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DECEN-1.jpg
21 viewsDECENTIVS - AE Centenionalis - Lugdunum mint - 351/353
Obv.:DN DECENTIVS NOB CAES, cuirassed bust right
Rev.: VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE, two Victories standing facing holding shield inscribed VOT V MVLT X, *SV in central field. SRLG in ex.
Gs. 4,7 mm. 21,2
Cohen 43
Maxentius
IMG_7010.jpg
64 viewsBulgarian trachy of Constantine Tich Asen (1257-1277). Obv: Bust of Christ. Rev: Czar on horseback, holding scepter topped with patriarchal cross. Dumbarton Oaks Vol IV, pl. XLVIII B (3). +Alexios
IMG_7000.jpg
54 views Bulgarian trachy of Constantine Tich Asen (1257-1277). Obv: Bust of Christ, + in left and right fields. Rev: Standing czar holding labarum-headed scepter and globus. Reference: Dumbarton Oaks Vol IV, pl. XLVIII B (1), and Radushev p.171.
+Alexios
VA10267LG.jpg
171 viewsCONSTANTINE II, as Caesar. 317-337 AD. Æ Follis (22mm - 3.19 g). Trier mint. Struck 321 AD.
obv: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust left, holding Victory on a globe in right hand, mappa in left
rev: BEATA TRAN-QVILLITAS, globe set on altar inscribed VOT/IS/XX in three lines; PTR. RIC VII 312. EF, attractive brown patina.

ex VAuctions Sale : 213 Lot: 101, seller's picture
7 commentsareich
glok_lokLG.jpg
151 viewsLOKRIS Locri Opuntii. Triobol or Hemidrachm, ca 330 bc (AR; 15mm; 2.68g; 11h) Head of Demeter with wreath of corn-ears to right. Rev. OPONTIWN Ajax advancing to right, between his legs, kantharos; symbol inside the shield, serpent.

BCD coll 99; De Luynes 1958.

5 commentspaul1888
Pisidia_Selge_Gorgon_Athena_AR9_0_9g.jpg
54 views1 commentsareich
star-SLG-URBS-rev_detail.jpg
54 viewsMatthew W2
star-SLG-URBS-revcracks.jpg
31 viewsMatthew W2
star-SLG-URBS.jpg
60 views2 commentsMatthew W2
polis06LG.jpg
30 views1 commentsMatthew W2
Ägypten_Egypt_20_Piaster_1980_AH_1400_Falke_Kupfer_Nickel.jpg
11 views
Ägypten

5 Piaster

AD 1972 / AH 1392

Vs.: Oben arabische Schrift im Bogen, im Feld Nominal, rechts und links Jahreszahlen, unten Verzierungen

Rs.: Islamischer Falke

Zitat: KM# A428

Erhaltung: Kleiner Fleck, ansonsten Stempelglanz

Metall: Kupfer-Nickel

25 mm, 4,49 g _199
Antonivs Protti
Belgien_Medaille_1909_Erinnerung_Eröffnung_Klinik_Krankenkasse.jpg
11 viewsBelgien

Medaille 1909 (Bronze)

auf die Eröffnung der Klinik am 14.6.1909, finanziert durch die Gemeinschaftskasse von Industrie und Handel

Gewicht: 19,1g

Durchmesser: 34mm

Erhaltung: zaponiert, min.Rdf., vorzüglich _1298
Antonivs Protti
Deutsches_Reich_Kaiserreich_12_Mark_1918_D_München_Wilhelm_II__Adler.jpg
17 viewsDeutsches Reich -- Kaiserreich

Wilhelm II. 1888-1918

1/2 Mark 1918 D

München

Vorderseite: Jahr und Wert zwischen Eichenzweigen.

Rückseite: Adler zwischen Eichenzweigen.

Erhaltung: Fast Stempelglanz.

Metall: Silber, .900 fein.

Gewicht: 2,7 g.

Durchmesser: 20 mm. _792
Antonivs Protti
Deutschland_Medaille_o_J__Aussenminister_Hans_Dietrich_Genscher.jpg
13 viewsDeutschland

Medaille o.J. 1990er Jahre (Kupfer-Nickel, vergoldet)

von Sir Roward Hill

auf Hans-Dietrich Genscher

Durchmesser: 39mm

Gewicht: 27,2g

Erhaltung: stempelglanz _290
Antonivs Protti
Deutschland_Medaille_1982_U-Boot_U_2540_Museum_Bremerhaven.jpg
22 viewsDeutschland

Bremerhaven

Medaille 1982 (Kupfer-Nickel)

auf das Technikmuseum U-Boot Wilhelm Bauer e.v.

Vs.: U-Boot

Rs.: Elefant

Gewicht: 19,0g

Durchmesser: 37mm

Erhaltung: vorzüglich-stempelglanz _798
Antonivs Protti
Deutschland_Berlin_Medaille_o_J__Gedächtniskirche_Mahnmal.jpg
12 viewsDeutschland

Berlin

Medaille o.J. (Kupfer-Nickel, vergoldet)

von Sir Roward Hill

auf die Gedächtniskirche Berlin

Vs.: Kirche

Rs.: Adler

Gewicht: 26,8g

Durchmesser: 39mm

Erhaltung: stempelglanz _190
Antonivs Protti
Libyen_Idris_I_10_Milliemes_AD_1965_AH_1385_Wappen_Kranz_Kupfer_Nickel.jpg
9 views
Libyen

Idris I. 1951-1969

10 Milliemes

AD 1965 / AH 1385

Vs.: Arabische Schrift über Wappen, unten Jahreszahlen

Rs.: Nominal im Kranz, darunter Nominal auf Englisch im Bogen

Rand: Geriffelt

Erhaltung: Stempelglanz

Metall: Kupfer-Nickel

20 mm, 3,22 g _598
Antonivs Protti
Libyen_Idris_I_5_Milliemes_AD_1965_AH_1385_Wappen_Kranz_Nickel_Messing.jpg
9 views
Libyen

Idris I. 1951-1969

5 Milliemes

AD 1965 / AH 1385

Vs.: Arabische Schrift über Wappen, unten Jahreszahlen

Rs.: Nominal im Kranz, darunter Nominal auf Englisch im Bogen

Erhaltung: Etwas fleckig, ansonsten Stempelglanz

Metall: Nickel-Messing

19-20 mm, 2,52 g _898
Antonivs Protti
Libyen_Idris_I_1_Millieme_AD_1965_AH_1385_Wappen_Kranz_Nickel_Messing.jpg
12 views
Libyen

Idris I. 1951-1969

1 Millieme

AD 1965 / AH 1385

Vs.: Arabische Schrift über Wappen, unten Jahreszahlen

Rs.: Nominal im Kranz, darunter Nominal auf Englisch im Bogen

Rand: Glatt

Erhaltung: Etwas fleckig, ansonsten fast Stempelglanz / Stempelglanz

Metall: Nickel-Messing

16 mm, 1,77 g _593
Antonivs Protti
Mexiko_5_Pesos_1957_Mo_Miguel_Hidalgo_Adler_Schlange_Kaktus_Silber.jpg
16 viewsMexiko

5 Pesos

1957 Mo

Münzstätte: Mexiko Stadt

Vs.: Adler mit Schlange im Schnabel auf Kaktus, darunter Eichen- und Lorbeerkranz, darunter Jahr

Rs.: Kopf von Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla

Rand: Geriffelt

Erhaltung: Vorzüglich

Metall: 0.720 Silber

36 mm, 18,04 g _2196
Antonivs Protti
Preussen_2_Mark_1901_Friedrich_I__Wilhelm_II_Helm_Adler_Krone_Silber.jpg
24 viewsDeutsches Reich

Preussen

Königreich



Wilhelm II. (1888-1918)

2 Mark 1901

Münzstätte: Berlin

Anlässlich des 200jährigen Bestehen des Königreiches



Vorderseite: "+FRIEDRICH.I.1701. WILHELM.II.1901." um gestaffelte Brustbilder (nach links), das vordere mit gekröntem Adler auf Helm

Rückseite: "DEUTSCHES REICH 1901 / * ZWEI MARK *" um Krone über Adler mit Wappenschild auf Brusthöhe

Rand geriffelt

feine Kratzer, Vorzüglich / Stempelglanz

Silber (900/1000)

11,1g

Durchmesser ca. 28mm

AKS # 136

Jaeger # 105 _2998
Antonivs Protti
San_Marino_1_Lira_1977_FAO_Burg_Rom~0.jpg
12 viewsSan Marino

1 Lira 1976 (Aluminium)

Münzstätte Rom

Vs.: Weltkugel

Rs.: Burg,Wert und Jahreszahl

Gewicht: 0,6g

Erhaltung: stempelglanz _190
Antonivs Protti
Ägypten_Egypt_5_Piaster_1967_AH_1387_Adler_Kupfer_Nickel.jpg
13 views
Ägypten

5 Piaster

AD 1967 / AH 1387

Vs.: Oben arabische Schrift im Bogen, im Feld Nominal, unten Verzierung, links und rechts Jahreszahlen

Rs.: Adler

Zitat: KM# 412

Erhaltung: Vorzüglich - fast Stempelglanz

Metall: Kupfer-Nickel

25 mm, 4,42 g _296
Antonivs Protti
_T2eC16dHJIkE9qU3lQ,hBR(r-rhsKw~~60_1.jpg
19 viewsÄgypten 5 Milliemes AD 1973 / AH 1393
Vs.: Oben arabische Schrift im Bogen, im Feld Nominal, links und rechts Jahreszahlen
Rs.: Adler
Zitat: KM# 432
Erhaltung: Stempelglanz
Metall: Messing
18 mm, 1,96 g _196
Antonivs Protti
Nero_Milne_145.jpg
13 viewsNERO
Billon Tetradrachm
25mm, 8.1 grams

OBV: NER KLAY KAIS SEB GER AYTO, Head of Nero right
REV: PRON NEOY SEBASTOY, Nero wearing a radiate crown seated left holding a map and scepter
LG to left = year 3
Milne 145
ziggy9
antoninus_pius_ric_II_914.jpg
17 viewsANTONINUS PIUS
Sestertius 152-153 AD
32.4mm, 23.3 grams

OBV: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVII, laureate head right
REV: INDVLGENTIA AVG COS IIII, Indulgentia seated left, extending hand & holding Scepter.
SC below.
RIC- III – 914
ziggy9
Constantine_Sol.jpg
72 viewsIMP CONSTANTINVS P AVG
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.

SOLI INV-IC-TO COMITI
Sol standing left, raising right hand, holding globe in left; Star to left; PLN in exergue.

3.61g

London Mint, 312-313 AD
RIC 282.

Ex-Calgary Coin
2 commentsJay GT4
image00075.jpg
12 viewsParthian Kingdom. Vologases IV . A.D. 147-191. Æ 18 Dichalkon (17.89 mm, 3.53 g, 12 h). struck A.D. 154. Bust of Volgases IV facing with long, tapered beard, end cut square; wearing tiara with hooks on crest, horn on side and long, curved earflaps; to right, Seleucid date (= SE 466 = A.D. 154) / Nike seated left on column; palm in left field. Sellwood ICP 84.142; Shore --. VF, tan patina with greenish encrustation in recesses, edge split. Quant.Geek
110893LG.jpg
7 viewsSouthern Gaul, Volcae-Tectosages. 1st century B.C. AR drachm (12 mm, 2.39 g). Head left with wild hair and Negroid features / Cross with one ring and three pellets in angles, crescents enclosing each quadrant. LT 2986Quant.Geek
110561LG.jpg
6 viewsPostumus. Romano-Gallic Emperor, A.D. 260-269. BI antoninianus (21 mm, 2.30 g, 1 h). Treveri, A.D. 261. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus right / P M TR P CO-S II P P, emperor standing facing, head left, holding globe and spear. RIC 54; Mairat 27-31; AGK 60; RSC 243aQuant.Geek
110353LG.jpg
11 viewsPostumus. Romano-Gallic Emperor, A.D. 260-269. BI antoninianus (20 mm, 3.04 g, 7 h). Treveri, A.D. 266. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus right / FIDES [E]XERCITVS, four military standards. RIC 303; Mairat 120; AGK 20; RSC 65. Quant.Geek
110347LG.jpg
13 viewsVictorinus. Romano-Gallic Emperor, A.D. 269-271. Æ antoninianus (20 mm, 3.09 g, 7 h). Treveri, A.D. 269. IMP C PIAV VICTORINVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Victorinus right / PA-X AVG, Pax standing facing, head left, holding branch and scepter; V-*. RIC 117; Mairat 244; AGK 12c. Brown patina. Nice full flan with complete legendsQuant.Geek
110563LG.jpg
10 viewsDivus Victorinus. Died A.D. 271. Æ antoninianus (21 mm, 2.99 g, 12 h). Colonia Agrippinensis, under Tetricus I, late A.D. 271. [DI]VO VICTORINO PIO, radiate and cuirassed bust of Victorinus right / CONSA[C]RATIO, eagle standing right on globe, head left, holding wreath in beak. Cf. RIC 85 (bust); cf. Mairat 416 (bust); AGK 1b. Brown patina with a few hard green depositsQuant.Geek
110088LG.jpg
14 viewsTheodosius I. A.D. 379-395. Æ nummus (13 mm, 1.3412 g, 12 h). Heraclea, A.D. 388-392. D N THEODO-SIVS P F AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Theodosius I right / SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory advancing left, head right, holding trophy over shoulder and dragging captive; SMHB. RIC 26b.2. Quant.Geek
110295LG.jpg
8 viewsNorthwest Gaul, Carnutes. Ca. 100-52 B.C. Æ (16 mm, 3.12 g, 9 h). Head right / Two eagles flying right; in field, pentagram and cross with pellet in each quarter; serpent to right. Depeyrot 25; Delestrée & Tache 2582Quant.Geek
110315LG.jpg
8 viewsNorthwest Gaul, Carnutes. Ca. 100-52 B.C. Æ (16 mm, 3.49 g, 7 h). Female bust left / Eagle and eaglette flying left. Delestrée & Tache 2588Quant.Geek
110895LG.jpg
9 viewsNortheast Gaul, Bellovaci. Ca. 50-20 B.C. Æ (15 mm, 2.25 g, 9 h). Stylized head left / Horizontal line with three lines extending below it; above, chevron-S. Delestrée & Tache 535; Scheers 711Quant.Geek
6F5CEE77-ACA9-41AF-ACC7-FEF70FA1D78A.jpeg
28 viewsDIOCLETIAN.. Ae follis. Lyons.. 285-ca.310 A.D.

IMP DIOCLETIANVS AVG: Laureate bust left

GENIO POPVLI ROMANI: Genius standing left holding patera over altar, - / * in field, PLG in exergue.
2 commentspaul1888
Hadrian_and_Sabina_Alex_Tet_-_Köln_1093_lg~0.jpg
15.25 Hadrian and Sabina70 viewsEGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian. AD 117-138. BI Tetradrachm (25mm, 12.94 g, 12h). Dated RY 18 (AD 133/4). Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Hadrian right / Draped bust of Sabina right, wearing stephane; L–IH (date) across field. Köln 1093; Dattari (Savio) 1255; K&G 32.572. VF, find patina, slight die shift on obverse.

Ex Classical Numismatic Group 34 (6 May 1995), lot 331.

Ex CNG eAuction 318
6 commentsSosius
Aquilia_Severa_Alex_Tet_-_Köln_2369_lg~0.jpg
29.6 Aquilia Severa - Wife of Elagabalus32 viewsEGYPT, Alexandria. Aquilia Severa. Augusta, AD 220-221 & 221-222. Potin Tetradrachm (23mm, 11.63 g, 11h). Dated RY 4 of Elagabalus (AD 220/1). Draped bust right / Homonoia standing left, right hand raised, holding double cornucopia with left; L Δ (date) to left. Köln 2369; Dattari (Savio) 4178; K&G 58.3. Near VF, dark brown patina, light porosity.

Ex CNG eAuction 318
Sosius
Constantius_I_Lyons_167a.jpg
3 Constantius I22 viewsCONSTANTIUS I
AE1 Folles, Lyons, Struck 301-301 AD
CONSTANTIVS NOB C, Laureate cuirassed bust l.., scepter over r. shoulder / GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genuis standing left by altarholding patera and cornucopiae, A in l. field, PLG in ex.\\\\\\\\
RIC VI Lyons 167a
Sosius
rjb_gal21_09_06.jpg
54115 viewsAntoninianus
Rome
Issue 8
INDVLGENT AVG
G 541
mauseus
2580450.jpg
8 Macrianus13 viewsAntoninianus (20mm, 4.16 g, 12h). Samosata mint. 1st emission. 260-261 AD.

O: Radiate and cuirassed bust right

R: Indulgentia seated left, holding scepter; star to left

RIC V 8; MIR 44, 1732k; RSC 6.

Good Fine, toned, porous surfaces.

Ex-CNG
Sosius
T1118LG.jpg
C POBLICIUS Q F. 80 BC91 viewsHelmeted bust of Roma right / Hercules strangling the Nemean lion; bow and quiver at left; club below. Cr. 380/1.

POBLICIA, a plebian family, but of consular rank. Its cognomen on coins is Malleolus. There are fifteen varieties, all of silver, on some of which a small hammer or mallett is engraved, evidently alluding to the surname Malleolus.

The first of Heracles' twelve labours, set by King Eurystheus (his cousin) was to slay the Nemean lion.

According to one version of the myth, the Nemean lion took women as hostages to its lair in a cave near Nemea, luring warriors from nearby towns to save the damsel in distress. After entering the cave, the warrior would see the woman (usually feigning injury) and rush to her side. Once he was close, the woman would turn into a lion and kill the warrior, devouring his remains and giving the bones to Hades.

Heracles wandered the area until he came to the town of Cleonae. There he met a boy who said that if Heracles slew the Nemean lion and returned alive within 30 days, the town would sacrifice a lion to Zeus; but if he did not return within 30 days or he died, the boy would sacrifice himself to Zeus.[3] Another version claims that he met Molorchos, a shepherd who had lost his son to the lion, saying that if he came back within 30 days, a ram would be sacrificed to Zeus. If he did not return within 30 days, it would be sacrificed to the dead Heracles as a mourning offering.

While searching for the lion, Heracles fetched some arrows to use against it, not knowing that its golden fur was impenetrable; when he found and shot the lion and firing at it with his bow, he discovered the fur's protective property when the arrow bounced harmlessly off the creature's thigh. After some time, Heracles made the lion return to his cave. The cave had two entrances, one of which Heracles blocked; he then entered the other. In those dark and close quarters, Heracles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight the lion bit off one of his fingers. Others say that he shot arrows at it, eventually shooting it in the unarmoured mouth.

After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt, but failed. He then tried sharpening the knife with a stone and even tried with the stone itself. Finally, Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told Heracles to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.

When he returned on the thirtieth day carrying the carcass of the lion on his shoulders, King Eurystheus was amazed and terrified. Eurystheus forbade him ever again to enter the city; in future he was to display the fruits of his labours outside the city gates. Eurystheus warned him that the tasks set for him would become increasingly difficult. He then sent Heracles off to complete his next quest, which was to destroy the Lernaean hydra.

The Nemean lion's coat was impervious to the elements and all but the most powerful weapons. Others say that Heracles' armour was, in fact, the hide of the lion of Cithaeron.
ecoli
Gordian_III_Cappadocia.jpg
Cappadocia, Caesarea. Six corn ears26 viewsGordian III, 238-244 A.D. Cappadocia, Caesarea. 7,1g, 23mm. Obv: AV KAI M ANT GORDIANOC; Draped and laureate Gordian III right; Rev: [MHTP] KAI NE (in field) [E]T - Z ("Münze von Kaisareia, Metropolis und Inhaberin einer Neokorie"); Six corn ears, Year Z (= 7, Year 244 A.D.) Cf. Sydenham 616; SNG Österreich, Slg. Leypold II 2812 and 2814. Podiceps
Gordian_Deultum_2.jpg
Gordian III - Deultum28 viewsAE Tetrasarion?
238-244 AD
laureate and draped bust right from behind
IMP GORDIAN_VS PIVS FEL (AV)G
Heracles? in tetrastyle temple facing, holding lion skin and club
COL F_L P_AC__DEV / LT
SNG Bulgaria 1338, Jurukova 264
7,1g
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
osbd.jpg
Otacilla Severa, Wife of Philip I, 244-249 CE.12 viewsObverse: MARCIA OTACIL SEVHRA AVG, diademed and draped bust right
Reverse: COL FL PAC DEVLT, Concordia standing left, patera in right hand and cornucopia in left.
Thrace, Deultum reverse die broken
SNG Bulgaria 1965ff. 19.6 mm diam., 2.9 g.
NORMAN K
KAFFA_PUL_cm.jpg
Pul with Kaffa c/m5 views
CRIMEA, GOLDEN HORDE, (with Genoese countermark)

Anonymous AE - Pul

Obverse: uncertain Ornament, Kaffa Genoese trading colony; Circular countermark arms of Genoa with partitioned portal, within circular frame of dots.

Reverse: uncertain Ornament

Mint: Uncertain (Bulghar?)

Minted: 14th Century (?) cm - 1420 - 1475

Notes: Fair/Fair(c/m a/VF), Crude

Ref: Retowski, Coins with Genoese Countermarks 2


jimbomar
charles2-gdr-curtisasonien.JPG
D.375 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 2, Courcessin?)36 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
GDR denier (Courcessin?, class 2, 864-875)

Silver, 1.43 g, 19 mm diameter, die axis 12h

O/ +GRΛTIΛ D-I REX; carolingian monogram
R/ +I.CVRTISΛSONIEH; cross pattée

In 864, Charles the Bald promulgated the edict of Pîtres, huge reform whose aim was to protect the kingdom from Viking raids. It also reinforced royal authority on minting, and created a new type of deniers . The new coins could be only struck at 10 mints (Palace, Chalon sur Saône, Melle, Narbonne, Orléans, Paris, Quentovic, Reims, Rouen and Sens). This limitation had never been applied, more than 110 mints struck the new coinage. This can be understood as a lack of control of the central autority. However it seems that several mints shared dies... Grierson and Blackburn proposed that only 10 main mints produced dies and partially outsourced coinage production ?
On the obverse is written GRATIA D-I REX (GDR) around a carolingian monogram. The alliance with Roman Church goes on... The reverse already existed for Class 1, with the mint name around a cross pattée.
Class 2 of Charles' coinage is made of these GDR deniers.

The precise localization of the mint in Normandie (north of France) is still not clear. According to Grierson and Blackburn, Courti(s) Sasonien(sis) may come from some groups of Saxons settled in northern part of Gaul.
Droger
lg004_quad_sm.jpg
"As de Nîmes" or "crocodile" Ӕ dupondius of Nemausus (9 - 3 BC), honoring Augustus and Agrippa36 viewsIMP DIVI F , Heads of Agrippa (left) and Augustus (right) back to back, Agrippa wearing rostral crown and Augustus the oak-wreath / COL NEM, crocodile right chained to palm-shoot with short dense fronds and tip right; two short palm offshoots left and right below, above on left a wreath with two long ties streaming right.

Ӕ, 24.5 x 3+ mm, 13.23g, die axis 3h; on both sides there are remains of what appears to be gold plating, perhaps it was a votive offering? Rough edges and slight scrapes on flan typical for this kind of coin, due to primitive technology (filing) of flan preparation.

IMPerator DIVI Filius. Mint of COLonia NEMausus (currently Nîmes, France). Known as "As de Nîmes", it is actually a dupontius (lit. "two-pounder") = 2 ases (sometimes cut in halves to get change). Dupondii were often made out of a golden-colored copper alloy (type of brass) "orichalcum" and this appears to be such case.

Key ID points: oak-wreath (microphotography shows that at least one leaf has a complicated shape, although distinguishing oak from laurel is very difficult) – earlier versions have Augustus bareheaded, no PP on obverse as in later versions, no NE ligature, palm with short fronds with tip right (later versions have tip left and sometimes long fronds). Not typical: no clear laurel wreath together with the rostral crown, gold (?) plating (!), both features really baffling.

But still clearly a "middle" kind of the croc dupondius, known as "type III": RIC I 158, RPC I 524, Sear 1730. It is often conservatively dated to 10 BC - 10 AD, but these days it is usually narrowed to 9/8 - 3 BC.

It is a commemorative issue, honoring the victory over Mark Antony and conquest of Egypt in 30 BC. The heads of Augustus and Agrippa were probably positioned to remind familiar obverses of Roman republican coins with two-faced Janus. Palm branch was a common symbol of victory, in this case grown into a tree, like the victories of Augustus and Agrippa grown into the empire. The two offshoots at the bottom may mean two sons of Agrippa, Gaius and Lucius, who were supposed to be Augustus' heirs and were patrons of the colony. Palm may also be a symbol of the local Nemausian deity, which was probably worshiped in a sacred grove. When these coins were minted, the colony was mostly populated by the settled veterans of Augustus' campaigns, hence the reminiscence of the most famous victory, but some of the original Celtic culture probably survived and was assimilated by Romans. The crocodile is not only the symbol of Egypt, like in the famous Octavian's coins AEGYPTO CAPTA. It is also a representation of Mark Antony, powerful and scary both in water and on land, but a bit slow and stupid. The shape of the crocodile with tail up was specifically chosen to remind of the shape of ship on very common "legionary" denarius series, which Mark Antony minted to pay his armies just before Actium. It is probably also related to the popular contemporary caricature of Cleopatra, riding on and simultaneously copulating with a crocodile, holding a palm branch in her hand as if in triumph. There the crocodile also symbolized Mark Antony.

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was born c. 64-62 BC somewhere in rural Italy. His family was of humble and plebeian origins, but rich, of equestrian rank. Agrippa was about the same age as Octavian, and the two were educated together and became close friends. He probably first served in Caesar's Spanish campaign of 46–45 BC. Caesar regarded him highly enough to send him with Octavius in 45 BC to train in Illyria. When Octavian returned to Rome after Caesar's assassination, Agrippa became his close lieutenant, performing many tasks. He probably started his political career in 43 BC as a tribune of the people and then a member of the Senate. Then he was one of the leading Octavian's generals, finally becoming THE leading general and admiral in the civil wars of the subsequent years.

In 38 as a governor of Transalpine Gaul Agrippa undertook an expedition to Germania, thus becoming the first Roman general since Julius Caesar to cross the Rhine. During this foray he helped the Germanic tribe of Ubii (who previously allied themselves with Caesar in 55 BC) to resettle on the west bank of the Rhine. A shrine was dedicated there, possibly to Divus Caesar whom Ubii fondly remembered, and the village became known as Ara Ubiorum, "Altar of Ubians". This quickly would become an important Roman settlement. Agrippina the Younger, Agrippa's granddaughter, wife of Emperor Claudius and mother of Emperor Nero, would be born there in 15 AD. In 50 AD she would sponsor this village to be upgraded to a colonia, and it would be renamed Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium (colony of Claudius [at] the Altar of Agrippinians – Ubii renamed themselves as Agrippinians to honor the augusta!), abbreviated as CCAA, later to become the capital of new Roman province, Germania Inferior.

