTI CMH, Genius standing left pouring libations from patera in right, cornucopia in left, MKV[...] in ex; full circles strike; scarce. Ex FORVMPodiceps
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GENIO AVGVSTI, RIC 101a Cyzicus4 viewsMaximinus II Daia, late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D. Silvered follis, RIC VI 101a, VF, Cyzicus mint, 4.563g, 24.0mm, 0o, 311 A.D; obverse IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left pouring libations from patera in right, cornucopia in left, altar at feet, “G” right, SMK in ex; scarce. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
83188q00_Maximinus_II_daia_RIC_VI_199,_aVF,_Siscia.jpg
GENIO AVGVSTI, SIS in ex; RIC VI 199, Siscia7 viewsMaximinus II Daia, late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D. Bronze follis, RIC VI 199, Siscia mint, 6.584g, 27.6mm, 0o, as Caesar 309 - 310 A.D.; obverse MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on head, patera in right, cornucopia in left, crescent left, A right, SIS in ex; scarce. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
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GENIO IMPERATORIS, HTE in ex. Heraclea7 viewsMaximinus II AE Follis. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINO PF INV AVG, laureate head right / GENIO IMPERATORIS, Genius standing left, naked except for modius on head & chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera, from which liquid flows, & cornucopiae, T to right, HTE in ex. Ex Rutten & WielandPodiceps
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GENIO POP ROM - Maximinus II29 viewsAE Follis, London, Mid 310 - Late 312
4.81gm, 22mm
Ox: IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG
O: Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
Rx: GENIO POP ROM, PLN in ex., * in right field
R: Genius standing left, head towered, loins draped, holding patera in right hand, cornucopiae in left.

RIC VI.209b (C2), ex. Joseph Sermarini, ex. Aiello Collection
Paul DiMarzio
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GENIO POP ROM - Maximinus II66 viewsAE Follis, London, Summer 307
7.56gm, 25mm
Ox: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C
O: Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rx: GENIO POP ROM, PLN in ex.
R: Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera in right hand, cornucopiae in left.

RIC VI.89a (C), ex. Clive Eyre
Paul DiMarzio
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GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, RIC 171a Siscia18 viewsMaximinus II Daia, late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D. Bronze quarter-follis, RIC VI 171b, VF, Siscia mint, 2.275g, 18.7mm, 0o, as Caesar 305 - 306 A.D.; obverse MAXIMINVS NOB C, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius of the Roman people standing left, wearing modius, holding cornucopia in left and patera in right, SIS in ex; scarce. Some references identify this type as a bronze denarius. Ex FORVMPodiceps
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Gordian I Africanus / Athena61 viewsGordian I Africanus, Egypt, Alexandria. A.D. 238. BI tetradrachm (22 mm, 12.47 g, 12 h). RY 1.
O: A K M AN ΓOPΔIANOC CЄM AΦ ЄVCЄB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian I right
R: Athena seated left, holding Nike and spear; in left field, date (L A).
- Köln 2600; cf. Dattari (Savio) 4656 (legend); Kampmann & Ganschow 68.6., Ex Coin Galleries (16 July 2003), 264.

Perhaps the most reluctant of Emperors, Gordian I (Marcus Antonius Gordianus Sempronianus Romanus Africanus Augustus) was Roman Emperor for one month with his son Gordian II in 238, the Year of the Six Emperors. Caught up in a rebellion against the Emperor Maximinus Thrax, he was defeated by forces loyal to Maximinus before committing suicide.

According to Edward Gibbon:

"An iniquitous sentence had been pronounced against some opulent youths of [Africa], the execution of which would have stripped them of far the greater part of their patrimony. (…) A respite of three days, obtained with difficulty from the rapacious treasurer, was employed in collecting from their estates a great number of slaves and peasants blindly devoted to the commands of their lords, and armed with the rustic weapons of clubs and axes. The leaders of the conspiracy, as they were admitted to the audience of the procurator, stabbed him with the daggers concealed under their garments, and, by the assistance of their tumultuary train, seized on the little town of Thysdrus, and erected the standard of rebellion against the sovereign of the Roman empire. (...) Gordianus, their proconsul, and the object of their choice [as emperor], refused, with unfeigned reluctance, the dangerous honour, and begged with tears that they should suffer him to terminate in peace a long and innocent life, without staining his feeble age with civil blood. Their menaces compelled him to accept the Imperial purple, his only refuge indeed against the jealous cruelty of Maximin (...)."

Because of the absence of accurate dating in the literary sources, the precise chronology of these events has been the subject of much study. The present consensus among historians assigns the following dates (all in the year 238 A.D.) to these events: March 22nd Gordian I, II were proclaimed Emperors in Africa; April 1st or 2nd they were recognized at Rome; April 12th they were killed (after reigning twenty days); April 22nd Pupienus and Balbinus were proclaimed Emperors; June 24th Maximinus and his son were assassinated outside of Aquileia; July 29th Pupienus and Balbinus were assassinated and Gordian III proclaimed as sole Augustus.
3 commentsNemonater
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Gordian II Africanus / Victory62 viewsGordian II Africanus. Silver Denarius, AD 238. Rome.
O: IMP M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian II right.
R: VICTO-RIA AVGG, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm.
- RIC 2; BMC 28; RSC 12.

Gordian II (Marcus Antonius Gordianus Sempronianus Romanus Africanus Augustus), was Roman Emperor for one month with his father Gordian I in 238, the Year of the Six Emperors. The double "GG" in "AVGG" (Augustus) on the reverse was to show that power was shared between the two men although Gordian II did not receive the additional title of high priest or Pontifex Maximus. He died in battle outside of Carthage.

Confronted by a local elite that had just killed Maximinus's procurator, Gordian's father (Gordian I) was forced to participate in a full-scale revolt against Maximinus in 238 and became Augustus on March 22.

Due to his advanced age, Gordian I insisted that his son, Marcus Antonius Gordianus (Gordian II), be associated with him. A few days later, Gordian entered the city of Carthage with the overwhelming support of the population and local political leaders. Meanwhile in Rome, Maximinus' praetorian prefect was assassinated and the rebellion seemed to be successful. Gordian in the meantime had sent an embassy to Rome, under the leadership of Publius Licinius Valerianus, to obtain the Senate’s support for his rebellion. The senate confirmed the new emperor on 2 April and many of the provinces gladly sided with Gordian.

Opposition would come from the neighboring province of Numidia. Capelianus, governor of Numidia, loyal supporter of Maximinus Thrax, and who held a grudge against Gordian, renewed his alliance to the former emperor and invaded Africa province with the only legion stationed in the region, III Augusta, and other veteran units. Gordian II, at the head of a militia army of untrained soldiers, lost the Battle of Carthage and was killed, and Gordian I took his own life by hanging himself with his belt. The Gordians had reigned only twenty-two days.
3 commentsNemonater
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Here Comes the Sun64 viewsPortraits of Sol on Greek and Roman Coins

First Row:
RSC Aquillia 1, RIC IV 163 Caracalla, RSC 13 Mark Antony

Center:
RIC Vi 64 Aurelian, S3735 Hadrian, RIC VI 164b Maximinus II

Third Row:
Asia Minor GCV 5063 (var.), RIC IVii 112 Severus Alexander, RIC II 342 Trajan

All coins, obverse and reverse, with full descriptions may be seen in my gallery.
2 commentsSPQR Matt
Maximinus_II_Daia_39.jpg
I133 viewsMaximinus II AE Follis

Attribution: RIC 66c Nicomedia
Date: AD 309-313
Obverse: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head r.
Reverse: GENIO AV-GVSTI CH, nude Genius standing l. pouring out patera w/ r. hand and holding cornucopia w/ l., SMNA in exergue
Size: 22 mm
Weight: 5.7 grams

“But Daia, who had only recently been picked up from looking after cattle in the forests, had at once become a guardsman, then an officer of the guard, soon afterwards a tribune, and then the next day a Caesar, and he now received the east to crush and trample underfoot… He would squander money too on anything, without discrimination or limit… He would also take away people’s goods while they were still alive and give them to any of his own followers who sought other people’s property. But his capital vice, in which he surpassed all who have ever lived, was his appetite for seduction… By the end, he had introduced the practice of allowing no one to marry a wife without his permission, so that he himself could sample every marriage in advance…” – Lactantius On the Deaths of the Persecutors 19, 37-38

After the suicide of Maximian and, later, the death of Galerius, Maximinus Daia made a bid for emperor. He and his primary rival, Licinius I came to terms and decided to divide the provinces. Licinius was to control the Balkans, while Maximinus was given Asian Minor and the eastern provinces. Maximinus then resumed the persecution of Christians which had ceased under Galerius’ orders only six months before. In AD 313, however, Maximinus found himself in a final confrontation with his rival Licinius. They met on the plain of the River Ergenus, near Hadrianopolis in Thrace. Constantine (the Great) joined forces with Licinius for the battle. Although Maximinus’ forces numbered over twice as many as his opponents’ (70,000 men), he was not the superior tactician. Maximinus fled the battle dressed as a peasant and headed to Tarsus. This was to no avail, for a few months later, he was under siege by land and sea. Poison proved to be Maximinus Daia’s choice to avoid capture. He drank a poison which was slow acting and took four days of pain and suffering to kill him.
5 commentsNoah
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IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG / P M S COL VIM / Ӕ30 (239-240 AD)18 viewsIMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right / P M S CO - L VIM, personification of Moesia standing facing, head left, arms outstretched over a lion (right) and a bull (left). AN • I • in exergue.

Ӕ, 29-30+mm, 16.75g, die axis 1h (slightly turned medal alignment), material: looks like red copper.

IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG = Imperator Caesar Marcus Antonius Gordianus Augustus, P M S COL VIM = Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium = Colony of Viminacium, in the province of Upper Moesia, AN•I• = the first year. 238 AD was the infamous "year of the 6 emperors", so 239-240 was the first sole ruling year of Gordian III. The bull is the symbol of Legio VII Claudia, based in the capital of Moesia Superior, Viminacium itself, and the lion is the symbol of Legio IV Flavia Felix based in another city of Moesia Superior, Singidunum (modern Belgrade). Due to size this is most probably a sestertius, but large dupondius is another possibility, since it is clearly made of red copper and sestertii were typically made of expensive "gold-like" orichalcum, a kind of brass (but in this time of civil strife they could have used a cheaper replacement). Literature fails to clearly identify the denomination of this type.

A straightforward ID due to size and clear legends, this is AMNG 71; Martin 1.01.1 minted in Viminacium, Moesia Superior (Kostolac, Serbia).

Gordian III was Roman Emperor from 238 AD to 244 AD. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. Antonia Gordiana was the daughter of Emperor Gordian I and younger sister of Emperor Gordian II. Very little is known of his early life before his acclamation. Gordian had assumed the name of his maternal grandfather in 238 AD.

In 235, following the murder of Emperor Alexander Severus, Maximinus Thrax was acclaimed Emperor. In the following years, there was a growing opposition against Maximinus in the Roman senate and amongst the majority of the population of Rome. In 238 (to become infamous as "the year of six emperors") a rebellion broke out in the Africa Province, where Gordian's grandfather and uncle, Gordian I and II, were proclaimed joint emperors. This revolt was suppressed within a month by Cappellianus, governor of Numidia and a loyal supporter of Maximinus Thrax. The elder Gordians died, but public opinion cherished their memory as peace-loving and literate men, victims of Maximinus' oppression.

Meanwhile, Maximinus was on the verge of marching on Rome and the Senate elected Pupienus and Balbinus as joint emperors. These senators were not popular and the population of Rome was still shocked by the elder Gordians' fate, so the Senate decided to take the teenage Gordian, rename him Marcus Antonius Gordianus like his grandfather, and raise him to the rank of Caesar and imperial heir. Pupienus and Balbinus defeated Maximinus, mainly due to the defection of several legions, particularly the II Parthica, who assassinated Maximinus. However, their joint reign was doomed from the start with popular riots, military discontent and an enormous fire that consumed Rome in June 238. On July 29, Pupienus and Balbinus were killed by the Praetorian Guard and Gordian proclaimed sole emperor.

Due to Gordian's age, the imperial government was surrendered to the aristocratic families, who controlled the affairs of Rome through the Senate. In 240, Sabinianus revolted in the African province, but the situation was quickly brought under control. In 241, Gordian was married to Furia Sabinia Tranquillina, daughter of the newly appointed praetorian prefect, Timesitheus. As chief of the Praetorian Guard and father in law of the Emperor, Timesitheus quickly became the de facto ruler of the Roman Empire.

In the 3rd century, the Roman frontiers weakened against the Germanic tribes across the Rhine and Danube, and the Sassanid Empire across the Euphrates increased its own attacks. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243). The campaign was a success and Gordian, who had joined the army, was planning an invasion of the enemy's territory, when his father-in-law died in unclear circumstances. Without Timesitheus, the campaign, and the Emperor's security, were at risk.

Gaius Julius Priscus and, later on, his own brother Marcus Julius Philippus, also known as Philip the Arab, stepped in at this moment as the new Praetorian Prefects and the campaign proceeded. Around February 244, the Persians fought back fiercely to halt the Roman advance to Ctesiphon. Persian sources claim that a battle occurred (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. Roman sources do not mention this battle and suggest that Gordian died far away from Misiche, at Zaitha (Qalat es Salihiyah) in northern Mesopotamia. Modern scholarship does not unanimously accept this course of the events. One view holds that Gordian died at Zaitha, murdered by his frustrated army, while the role of Philip is unknown. Other scholars have concluded that Gordian died in battle against the Sassanids.
Philip transferred the body of the deceased emperor to Rome and arranged for his deification. Gordian's youth and good nature, along with the deaths of his grandfather and uncle and his own tragic fate at the hands of the enemy, earned him the lasting esteem of the Romans.
Yurii P
Maximian.jpg
IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG53 viewsBohemian
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Julia Mamaea Denarius - Felicitas (RIC 335)35 viewsAR Denarius
Rome, 222-235 AD
3.43g

Obv: Diademed and draped bust of Julia Mamaea (R)
IVLIA MAMAEA AVG

Rev: Felicitas standing front, head to left, legs crossed, holding caduceus in her right hand and leaning on column with her left elbow.
FELICITAS PVBLICA

RIC 335, BMC 483, Cohen 17

Leu Numismatik Web Auction 6, Lot 1062
ex. Maggiore Collection, formed in the late 1970s to early 2000s.

Julia Avita Mamaea (180–235) was the second daughter of Julia Maesa, a powerful Roman woman of Syrian origin, and Syrian noble Gaius Julius Avitus Alexianus. She was a niece of empress Julia Domna and sister of Julia Soaemias Bassiana (mother of Elegabalus). She was born and raised in Emesa (modern Homs, Syria). She was the mother of Roman Emperor Alexander Severus and served as regent of Rome and de facto ruler during her son's reign.

In 232, mother and son were sent north to deal with a German attack. Alexander so alienated the Rhine legions by his lack of military prowess and his inflexibility towards pay that the troops proclaimed Maximinus Thrax as emperor in 235. Troops sent to kill Alexander found him clinging to his mother in a tent. Mother and son were butchered together, ending the Severan dynasty.
3 commentsOptimo Principi
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Julia Mamaea, Juno with peacock, Silver Denarius * 222-235 A.D.66 views
AR Denarius

Obv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG. Draped bust, right.
Rev: IVNO CONSERVATRIX. Juno* standing left, holding patera in left hand and scepter in right hand, peacock at her feet to left and both left-facing.

Mint: Rome
Struck: 222 AD.

Size: 1.9 cm.
Weight: 3.1 grams.
Die axis: 0 degs.

Beautiful clear luster, with ‘minor’ shock damage to lower edge.