In 37 BC Octavian recalled Agrippa back to Rome and arranged for him to win the consular elections, he desperately needed help in naval warfare with Sextus Pompey, the youngest son of Pompey the Great, who styled himself as the last supporter of the republican cause, but in reality became a pirate king, an irony since his father was the one who virtually exterminated piracy in all the Roman waters. He forced humiliating armistice on the triumvirs in 39 BC and when Octavian renewed the hostilities a year later, defeated him in a decisive naval battle of Messina. New fleet had to be built and trained, and Agrippa was the man for the job. Agrippa's solution was creating a huge secret naval base he called Portus Iulius by connecting together lakes Avernus, Avernus and the natural inner and outer harbors behind Cape Misenum at the northern end of the Gulf of Naples. He also created a larger type of ship and developed a new naval weapon: harpax – a ballista-launched grapnel shot with mechanisms that allowed pulling enemy ships close for easy boarding. It replaced the previous boarding device that Romans used since the First Punic War, corvus – effective, but extremely cumbersome. A later defence against it were scythe blades on long poles for cutting ropes, but since this invention was developed in secret, the enemy had no chance to prepare anything like it. It all has proved extremely effective: in a series of naval engagements Agrippa annihilated the fleet of Sextus, forced him to abandon his bases and run away. For this Agrippa was awarded an unprecedented honour that no Roman before or after him received: a rostral crown, "corona rostrata", a wreath decorated in front by a prow and beak of a ship.

That's why Virgil (Aeneid VIII, 683-684), describing Agrippa at Actium, says: "…belli insigne superbum, tempora navali fulgent rostrata corona." "…the proud military decoration, gleams on his brow the naval rostral crown". Actium, the decisive battle between forces of Octavian and Mark Antony, may appear boring compared to the war with Sextus, but it probably turned out this way due to Agrippa's victories in preliminary naval engagements and taking over all the strategy from Octavian.

In between the wars Agrippa has shown an unusual talent in city planning, not only constructing many new public buildings etc., but also greatly improving Rome's sanitation by doing a complete overhaul of all the aqueducts and sewers. Typically, it was Augustus who later would boast that "he had found the city of brick but left it of marble", forgetting that, just like in his naval successes, it was Agrippa who did most of the work. Agrippa had building programs in other Roman cities as well, a magnificent temple (currently known as Maison Carrée) survives in Nîmes itself, which was probably built by Agrippa.

Later relationship between Augustus and Agrippa seemed colder for a while, Agrippa seemed to even go into "exile", but modern historians agree that it was just a ploy: Augustus wanted others to think that Agrippa was his "rival" while in truth he was keeping a significant army far away from Rome, ready to come to the rescue in case Augustus' political machinations fail. It is confirmed by the fact that later Agrippa was recalled and given authority almost equal to Augustus himself, not to mention that he married Augustus' only biological child. The last years of Agrippa's life were spent governing the eastern provinces, were he won respect even of the Jews. He also restored Crimea to Roman Empire. His last service was starting the conquest of the upper Danube, were later the province of Pannonia would be. He suddenly died of illness in 12 BC, aged ~51.

Agrippa had several children through his three marriages. Through some of his children, Agrippa would become ancestor to many subsequent members of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. He has numerous other legacies.
Yurii P
opium weights.jpg
'Opium weights'87 viewsSet of five hintha bird weights (a Brahmani Duck (Hamsa) emblem of the Mon kingdom with duck’s bill, crested comb, bulging eyes, side wings and upturned tail standing with 2 legs and rear post on a tapered hexagonal base with serrated edge). These are sometimes referred to as cock weights or opium weights. The bases are hexagonal - probably from Burma or surrounding The lighest one is 15g and they double up from there

Likely late 18th or early 19th century

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
septim_dancers.jpg
(0193) SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS (Corybantes rev.)23 views193 - 211 AD
AE 27 mm; 10.2 g
O: AY K L CEP - CEYHROS Laureate draped bust right
R: MESAMBR - IA[NWN] Two Corybantes performing Pyrrhic dance, holding shield above their helmeted heads and short swords.
Thrace, Mesembria; cf Karayotov Vol. II, Plate CXXXII 19 and 20
note: Karayotov only lists two example from the same pair of dies:
19) Coll. of Metodi Minchev, Burgas
20) Varna, AM, II 19652; Lazarenko 2003, p. 76 Fig 2. (Lazarenko is a reference in a Bulgarian language numismatic journal)
laney
cara_staff_snake_~0.jpg
(0198) CARACALLA39 views198 - 217 AD
AE 17mm 2.92g
O: LAUR HEAD R
R: SERPENT ENTWINED ON STAFF OF ASKLEPIOS
THRACE, HADRIANOPOLIS
VARBANOV (BULG.) 1825
laney
macrinus_deult_cerberc.jpg
(0217) MACRINUS43 views217 - 218 AD
AE 25 mm 10.84 g
O: IMP CM OPEL SEV MACRINVS PI Radiate bust right
R: COL FL PAC DEVLT Hades-Serapis seated left, Cerberus at feet on left
Thrace, Deultum
SNG (Bulg.) Ruse 1, Deultum, no. 120, pl. 9 (=Jurukova 46)
(Draganov cites just one die pair, apparently the same as this coin; provincials at Deultum start with Caracalla, so Macrinus is an early issue)
laney
egal_trop_RESIZED.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS -- NIKOPOLIS AD ISTRUM70 viewsAE 16X17 mm 2.25 g
218 - 222 AD
OBV: M AVR - ANTWNINOC
LAUR DR CUIR BUST R, SEEN FROM BEHIND
REV: NIKOPOLITWN PR - OC ICTRON
TROPAION, 2 SEATED CAPTIVES AT BASE, SURROUNDED BY NIKE FACING R AND EMP FACING L
NIKOPOLIS AD ISTRUM AMNG I/1 2028 H/J 8.26.47.6
RARE
1 commentslaney
tranq_deult_wolf_-_Copyb.jpg
(0241) TRANQUILLINA25 views(wife of Gordian III)
241-244 AD
AE 7.108g, 23.7mm max.
O: SAB TRANQVILLINA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane, elaborate hairstyle with hair in ridges, and in plait looped below her ear and then up the back of her head;
R: COL FL PA-C, DEVLT (starting above, ending in exergue), she-wolf standing right, head turned back left, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus
Thrace, Deultum (Debelt, Bulgaria) mint
Jurukova Deultum 414; SNG Deultum 1526 (O148/R67); Draganov Deultum 1527a (O148/R67);
Varbanov II 2957 (R4); Moushmov 3744; MPR II-4 2083um
(ex Forum)
laney
theodora.jpg
(0293) THEODORA23 views(2nd wife of Constantius I)
Posthumous, Struck 337- 340 AD
AE 13 mm 1.54 g
O: Mantled bust right
R: Pietas standing facing, head right, holding infant to breast; •TRP in exe.
Trier
RIC VIII 48
laney
SEVERUS_II_B.jpg
(0306) SEVERUS II27 views306 - 307 AD
struck 305/306 AD as Caesar
AE Quarter Follis
O: VL VAL SEVERVS NOB
LAUR HEAD R
R: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI
GENIUS STANDING L, MODIUS ON NEAD, NAKED EXCEPT FOR CHLAMYS, HOLDING PATERA AND CORNUCOPIAE
SIS IN EXE
SISCIA
RIC VI 170a (RARE)
(ex P.Bulgerin)
laney
constantine_ii_gloria_plg_res.jpg
(0317) CONSTANTINE II (as Caesar)48 views317 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 340 AD (as Augustus)
AE 15 mm 1.65 g
O: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers facing each on either side of a single standard; leaf PLG in exe.
Lyons mint; RIC 286; rare (R4)
laney
constantius_ii_ft_fpls_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II36 views324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
19 mm 2.71 g
O: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG diademed draped cuirassed bust right
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO soldier advancing left and spearing a fallen horseman; FPLG in exe.
RIC 184 (scarce to rare)
Lyons mint
2 commentslaney
magnentius_victo_res.jpg
(0350) MAGNENTIUS30 views350 - 353 AD
AE 24 mm max. 4.73 g
O: D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, draped & cuirassed bust right, A to left
R: VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE, two Victories holding shield inscribed VOT V MVLT X; S V between; RPLG in ex.
LUGDUNUM; RIC 1221. LRBC 217
laney
julian_ii_fel_lugdun_mslg.jpg
(0355) JULIAN II THE APOSTATE (as Caesar)27 viewsJulian II as Caesar
Caesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
struck 355 - 360 AD (Officina 2)
AE 17.5 mm; 2.33 g
Obv.: FL CL IVLIANVS NOB C / M , his bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust facing right
Rev.: FEL TEMP - REPARATIO helmeted soldier standing l., spearing fallen horseman; horseman, wearing pointed hat, leaning l. on horse, turned r. and raising hand, shield on ground r.; MSLG in exe.
Lugdunum (Lyon) mint
RIC VIII, 191, 200 (R) ; Bastien 248 (3 ex) ; nummus-bible-database.com: only 1 piece, also from officina 2. Rare
laney
coin222.JPG
003. Tiberius (14 AD - 37 AD)68 viewsTiberius.

Hard and secretive by nature and embittered by the neglect with which his step- father allowed him to be treated, he did not arouse personal enthusiasm, and until recently was described by historians as a bloody tyrant. It is only during the last sixty years that he has been more fairly judged, and at present the opinion begins to prevail that he was a genuine Roman, a ruler faithful to his duties, just, wise, and self-contained. The strong opposition which grew up against him was due to his taciturn and domineering disposition, and to the influence of the prefect of the guard, Ælius Sejanus, who alone possessed his confidence.

Lugdunum mint. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right, holding olive branch & long scepter RSC 16a. Ex Calgary
ecoli
3363LG.jpg
003a. Drusus136 viewsDrusus

Tiberius' son, Drusus Caesar, d. 23, called Drusus Junior, served in the provinces Pannonia ( 15) and in Illyricum ( 17? 20). In 22 he was made tribune. Meanwhile, Sejanus, Tiberius' minister, had become jealous of Drusus' power and tried to turn Tiberius against him. Drusus may have been poisoned by Sejanus or by his wife under Sejanus' influence.

As. Sear 2594, restitution issue by Titus. 10.0 g, 26x27 mm. Glossy dark green patina with slight roughness. OBV.: Drusus left, DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N. REV.: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG REST around SC.
1 commentsecoli73
7117LG.jpg
005a. Antonia76 viewsF/F Antonia Dupondis



Attribution: RIC 92
Date: 41-54 AD
Obverse: ANTONIA AVGVSTA, bust r.
Reverse: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P S C. Claudius standing left, holding simpulum
Size: 29.04 mm
Weight: 10.2 grams

Check
ecoli73
0081.jpg
0081 - Denarius Septimius Severus 201-10 AC35 viewsObv/SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head of Septimiusr.
Rev/INDULGENTIA AVGG, Dea Caelestis riding r. on a lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre; below, waters gushing from rock.

Ag, 18.3mm, 3.25g
Mint: Rome.
RIC IVa/266 [C] - BMCRE V/335
ex-A.L.Romero Martín
dafnis
Mamillius-Syd-741.jpg
009. C. Mamilius Limetanus.64 viewsDenarius, 82-81 BC, Rome mint.
Obverse: Bust of Mercury wearing winged hat; caduceus and the letter I behind.
Reverse: C MAMIL LIMETAN / Ulysses, dressed like a Greek sailor, being recognized by his dog Argus upon returning to Ithaca.
4.06 gm., 19 mm.
Syd. #741; RSC #Mamilia 6; Sear #282.

The Mamilia gens claimed descent from Mamilia, the daughter of Telgonius, reputed son of Ulysses. Mercury is an ancestor of Ulysses.

The story as told in Homer's "Odyssey" is somewhat different from that portrayed on this coin. When Ulysses returned to Ithaca after twenty years, he found his dog Argus lying on a dung heap and nearly dead. Argus had only enough strength to wag his tail in recognition of his master's voice before he died. Be that as it may, this is still an elegant portrayal of this touching scene, the likes of which are rarely found on Roman coinage.

2 commentsCallimachus
0092.jpg
0092 - Denarius Antoninus Pius 158-9 AC10 viewsObv/ ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS PIVS PP TR P XXII, laureate head of A.P. r.
Rev/ COS IIII, arched tetrastyle altar; statue inside, holding branch and standard.

Ag, 18.1 mm, 2.84 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC III/285
ex-G.Hirsch Nachfolger, auction 271, lot 2359
dafnis
AS Augusto RIC 379~0.jpg
01-14 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)91 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 mm 9.0 gr.
Legado Monetario C GALLIUS LUPERCUS

Anv: "[CAE]SAR AVGVSTVS TRI
BV[NIC POTEST]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·GAL[LIVS C F LVPERCVS III V]IR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 16 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #379 Pag.70 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1679 Pag.330 - BMCRE #174 (=BMCRR #4510) - Cohen Vol.1 #436 Pag.124 - DVM #99a Pag.71 - CBN #428
mdelvalle
RIC_379_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-14 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)27 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 mm 9.0 gr.
Legado Monetario C GALLIUS LUPERCUS

Anv: "[CAE]SAR AVGVSTVS TRI
BV[NIC POTEST]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·GAL[LIVS C F LVPERCVS III V]IR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 16 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #379 Pag.70 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1679 Pag.330 - BMCRE #174 (=BMCRR #4510) - Cohen Vol.1 #436 Pag.124 - DVM #99a Pag.71 - CBN #428
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 386.jpg
01-15 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)56 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 25 mm 8.4 gr.
Legado Monetario L SURDINUS

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[L] SVRDINVS [III VIR A A A F F]" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 15 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #386 Pag.70 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1683 Pag.331 - BMCRE #144 (=BMCRR #4631) - Cohen Vol.1 #473 Pag.131 - DVM #99 var Pag.71 - CBN #483
mdelvalle
RIC_386_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-15 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)27 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 25 mm 8.4 gr.
Legado Monetario L SURDINUS

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[L] SVRDINVS [III VIR A A A F F]" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 15 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #386 Pag.70 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1683 Pag.331 - BMCRE #144 (=BMCRR #4631) - Cohen Vol.1 #473 Pag.131 - DVM #99 var Pag.71 - CBN #483
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 379.jpg
01-17 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)59 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 x 29 mm 9.9 gr.
Legado Monetario C PLOTIUS RUFUS

Anv: "[CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·PLOT[IVS·RVFVS·III VIR A·A·]A·F·F·" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 15 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #389 Pag.71 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1680 Pag.330 - BMCRE #153 (=BMCRR #4639) - Cohen Vol.1 #504 Pag.137 - DVM #99d Pag.71 - CBN #503/12
mdelvalle
RIC_389_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-17 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)24 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 x 29 mm 9.9 gr.
Legado Monetario C PLOTIUS RUFUS

Anv: "[CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·PLOT[IVS·RVFVS·III VIR A·A·]A·F·F·" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 15 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #389 Pag.71 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1680 Pag.330 - BMCRE #153 (=BMCRR #4639) - Cohen Vol.1 #504 Pag.137 - DVM #99d Pag.71 - CBN #503/12
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 427.jpg
01-23 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)59 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 24 mm 8.3 gr.
Legado Monetario PLURIUS AGRIPPA

Anv: "[CA]ESAR AVGVS[T PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PLVRIVS AGRIPPA [III VIR A A A F F]" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #427 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1686 Pag.331 - BMCRE #209 - Cohen Vol.1 #445 Pag.126 - DVM #100a Pag.71 - CBN #623
mdelvalle
RIC_427_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-23 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)19 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 24 mm 8.3 gr.
Legado Monetario PLURIUS AGRIPPA

Anv: "[CA]ESAR AVGVS[T PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PLVRIVS AGRIPPA [III VIR A A A F F]" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #427 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1686 Pag.331 - BMCRE #209 - Cohen Vol.1 #445 Pag.126 - DVM #100a Pag.71 - CBN #623
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 431.jpg
01-24 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)74 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 28 mm 11.7 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVST[PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M SALVIVS OTH[O III VI]R A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #431 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 Pag.331 - BMCRE #226 (=BMCRR #4693) - Cohen Vol.1 #515 Pag.139 - DVM #100b Pag.71 - CBN #687
mdelvalle
RIC_431_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-24 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)22 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 28 mm 11.7 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVST[PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M SALVIVS OTH[O III VI]R A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #431 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 Pag.331 - BMCRE #226 (=BMCRR #4693) - Cohen Vol.1 #515 Pag.139 - DVM #100b Pag.71 - CBN #687
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 431_1.jpg
01-25 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)62 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 25 mm 7.3 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVST [PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M SALVIVS OTH[O III VI]R A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #431 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 Pag.331 - BMCRE #226 (=BMCRR #4693) - Cohen Vol.1 #515 Pag.139 - DVM #100b Pag.71 - CBN #687
mdelvalle
RIC_431_AS_Octavio_Augusto_1.jpg
01-25 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)22 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 25 mm 7.3 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVST [PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M SALVIVS OTH[O III VI]R A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #431 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 Pag.331 - BMCRE #226 (=BMCRR #4693) - Cohen Vol.1 #515 Pag.139 - DVM #100b Pag.71 - CBN #687
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 432.jpg
01-26 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)107 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 mm 9.6 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "[CAE]SAR AVGVST PONT [MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a izquierda.
Rev: "M SALVI[VS OT]HO III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #432 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 var Pag.331 - Cohen Vol.1 #516 Pag.139 - DVM #100b var Pag.71 - CBN #708
mdelvalle
RIC_432_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-26 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)25 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 mm 9.6 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "[CAE]SAR AVGVST PONT [MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a izquierda.
Rev: "M SALVI[VS OT]HO III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #432 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 var Pag.331 - Cohen Vol.1 #516 Pag.139 - DVM #100b var Pag.71 - CBN #708
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 439.jpg
01-28 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.) 65 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 23 mm 7.9 gr.
Legado Monetario SEX NONIUS QUINCTILIAN

Anv: "CAESAR AVG[VST PONT MAX TRI]BVNIC POT" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[SEX N]ONIVS QVINC[TIL]IAN III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 6 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #439 Pag.76 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1687 Pag.331 - BMCRE #237 (=BMCRR #4667) - Cohen Vol.1 #474 Pag.76 - CBN #725
mdelvalle
RIC_439_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-28 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.) 24 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 23 mm 7.9 gr.
Legado Monetario SEX NONIUS QUINCTILIAN

Anv: "CAESAR AVG[VST PONT MAX TRI]BVNIC POT" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[SEX N]ONIVS QVINC[TIL]IAN III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 6 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #439 Pag.76 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1687 Pag.331 - BMCRE #237 (=BMCRR #4667) - Cohen Vol.1 #474 Pag.76 - CBN #725
mdelvalle
RPC_I_1626_Augusto_AMFIPOLIS_MACEDONIA.jpg
01-70 - Amphipolis - Macedonia - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)18 viewsAE22 22 mm 6.9 gr.

Anv: " ΚΑΙΣΑΡ ΘΕΟΥ ΥΙΟΣ" (Leyenda anti-horaria)- Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "ΑΜΦΙΠΟΛEΙΤΩΝ." - Europa/Artemisa Taurópodo cabalgando a derecha sobre un toro.

Acuñada 31-30 A.C.
Ceca: Amfípolis - Macedonia

Referencias: RPC I #1626 - SNG Cop #92 - Sear GICTV #29 Pag.4 - SNG ANS #160-165 - BMC #73 - Moushmov #6035
mdelvalle
T1342LG.jpg
010. VESPASIAN88 viewsAR denarius (18mm, 3.51g). Rome mint. Struck under Titus, AD 80-81.
DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS. Laureate head right / Two capricorns support shield inscribed S C, globe below. RIC II-1 357 (Titus). RSC 497.


3 commentsecoli
augustus hisp as-.jpg
027 BC-14 AD - AUGUSTUS AE27 of Colonia Julia Traducta47 viewsobv: PERM.CAES.AVG (bare head of Augustus left)
rev: IVLIA.TRAD (in oak wreath)
ref: RPC99, C.151, S.0538, Burgos215
mint: Colonia Julia Traducta (Hispania)
10.77gms, 27mm

A rare coin from a colony of Hispania Baetica, Julia Traducta (today Algesiras)
berserker
GI 048a img.jpg
048 - Antoninus Pius AE18 - Ares - Philippopolis50 viewsObv:– AVT AI AΔPIA ANTΩNEIN, bare head right
Rev:– ΦIΛIΠΠOΠOΛEITΩN, Ares / Mars standing left, holding spear in left hand; shield leaning against him
Minted in Philippopolis
Obv. legend and bust type variant of Varbanov 786 (Bulgarian ed.) (which is AVT AI ADPI ANTWNEINOC, Head laureate r.)
maridvnvm
Septimius-Severus_AR-Den_SEVERVS-PIVS-AVG_INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G_INCARTH_RIC-IV-266_p-_BMCRE-335_C-222_Rome-203-04-AD_Q-001_17-19mm_3,79g-s~0.jpg
049 Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), RIC IV-I 266, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH, 119 views049 Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), RIC IV-I 266, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH,
avers:- SEVERVS-PIVS-AVG, Laurate bust right.
revers:- INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G, The Dea Caelestis, wearing elaborate headdress, looking right, riding right on lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, below, water gushing from rocks at left.
exe: -/-//INCARTH, diameter: 17-19mm, weight: 3,79g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 203-04 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-266, p-125, C-222, BMCRE-335,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Denarius M.ABURIUS M.F.GEMINUS.jpg
05-01 - M. ABURIUS M.F. GEMINUS (132 A.C.)108 viewsAR Denarius 19 mm 3.8 gr
Anv: Cabeza con yelmo de Roma viendo a derecha - "Monograma = XVI = Nueva marca de valor = 16 Ases" bajo la pera de Roma, "GEM" detrás.
Rev: "M ABVRI" (AB y VR en ligadura) - Sol con corona radiada y látigo cabalgando en cuadriga a derecha. "ROMA" en exergo.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #127 Pag.97 - Craw RRC #250/1 - Syd CRR #487 - BMCRR #995 - RSC Vol.1 Aburia 6 Pag.9
1 commentsmdelvalle
Craw_250_1_Denario_M_Aburius_M_F_Geminus.jpg
05-01 - M. ABURIUS M.F. GEMINUS (132 A.C.)21 viewsAR Denarius 19 mm 3.8 gr
Anv: Cabeza con yelmo de Roma viendo a derecha - "Monograma = XVI = Nueva marca de valor = 16 Ases" bajo la pera de Roma, "GEM" detrás.
Rev: "M ABVRI" (AB y VR en ligadura) - Sol con corona radiada y látigo cabalgando en cuadriga a derecha. "ROMA" en exergo.

Ceca: Roma

Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #127 Pag.97 - Craw RRC #250/1 - Syd CRR #487 - BMCRR #995 - RSC Vol.1 Aburia 6 Pag.9
mdelvalle
Caracalla_AR-Den_ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG_INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G_INCARTH_RIC-IV-I-130a-p231_C-96-97_Rome_201-206-AD_Q-001_axis-7h_18-18,5mm_2,91g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 130a, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH,108 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 130a, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH,
avers:- ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate draped head right.
revers:- INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G/INCARTH, Dea Caelestis riding lion right over flowing water, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
exe: -/-//INCARTH, diameter: 18-18,5mm, weight: 2,91g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 201-206 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-130a, p-231,
Q-001
quadrans
Caracalla_AR-Den_ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG_INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G_INCARTH_RIC-IV-I-130a-p231_C-96-97_Rome_201-206-AD_Q-002_6h_18,5-20mm_2,93g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 130a, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH, (but base metal, "limes" ?),144 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 130a, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH, (but base metal, "limes" ?),
avers:- ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate draped head right.
revers:- INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G/INCARTH, Dea Caelestis riding lion right over flowing water, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
exe: -/-//INCARTH, diameter: 18,5-20mm, weight: 2,931g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 201-206 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-130a, p-231, (but base metal, "limes" ?),
Q-001
quadrans
Caracalla_AR-Den_ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG_INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G_INCARTH_RIC-IV-I-130a-p231_C-96-97_Rome_201-206-AD_Q-002_6h_18,5-20mm_2,93g-s~0.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 130a, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH, (but base metal, "limes" ?),121 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 130a, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH, (but base metal, "limes" ?),
avers:- ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate draped head right.
revers:- INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G/INCARTH, Dea Caelestis riding lion right over flowing water, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
exe: -/-//INCARTH, diameter: 18,5-20mm, weight: 2,931g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 201-206 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-130a, p-231, (but base metal, "limes" ?),
Q-001
quadrans
051_Caracalla_RIC_IV-I_300_AR-Den,_ANTONINVS_PIVS_AVG_GERM,_INDVLGENTIAE_AVG,_RSC-103,_BMC-68,_Rome,_213_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_18-19,5mm,_3,03g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 300, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIAE AVG, Indulgentia seated left,120 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 300, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIAE AVG, Indulgentia seated left,
avers:- ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate head right.
revers:- INDVLGENTIAE AVG, Indulgentia seated left holding patera and scepter.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 18,0-19,5mm, weight: 3,03g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 213 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-300, p-, RSC-103, BMC-68,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
051_Caracalla_(198_-_217_A_D_)_AE-20_Lydia-_Thyateira_ANT_-NINOC_QVOTEIPHNWN_Q-001_6h_20mm_3,46ga-s.jpg
051p Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), Lydia, Thyateira, SNG KOP 28 612(1), AE-20, ΘVATEI-PHNΩN, Asclepius standing, 65 views051p Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), Lydia, Thyateira, SNG KOP 28 612(1), AE-20, ΘVATEI-PHNΩN, Asclepius standing,
avers:- ANTΩ-NEINOC, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- ΘVATEI-PHNΩN, Asclepius standing facing, head left, holding serpent-entwined staff.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 20mm, weight: 3,46g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lydia, Thyateira, date: 198-217 A.D., ref: SNG TUEBINGEN 3857(1) / COLL Y(1), SLG WEBER 6934(1), SNG KOP 28 612(1),
Q-001
quadrans
17675LG~0.jpg
0636a (156)18 viewsAtelier : ROME
Droit : GALLIENUS AVG
Revers : VIRTVS AVGUSTI
3,13 g ; 17/22 mm ; 7h
Ségusiaves
RI 064eg img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 01251 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– LEG XI CL / TR P COS, Legionary eagle between two standards, Capricorns on standards.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 193
Reference:– Cohen 268. RIC 12 (Scarce)

Capricorns were the symbols of the XIIII the legion though Capricorns have been noted on several other legions in error.

Legio XI Claudia Pia Fidelis dates back to the two legions (the other was the XIIth) recruited by Julius Caesar to invade Gallia in 58 BC, and it existed at least until early 5th century, guarding lower Danube in Durostorum (modern Silistra, Bulgaria).
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_064mj_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 01226 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– LEG XI CL / TR P COS, Legionary eagle between two standards, Capricorns on standards.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 193
Reference:– Cohen 268. RIC 12 (Scarce)

Capricorns were the symbols of the XIIII the legion though Capricorns have been noted on several other legions in error.

Legio XI Claudia Pia Fidelis dates back to the two legions (the other was the XIIth) recruited by Julius Caesar to invade Gallia in 58 BC, and it existed at least until early 5th century, guarding lower Danube in Durostorum (modern Silistra, Bulgaria).
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_064lg_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 07423 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIII, Laureate head right
Rev:– ADVENTI AVG FELICISSIMO, Septimius Severus on horseback right, raising right hand
Minted in Rome. A.D. 196-197
Reference:– BMCRE W151-6. RIC 74. RSC 6.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 064t img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 26642 viewsObv:– SEVERVS PIVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– INDVLGENTIA AVGG / IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage, with elaborate headdress, looking front, riding right on springing lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, water gushing from rocks at left below
Minted in Rome, A.D. 203
References:– RIC 266 (Common), RCV02 6285, RSC222
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_064lb_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 26620 viewsObv:- SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate bust right
Rev:- INDVLGENTIA AVGG / IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage, with elaborate headdress, looking front, riding right on springing lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, water gushing from rocks at left below
Minted in Rome, A.D. 203
Reference:– RIC 266. RSC 222.
maridvnvm
RI_064lj_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 26626 viewsObv:- SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate bust right
Rev:- INDVLGENTIA AVGG / IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage, with elaborate headdress, looking front, riding right on springing lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, water gushing from rocks at left below
Minted in Rome, A.D. 203
Reference:– RIC 266. RSC 222.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 066a img.jpg
066 - Caracalla denarius - RIC 130d66 viewsObv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate bust right, draped
Rev:– INDVLGENTIA AVGG, Dea Caelestis, holding thunderbolt and scepter, riding lion over waters gushing from rock on left. Exe: IN CARTH
Minted in Rome, A.D. 204-205
References:– VM 29, RIC 130D, RCV02 6806, RSC 97
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 066al img.jpg
066 - Caracalla denarius - RIC 21421 viewsObv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT, Laureate bust right
Rev:– INDVLG FECVNDAE, Julia Domna seated left, on curule chair, holding sceptre
Reference:– RIC 214. RSC 104
Small red staining on reverse.
maridvnvm
SalGenHvm.jpg
066 - Caracalla denarius - RIC 35081 viewsObv:– ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS, Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SAL GEN HVM, Salus standing left, extending right hand to raise up a woman kneeling to her right, holding a serpent entwined scepter in her left hand
Minted in Laodicea ad Mare. A.D. 200.
Reference:– RIC 350 (Scarce). BMCRE 701. RSC 558a.
Weight 3.65 g

Ex Barry Murphy Collection.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
GI_066n_img.jpg
066 - Caracalla, AE27, Markianopolis 18 viewsAE27
Obv:- AY K M AY ANTWNINOC AY K P CEP, GETAC in exergue, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Caracalla right confronting laureate and draped bust of Geta left;
Rev:- Y FL OYLPIANOY MAPKIANOPOLITWN, Concordia standing slightly left, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, E (mark of value) lower left;
Minted in Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria). Consular Legate Flavius Ulpianus, 210 - 211 A.D
Reference:– Varbanov (Engl.) 1083

27.33 mm. 11.74 gms. 0 degrees.
maridvnvm
068.jpg
067 MAGNENTIUS33 viewsEMPEROR: Magnentius
DENOMINATION: AE2
OBVERSE: D N MAGNEN-TIVS P F AVG, draped and cuirassed bust right, A to left
REVERSE: VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAES, Two Victories holding shield inscribed VOT V MVLT X; S V
EXERGUE: RPLG
DATE: 350 AD
MINT: Lugdunum
WEIGHT: 5.20 g
RIC VIII 123
Bastien 169
2 commentsBarnaba6
927_P_Hadrian_RPC675.jpg
0675 THRACE, Abdera. Hadrian Ae 17 young beardless bust21 viewsReference.
RPC III, 675; C-N 909-16 (dies unlisted); Varbanov 21 var Münzer/Strack, Thrakien, S. 119, 252

Obv. ΑΥΤΟ ΤΡΑ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΑΙСΑΡ
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Hadrian right

Rev. ΑΥ ΤΡΑ ΘΕ ΔΙ ΑΒΔΗΡΙΤΗ
Laureate, draped and cuirassed male head, r., seen from rear

4.40 gr
17 mm
6h

Note.
CNG Auction 406 lot 596
From the Belgica Collection. Ex Peus 403 (27 April 2011), lot 335
okidoki
069.jpg
068 DECENTIUS22 viewsEMPEROR: Decentius
DENOMINATION: AE3
OBVERSE: DN DECENTIVS NOB CAES, bare-headed, cuirassed bust right
REVERSE: VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAES, two Victories standing facing each other, holding between them a wreath inscribed VOT V MVLT X on a column. S-V across fields
EXERGUE: RSLG
DATE: 350-353 AD
MINT: Lugdunum
WEIGHT: 4.99 g
RIC VIII Lyons 124
Barnaba6
06f-Constantine-Lug-RIC-213b.jpg
06f. Constantine as Caesar: Lugdunum follis.33 viewsFollis, Spring 307, Lugdunum mint.
Obverse: FL VAL CONSTANTINVS N C / Laureate bust of Constantine.
Reverse: GENIO POP ROM / Genius standing, holding patera and cornucopia. Lighted altar at left. N in right field.
Mint mark: PLG
6.86 gm., 34.5 mm.
RIC #213b; PBCC #246; Sear #15525.
Callimachus
072_Gordianus-III__(238-244_A_D_),_RIC_202_AR-Ant_,_IMP_CAES_M_ANT_GORDIANVS_AVG,_VICTORIA_AVG,_RSC-,_Antioch,_241_AD,_Q-001,_10h,_21-22,5mm,_4,16g-s.jpg
072 Gordianus III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 005, (Look, Bulgarian, modern Fake!), AR-Antoninianus, Roma, VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking left, #174 views072 Gordianus III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 005, (Look, Bulgarian, modern Fake!), AR-Antoninianus, Roma, VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking left, #1
avers: IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed.
reverse: VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking left with wreath and palm branch.
exergue:-/-//--, diameter: 21,0-22,5mm, weight: 4,16g, axis: 10h,
mint: Roma, date: 238 A.D., 1st Issue, 6th officina,
ref: RIC IV-III 5, RSC 357, Sear-8664, (Look, Bulgarian, modern Fake!)
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
90Hadrian__RIC725.jpg
0725 Hadrian AS Roma 132-34 AD Indulgentia25 viewsReference.
RIC 725; C. 849; BMC S. 462; Strack 817

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Bare headed, draped and cuirassed bust right

Rev. INDVLGENTIA – AVG COS III P P in ex
Indulgentia seated l., extending r. hand and holding sceptre.

10.78 gr
27 mm
6h

Note.
Indulgentia. Clemency, lenity, grace, favour. -This word is used on Roman coins to denote either some permission given, some privilege bestowed, or some tribute remitted. -In inscriptions of a very early date, princes are called indulgentissimi.
(FORVM)
okidoki
Gordianus-III_AE-23-Dup_IMP-GORDIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG_COL-FL-PA-C-DEULT_Deultum-Thrace-_AD_Q-001_7h_22,5-23mm_6,19g-s~0.jpg
072p Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), Thrace, Deultum, Varbanov (engl.) 2551, AE-23, COL FL PA C DEULT, Artemis walking left,73 views072p Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), Thrace, Deultum, Varbanov (engl.) 2551, AE-23, COL FL PA C DEULT, Artemis walking left,
avers:- IMP-GORDIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG (AV ligate), Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian-III right.
revers:- COL-FL-PA-C-DEULT, Artemis walking left with bow and arrow; dog behind her.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 22,5-23mm, weight: 6,19g, axis:7h,
mint: Thrace, Deultum, date: A.D., ref:Varbanov-II.(engl.)-2551, p-221, (cites Jurukova 1981, 372), SNG Bulgaria, Deultum 963-964, which is Jurakova 318.
Q-001
quadrans
1242_P_Hadrian_RPC746_7.jpg
0746 THRACE. Philippopolis Hadrian, Herbus reclining, with city goddess standing27 viewsReference.
RPC III, 746.7; Mouchmov 12-14, Varbanov 636; BMC -. SNG Cop. -. Slg. Lindgren - ; SNG Tübingen - ; SNG Evelpidis - ; Mionnet -

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕΒΑСΤΟС
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r. with paludamentum seen from rear


Rev. ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΠΟΛΕΙΤΩΝ
Female figure wearing polos standing l., holding patera in r. hand and poppy and two ears of corn in l. hand; on l., river-god (Hebrus) reclining

25.44 gr
33 mm
6h

Note.
Gorny & Mosch Giessener Münzhandlung auction 224 lot 353 2014
4 commentsokidoki
07a-Constantine-Lug-273.jpg
07a. Constantine: Lugdunum follis.25 viewsFollis, Autumn 307 - Summer 308, Lugdunum mint.
Obverse: IMP C CONSTANTINVS P F AVG / Laureate bust of Constantine.
Reverse: PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS / Constantine standing, in military dress, holding standard in each hand.
Mint mark: PLG
7.44 gm., 26 mm.
RIC #273; PBCC #259; Sear #16027.
Callimachus
domit_as_caesar_vesta_lg.jpg
08 Domitian as Caesar RIC-108778 viewsAR Denarius, 3.54g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Vesta, std. l., with palladium and sceptre
RIC 1087 (C2). BMC 262. RSC 378. BNC 233.
Acquired from Amphora Coins, July 2008.

Vesta is supposed to be holding a palladium in her right hand, but on this example the legend covers up the palladium completely. It is barely visible (if at all) under the legend. Most examples of the type clearly show it in her out-stretched hand. A note for an aureus of the type in the BM (#261) notes - 'palladium hardly visible, sceptre nearly vertical'. There is no illustration of the specimen, so I'm guessing mine is similar.
vespasian70
Denarius A.C.PULCHER.jpg
08-01 - APPIUS CLAUDIUS PULCHER, T. MANLIUS MANCINUS y Q. URBINIUS (111 - 110 A.C.)58 viewsAR Denarius 17 mm 3.3 gr
Anv: Busto de Minerva o Palas (como Roma) con yelmo alado viendo a derecha, detrás un signo desconocido.
Rev: Victoria llevando con ambas manos las riendas de una triga que cabalga a derecha . Uno de los caballos mira hacia atrás.
Una de las dos ocasiones en que se acuña una triga ( Carruaje de guerra griego tirado por tres caballos) en las monedas romanas. "AP•CL•T•MANL•Q•VR" (MANL y VR en ligadura) en Exergo.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #176 Pag.106 - Craw RRC #299/1a - Syd CRR #570 - BMCRR #1290 - RSC Vol.1 Claudia 2 Pag.31
mdelvalle
Craw_299_1a_Appius_Claudius_-_Manlius_Mancinus_-_R__Urbinus.jpg
08-01 - APPIUS CLAUDIUS PULCHER, T. MANLIUS MANCINUS y Q. URBINIUS (111 - 110 A.C.)18 viewsAR Denarius 17 mm 3.3 gr
Anv: Busto de Minerva o Palas (como Roma) con yelmo alado viendo a derecha, detrás un signo desconocido.
Rev: Victoria llevando con ambas manos las riendas de una triga que cabalga a derecha . Uno de los caballos mira hacia atrás.
Una de las dos ocasiones en que se acuña una triga ( Carruaje de guerra griego tirado por tres caballos) en las monedas romanas. "AP•CL•T•MANL•Q•VR" (MANL y VR en ligadura) en Exergo.

Ceca: Roma

Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #176 Pag.106 - Craw RRC #299/1a - Syd CRR #570 - BMCRR #1290 - RSC Vol.1 Claudia 2 Pag.31
mdelvalle
Antíoco IV, Epiphanes.jpg
08-02 - Anti­oco IV, Epiphanes (175 - 164 A.C.)68 viewsAntíoco IV Epífanes (Αντίοχος Επιφανής en griego, 215 adC-163 adC) fue rey de Siria de la dinastía Seléucida desde c. 175 adC-164 adC.
Era hijo de Antíoco III Megas y hermano de Seleuco IV Filopator. Originalmente fue llamado Mitríades, pero adoptó el nombre de Antíoco tras su ascensión al trono (o quizás tras la muerte de su hermano mayor, también Antíoco).
Subió al trono tras la muerte de su hermano Seleuco IV Filopátor que gobernó durante poco tiempo antes que él, hasta que Heliodoro, tesorero suyo, lo mató por ambición. Había vivido en Roma según los términos de la paz de Apamea (188 adC), pero acababa de ser intercambiado por el hijo y legítimo heredero de Seleuco IV, el futuro (Demetrio I Sóter). Antíoco se aprovechó de la situación, y junto con su otro hermano Antíoco, se proclamó rey con el apoyo de Eumenes II de Pérgamo y el hermano de éste, Atalo I. Su hermano Antíoco sería asesinado pocos años después.
Por su enfrentamiento con Ptolomeo VI, que reclamaba Coele-Syria, atacó e invadió Egipto, conquistando casi todo el país, con la salvedad de la capital, Alejandría. Llegó a capturar al rey, pero para no alarmar a Roma, decicidió reponerlo en el trono, aunque como su marioneta. Sin embargo, los alejandrinos habían elegido al hermano de éste, Ptolomeo VII Euergetes como rey, y tras su marcha decidieron reinar conjuntamente. Esto le obligó a reinvadir el país, y así el 168 adC, repitiendo la invasión, con su flota conquistaba Chipre. Cerca de Alejandría se encontró con el cónsul romano Cayo Popilio Laenas, instó a abandonar Egipto y Chipre. Cuando Antíoco replicó que debía consultarlo con su consejo, Popilio trazó un círculo en la arena rodeándole y le dijo: "píensalo aquí". Viendo que abandonar el círculo sin haber ordenado la retirada era un desafío a Roma decidió ceder con el fin de evitar una guerra.
A su regreso, organizó una expedición contra Jerusalén, qué saqueo cruelmente. Según él Libro de los Macabeos, promulgó varias ordenanzas de tipo religioso: trató de suprimir el culto a Yahveh, prohibió el judaísmo suspendiendo toda clase de manifestación religiosa y trató de establecer el culto a los dioses griegos. Pero el sacerdote judío Matatías y sus dos hijos llamados Macabeos consiguieron levantar a la población en su contra y lo expulsaron. La fiesta judía de Jánuca conmemora este hecho.
Antíoco, en campaña contra el Imperio Parto, envió varios ejércitos sin éxito. Mientras organizaba una expedición punitiva para retomar Israel personalmente le sobrevino la muerte. Le sucedió su hijo Antíoco V Eupátor.
Su reinado fue la última época de fuerza y esplendor para el Imperio Seleúcida, que tras su muerte se vio envuelto en devastadoras guerras dinásticas. (Wikipedia)

AE (Canto aserrado) 15 mm 3.5 gr.

Anv: Busto velado de Laodicea IV (Esposa de Seleuco IV y Hermana de Antíoco IV) viendo a der. Grafila de puntos.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY" - Cabeza de elefante a izquierda, proa de galera a izquierda (El elefante simboliza las aspiraciones orientales de los reyes de Seleucia además de ser una de las grandes armas de su arsenal y la proa su importancia como ciudad puerto).

Ceca: Seleucia de Pieria (Costa N. de Siria - Puerto de Antioquía) o Akke Ptolomais

Referencias : B.M.C. Vol.4 (Seleucid Kings of Syria) #3 Pag.43 - SC#1477.2 - Houghton #113 - HGS #684-6 Pag.9 - SNG Spaer #1017-40 - SNG Cop #184 - Hoover #685
1 commentsmdelvalle
Vitellius_RIC_I_90.jpg
09 Vitellius RIC I 09093 viewsVitellius Jan. 2-Dec. 20, 69 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint 69 A.D. (3.07g, 19.9m, 6h). Obv: A VITELLIVS GERM I{MP AVG TR P}, laureate head right. Rev: CONCORDIA PR, Concordia seated left holding patera & double cornucopiae. RIC I 90, RSC 18.

Vitellius is described by Suetonius as lazy and self-indulgent, fond of eating and drinking, and an obese glutton, eating banquets four times a day and feasting on rare foods he would send the Roman navy to procure.
2 commentsLucas H
GI 092a img.jpg
092 - Phillip II, AE26, Mesembria, Nemesis27 viewsAE26
Obv:– MAP IOVΛIOΣ ΦIΛΛIΠOI KAICA/P, Confronted busts of Philip II and Serapis
Rev:– MECAMBPIANΩN, Nemesis standing left, holding rod and bridle; wheel at side
Minted in Thrace, Mesembria
Reference:– Varbanov II (Bulg.) no. 2689
maridvnvm
BasIISear1813.jpg
0976-1025 AD - Basil II (Bulgaroktonos) - Anonymous Follis, Class A213 viewsEmperor: Basil II (Bulgaroktonos) (r. 976-1025 AD)
Date: 976-1025 AD
Condition: Fair
Denomination: Anonymous Follis, Class A2

Obverse: -
Bust of Christ facing, bearded, with nimbus cross having in each arm, wearing tunic and himation; right hand raised in blessing in sling of cloak, left holds book with probable in jeweled border. In field, - .

Reverse: ///
above and beneath.

Sear 1813; probable DO A2.25
15.47g; 35.3mm; 30°
Pep
BasIIDOA2_24.jpg
0976-1025 AD - Basil II (Bulgaroktonos) - Anonymous Follis, Class A2.2420 viewsEmperor: Basil II (Bulgaroktonos) (r. 976-1025 AD)
Date: 976-1025 AD
Condition: aVF
Denomination: Anonymous Follis, Class A2

Obverse: -
Bust of Christ facing, bearded, with nimbus cross having in each arm, wearing tunic and himation; right hand raised in blessing in sling of cloak, left holds book with in jeweled border. In field, - .

Reverse: ///
above and beneath.

DO A2.24; Sear 1813
13.40g; 29.0mm; 180°
Pep
V1496lg.jpg
09e Domitian as Caesar-RIC 1496110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS IIII; Winged caduceus
RIC 1496 (R2). BMC 489. RSC 369. RPC 1469 (2 spec.). BNC 377.
Acquired from Britaly Coins, April 2016.

The small series struck under Vespasian this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman silver Coinage analysed the Ephesian and 'o' mint series and their data shows both issues are made from the same bullion. Not definitive proof the two series are from the same mint, but good evidence of a strong link. Unlike the Ephesian series, the 'o' issue is full of blundered legends and mules. This denarius struck for Domitian Caesar has a PON MAX reverse legend, an impossible title for the young prince. However, what the mint masters lacked in competency, the engravers made up for in their stylish portraits.

A wonderful portrait struck on a large flan. An obverse die match with my RIC V1494.
6 commentsDavid Atherton
IMG_3773.jpg
1 Constans27 viewsAE4
D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Rosette diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, Emperor standing left on galley, holding phoenix on Globe, piloted by Victory
PLG in ex

RIC Lyons 96
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_2339.JPG
10 Constans37 viewsConstans
AE2 Lyons
DN CONSTA-NS PF AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right/ FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, soldier standing left, spearing fallen horseman, wearing Phrygian helmet, kneeling. PLG star in ex.
Lyons 80, Scarce
Randygeki(h2)
013.JPG
10 Constantius II50 viewsConstantius II AE3. D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed monocled bust right / FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman who is wearing a Phrygian helmet, reaching backwards, GSLG in ex. Lyons 189 C5
Randygeki(h2)
1395921_590830317620550_326664335_n.jpg
10 Constantius II75 viewsConstantius II. AE2. Lyons. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right, A behind head / FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, soldier standing left, one knee drawn up, about to spear fallen horseman wearing a Phrygian helmet and is sitting on ground, arms raised. A in left field. Mintmark SLG star. RIC VIII Lyons 102.2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_4133.jpg
10 Constantius II59 viewsConstantius II AE3. D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed monocled bust right / FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman who is wearing a Phrygian helmet, reaching backwards, GPLG in ex. Lyons 189 C55 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_5147.jpg
10 Constantius II74 viewsConstantius II. AE2. Lyons. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademe, draped, cuirassed bust right, A behind head / FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, soldier standing left, one knee drawn up, about to spear fallen horseman wearing a Phrygian helmet and is sitting on ground, arms raised. A in left field. Mintmark SLG

RIC Lyons 100
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
SevAlex-RIC-002.jpg
10. Severus Alexander as Caesar.29 viewsDenarius, July 221 - Mar. 222 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: M AVR ALEXANDER CAES / Bust of Severus Alexander.
Reverse: INDVLGENTIA AVG / Spes walking, holding flower and raising skirt.
3.31 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #2; Sear #7793.
1 commentsCallimachus
1406Hadrian_RICIII1016.jpg
1016 Hadrian Denarius Roma 129-30 AD Indulgentia6 viewsReference.
RIC III, 1016; RIC II, 213 ; C 853; Strack 325

Bust A2+

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Bare head, draped bust, viewed from side

Rev. INDVLGENTI-A AVG P P / in Ex.COS III
Indulgentia seated left, extending right and holding transverse scepter

3.00 gr
17 mm
6h
okidoki
166Hadrian_RIC213.jpg
1019 Hadrian Denarius Roma 129-30 AD Indulgentia31 viewsReferentie.
RIC II, 213; Strack 325; RIC III, 1019

Bust A2+/L

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Bare head, draped bust, viewed from side

Rev. INDVLGENTIA AVG PP / in Ex COS III
Indulgentia seated left, extending right hand and holding transverse scepter

3.20 gr
18 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki
115Hadrian__RIC213c.jpg
1021 Hadrian Denarius Roma 129-30 AD Indulgentia 30 viewsReference.
RIC III, 1021; RIC II, 213 ; C 853; Strack 325

Bust C2+

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Bare head, draped bust, viewed from side

Rev. INDVLGENTI-A AVG P P / in Ex.COS III
Indulgentia seated left, extending right hand and holding transverse scepter


3.42 gr
19 mm
h
okidoki
60304LG.jpg
102a. Plotina136 viewsPlotina, wife of Trajan.

Under Trajan, his female relations played enormously important roles in the empire's public life, and received honors perhaps unparalleled. Trajan's wife, Pompeia Plotina, is reported to have said, when she entered the imperial palace in Rome for the first time, that she hoped she would leave it the same person she was when she entered. She received the title Augusta no later than 105. She survived Trajan, dying probably in 121, and was honored by Hadrian with a temple, which she shared with her husband, in the great forum which the latter had built.

Æ trial strike of denarius dies (23 mm, 7.42 g). Rome. [PL]OTINA AVG IMP TRAIANI, diademed and draped bust right, hair in queue down neck / CAES AVG GERMA [D]A[C] COS V[I P P], Vesta seated left, holding palladium in right hand, sceptre in left. Cf. RIC 730 (Trajan); cf. BMC 526 (Trajan); cf. RSC 3. VF, rough green patina. Very unusual and probably unique. Ex Spink 160 (9-10 October 2002), 852.
ecoli73
T1356LG.jpg
108a MANLIA SCANTILLA65 viewsAE sestertius. Rome mint.
MANL SCANTILLA AVG. Draped bust right / IVNO REGINA SC. Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; peacock at feet. RIC IV 18b (Didius Julianus). VERY RARE

Check
2 commentsecoli
395Hadrian_RIC212g.jpg
1093 Hadrian Denarius Roma 129-130 AD Indulgentia23 viewsReference.
Strack 342 var.; RIC III, 1093; RIC II, 212g;

Bust A2+/L

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Bare head with drapery

Rev. INDVLGENTIA AVG in ex. COS III P P
Indulgentia, draped, seated left on throne, holding out right hand and holding vertical sceptre in left

3.24 gr
18 mm
h

Vcoins B Murphy
okidoki
PhilippusRR.jpg
113/112 BC L. Marcius Philippus142 viewsL Marcius Philippus
ROMA monogram
Head of King Philip V of Macedon right, wearing helmet decorated with goat's horns, Φ below chin

L PHILIPPVS
Equestrian statue right on tablet with inscription. Horseman carrying laurel-branch flower at horses feet. (XVI monogram) below tablet.

Rome 113/112 BC

3.96g

Crawford 293/1. Sydenham 551. Marcia 12.

Ex Calgary-Coin

This is the first Roman coin to depict an historical person instead of a personification or deity. The money’s ancestor L. Marcius Q.f. Philippus negotiated a treaty between Rome and Philip V of Macedon.
5 commentsJay GT4
rjb_gallienus69_08_05.jpg
119914 viewsAntoninianus
Milan
Issue 5
INDVLG AVG
G 1199
mauseus
Denarius SILANUS.jpg
12-01 - D. JUNIUS L. F. SILANUS (91 A.C.)46 viewsAR Denarius 17 mm 3.6 gr
Anv: Cabeza con yelmo alado de Roma viendo a derecha - "A" letra de control detrás de la cabeza.
Rev: "D.SILANVS L.F." Victoria en biga cabalgando a derecha, sosteniendo las riendas con ambas manos. Número de control sobre los caballos. "ROMA" en Exergo.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #225 Pag.115 - Craw RRC #337/3 - Syd CRR #646 -BMCRR #1772-1839 - RSC Vol.1 Junia 15 Pag.54
mdelvalle
Craw_337_3_Denario_D__Junius_L_F__Silanus.jpg
12-01 - D. JUNIUS L. F. SILANUS (91 A.C.)14 viewsAR Denarius 17 mm 3.6 gr

Anv: Cabeza con yelmo alado de Roma viendo a derecha - "A" letra de control detrás de la cabeza.
Rev: "D.SILANVS L.F." Victoria en biga cabalgando a derecha, sosteniendo las riendas con ambas manos. Número de control sobre los caballos. "ROMA" en Exergo.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #225 Pag.115 - Craw RRC #337/3 - Syd CRR #646 -BMCRR #1772-1839 - RSC Vol.1 Junia 15 Pag.54
mdelvalle
Craw_337_3_Denario_D__Junius_L_F__Silanus_1.jpg
12-01 - D. JUNIUS L. F. SILANUS (91 A.C.)23 viewsAR Denarius 17x18 mm 3.6 gr

Anv: Cabeza con yelmo alado de Roma viendo a derecha - "A" letra de control detrás de la cabeza.
Rev: "D.SILANVS L.F." Victoria en biga cabalgando a derecha, sosteniendo las riendas con ambas manos. "II" Número de control sobre los caballos. "ROMA" en Exergo.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #225 Pag.115 - Craw RRC #337/3 - Syd CRR #646 -BMCRR #1772-1839 - RSC Vol.1 Junia 15 Pag.54
mdelvalle
12-Alex-Callatis-P946.jpg
12. Callatis: Tetradrachm in the name of Alexander the Great.35 viewsTetradrachm, ca 250 - 225 BC, Callatis mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΟΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. K at left, NAY under throne.
16.61 gm., 30 mm.
P. #943.

On the tag that came with this coin is the inscription "6 / Sept / 44 Bulgaria." The Soviet occupation of Bulgaria began on Sept. 9, 1944. It would be interesting to know the story behind that inscription as it applies to this coin...
Callimachus
122c.jpg
122c Urbs roma. AE follis 2.4gm20 viewsobv: VRBS ROMA helm an mantled bust of Roma l.
rev: she wolf std. l. head r. suckling twins Romulus and Remus, two stars above
ex: *PLG
"City commerative struck in honor of Rome, alluding to the founding with the emagery of the she-wolf and twins"
hill132
122e.jpg
122e Urbs Roma. AE follis 2.9gm22 viewsobv: VRBS ROMA helm and mantled bust of Roma l.
rev: she-wolf std. l. head r. suckling the twins Romulus and Remus
ex: PLG
"city commemorative"
hill132
Craw_340_1_Denario_L_Calpurnius_Piso_L_f__L_n__Frugi.jpg
13-01 - L. CALPURNIUS PISO L.f. L.n. FRUGI (90 A.C.)17 viewsAR Denarius 18 mm 2.8 gr

Anv: Cabeza de Apolo laureado viendo a derecha - "A" letra de control detrás de la cabeza.
Rev: "L.PISO FRVGI" Jinete cabalgando a der. y portando una hoja de palma. Número de control en Exergo.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #235 Pag.117 - Craw RRC #340/1 - Syd CRR #663-670 - BMCRR #1938-2129 - RSC Vol.1 Calpurnia 11 Pag.24
mdelvalle
DiocleAnt.jpg
1301a, Diocletian, 284-305 A.D. (Antioch)98 viewsDIOCLETIAN (284 – 305 AD) AE Antoninianus, 293-95 AD, RIC V 322, Cohen 34. 20.70 mm/3.1 gm, aVF, Antioch. Obverse: IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Radiate bust right, draped & cuirassed; Reverse: CONCORDIA MILITVM, Jupiter presents Victory on a globe to Diocletian, I/XXI. Early Diocletian with dusty earthen green patina.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Diocletian ( 284-305 A.D.)