RIC IV/2, 343; C.35
Sear 2310
BMCR.43

* Olympian

Mamaea's imperial title was Iulia Augusta, mater Augusti nostri et castrorum et senatus et patriae, recalling the titulature of Julia Domna. Her position in the government was confirmed by the title consors imperii. Recognized as religiosissima, she had conversation with Origen while in the East as She accompanied Alexander on campaign there against the Persians in 230-231. In 235, she was with him in Germany, at Mainz, when they were assassinated by the troops, with Maximinus Thrax chosen as successor. She suffered damnatio memoriae.
Tiathena
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Laureate bust198 viewsBITHYNIA. Prusa ad Olympum. Maximinus I. Æ 23. A.D. 235-238. Obv: ΓIOVMAΞIMEINOCAV. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; countermark on bust. Rev: ΠP-OVC-AEΩN. Athena standing left, holding patera in right hand and spear in left, shield at her feet. Ref: BMC -; Waddington 148. Axis: 30°. Weight: 8.95 g. CM: Laureate bust right, in oval punch, 5 x 6 mm. Howgego 65 (130 pcs). Note: Dating of the countermark is problematic, and it seems likely that it was applied over a period of time. Collection Automan.Automan
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Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.21 viewsBronze follis, RIC 8, aVF, Siscia mint, 3.409g, 22.0mm, 180o, 313 - 315 A.D.; obverse IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CON-SERVATORI, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and scepter, eagle with wreath in beak left, B right, SIS in ex;

Licinius I was a comrade of emperor Galerius in the Tetrarchic period. Following the abdication of Diocletian and Maximianus, Licinius was raised to the rank of Augustus despite never having held the position of Caesar. After Maximinus II invaded his territories, Licinius marched against him and defeated him soundly. Over the next few years, relations between Licinius and Constantine I deteriorated. Armed conflict broke out several times and Licinius was defeated. Only through the intervention of Licinius' wife, Constantine`s sister, was his life spared. However, shortly after he was executed for additional political machinations against Constantine.

cwonsidler
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Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.47 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 30, aVF, Rome mint, 3.69g, 20.6mm, 180o, 314 - 315 A.D.; obverse IMP LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse SOLI INV-I-CTO COMITI, Sol standing left, raising right hand and globe in left, RX and F at sides, RT in ex;
Licinius I was a comrade of emperor Galerius in the Tetrarchic period. Following the abdication of Diocletian and Maximianus, Licinius was raised to the rank of Augustus despite never having held the position of Caesar. After Maximinus II invaded his territories, Licinius marched against him and defeated him soundly. Over the next few years, relations between Licinius and Constantine I deteriorated. Armed conflict broke out several times and Licinius was defeated. Only through the intervention of Licinius` wife, Constantine`s sister, was his life spared. However, shortly after he was executed for additional political machinations against Constantine.


cwonsidler
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Lyre (?)119 viewsBITHYNIA. Nicaea. Maximinus I. Æ 23. A.D. 235-238. Obv: (ГI)OVOVHMA-ΞI(MEINOCAVГ). Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; countermark behind neck. Rev: NIKAI-(EΩN). Triptolemus standing in chariot, drawn right by two winged serpents. Ref: BMC -; Axis: 360°. Weight: 6.97 g. CM: Possibly a lyre (?).Howgego -. Collection Automan.Automan
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MACEDON - THESSALONICA - MAXIMINUS THRAX - NIKE WALKING WITH STATUE OF KABIR.27 viewsObv: Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: Nike standing left, holding palmbranch and statue of kabir.

Antonio Protti
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Max Thrax Germ Sestertius30 viewsMaximinus I Æ Sestertius.
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laur, dr and cuir bust right from behind Reverse: VICTORIA GERMANICA, Victory standing left with wreath & palm; captive seated before.
RIC 90, Cohen 109.
30mm , 17.9gm
Jerome Holderman
Maximinus II 5 D.jpg
Maximianus AE Radiate14 viewsMaximianus AE Post-Reform Radiate Fraction. 295-299 AD. IMP C MA MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate draped bust right / CONCORDIA MILITVM, emperor standing right receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter, KA between.

Cyzicus RIC 15b
Tanit
IMG_9903_9904.JPG
Maximianus tetradrachm43 viewsMaximianus, 285 - 310 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt, Billon tetradrachm, Milne 5067 (B in ex), BMC 2558 (A in ex), SNG Cop 1052 (Γ in ex), Curtis -, Geissen -, aVF, 7.374g, 17.9mm, 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 292 - 28 Aug 293; obverse ΜΑΞΙΜΙΑΝΟC CΕΒ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Elpis standing left, flower in right, raising drapery with left, star behind, L - H (year 8 ) across fields.2 commentstjaart
max1.jpg
MAXIMIANVS I 235-238 denarius25 viewsOb. IMP MAXIMINUS PIVS AVG. Laureate and draped bust right.
Rev. PM.TR.P.II.COS.P.P Maximinus standing between two standards
Ref. Sear 2242, RIC 2 (pp139)
Year 236
Common


-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
MaxIIDaiaFollis GEN PO SMN.jpg
Maximin II Daia, Follis49 viewsAE 29mm., 308 A.D., Nicomedia
Obv: Gal Val Maximinus Nob Caes
Rev: Genio Caesaris
Ex: SMNB, for 2nd officina of Nicomedia
Ref: CMIR , Vol III, Juan R. Cayon, P. 1959, # 63
Jean Paul D
maxi.jpg
Maximinus (235 - 238 A.D)47 viewsAR Denarius
O: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
R: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing facing, head left, holding olive branch and transverse scepter.
20mm
3.1g
Rome
RIC 019 RSC 037
2 commentsMat
maximinus_genio_1a.png
Maximinus 4.03.02411 viewsMaximinus Daia
Obv MAXIMINVS NOBILISSIMVS CAES
(R. laur. dr. cuir)
Rev GENIO POPVLI ROMANI
(Genius stg l. holding patera and cornucopiae)
No mint mark
London
RIC VI 59b LMCC 4.03.024 (S)
9.5g
(ex Steve Thomas)
(ex Steve Thomas)
(When Diocletian and Maximian Herculius retired on 1st May 305, Constantius and Galerius were elevated to the level of Augustus. At the same time two new Caesars were appointed by Diocletian to keep the pattern of the Tetrachy. Severus became Caesar to Constantius and Maximinus (also known as Maximinus Daia or Daza) became Caesar to Galerius. Galerius also gave Licinius the rank of Augustus in 308. When Galerius died in 311, Licinius and Maximinus divided the eastern empire between them. Maximinus formed an alliance with Maxentius (the son of Maximian Herculius) and fought Licinius at the battle of Tzirallum in April 313. He suffered a crushing defeat and died in the August at Tarsus.)
Noviomagus
maximinus_genio_1b.png
Maximinus 4.03.02813 viewsMaximinus Daia
Obv MAXIMINVS NOBILIS C
(R. laur. dr. cuir from front)
Rev GENIO POPVLI ROMANI
(Genius stg l. holding patera and cornucopiae)
No mint mark
London
RIC VI 63b LMCC 4.03.028 (S)
9.5g
(ex Steve Thomas)
Noviomagus
maximinus_genio_1c.png
Maximinus 5.01.00513 viewsMaximinus Daia
Obv GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C
(R. laur. dr. cuir)
Rev GENIO POP ROM
(Genius stg l. holding patera and cornucopiae)
PLN in ex
London
RIC VI 89a LMCC 5.01.005 (S)
8.1g
c. 307AD
(ex CGB)
Noviomagus
maximinus_soli.png
Maximinus 6.02.01923 viewsMaximinus
Obv IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG (R.laur.cuir)
Rev SOLI INVICTO COMITI
(Sol raising right hand, holding up globe with left)
T|F
PLN
RIC VI 121b LMCC 6.02.019 (R)
London
4.1g
1 commentsNoviomagus
maximinus_comiti.png
Maximinus 7.02.00610 viewsMaximinus Daia
Obv IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG
(R.laur. cuir)
Rev COMITI AAVVGG
(Sol holding whip in right hand, globe in left)
| *
PLN in ex
London
RIC VI 146b LMCC 7.02.006 (R)
4.4g
(ex CNG)
Noviomagus
maximinus_1~0.png
Maximinus 7.05.01111 viewsMaximinus Daia
Obv IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG
(R. laur. cuir)
Rev GENIO POP ROM
(Genius stg l. holding patera and cornucopiae)
| *
PLN in ex
London
RIC VI 209b LMCC 7.05.011 (CC)
4.1g
Noviomagus
maximinus_02~0.jpg
Maximinus AR Denarius 27 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: SALVS AVGVSTI - Salus enthroned left, feeding snake rising from altar.
Date: Mar 235 - Jan 236 AD
Mint: Rome
Ref: RIC IVb 14, RSC III 85
oa
maximinus_03.jpg
Maximinus AR Denarius 17 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: SALVS AVGVSTI - Salus enthroned left, feeding snake rising from altar.
Date: Mar 235 - Jan 236 AD
Mint: Rome
Ref: RIC IVb 14, RSC III 85
oa
maximinus_04.jpg
Maximinus AR Denarius 16 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG - Laureate and draped bust right.
Rev: FIDES MILITVM - Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
Date: Mar 235 - Jan 236 AD
Mint: Rome
Ref: RIC IVb 7a, RSC III 7a.
oa
Antoninus D 4.jpg
Maximinus As28 viewsAE As. Obv.: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG ; Rev.: VICTORIA AVG SC ; Victory running r.
(RIC IV/3, 262a)
Tanit
216- Maximinus As.JPG
Maximinus As-VICTORIA AVG32 viewsAE As, Rome mint, struck 235-238 A.D.

Obverse – IMP. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG. – Laur., dr. and cuir. bust r.


Reverse. – VICTORIA AVG. S. C. – Victory advancing.

Sear 2363; C. 101; R.I.C. 69; B.M.C. 29

27mm, 12.4g
Jerome Holderman
Maximin_Daïa.jpg
Maximinus Daia30 views3 commentsGinolerhino
1798582_630623706974544_214059233_n.jpg
Maximinus Daia 38 viewsMaximinus Daia as Caesar Follis, struck AD 308 - 310 at Nicomedia mint.
Obv: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right.
Rev: GENIO CAESARIS CMH (in ligation) / SMNB, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae
RIC 55
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Maximinus_Daia_1.jpg
Maximinus Daia - Antiochia21 viewsMaximinus Daia (305-313)
Follis
Antiochia
Obv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG
laureate head right
Rev: GENIO AVGVSTI
Genio standing left holding radiate head of Sol and cornucopia, star left, B right
4,2g 21 mm.
Ref.: RIC 164b, C 21.
shanxi
108MXD001_Maximinus_Daia_Genius_RIC6_Thessalonica_32_a.jpg
Maximinus Daia Follis, Genius (RIC Thessalonica 32a)15 viewsThessalonica mint, sixth officina, 308-310. 24.5 mm, 5.80 g, 0º.

Obverse: MAXIMINVS FIL AVGG Laureate bust, looking right.

Reverse: GENIO CAESARIS Genius, half naked and wearing modius, standing left, holding cornucopia and patera. Star in left field, ∆ in right.

Exergue: •SM•TS•

Reference: RIC VI Thessalonica 32a.
Manuel
MaximinusVictoriaDenarius.jpg
Maximinus Denarius67 viewssocalcoins
Maximin_genio.jpg
Maximinus Follis21 viewsGinolerhino
maximinus-thrax-fouree.jpg
Maximinus Fouree Denarius22 viewsRoman Imperial, Maximinus Fouree Denarius

Obverse: IMP MAXIMINUS PIV AVG, Laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, holding branch and sceptre, altar at feet.

Reference: Pending

Ex: Holding History Coins +photo
Gil-galad
41-Maximinus Germ-AVG Mule.jpg
Maximinus Germ-AVG Mule53 viewsAR Denarius , Rome Mint , 235-238AD
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate , draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing right with wreath and palm.
3.0gm. , 22mm
RIC 22. Scarce
2 commentsjdholds
maximinus_I.jpg
MAXIMINUS I28 viewsÆ 4 Assaria. Tomis (Moesia Inferior). 237-238 AD. 11.36 gm, 1h. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind . / AVT MAΞIMEINOC EV CEB AVΓ. / Winged Nemesis standing facing, head left, holding sceptre and reins; wheel behind. MHTPOΠONTOV TOMEWC (delta). AMNG I 3327. Varbanov 4386 .
CNG 151122. Gorny & Mosch 126 , lot 1649.

benito
maximinus.jpg
MAXIMINUS I28 viewsAE sestertius. 235-236 AD. 17.48 gr. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right. IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG. / Fides Militum standing facing, head left, holding military standards. FIDES MILITVM. Across field S C. RIC IV 43. Cohen 10.benito
00maximinusar.jpg
MAXIMINUS I33 viewsAR denarius. 236 AD. 3,28 grs. Laureate,draped,and cuirassed bust right. IMP MAXIMINUS PIUS AVG. / Salus enthroned left, feeding serpent rising from altar. SALVS AVGVSTI.
C. 85. RSC 85. RIC 14.
benito
00maximinussest.jpg
MAXIMINUS I42 viewsAE sestertius. 235-236 AD. 17.48 gr. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right. IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG. / Fides Militum standing facing, head left, holding military standards. FIDES MILITVM. Across field S C. RIC IV 43. Cohen 10.
1 commentsbenito
00maximinusAR1.jpg
MAXIMINUS I32 viewsAR denarius. 236 AD. 3,28 grs. Laureate,draped,and cuirassed bust right. IMP MAXIMINUS PIUS AVG. / Salus enthroned left, feeding serpent rising from altar. SALVS AVGVSTI.
C. 85. RSC 85. RIC 14.

benito
00maximinusprov.jpg
MAXIMINUS I16 viewsÆ 4 Assaria. Tomis (Moesia Inferior). 237-238 AD. 11.36 gm, 1h. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind . / AVT MAΞIMEINOC EV CEB AVΓ. / Winged Nemesis standing facing, head left, holding sceptre and reins; wheel behind. MHTPOΠONTOV TOMEWC (delta). AMNG I 3327. Varbanov 4386 .
benito
00191-MaximusI.JPG
Maximinus I15 viewsMaximinus I Sestertius
31 mm 18.78 gm
O: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R:PAX AVGVSTI
Pax standing left, holding olive branch and sceptre
1 commentsKoffy
Maximinus_I_-_Black.jpg
Maximinus I30 views Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: P M TR P P P, Maximinus standing left between two standards, leaning on scepter & raising right hand in salute
Size: 21/19mm Weight: 2.99gm
Id's: RIC 1, RSC 46, BMC 9
Minted: Rome mint, April - Dec 235 AD
ickster
Maximinus_I_Emmett_3293.jpg
Maximinus I39 viewsMAXIMINUS I
Tetradrachm, Alexandria Mint
Laureate bust right / Nilus reclining left, arm resting on hippopotamus head
Emmett 3293
1 commentsSosius
Maxmin1as01C39DaR.jpg
Maximinus I - AE as.16 viewsRugser
Maxmin1as02C81DaR.jpg
Maximinus I - AE as.26 views1 commentsRugser
Maxmin1R01C00DaR.jpg
Maximinus I - denarius24 viewsRugser
Maxmin1R02C00DaR.jpg
Maximinus I - denarius29 viewsRugser
Maxmin1dp01C82DaR.jpg
Maximinus I - Dupondius20 viewsRugser
Maxmin1s01C80DaR.jpg
Maximinus I - sestertius29 viewsRugser
Maxmin1s02C109DaR.jpg
Maximinus I - sestertius19 viewsRugser
Maxmin1s03C38DaR.jpg
Maximinus I - sestertius38 views1 commentsRugser
Maxmin1s04C00DaR.jpg
Maximinus I - sestertius30 viewsRugser
MAXIMIN1-1.jpg
Maximinus I AE Sestertius RIC IV 8122 viewsObv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Laureate and draped bust right
Rev: PAX AVGVSTI S-C
Pax standing left holding branch & sceptre
31mm 21.6gm
OWL365
MAXIMIN1-2.jpg
Maximinus I RIC IV 328 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: P M TR P II COS P P
Maximinus standing between two legionary standards
20.5mm 3.2gm
OWL365
Maximinus_RIC_7A.JPG
Maximinus I "Thrax," 235 - 238 AD25 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Maximinus facing right.

Rev: FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing facing, head turned left, holding a military standard in each hand.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, March 235 - January 236 AD

3.0 grams, 19.69 mm, 180°

RIC IVii 7A, RSC 7a, S8307 (var.), VM 2
SPQR Coins
Maximinus_I_RIC_13.JPG
Maximinus I "Thrax," 235 - 238 AD33 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Maximinus facing right, seen from behind.

Rev: PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, holding a wand over a globe at her feet, and a cornucopia.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 134 AD

3.27 grams, 20 mm, 0°

RIC IVii 13, RSC 77a, S8315, VM 9
SPQR Coins
Maximinus_RIC_23.JPG
Maximinus I "Thrax," 235 - 238 AD35 viewsObv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Maximinus facing right.

Rev: VICTORIA GERM, Victory standing left, holding a wreath and a palm, a German captive sits at her feet.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 236 - 238 AD

2.7 grams, 20.7 mm, 180°

RIC IVii 23, RSC 107, S8318, VM 12
SPQR Coins
Maximinus_RIC_3.JPG
Maximinus I "Thrax," 235 - 238 AD34 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Maximinus facing right.