Ralph W. Mathisen
University of South Carolina


Summary and Introduction
The Emperor Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (A.D. 284-305) put an end to the disastrous phase of Roman history known as the "Military Anarchy" or the "Imperial Crisis" (235-284). He established an obvious military despotism and was responsible for laying the groundwork for the second phase of the Roman Empire, which is known variously as the "Dominate," the "Tetrarchy," the "Later Roman Empire," or the "Byzantine Empire." His reforms ensured the continuity of the Roman Empire in the east for more than a thousand years.

Diocletian's Early Life and Reign
Diocletian was born ca. 236/237 on the Dalmatian coast, perhaps at Salona. He was of very humble birth, and was originally named Diocles. He would have received little education beyond an elementary literacy and he was apparently deeply imbued with religious piety He had a wife Prisca and a daughter Valeria, both of whom reputedly were Christians. During Diocletian's early life, the Roman empire was in the midst of turmoil. In the early years of the third century, emperors increasingly insecure on their thrones had granted inflationary pay raises to the soldiers. The only meaningful income the soldiers now received was in the form of gold donatives granted by newly acclaimed emperors. Beginning in 235, armies throughout the empire began to set up their generals as rival emperors. The resultant civil wars opened up the empire to invasion in both the north, by the Franks, Alamanni, and Goths, and the east, by the Sassanid Persians. Another reason for the unrest in the army was the great gap between the social background of the common soldiers and the officer corps.

Diocletian sought his fortune in the army. He showed himself to be a shrewd, able, and ambitious individual. He is first attested as "Duke of Moesia" (an area on the banks of the lower Danube River), with responsibility for border defense. He was a prudent and methodical officer, a seeker of victory rather than glory. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube proclaimed the praetorian prefect Carus as emperor. Diocletian found favor under the new emperor, and was promoted to Count of the Domestics, the commander of the cavalry arm of the imperial bodyguard. In 283 he was granted the honor of a consulate.

In 284, in the midst of a campaign against the Persians, Carus was killed, struck by a bolt of lightning which one writer noted might have been forged in a legionary armory. This left the empire in the hands of his two young sons, Numerian in the east and Carinus in the west. Soon thereafter, Numerian died under mysterious circumstances near Nicomedia, and Diocletian was acclaimed emperor in his place. At this time he changed his name from Diocles to Diocletian. In 285 Carinus was killed in a battle near Belgrade, and Diocletian gained control of the entire empire.

Diocletian's Administrative and Military Reforms
As emperor, Diocletian was faced with many problems. His most immediate concerns were to bring the mutinous and increasingly barbarized Roman armies back under control and to make the frontiers once again secure from invasion. His long-term goals were to restore effective government and economic prosperity to the empire. Diocletian concluded that stern measures were necessary if these problems were to be solved. He felt that it was the responsibility of the imperial government to take whatever steps were necessary, no matter how harsh or innovative, to bring the empire back under control.

Diocletian was able to bring the army back under control by making several changes. He subdivided the roughly fifty existing provinces into approximately one hundred. The provinces also were apportioned among twelve "dioceses," each under a "vicar," and later also among four "prefectures," each under a "praetorian prefect." As a result, the imperial bureaucracy became increasingly bloated. He institutionalized the policy of separating civil and military careers. He divided the army itself into so-called "border troops," actually an ineffective citizen militia, and "palace troops," the real field army, which often was led by the emperor in person.

Following the precedent of Aurelian (A.D.270-275), Diocletian transformed the emperorship into an out-and-out oriental monarchy. Access to him became restricted; he now was addressed not as First Citizen (Princeps) or the soldierly general (Imperator), but as Lord and Master (Dominus Noster) . Those in audience were required to prostrate themselves on the ground before him.

Diocletian also concluded that the empire was too large and complex to be ruled by only a single emperor. Therefore, in order to provide an imperial presence throughout the empire, he introduced the "Tetrarchy," or "Rule by Four." In 285, he named his lieutenant Maximianus "Caesar," and assigned him the western half of the empire. This practice began the process which would culminate with the de facto split of the empire in 395. Both Diocletian and Maximianus adopted divine attributes. Diocletian was identified with Jupiter and Maximianus with Hercules. In 286, Diocletian promoted Maximianus to the rank of Augustus, "Senior Emperor," and in 293 he appointed two new Caesars, Constantius (the father of Constantine I ), who was given Gaul and Britain in the west, and Galerius, who was assigned the Balkans in the east.

By instituting his Tetrarchy, Diocletian also hoped to solve another problem. In the Augustan Principate, there had been no constitutional method for choosing new emperors. According to Diocletian's plan, the successor of each Augustus would be the respective Caesar, who then would name a new Caesar. Initially, the Tetrarchy operated smoothly and effectively.

Once the army was under control, Diocletian could turn his attention to other problems. The borders were restored and strengthened. In the early years of his reign, Diocletian and his subordinates were able to defeat foreign enemies such as Alamanni, Sarmatians, Saracens, Franks, and Persians, and to put down rebellions in Britain and Egypt. The easter frontier was actually expanded.

.
Diocletian's Economic Reforms
Another problem was the economy, which was in an especially sorry state. The coinage had become so debased as to be virtually worthless. Diocletian's attempt to reissue good gold and silver coins failed because there simply was not enough gold and silver available to restore confidence in the currency. A "Maximum Price Edict" issued in 301, intended to curb inflation, served only to drive goods onto the black market. Diocletian finally accepted the ruin of the money economy and revised the tax system so that it was based on payments in kind . The soldiers too came to be paid in kind.

In order to assure the long term survival of the empire, Diocletian identified certain occupations which he felt would have to be performed. These were known as the "compulsory services." They included such occupations as soldiers, bakers, members of town councils, and tenant farmers. These functions became hereditary, and those engaging in them were inhibited from changing their careers. The repetitious nature of these laws, however, suggests that they were not widely obeyed. Diocletian also expanded the policy of third-century emperors of restricting the entry of senators into high-ranking governmental posts, especially military ones.

Diocletian attempted to use the state religion as a unifying element. Encouraged by the Caesar Galerius, Diocletian in 303 issued a series of four increasingly harsh decrees designed to compel Christians to take part in the imperial cult, the traditional means by which allegiance was pledged to the empire. This began the so-called "Great Persecution."

Diocletian's Resignation and Death
On 1 May 305, wearied by his twenty years in office, and determined to implement his method for the imperial succession, Diocletian abdicated. He compelled his co-regent Maximianus to do the same. Constantius and Galerius then became the new Augusti, and two new Caesars were selected, Maximinus (305-313) in the east and Severus (305- 307) in the west. Diocletian then retired to his palace at Split on the Croatian coast. In 308 he declined an offer to resume the purple, and the aged ex-emperor died at Split on 3 December 316.

Copyright (C) 1996, Ralph W. Mathisen, University of South Carolina
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

1 commentsCleisthenes
DicletianConcordCyz.jpg
1301b, Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 March 305 A.D.62 viewsDiocletian. RIC V Part II Cyzicus 256 var. Not listed with pellet in exegrue
Item ref: RI141f. VF. Minted in Cyzicus (B in centre field, XXI dot in exegrue)Obverse:- IMP CC VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Reverse:- CONCORDIA MILITVM, Diocletian standing right, holding parazonium, receiving Victory from Jupiter standing left with scepter.
A post reform radiate of Diocletian. Ex Maridvnvm.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Diocletian ( 284-305 A.D.)

Ralph W. Mathisen
University of South Carolina


Summary and Introduction
The Emperor Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (A.D. 284-305) put an end to the disastrous phase of Roman history known as the "Military Anarchy" or the "Imperial Crisis" (235-284). He established an obvious military despotism and was responsible for laying the groundwork for the second phase of the Roman Empire, which is known variously as the "Dominate," the "Tetrarchy," the "Later Roman Empire," or the "Byzantine Empire." His reforms ensured the continuity of the Roman Empire in the east for more than a thousand years.

Diocletian's Early Life and Reign
Diocletian was born ca. 236/237 on the Dalmatian coast, perhaps at Salona. He was of very humble birth, and was originally named Diocles. He would have received little education beyond an elementary literacy and he was apparently deeply imbued with religious piety He had a wife Prisca and a daughter Valeria, both of whom reputedly were Christians. During Diocletian's early life, the Roman empire was in the midst of turmoil. In the early years of the third century, emperors increasingly insecure on their thrones had granted inflationary pay raises to the soldiers. The only meaningful income the soldiers now received was in the form of gold donatives granted by newly acclaimed emperors. Beginning in 235, armies throughout the empire began to set up their generals as rival emperors. The resultant civil wars opened up the empire to invasion in both the north, by the Franks, Alamanni, and Goths, and the east, by the Sassanid Persians. Another reason for the unrest in the army was the great gap between the social background of the common soldiers and the officer corps.

Diocletian sought his fortune in the army. He showed himself to be a shrewd, able, and ambitious individual. He is first attested as "Duke of Moesia" (an area on the banks of the lower Danube River), with responsibility for border defense. He was a prudent and methodical officer, a seeker of victory rather than glory. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube proclaimed the praetorian prefect Carus as emperor. Diocletian found favor under the new emperor, and was promoted to Count of the Domestics, the commander of the cavalry arm of the imperial bodyguard. In 283 he was granted the honor of a consulate.

In 284, in the midst of a campaign against the Persians, Carus was killed, struck by a bolt of lightning which one writer noted might have been forged in a legionary armory. This left the empire in the hands of his two young sons, Numerian in the east and Carinus in the west. Soon thereafter, Numerian died under mysterious circumstances near Nicomedia, and Diocletian was acclaimed emperor in his place. At this time he changed his name from Diocles to Diocletian. In 285 Carinus was killed in a battle near Belgrade, and Diocletian gained control of the entire empire.

Diocletian's Administrative and Military Reforms
As emperor, Diocletian was faced with many problems. His most immediate concerns were to bring the mutinous and increasingly barbarized Roman armies back under control and to make the frontiers once again secure from invasion. His long-term goals were to restore effective government and economic prosperity to the empire. Diocletian concluded that stern measures were necessary if these problems were to be solved. He felt that it was the responsibility of the imperial government to take whatever steps were necessary, no matter how harsh or innovative, to bring the empire back under control.

Diocletian was able to bring the army back under control by making several changes. He subdivided the roughly fifty existing provinces into approximately one hundred. The provinces also were apportioned among twelve "dioceses," each under a "vicar," and later also among four "prefectures," each under a "praetorian prefect." As a result, the imperial bureaucracy became increasingly bloated. He institutionalized the policy of separating civil and military careers. He divided the army itself into so-called "border troops," actually an ineffective citizen militia, and "palace troops," the real field army, which often was led by the emperor in person.

Following the precedent of Aurelian (A.D.270-275), Diocletian transformed the emperorship into an out-and-out oriental monarchy. Access to him became restricted; he now was addressed not as First Citizen (Princeps) or the soldierly general (Imperator), but as Lord and Master (Dominus Noster) . Those in audience were required to prostrate themselves on the ground before him.

Diocletian also concluded that the empire was too large and complex to be ruled by only a single emperor. Therefore, in order to provide an imperial presence throughout the empire, he introduced the "Tetrarchy," or "Rule by Four." In 285, he named his lieutenant Maximianus "Caesar," and assigned him the western half of the empire. This practice began the process which would culminate with the de facto split of the empire in 395. Both Diocletian and Maximianus adopted divine attributes. Diocletian was identified with Jupiter and Maximianus with Hercules. In 286, Diocletian promoted Maximianus to the rank of Augustus, "Senior Emperor," and in 293 he appointed two new Caesars, Constantius (the father of Constantine I ), who was given Gaul and Britain in the west, and Galerius, who was assigned the Balkans in the east.

By instituting his Tetrarchy, Diocletian also hoped to solve another problem. In the Augustan Principate, there had been no constitutional method for choosing new emperors. According to Diocletian's plan, the successor of each Augustus would be the respective Caesar, who then would name a new Caesar. Initially, the Tetrarchy operated smoothly and effectively.

Once the army was under control, Diocletian could turn his attention to other problems. The borders were restored and strengthened. In the early years of his reign, Diocletian and his subordinates were able to defeat foreign enemies such as Alamanni, Sarmatians, Saracens, Franks, and Persians, and to put down rebellions in Britain and Egypt. The easter frontier was actually expanded.

.
Diocletian's Economic Reforms
Another problem was the economy, which was in an especially sorry state. The coinage had become so debased as to be virtually worthless. Diocletian's attempt to reissue good gold and silver coins failed because there simply was not enough gold and silver available to restore confidence in the currency. A "Maximum Price Edict" issued in 301, intended to curb inflation, served only to drive goods onto the black market. Diocletian finally accepted the ruin of the money economy and revised the tax system so that it was based on payments in kind . The soldiers too came to be paid in kind.

In order to assure the long term survival of the empire, Diocletian identified certain occupations which he felt would have to be performed. These were known as the "compulsory services." They included such occupations as soldiers, bakers, members of town councils, and tenant farmers. These functions became hereditary, and those engaging in them were inhibited from changing their careers. The repetitious nature of these laws, however, suggests that they were not widely obeyed. Diocletian also expanded the policy of third-century emperors of restricting the entry of senators into high-ranking governmental posts, especially military ones.

Diocletian attempted to use the state religion as a unifying element. Encouraged by the Caesar Galerius, Diocletian in 303 issued a series of four increasingly harsh decrees designed to compel Christians to take part in the imperial cult, the traditional means by which allegiance was pledged to the empire. This began the so-called "Great Persecution."

Diocletian's Resignation and Death
On 1 May 305, wearied by his twenty years in office, and determined to implement his method for the imperial succession, Diocletian abdicated. He compelled his co-regent Maximianus to do the same. Constantius and Galerius then became the new Augusti, and two new Caesars were selected, Maximinus (305-313) in the east and Severus (305- 307) in the west. Diocletian then retired to his palace at Split on the Croatian coast. In 308 he declined an offer to resume the purple, and the aged ex-emperor died at Split on 3 December 316.

Copyright (C) 1996, Ralph W. Mathisen, University of South Carolina
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


Cleisthenes
Lcnius1.jpg
1308b, Licinius I, 308 - 324 A.D. (Siscia)62 viewsLicinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D. Bronze follis, RIC 4, F, Siscia, 3.257g, 21.6mm, 0o, 313 - 315 A.D. Obverse: IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; Reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and scepter, eagle with wreath in beak left, E right, SIS in exergue.



De Imperatoribus Romanis : An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Licinius (308-324 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Licinius' Heritage

Valerius Licinianus Licinius, more commonly known as Licinius, may have been born ca. 265. Of peasant origin, his family was from Dacia. A close friend and comrade of arms of the Emperor Galerius, he accompanied him on his Persian expedition in 297. When campaigns by Severus and Galerius in late 306 or early 307 and in the summer of 307, respectively, failed to dislodge Maxentius who, with the luke warm support of his father Maximianus Herculius, was acclaimed princeps on 28 October 306, he was sent by the eastern emperor to Maxentius as an ambassador; the diplomatic mission, however, failed because the usurper refused to submit to the authority of his father-in-law Galerius. At the Conference of Carnuntum which was held in October or November of 308, Licinius was made an Augustus on 11 November 308; his realm included Thrace, Illyricum, and Pannonia.

Licinius' Early Reign

Although Licinius was initially appointed by Galerius to replace Severus to end the revolt of Maxentius , Licinius (perhaps wisely) made no effort to move against the usurper. In fact, his first attested victory was against the Sarmatians probably in the late spring, but no later than the end of June in 310. When the Emperor Galerius died in 311, Licinius met Maximinus Daia at the Bosporus during the early summer of that year; they concluded a treaty and divided Galerius' realm between them. It was little more than a year later that the Emperor Constantine defeated Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge on 28 October 312. After the defeat of the usurper, Constantine and Licinius met at Mediolanum (Milan) where Licinius married the former's sister Constantia; one child was born of this union: Valerius Licinianus Licinius. Licinius had another son, born of a slave woman, whose name is unknown. It appears that both emperors promulgated the so-called Edict of Milan, in which Constantine and Licinius granted Christians the freedom to practice their faith without any interference from the state.

As soon as he seems to have learned about the marital alliance between Licinius and Constantine and the death of Maxentius, who had been his ally, Daia traversed Asia Minor and, in April 313, he crossed the Bosporus and went to Byzantium, which he took from Licinius after an eleven day siege. On 30 April 313 the armies of both emperors clashed on the Campus Ergenus; in the ensuing battle Daia's forces were routed. A last ditch stand by Daia at the Cilician Gates failed; the eastern emperor subsequently died in the area of Tarsus probably in July or August 313. As soon as he arrived in Nicomedeia, Licinius promulgated the Edict of Milan. As soon as he had matters in Nicomedeia straightened out, Licinius campaigned against the Persians in the remaining part of 313 and the opening months of 314.

The First Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine

Once Licinius had defeated Maximinus Daia, the sole rulers of the Roman world were he and Constantine. It is obvious that the marriage of Licinius to Constantia was simply a union of convenience. In any case, there is evidence in the sources that both emperors were looking for an excuse to attack the other. The affair involving Bassianus (the husband of Constantius I's daughter Anastasia ), mentioned in the text of Anonymus Valesianus (5.14ff), may have sparked the falling out between the two emperors. In any case, Constantine' s forces joined battle with those of Licinius at Cibalae in Pannonia on 8 October 314. When the battle was over, Constantine prevailed; his victory, however, was Pyrrhic. Both emperors had been involved in exhausting military campaigns in the previous year and the months leading up to Cibalae and each of their realms had expanded so fast that their manpower reserves must have been stretched to the limit. Both men retreated to their own territory to lick their wounds. It may well be that the two emperors made an agreement, which has left no direct trace in the historical record, which would effectively restore the status quo.

Both emperors were variously engaged in different activities between 315 and 316. In addition to campaigning against the Germans while residing in Augusta Treverorum (Trier) in 315, Constantine dealt with aspects of the Donatist controversy; he also traveled to Rome where he celebrated his Decennalia. Licinius, possibly residing at Sirmium, was probably waging war against the Goths. Although not much else is known about Licinius' activities during this period, it is probable that he spent much of his time preparing for his impending war against Constantine; the latter,who spent the spring and summer of 316 in Augusta Treverorum, was probably doing much the same thing. In any case, by December 316, the western emperor was in Sardica with his army. Sometime between 1 December and 28 February 317, both emperors' armies joined battle on the Campus Ardiensis; as was the case in the previous engagement, Constantine' s forces were victorious. On 1 March 317, both sides agreed to a cessation of hostilities; possibly because of the intervention of his wife Constantia, Licinius was able to keep his throne, although he had to agree to the execution of his colleague Valens, who the eastern emperor had appointed as his colleague before the battle, as well as to cede some of his territory to his brother-in-law.

Licinius and the Christians

Although the historical record is not completely clear, Licinius seems to have campaigned against the Sarmatians in 318. He also appears to have been in Byzantium in the summer of 318 and later in June 323. Beyond these few facts, not much else is known about his residences until mid summer of 324. Although he and Constantine had issued the Edict of Milan in early 313, Licinius turned on the Christians in his realm seemingly in 320. The first law that Licinius issued prevented bishops from communicating with each other and from holding synods to discuss matters of interest to them. The second law prohibited men and women from attending services together and young girls from receiving instruction from their bishop or schools. When this law was issued, he also gave orders that Christians could hold services only outside of city walls. Additionally, he deprived officers in the army of their commissions if they did not sacrifice to the gods. Licinius may have been trying to incite Constantine to attack him. In any case, the growing tension between the two rulers is reflected in the consular Fasti of the period.

The Second Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine and Licinius' Death

War actually broke out in 321 when Constantine pursued some Sarmatians, who had been ravaging some territory in his realm, across the Danube. When he checked a similar invasion of the Goths, who were devastating Thrace, Licinius complained that Constantine had broken the treaty between them. Having assembled a fleet and army at Thessalonica, Constantine advanced toward Adrianople. Licinius engaged the forces of his brother-in-law near the banks of the Hebrus River on 3 July 324 where he was routed; with as many men as he could gather, he headed for his fleet which was in the Hellespont. Those of his soldiers who were not killed or put to flight, surrendered to the enemy. Licinius fled to Byzantium, where he was besieged by Constantine. Licinius' fleet, under the command of the admiral Abantus, was overcome by bad weather and by Constantine' s fleet which was under the command of his son Crispus. Hard pressed in Byzantium, Licinius abandoned the city to his rival and fled to Chalcedon in Bithynia. Leaving Martinianus, his former magister officiorum and now his co-ruler, to impede Constantine' s progress, Licinius regrouped his forces and engaged his enemy at Chrysopolis where he was again routed on 18 September 324. He fled to Nicomedeia which Constantine began to besiege. On the next day Licinius abdicated and was sent to Thessalonica, where he was kept under house arrest. Both Licinius and his associate were put to death by Constantine. Martinianus may have been put to death before the end of 324, whereas Licinius was not put to death until the spring of 325. Rumors circulated that Licinius had been put to death because he attempted another rebellion against Constantine.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
Licin1AEFolJupiAlex.jpg
1308c, Licinius I, 308-324 A.D. (Alexandria)71 viewsLicinius I, 308-324 A.D. AE Follis, 3.60g, VF, 315 A.D., Alexandria. Obverse: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG - Laureate head right; Reverse: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI AVGG - Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on a globe and scepter; exergue: ALE / (wreath) over "B" over "N." Ref: RIC VII, 10 (B = r2) Rare, page 705 - Hunterian Museum, Glasgow, Scotland.


De Imperatoribus Romanis : An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Licinius (308-324 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Licinius' Heritage

Valerius Licinianus Licinius, more commonly known as Licinius, may have been born ca. 265. Of peasant origin, his family was from Dacia. A close friend and comrade of arms of the Emperor Galerius, he accompanied him on his Persian expedition in 297. When campaigns by Severus and Galerius in late 306 or early 307 and in the summer of 307, respectively, failed to dislodge Maxentius who, with the luke warm support of his father Maximianus Herculius, was acclaimed princeps on 28 October 306, he was sent by the eastern emperor to Maxentius as an ambassador; the diplomatic mission, however, failed because the usurper refused to submit to the authority of his father-in-law Galerius. At the Conference of Carnuntum which was held in October or November of 308, Licinius was made an Augustus on 11 November 308; his realm included Thrace, Illyricum, and Pannonia.

Licinius' Early Reign

Although Licinius was initially appointed by Galerius to replace Severus to end the revolt of Maxentius , Licinius (perhaps wisely) made no effort to move against the usurper. In fact, his first attested victory was against the Sarmatians probably in the late spring, but no later than the end of June in 310. When the Emperor Galerius died in 311, Licinius met Maximinus Daia at the Bosporus during the early summer of that year; they concluded a treaty and divided Galerius' realm between them. It was little more than a year later that the Emperor Constantine defeated Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge on 28 October 312. After the defeat of the usurper, Constantine and Licinius met at Mediolanum (Milan) where Licinius married the former's sister Constantia; one child was born of this union: Valerius Licinianus Licinius. Licinius had another son, born of a slave woman, whose name is unknown. It appears that both emperors promulgated the so-called Edict of Milan, in which Constantine and Licinius granted Christians the freedom to practice their faith without any interference from the state.

As soon as he seems to have learned about the marital alliance between Licinius and Constantine and the death of Maxentius, who had been his ally, Daia traversed Asia Minor and, in April 313, he crossed the Bosporus and went to Byzantium, which he took from Licinius after an eleven day siege. On 30 April 313 the armies of both emperors clashed on the Campus Ergenus; in the ensuing battle Daia's forces were routed. A last ditch stand by Daia at the Cilician Gates failed; the eastern emperor subsequently died in the area of Tarsus probably in July or August 313. As soon as he arrived in Nicomedeia, Licinius promulgated the Edict of Milan. As soon as he had matters in Nicomedeia straightened out, Licinius campaigned against the Persians in the remaining part of 313 and the opening months of 314.

The First Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine

Once Licinius had defeated Maximinus Daia, the sole rulers of the Roman world were he and Constantine. It is obvious that the marriage of Licinius to Constantia was simply a union of convenience. In any case, there is evidence in the sources that both emperors were looking for an excuse to attack the other. The affair involving Bassianus (the husband of Constantius I's daughter Anastasia ), mentioned in the text of Anonymus Valesianus (5.14ff), may have sparked the falling out between the two emperors. In any case, Constantine' s forces joined battle with those of Licinius at Cibalae in Pannonia on 8 October 314. When the battle was over, Constantine prevailed; his victory, however, was Pyrrhic. Both emperors had been involved in exhausting military campaigns in the previous year and the months leading up to Cibalae and each of their realms had expanded so fast that their manpower reserves must have been stretched to the limit. Both men retreated to their own territory to lick their wounds. It may well be that the two emperors made an agreement, which has left no direct trace in the historical record, which would effectively restore the status quo.

Both emperors were variously engaged in different activities between 315 and 316. In addition to campaigning against the Germans while residing in Augusta Treverorum (Trier) in 315, Constantine dealt with aspects of the Donatist controversy; he also traveled to Rome where he celebrated his Decennalia. Licinius, possibly residing at Sirmium, was probably waging war against the Goths. Although not much else is known about Licinius' activities during this period, it is probable that he spent much of his time preparing for his impending war against Constantine; the latter,who spent the spring and summer of 316 in Augusta Treverorum, was probably doing much the same thing. In any case, by December 316, the western emperor was in Sardica with his army. Sometime between 1 December and 28 February 317, both emperors' armies joined battle on the Campus Ardiensis; as was the case in the previous engagement, Constantine' s forces were victorious. On 1 March 317, both sides agreed to a cessation of hostilities; possibly because of the intervention of his wife Constantia, Licinius was able to keep his throne, although he had to agree to the execution of his colleague Valens, who the eastern emperor had appointed as his colleague before the battle, as well as to cede some of his territory to his brother-in-law.

Licinius and the Christians

Although the historical record is not completely clear, Licinius seems to have campaigned against the Sarmatians in 318. He also appears to have been in Byzantium in the summer of 318 and later in June 323. Beyond these few facts, not much else is known about his residences until mid summer of 324. Although he and Constantine had issued the Edict of Milan in early 313, Licinius turned on the Christians in his realm seemingly in 320. The first law that Licinius issued prevented bishops from communicating with each other and from holding synods to discuss matters of interest to them. The second law prohibited men and women from attending services together and young girls from receiving instruction from their bishop or schools. When this law was issued, he also gave orders that Christians could hold services only outside of city walls. Additionally, he deprived officers in the army of their commissions if they did not sacrifice to the gods. Licinius may have been trying to incite Constantine to attack him. In any case, the growing tension between the two rulers is reflected in the consular Fasti of the period.

The Second Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine and Licinius' Death

War actually broke out in 321 when Constantine pursued some Sarmatians, who had been ravaging some territory in his realm, across the Danube. When he checked a similar invasion of the Goths, who were devastating Thrace, Licinius complained that Constantine had broken the treaty between them. Having assembled a fleet and army at Thessalonica, Constantine advanced toward Adrianople. Licinius engaged the forces of his brother-in-law near the banks of the Hebrus River on 3 July 324 where he was routed; with as many men as he could gather, he headed for his fleet which was in the Hellespont. Those of his soldiers who were not killed or put to flight, surrendered to the enemy. Licinius fled to Byzantium, where he was besieged by Constantine. Licinius' fleet, under the command of the admiral Abantus, was overcome by bad weather and by Constantine' s fleet which was under the command of his son Crispus. Hard pressed in Byzantium, Licinius abandoned the city to his rival and fled to Chalcedon in Bithynia. Leaving Martinianus, his former magister officiorum and now his co-ruler, to impede Constantine' s progress, Licinius regrouped his forces and engaged his enemy at Chrysopolis where he was again routed on 18 September 324. He fled to Nicomedeia which Constantine began to besiege. On the next day Licinius abdicated and was sent to Thessalonica, where he was kept under house arrest. Both Licinius and his associate were put to death by Constantine. Martinianus may have been put to death before the end of 324, whereas Licinius was not put to death until the spring of 325. Rumors circulated that Licinius had been put to death because he attempted another rebellion against Constantine.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
RI 132lg img.jpg
132 - Probus - RIC 612 - Bust Type C (Siscia) (XXIP)57 viewsObv:– IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, Radiate draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– P M TRI P COS II P P, Lion walking right, holding thunderbolt in mouth, before him, head of ox
Minted in Siscia (XXIP) Emission 5, Officina 1. A.D. 278
Reference:– Cohen unlisted. Not listed in Alfoldi with this bust type. cf. Type 43, nº1 (cuirassed). RIC 612 Bust type C
maridvnvm
134a.jpg
134a Decentius. AE Centenionalis25 viewsobv: DN DECENTIVS NOB CAES bare headed and cuir. bust r.
rev: VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE two victories holding wreath inscribed VOT/V/MVLT/X on column
ex: RSLG
1 commentshill132
134b.jpg
134b Decentius. AE Centenionalis17 viewsobv: DN DECENTIVS NOB CAES bare headed and cuir. bust r.
rev: VICTORIAE DD NN ET CAE two victories holding wreath inscribed VOT/V/MVLT/X
ex: SP//RSLG
hill132
Constantinus-I__AE-Follis_CONSTANTINVS-PF-AVG_SOLI-INVI-CTO-COMITI_F-T_PLG_RIC-VI-16-p-123_Lugdunum_1st_-off__309-10-AD_R_Q-001_6h_21,5-24,5mm_3,81g-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Lugdunum, RIC VII 016, AE-2 Follis, F/T//PLG, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol radiate, head left, Rare!80 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Lugdunum, RIC VII 016, AE-2 Follis, F/T//PLG, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol radiate, head left, Rare!
avers:- CONSTANTINVS P F AVG 1a, C, Laurate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- SOLI INVIC TO COMITI, Sol radiate, head left, rising right hand, chlamys over left shoulder, and hanging behind, across the right shoulder, holding up globe left hand.
exerg: F/T//PLG, diameter: 21,5-24,5mm, weight: 3.81g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lugdunum, 1st.-off., date: 309-310-A.D., ref:RIC VII 016, p-123, Rare!
Q-001
quadrans
antpius dup-indulgentia.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AE dupondius - struck 153-154 AD74 viewsobv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TRP XVII (radiate head right)
rev: INDVLGENTIA AVG COS IIII / S.C. (Indulgentia seated left, extending right hand & holding scepter)
ref: RIC III 919, C.455 (2frcs)
13.51gms, 25mm, brass
berserker
antpius-RIC70.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AR denarius - struck 140-143 AD27 viewsobv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III (bare head right)
rev: GENIVS POP ROMANI (Genius standing front, head right, with scepter & cornucopiae)
ref: RIC III 70, RSC 405 (6frcs), BMC 207
3.15gms, 18mm

The Roman genius, representing man's natural optimism, always endeavoured to guide him to happiness; that man was intended to enjoy life is shown by the fact that the Roman spoke of indulging or cheating his genius of his due according as he enjoyed himself or failed to do so, when he had the opportunity. The genius publicus Populi Romani - probably distinct from the genius Urbis Romae, to whom an old shield on the Capitol was dedicated, stood in the forum near the temple of Concord, in the form of a bearded man, crowned with a diadem, and carrying a cornucopiae and sceptre. In imperial times the genius of Augustus and of the reigning emperor, as part of the sacra of the imperial family, were publicly worshipped. The reverse probably commemorate this (the scepter as Genius attributum is unusual).
berserker
antpius RIC111.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AR denarius - struck 143-144 AD38 viewsobv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III (laureate head right)
rev: IMPERATOR II (Victory standing front, head left, holding wreath and palm)
ref: RIC III 111, RSC 437, BMC 496
3.40gms, 18mm,

History: Quintus Lollius Urbicus was made governor of Roman Britain in 138. He evidently campaigned against several British tribes: the northern Brigantes, the Votadini, the Selgovae, the Damnonii and the Novantae. Lollius probably also oversaw the initial construction of the Antonine Wall and refurbished many forts. The reverse commemorates Antoninus' second imperatorial acclamation which he accepted in 143 AD for Q. Lollius Urbicus' victory over the Brigantes in Britannia.
berserker
Henry_IV_AR_Hardi.JPG
1399 - 1413, Henry IV, AR Hardi d'Argent, Struck 1399 -1453 at Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France12 viewsObverse: ERIC R ANGLIE ✤ Crowned and robed half-length figure of Henry facing under Gothic canopy, holding sword in right hand, left hand raised with finger pointing in benedictory or admonitory position. Mullet over crown, rosette either side of crown. Rosette in legend.
Reverse: FRA-CIE ✤ DNS AQI ✤ Long cross collarino, pattée at the ends, extending through legend. Fleur de lis with roundel underneath in second and third quarters; lion passant, guardant in first and fourth quarters, roundel over lion in fourth quarter. Rosettes in legend.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 1.13gms | Axis 10
SPINK: 8147 | Elias: 233h
Ex. Bazas Hoard | Ex. Jean Elsen (Belgium) | Scarce

The last series of these Anglo-Gallic coins was likely struck under more than one Henry and they have not currently been differentiated by ruler because the legends and types are generic. However, over time, Anglo-Gallic issues suffered from regular debasement and a deterioration in workmanship, the size, weight and quality of the strike of this coin would therefore all seem to point to it being an early example.

The Bazas Hoard
This hoard was discovered in May 2004 by a builder at Bazas in south West France when he was renovating his house. Bazas was a regional centre in the middle ages. The hoard consisted of a mixture of medieval coins which had been minted in Spain, Portugal, Italy, England, the Netherlands and various French duchies. Of the 1010 coins found, 157 were gold, 300 were silver and the remainder were billon. The oldest coin was a King Jean II franc from 1360 and the rarest coin was a gold castellano from the time of Henry IV of Castile, of which only one other example is known to exist.

Henry IV
In 1399, Henry, Duke of Lancaster, overthrew his cousin, Richard II and took the throne as Henry IV, ruling until his death in 1413. Henry's first major problem as monarch was what to do with the deposed Richard. After an early assassination plot against Henry was foiled in January 1400, Richard died in prison, allegedly of starvation. Though Henry was suspected of having had Richard murdered, it was also claimed that he took his own life.
Henry, also known as Henry Bolingbroke, was a grandson of Edward III and when he took the throne he asserted his grandfather's claim to the Kingdom of France. He founded the Lancaster branch of the House of Plantagenet and he was the first King of England since the Norman Conquest whose mother tongue was English rather than French.
Early in his reign, Henry hosted the visit of Manuel II Palaiologos, the only Byzantine emperor ever to visit England, and he gave monetary support to Manuel II to aid him against the Ottoman Empire.
Despite the example set by most of his recent predecessors, after their deaths, Henry and his second wife, Joan of Navarre, Queen of England, were buried not at Westminster Abbey but at Canterbury Cathedral, on the north side of Trinity Chapel and directly adjacent to the shrine of St Thomas Becket.
2 comments*Alex
Julian2VotXConstantinople.jpg
1409a, Julian II "the Philosopher," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.143 viewsJulian II, A.D. 360-363; RIC 167; VF; 2.7g, 20mm; Constantinople mint; Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted & cuirassed bust right, holding spear & shield; Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath; CONSPB in exergue; Attractive green patina. Ex Nemesis.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Julian the Apostate (360-363 A.D.)

Walter E. Roberts, Emory University
Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University

Introduction

The emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus reigned from 360 to 26 June 363, when he was killed fighting against the Persians. Despite his short rule, his emperorship was pivotal in the development of the history of the later Roman empire. This essay is not meant to be a comprehensive look at the various issues central to the reign of Julian and the history of the later empire. Rather, this short work is meant to be a brief history and introduction for the general reader. Julian was the last direct descendent of the Constantinian line to ascend to the purple, and it is one of history's great ironies that he was the last non-Christian emperor. As such, he has been vilified by most Christian sources, beginning with John Chrysostom and Gregory Nazianzus in the later fourth century. This tradition was picked up by the fifth century Eusebian continuators Sozomen, Socrates Scholasticus, and Theodoret and passed on to scholars down through the 20th century. Most contemporary sources, however, paint a much more balanced picture of Julian and his reign. The adoption of Christianity by emperors and society, while still a vital concern, was but one of several issues that concerned Julian.

It is fortunate that extensive writings from Julian himself exist, which help interpret his reign in the light of contemporary evidence. Still extant are some letters, several panegyrics, and a few satires. Other contemporary sources include the soldier Ammianus Marcellinus' history, correspondence between Julian and Libanius of Antioch, several panegyrics, laws from the Theodosian Code, inscriptions, and coinage. These sources show Julian's emphasis on restoration. He saw himself as the restorer of the traditional values of Roman society. Of course much of this was rhetoric, meant to defend Julian against charges that he was a usurper. At the same time this theme of restoration was central to all emperors of the fourth century. Julian thought that he was the one emperor who could regain what was viewed as the lost glory of the Roman empire. To achieve this goal he courted select groups of social elites to get across his message of restoration. This was the way that emperors functioned in the fourth century. By choosing whom to include in the sharing of power, they sought to shape society.

Early Life

Julian was born at Constantinople in 331. His father was Julius Constantius, half-brother of the emperor Constantine through Constantius Chlorus, and his mother was Basilina, Julius' second wife. Julian had two half-brothers via Julius' first marriage. One of these was Gallus, who played a major role in Julian's life. Julian appeared destined for a bright future via his father's connection to the Constantinian house. After many years of tense relations with his three half-brothers, Constantine seemed to have welcomed them into the fold of the imperial family. From 333 to 335, Constantine conferred a series of honors upon his three half-siblings, including appointing Julius Constantius as one of the consuls for 335. Julian's mother was equally distinguished. Ammianus related that she was from a noble family. This is supported by Libanius, who claimed that she was the daughter of Julius Julianus, a Praetorian Prefect under Licinius, who was such a model of administrative virtue that he was pardoned and honored by Constantine.

Despite the fact that his mother died shortly after giving birth to him, Julian experienced an idyllic early childhood. This ended when Constantius II conducted a purge of many of his relatives shortly after Constantine's death in 337, particularly targeting the families of Constantine's half-brothers. ulian and Gallus were spared, probably due to their young age. Julian was put under the care of Mardonius, a Scythian eunuch who had tutored his mother, in 339, and was raised in the Greek philosophical tradition, and probably lived in Nicomedia. Ammianus also supplied the fact that while in Nicomedia, Julian was cared for by the local bishop Eusebius, of whom the future emperor was a distant relation. Julian was educated by some of the most famous names in grammar and rhetoric in the Greek world at that time, including Nicocles and Hecebolius. In 344 Constantius II sent Julian and Gallus to Macellum in Cappadocia, where they remained for six years. In 351, Gallus was made Caesar by Constantius II and Julian was allowed to return to Nicomedia, where he studied under Aedesius, Eusebius, and Chrysanthius, all famed philosophers, and was exposed to the Neo-Platonism that would become such a prominent part of his life. But Julian was most proud of the time he spent studying under Maximus of Ephesus, a noted Neo-Platonic philospher and theurgist. It was Maximus who completed Julian's full-scale conversion to Neo-Platonism. Later, when he was Caesar, Julian told of how he put letters from this philosopher under his pillows so that he would continue to absorb wisdom while he slept, and while campaigning on the Rhine, he sent his speeches to Maximus for approval before letting others hear them. When Gallus was executed in 354 for treason by Constantius II, Julian was summoned to Italy and essentially kept under house arrest at Comum, near Milan, for seven months before Constantius' wife Eusebia convinced the emperor that Julian posed no threat. This allowed Julian to return to Greece and continue his life as a scholar where he studied under the Neo-Platonist Priscus. Julian's life of scholarly pursuit, however, ended abruptly when he was summoned to the imperial court and made Caesar by Constantius II on 6 November 355.

Julian as Caesar

Constantius II realized an essential truth of the empire that had been evident since the time of the Tetrarchy--the empire was too big to be ruled effectively by one man. Julian was pressed into service as Caesar, or subordinate emperor, because an imperial presence was needed in the west, in particular in the Gallic provinces. Julian, due to the emperor's earlier purges, was the only viable candidate of the imperial family left who could act as Caesar. Constantius enjoined Julian with the task of restoring order along the Rhine frontier. A few days after he was made Caesar, Julian was married to Constantius' sister Helena in order to cement the alliance between the two men. On 1 December 355, Julian journeyed north, and in Augusta Taurinorum he learned that Alamannic raiders had destroyed Colonia Agrippina. He then proceeded to Vienne where he spent the winter. At Vienne, he learned that Augustudunum was also under siege, but was being held by a veteran garrison. He made this his first priority, and arrived there on 24 June 356. When he had assured himself that the city was in no immediate danger, he journeyed to Augusta Treverorum via Autessioduram, and from there to Durocortorum where he rendezvoused with his army. Julian had the army stage a series of punitive strikes around the Dieuse region, and then he moved them towards the Argentoratum/Mongontiacum region when word of barbarian incursions reached him.

From there, Julian moved on to Colonia Agrippina, and negotiated a peace with the local barbarian leaders who had assaulted the city. He then wintered at Senonae. He spent the early part of the campaigning season of 357 fighting off besiegers at Senonae, and then conducting operations around Lugdunum and Tres Tabernae. Later that summer, he encountered his watershed moment as a military general. Ammianus went into great detail about Julian's victory over seven rogue Alamannic chieftains near Argentoratum, and Julian himself bragged about it in his later writing. After this battle, the soldiers acclaimed Julian Augustus, but he rejected this title. After mounting a series of follow-up raids into Alamannic territory, he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia, and on the way defeated some Frankish raiders in the Mosa region. Julian considered this campaign one of the major events of his time as Caesar.

Julian began his 358 military campaigns early, hoping to catch the barbarians by surprise. His first target was the Franks in the northern Rhine region. He then proceeded to restore some forts in the Mosa region, but his soldiers threatened to mutiny because they were on short rations and had not been paid their donative since Julian had become Caesar. After he soothed his soldiers, Julian spent the rest of the summer negotiating a peace with various Alamannic leaders in the mid and lower Rhine areas, and retired to winter quarters at Lutetia. In 359, he prepared once again to carry out a series of punitive expeditions against the Alamanni in the Rhine region who were still hostile to the Roman presence. In preparation, the Caesar repopulated seven previously destroyed cities and set them up as supply bases and staging areas. This was done with the help of the people with whom Julian had negotiated a peace the year before. Julian then had a detachment of lightly armed soldiers cross the Rhine near Mogontiacum and conduct a guerilla strike against several chieftains. As a result of these campaigns, Julian was able to negotiate a peace with all but a handful of the Alamannic leaders, and he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia.

Of course, Julian did more than act as a general during his time as Caesar. According to Ammianus, Julian was an able administrator who took steps to correct the injustices of Constantius' appointees. Ammianus related the story of how Julian prevented Florentius, the Praetorian Prefect of Gaul, from raising taxes, and also how Julian actually took over as governor for the province of Belgica Secunda. Hilary, bishop of Poitiers, supported Ammianus' basic assessment of Julian in this regard when he reported that Julian was an able representative of the emperor to the Gallic provincials. There is also epigraphic evidence to support Julian's popularity amongst the provincial elites. An inscription found near Beneventum in Apulia reads:
"To Flavius Claudius Julianus, most noble and sanctified Caesar, from the caring Tocius Maximus, vir clarissimus, for the care of the res publica from Beneventum".

Tocius Maximus, as a vir clarissimus, was at the highest point in the social spectrum and was a leader in his local community. This inscription shows that Julian was successful in establishing a positive image amongst provincial elites while he was Caesar.

Julian Augustus

In early 360, Constantius, driven by jealousy of Julian's success, stripped Julian of many troops and officers, ostensibly because the emperor needed them for his upcoming campaign against the Persians. One of the legions ordered east, the Petulantes, did not want to leave Gaul because the majority of the soldiers in the unit were from this region. As a result they mutinied and hailed Julian as Augustus at Lutetia. Julian refused this acclamation as he had done at Argentoratum earlier, but the soldiers would have none of his denial. They raised him on a shield and adorned him with a neck chain, which had formerly been the possession of the standard-bearer of the Petulantes and symbolized a royal diadem. Julian appeared reluctantly to acquiesce to their wishes, and promised a generous donative. The exact date of his acclamation is unknown, but most scholars put it in February or March. Julian himself supported Ammianus' picture of a jealous Constantius. In his Letter to the Athenians, a document constructed to answer charges that he was a usurper, Julian stated that from the start he, as Caesar, had been meant as a figurehead to the soldiers and provincials. The real power he claimed lay with the generals and officials already present in Gaul. In fact, according to Julian, the generals were charged with watching him as much as the enemy. His account of the actual acclamation closely followed what Ammianus told us, but he stressed even more his reluctance to take power. Julian claimed that he did so only after praying to Zeus for guidance.

Fearing the reaction of Constantius, Julian sent a letter to his fellow emperor justifying the events at Lutetia and trying to arrange a peaceful solution. This letter berated Constantius for forcing the troops in Gaul into an untenable situation. Ammianus stated that Julian's letter blamed Constantius' decision to transfer Gallic legions east as the reason for the soldiers' rebellion. Julian once again asserted that he was an unwilling participant who was only following the desire of the soldiers. In both of these basic accounts Ammianus and Julian are playing upon the theme of restoration. Implicit in their version of Julian's acclamation is the argument that Constantius was unfit to rule. The soldiers were the vehicle of the gods' will. The Letter to the Athenians is full of references to the fact that Julian was assuming the mantle of Augustus at the instigation of the gods. Ammianus summed up this position nicely when he related the story of how, when Julian was agonizing over whether to accept the soldiers' acclamation, he had a dream in which he was visited by the Genius (guardian spirit) of the Roman state. The Genius told Julian that it had often tried to bestow high honors upon Julian but had been rebuffed. Now, the Genius went on to say, was Julian's final chance to take the power that was rightfully his. If the Caesar refused this chance, the Genius would depart forever, and both Julian and the state would rue Julian's rejection. Julian himself wrote a letter to his friend Maximus of Ephesus in November of 361 detailing his thoughts on his proclamation. In this letter, Julian stated that the soldiers proclaimed him Augustus against his will. Julian, however, defended his accession, saying that the gods willed it and that he had treated his enemies with clemency and justice. He went on to say that he led the troops in propitiating the traditional deities, because the gods commanded him to return to the traditional rites, and would reward him if he fulfilled this duty.

During 360 an uneasy peace simmered between the two emperors. Julian spent the 360 campaigning season continuing his efforts to restore order along the Rhine, while Constantius continued operations against the Persians. Julian wintered in Vienne, and celebrated his Quinquennalia. It was at this time that his wife Helena died, and he sent her remains to Rome for a proper burial at his family villa on the Via Nomentana where the body of her sister was entombed. The uneasy peace held through the summer of 361, but Julian concentrated his military operations around harassing the Alamannic chieftain Vadomarius and his allies, who had concluded a peace treaty with Constantius some years earlier. By the end of the summer, Julian decided to put an end to the waiting and gathered his army to march east against Constantius. The empire teetered on the brink of another civil war. Constantius had spent the summer negotiating with the Persians and making preparations for possible military action against his cousin. When he was assured that the Persians would not attack, he summoned his army and sallied forth to meet Julian. As the armies drew inexorably closer to one another, the empire was saved from another bloody civil war when Constantius died unexpectedly of natural causes on 3 November near the town of Mopsucrenae in Cilicia, naming Julian -- the sources say-- as his legitimate successor.

Julian was in Dacia when he learned of his cousin's death. He made his way through Thrace and came to Constantinople on 11 December 361 where Julian honored the emperor with the funeral rites appropriate for a man of his station. Julian immediately set about putting his supporters in positions of power and trimming the imperial bureaucracy, which had become extremely overstaffed during Constantius' reign. Cooks and barbers had increased during the late emperor's reign and Julian expelled them from his court. Ammianus gave a mixed assessment of how the new emperor handled the followers of Constantius. Traditionally, emperors were supposed to show clemency to the supporters of a defeated enemy. Julian, however, gave some men over to death to appease the army. Ammianus used the case of Ursulus, Constantius' comes sacrum largitionum, to illustrate his point. Ursulus had actually tried to acquire money for the Gallic troops when Julian had first been appointed Caesar, but he had also made a disparaging remark about the ineffectiveness of the army after the battle of Amida. The soldiers remembered this, and when Julian became sole Augustus, they demanded Ursulus' head. Julian obliged, much to the disapproval of Ammianus. This seems to be a case of Julian courting the favor of the military leadership, and is indicative of a pattern in which Julian courted the goodwill of various societal elites to legitimize his position as emperor.

Another case in point is the officials who made up the imperial bureaucracy. Many of them were subjected to trial and punishment. To achieve this goal, during the last weeks of December 361 Julian assembled a military tribunal at Chalcedon, empanelling six judges to try the cases. The president of the tribunal was Salutius, just promoted to the rank of Praetorian Prefect; the five other members were Mamertinus, the orator, and four general officers: Jovinus, Agilo, Nevitta, and Arbetio. Relative to the proceedings of the tribunal, Ammianus noted that the judges, " . . . oversaw the cases more vehemently than was right or fair, with the exception of a few . . .." Ammianus' account of Julian's attempt at reform of the imperial bureaucracy is supported by legal evidence from the Theodosian Code. A series of laws sent to Mamertinus, Julian's appointee as Praetorian Prefect in Italy, Illyricum, and Africa, illustrate this point nicely. On 6 June 362, Mamertinus received a law that prohibited provincial governors from bypassing the Vicars when giving their reports to the Prefect. Traditionally, Vicars were given civil authority over a group of provinces, and were in theory meant to serve as a middle step between governors and Prefects. This law suggests that the Vicars were being left out, at least in Illyricum. Julian issued another edict to Mamertinus on 22 February 362 to stop abuse of the public post by governors. According to this law, only Mamertinus could issue post warrants, but the Vicars were given twelve blank warrants to be used as they saw fit, and each governor was given two. Continuing the trend of bureaucratic reform, Julian also imposed penalties on governors who purposefully delayed appeals in court cases they had heard. The emperor also established a new official to weigh solidi used in official government transactions to combat coin clipping.

For Julian, reigning in the abuses of imperial bureaucrats was one step in restoring the prestige of the office of emperor. Because he could not affect all elements of society personally, Julian, like other Neo-Flavian emperors, decided to concentrate on select groups of societal elites as intercessors between himself and the general populace. One of these groups was the imperial bureaucracy. Julian made it very clear that imperial officials were intercessors in a very real sense in a letter to Alypius, Vicar of Britain. In this letter, sent from Gaul sometime before 361, the emperor praises Alypius for his use of "mildness and moderation with courage and force" in his rule of the provincials. Such virtues were characteristic of the emperors, and it was good that Alypius is representing Julian in this way. Julian courted the army because it put him in power. Another group he sought to include in his rule was the traditional Senatorial aristocracy. One of his first appointments as consul was Claudius Mamertinus, a Gallic Senator and rhetorician. Mamertinus' speech in praise of Julian delivered at Constantinople in January of 362 is preserved. In this speech, Claudius presented his consular selection as inaugurating a new golden age and Julian as the restorer of the empire founded by Augustus. The image Mamertinus gave of his own consulate inaugurating a new golden age is not merely formulaic. The comparison of Julian to Augustus has very real, if implicit, relevance to Claudius' situation. Claudius emphasized the imperial period as the true age of renewal. Augustus ushered in a new era with his formation of a partnership between the emperor and the Senate based upon a series of honors and offices bestowed upon the Senate in return for their role as intercessor between emperor and populace. It was this system that Julian was restoring, and the consulate was one concrete example of this bond. To be chosen as a consul by the emperor, who himself had been divinely mandated, was a divine honor. In addition to being named consul, Mamertinus went on to hold several offices under Julian, including the Prefecture of Italy, Illyricum, and Africa. Similarly, inscriptional evidence illustrates a link between municipal elites and Julian during his time as Caesar, something which continued after he became emperor. One concrete example comes from the municipal senate of Aceruntia in Apulia, which established a monument on which Julian is styled as "Repairer of the World."

Julian seems to have given up actual Christian belief before his acclamation as emperor and was a practitioner of more traditional Greco-Roman religious beliefs, in particular, a follower of certain late antique Platonist philosophers who were especially adept at theurgy as was noted earlier. In fact Julian himself spoke of his conversion to Neo-Platonism in a letter to the Alexandrians written in 363. He stated that he had abandoned Christianity when he was twenty years old and been an adherent of the traditional Greco-Roman deities for the twelve years prior to writing this letter.

(For the complete text of this article see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/julian.htm)

Julian’s Persian Campaign

The exact goals Julian had for his ill-fated Persian campaign were never clear. The Sassanid Persians, and before them the Parthians, had been a traditional enemy from the time of the Late Republic, and indeed Constantius had been conducting a war against them before Julian's accession forced the former to forge an uneasy peace. Julian, however, had no concrete reason to reopen hostilities in the east. Socrates Scholasticus attributed Julian's motives to imitation of Alexander the Great, but perhaps the real reason lay in his need to gather the support of the army. Despite his acclamation by the Gallic legions, relations between Julian and the top military officers was uneasy at best. A war against the Persians would have brought prestige and power both to Julian and the army.