Rev: PM TRP II COS PP, Emperor standing left, dressed in military attire, holding a scepter, between two military standards.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 236 AD

2.8 grams, 20.5 mm, 180°

RIC IVii 3, RSC 55, S8312, VM 6
1 commentsSPQR Coins
Maximinus_I_RIC_12.JPG
Maximinus I "Thrax," 235 - 238 AD22 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Maximinus facing right.

Rev: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left holding a branch and a spear.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 235- 236 AD

3.1 grams, 20 mm, 0°

RIC IVii 12, RSC 31, S8310, VM 5
Matt Inglima
Maximinus_Thrax_Salus_3b.jpg
Maximinus I 'Thrax' * Salus - AR Denarius * 235-238 AD.111 views
Maximinus I 'Thrax' * Salus - Silver Denarius

Obv: Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
Rev: Salus seated left, feeding serpent arising from altar to front from patera extended in right arm, left elbow resting on seat: SALVS AVGVSTI

Exergue: Clear

Mint: Rome
Struck: 235-238 AD.

Size: 20.07 mm.
Weight: 3.16 gms.
Die axis: 180°

Condition: Beautiful: clear, sharp, distinct images and legends in superb relief, with some notable wear to the serpent.
Lovely silver luster overall.

Refs:*
RIC 14. RSC. 85a.
BMCRE 99, pl. 36.

Status: TCJH * Private Collection
Gift from a very dear friend.
4 commentsTiathena
mextet.jpg
Maximinus I (235 - 238 A.D.)35 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Potin Tetradrachm
O:  AYTO MAΞIMINOC EVC CEB Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
R: Athena standing facing, head left, holding shield and spear; L Δ (date) across field. Dated RY 4 (237/8 AD)
9.4g
24mm
Köln 2580 var. (obv. legend); Dattari 4567; K&G 65.57; Emmett 3274.4
2 commentsMat
maxtet5.jpg
Maximinus I (235 - 238 A.D.)21 viewsBillon Tetradrachm
O: AVTO MAΞIMINOC EVC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right .
R: Nike walking left, wearing long chiton, carrying wreath and palm; LΓ in left field. Y 3 = AD 236-237.
13.38g
23mm
Dattari 4583; Emmett 3288.3

Ex. Roma Numismatics E-Sale 36, Lot 242, May 5, 2017

Published on Wildwinds!
3 commentsMat
14480.jpg
Maximinus I (235-238) AR Denarius RIC IV 2345 viewsAttribution: RIC IV 23
Date: 235-238 AD
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate and draped bust right
Reverse: VICTORIA GERM, Victory standing left holding wreath in right hand and palm in left, captive seated at feet
Size: 20.51 mm
Weight: 3.7 grams
1 commentscliff_marsland
00727.jpg
Maximinus I (RIC 16, Coin #727)6 viewsRIC 16 (C), AR Denarius, Rome, 235-238 AD.
OBV: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
REV: VICTORIA AVG; Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm.
SIZE: 19.5mm, 3.70g
MaynardGee
00364.jpg
Maximinus I (RIC 3, Coin #364)11 viewsRIC 3 (C), AR Denarius, Rome, 236 AD.
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: P M TR P II COS P P Maximinus standing half-left, raising right hand, spear in left, standards at sides.
Size: 20.2mm 3.26gm
MaynardGee
00166.jpg
Maximinus I (RIC 43, Coin #166)15 viewsRIC 43 (C), AE Sestertius, Rome, 235-236 AD.
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG Laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Rev: FIDES MILITVM S C Fides standing left, standard in each hand.
Size: 31.8mm 21.10gm
MaynardGee
00365.jpg
Maximinus I (RIC 43, Coin #365)14 viewsRIC 43 (C), AE Sestertius, Rome, 235-236 AD.
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG Laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Rev: FIDES MILITVM S C Fides standing left, standard in each hand.
Size: 29.7mm 22.12gm
MaynardGee
00354.jpg
Maximinus I (RIC 67, Coin #354)17 viewsRIC 67 (C), Orichalcum Sestertius, Rome, 235 - 236 AD.
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: VICTORIA AVG Victory advancing right, holding wreath in right and palm frond in left, S - C across fields.
Size: 30.1mm 20.40gm
MaynardGee
00732.jpg
Maximinus I (RIC 78, Coin #732)7 viewsRIC 78 (C), AE Sestertius, Rome, 236-238 AD.
OBV: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
REV: FIDES MILITVM S C; Fides standing left holding a signum in each hand.
SIZE: 31.8mm, 19.58g
MaynardGee
1490_Maximinus_Victory.jpg
Maximinus I - AE Sestertius4 viewsIII 235 - I 236 AD
Rome
laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind
IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
Victory advancing right holding wreath and palm
VICTORIA AVG
S C
RIC IV 67
Johny SYSEL
Trajan_Decius_Alexandia.jpg
Maximinus I - Alexandria4 viewsBI tetradrachm
March - 28 Aug 235 AD
laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind
AVTO MAΞIMINOC EVC CEB
Serapis seated on throne left, modius on head, holding long scepter; Kerberos at his feet left; Nike on the back of the throne presenting wreath, holding palm
L A
Ganschow 65.5, Emmett 3298, Geissen 2550, Dattari (Savio) 4596
12,8g
ex Rauch
Johny SYSEL
MaximinusI_RIC_20.jpg
Maximinus I - denarius RIC 2013 viewsMaximinus I Denarius, minted in Rome, 236-238 AD; 2.88g; obv. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust rt.; rev. PROVIDENTIA AVG., Providence standing lt. with baton over a globe & cornucopiae. RIC 20.Bartosz Awianowicz
MaximinusI_RIC_7a.jpg
Maximinus I - denarius RIC 7a24 viewsMaximinus I. Silver denarius, minted in Rome, 235-236 AD; 3.34g; obv. IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate & draped bust right; rev. FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand. RIC 7A, RSC 7a.

Ex F. R. Künker Auktion 143
1 commentsBartosz Awianowicz
maximinus_-_ric_14.jpg
Maximinus I - RIC 149 viewsMaximinus Thrax
Denarius.
IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right /
SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding from patera a serpent arising from altar.
xokleng
maximinus_-_ric_78_1.jpg
Maximinus I - RIC 7815 viewsMaximinus I Thrax
AE Sestertius.
MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right,
seen from the side or back /
FIDES MILITVM S-C, Fides standing left holding two standards.
xokleng
maxmin13~0.jpg
Maximinus I --AE33, Ninica-Claudiopolis. 492 viewsDraped bust of Maximinus R/Draped bust of Maximus R.. SNG France 2, 796. Multiple c/m. (featherz)2 commentsfeatherz
max38a.jpg
Maximinus I AE Sestertius RIC 38, 235-238 CE8 viewsObverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing and holding scepter and branch. S C in field.
31.1 mm., 14.3 g.
NORMAN K
maximinus_01.jpg
Maximinus I AR Denarius30 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: VICTORIA AVG - Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch.
Mint: Rome
Date: 235
Ref: RIC 16, Cohen 99
oa
AAFAb_small.png
Maximinus I Denarius15 viewsMaximinus I, Thrax, 235-238 AD.

Rome, 235 AD.

22mm., 2.76g.

IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG. Bust of Maximinus I, laureate, draped, cuirassed, right.

P M TR P P P. Maximinus Thrax, in military attire, standing left between two standard, raising right hand and leaning to left on spear held in left hand.

References: RIC IV Maximinus Thrax 1 (denarius)

AAFA
RL
maxthrax.jpg
Maximinus I Denarius 235-236 AD26 viewsObverse: IMP MAXIMINUS PIUS AVG; Laureate draped bust right
Reverse: FIDES MILITUM; Fides standing left holding two standards.

A very nice, rather idealized portrait coin without the usual pointed jaw and bulging forehead.
RIC 7A, weight 3.30 grams
daverino
maximinusI den-salus-.jpg
MAXIMINUS I denarius AD235263 viewsobv:IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
rev:SALVS AVGVSTI (Salus seated left, feeding from patera a serpent arising from altar)
ref:RIC14, C.85
2.80gms
The reverse of SALVS AVGVSTI means the Health of the Emperor – should commemorate the Emperor’s survival through two conspiracies against his life. (from RIC IV i)
The ex-consul Magnus had entered into a conspiracy with a number of soldiers and centurions to stab Maximinus, wishing thereby to get the imperial power for himself. Maximinus wished to make a bridge (through the Rhine at Mogantiacum) and cross over against the Germans, and it was resolved that the conspirators should cross over with him and then, breaking the bridge behind them, surround Maximinus on the barbarians' side and kill him, while Magnus seized the throne. (from Historia Augusta)
There was an another uprising by disgruntled soldiers who accompanied Severus Alexander from the East and who championed the recently dismissed provincial governor Quartinus as a rival emperor.
berserker
maximinusI den01-.jpg
MAXIMINUS I denarius AD23531 viewsobv:IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
rev:FIDES MILITVM (Fides standing left, a standard in each hand)
ref:RIC7, C.7
2.99g
berserker
maximinusI den-.jpg
MAXIMINUS I denarius AD23539 viewsobv:IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
rev:SALVS AVGVSTI (Salus seated left, feeding from patera a serpent arising from altar)
ref:RIC14, C.85
2.80gms
See also at Historical Coins gallery
berserker
Maximinus_RIC_16.jpg
Maximinus I Denarius RIC 16, RSC 99a, BMC 10520 views IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped bust right / VICTORIA AVG, Victory running right bearing wreath & palm.
Maximum Diameter: 19.5 mm
Weight: 2.85 g
1 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
Maximinus1.jpg
MAXIMINUS I Denarius RIC 16, Victory13 viewsOBV: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped bust right, early portrait resembling Severus Alexander
REV: VICTORIA AVG, Victory running right, holding wreath and palm
2.8g, 21mm

Minted at Rome, March 235 - January 236
Legatus
maximinus fouree denar.jpg
MAXIMINUS I fourée denarius24 viewsobv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
rev: SALVS AVGVSTI (Salus seated left, feeding from patera a serpent arising from altar)
ref: RIC14, C.85
3.43gms
This coin shows, by the first half of the third century AD, fourée coins had a very thin layer of silver, or rather, the partial remains of that layer, mainly on reverse.
berserker
Maximinus_I_Pax_Sestertius.JPG
Maximinus I Pax Sestertius27 viewsMaximinus I Æ sestertius. Struck March 235 - January 236 AD, 30mm, 20.01g,
OBV: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
REV: PAX AVGVSTI SC, Pax standing with olive branch in outstretched rt hand,
cradling cloak and long sceptre in left arm
RIC IV 58, Pink III, pg. 21, Banti 11a, BMCRE 7, Cohen 34

SCARCE
Romanorvm
Maximinus_I_Pella_City_Goddess~0.JPG
Maximinus I Pella City Goddess56 viewsMaximinus I, Pella Macedonia, 235 - 238 AD, 8.02g, 23mm, Varbanov III (Engl.) 3742, Moushmov 6484 plate XLV - 8,
OBV: IMP CC IVL VER MAXIMINVS, Laureate, draped cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
REV: COL IVL A-VG PELLA, City goddess seated left

Meaning of legend: IMP Caesar Caius VERus MAXIMINVS (IMP C C IVL VER MAXIMINUS)
Meaning of legend: Colony IVLia AVGusta PELLA (COL IVL AVG PELLA)

RARE
1 commentsRomanorvm
maximinus_23.jpg
Maximinus I RIC IV, 23110 viewsMaximinus I Thrax 235 - 238
AR - Denar, 2.83g, 19mm
Rome AD 235/236
obv. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM
draped bust, laureate head r.
rev. VICTORIA GERM
Victory standing l., holding laurel-branch in r. hand
and palmbranch in l. arm; to her feet sitting captured German
RIC IV, 23; C.105
EF mint-state

VICTORIA GERM, due to his ruthless revenge campaigns against the Germans on the northern frontiers of the empire AD 235.
3 commentsJochen
maximinus_78.jpg
Maximinus I RIC IV, 7889 viewsMaximinus I 235 - 238
AE - Sestertius, 20.72g, 29mm
Rome Jan. 236 - March/Apr. 238
obv. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM
draped, cuirassed bust, laureate head r.
rev. FIDES - MILITVM
Fides standing facing, head l., holding military standard in each hand
between S - C
RIC IV/2, 78; C.13
about VF, nice green patina
2 commentsJochen
032A.jpg
Maximinus I Sestertius88 viewsRIC IVb 58 Rome
18.29 g, 31mm
Struck March 235-January 236 A.D.
IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG Laureate and draped bust right
PAX AVGVSTI SC, Pax standing with olive branch.
EX: Roma Numismatics/Richard Beale
3 commentsMark Z2
maximinus2.jpg
Maximinus I Sestertius4 viewsAE Sestertius 236/238 -Roma-.
Obv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust r.
Rev: SALVS AVGVSTI - S C ; Salus enthroned l. feeding snake arising from altar.

RIC 85, C. 92.
Tanit
maximinus4.jpg
Maximinus I Sestertius5 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
Rev: VICTORIA AVG S C ; Victory running r.

Cohen 100
Tanit
maximinus~3.jpg
Maximinus I Sestertius5 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG; laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: FIDES MILITVM SC; Fides stg. l. with two standards

RIC 43. C.10
Tanit
Maximinus_RIC_58.jpg
Maximinus I Sestertius A.D. 235/6 RIC 58, BMC 7240 views IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Maximinus I right / PAX AVGVSTI, S C across field, Pax standing facing, head left, holding branch and transverse scepter.
Maximum Diameter: 27 mm
Weight: 16.02 g
1 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
Maximinus3.jpg
MAXIMINUS I Sestertius, RIC 43, Fides31 viewsOBVERSE: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right
REVERSE: FIDES MILITVM S-C, Fides standing left, standard in each hand
16.3g, 30mm

Struck at Rome, 235-236
Legatus
Maximinus2.jpg
MAXIMINUS I Sestertius, RIC 85, Salus18 viewsOBV: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
REV: SALVS AVGVSTI S-C, Salus seated left, feeding out of patera a snake rising from altar
20.7g, 29.5mm

Minted at Rome, March 235 - January 236
Legatus
Maximinus_20_39g,_S_8338.jpeg
Maximinus I Thrax24 viewsMaximinus I Thrax (the Thracian), AE Sestertius, 20.39g. 236-238 AD. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, cuirassed, draped bust right / SALVS AVGVSTI S-C, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising from altar. RIC 85; Cohen 92; BMCRE 175-176; Banti 24; Sear 8338.1 commentsMolinari
Maximinus_I_Thrax.JPG
Maximinus I Thrax - RIC 77a76 viewsDenarius, Rome, 235-6 AD, 2.99g. Obv: without GERM, second portrait. IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped bust right / PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providence standing left holding cornucopia & wand pointed at globe at foot. BMC-86, RSC-77a, RIC-13, RCV-83153 commentsBud Stewart
Maximinus_RIC85.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax - Sestertius - RIC 8517 viewsObv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate draped bust right
Rev: SALVS AVGVSTI S-C, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising from altar
Size: 32mm
Weight: 19g
Mint: Rome
Date: AD 236-237
Ref: RIC IV 85, Cohen 92
vs1969
MaxTRPIIII.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax / P M TR P IIII49 viewsMaximinus I. AD 235-238. AR Denarius 2.55 g. Rome mint, 6th officina. 6th emission, December AD 237-April AD 238.
O: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
R: P M TR P IIII COS P P Maximinus standing left, raising hand and holding spear; two signa flanking.
- RIC IV 6; BMCRE 219; RSC 70.