Julian set out on his fateful campaign on 5 March 363. Using his trademark strategy of striking quickly and where least expected, he moved his army through Heirapolis and from there speedily across the Euphrates and into the province of Mesopotamia, where he stopped at the town of Batnae. His plan was to eventually return through Armenia and winter in Tarsus. Once in Mesopotamia, Julian was faced with the decision of whether to travel south through the province of Babylonia or cross the Tigris into Assyria, and he eventually decided to move south through Babylonia and turn west into Assyria at a later date. By 27 March, he had the bulk of his army across the Euphrates, and had also arranged a flotilla to guard his supply line along the mighty river. He then left his generals Procopius and Sebastianus to help Arsacius, the king of Armenia and a Roman client, to guard the northern Tigris line. It was also during this time that he received the surrender of many prominent local leaders who had nominally supported the Persians. These men supplied Julian with money and troops for further military action against their former masters. Julian decided to turn south into Babylonia and proceeded along the Euphrates, coming to the fortress of Cercusium at the junction of the Abora and Euphrates Rivers around the first of April, and from there he took his army west to a region called Zaitha near the abandoned town of Dura where they visited the tomb of the emperor Gordian which was in the area. On April 7 he set out from there into the heart of Babylonia and towards Assyria.

Ammianus then stated that Julian and his army crossed into Assyria, which on the face of things appears very confusing. Julian still seems to be operating within the province of Babylonia between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. The confusion is alleviated when one realizes that,for Ammianus, the region of Assyria encompassed the provinces of Babylonia and Assyria. On their march, Julian's forces took the fortress of Anatha, received the surrender and support of several more local princes, and ravaged the countryside of Assyria between the rivers. As the army continued south, they came across the fortresses Thilutha and Achaiachala, but these places were too well defended and Julian decided to leave them alone. Further south were the cities Diacira and Ozogardana, which the Roman forces sacked and burned. Soon, Julian came to Pirisabora and a brief siege ensued, but the city fell and was also looted and destroyed. It was also at this time that the Roman army met its first systematic resistance from the Persians. As the Romans penetrated further south and west, the local inhabitants began to flood their route. Nevertheless, the Roman forces pressed on and came to Maiozamalcha, a sizable city not far from Ctesiphon. After a short siege, this city too fell to Julian. Inexorably, Julian's forces zeroed in on Ctesiphon, but as they drew closer, the Persian resistance grew fiercer, with guerilla raids whittling at Julian's men and supplies. A sizable force of the army was lost and the emperor himself was almost killed taking a fort a few miles from the target city.
Finally, the army approached Ctesiphon following a canal that linked the Tigris and Euphrates. It soon became apparent after a few preliminary skirmishes that a protracted siege would be necessary to take this important city. Many of his generals, however, thought that pursuing this course of action would be foolish. Julian reluctantly agreed, but became enraged by this failure and ordered his fleet to be burned as he decided to march through the province of Assyria. Julian had planned for his army to live off the land, but the Persians employed a scorched-earth policy. When it became apparent that his army would perish (because his supplies were beginning to dwindle) from starvation and the heat if he continued his campaign, and also in the face of superior numbers of the enemy, Julian ordered a retreat on 16 June. As the Roman army retreated, they were constantly harassed by guerilla strikes. It was during one of these raids that Julian got caught up in the fighting and took a spear to his abdomen. Mortally wounded he was carried to his tent, where, after conferring with some of his officers, he died. The date was 26 June 363.

Conclusion

Thus an ignominious end for a man came about who had hoped to restore the glory of the Roman empire during his reign as emperor. Due to his intense hatred of Christianity, the opinion of posterity has not been kind to Julian. The contemporary opinion, however, was overall positive. The evidence shows that Julian was a complex ruler with a definite agenda to use traditional social institutions in order to revive what he saw as a collapsing empire. In the final assessment, he was not so different from any of the other emperors of the fourth century. He was a man grasping desperately to hang on to a Greco-Roman conception of leadership that was undergoing a subtle yet profound change.
Copyright (C) 2002, Walter E. Roberts and Michael DiMaio, Jr. Used by permission.

In reality, Julian worked to promote culture and philosophy in any manifestation. He tried to reduce taxes and the public debts of municipalities; he augmented administrative decentralisation; he promoted a campaign of austerity to reduce public expenditure (setting himself as the example). He reformed the postal service and eliminated the powerful secret police.
by Federico Morando; JULIAN II, The Apostate, http://www.forumancientcoins.com/NumisWiki/view.asp?key=Julian%20II

Flavius Claudius Iulianus was born in 331 or maybe 332 A.D. in Constantinople. He ruled the Western Empire as Caesar from 355 to 360 and was hailed Augustus by his legions in Lutetia (Paris) in 360. Julian was a gifted administrator and military strategist. Famed as the last pagan emperor, his reinstatement of the pagan religion earned him the moniker "the Apostate." As evidenced by his brilliant writing, some of which has survived to the present day, the title "the Philosopher" may have been more appropriate. He died from wounds suffered during the Persian campaign of 363 A.D. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.




2 commentsCleisthenes
RI_141cu_img.jpg
141 - Diocletian - Antoninianus - RIC V 167 Bust Type F17 viewsAntoninianus
Obv: IMP DIOCLE-TIANVS AVG, Radiate and cuirassed bust right
Rev: IOVI F-VLGERATORI, [to Jupiter the Thunderer] Jupiter, naked except for cloak fluttering over left arm, right foot drawn back in act to throw thunderbolt, which is raised up in right hand; head right, At feet left., eagle standing left, head right
Minted in Rome (//XXIB).
Reference(s) – RIC V 167 Bust Type F

3.77 gms. 24.46 mm. 0 degrees
1 commentsmaridvnvm
jovian.jpg
1410a, Jovian, 27 June 363 - 17 February 364 A.D.78 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 179, aVF, Constantinople, 3.126g, 21.6mm, 180o. Obverse: D N IOVIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left; Reverse: VOT V MVLT X within wreath, CONSPG in exergue; scarce.

Flavius Jovianuswas born in 331 at Singidunum, modern Belgrade. His distinguished father, Varronianus, had been a tribune of the legion Ioviani and a comes domesticorum, perhaps under Constantius II, who had retired to private life shortly before Jovian's elevation to the purple. Jovian married a daughter of Lucillianus, perhaps named Charito, and by her produced at least two children.

Jovian himself was a protector domesticus under Constantius II and Julian and, under Julian, primicerius domesticorum. Various Christian sources maintain that Jovian's Christianity led to his deposition by Julian, though most modern scholars dismiss this as ex post facto Christian apologetic. Jovian, recalled to the ranks if he had ever been dismissed, marched with Julian against Sapor in 363, and on 27 June, the day after that emperor's death, was acclaimed Augustus.

Ammianus and Zosimus, among others, detail the difficult straits of the Roman army during its withdrawal from Persian territory, Ammianus from the perspective of a proud soldier confident even in defeat of the superiority of Roman arms, Zosimus, in a much shorter and confused version, concentrating on the predicament of Jovian's troops and on the dire effects to the empire of the peace terms agreed to with Sapor. These terms entailed the cessation to Persia of Roman territory beyond the Tigris -- the cities of Singara and Nisibis, however, to be surrendered on the condition of the safe passage of their inhabitants -- and the guarantee of the neutrality of Rome's ally Arsaces, King of Armenia, in the event of future hostilities between Roman and Persia. Ammianus asserts that in agreeing to these terms Jovian misjudged his tactical strength and wasted an opportunity presented by negotiations with Sapor to move his forces closer to supplies at Corduena, and that Jovian acted on the advise of flatterers to preserve the fighting strength of his forces in the event of an attempt by Julian's relative Procopius to seize the throne. Others present the treaty terms as unavoidable given the Roman predicament.

Jovian appears to have treaded cautiously with regard to religious matters during the early months of his reign. Eunapius says that Jovian continued to honor Maximus and Priscus, the Neoplatonist advisors of Julian, and, upon reaching Tarsus, Jovian performed funeral rites for Julian. Nonetheless, various Christians, most notably Athanasius, took the initiative in an effort to gain Jovian's favor and support. An adherent of the Nicaean creed, Jovian did eventually recall various bishops of homoousian disposition and restore to their followers churches lost under earlier emperors. But in spite of such measures, unity among various Christian sects seems to have been the foremost concern of Jovian, whose ipsissima verba Socrates Scholasticus purports to give: "I abhor contentiousness, but love and honor those hurrying towards unanimity" (Hist. Eccl. 3.25).

Jovian died at the age of thirty-two on 17 February 364 at Dadastana on the boundary of Bithynia and Galatia. The cause of his death was most probably natural and is variously attributed to overeating, the consumption of poisonous mushrooms, or suffocation from fumes of charcoal or of the fresh paint on the room in which he was sleeping. Ammianus' comparison of the circumstances of Jovian's death to those of Scipio Aemilianus suggest the possibility of foul play, as does John of Antioch's reference to a poisoned rather than a poisonous mushroom, while John Chrysostom -- in a highly suspect literary context of consolatio-- asserts outright that the emperor was murdered. Eutropius records that he was enrolled among the gods, inter Divos relatus est. Zonaras says he was buried in the Church of the Holy Apostles and that his wife, Charito, was eventually laid to rest beside him.

Ancient authors agree that Jovian was of modest intellect but imposing physique and disposed to excessive eating and drinking.

By Thomas Banchich, Canisius College
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited By J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
Lugdunum_RIC_VII_116,_142_Crispus_AE-3-Follis-Silvered_D-N-CRISPO-NOB-CAES-5a-B1_VIRTVS-EXERCIT_VOT-XX_C-R_2captives_PLG_p130_R1_321-AD__Q-001_h_19-20mm_2_84ga-s.jpg
142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC VII 116, AE-3 Follis, C/R//PLG, VIRTVS EXERCIT, VOT/XX, C-R, R1!112 views142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC VII 116, AE-3 Follis, C/R//PLG, VIRTVS EXERCIT, VOT/XX, C-R, R1!
avers:- DN-CRISPO-NOB-CAES, 5a, B1, Laureate bust right.
revers:- VIRTVS-EXERCIT, Standard inscribed VOT/XX, captive sit in ground on either side, C and R left and right side in fields.
exergo: C/R//PLG, diameter: 19-20mm, weight: 2,84g, axis: 1h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 321 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-116, p-130, R1!
Q-001
quadrans
Lugdunum_RIC_VII_204,_142_Crispus_AE-3-Follis-Silvered_D-N-CRISPO-NOB-CAES-5a-B1_BEATA-TRAN-QVILLITAS_VOT--IS-XX_PLG_p134_R4_323-AD_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC VII 204, AE-3 Follis, -/-//PLG, BEATA-TRAN-QVILLITAS, Globe on altar, R4!!!86 views142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC VII 204, AE-3 Follis, -/-//PLG, BEATA-TRAN-QVILLITAS, Globe on altar, R4!!!
avers:- DN-CRISPO-NOB-CAES, 5a, B1, Laureate bust right.
revers:- BEATA-TRAN-QVILLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VOT/IS/XX, above, three stars.
exergo: -/-//PLG, diameter: -mm, weight:-g, axis:-h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 323 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-204, p-134, R4!!!
Q-001
quadrans
RI 146ag img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI Lugdunum 234 (Senior Augustus)15 viewsObv:– DN MAXIMIANO P F S AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP ROM, Genius standing left, modius on head, loins draped, right hand holding patera, left hand holding cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum (N in right field, PLG in exe). November to December A.D. 307
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 234 (S) Bastien Volume XI 427 (5 examples)
maridvnvm
Constans_AE-4-Follis_CONST-ANS-AVG-Cn17-D3_GLOR-IA-EXERC-ITVS_SMALGamma_RIC-VIII-21-p-539_Alexandria-340-AD_C2_Q-001_10h_14,5mm_1,58ga-s.jpg
146 Constans (333-337 A.D. Caesar, 337-350 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, RIC VIII 021, -/-//SMALΓ, AE-4 Follis, GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers with one standard, #162 views146 Constans (333-337 A.D. Caesar, 337-350 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, RIC VIII 021, -/-//SMALΓ, AE-4 Follis, GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers with one standard, #1
avers:- CONSTAN-S-PF-AVG, Cn17, D3, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- GLOR-IA-EXERC-ITVS, Two soldiers holding spears and shields with one standard between them.
exergo: -/-//SMALΓ, diamater:14,5mm, weight: 1,58g, axis: 10h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 340 A.D, ref: RIC-VIII-47, p-539,
Q-001
quadrans
Constans_AE-4-Follis_DN-CONST-ANS-P-F-AVG-Cn17-D3_VOT_XX_MVLT_XXX_SMALGamma_RIC-VIII-34-p-541_Alexandria-340-AD_C2_Q-001_11h_15,5mm_2,11g-s.jpg
146 Constans (333-337 A.D. Caesar, 337-350 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, RIC VIII 034, -/-//SMALΓ, AE-4 Follis, VOT/XX/MVLT/XXX, In four lines within laurel wreath, #179 views146 Constans (333-337 A.D. Caesar, 337-350 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, RIC VIII 034, -/-//SMALΓ, AE-4 Follis, VOT/XX/MVLT/XXX, In four lines within laurel wreath, #1
avers:- CONSTAN-S-PF-AVG, Cn17, D3, Pearl-diademed bust right.
revers:- VOT/XX/MVLT/XXX, In four lines within laurel wreath.
exergo: -/-//SMALΓ, diamater:15,5mm, weight: 2,11g, axis: 11h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 340 A.D, ref: RIC-VIII-34, p-541,
Q-001
quadrans
RI_147ac_img.jpg
147 - Constantius Chlorus - AE Follis - RIC VI Lugdunum 187a13 viewsAE Follis
Obv:– IMP CONSTANTIVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust left
Rev:– GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chalmys over left shoulder, right holding patera over altar, left cornucopia
Minted in Lugdunum (_ | * / PLG). May A.D. 305 to Early A.D. 307 (Bastien 1st May A.D. 305 – 25th July A.D 306)
Reference:– Bastien XI 369 iii (71). RIC VI Lugdunum 187a.

Somewhat overcleaned. Let's see what it looks like in a few years time when nature has had some time to work on it.
maridvnvm
RI 147m img.jpg
147 - Constantius I Chlorus - RIC VI Lugdunum 187a19 viewsObverse Legend – IMP CONSTANTIVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust left
Reverse Legend – GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chalmys over left shoulder, right holding patera over altar, left cornucopia
Minted in Lugdunum (* in right field, PLG in exe). 1st May A.D. 305 – 25th July A.D 306
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 187a. Bastien XI 369 legend break iii
maridvnvm
RI 147j img.jpg
147 - Constantius I Chlorus - RIC VI Lugdunum 187a20 viewsObverse Legend – IMP CONSTANTIVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust left
Reverse Legend – GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chalmys over left shoulder, right holding patera over altar, left cornucopia
Minted in Lugdunum (* in right field, PLG in exe). 1st May A.D. 305 – 25th July A.D 306
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 187a. Bastien XI 369 legend break iii
maridvnvm
RI 147i img.jpg
147 - Constantius I Chlorus - RIC VI Lugdunum 25152 viewsAE Follis
Obverse Legend – DIVO CONSTANTIO PIO, Laureate, bust right
Reverse Legend – CONSECRATIO, Eagle standing up with head up and wings spread on altar
Minted in Lugdunum (PLG in exe.). Summer A.D. 307 to Summer A.D. 308
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 251 (Scarce). Bastien XI 436 (4 examples cited)

Weight 6.96 gms.
Size 22.22mm on Obv. X-Axis, 22.94mm in Obv. Y-Axis.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
IVNI.jpg
149 BC* C. Junius C.f.51 viewsHelmeted head of Roma right X behind

Rev. Dioscuri galloping right
C IVNI C F below ROMA in ex or in linear frame

Rome 149 BC

Sear 87

Sold to Calgary Coin Feb 2017
Jay GT4
Denarius N.BALBUS.jpg
15-01 - C. NAEVIUS BALBUS (79 A.C.)52 viewsAR Denarius Aserrado 18 mm 3.4 gr
Anv: Cabeza con diadema de Venus viendo a derecha - "S C".
Rev: Victoria en triga cabalgando a derecha, "CXXXX" número de control sobre los caballos. "C·NAE·BALB·" (AB y AL en ligadura) en Exergo.
Una de las dos ocasiones en que se acuña una triga (Carruaje de guerra griego tirado por tres caballos) en las monedas romanas.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #309 Pag.130 - Craw RRC #382/1b - Syd CRR #769b -BMCRR #2926-76 - RSC Vol.1 Naevia 6 Pag.68
mdelvalle
Craw_382_1b_Denario_C__Naevius_Balbus_1.jpg
15-01 - C. NAEVIUS BALBUS (79 A.C.)15 viewsAR Denarius Aserrado 18 mm 3.4 gr

Anv: Cabeza con diadema de Venus viendo a derecha - "S C".
Rev: Victoria en triga cabalgando a derecha, "CXXXX" número de control sobre los caballos. "C·NAE·BALB·" (AB y AL en ligadura) en Exergo.
Una de las dos ocasiones en que se acuña una triga (Carruaje de guerra griego tirado por tres caballos) en las monedas romanas.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #309 Pag.130 - Craw RRC #382/1b - Syd CRR #769b -BMCRR #2926-76 - RSC Vol.1 Naevia 6 Pag.68
mdelvalle
Craw_382_1b_Denario_C__Naevius_Balbus_2.jpg
15-01 - C. NAEVIUS BALBUS (79 A.C.)15 viewsAR Denarius Aserrado 19 mm 3.8 gr
Anv: Cabeza con diadema de Venus viendo a derecha - "S C".
Rev: Victoria en triga cabalgando a derecha, "L" número de control sobre los caballos. "C·NAE·BALB·" (AB y AL en ligadura) en Exergo.
Una de las dos ocasiones en que se acuña una triga (Carruaje de guerra griego tirado por tres caballos) en las monedas romanas.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #309 Pag.130 - Craw RRC #382/1b - Syd CRR #769b -BMCRR #2926-76 - RSC Vol.1 Naevia 6 Pag.68
mdelvalle
RI_150c_img.jpg
150 - Severus II - Follis - RIC VI Lugdunum199a24 viewsFollis
Obv:– SEVERVS NOB C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, plain altar beneath
Minted in Lugdunum (_ | * //PLG). 1st May A.D. 305 - 26th July A.D. 306
Reference(s) – Cohen 43. RIC VI Lugdunum199a (C). Bastien 377 (46 examples cited)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_155w_img.jpg
155 - Licinius I - RIC VII Lugdunum 4821 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP LICINIVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP ROM, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys round waist, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in Lugdunum (TF | * / PLG). A.D. 315
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 48 (R4). Bastien XI 598 (8 examples cited)
Martin Griffiths
RI_155y_img.jpg
155 - Licinius I - RIC VII Lugdunum 50 corr.25 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP LICINIVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP ROM, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys round waist, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in Lugdunum (TF | * / PLG). A.D. 315
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 50 corr (R5). Bastien XI 600 (6 examples cited)
Martin Griffiths
RI_160fc_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - AE3 - RIC VII Lugdunum 261 21 viewsObv:–CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, Rosette-diadem, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:–.GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing two standards between them
Minted in Lugdunum (*PLG). A.D. 333-334
Reference(s) – Bastien XIII 249 (5). RIC VII Lugdunum 261 (R5)
maridvnvm
RI_160dw_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - Follis - RIC VI Lugdunum 312 20 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
Rev:- SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol advancing left, raising right hand, holding whip in left hand
Minted in Lugdunum (F | T / PLG). Spring A.D. 310 - 311
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 312 (Rated Scarce). Bastien XI 528 (28 examples)
3.32g. 24.26mm
maridvnvm
RI_160ec_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - Follis - RIC VII Lugdunum 0312 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, Laureate, draped cuirassed bust right (see from rear)
Rev:- SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left hand and raising right
Minted in Lugdunum (S | F / PLG), A.D. 322-323
Reference:– Bastien XI 540. RIC VII Lugdunum 3 (Rated Scarce)
maridvnvm
RI_160dn_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - Follis - RIC VII Lugdunum 5312 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
Rev:– SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left hand and raising right.
Minted in Lugdunum (A | S / PLG).
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 53

Weight 3.29g. 19.13mm.
maridvnvm
RI 160ay img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 0057 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right (rear)
Rev:– SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left, holding globe in left hand, right hand high in salute
Minted in Lugdunum. S in left field, F in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 313/4
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 5. Bastien XI 543 (245 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 160ao img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 00730 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol standing left, holding globe in left hand, right hand high in salute
Minted in Lugdunum. S in left field, F in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 313/4
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 7
maridvnvm
RI 160bx img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 01514 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right (seen from rear)
Rev:– SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left and raising right
Minted in Lugdunum. T in left field, F in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 314-315
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 15. Bastien XI 562
maridvnvm
RI 160cr img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 0158 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right (seen from rear)
Rev:– SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left and raising right
Minted in Lugdunum. T in left field, F in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 314-315
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 15. Bastien XI 562
maridvnvm
RI 160ca img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 01626 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right (seen from rear)
Rev:– SOLI INV-IC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left and raising right
Minted in Lugdunum. T in left field, F in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 314-315
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 16 (Rated R4). Bastien XI ???
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 160bw img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 01723 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left and raising right
Minted in Lugdunum. T in left field, F in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 314-315
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 17 (R1).
maridvnvm
RI 160as img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 01910 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right (seen from front)
Rev:– SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left and raising right
Minted in Lugdunum. T in left field, F in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 314-315
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 19 (R3)
maridvnvm
RI 160av img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 02014 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left and raising right.
Minted in Lugdunum. T in left field, F in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 314-315
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 20
maridvnvm
RI 160at img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 03215 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right (seen from rear)
Rev:– SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left and raising right
Minted in Lugdunum. TF in left field, * in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 315-316
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 32 (R1)
maridvnvm
RI 160cm img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 0337 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, Laureate bust right
Rev:– SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left and raising right
Minted in Lugdunum. TF in left field, * in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 315-316
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 33 (R3). Bastien XI 594 (16 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 160bz img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 03422 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, Laureate bust right
Rev:– SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left and raising right
Minted in Lugdunum. TF in left field, * in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 315-316
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 34
maridvnvm
RI_160fn_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 03421 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, Laureate bust right
Rev:– SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left and raising right
Minted in Lugdunum. TF in left field, * in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 315-316
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 34
maridvnvm
RI 160br img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 113 64 viewsObv:– CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, Laureate bust right
Rev:–. VIRTVS EXERCIT, Two captives seated either side of banner inscribed VOT XX
Minted in Lugdunum (C | R /PLG). A.D. 321
Reference:– Bastien XI 65. RIC VII Lugdunum 113 (R1)