Maximinus took his fourth tribunitian on December 10, 237. Although assassinated in April of the following year, he lost control of the Rome mint that January. This rare last issue of his reign was struck between December 237 and January 238.
2 commentsNemonater
roman61.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax AE Sestertius42 views235-6 AD. Rome mint.
Obv.: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Maximinus I right.
Rev.: FIDES MILITVM - Fides Militum standing facing, head left, holding two standards.
RIC 43. Alram 9-5/A. BMC 63. Cohen 10.
3 commentsMinos
maximinusI sest-victory.jpg
MAXIMINUS I Thrax AE sestertius - 235-236 AD26 viewsobv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG (laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right)
rev: VICTORIA AVG (Victory advancing right bearing wreath & palm), S-C across fields
ref: RIC 67, Cohen 100, BMC 108
24.82gms, 31mm
History: The first "soldier-emperor," Gaius Julius Verus Maximinus spent the winter of AD 235-36 at Sirmium and then led successful campaigns against Dacian and Sarmatian tribes. The Senate granted the titles Sarmaticus Maximus and Dacicus Maximus for him, but these titles aren't on his coins.
berserker
maximinus_RIC61.jpg
MAXIMINUS I Thrax AE sestertius - 235-236 AD23 viewsobv:: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG (laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right)
rev: PROVIDENTIA AVG (Providentia standing left, holding wand over globe & cornucopiae), S-C in field
ref: RIC 61, Cohen 80
18.03gms, 28mm
Providence is most often depicted under the form of a female, clothed in a matron's gown, holding in her left hand a cornucopiae, or the hasta pura, and in her right a short wand, with which she either touches or points to a globe. This coin reverse type is intended to mark the power and wisdom of the emperor, who ruled the Roman world.
berserker
maximinusI sest2.jpg
MAXIMINUS I Thrax AE sestertius - 236 AD14 viewsobv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG (laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right)
rev: PM TRP II COS PP (Maximinus I standing left, raising hand and holding scepter, two standards to left and one to right), S-C across fields
ref: RIC33, C.58
19.79gms, 28mm
berserker
maximinusI sest.jpg
MAXIMINUS I Thrax AE sestertius - 236 AD19 viewsobv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG (laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right)
rev: PM TRP II COS PP / S.C. (Maximinus I standing left, raising hand and holding scepter, two standards to left and one to right), S-C across fields
ref: RIC30, C.59
18.13gms, 29mm
berserker
maximinus sest-.jpg
MAXIMINUS I Thrax AE sestertius - 236-238 AD23 viewsobv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM (laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right)
rev: FIDES MILITVM (Fides standing left, holding two standards), S C across field
ref: RIC IV 78; Cohen 13
17.33gms, 30mm
berserker
roman8.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax Ar Denarius22 views235-236 AD. Rome mint.
Obv.: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: PAX AVGVSTI - Pax standing left, holding branch upwards in right hand and transverse scepter with left.
RIC 12.
Minos
maximinus-fouree-denarius.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax Fouree Denarius24 viewsRoman Imperial, Maximinus Fouree Denarius

Obverse: IMP MAXIMINUS PIV AVG, Laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, holding branch and sceptre, altar at feet.

Reference: Pending

Ex: Holding History Coins
Gil-galad
thrax.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax, AD 235-2389 viewsAR Denarius, 1.8g, 20mm, 12h; Rome mint, AD 236-238.
Obv.: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG; laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: VICTORIA AVG; Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm.
Reference: RIC IV(b) Maximinus I 16, p. 141.
Notes: sold to JB, 10/15/15
John Anthony
max_k.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax, AD 235-2384 viewsAR denarius, 20mm, 3.0g, 12h; Rome mint, AD 235-6
Obv.: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG; Laureate, draped bust right.
Rev.: VICTORIA AVG; Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch.
Reference: RIC IVb 16, p. 141 16-185-125
Notes: early bust akin to Severus Alexander.
John Anthony
Thrax_Pax_k.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax, AD 235-2389 viewsAR denarius, 22mm, 3.3g, 12h; Rome mint, AD 236-8
Obv.: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind.
Rev.: PAX AVGVSTI; Pax standing half left, branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left.
Reference: RIC IVb 19, p. 141 / 16-389-65
John Anthony
thrax_vict_k.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax, AD 235-2388 viewsAR denarius, 20mm, 2.8g, 12h; Rome mint, AD 235-6
Obv.: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG; Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
Rev.: VICTORIA AVG; Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch.
Reference: RIC IVb 16, p. 141 / 16-402-65
John Anthony
combined.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax, AR Denarius. AD 235-236. 25 viewsOBV - IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped bust right.
REV - FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, holding a standard in
each hand.

Minted in Rome 235-236 AD
2,55g, 21,90mm

RIC 7A; RSC 7a; Sear (1988) 2337; BMCRE 58.
Flamur H
1Trace_completa.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax, denario (Gaviller & Boyd collection)21 viewsMaximinus I (235-238 d.C.), denario, zecca di Roma, circa marzo 236 d.C.
AR, gr 3,39, mm 18, 360°, BB
D/ IMP MAXIMNVS PIVS AVG, busto a dx laureato, drappeggiato e corazzato.
R/ P M TR P II COS PP, l'imperatore stante tra due stendardi
RSC-55, RIC-3
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (15 settembre 2010, numero catalogo 118); ex Joseph Mastrario collection (Imperator Coins, Byron GA Usa, 2010), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, New York-Londra, 2007); ex Baldwin's auction 42 (London, 2005); ex W. C. Boyd collection (London, 1886); ex George Gaviller collection (London, prima del 1886).
paolo
11Massimino_Trace_bis.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax, denarius (Boynton & Boyd collection)32 viewsMassimino I Trace, denario, zecca di Roma (235-236 d.C.)
AR, 3.24 gr., 20,0 mm.; BB/MB+ (VF)
D/ IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, busto di Massimino laureato e drappeggiato a dx.
R/ SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seduta a sx alimenta un serpente proveniente da altare
RIC 14
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (3 aprile 2008, numero catalogo 28), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2005), ex Baldwin's auction 42 (London, 2005), ex W.C. Boyd collection (London, 2 febbraio 1900), ex Sotheby's (London, 2 febbraio 1900, nel lotto 309), ex Boynton collection (London, fino al 1899).
paolo
1112_1113.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax, Denarius, PROVIDENTIA AVG3 viewsAR Denarius
Maximinus I Thrax
Augustus: 325 - 328AD
Issued: 236 - 238AD
21.0mm 1.83gr
O: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust, right.
R: PROVIDENTIA AVG; Providentia standing left, holding wand over globe and cornucopia.
Rome Mint
Aorta: 54: B1, O2, R18, T20.
RSC 75; RIC 20 (wand points to between P and R of PROVIDENTIA); BMC 170-1.
romae_aeternae_numismatics 192230095295
8/22/16 1/21/17
Nicholas Z
4590_4591.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax, Denarius, PROVIDENTIA AVG10 viewsAE Denarius
Maximinus I Thrax
Augustus: 235 - 238AD
Issued: April - December, 235
19.0mm
O: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust, right.
R: PROVIDENTIA AVG; Providentia standing left, holding wand over globe in right hand and cornucopia in left.
Rome Mint
RIC 20
Aorta: 44: B1, O1, R18, T20.
ajscoinshop 231078033693
10/27/13 4/4/17
Nicholas Z
MaximinusThrax_Ninica-Claudiopolis_ColonistWithOxen_AE28_10.7g.jpg
Maximinus I Thrax, Ninica-Claudiopolis, colonist with oxen, AE2844 viewsBronze AE 28, BMC 8 var, VF, 10.706g, 27.6mm, 180o, Ninica-Claudiopolis mint, obverse [...] MAXIMINVS [...], laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL NINI CLAUD, colonist ploughing behind two oxen, in background vexillum, star before colonist

Obverse countermarked with:
1. D containing dot, all within circle, circular punch, 6 mm, Howgego 669 (49 pcs).
2. Six-pointed star, incuse, 6 mm from point to point, Howgego 451 (45 pcs).
3 & 4. Nike right in oval punch, c. 5 x 8 mm, Howgego 262 (34 pcs).

The sequence of application appears to have been 669-451-262.

ex Automan, ex FORVM
areich
Maximinus_I_War_Galley~0.JPG
Maximinus I War Galley15 viewsOBV - IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, bust laureate and draped, r., REV - COLF - LPAC - DEVLT, galley with oarsmen to r.
Lanz Auc 112, 752??
Gerhard Hirsch 235/236, lot 2514; rated R6 so a rarer type.
Deultum.
From Wildwinds:
Maximinus AE24 of Deultum, Thrace. IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right / COL F L PAC DEVLT, galley under
full sail right.
From Wildwinds text:
Galley right, with wind-filled sail, rudder at stern and seven oars ov er side. Jurukova, Nuenzpraegung von Deultum knows a similar type for
Gordian III (#274) but not for Maximinus or any other emperor. Same obverse die as Jurukova #179, plate 12.

VERY RARE
Romanorvm
Maximinus_I_pan.jpg
Maximinus I, 19 Mar.235 to May/Jun. 238 AD, Rome mint49 viewsOrichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 43, Sear RCV 8327, (BMCRE 2, 63), (Cowen 10); Rome mint; Weight 27.13gr., Max. Diameter 30.58mm; 235-6 A.D.; Obv. IMP MAXIMINUS PIVS AVG, laureate and draped and cuirassed bust right, Rev. FIDES MILTVM S C, Fides Militum stg. l., holding standard in each hand. Thin brown/green patina worn on high spots.
Pleasant portrait without the usual exagerrated chin and nose!

Ex. Roma Numismatics
1 commentsSteve E
08004AB.jpg
Maximinus I, 235-238 A.D., 20mm, 2.80g36 viewsSilver Denarius 20mm (2.80 grams) Rome mint: March 235 - January 236 A.D.

O - IMPMAXIMINVSPIVSAVG - Laureate, draped bust right.
R - SALVSAVGVSTI - Salus seated left, feeding snake on altar.

Reference: RIC 14, C 85
robertpe
Maximinus_I_RIC_12~0.JPG
Maximinus I, RIC 1217 viewsIMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
PAX AVGVSTI
AR denarius, 21mm, 2.88g
Laureate bust draped and cuirassed right, seen from behind
Pax standing left with branch and scepter
novacystis
Max1se03-2.jpg
Maximinus I, RIC 64, Sestertius of AD 235-236 27 viewsÆ Sestertius (22.6g, Ø30mm, 12h), Rome mint, Struck AD 235-236
Obv.: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laurate, draped bust of Maximinus I facing right.
Rev.: SALVS AVGVSTI (around) S C (in ex.), Salus seated left, holding a patera, feeding a snake arising from an altar.
RIC 64; Cohen 88
Charles S
Max1se02-2.jpg
Maximinus I, RIC 90, Sestertius of AD 236-238 9 viewsÆ Sestertius (23.8g, Ø31mm, 12h), Rome mint, Struck AD 236-238
Obv.: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laurate, draped bust of Maximinus I facing right.
Rev.: VICTORIA GERMANICA (around) S C (in field), Victoria standing left, holding wreath and palm branch; captive at her feet.
RIC 90; Cohen 109; Foss (RHC) 199:9

Issued to celebrate the victories in Germany during the years AD 236-238.

Charles S
MAXIMIN1-1-ROMAN~0.jpg
Maximinus I, RIC IV-12 Rome10 viewsAR Denarius
Rome mint, 235-236 A.D.
20mm, 3.03g
RIC IV-12

Obverse:
IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse:
PAX AVGVSTI
Pax standing left, holding branch and transverse sceptre.
rubadub
susi.jpg
MAXIMINUS I, THRACE, DEULTUM, She-wolf & twins.6 viewsMAXIMINUS I, THRACE, DEULTUM, Æ 24, Rev. COL FL PAC DEVLT, She-wolf & suckling twins. 7.7 g, V 2420, SNGBI 724-5 sim.Podiceps
Maximinus_Thrax_RIC_3.jpg
Maximinus I, Thrax53 viewsDenarius (3,04g - 19mm)
obv. IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
rev. P M TR P II COS P P
Bare-headed emperor standing
left, holding spear, standard at either side.
Rome mint AD 236
RIC 3
1 commentsHolger G
Maximinus_Thrax_Bust_and_Denarius.JPG
Maximinus I, Thrax, 235-238 AD.34 views2 commentsAntonivs Protti
Maximinus_Thrax_AR_denier,Superbe.jpg
Maximinus I, Thrax, 235-238 AD. Denarius (late portrait), Superb.36 views2,47 g.,20 mm,
Maximinus Thrax Denarius. IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding from patera a serpent arising from altar. RSC 85a, RIC 14, BMC 99.
Antonivs Protti
Maximinus,_Victoria.JPG
Maximinus I, VICTORIA AVG6 viewsMaximinus I AR Denarius, Mint: Rome, 235-6 AD, Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG - Laur., dr. and cuir. bust r.ight, Rev: VICTORIA AVG - Victory running r., holding out wreath and palm over l. shoulder., RIC 16, RSC 99a, BMC 105, SEAR RCV III: 8317. ex oa, photo credit oaPodiceps
Maximinus_I__AD_235-238__AR_Denarius.png
Maximinus I. AD 235-238. AR Denarius.41 viewsLaureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind / Providentia standing left, holding wand over globe and cornucopia.
Rome mint. Superb obverse / VF.
2 commentsSam
Maximinus_Sestertius.jpg
Maximinus I. AD 235-238. Æ Sestertius25 viewsMaximinus I. AD 235-238. Æ Sestertius. Rome mint. 3rd emission, AD 236-237. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Salus seated left, feeding out of patera serpent rising from altar to left. RIC IV 85; BMCRE 175-6; Banti 24. Near VF. Nice glossy green patina


Philoromaos
maximinus_y3_helios.jpg
Maximinus I. Helios, year 39 viewsMaximinus I. Alexandrian Tetradrachm. Year 3. Radiate bust of Helios right. Emmett 3280. Ex VauctionsPodiceps
Maximinus_I_Thrax.jpg
Maximinus I. Thrax 235-238 A.D.4 viewsMaximinus I. Thrax (235-238 A.D.). Ar Denarius (17.8~19.7 mm. 2.67 g), Rome. Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Rev: FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing front, head turned left, holding two standards.
RIC IV, 2, 7a.
ddwau
MAXIMINUS_I__THRAX_DENAR_ROM_PROVIDENTIA_STAB_FÜLLHORN_GLOBUS.jpg
Maximinus I. Thrax, 235-238 n. Chr.26 viewsAR-Denar, 235/236 n.Chr
Rom
Vs.:Drapierte Panzerbüste r. mit Lorbeerkranz.
Rs.:Providentia steht l. mit Stab und Füllhorn, davor Globus.
RIC 13; C. 77.
f.vz
3,06 gr - 20 mm _5550
Antonivs Protti
massimino_II_genio_imperatoris_ant_ric148c_delta_.jpg
Maximinus II8 viewsGenio Imperatoris
Ric Ant (delta) 148
antvwala
MAXIMINUS_II.JPG
MAXIMINUS II46 viewsMaximinus II - Alexandria Mint - AE Follis - RIC VI 99a

O: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right (divergent wreath ties, pointed ends

R: GENIO CA-ESARIS, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera from which liquid flows and cornucopiae, K in left field, E over P in right field, ALE in exergue

6.2grams, 22.5/23.5mm, 315 degree die axis, 308-310AD
2 commentsBiancasDad
061008max.jpg
Maximinus II16 viewsMaximinus II
AE Follis
Ob: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right
Rv: HERCULI VICTORI, Hercules naked standing right, leaning on club, A to left
Ex: MKV (Cyzicus)
Ref: RIC VI (Cyzicus) 89a
Scotvs Capitis
MaximinusII.jpg
Maximinus II75 viewsAE Follis
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
Laureate head right

GENIO IMPERATORIS
Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over shoulder, holding patera & cornucopiae, * left, A right, ANT in ex.

Antioch 310 AD

ex-ANE

Sold Forum Auction March 2019
Jay GT4
MaxGenio.jpg
Maximinus II70 viewsMaximinus II AE Follis.
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINO PF INV AVG
laureate head right

GENIO IMPERATORIS
Genius standing left with cornucopeia and patera from which liquid flows, * to left, HTA in ex.

Heraclea
RIC 49a
scarce

ex-ANE

Sold Forum Auction March 2019
Jay GT4
00375-Maximinus2.JPG
Maximinus II13 viewsMaximinus II Follis
22 mm 4.51 gm
O: IMP MAXIMINVS AVG
Radiate bust right
R: CONCORDIA MILITVM
Maximianius receiving Vicotry on globe from Jupiter
John Campbell
2150491.jpg
Maximinus II21 viewsMaximinus II. AD 310-313. BI 17mm (17mm, 1.90 g, 5h). Treveri (Trier) mint. Struck circa AD 312-313. Radiate and draped bust left, holding mappa and globe / Sol driving facing quadriga, head left, raising hand and holding whip. RIC VI -; Failmezger 249M2. Fine, rough dark brown patina. A rare and poorly understood denomination.

From the J.S. Vogelaar Collection.

Ex-CNG

ecoli
coins88.JPG
Maximinus II29 viewsMAXIMINVS PF AVG
IOVI CONSE-RVATORI

Laureate head only,
Jupiter standing, holding ball globe and leaning on sceptre.

RIC VI Thessalonica 50a C

ecoli
massimino_II_genio_augusti_nicom_ric_74_delta.jpg
Maximinus II9 viewsGenio Augusti
Ric Nicomedia 74
antvwala
maximinusI.jpg
MAXIMINUS II22 viewsÆ Follis. Nicomedia,4th officina. 312 AD. 5.15 gm, 7h. Laureate head right. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG. / Sol standing left, raising hand, holding head of Serapis in left ; SOLI INVICTO , * delta in left field , SMN in exergue. RIC VI 77b.
CNG 156885.
benito
00maximinusII.jpg
MAXIMINUS II24 viewsÆ Follis. Nicomedia,4th officina. 312 AD. 5.15 gm, 7h. Laureate head right. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG. / Sol standing left, raising hand, holding head of Serapis in left ; SOLI INVICTO , * delta in left field , SMN in exergue. RIC VI 77b.
benito
2011-09-013.jpg
Maximinus II 35 viewsObverse:Bust rt.impcgalvalmaximinvspfavg
Reverse: Genio/ naked patera from which liguid flows. ANT ex, Z
Mint: Antioch
Date: 310-311 CE
RIC-VI
22mm, 6.51
2 commentswileyc
MAXIMINUS_II_ANT.JPG
Maximinus II120 viewsMaximinus II - Antioch Mint - AE Follis - RIC VI 166b

O: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureated head right

R: IOVI CONS_ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, cloak spread behind; right hand holding Victory on globe, left leaning on sceptre, * in left field, Δ in right field, ANT in exergue

5.2g, 20.3/21.1mm, 180 degree die axis, 312AD


BiancasDad
Maximinus_II_Soli.jpg
Maximinus II 12 viewsSilvered Æ Follis.
Nicomedia mint, c. 312 AD
RIC VI 77b.
4.72g, 21mm
Samson L2
Maximinus_II.jpg
Maximinus II23 viewsObv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINO PF INV AVG, laureate head right
Rev: GENIO IMPERATORIS, Genius standing left with cornucopeia and patera from which liquid flows, star to left, HTA in ex.
Size: 25mm, 6gm Mint:Heraclea 309-313 AD
Id: AE Follis, Heraclea RIC VI 49a
ickster
1_6.jpg
Maximinus II43 viewsMaximinus II AE Follis
Alexandria mint 308-310 AD
26mm 6.6g
Obv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG
Laureate head right
Rev: GENIO IMP-ERATORIS
Genius stg left modius on head, chlamys over l. shoulder
holding patera from which liquor flows and cornucopiae
B/P in r. field, K in l. field
Ex: ALE
RIC VI 105c



1 commentssean c2
MAXIMIN2-1.jpg
Maximinus II RIC VI 233b 55 viewsObv:IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG
laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG N N
Jupiter standing facing, head left, chlamys hanging from left shoulder, holding Victory on globe & leaning on scepter, eagle with wreath left, E to right
SIS in ex
22mm 2.5gm
OWL365
Maximinus R-10.jpg
Maximinus II "Daza" 305-313 CE, Alexandria mint, Æ 18-20mm, 4.80 gr., Follis13 viewsMaximinus II "Daza" 305-313 CE, Alexandria mint, Æ 18-20mm, 4.80 gr., Follis

Obverse: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right

Reverse: GENIO AVGVSTI, over N over /Γ, ALE in ex. - Genius standing left, holding head of Serapis in right hand and in left a cornucopia.

Reference: RIC 160b,D.
Daniel Friedman
Maximinus_II_Daia.jpg
Maximinus II "Daza" RIC VI Heraclea 7428 viewsAE 2
obv.IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG
laureate head right
rv. IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG
Jupiter standing left, holding Victory & sceptre, eagle at foot left with wreath in its beak, A right
ex. SMHT
mint Heraclea
Struck 312
Holger G
TC-09.jpg
Maximinus II (A.D. 309-313)31 viewsSilvered Follis, A.D. 312, Thessalonica, 25.2mm, 4.88g, 0°, RIC VI 50a; scarce.
Obv: MAXIMINVS P F AVG. Laureate head right.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI. Jupiter standing left, globe in right, scepter in left; wreath and epsilon in field, SMTS in ex.
Joseph D5
Maximinus_II_ric_55.JPG
Maximinus II (as Caesar), 305 - 305 AD19 viewsObv: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head of Maximinus II facing right.

Rev: GENIO CAESARIS CMH (in monogram), Genius standing left, holding a patera and cornucopia; SMNΓ in exergue.

Billon Follis, Nicomedia mint, 308 - 310 AD

6.6 grams, 26 mm, 180°

RIC VI 55, VM 12
SPQR Coins
daia follis.jpg
MAXIMINUS II (DAIA) red.follis AD311-31361 viewsobv: IMP.MAXIMINUS.PF.AVG (laureate head right)
rev: GENIO.AVGVSTI (Genius, half naked and wearing modius, standing left holding cornucopia and pouring from patera over altar at his feet) / [A]QS
ref: RIC VI-Aquilea130
4.74gms, 22mm
Scarce
1 commentsberserker
00037.jpg
Maximinus II (RIC 36, Coin #37)15 viewsRIC 36 (C), AE Follis, Heraclea, 308-309 AD.
Obv: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES Laureate head right.
Rev: GENIO CAESARIS (•HT delta•) Genius standind left, holding patera & cornucopia.
Size: 26.2mm 7.06gm
MaynardGee
00689.jpg
Maximinus II (RIC 50a, Coin #689)9 viewsRIC 50a (Common), AE Follis, Thessalonica 312 AD.
OBV: MAXIMINVS P F AVG; Laureate bust right.
REV: IOVI CONSERVATORI (.SM.TS.); Jupiter standing left, holding globe & leaning on sceptre; wreath in left field; E in r. field.
SIZE: 25.5mm 4.64g
MaynardGee
maximinus-II_AE_GENIO-POP-ROM_london-mint_4_0gr_US-25cents_04.JPG
Maximinus II - AE - Genius - 'GENIO POP ROM' - PLN mintmark13 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Maximinus II
309 - 313 AD

obv: IMP MAXIMINUS PF AUG - Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: GENIO POP ROM - Genius standing left holding cornicopiae and patera.
PLN in exergue (below).

4.0 Grams, 25 mm - large flan.
--------------
*U.S.A. 25 cent piece (quarter) for size comparison.
rexesq
maximinus-II_AE_GENIO-POP-ROM_london-mint_4_0gr_obv_04_rev_04.JPG
Maximinus II - AE - Genius - 'GENIO POP ROM' - PLN mintmark22 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Maximinus II
309 - 313 AD
Bronze Follis. London mint.

obv: IMP MAXIMINUS PF AUG - Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: GENIO POP ROM - Genius standing left holding cornicopiae and patera.
PLN in exergue(below design)


4.0 Grams, 25 mm - large flan.
4 commentsrexesq
maximinus-II_AE_GENIO-POP-ROM_london-mint_4_0gr_US-25cents_05.JPG
Maximinus II - AE - Genius - 'GENIO POP ROM' - PLN mintmark12 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Maximinus II
309 - 313 AD
Bronze Follis.
Struck at the mint in Lugdunum (Lyons)

obv: IMP MAXIMINUS PF AUG - Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: GENIO POP ROM - Genius standing left holding cornicopiae and patera.
PLN in exergue(below).

4.0 Grams, 25mm - large flan.
--------------
*U.S.A. 25 cent piece (quarter) for size comparison.
rexesq
maximinus-II_AE_GENIO-POP-ROM_london-mint_4_0gr_US-25cents_01.JPG
Maximinus II - AE - Genius - 'GENIO POP ROM' - PLN mintmark12 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Maximinus II
309 - 313 AD
Bronze Follis struck at the mint in Lugdunum (Lyons)

obv: IMP MAXIMINUS PF AUG - Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: GENIO POP ROM - Genius standing left holding cornicopiae and patera.
PLN in exergue, (below).

4.0 Grams, 25 mm - large flan.
--------------
*U.S.A. 25 cent piece (quarter) for size comparison. Bright lighting.
rexesq
899_Maximian_II_Cyzicus.jpg
Maximinus II - AE follis7 viewsCyzicus
306 AD
laureate head right
GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES
Genius standing left, wearing modius and chalmys, pouring libations from patera, holding cornucopia
GENIO AVGG ET__CAESARVM NN

RIC VI Cyzicus 20b / 24a
Johny SYSEL
maximinus-II_ae-follis_sol-invicto_obv_04_rev_03.JPG
Maximinus II - AE Follis - Sol Invicto14 viewsMaximinus II.
Minted in Ostia, 3rd officina. 312 - 313 AD
obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG - Laureate bust right, cuirassed. Seen from the front.

rev: SOLI INVICTO COMITI - Sol radiate standing facing left, raising right arm and holding globe in other hand.
M OST T - in exergue.

4.8 Grams

* Slightly off color in this photo. The paper behind the coin is plain white...
rexesq
maximinus-II_ae-follis_sol-invicto_obv_02.JPG
Maximinus II - AE Follis - Sol Invicto. Obv8 viewsMaximinus II.
Minted in Ostia, 3rd officina. 312 - 313 AD
obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG - Laureate bust right, cuirassed. Seen from the front.

rev: SOLI INVICTO COMITI - Sol radiate standing facing left, raising right arm and holding globe in other hand.
M OST T - in exergue.

4.8 Grams
rexesq
maximinus-II_ae-follis_sol-invicto_rev_01.JPG
Maximinus II - AE Follis - Sol Invicto. Rev.10 viewsMaximinus II.
Minted in Ostia, 3rd officina. 312 - 313 AD
obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG - Laureate bust right, cuirassed. Seen from the front.

rev: SOLI INVICTO COMITI - Sol radiate standing facing left, raising right arm and holding globe in other hand.
M OST T - in exergue.

4.8 Grams
rexesq
maximinus_II.png
Maximinus II - RIC 1667 viewsAntioch 312 AD.
Maximinus II AE Follis.
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right /
IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left with sceptre & globe surmounted by Victory
who is crowning him, star in left field,
officina letter in right field,
ANT in ex
xokleng
maximinusII-cng.jpg
Maximinus II - RIC 99a14 viewsMaximinus II. AE Follis.
308-310 AD. GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, laureate head right
(divergent wreath ties, pointed ends /
GENIO CA-ESARIS, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder,
holding patera from which liquid flows and cornucopiae.
K in left field, A over P in right field.
Mintmark ALE. RIC VI Alexandria 99a.
xokleng
Maximinus_II_-_Genius_SMK.jpg
Maximinus II - silvered follis9 viewsCyzicus
312 AD
laureate head right
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG
Genius standing left, wearing chalmys, holding cornucopia, pouring libations from patera over altar
GENIO AV_GVSTI
E
SMK
RIC VI Cyzicus 101a
ex Gitbud and Naumann
Johny SYSEL
82- Maximinus II -1.JPG
Maximinus II -1-S27 viewsAE Follis, Cyzicus mint, 305-308 AD.
Obv: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, Laureate head right.
Rev: VIRTVTI EXERCITVS, Virtus walking right with shield , spear and trophy. Gamma left, star right.
MKV in exergue.
25mm , 7.6 gm.
RIC 49.
jdholds
83-Maximinus II-2.JPG
Maximinus II -227 viewsAE Follis, Siscia mint. 309-313AD
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev: GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left with wreath and cornucopia. Crescent in field.
SIS in exergue
23mm, 4.9gm
jdholds
84-Maximinus II-3.JPG
Maximinus II -323 viewsAE Follis, 309-313 AD, Nicomedia mint.
Obv: IMP GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and sceptre. B in right field.
SMN in exergue.
21mm, 3.8gm
jdholds
85-Maximinus II-4.JPG
Maximinus II -4-S33 viewsAE Follis, 309-313AD, Nicomedia mint.
Obv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev: HERCVLI VICTORI, Hercules standing holding lion skin and leaning on club.
SMN in exergue
22mm, 4.7gm.

jdholds
86-Maximinus II-5.JPG
Maximinus II -5-S23 viewsAE Follis, 305-308 AD, Ticinum mint.
Obv: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right.
Rev: GENIO CAESARIS, Genius standing left with wreath and cornucopia.
MT(delta) in exergue.
26mm , 6.2gm.

jdholds
87-Maximinus II-6.JPG
Maximinus II -6-S27 viewsAE Follis, 310-313AD, Treveri mint.
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG, Laurate , cuirassed bust right.
Rev: GENIO POP ROM, Genius left with patera and cornucopia, TF in field.
PTR in exergue.
22mm, 3.5gm
RIC 845a.
jdholds
88-Maximinus II-7.JPG
Maximinus II -7-S40 viewsAE Follis, 309-313AD , Cyzicus mint.
Obv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev: GENIO AVGVSTI CH , Genius standing left with wreath and cornucopia.
MKVA in exergue.
22mm, 6.2gm.
RIC 77a
1 commentsjdholds
89-Maximinus II-8.JPG
Maximinus II -8-S32 viewsSilvered AE Follis, 309-313 AD , Nicomedia mint.
Obv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG. Laureate head right.
Rev: SOLI INVICTO , Sol stading left holding the head of Serapis.
SMN in exergue.
22mm, 3.5gm
jdholds
90-Maximinus II-9.JPG
Maximinus II -925 viewsAE Follis, 309-313 AD, Uncertain mint
Obv: MAXIMINVS PF AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left holding sceptre. Wreath left , (delta) right.
23mm, 5.7gm
Sear 3767.
jdholds
maximinus_II_02.jpg
Maximinus II AE Follis 19 viewsObv: MAXIMINVS NOB CAES - Laureate bust right.
Rev: VIRTVS AVG ET CAESS NN - Prince standing facing, head left, in military dress, right holding up small Victory, left supporting spear and shield resting on ground; to left, seated captive.
Mint: Aquileia (AQΓ)
Date: 305-306 AD
Ref: RIC VI 72b
Notes: Rare.
oa
roman24.jpg
Maximinus II AE Follis57 views308 AD. Alexandria mint.
Obv.: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES - Laureate bust of Maximinus II.
Rev.: VIRTVS EXERCITVS - Mars in military dress, holding transverse spear, shield and trophy over shoulder. X in l. field, B/K in r..
RIC 83.
3 commentsMinos
roman23.jpg
Maximinus II AE Follis19 views311-313 AD. Nicomedia mint.
Obv.: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG - Laureate head right.
Rev.: SOLI INVICTO - Sol standing left in long robe, with raised right hand & holding up head of Serapis in left. SMN in ex., */A in l. field.
RIC 77b
Minos
Maximinus_II_6.jpg
MAXIMINUS II AE Follis RIC VI 147c, Genius25 viewsOBV: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG, laureate head right
REV: GENIO EX-ERCITVS, Genius standing left by altar, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder (falls low), holding patera from which liquid flows, and cornucopiae. Crescent in upper left field, epsilon over delta in right field. ANT in ex.
6.2g, 23mm

Struck at Antioch, 310-311 AD
Legatus
Maximinus_II_1_opt.jpg
MAXIMINUS II AE Follis RIC VI 26b, Genius25 viewsOBV: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right
REV: GENIO POPV-L-I ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder (falls low), holding patera from which liquid flows and cornucopiae. HTB in ex.
1.6g, 18mm

Minted at Heraclea, 310-11 AD
Legatus
Maximinus_II_3_opt.jpg
MAXIMINUS II AE Follis RIC VI Trier 851a, 11 viewsOBV: IMP MAXIMINVS AVG, laureate, cuirassed bust right
REV: GENIO POP ROM, Genius standing left, towered, loins draped, holding patera and cornucopiae. T-F across fields, PTR in ex.
3.9g, 22mm

Minted at Treveri, 310-13 AD
Legatus
coin341a.jpg
Maximinus II AE Follis. Siscia RIC 227b 11 viewsMaximinus II AE Follis. Siscia RIC 227b
Late AD 312. IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right / IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt & leaning on scepter, wreath left, epsilon right, SIS in ex. Coin #341
cars100
maximinus-ii-reshoot.jpg
Maximinus II AE Quarter Follis. 305-306 AD14 viewsRoman Imperial, Maximinus II AE Quarter Follis, (305-306 AD), 1.5g, 18.79mm

Obverse: MAXIMINVS NOB C, Laureate head right.