A pleasing fully silvered example with some golden toning to the silvering.
3 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 160ap img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 12818 viewsObv:–CONSTANTINVS P AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– BEATA TRANQVILLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VOT/IS/XX; three stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. C in left field, R in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 321
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 128
maridvnvm
RI 160bg img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 12811 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS P AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– BEATA TRANQVILLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VOT/IS/XX; three stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. C in left field, R in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 321
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 128
maridvnvm
RI 160dc img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 12914 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– BEATA TRANQVILLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VOT/IS/XX; three stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. C in left field, R in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 321
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 129. Bastien XIII 100 Legend break ii (1 example listed with unbroken obverse legend - Ashmolean, the more normal obverse legend break N-T has 8 examples cited in Bastien)
maridvnvm
RI 160ba img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 13011 viewsObv:– CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– BEATA TRANQVILLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VO/TIS/XX; three stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. C in left field, R in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 322-323
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 130. Bastien XIII 80 ii (5 examples cited with this legend break)
maridvnvm
RI 160ar img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 15315 viewsObv:– CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, Laureate bust right
Rev:– BEATA TRAN-QVILLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VOT/IS/XX; three stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. C in left field, R in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 322-323
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 153
maridvnvm
RI 160az img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 155 9 viewsObv:–CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– BEATA TRAN-QVILLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VOT/IS/XX; three stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. C in left field, R in right field; PLG in exe. A.D. 322-323
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 155
maridvnvm
RI 160aq img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 199 12 viewsObv:– CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, Laureate bust right
Rev:– BEATA TRAN-QVILLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VOT/IS/XX; three stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. PLG in exe. A.D. 322
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 199 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI 160bq img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 20010 viewsObv:– CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– BEATA TRAN-QVILLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VO/TIS/XX; three stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. PLG in exe. A.D. 322
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 200 (R5). Bastien XIII 153 (2 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 160bn img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 22530 viewsObv:–CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, Laureate bust right
Rev:–. PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, Campgate with six rows, two turrets, no doors, star above
Minted in Lugdunum (PLG in exe).end A.D. 325 – A.D. 325
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 225 (Scarce), Bastien XIII 184
maridvnvm
RI 160bm img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Lugdunum 23617 viewsFollis
Obv:– CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, Rosette-diadem, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing two standards between them
Minted in Lugdunum. SLG in exe.
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 236 (R4). Bastien XIII 203 (3 examples cited)
maridvnvm
1609_Lion_Daalder_Zeeland.jpg
1609 Lion Daalder17 viewsNetherlands: Zeeland
1609 Lion Daalder
Obv: Knight facing, looking to his left, above shield w/ lion rampant; MO.ARG.PRO.CON / FO.BELG.ZEL
Rev: Rampant lion facing left; CONFIDENS.DNO.NON.MOVETVR; mintmark: rosette. 1609
27.12 grams; 40.29 mm
Davenport: 4872
Delmonte: 839
cmcdon0923
RI 161l img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 24130 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum (PLG in exe). A.D. 330
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 241 (R1). Bastien 202 (36 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI_161ay_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 24226 viewsObv:– VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left
Rev:– –, She wolf feeding Romulus and Remus, two stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. PLG in exe.
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 242 (R2).
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 161i img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 24621 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum. dot PLG in exe.
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 246 (R2).
maridvnvm
RI 161g img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 247 21 viewsObv:– VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left
Rev:– –, She wolf feeding Romulus and Remus, two stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. • PLG in exe. A.D. 332
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 247 (R1).
maridvnvm
RI 161e img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 24714 viewsObv:– VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left
Rev:– –, She wolf feeding Romulus and Remus, two stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. • SLG in exe. A.D. 332
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 247 (R1). Bastien XIII 237 (23)
maridvnvm
RI_161r_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 24743 viewsObv:– VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left
Rev:– –, She wolf feeding Romulus and Remus, two stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. • PLG in exe. A.D. 332
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 247 (R1).
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_161q_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 24726 viewsObv:– VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left
Rev:– –, She wolf feeding Romulus and Remus, two stars above
Minted in Lugdunum (•SLG). A.D. 332
Reference(s) – Bastien XIII 237 (23). RIC VII Lyons 247 (R3).
maridvnvm
RI_161ak_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 24722 viewsObv:– VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left
Rev:– –, She wolf feeding Romulus and Remus, two stars above
Minted in Lugdunum (•SLG). A.D. 332
Reference(s) – Bastien XIII 237 (23). RIC VII Lyons 247 (R3).
maridvnvm
RI 161d img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 25634 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum. dot in Crescent PLG in exe. A.D. 330 - 333
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 256 (R1). Bastien Vol. XIII 222.
maridvnvm
RI_161al_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 25620 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum. dot in Crescent PLG in exe. A.D. 330 - 333
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 256 (R1). Bastien Vol. XIII 222.
maridvnvm
RI_161am_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 256 16 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum (dot in Crescent PLG). A.D. 330 - 333
Reference(s) – Bastien XIII 222 (44). RIC VII Lugdunum 256 (R1)
maridvnvm
RI 161m img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 25736 viewsObv:– VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left
Rev:– –, She wolf feeding Romulus and Remus, two stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. • in crescent PLG in exe. A.D. 331
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 257 (R2). Bastien XIII 221 (62 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 161k img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 26622 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum. *SLG in exe. A.D. 334-335
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 266 (R3). Bastien Vol. XIII 260 (11 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 161c img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 26734 viewsObv:– VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left
Rev:– –, She wolf feeding Romulus and Remus, two stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. *PLG in exe
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 267 (R3). Bastien Vol. XIII 253.
maridvnvm
RI 161f img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 26727 viewsObv:– VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left
Rev:– –, She wolf feeding Romulus and Remus, two stars above
Minted in Lugdunum. *SLG in exe. A.D. 334-335
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 267 (R3). Bastien XIII 259 (17 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI_161s_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 26718 viewsObv:– VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left
Rev:– –, She wolf feeding Romulus and Remus, two stars above
Minted in Lugdunum (*PLG). A.D. 333-334
Reference(s) – Bastien XIII 253 (36). RIC 267 (R3).
maridvnvm
RI_161ao_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lyons 267 19 viewsObv:– VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left
Rev:– None, She wolf feeding Romulus and Remus, two stars above
Minted in Lugdunum (*SLG). A.D. 334-335
Reference:– Bastien XIII 259. RIC VII Lyons 267 (R3)
maridvnvm
RI_161ac_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Lugdunum 241 (R3)15 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum (//SLG). A.D. 330
Reference:– Bastien 205 (11 examples cited). RIC VII Lugdunum 241 (R3)
maridvnvm
RI_161z_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Lugdunum 266 (R3)16 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum (*SLG). A.D. 334-335
Reference:– Bastien 260 (11 examples cited). RIC VII Lugdunum 266 (R3)
maridvnvm
1616_Half_Lion_Daalder_Zeeland.jpg
1616 Half Daalder6 viewsNetherlands: Zeeland
1616 Lion Half Daalder
Obv: Knight facing, looking to his left, above shield w/ lion rampant; MO.ARG.PRO.CON / FOE.BELG.ZEL
Rev: Rampant lion facing left; CONFIDENS.DNO.NON.MOVETVR; mintmark: rosette. 1616
12.98 grams; 34.21 mm
Davenport: n/a
Delmonte:
cmcdon0923
1616_Lion_Daalder_Overyssel.jpg
1616 Lion Daalder7 viewsNetherlands: Overijessl
1616 Lion Daalder
Obv: Knight facing, looking to his left, above shield w/ lion rampant; MO.ARG.PRO.CON / FO.BELG.TRAN
Rev: Rampant lion facing left; CONFIDENS.DNO.NON.MOVETVR; . 1616 .
26.75 grams; 40.44 mm
Davenport: 4860
Delmonte:
cmcdon0923
1616_Lion_Daalder_Utrecht.JPG
1616 Lion Daalder6 viewsNetherlands: Utrecht
1616 Lion Daalder
Obv: Knight facing, looking to his left, above shield w/ lion rampant; MO.ARG.PRO.CON / FO.BELG.TRA
Rev: Rampant lion facing left; CONFIDENS.DNO.NON.MOVETVR + 1616 +
27.39 grams; 42.35 mm
Davenport: 4863
Delmonte:
cmcdon0923
1617_Lion_Daalder_Utrecht.jpg
1617 Lion Daalder3 viewsNetherlands: Utrecht
1617 Lion Daalder
Obv: Knight facing, looking to his left, above shield w/ lion rampant; MO.ARG.PRO.CON / FOE.BELG.TRAI
Rev: Rampant lion facing left; CONFIDENS.DNO.NON.MOVETVR; + 1617 +
26.14 grams; 41.28 mm
Davenport: 4863
Delmonte:
cmcdon0923
RI_162b_img.jpg
162 - Fausta - RIC VII Lugdunum 23526 viewsObv:– FLAV • MAX • FAVSTA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– SPES REIPVBLICAE, Spes standing left with two children in her arms
Minted in Lugdunum. PLG in exe. end A.D. 324 – A.D. 325
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 235 (R2). Bastien Vol. XIII 193 (20 examples cited)
Martin Griffiths
RI_162c_img.jpg
162 - Fausta - RIC VII Lugdunum 23511 viewsObv:– FLAV • MAX • FAVSTA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– SPES REIPVBLICAE, Spes standing left with two children in her arms
Minted in Lugdunum. PLG in exe. end A.D. 324 – A.D. 325
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 235 (R2). Bastien Vol. XIII 193 (20 examples cited)
Martin Griffiths
Flavius-Victor_DN-FL-VIC-TOR-P-F-AVG_SPES-ROMA-NORVM_P-CON_RIC-IX-47a_p-_5th-em_Arleate_387-388-AD_Q-001_11h_14mm_1,29ga-s.jpg
163 Flavius Victor (387-388 A.D.), AE-4 Follis, RIC IX 047a, Arleate, SPES ROMANORVM, Campgate, Rare! Modern Fake !!!105 views163 Flavius Victor (387-388 A.D.), AE-4 Follis, RIC IX 047a, Arleate, SPES ROMANORVM, Campgate, Rare! Modern Fake !!!
Avers:- DN-FL-VIC-TOR-P-F-AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- SPES-ROMA-NORVM, Campgate, 2 turrets, 4 layers plus 1 layer on turrets, star above, no doors.
exerg:-|-//P-CON, diameter: 14mm, weight: 1,29g, axes: 11h,
mint: Arleate, date: 387-388 A.D., ref: RIC IX 47a, Rare !
Q-001
by "postvmvs":
"Identified in the Forvm thread on the eBay seller 'Romanseller' (ca. Aug. 2005) but never listed here. An example struck from the same dies (but not the same coin) appeared as Lot 788 of Auction 384-385 (Nov. 2005) by Dr. Busso Peus Nachfolger estimated at 175 EUR, where it was identified as a fake before the end of the sale."

Thank you postvmvs, maridvnvm and Pscipio !!!
quadrans
1641_Lion_Daalder_Gelderland.jpg
1641 Lion Daalder28 viewsNetherlands: Gelderland
1641 Lion Daalder
Obv: Knight facing, looking to his left, above shield w/ lion rampant; MO.ARG.PRO.CO.FO.BELG.GEL
Rev: Rampant lion facing left; CONFIDENS.DNO.NON.MOVETVR.1641.
26.88 grams; xx.xx mm
Davenport:
Delmonte:
1 commentscmcdon0923
RI_165y_img.jpg
165 - Crispus - Follis - RIC VII Lyons 21510 viewsAE3
Obv:– IVL CRISPVS NOB C, Laureate head right
Rev:– CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, Wreath enclosing VOT / X.
Minted in Lugdunum (//PLGC).
Reference:– RIC VII Lyons 215
maridvnvm
RI 165o img.jpg
165 - Crispus - RIC VII Lugdunum 2108 viewsObv:–IVL CRIS-PVS NOB C, Laureate, bust right
Rev:– CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, Wreath enclosing VOT X
Minted in Lugdunum (PLG crescent in exe). A.D. 323
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 210 (R2). Bastien XIII 168 (9 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 165h img.jpg
165 - Crispus - RIC VII Lugdunum 215 10 viewsObv:–IVL CRIS-PVS NOB C, Laureate, bust right
Rev:– CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, Wreath enclosing VOT X
Minted in Lugdunum (PLGC in exe).
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 215
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 165u img.jpg
165 - Crispus - RIC VII Lugdunum 2168 viewsObv:– FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left
Rev:– CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, Wreath enclosing VOT / X
Minted in Lugdunum (PLGC in exe).
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 216 (R2).
maridvnvm
RI 165m img.jpg
165 - Crispus - RIC VII Lugdunum 22015 viewsObv:– FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left
Rev:– CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, Wreath enclosing VOT / •X•
Minted in Lugdunum (PLGC in exe).
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 220 (R3). Bastien XIII 177 dot variety iii (16 examples cited).
maridvnvm
RI 165l img.jpg
165 - Crispus - RIC VII Lugdunum 220 var22 viewsObv:– FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left
Rev:– CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, Wreath enclosing VOT / • / •X•
Minted in Lugdunum (PLGC in exe).
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 220 var (not listed with do in centre field). Bastien XIII 177 dot variety iv (3 examples cited).
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 165v img.jpg
165 - Crispus - RIC VII Lugdunum 22711 viewsObv:– FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, Camp gate with two turrets, no doors, star above, 6 rows of bricks
Minted in Lugdunum (PLG in exe).
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 227 (R3).
maridvnvm
RI_168ax_img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - AE3 - RIC VII Lugdunum 24429 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing two standards between them
Minted in Lugdunum (//•PLG). A.D. 330-331
Reference:– Bastien XIII 230. RIC 244 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI_168bc_img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - AE3 - RIC VII Lugdunum 244 29 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing two standards between them
Minted in Lugdunum (//•SLG).
Reference:– Bastien XIII 235 (19 examples cited). RIC VII Lyons 244 (R3)
maridvnvm
RI_168bb_img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - AE3 - RIC VII Lugdunum 254 25 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing two standards between them
Minted in Lugdunum (//Dot in Crescent SLG).
Reference:– Bastien XIII 224 (19). RIC VII Lugdunum 254 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI_168aw_img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - AE3 - RIC VII Lugdunum 28633 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing standard between them
Minted in Lugdunum (//Palm Branch SLG).
Reference:– Bastien XIII 287(16 examples cited). RIC VII Lugdunum 286 (R3)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 168s img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - RIC VII Lugdunum 22114 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust, left (B4L)
Rev:– CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, VOT •X• within wreath
Minted in Lugdunum (PLGC in exe) A.D. 318-337
Reference:– RIC 221 (R2). Bastien 181.
maridvnvm
RI 168ah img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - RIC VII Lugdunum 221 var9 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust, left (B4L)
Rev:– CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, VOT / • / •X• within wreath
Minted in Lugdunum (PLGC in exe) A.D. 318-337
Reference:– RIC 221 var (not noted with additional • in RIC). Bastien 181 sub-type iv (3 examples cited).
maridvnvm
RI 168ac img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - RIC VII Lugdunum 23822 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing two standards between them
Minted in Lugdunum (PLG in exe) A.D. 330 (Bastien)
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 238 (R1). Bastien Vol. XIII 199
maridvnvm
RI 168v img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - RIC VII Lugdunum 244 13 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing two standards between them
Minted in Lugdunum (•PLG in exe) A.D. 330-331 (Bastien)
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 244 (R3). Bastien Vol. XIII 230
maridvnvm
RI 168af img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - RIC VII Lugdunum 244 11 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing two standards between them
Minted in Lugdunum (•SLG in exe) A.D. 330-331 (Bastien)
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 244 (R3). Bastien Vol. XIII 235
maridvnvm
RI 168z img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - RIC VII Lugdunum 24417 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing two standards between them
Minted in Lugdunum (•SLG in exe) A.D. 330-331 (Bastien)
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 244 (R3). Bastien Vol. XIII 235
maridvnvm
RI 168t img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - RIC VII Lugdunum 254 9 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers standing either side of two standards
Minted in Lugdunum (dot in Crescent PLG in exe) A.D. 332
Reference:– RIC 254 (R1)
maridvnvm
RI 168al img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - RIC VII Lugdunum 2549 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers standing either side of two standards
Minted in Lugdunum (dot in Crescent SLG in exe) A.D. 332
Reference:– RIC 254 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI 168am img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - RIC VII Lugdunum 25410 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers standing either side of two standards
Minted in Lugdunum (dot in Crescent SLG in exe) A.D. 332
Reference:– RIC 254 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI 168ag img~0.jpg
168 - Constantine II - RIC VII Lugdunum 28110 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust, right
Rev:– GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing single standard between them
Minted in Lugdunum (Palm Branch PLG in exe). A.D. 336
Reference:– RIC 281 (R3).
maridvnvm
RI 168ak img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - RIC VII Lugdunum 28112 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust, right
Rev:– GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing single standard between them
Minted in Lugdunum (*PLG in exe). A.D. 336
Reference:– RIC 281 (R3). Bastien XIII 272 (11 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 168ag img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - RIC VII Lugdunum 28619 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers standing either side of a single standard
Minted in Lugdunum (Palm Branch PLG in exe) A.D. 337 (Bastien)
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 286 (R3). Bastien Vol. XIII 82
maridvnvm
RI_169bl_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE2 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 08425 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand
Rev:- FEL TEMP REPAR-ATIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points up and to the right
Minted in Lugdunum, (// PLG), A.D. 348-350
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 84 (S)

4.04 gms. 0 degrees. 20.89 mm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_169ae_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE2 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 8737 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand
Rev:- FEL TEMP REPAR-ATIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points up and to the right
Minted in Lugdunum, (// *PLG), A.D. 348-350
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 87 (R)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_169k_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE2 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 8739 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand
Rev:- FEL TEMP REPAR-ATIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points up and to the right
Minted in Lugdunum, (// *PLG), A.D. 348-350
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 87 (R)

Ex collection of Count Gaston de Lambertye formed in the 18th century
maridvnvm
RI_169i_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE3 - RIC VIII Alexandria 20 13 viewsAE3
Obv:- CONSTANS AVG, Laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev:- GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing a standard between them
Minted in Siscia, (// SMALG), A.D. 334-335.
Reference:– RIC VIII Alexandria 20
maridvnvm
RI_169an_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE3 - RIC VIII Lyons 5812 viewsAE3
Obv:- CONSTAN-S P F AVG, Rosette diadem, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:- VICTORIAE D D AVGG Q N N, Victories standing facing each other, each holding wreath and palm branch
Minted in Lugdunum; (PHh Ligate// PLG ), A.D. ???
Reference:– RIC VIII Lyons 58
maridvnvm
RI_169y_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE3 - RIC VIII Lyons 90 16 viewsAE3
Obv:- D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:- FEL . TEMP . REPARATIO, Radiate Phoenix standing right on mound of stones.
Minted in Lugdunum; (/PLG), A.D. 348-350
Reference:– RIC VIII Lyons 90 (R)
maridvnvm
RI 169d img.jpg
169 - Constans - RIC VIII Lugdunum 7223 viewsObv:– D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Rosette diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Emperor standing left on galley, holding Victory & labarum, piloted by Victory
Minted in Lugdunum (//PLG)
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 72
maridvnvm
RI 169c img.jpg
169 - Constans - RIC VIII Lugdunum 8616 viewsObv:– D N CONSTANS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust left, holding globe
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, tip downwards, advancing right, head left, leading small figure from a hut beneath a tree
Minted in Lugdunum (//*SLG),
Reference:– RIC VIII 86 (R)
maridvnvm
LM_1694_0800_M.jpg
1694 8 Reales11 views1694 8 Reales
Lima, Peru
King Carlos II
Assayer: M (Felix Cristobal Cano Melgarejo - 1694 only)
27.14 grams
Sedwick type: L11
cmcdon0923
RI_170t_img.jpg
170 - Constantine II - Ae3 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 18926 viewsObv:– DN CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing falling horseman
Minted in Lugdunum (GSLG).
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 189

Weight 2.07g. 18.35mm.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170ci_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 102 38 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, A behind bust
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman is seated on the ground reaching towards emperor
Minted in Lugdunum (A | _ //SLG*)
Reference:- RIC VIII Lugdunum 102
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170x_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VII Lugdunum -. cf RIC 281 For officina S26 viewsObv:– FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing single standard between them
Minted in Lugdunum (//*PLG).
Reference:– Bastien 273 (4 examples cited). RIC VII Lugdunum - (cf RIC 281 For officina S)
maridvnvm
RI_170ae_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - Ae3 - RIC VII Lugdunum 240 15 viewsObv:– FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing two standards between them
Minted in Lugdunum (//PLG).
Reference:– Bastien XIII 200 (34). RIC VII Lugdunum 240 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI_170ac_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - Ae3 - RIC VII Lugdunum 25516 viewsObv:– FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers standing either side of two standards
Minted in Lugdunum (dot in Crescent PLG). A.D. 332
Reference:– Bastien XIII 225 (5 examples cited). RIC 255 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI_170aa_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VII VII Lugdunum 24037 viewsObv:– FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing two standards between them
Minted in Lugdunum (//SLG).
Reference:– Bastien XIII 205(5 examples cited). RIC VII Lugdunum 240 (R5)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170co_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 097 24 viewsAE3
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, A behind bust
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Emperor standing left on galley, holding phoenix on globe and labarum; Victory behind, steering galley
Minted in Lugdunum (//*SLG). A.D. 348-350.
Reference:- RIC VIII Lugdunum 97 (R)

17 mm

Ex Col. Hermann-Joseph Lückger, Germany (1864-1951). Lückger was a German entrepreneur in the textile industry and amateur historian and collector of art.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170bo_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 18714 viewsAe3
Obv:– DN CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, Rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman is falling forwards wearing cap reaching towards emperor
Minted in Lugdunum (//FSLG).
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 187 (S)
maridvnvm
RI_170am_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 18933 viewsAe3
Obv:– DN CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing falling horseman
Minted in Lugdunum (GPLG). 18th August A.D. 353 - 6th November A.D. 355
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 189

19.70 mm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170bq_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 8 11 viewsAe3
Obv:– CONSTANTIVS AVG, Rosette diademed, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing a standard between them, decorated with a Christogram.
Minted in Lugdunum (//PLG). A.D. Before April 340
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 8 (C)
maridvnvm
RI 170l img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - RIC VIII Lugdunum 18916 viewsObv:– DN CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing falling horseman
Minted in Lugdunum (//GSLG).
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 189
maridvnvm
RI 170p img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - RIC VIII Lugdunum 20111 viewsObv:– DN CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SPEI REIPVBLICE, Emperor standing left holding globe and sceptre
Minted in Lugdunum (//MPLG). A.D. 355-360
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 201 (R)
maridvnvm
RI_171d_img.jpg
171 - Magnentius - AE Centenionalis - RIC Lugdunum 11525 viewsObv:- D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped & cuirassed bust right; A behind head
Rev:- GLORIA ROMANORVM, emperor galloping right, spearing fallen enemy
Minted in Lugdunum, RPLG in exe. A.D. 350-351
Reference:- RIC 115 of Lyons, Cohen 20.
maridvnvm
RI_171m_img.jpg
171 - Magnentius - AE Centenionalis - RIC Lugdunum 1156 viewsObv:- D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped & cuirassed bust right; A behind head
Rev:- GLORIA ROMANORVM, emperor galloping right, spearing fallen enemy
Minted in Lugdunum, RSLG in exe. A.D. 350-351
Reference:- RIC VIII Lugdunum 115, Cohen 20.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_171e_img.jpg
171 - Magnentius - Centenionalis - RIC VIII Lugdunum 12629 views
Centenionalis
Obv:– D N MAGNEN-TIVS P F AVG, Bare-headed, draped & cuirassed bust right; A behind head
Rev:– VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE, Two Victories supporting wreath inscribed VOT/V/MVLT/X
Mint – Lugdunum (SV//RPLG). Beginning A.D. 351 to August A.D. 352
Reference(s) – Cohen 68. Bastien 174 (12). RIC VIII Lugdunum 126 (C)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_171f_img.jpg
171 - Magnentius - Centenionalis - RIC VIII Lugdunum 14518 viewsCentenionalis
Obv:– D N MAGNEN-TIVS P F AVG, Bare-headed, draped & cuirassed bust right; A behind head
Rev:– VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE, two Victories standing facing each other, holding wreath inscribed VOT-V-MVLT-X , chi-rho in upper centre
Mint – Lugdunum (SP/RPLG). August A.D. 352 to end A.D. 352
Reference(s) – Cohen 69. Bastien 194 (8). RIC VIII Lugdunum 145 (C)
maridvnvm
RI_171a_img.jpg
171 - Magnentius - RIC VIII Lugdunum 11218 viewsObv:– D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, Rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FELICITAS REIPVBLICE, Emperor in military dress standing left, holding Victory on globe and standard with Chi-Rho on banner
Minted in Lugdunum (RSLG in exe). 19th January A.D. 350 – 18th August A.D. 353
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 112
maridvnvm
RI 171c img.jpg
171 - Magnentius - RIC VIII Lugdunum 12619 viewsObv:– D N MAGNEN-TIVS P F AVG, Bare-headed, draped & cuirassed bust right; A behind head
Rev:– VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE, Two Victories supporting wreath inscribed VOT/V/MVLT/X
Minted in Lugdunum (SV/RPLG).
Reference:– Cohen 68. RIC VIII Lugdunum 126. Bastien 174 (12 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI_172b_img.jpg
172 - Decentius as Caesar - AE Double Cententionalis21 viewsObv:- DN DECENTIVS NOB CAES; Cuirassed bust facing right.
Rev:- SALVS DD NN AVG ET CAES; Large Chi-Rho flanked by A and W
Minted in Lugdunum (//?SLG)
maridvnvm
StUrbainLeopoldILorraineBridge.JPG
1727. Leopold I: Reconstruction Of The Bridge In The Forest Of Haye. 71 viewsObv: Leopold to right, in peruke, wearing armor and the Order of the Golden Fleece LEOPOLDVS. I. D.G. DVX. LOT. BAR. REX. IER
Rev: A traveling horseman going over bridge toward Abundance in countryside. In background landscape a herm of Mercury PROVIDENTIA. PRINCIPIS
Exergue: VIAE. MVNITAE MDCCXXVII Signed: SV.
AE64mm. Ref: Forrer V, p. 309, #6; Slg. Florange 171; Molinari 40/120; Europese Penningen # 1739

Leopold Joseph Charles (Leopold I) (1679-1729), Duke of Lorraine and Bar (1697), was the son of Charles V, Duke of Lorraine and Bar. This medal commemorates further the many reconstruction projects that Leopold I, Duke of Lorraine and Bar, fostered during his reign, in this case, the reconstruction of the bridge in the forest of Haye. The reverse alludes to the fact that the bridge increased commerce (Mercury) in Lorraine and led to more abundance for its inhabitants.
A herm, referred to in this medal, is a statue consisting of the head of the Greek god Hermes mounded on a square stone post. Hermes is the god of commerce, invention, cunning and theft, who also serves as messenger and herald for the other gods.
LordBest
nantes.JPG
1738 - mairie de Nantes15 viewscuivre
8,37g
28mm
mairie de François de la Haye Moricaud
DE LA MAIRIE DE MR DE LA HAYE MORICAUD
Dans un cartouche, écu aux armes du maire (d’argent, à trois têtes de Maures de sable tortillées d’argent.) timbré d'une couronne de marquis
NON REGIT INVITAM
"Il ne dirige pas la ville malgré elle"
1738
Ecu ovale sur un cartouche, des armes de la ville de Nantes : vaisseau Nantais voguant à gauche, au chef chargé d' hermines, surmonté d'une couronne comtale, le tout entouré de la cordelière
PYL
RI_175ac_img.jpg
175 - Constantius Gallus - AE3 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 192 32 viewsAE3
Obv:– DN CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right
Rev:– FEL TEMP - REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is bare headed, reaching back towards the emperor
Minted in Lugsunum (//GSLG),
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 192 (R2).

1.85 gms. 17.74 mm. 0 degrees.

Harder to find than I imagined.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_176k_img.jpg
176 - Julian II - AE3 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 195 29 viewsAE3
Obv:– IMP IVLIANVS NOB CAES, Bare headed draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP - REPARATIO, Soldier spears a horseman on left, one hand holding the neck of the horse & the other back at his attacker; he wears a Phrygian cap
Minted in Lugdunum (// GSLG), 6th November A.D. 355 to Spring A.D. 360
Reference(s) – RIC VIII Lugdunum 195 (R)

2.18 gms. 18.35 mm. 0 degrees.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 176b img.jpg
176 - Julian II - RIC VIII Lugdunum 19967 viewsObv:– C L IVLIANVS NOB C, Bare headed draped and cuirassed bust right, M to left of bust
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spears a horseman on left, one hand holding the neck of the horse & the other back at his attacker
Minted in Lugdunum (//GSLG), 6th November A.D. 355 to Spring A.D. 360
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 199 (R)
maridvnvm
1812_BRITISH_NAVAL_HALFPENNY.JPG
1812 AE Non-local Halfpenny Token. Stockton on Tees, Yorkshire.21 viewsObverse: ENGLAND EXPECTS EVERY MAN TO DO HIS DUTY •. Bust of Horatio Nelson facing left.
Reverse: BRITISH NAVAL HALPPENNY (sic). Three masted ship, probably H.M.S. Victory, sailing right, 1812 in panel below.
Edge: Centre Grained.
Diameter 30mm | Die Axis 6
Withers: 1590 | Davis: 150 (Yorkshire)

The dies for this token were, according to some sources, engraved by Thomas Wyon. Though the manufacturer of the token is unknown, it was most likely struck in Birmingham.

Issued from Stockton on Tees, this token seems to have been struck to commemorate the Battle of Trafalgar which took place in 1805, and in which Nelson was killed. The issuer is uncertain but it was probably Robert Christopher and Thomas Jennett.
Robert Christopher & Thomas Jennett were booksellers and printers in Stockton, they were also the Stockton agents for the Sun Fire Office.
Jennett was Christopher's apprentice and on the completion of his indentures, he was taken into partnership. Matching the high standards of his companion, Jennett became well known and much respected, growing to be a man of power and influence. He became a magistrate and was mayor of Stockton three times.
*Alex
IMG_4604~0.JPG
183. Decentius (351-353 A.D.) 8 viewsAv.: DN DECENTIVS NOB CAES
Rv.: VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE
Ex.: RSLG

AE Maiorina Ø22-25 / 5.8g
RIC VIII 122 Lyons
Scarce!
Juancho
Belgium1836.jpg
1836: Two centimes of Leopold I27 viewsKing Leopold I. 2 Centimes. 1836.

Seated lion guarding the Belgian Constitution of 1831 surrounded by the legend L'UNION FAIT LA FORCE ("Strength through Union") / "L" monogram of Leopold I, surrounded by legend LEOPOLD PREMIER - ROI DES BELGES 1836.
Belisarius
Belgium_(1845)_-_1_cent.jpg
1845: One centime of Leopold I9 viewsKing Leopold I. 1 Centime. 1845.

Seated lion guarding the Belgian Constitution of 1831 surrounded by the legend L'UNION FAIT LA FORCE ("Strength through Union") / "L" monogram of Leopold I, surrounded by legend LEOPOLD PREMIER - ROI DES BELGES 1845.
Belisarius
Leopold_20centimes1.jpg
1853: Twenty centimes of Leopold I17 viewsKing Leopold I. 20 Centimes. 1853.

Coat of arms of Belgium, surrounded by foliage, surrounded by the legend L'UNION FAIT LA FORCE ("Strength through Union") 1853 / Neoclassical portrait of Leopold I, left, surrounded by legend LEOPOLD PREMIER - ROI DES BELGES.
Belisarius
Belgium1857.jpg
1857: Five centimes of Leopold I19 viewsKing Leopold I. 5 Centimes. 1857.

Seated lion guarding the Belgian Constitution of 1831 surrounded by the legend L'UNION FAIT LA FORCE ("Strength through Union") / "L" monogram of Leopold I, surrounded by legend LEOPOLD PREMIER - ROI DES BELGES 1857.
Belisarius
LeoI.jpg
1861: Ten centimes of Leopold I16 viewsKing Leopold I. Cupro-nickel 10 Centimes. 1861.