Reverse: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, naked except for modius on head & chlamis over shoulder, holding patera & cornucopiae, SIS in ex. "Genius of the Roman People"

Reference: RIC Siscia 171B
Gil-galad
Maximinus_II~0.jpg
Maximinus II AE2. 312 AD. 24 viewsMaximinus II AE2. 312 AD. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F INV AVG, laureate head right .
IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory & sceptre, wreath left, A right, SMHT in ex
Britanikus
maximinus_ii_(2).jpg
Maximinus II AE2. 312 AD.20 viewsMaximinus II AE2. 312 AD. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F INV AVG, laureate head right / IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, holding globe & sceptre, wreath left, officina letter to right, SMHT in ex. Britanikus
Maximinus_II_2_opt.jpg
MAXIMINUS II AE24 Follis RIC VI 62, Genius15 viewsOBV: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG, laureate head right
REV: GENIO IMPERATORIS, Genius tanding left, pouring libation from patera & holding cornucopiae, HT "G" in ex.
6.4g, 27mm

Minted at Heraclea. 305-6 AD
Legatus
Maximinus_II_4_opt.jpg
MAXIMINUS II AE27 Follis RIC VI 170b, Genius15 viewsOBV: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, laureate head right
REV: GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, naked except for modius on head & chlamis over shoulder, holding patera & cornucopiae, SIS in ex.
11.2g, 27mm

Minted at Siscia, 305-6 AD
Legatus
coin600.JPG
Maximinus II Alexandria 14 viewsMaximinus II

Obv: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES
Rev: GENIO CA-ESARIS
ALE

RIC VI Alexandria 71 C

check

ecoli
maximinus-II_AE-Follis-Ostia_Constantine-I_AE-Follis-Rome_sol-invicto_obv_06_off-color.JPG
Maximinus II and Constantine I - AE Follis'11 viewsleft:
Emperor Maximinus II.
Minted in Ostia, 3rd officina. 312 - 313 AD
obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG - Laureate bust right, cuirassed. Seen from the front.

rev: SOLI INVICTO COMITI - Sol radiate standing facing left, raising right arm and holding globe in other hand.
M OST T - in exergue.

right:
Emperor Constantine I - 307-337 A.D. - AE Follis
Rome Mint, 314-315 AD

obv. IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Seen from the front.

rev: SOL INVICTO COMITI - Sol standing left, raising right arm and holding globe.
in exergue: R P
in fields: 'R' above 'X' to right of Sol and 'F' in left field.
----------------

* Slightly off color in this photo. The paper behind the coin is plain white...
rexesq
maximinus-II_AE-Follis-Ostia_Constantine-I_AE-Follis-Rome_sol-invicto_obv_03.JPG
Maximinus II and Constantine I - AE Follis'7 viewsleft:
Emperor Maximinus II.
Minted in Ostia, 3rd officina. 312 - 313 AD
obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG - Laureate bust right, cuirassed. Seen from the front.

rev: SOLI INVICTO COMITI - Sol radiate standing facing left, raising right arm and holding globe in other hand.
M OST T - in exergue.

right:
Emperor Constantine I - 307-337 A.D. - AE Follis
Rome Mint, 314-315 AD

obv. IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Seen from the front.

rev: SOL INVICTO COMITI - Sol standing left, raising right arm and holding globe.
in exergue: R P
in fields: 'R' above 'X' to right of Sol and 'F' in left field.
rexesq
maximinus-II_AE-Follis-Ostia_Constantine-I_AE-Follis-Rome_sol-invicto_rev_07_off-color.JPG
Maximinus II and Constantine I - AE Follis' - Rev.12 viewsleft:
Emperor Maximinus II.
Minted in Ostia, 3rd officina. 312 - 313 AD
obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG - Laureate bust right, cuirassed. Seen from the front.

rev: SOLI INVICTO COMITI - Sol radiate standing facing left, raising right arm and holding globe in other hand.
M OST T - in exergue.

right:
Emperor Constantine I - 307-337 A.D. - AE Follis
Rome Mint, 314-315 AD

obv. IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Seen from the front.

rev: SOL INVICTO COMITI - Sol standing left, raising right arm and holding globe.
in exergue: R P
in fields: 'R' above 'X' to right of Sol and 'F' in left field.
----------------

* Slightly off color in this photo. The paper behind the coin is plain white...
rexesq
maximinus-II_AE-Follis-Ostia_Constantine-I_AE-Follis-Rome_sol-invicto_rev_05.JPG
Maximinus II and Constantine I - AE Follis' - Rev.14 viewsleft:
Emperor Maximinus II.
Minted in Ostia, 3rd officina. 312 - 313 AD
obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG - Laureate bust right, cuirassed. Seen from the front.

rev: SOLI INVICTO COMITI - Sol radiate standing facing left, raising right arm and holding globe in other hand.
M OST T - in exergue.

right:
Emperor Constantine I - 307-337 A.D. - AE Follis
Rome Mint, 314-315 AD

obv. IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Seen from the front.

rev: SOL INVICTO COMITI - Sol standing left, raising right arm and holding globe.
in exergue: R P
in fields: 'R' above 'X' to right of Sol and 'F' in left field.
rexesq
rjb_2011_12_02.jpg
Maximinus II argenteus26 views1 commentsmauseus
max.jpg
Maximinus II as Augustus, AD 308-31319 viewsAE Follis, 21mm, 5.12g, 12h; Antioch mint: 312.
Obv. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG; Laureate head right, parallel laurel ties.
Rev.: GENIO-AVGVSTI; Genius standing facing, modius on head left, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, head of Sol in right hand, cornucopiae in left; star / A // ANT.
Reference: RIC VI, Antioch 164b (p. 643).
Notes: sold to jwt, 9/15
John Anthony
max_follis_k.jpg
Maximinus II as Augustus, AD 310-31210 viewsAE Follis, 20mm, 4.9g, 12h; Antioch mint.
Obv.: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG; Laureate head right, parallel laurel ties.
Rev.: GENIO-AVGVSTI; Genius standing facing, modius on head left, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, head of Sol in right hand, cornucopia in left; star - E // ANT
Reference: RIC VI Antioch 164b, E; Notes: CB
John Anthony
maximinus_II_Genio_Caes.jpg
Maximinus II as Caesar AE Follis Heraclea37 views Obv. GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right
Rev. GENIO CAESARIS, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys across left shoulder, holding patera & cornucopiae
.HTB. in exergue RIC 36B
2 commentsSkyler
Maximinus_II_virtuti_exercitus.jpg
Maximinus II as Caesar Ae Follis Thessalonika9 views Obv. GAL VAL MAXIMINUS NOB CAES Laureate head Right
Rev. VIRTVTI E-XERCITVS, Mars advancing right carrying spear, shield and trophy
SMNGamma in exergue
Skyler
MaxVI667b.jpg
Maximinus II as Caesar, AD 305-30810 viewsÆ Follis, 26mm, 6h; Trier mint, 1 May 305 - early 307.
Obv.: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C; Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: GENIO POPV-LI ROMANI; Genius standing left, head towered, loins draped, right hand holding patera, left cornucopia; S - F // PTR
Reference: RIC VI Treveri 667b (p. 208)
Notes: sold to Aleg, 10/26/15
John Anthony
MAXIMINUS_II_DAIA.jpg
Maximinus II Daia42 views1 commentsPaul R3
IMG_4175.jpg
Maximinus II Daia35 viewsSize and weight: 24x25mm; 6.9g.
Obverse: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES
Laureate head right. Divergent wreath ties with pointed ends.
Reverse: GENIO CA-ESARIS
Genius standing facing, head left, wearing modius on head, chlamys across left shoulder, right hand holding out a patera from which liquid flows, left arm holding a cornucopia behind.
Field Marks: K in left field, Δ over P in right field.
Exergue: ALE
Reference: RIC VI Alexandria 99a.
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
CollageMaker_20180702_192533433.jpg
Maximinus II Daia13 viewsAE2 Follis, Struck Dec. 308 - May 310 AD, Thessalonica Mint
Obverse: MAXIMINVS • FIL • AVGG, Head of Maximinus Daia, laureate, right.
Reverse: GENIO CA-ESARIS, Genius, wearing modius, sometimes radiate, nude, chlamys draped over left shoulder, standing left, pouring liquid from patera in right hand and holding cornucopiae in left hand, SMTS in ex.
References: RIC VI 32a, Cohen 42
Size: 24mm, 6.3g

The empty title 'Filius Augustorum" was bestowed upon Constantine I and Maximinus II in AD 308 to placate them. Licinius I was promoted to Augustus without holding the rank of Caesar bypassing Maximinus II. This was all established at the conference held by Galerius at Carnuntum. The titles did nothing to improve relations and were quickly dropped from the coinage as the situation deteriorated. A very scarce and historical issue!
Justin L
max2.jpg
Maximinus II Daia (309 - 313 A.D.)152 viewsÆ(S) Follis
O: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAESAR, Laureate head right.
R:GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, right hand holding patera from which liquord flows; left a cornucopia., A in right field, •SM•SD• in exergue.
Serdica mint
10.7g
28mm
RIC VI 13b RCV 3754v (obverse inscription)

Rare

Published on Wildwinds!
2 commentsMat
RIC_Maximinus_II_Daia_RIC_VI_36.JPG
Maximinus II Daia (Caesar, 305-308 A.D.; Filius Augustorum, 308-309 A.D.; Augustus, 309-312 A.D.) (Caius Galerius Valerius Maximinus)27 viewsRIC VI 36

AE follies, 27 mm., die orientation 0°

Heraclea mint, 4th officina

Obv: GAL VAL MAXIMINUVS NOB CAES, laureate head, right.

Rev: GENIO CA—ESARIS, Genius standing left holding patera & cornucopiae, •HTdelta• in exergue.
Stkp
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MAXIMINUS II DAIA , 309 AD, Antioch.10 viewsObv. GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES. Lauret bust to the right.
Rev. VIRTVS EX-ERCITVS/ -|O/Z// ANT in exergue. Helmeted Virtus advancing right holding a spear, shield and trophy on shoulder.
References: RIC.117.
23mm, 5.65grams.
Canaan
Maximinus_II_207c.jpg
Maximinus II Daia - AE follis21 viewsSiscia
311 AD
laureate head right
IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG
Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia
GENIO AV_GVSTI
B / crescent
SIS
RIC VI 207c
6,43 g 24,5-22,5 mm
Johny SYSEL
365_Maximinus_II_Heraclea.jpg
Maximinus II Daia - AE follis7 viewsHeraclea
308-309 AD
laureate head right
GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES
Genius standing left, pouring out patera and holding cornucopia
GENIO CA_ESARIS
·HTΔ·
RIC VI Heraclea 36
7,97g
Johny SYSEL
660_Maximinus_II_Alexandria.jpg
Maximinus II Daia - AE follis6 viewsAlexandria
312-313 AD
laureate head right
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG
Genius standing left, holding head od Serapis and cornucopia
GENIO_AVGVSTI
star between heads / N left / branch at feet / Δ right
ALE
RIC VI Alexandria 160b
4,37g
Johny SYSEL
Maximinus_II_7.jpg
MAXIMINUS II DAIA AE Follis RIC VI 149b. Genius22 viewsOBVERSE: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG, laureate head right
REVERSE: GENI-O-AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, holding head of Serapis and cornucopiae. X-A across fields; ALE in ex.
4.83g, 21mm

Struck at Alexandria 312 AD
Ex Spink
Legatus
Maximinus_II_Daia.jpg
Maximinus II Daia AE219 viewsOBV: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG
Laureate head of Maximinus II Daia, right.
REV: GENIO AUGUSTI Genius left, holding patera
and cornucopia. Cresent / B in field.
SIS in exergue.

RIC 207c
A.D. 309 - 313
5.51gm 25mm
goldenancients
Max_II_Daia_black_small.png
Maximinus II Daia AE238 viewsMaximinus II Daia: Caesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313 AD.

Antioch, AD 308

24mm., 6.38g.

GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES - Head laureate right

VIRTVS EX-ERCITVS - Virtus advancing right holding transverse spear in right and shield in left, trophy over shoulder, crescent and S in right field. ANT.

References: RIC VI Antioch 100

AAIR
RL
maximinus_II_daia_01.jpg
Maximinus II Daia AR Argenteus22 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMINVS AVG - Radiate, mantled bust left, holding mappa & globe.
Rev: SOLI INVICTO COMITI - Sol driving a split, stationary quadriga facing, his radiate head left, hand raised, holding globe and whip; PTR in ex.
Date: 306 AD
Mint: Trier
Ref: RIC VI 826
Notes: R3
oa
maximinus_SMN_not_in_RIC_78b.jpg
Maximinus II Daia Follis Nicomedia67 viewsIMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
Laureated head right

VIRTVTI E - X - ERCITVS
/ * E /SMN

Mars walking right with shield end trophy, dragging captive

Follis struck in Nicomedia

22 mm --- 5,60 g

NOT in RIC for the officin see RIC vol VI, 78b R

near full silvering

4 commentsgb29400
Pagan_Commemorative_opt.jpg
MAXIMINUS II DAIA Quarter Nummis, Vagi 2955, Pagan Commemorative19 viewsOBV: IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter seated left holding globe & sceptre
REV: VICTORIA AVGG, Victory advancing left with wreath & palm, officina letter to right, ANT in ex.
1.3g, 15mm

Minted at Antioch, 310-13 AD
Legatus
Maximinus_II_5_opt.JPG
MAXIMINUS II DAIA Quarter Nummis, Van Heesch 3, A, Pagan Commemorative48 viewsOBV: GENIO ANTIOCHENI, Tyche of Antioch seated facing on rocks, turreted and veiled, stalks of grain in right, river-god Orontes swimming below
REV: APOLLONI SANCTO, Apollo standing left, patera in right, lyre in left. A in right field, mintmark SMA
1.2g, 13mm

Struck at Antioch, 312 AD
Legatus
Maximinus_II_8.jpg
MAXIMINUS II DAIA Quarter Nummis, Van Heesch 3, A, Pagan Commemorative16 viewsOBVERSE: GENIO ANTIOCHENI, Tyche of Antioch seated facing on rocks, turreted and veiled, stalks of grain in right, river-god Orontes swimming below
REVERSE: APOLLONI SANCTO, Apollo standing left, patera in right, lyre in left. S in right field, mintmark SMA
1.2g, 13mm

Struck at Antioch, 312 AD
Legatus
max_daia.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, AE Follis.34 viewsIMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG; laureate head right

GENIO IMP-ERATORIS; Genius standng left with patera and cornucopia,

ALE in exergue, K in left, S over P in right field

RIC VI Alexandria 105c

2 commentsGaiusCaligula
massimino_II~0.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, argenteus (Boyd collection)67 viewsMAXIMINUS II (309 - 313 d.C.), argenteus in billone. Zecca di Treviri
AE, 3.57gr., mm 19,0, BB/B, RRR (Sear, Roman Silver Coins ed. 1987)
D/ IMP MAXIMINVS AVG, busto radiato, drappeggiato e corazzato a sin,
R/ SOLI INVICTO COMITI, PTR in ex. Sol che tiene globo e frusta stante a sin, guida la quadriga
RIC 826 var., Coh. 174
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (3 novembre 2009, numero catalogo 10), ex W.S.Lincoln collection (London, 1890), ex W.C. Boyd collection (London, novembre 1890), ex Baldwin's Auctions 42 (London, 26 settembre 2005, lotto 687), ex Antony Wilson (Yorkcoins, New York-London, 2005).




1 commentspaolo
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Maximinus II Daia, follis16 viewsMaximinus II Daia (308-313), follis, Alexandria mint, AD 312-313.
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right.
GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left holding head of Serapis left in right hand, cornucopia in left; star, N and palm-branch in left field, gamma in right, ALE in exergue.
5.10 gr - 21 mm.
Ref : RIC VI Alexandria 160b
From the zumbly collection, Ex CNG
1 commentsPotator II
1guberman_unita.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, follis (Boyd & Guberman collections)26 viewsMaximinus II (309-313 d.C.), follis ridotto, zecca di Treveri
AE, gr 5,1, mm 32,0, BB
D/ IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG, busto laureato e corrazzato a dx
R/ GENIO POP ROM T-F, Genio in piedi a sx, testa torreggiata, lombi drappeggiati, con patera e cornucopia, PTR in ex
RIC 845a Cohen 69v
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (13 ottobre 2010, numero catalogo 120); ex Wayne von Hardenberg collection (Copper Penny, Wethersfield, Ct Usa, 2008); ex Jay Guberman collection (Hartford Connecticut Usa, 29 aprile 2007); ex Antony Wilson (Yorkcoins, London, 2005); ex Baldwins auction 42 (London, 26 settembre 2005, parte del lotto 688); ex W.C. Boyd collection (London, febbraio 1892); ex Spink (London 1891).
paolo
Msssimino_unita.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, follis (Boyd collection)29 viewsMaximinus II Daia augusto (209-313 d.C.), follis, zecca di Antiochia, 312 d.C.
AE, 21 mm , 5.1 gr, 360° , nVF
D/ IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG; testa laureata a dx
R/ GENIO AVGVSTI; Genius stante a sinistra regge la testa di Serapis a dx e cornucopia a six
RIC164b, Sear 3664v
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (14 marzo 2009, numero catalogo 16), ex Joseph Mastrario collection (Imperator coins), Byron GA, Usa (2009), ex Baldwin's auction 42 2005 (parte del lotto 688), ex W,C. Boyd collection, London Uk (gennaio 1890), ex rev. dr. Simpson collection, London Uk (1889).
paolo
1Massimino_Daia.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, follis (Boyd collection) 24 viewsMassimino II (309-313 d.C.), follis ridotto. Zecca di Treveri, I officina (310-313 d.C.)
AE, 4.75 gr., mm. 24,0; qBB (qVF)
D/ IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG, busto laureato e corazzato a dx
R/ GENIO POP ROM, T F nel campo, Genius turrito stante a sx, con patera a dx e cornucopia a sx. PTR in ex.
RIC 845a, Cohen 58.
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (1 maggio 2008, numero catalogo 30), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2005), ex Baldwin's auctions 42 (London, 26 settembre 2005, nel lotto 688) , ex W.C. Boyd collection (London novembre 1892), ex Spink (London, prima del 1892).
paolo
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Maximinus II Daia, Follis, GENIO IMPERATORIS3 viewsAE Follis
Maximinus II Daia
Caesar: 305 - 308AD
Augustus: 308 - 313AD
Issued: 310AD
22.0mm
O: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG; Laureate head, right.
R: GENIO IMPERATORIS; Genius standing left, pouring out patera and holding cornucopia.
Exergue: (Star), left field; ε, right field; ANT, below line.
Antioch Mint
Aorta: 592: B10, O11, R19, T13, M2.
RIC VII, 133c, ε.
oldcoingallery 361421390257
11/7/15 1/31/17
Nicholas Z
49751q00.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, Late 309 - 30 April 313 A.D.41 viewsBronze follis, RIC VI 70a, F/VF, Nicomedia mint, weight 4.240g, maximum diameter 21.5mm, die axis 225o, 311 A.D.; obverse IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse VIRTVTI E - XERCITVS, Virtus standing right holding spear and shield, trophy over shoulder, Γ in right field, SMN in exergue; scarce;Philoromaos
maxdia.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, RIC 134 Ticinum, 310-313 CE15 viewsObverse: MAXIMINVS P F AVG. Laureate bust right.
Reverse: SOLI INVICTO COMITI / T T, Sol standing right, head left, holding globe, whip and raising hand.
RIC 134. 23.8 mm., 3.4 g.
NORMAN K
maximinusII_alexandria_160b.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, RIC VI, Alexandria 160b33 viewsMaximinus II Daia, AD 309-313
AE - Follis
Alexandria, 1st officina, AD 312/3
obv. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
Head, laureate, r.
rev. GENIO - AVGVSTI
Genius, nude, except chlamys over l. shoulder, wearing modius, stg. facing,
head l., holding cornucopiae in l. arm and in outstretched r. hand head of
Serapis with modius
in l. field one upon the other star / N / palmbranch
in r. field A
in ex. ALE
RIC VI, Alexandria 160b
VF, nice sandpatina
1 commentsJochen
maximinusII_cyzicus_92.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, RIC VI, Cyzicus 92 11 viewsMaximinus II Daia, AD 309-313
AE - Follis, 5.00g, 22.22mm
Cyzicus, 4th officina, AD 311-312
obv. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
Head, laureate, r.
rev. SOLE IN - VICTO
Sol, in long garment, radiate and with waving chlamys, stg. half left, raising r. hand and holding bearded
head of Serapis in extended l. hand.
in l. field Delta
in ex. MKV
ref. RIC VI, Cyzicus 92; C. 156
Scarce, nice EF
Pedigree:
ex Scott coll.
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!
Jochen
maximinusII_heraclea_49a.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, RIC VI, Heraclea 49a8 viewsMaximinus II Daia, AD 309-313
AE - Follis (AE 2), 5.77g, 25.44mm, 150°
Heraclea, 1st officina, ca. 310
obv. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINO P F INV AVG
laureate head r.
rev. GENIO IMP - E - RATORIS
Genius, nude, wearing modius, chlamys over l. shoulder, stg. l., holding cornucopiae in l. arm and in extended r. hand patera from which liquid is flowing
in l. field star
in ex. HTA
ref. RIC VI, Heraclea 49a
scarce, about VF
Jochen
maximinusII_london_209b.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, RIC VI, London 209b30 viewsMaximinus II Daia, AD 309-313
AE - Follis, 4.80g, 23mm
London, 1st officina AD 310-312
obv. IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG
Bust, cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. GENIO - POP ROM
Youthful genius, nude except himation over loins, wearing mural crown, stg.l.,
holding cornucopiae in l. arm and patera in r. hand
in r. feld star
in ex. PLN
RIC VI, London 209b
EF

The mural crown here looks more like a rampart!
1 commentsJochen
maximinusII_nicomedia_66c.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, RIC VI, Nicomedia 66c24 viewsMaximinus II Daia, AD 309-313
AE - Follis, 23mm, 6.03g
Nicomedia, AD 310-312, group V, class II, 4th officina
obv. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
Head, laureate, r; ties parallel
rev. GENIO AV - GVSTI CMH (CMH ligate)
Genius, nude except chlamys over l. shoulder, modius on head, stg. half left, holding cornucopiae in l. arm
and pouring from patera in r. hand
in ex. SMN Delta
ref. RIC VI, Nicomedia 66c
about EF
Pedigree:
ex coll. Voz of Roman Imperial Tetrarchy

According to Failmezger CMH is a value mark meaning = 100 sestertii struck at 48 pieces from 1 pound bronze. This interpretation is disputed.
2 commentsJochen
mdvagi2954OR.jpg
Maximinus II Daia, Vagi 295438 viewsAntioch mint, Maximinus II Daia, 309-313 A.D. AE, 16mm 1.40g, Vagi 2954
O: GENIO AN-TIOCHENI, Tyche of the Orontes seated facing, river god Orontes swimming below
R: APOLLONI SANCTO, Apollo standing left, patera in left, lyre in right, H right
Ex: SMA
casata137ec
Maximinus_II_Daya_Nicomedia_RIC_VI_68A.jpg
Maximinus II Daza36 viewsAE (4,31g - 21mm)
Obv. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
laureate head right
Rv.HERCULI VICTORI
Hercules standing right leaning on club, right hand held behind back, lion's skin on left arm
B in left field
in exergue SMN
mint Nicomedia
RIC VI Nicomedia 68
HG
coin363.JPG
Maximinus II Daza Heraclea Genio14 viewsRIC VI Heraclea 36 C

Uncleared find

Check
ecoli
Maximinus II D 1~0.jpg
Maximinus II Follis32 viewsMaximinus II AE Follis, Carthage mint, 305-306 AD.

Obverse: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right.
Reverse: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing left holding
fruits in both hands, I in left field, Delta in exergue.

RIC VI 40b, Cohen 150..
Tanit
081B.jpg
Maximinus II Follis106 viewsRIC VI 34 Cyzicus 308-309 A.D.
26 mm, 6.86 gm
GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right
GENIO CA-ESARIS, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera from which liquid flows & cornucopiae, MKG(amma) in exergue
Rare
8 commentsMark Z
mx2s.jpg
Maximinus II Follis RIC 233b,h Siscia29 viewsMaximinus II Follis "Iovi Cons Siscia" Maximinus Daza CE 305-131 AE Follis
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG - Laureate bust right, cuirassed.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI - Jupiter standing left, holding Victory and scepter; at feet left, and eagle with wreath in its beak. B over H in right field
Exe: SIS H Siscia mint: 313 CE = RIC VI, 233b
NORMAN K
Maximinus II follis, 311 AD, Thesalonica.JPG
Maximinus II follis, 311 AD, Thesalonica23 viewsMaximinus II, AD 308-313
Follis – 26mm
Thessalonica, 311 AD
laureate head r.
MAXIMINVS PF AVG
Sol facing w/ head l., holding thunderbolt, leaning on scepter;
eagle w/ wreath l.
IOVI CONSERV-ATORI AVGG
delta in r. field, dot SM dot TS dot in ex.
RIC Thessalonica 47a
C
Ardatirion
coin301.JPG
Maximinus II IOVI CONSERVATORI Thessalonica149 viewsThessalonica

Thessalonica was located at the intersection of two major Roman roads, one leading from Italy eastward (Ignatia Way) and the other from the Danube to the Aegean. Thessalonica’s location and use as a port made it a prominent city. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of the second district of Macedonia and later it was made the capital and major port of the whole Roman province of Macedonia (146 B.C.). In 42 B.C., after the battle at Philippi, Thessalonica was made a free city.

Very little has been uncovered at ancient Thessalonica because Thessaloniki sits atop the remains. The area pictured above and at right was formerly a bus station; when it was moved in 1962, this 1st or 2nd century A.D. forum was revealed. Excavators found a bathhouse and mint dating to the 1st century A.D. below pavement surrounding an odeum. An inscription (30 B.C. to 143 A.D.) from the Vardar gate bears the word politarches, the word Luke used in reference to the officials of the city before whom Jason was brought by the mob (Acts 17:6). The word does not appear in any other Greek literature but does match the archaeology of the site.

Paul (with Silas and Timothy) came to Thessalonica from Philippi on his second missionary journey, stopping in Amphipolis and Apollonia before arriving here (Acts 17). He preached in the city’s synagogue, the chief synagogue of the region, for at least three weeks. His ministry was strong, and he established a Jewish-Gentile church, although it was more heavily Gentile (1 Thes. 1:9). When Paul faced great persecution at the hands of the mob, he fled to Berea, but Thessalonians eventually forced him to leave there also (Acts 17:13-14).

IMP C MAXIMINVS PF AVG
IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN
dot TS dot B dot
RIC VI Thessalonica 61a

ecoli
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Maximinus II IOVI CONSERVATORI Thessalonica25 viewsMaximinus II RIC VI Thessalonica 50a C
ecoli
max207a.jpg
Maximinus II RIC 207c Siscia12 viewsMaximinus II follis, 311 CE
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG, laureate bust right.
Reverse: GENIO AV-GVSTI , Genius standing left, modius on headn naked but for chlamys over shoulder, holding patera and cornucopia.
SIS in ex. Siscia mint. 25.3 mm., 6.9 g.
NORMAN K
max233b,h.jpg
Maximinus II RIC 233b,h Siscia14 viewsMaximinus II follis
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate & cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, and eagle with wreath in its beak. B over H in right field.
SISH in ex. Siscia mint. 25.7 mm., 5.2 g.
NORMAN K
MAX36B.jpg
Maximinus II RIC 36b Heraclea15 viewsMaximinus II follis, 308-309 CE
Obverse: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOBCAES, laureate bust right.
Reverse: GENIO CA-ESARIS, Genius standing left, modius on headn naked but for chlamys over shoulder, holding patera and cornucopia.
HTB dot in ex. Heraclea mint. 25.7 mm., 5.2 g.
NORMAN K
max com~1.JPG
maximinus II RIC VI Alexandria 160b39 viewsFolles
AE 19- 23 mm 4.6 grams 312-313 AD
OBV :: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG. Laureate head right
REV :: GENIO-AVGVSTI . Genius standing left,naked with modius on head . Chlamys draped over left shoulder. Holding head of Serapis In right hand the and a cornucopia in left. Star over N over palm branch angled \ in left field, S in right
EX :: ALE (Alexandria)
RIC VI Alexandria 160b
RIC rated C
Purchased 04/2008
Johnny
max2_com.JPG
Maximinus II RIC VI Antioch 147c17 viewsAE 21-23 mm 6.6 grams 310-311 AD
OBV :: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG. Laureate head right
REV :: GENIO EX-ERCITVS. Naked Genio standing left by altar. Modius on head, chlamys over left shoulder (falls low). Holding patera from which liquid flows and cornucopiae. crescent in left, epsilon in right fields
EX :: ANT ( Antioch )
RIC VI Antioch 147c
RIC rated C2
from uncleaned lot 06/2008
Johnny
roman25.jpg
Maximinus II Silvered Follis24 views312 AD. Heraclea mint.
Obv.: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F INV AVG - Laureate head right.
Rev.: IOVI CONSERVATORI - Jupiter standing left, holding globe in right hand, scepter in left; V in wreath//HTD.
Unlisted in RIC.
1 commentsMinos
coin797.JPG
Maximinus II VIRTUTI EXERCITUS13 viewsOBVERSE: Laureate Maximinus II facing right, GAL VAL MAXIMINUS NOB C.
REVERSE: Mars advancing right, holding spear and trophy, VIRTUTI EXERCITUS, (B)/* in fields, MKV in exergue
ecoli
n.PNG
Maximinus II,5 viewsMaximinus II, as Caesar, Follis. 306-307 AD AE3 19.5mm (Thickness 1.5mm), weight ?g.

Obverse: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, laureate & cuirassed bust right

Reverse: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI S-F, Genius standing left, head towered, loins draped, holding patera & cornucopiae
discwizard
Maximinus_II_RIC_VI_164b.JPG
Maximinus II, 309 - 313 AD32 viewsObv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG, laureate head of Maximinus II facing right.

Rev: GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius naked except for a cloak draped over his left shoulder, standing facing, head turned left, in his outstretched right hand he holds a radiate, draped bust of Sol, in his left hand he holds a cornucopia; a star is in left field, Є over Δ in right field; ANT in exergue.

Billon Follis, Antioch mint, 312 AD

4.9 grams, 21 mm, 0°

RIC VI 164b, S14840
2 commentsSPQR Coins
Maximinus_II_RIC_VI_75b.JPG
Maximinus II, 309 - 313 AD31 viewsObv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG, laureate head of Maximinus II facing right.

Rev: HERCVLI VICTORI, Hercules standing right, leaning on club, holding lion-skin, eight-pointed star and Γ in left field; SMN in exergue.

Note: Hercules is depicted in the same pose as the Farnese Hercules, a massive marble sculpture, which depicts a muscular yet weary Hercules leaning on his club, which has his lion-skin draped over it. He has just performed the last of The Twelve Labors, which is suggested by the apples of the Hesperides he holds behind his back. The Farnese Hercules is probably an enlarged copy made in the early third century A.D., signed by Glykon, from an original by Lysippos that would have been made in the fourth century B.C. The copy was made for the Baths of Caracalla in Rome (dedicated in 216 A.D.), where it was recovered in 1546. Today it is in Naples National Archaeological Museum. The statue was well-liked by the Romans, and copies have been found in many Roman palaces and gymnasiums. It is one of the most famous sculptures of antiquity, and has fixed the image of the mythic hero in the human imagination. ~Credit: Forvm

Billon Follis, Nicomedia mint, 312 AD

3.6 grams, 21 mm, 180°

RIC VI 75b, S14860
1 commentsSPQR Coins
maximinus-ii-caesar-horseback-shield.jpg
Maximinus II, AE Follis, Aquileia mint, (305-306 AD)8 viewsRoman Imperial, Maximinus II, AE Follis, Aquileia mint, (305-306 AD)

Obverse: MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, Laureate, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, holding sceptre over right shoulder and decorated shield on left arm.

Reverse: VIRTVS AVGG ET CAESS NN, Prince on horseback, shield on left arm, galloping right and spearing kneeling enemy, second enemy prostrate on ground. Mintmark AQ

Reference: RIC 68b; Sear IV 14778
Gil-galad
mx1.jpg
Maximinus II, AE follis. Siscia. 311 CE.25 viewsObverse: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: GENIO AV-GVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked
but for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera and cornucopiae.
Crescent-a across fields.
Mintmark SIS.
RIC VI Siscia 207a
NORMAN K
max171.jpg
Maximinus II, AE Quarter Follis, RIC VI, 171b Siscia, 305-306 CE15 viewsMaximinus II, AE Quarter Follis, 305-306, Group II, Class V, Siscia
Obverse: MAXIMINVS NOB C, Laureate head right
Reverse: GENIO POP_VLI ROMANI, Genius with modius on head, standing facing, head left, chlamys over left shoulder, patera in right hand, cornucopiae in left
SIS in exergue Siscia mint, 18.8mm, 2.8g RIC VI, 171b
NORMAN K
coin340b.jpg
Maximinus II, as Caesar (AD 305-308). Billon follis (6.31 gm). Antioch AD 305-306.6 viewsMaximinus II, as Caesar (AD 305-308). Billon follis (6.31 gm). Antioch AD 305-306. GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right / GENIO CAESARIS, Genius of the Caesar standing left, pouring libation from patera and holding cornucopia, dot ANT dot in exergue, A in right field . officina A (= 1). Mint Antioch Coin #340
cars100
4001_115_68_1.jpg
Maximinus II, as Caesar, Æ Large Follis. AD 308-309.2 viewsCyzicus mint, (7.45g, 28mm.) GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, laureate head right / VIRTVTI EXERCITVS, Mars advancing right, naked except for floating chlamys, holding transverse spear, with trophy over shoulder; Δ in left field, MKV in exergue. RIC 49.

Ex Roma Numismatics Ltd., E-Sale 40, 28 October 2017, lot 854;
Purchased from Fritz Rudolf Künker GmbH & Co. KG, September 2009.
Ruslan K
507-3.png
Maximinus II, BI Nummus13 viewsAD 308-313, Alexandia
8.17 grams
Obv.: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right.
Rev.: GENIO IMPERATORIS, Genius standing left, holding patera from which liquid flows & cornucopiae; crescent over K to left, B over P to right; ALE in ex.
RIC VI #139b (A common variety)
Purchased on eBay
NGC Ch AU: Strike 5/5: Surface 4/5
Richard M10
MAXIMIN2-3-ROMAN.jpg
Maximinus II, Cyzicus RIC VI-049(Γ)19 viewsAE Folles
Cyzicus mint, 308-309 A.D.
25mm, 7.09g
RIC VI-49

Obverse:
GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C
Laureate head right.

Reverse:
VIRTVS EXERCITVS
Γ in left field
MKV in exergue
Mars advancing right, naked but for floating chlamys, right holding transverse spear, trophy over left shoulder.
rubadub
0610-310np_noir.jpg
Maximinus II, Follis73 viewsAntioch mint, 2nd officina, AD 310-311
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head of Maximinus II right
GENIO EXERCITVS, Genius standing left holding patera and cornucopia, cressent and S in field, ANT at exergue
7.28 gr
Ref : RCV # 14845 (55), Cohen #47
1 commentsPotator II
0610-301.jpg
Maximinus II, Follis - 0045117 viewsKarthage mint
GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right
SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Karthage standing left holding fruits. I in left field, Delta at exergue
8.6 gr
Ref : Cohen # 150
Potator II
MAXIMIN2-2-ROMAN.jpg
Maximinus II, Heraclea RIC VI-036a(Δ)20 viewsAE Folles
Heraclea mint, 308-309 A.D.
27mm, 6.71g
RIC VI-36a

Obverse:
GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES
Laureate head right.

Reverse:
GENIO CAESARIS
.HTΔ. in exergue
Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, right holding patera, left cornucopiae.
rubadub
Maximinus_II_RIC_160.JPG
Maximinus II, RIC 16010 viewsIMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
GENO AVGVSTI
AE Follis, 20mm, 4.99g
Laureled head left
Genius facing left holding head of Serapis and cornucopia, NH to sides
ALE in ex.
Alexandria mint
novacystis
194.jpg
Maximinus II, RIC VI 67a, Cyzicus23 viewsObv: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG
Bust: Laureate head right
Rev: GENIO AVGVSTI
Genio standing left holding cornucopia and emptying patera.
Exe: MKV epsilon in field left, 3 vertical dots in field right
Date: 311 AD
Denom: Follis
Rated "C"
Bluefish
f3.jpg
Maximinus II. AE Follis. 308-310 AD.18 viewsObv: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, laureate head right.
Rev: GENIO CA-ESARIS, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera from which liquid flows and cornucopiae. K in left field, S over P in right field. Mintmark ALE.
RIC VI Alexandria 99a.
ancientone
Maximinus_b.jpg
Maximinus II. Daza follis45 viewsIOVI CONSERVATORI1 commentsTibsi
Maximinus_Daza_b2.jpg
Maximinus II. Daza follis43 viewsGENIO AVGVSTITibsi
Maximinus_Pax_Augusti_Sestertius.jpg
Maximinus Pax Augusti Sestertius30 viewsMaximinus, Sestertius, Struck 235 AD, Sear 2353, RIC 58, BMCRE 7
OBV: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG Laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind
REV: PAX AVGVSTI SC, Pax standing with olive branch in outstretched right hand,
and cradling long scepter in left hand

SCARCE
Romanorvm
Maximinus_persecution_issue,_Roma_e5_lot_871,_Oct_2_2014,_Feb_8_2014,_£30,_total__£44_5(_75_21).jpg
Maximinus persecution issue13 viewsChance Vandal
20- Maximinus RIC 16.JPG
Maximinus RIC 1653 viewsAR Denarius, 235-238 AD , Rome Mint.
Obv- IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right. Bust style-1
Rev: VICTORIA AVG, Victory Right with wreath and palm.
20mm
RIC 16
1 commentsjdholds
21-Maximinus RIC 16-2.JPG
Maximinus RIC 16-254 viewsAR Denarius, 235-238 AD , Rome Mint.
Obv- IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right. Bust style-2
Rev: VICTORIA AVG, Victory Right with wreath and palm.
20mm
RIC 16
jdholds
23-Maximinus RIC 16-3.JPG
Maximinus RIC 16-387 viewsAR Denarius, 235-238 AD , Rome Mint.
Obv- IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right. Bust style-3
Rev: VICTORIA AVG, Victory Right with wreath and palm.
20mm
RIC 16
jdholds
22-Maximinus RIC 23.JPG
Maximinus RIC 2341 viewsAR Denarius , 235-238 AD, Rome Mint
Obv:MAXININVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: VICTORIA GERM, Victory standing holding wreath and palm, captive seated to the left.
20mm
RIC 23
jdholds
34-Maximinus Sest~0.JPG
Maximinus Sest23 viewsAe Sestertius, 235-236 AD.
Obv:IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate and draped bust right.
Rev:VICTORIA AVG / SC, Victory advancing right with wreath and palm.
29mm, 17.4gm
RIC 67
Jerome Holderman
Maximinus_Sest~0.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius27 viewsMaximinus Thrax Æ Sestertius. 235-236 AD.
IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped bust right / PROVIDENTIA AVG S-C, Providence standing left with cornucopiae and wand over globe at feet.

RIC 61 ; Cohen 80.

Tanit
Maximinus 13 D.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius20 viewsAE Sestertius. Obv.: MAXININVS PIVS AVG GEM ; Rev.: PAX AVGVSTI S C ; Pax stg. l.Tanit
Maximinus Pius D 1~0.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius39 viewsAE Sestertius. Obv.:MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM ; Rev.: FIDES MILITVM SC ; Fides stg. l., with two standards.Tanit
Maximinus~0.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius21 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Rev: SALVS AVG S C ; Salus std. l.
Cohen 92
Tanit
maximinus.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius29 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Rev: PAX AVGVSTI S C ; Pax stg. l.

C. 38
Tanit
Max_Sest_2.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius18 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG; laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: FIDES MILITVM SC; Fides stg. l. with two standards

RIC 43. C.10
Tanit
Max_Sest_1.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius19 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM ; laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: FIDES MILITVM S C; Fides stg. l., with two standards.

C.13; RIC.78
Tanit
maximinus_sest.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius12 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
Rev: VICTORIA AVG S C ; Victory running r.

Cohen 100
Tanit
maximinus_sest_2.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius18 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Rev: VICTORIA GERMANICA SC ; Victory stg. l., captive at her feet.

Refers to the impressive victory over the Alemanni tribe, in 236-38 AD.

Cohen 109
Tanit
Max_Sest_3.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius9 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG; laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: FIDES MILITVM SC; Fides stg. l. with two standards

RIC 43. C.10
Tanit
Max_Sest_4.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius13 viewsMaximinus I Thrax Æ Sestertius. 236-238 AD. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate draped bust right / SALVS AVGVSTI S-C, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising from altar.

Ref Maximinus I Thrax AE Sestertius, RIC 85, Cohen 92, BMC 175
Tanit
Maximinus~1.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius15 viewsAE Sestertius 236/238 -Roma-.
Obv: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust r.
Rev: SALVS AVGVSTI - S C ; Salus enthroned l. feeding snake arising from altar.

RIC 85, C. 92.
Tanit
Maximinus~2.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius23 viewsMAXIMINUS I. 235-238 AD. Æ Sestertius. Struck 235 AD.
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
Rev: PAX AVGVSTI, S C across field, Pax Standing left, holding olive branch in outstretched right hand and cradling long sceptre in left arm.

RIC IV 58; Pink III, pg. 21; Banti 11a; BMCRE 7; Cohen 34.
1 commentsTanit
Maximinus_Sestertius_RIC_90.JPG
Maximinus Sestertius RIC 9030 viewsMaximinus I Æ Sestertius.
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laur, dr and cuir bust right from behind
Reverse: VICTORIA GERMANICA, Victory standing left with wreath & palm; captive seated before.
RIC 90, Cohen 109.
30mm , 19.2gm
Jerome Holderman
Maximinus_Sestertius_RIC_93.JPG
Maximinus Sestertius RIC 9315 viewsAE Sestertius, Rome Mint, 236-238 AD
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate , draped bust right.
Reverse: VICTORIA GERMANICA, Emperor standing left, captive before him, Victory crowning emperor from behind.
RIC 93; Cohen 114 ; BM 198
30mm, 17.66 gm.
Jerome Holderman
Maximinus_Victoria.jpg
Maximinus Sestertius Victoria advancing right RIC 6730 viewsMaximinus Æ Sestertius. 235-236 AD. IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVG S-C, Victory advancing right bearing wreath & palm. Ref RIC 67, Cohen 100, BMC 108, RCV 8339mattpat
maximinus_spqr.jpg
Maximinus SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI21 viewsMaximinus AE Follis. IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG, laureate, cuirassed bust right / SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Legionary eagle between two standards. Mintmark: RQ. James b4
Maximinus_standing.jpg
Maximinus Standing Denarius30 viewsMaximinus I Thrax
Reigned AD 235-238
Struck AD 236
AR Denarius
RIC 3, Seer (1988) 2342, RSC 55

O: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.

R: P M TR P II COS P P, Maximinus standing between two legionary standards.
1 commentsGao
IMG_1289.JPG
Maximinus Thrax117 viewsCapitoline museumsJohny SYSEL
thrax.jpg
Maximinus Thrax55 viewsRoman Empire
Maximinus Thrax
(Reign as 27th Emperor of the Roman Empire 235-238 AD)
(b. ca. 173 AD, d. 238 AD)


Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Maximinus facing right

Reverse: PM TR P II COS PP, Maximinus standing facing left, raising hand and holding spear, legionary standards on both sides




Silver Denarius
Minted in Rome 236AD



Translations:

IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG= Imperator(Commander-in-Chief) Maximinus Pious Emperor
PM TR P II COS PP=Greatest Priest, Tribune of the Plebs for the Second Time, Consul, Father of the Country





Reference:
RIC IVii 3
1 commentsSphinx357
IMG_3332.JPG
Maximinus Thrax12 viewsMaximinus Thrax, IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right / SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left feeding serpent which rises from altar. RIC 14; Sear V 8316; RSC 85a.Molinari
CD-01.jpg
Maximinus Thrax (A.D. 235-238)21 viewsAR Denarius, A.D. 235-236, Rome, 20.1mm, 3.28g, 180°, RIC IV 13.
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG. laureate draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: PROVIDENTIA AVG. Providentia standing left, wand over globe in right, cornucopia in left.
Joseph D5
Maximinus_4.jpg
Maximinus Thrax - AR denarius33 viewsRome
236 AD
2nd emission
laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind
MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Maximinus standing left, raising hand and holding scepter; standard on either side
P M TR P II__COS P P
RIC IV 4, RSC III 56
3,01 g 20-19 mm
Johny SYSEL
Max le Thrax dupondius.jpg
Maximinus Thrax - dupondius28 viewsIMP. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG. , radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SALVS AVGVSTI / S C , Salus seated left on throne feeding serpent rising from altar
Ginolerhino
Maximinus_Anchialos.jpg
Maximinus Thrax Anchialos AE1735 viewsMaximinus I Thrax
AD 235-238
AE 17 of Anchialos

O: laureate bust right

R: AGXIALEWN, lion walking right
Gao
Maximinus_Thrax_b.jpg
Maximinus Thrax denarius58 viewsPAX AVGVSTITibsi
maxthrax.jpg
Maximinus Thrax Denarius35 viewsIMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate & draped bust right

FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand

RIC 7A

ex-Roma Numismatics
3 commentsWill Hooton
1-image00053.jpg
Maximinus Thrax Denarius. AD 235-23810 viewsMaximinus I Denarius. AD 235-238...3.18gr
Obverse..IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped bust right.
Reverse..FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
RIC 7A Minted AD 235-236
Paul R3
234-Max Thrax Germ Sestertius.JPG
Maximinus Thrax Germ Sestertius33 viewsMaximinus I Æ Sestertius.
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laur, dr and cuir bust right from behind Reverse: VICTORIA GERMANICA, Victory standing left with wreath & palm; captive seated before.
RIC 90, Cohen 109.
30mm , 17.9gm

Jerome Holderman
Forum_Maximinus_Prv_Deultum.Jpg
Maximinus Thrax Provincial AE Deultum20 viewsWilliamBoyd
Maximinus_Salus.jpg
Maximinus Thrax Salus Denarius20 viewsMaximinus I Thrax
AD 235-238
AR Denarius
RIC 21, RSC 91

O:MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate draped bust right

R: SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising up from altar
Gao
217- Max Thrax Sest portrait 1.JPG
Maximinus Thrax Sest portrait 136 viewsAe Sestertius, 235-236 AD.
Obv:IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate and draped bust right.
Rev:VICTORIA AVG / SC, Victory advancing right with wreath and palm.
30mm, 19.8gm
RIC 67
Jerome Holderman
34-Maximinus Sest.JPG
Maximinus Thrax Sestertius.49 viewsAe Sestertius, 235-236 AD.
Obv:IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate and draped bust right.
Rev:VICTORIA AVG / SC, Victory advancing right with wreath and palm.
29mm, 17.4gm
RIC 67
1 commentsjdholds
Maximinus Collection-sm.JPG
Maximinus Thrax Victory Denarius Collection117 viewsI have now completed my Collection of Max Thrax Victory Denarius. In honor of today receiving the Rare Mule to complete the series I have re-photographed the entire collection.2 commentsjdholds
thrax_sestertius_k.jpg
Maximinus Thrax, AD 235-23812 viewsÆ Sestertius, 31mm, 26.4g, 12h; Rome mint.
Obv. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: VICTORIA GERMANICA / S - C, Victory standing left, holding wreath and palm branch; captive at her side.
Reference: RIC IVb 90, p. 147.
John Anthony
IMG_0441.JPG
Maximinus Thrax, Anchialos3 viewsTHRACE. Anchialos. Maximinus Thrax (235-238). Ae.
Obv: AVT MAXIMEINOC EYCEBHC AVG.
Laureate bust right.
Rev: AΓXIAΛEΩN.
Dolphin right; two tinny-fishes to left and right flanking.
Varbanov 495.
ecoli
mtdellionORweb.jpg
Maximinus Thrax, Jurakova 201-II12 viewsDeultum, Thrace mint, Maximinus Thrax A.D. 235-238 AE, 17mm 3.10g, Jurakova 201-II.
O: IMP MAXIMINVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust r.
R: C F P D, lion walking r.
casata137ec
mttundolanchORweb.jpg
Maximinus Thrax, Moushmov 289369 viewsAnchialus, Thrace mint, Maximinus Thrax, 235-238 A.D. AE, 26.5mm 8.43g, Moushmov 2893
O: AVT MAXIMEINOC EV CEB ACN, laureate head right
R: AGCIALEWN, dolphin between two tunny fish.
*note I had to look it up because it was bugging me, but a tunny fish is another na