Lion surrounded by legend L'UNION FAIT LA FORCE 1861. / 10 Centimes surrounded by LEOPOLD PREMIER ROI DES BELGES. Cupro-nickel.
Belisarius
Leopold_20centimes2.jpg
1861: Twenty centimes of Leopold I24 viewsKing Leopold I. 20 Centimes. 1861.

Lion surrounded by legend L'UNION FAIT LA FORCE 20 Cs. / 10 Centimes surrounded by LEOPOLD I ROI DES BELGES 1861. Cupro-nickel.
Belisarius
5cl1.jpg
1863: Five centimes of Leopold I13 viewsKing Leopold I. 5 Centimes. 1863.

Lion surrounded by legend L'UNION FAIT LA FORCE 1863. / 5 Centimes surrounded by LEOPOLD PREMIER ROI DES BELGES. Cupro-nickel.
Belisarius
c~0.jpg
1864 Belgium 10 Centimes Leopold I 28 viewsancientone
5fr.jpg
1869: Five franks of Leopold II13 viewsKing Leopold II. Silver 5 Francs. 1869

Coat of arms of Belgium, surrounded by foliage, surrounded by the legend L'UNION FAIT LA FORCE ("Strength through Union") 1869 / Neoclassical portrait of Leopold II, surrounded by legend LEOPOLD II ROI - DES BELGES.
Belisarius
Stotinka.jpg
1887-1918 AD - Ferdinand I - Bulgarian Stotinka101 viewsPrince: Ferdinand I (r. 1887-1918 AD (Tsar after 1908 AD))
Date: 1905 AD
Condition: Mediocre
Denomination: 1 Stotinka

Obverse: Cyrillic Legend
Bulgarian Coat of Arms.

Reverse: 1 STOTINKA (in Cyrillic) 1905 within wreath.

0.75g, 15.0mm, 180°
Pep
Columbian_Expo_History_Medal.JPG
1893 Columbian Exposition "Discovery of America" Medal18 viewsObv: SIGNING OF DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE - JULY 4TH 1776, a scene of the Signing taking place in Independence Hall; a banner inscribed: "WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION;" an eagle, with spread wings, atop a shield; to the left is a portrait of COLUMBUS, to the right is a portrait of WASHINGTON; CHICAGO below.

Rev: DISCOVERY OF AMERICA, a scene of Columbus's landing; a banner inscribed: "OCTOBER 1492;" a scene of the Pilgrims landing at Plymouth; DEC. 1620; LANDING OF THE PILGRIMS.

Designed by Charles Reinsch; Struck by S. D. Childs & Co., Chicago.

White metal; Diameter: 58.44 mm

HK-157 (WM), Eglit 36 (WM)
Matt Inglima
IMG_2682.JPG
190 Caracalla39 viewsCaracalla AD 198-217. Bronze (AR; 18-19mm; 3.40g; 12h) ancient forgery, regular style. ANTONINVS PIVS – AVG BRIT Laureate head of Caracalla to right. Rev. INDVLG FECVNDAE Indulgentia, veilded, towered, draped, seated left on curule chair, extending right hand and holding secptre, pointing upwards to right, in left.

cf. BMCRE V p. 370, 74 and pl. 55.3; cf. C. 104.

ex DS
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
1centfr.jpg
1901: One centime of Leopold II (fr)15 viewsKing Leopold II. 1 Centime. 1901.

Seated lion guarding the Belgian Constitution of 1831 surrounded by the legend L'UNION FAIT LA FORCE ("Strength through Union") / "L" monogram of Leopold II, surrounded by legend LEOPOLD II ROI - DES BELGES 1901.
Belisarius
1centnl.jpg
1901: One centime of Leopold II (nl)13 viewsKing Leopold II. 1 Centimes. 1901.

Seated lion guarding the Belgian Constitution of 1831 surrounded by the legend EENDRACHT MAAKT MACHT ("Strength through Union") / "L" monogram of Leopold II, surrounded by legend LEOPOLD II KONING - DER BELGEN 1901.
Belisarius
lii10centimesfr.jpg
1902: Ten centimes of Leopold II (fr)14 viewsKing Leopold II. Ten Centimes. 1902.

Spray of leaves with legend 10 CES./Monogram of Leopold II, with legend ROYAUME DE BELGIQUE 1902
Belisarius
lii5centimesfr.jpg
1905: Five centimes of Leopold II (fr)16 viewsKing Leopold II. Five Centimes. 1905.

Spray of leaves with legend 5 CES./Monogram of Leopold II, with legend ROYAUME DE BELGIQUE 1905.
Belisarius
Lii25centimesnl.jpg
1908: Twenty-five centimes of Leopold II (nl)12 viewsKing Leopold II. Twenty-five Centimes. 1908.

Spray of leaves with legend 25 CEN./Monogram of Leopold II, with legend KONINKRIJK BELGIE 1908
Belisarius
Belgium_(1915)_-_5_Cents.jpg
1915: Five centimes of the General Governorate of Belgium8 viewsGeneral Governorate of Belgium (1914-18). Zinc 5 Centimes. 1915

5 CENT surrounded by legend BELGIQUE-BELGIE 1915 / Belgian Lion rampant surrounded by vines.
Belisarius
Belgium_(1916)_-_25_Centimes.jpg
1915: Twenty-five centimes of the General Governorate of Belgium7 viewsGeneral Governorate of Belgium (1914-18). Zinc 25 Centimes. 1915.

25 CENT surrounded by legend BELGIQUE-BELGIE 1915 / Belgian Lion rampant surrounded by vines.
Belisarius
Belgium_(1916)_-_10_Centimes.jpg
1916: Ten centimes of the General Governorate of Belgium25 viewsGeneral Governorate of Belgium (1914-18). Zinc 10 Centimes. 1916.

10 CENT surrounded by legend BELGIQUE-BELGIE 1916 / Belgian Lion rampant surrounded by vines.
Belisarius
50_Centimes_1918.jpg
1918: Fifty centimes of the General Governorate of Belgium7 viewsGeneral Governorate of Belgium (1914-18). 50 Centimes. 1918.

Belgian coat of arms on spray of leaves / BELGIE - BELGIQUE 1918 around a star. Zinc.
Belisarius
Belgium1fr.jpg
1922: One franc of Albert I (nl)5 viewsKing Albert I. 1 Franc (Dutch version). 1923.

Belgica, the female personification of Belgium, kneeling in mourning with sword and shield slung BELGIE / Caduceus with inter-twined snakes GOED VOOR 1922.
Belisarius
Belgium50c.jpg
1923: Fifty centimes of Albert I (nl)3 viewsKing Albert I. 50 Centimes (Dutch version). 1923.

Belgica, the female personification of Belgium, kneeling in mourning with sword and shield slung BELGIE / Caduceus with inter-twined snakes GOED VOOR 50 CES. 1923
Belisarius
Belgium2fr.jpg
1923: Two francs of Albert I (fr)9 viewsKing Albert I. 2 Francs (French version). 1923.

Belgica, the female personification of Belgium, kneeling in mourning with sword and shield slung BELGIQUE / Caduceus with inter-twined snakes BON POUR 2 F 1923
Belisarius
Alberti.jpg
1930: Five francs of Albert I (nl)5 viewsKing Albert I. Cupro-nickel 5 Francs or 1 Belga. 1930.

Bust of Albert I facing left, legend ALBERT KONING - DER BELGEN / EEN BELGA - 5 FRANK 1930 surrounded by wreath and crown.
Belisarius
s-1932-6c.jpg
1932F ALEXIUS AE HALF TETARTERON S-1932 DOC 45 CLBC 2.4.8 22 views
OBV Patriarchal cross on two steps.

REV Bust of emperor wearing stemma divitision and jeweled loros and in r. hand holding jeweled scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Size 16/14mm

Weight 1.1gm



DOC lists 42 examples with weights ranging from .59gm to 3.22gm and sizes ranging from 13mm to 18mm

This example has the inscription on the cross reversed. Also the design of the cross is a bit more elaborate. I believe this to be a barbarous imitation. Current studies have this style from a Bulgarian mint.
Simon
Belgium_(1938)_-_5_Centimes.jpg
1938: Five centimes of Leopold III12 viewsKing Leopold III. Cupro-nickel 10 Centimes. 1938.

Monogram of Leopold III with 1938 / Three provincial coats of arms.
Belisarius
Belgium_(1938)_-_25_Centimes.jpg
1938: Twenty-five centimes of Leopold III15 viewsKing Leopold III. Cupro-nickel 25 Centimes. 1938.

Monogram of Leopold III with 1938 / Three provincial coats of arms.
Belisarius
Belgium_(1939)_-_5_Francs.jpg
1939: Five francs of Leopold III13 viewsKing Leopold III. Cupro-nickel 5 Francs. 1939.

Seated lion, right, with 1939 / Three provincial coats of arms.
Belisarius
Belgium_(1939)_-_1_Franc.jpg
1939: One franc of Leopold III13 viewsKing Leopold III. Cupro-nickel 1 Franc. 1939.

Seated lion, right, with 1939 / Three provincial coats of arms.
Belisarius
Belgium_(1939)_-_10_Centimes.jpg
1939: Ten Centimes of Leopold III23 viewsKing Leopold III. Cupro-nickel 10 Centimes. 1939.

Monogram of Leopold III with 1939 / Three provincial coats of arms.
Belisarius
lyons1.jpg
194 Crispus18 viewsobv: FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES laur. drp. cuir. bust l.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE CAESS campgate with two turrents star above
ex:PLG
hill132
Belgium_(1941)_-_5_Centimes.jpg
1941: Five centimes of the Military Administration of Belgium15 viewsKing Leopold III and the Military Administration of Belgium. Zinc 5 Centimes. 1941.

Monogram of Leopold III with 1941 / Three provincial coats of arms.
Belisarius
Belgium_(1942)_-_10_Centimes.jpg
1942: Ten centimes of the Military Administration of Belgium5 viewsKing Leopold III and the Military Administration of Belgium. Zinc 10 Centimes. 1942.

Monogram of Leopold III with 1942 / Three provincial coats of arms.
Belisarius
lyons2.jpg
195 Crispus13 viewsobv: FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES laur. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE CAESS campgate with two turrents star above
ex: dot in doorway//PLG
hill132
5fr_Leopold_iii.jpg
1950: Five francs of Leopold III/Baudouin (nl)17 viewsKing Leopold III or Baudouin. 5 Francs. 1950.

An oak branch underneath a crown, legend: 5 FR. BELGIE. / Head of Ceres and a cornucopia.
Belisarius
100francs.jpg
1950: Hundred francs of Leopold III (fr)21 viewsKing Leopold III. Silver 100 Francs. 1950.

Belgian coat of arms with legend 100 FR - BELGIQUE / Busts of all Kings of the Belgians (left to right: Leopold III, Albert I, Leopold II, Leopold I) with crown and star.
Belisarius
NeroAsGenAug.jpg
1ar Nero54 views54-68

As

Bare head, right, IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR P P P
Genius, GENIO AVGVSTI

RIC 86

Suetonius wrote: Nero was born nine months after the death of Tiberius, at Antium, at sunrise on the 15th of December (AD 37). . . . While he was still a young stripling he took part in a successful performance of the Troy Game in the Circus, in which he exhibited great self-possession. At the age of twelve or so (sometime in AD 50), he was adopted by Claudius, who appointed Annaeus Seneca, already a member of the Senate, as his tutor. The following night, it is said, Seneca dreamed that his young charge was really Caligula, and Nero soon proved the dream prophetic by seizing the first opportunity to reveal his cruel disposition. . . . After Claudius’s death (AD 54) had been announced publicly, Nero, who was not quite seventeen years old, decided to address the Guards in the late afternoon, since inauspicious omens that day had ruled out an earlier appearance. After being acclaimed Emperor on the Palace steps, he was carried in a litter to the Praetorian Camp where he spoke to the Guards, and then to the House where he stayed until evening. He refused only one of the many honours that were heaped upon him, that of ‘Father of the Country’, and declined that simply on account of his youth.

Eutropius summarized: To him succeeded NERO, who greatly resembled his uncle Caligula, and both disgraced and weakened the Roman empire; he indulged in such extraordinary luxury and extravagance, that, after the example of Caius Caligula, he even bathed in hot and cold perfumes, and fished with golden nets, which he drew up with cords of purple silk. He put to death a very great number of the senate. To all good men he was an enemy. At last he exposed himself in so disgraceful a manner, that he danced and sung upon the stage in the dress of a harp-player and tragedian. He was guilty of many murders, his brother, wife, and mother, being put to death by him. He set on fire the city of Rome, that he might enjoy the sight of a spectacle such as Troy formerly presented when taken and burned.

In military affairs he attempted nothing. Britain he almost lost; for two of its most noble towns4 were taken and levelled to the ground under his reign. The Parthians took from him Armenia, and compelled the Roman legions to pass under the yoke. Two provinces however were formed under him; Pontus Polemoniacus, by the concession of King Polemon; and the Cottian Alps, on the death of King Cottius.

15 When, having become detestable by such conduct to the city of Rome, and being deserted at the same time by every one, and declared an enemy by the senate, he was sought for to be led to punishment (the punishment being, that he should be dragged naked through the streets, with a fork placed under his head,5 be beaten to death with rods, and then hurled from the Tarpeian rock), he fled from the palace, and killed himself in a suburban villa of one of his freed-men, between the Salarian and Nomentane roads, at the fourth milestone from the city. He built those hot baths at Rome, which were formerly called the Neronian, but now the Alexandrian. He died in the thirty-second year of his age, and the fourteenth year of his reign; and in him all the family of Augustus became extinct.

Having successfully dispatched his scheming mother Agrippina in 59 and survived a decade on the throne, Nero must have felt like a genius when this was minted ca 64 AD!
1 commentsBlindado
FaustinaIIAsJuno.jpg
1bk Faustina Junior147 viewsWife of Marcus Aurelius. 131-176

As
Draped bust, left, FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL
Juno seated left holding the three graces and scepter, peacock at feet, IVNO SC

The daughter of Antoninus Pius, wife of Aurelius, and mother of Commodus, Faustina had a box seat to witness the end of the Golden Age. She bore Aurelius at least 13 children and accompanied him on his military campaigns, yet years later had her reputation impuned for alleged adultery.

The reverse is RIC 1400, for which only right-facing busts are listed.

From Curtis Clay: "This is a rev. type that used to be very rare, even with bust right, but quite a few specimens have emerged from Bulgaria since the fall of the Iron Curtain.

I had a specimen with bust left myself, acquired from Baldwin's c. 1970, which is now in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

A VF specimen with bust left, from the same dies as yours, was in CNG E54, 4 Dec. 2002, 145 = CNG 57, 4 April 2001, 1292.

Still an interesting and scarce reverse type, and rare with bust left, a variety that is hard to find on any Roman coin of Faustina II !" Thank you, Curtis!
Blindado
DidJulSestConMil.jpg
1bq Didius Julianus93 views193

Sestertius

Laureate head, right, IMP CAES M DID SEVER IVLIAN AVG
Concorde w/ standard, CONCORDIA MILIT SC

RIC 14

According to the Historia Augusta: Didius Julianus. . . was reared at the home of Domitia Lucilla, the mother of the Emperor Marcus. . . . [T]hrough the support of Marcus he attained to the office of aedile [and] praetor. After his praetorship he commanded the XXII Legion, the Primigenia, in Germany, and following that he ruled Belgium long and well. Here, with auxiliaries hastily levied from the provinces, he held out against the Chauci as they attempted to burst through the border; and for these services, on the recommendation of the Emperor, he was deemed worthy of the consulship. He also gained a crushing victory over the Chatti. Next he took charge of Dalmatia and cleared it of the hostile tribes on its borders. Then he governed Lower Germany. . . .

His consulship he served with Pertinax; in the proconsulship of Africa, moreover, he succeeded him. Pertinax always spoke of him as his colleague and successor. After [Pertinax'] death, when Sulpicianus was making plans to be hailed emperor in the camp, Julianus, together with his son-in-law, . . . discovered two tribunes, Publius Florianus and Vectius Aper, who immediately began urging him to seize the throne; and. . . conducted him to the praetorian camp. When they arrived at the camp, however, Sulpicianus, the prefect of the city and the father-in-law of Pertinax, was holding an assembly and claiming the empire himself, and no one would let Julianus inside, despite the huge promises he made from outside the wall. Julianus then . . . wrote on placards that he would restore the good name of Commodus; so he was admitted and proclaimed emperor. . . .

Julianus had no fear of either the British or the Illyrian army; but being chiefly afraid of the Syrian army, he despatched a centurion of the first rank with orders to murder Niger. Consequently Pescennius Niger in Syria and Septimius Severus in Illyricum, together with the armies which they commanded, revolted from Julianus. But when he received the news of the revolt of Severus, whom he had not suspected, then he was greatly troubled and came to the senate and prevailed upon them to declare Severus a public enemy. . . . Severus was approaching the city with a hostile army. . . and the populace hated and laughed at him more and more every day.

In a short time Julianus was deserted by all and left alone in the Palace with one of his prefects, Genialis, and with Repentinus, his son-in-law. Finally, it was propose'd that the imperial power be taken away from Julianus by order of the senate. This was done, and Severus was forthwith acclaimed emperor, while it was given out that Julianus had taken poison. Nevertheless, the senate despatched a delegation and through their efforts Julianus was slain in the Palace by a common soldier. . . .
Blindado
ElagabDenEleg.jpg
1bz Elagabalus_218 views218-222

Denarius

Laureate, horned & draped bust rightt, IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing from patera over lit tripod altar, holding branch, star in field left, SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG

RIC 146

The Historia Augusta, in the life of Caracalla, notes: Bassianus lived for forty-three years and ruled for six. . . . He left a son, who afterward received, like his father, the name Antoninus Marcus Antoninus Elagabalus; for such a hold had the name of the Antonines that it could not be removed from the thoughts of the people, because it had taken root in the hearts of all, even as had the name of Augustus.

In the life of Macrinus is recorded: Now there was a certain woman of the city of Emesa, called [Julia] Maesa or Varia; she was the sister of Julia, the wife of [Septimius] Severus Pertinax the African, and after the death of Antoninus Bassianus she had been expelled from her home in the palace through the arrogance of Macrinus. . . . This woman had two daughters, [Julia Soaemias] and [Julia] Mamaea, the elder of whom was the mother of Elagabalus; he assumed the names Bassianus and Antoninus, for the Phoenicians give the name Elagabalus to the Sun. Elagabalus, moreover, was notable for his beauty and stature and for the priesthood which he held, and he was well known to all who frequented the temple, and particularly to the soldiers. To these, Maesa, or Varia as she was also called, declared that this Bassianus was the son of Antoninus, and this was gradually made known to all the soldiers. Maesa herself, furthermore, was very rich (whence also Elagabalus was most wasteful of money), and through her promises to the soldiers the legions were persuaded to desert Macrinus. . . .

Finally, when he received the imperial power, he took the name Antoninus and was the last of the Antonines to rule the Roman Empire. . . . He was wholly under the control of his mother [Soaemias], so much so, in fact, that he did no public business without her consent, although she lived like a harlot and practised all manner of lewdness in the palace. For that matter, her amour with Antoninus Caracalla was so notorious that Varius, or rather Elagabalus, was commonly supposed to be his son. . . . In short, when Elagabalus' message was read in the senate, at once good wishes were uttered for Antoninus and curses on Macrinus and his son, and, in accordance with the general wish and the eager belief of all in his paternity, Antoninus was hailed as emperor. . . .

After he had spent the winter in Nicomedia, [218-219] living in a depraved manner and indulging in unnatural vice with men, the soldiers soon began to regret that they had conspired against Macrinus to make this man emperor, and they turned their thoughts toward his cousin Alexander, who on the murder of Macrinus had been hailed by the senate as Caesar. . . . Among the base actions of his life of depravity he gave orders that Alexander, whom he had formally adopted, be removed from his presence, saying that he regretted the adoption. Then he commanded the senate to take away from Alexander the name of Caesar. But when this was announced to the senate, there was a profound silence. For Alexander was an excellent youth, as was afterwards shown by the character of his rule, even though, because he was chaste, he was displeasing to his adoptive father he was also, as some declare, his cousin. Besides, he was loved by the soldiers and acceptable to the senate and the equestrian order. Yet the Emperor's madness went the length of an attempt to carry out the basest design; for he despatched assassins to kill Alexander. . . . The soldiers, however, and particularly the members of the guard, either because they knew what evils were in store for Elagabalus, or because they foresaw his hatred for themselves, formed a conspiracy to set the state free. First they attacked the accomplices in his plan of murdering Alexander. . . . Next they fell upon Elagabalus himself and slew him in a latrine in which he had taken refuge.
Blindado
CaurausiusComesAnt.jpg
1ds2 Carausius19 views287-293

AE Antoninianus

Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right, IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG
COMES AVG, Victory standing left holding wreath & palm. ML in ex

RIC 15

Eutropius recorded: During this period, Carausius, who, though of very mean birth, had gained extraordinary reputation by a course of active service in war, having received a commission in his post at Bononia, to clear the sea, which the Franks and Saxons infested, along the coast of Belgica and Armorica, and having captured numbers of the barbarians on several occasions, but having never given back the entire booty to the people of the province or sent it to the emperors, and there being a suspicion, in consequence, that the barbarians were intentionally allowed by him to congregate there, that he might seize them and their booty as they passed, and by that means enrich himself, assumed, on being sentenced by Maximian to be put to death, the imperial purple, and took on him the government of Britain. . . .

With Carausius, however, as hostilities were found vain against a man eminently skilled in war, a peace was at last arranged. At the end of seven years, Allectus, one of his supporters, put him to death, and held Britain himself for three years subsequently, but was cut off by the efforts of Asclepiodotus, praefect of the praetorian guard.
Blindado
115813LG.jpg
2.1 Augustus. AR tetradrachm. 24/23 BC.15 views
Syria, Seleucis and Pieria. Antiochia ad Orontem.(25 mm, 14.98 g, 12 h). Diademed head of Philip I Philadelphos right / [ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ Φ]ΙΛΙΠΠ[ΟΥ] ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥ[Σ ΦΙ]ΛΑΔΕΛΦ[ΟΥ], Zeus Nikephoros seated left, holding Nike and long scepter; in inner left field, monogram of Antioch; below throne, stylized monogram; in exergue, [date]. McAlee 19; Prieur 19; RPC 4142; SC 2491.16; HGC 9, 1360p.
Ruslan K
20 francs Or Belgique 1882.jpg
20 Francs From Belgium, Léopold II54 viewsAU, 21 mm. , Belgium, 1882
Obv: LEOPOLD II ROI DES BELGES, 1882
Rev: L'UNION FAIT LA FORCE, 20 FRS
Jean Paul D
BOTLAUREL_2014.JPG
201454 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
CLICK ON A COIN FOR ITS DETAILS

*Alex
BOTLAUREL_2017.JPG
201769 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
CLICK ON A COIN FOR ITS DETAILS

*Alex
20i-Constantine-Lug-214.jpg
20i. Constantine: Lugdunum.13 viewsAE3, 323 - 324, Lugdunum mint.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS AVG / Laureate bust of Constantine.
Reverse: SARMATIA DEVICTA / Victory advancing, holding trophy and branch, captive seated on ground at right. C in left field.
Mint mark: PLG (crescent)
2.62 gm., 21 mm.
RIC #214; PBCC #318; Sear #16282.
Callimachus
RIC_92_Denario_Forrado_Domiciano.jpg
21-03 - DOMICIANO (81 - 96 D.C.) 17 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA,
Híbrido realizado con cuños que al datarlos por los títulos que ostentaba el Emperador, nos dan dos fechas distintas, a saber: 93 D.C. para el cuño del anverso y 87 D.C. para el del reverso.
Denario Forrado 18 mm 2.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAES DOMIT AVG - GERM P M TR P XIII" - Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
[I] El cuño del anverso se puede datar por los títulos del Emperador (TR P XIII – Recibidos sus poderes de Tribuno por décima tercera vez) en el 93 D.C. Un corte de testeo cruza el busto del Emperador, al parecer a alguien en la antigüedad no lo convenció la falsificación
Rev: "IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P" – Minerva de pié a derecha sobre la proa de una galera, blandiendo una jabalina con mano derecha y portando escudo en la izquierda.
El cuño del reverso se puede datar por los títulos del Emperador (IMP XIIII COS XIII) en el 87 D.C.

Acuñada Con posterioridad al 93 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: Anverso copiado de los utilizados en las emisiones correspondientes a los años 93 y 94 D.C., y el reverso imitando al RIC Vol.II #92 Pag.165 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2730 Pag.495 - BMCRE Vol.2 #103 - Cohen Vol.1 #218 Pag.490 - DVM #19 Pag.110 - CBN #104 - RSC Vol. II #218 Pag.67
mdelvalle
Denario_Domitiano_RIC_92_176_Fourree.jpg
21-04 - DOMICIANO (81 - 96 D.C.) 46 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA,
Híbrido realizado con cuños que al datarlos por los títulos que ostentaba el Emperador, nos dan dos fechas distintas, a saber: 93 D.C. para el cuño del anverso y 87 D.C. para el del reverso.
Denario Forrado 18 mm 2.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAES DOMIT AVG - GERM P M TR P XIII" - Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
[I] El cuño del anverso se puede datar por los títulos del Emperador (TR P XIII – Recibidos sus poderes de Tribuno por décima tercera vez) en el 93 D.C. Un corte de testeo cruza el busto del Emperador, al parecer a alguien en la antigüedad no lo convenció la falsificación
Rev: "IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P" – Minerva de pié a derecha sobre la proa de una galera, blandiendo una jabalina con mano derecha y portando escudo en la izquierda.
El cuño del reverso se puede datar por los títulos del Emperador (IMP XIIII COS XIII) en el 87 D.C.

Acuñada Con posterioridad al 93 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: Anverso copiado de los utilizados en las emisiones correspondientes a los años 93 y 94 D.C., y el reverso imitando al RIC Vol.II #92 Pag.165 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2730 Pag.495 - BMCRE Vol.2 #103 - Cohen Vol.1 #218 Pag.490 - DVM #19 Pag.110 - CBN #104 - RSC Vol. II #218 Pag.67
mdelvalle
LarryW1931.jpg
210 Basil II Bulgaroktonos, AD 976-102567 viewsGold histamenon nomisma, 25mm, 4.40g, aEF
Struck at Constantinople c. AD 1005-1025
+ IhS CIS REX REGNANTIhM, bust of Christ facing, wears pallium, colobium, and nimbus cruciger with crescents; raised right hand, Gospels in left; triple border / + bASIL C CONSTANT b R, facing crowned busts of Basil wearing loros of square pattern (left) and Constantine wearing jeweled chlamys; holding between them with right hands a long plain cross; manus Dei above Basil's head; triple border
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
DOC 6a; Sear 1800; Wroth 12-13
Lawrence Woolslayer
OTA300-14.jpg
22. Celtic AR tetradrachm - SATTELKOPFPFERD type - c.125-75 BC441 viewsobv: stylized, laureated Lysimachos head right
rev: horse walking left with stylized rider made up of three dots and a leg. All within incuse - somewhat scyphate
ref: Göbl OTA 300-14; Slg. Lanz 648ff; Pink 305; Preda: Varteju-Bucarest type
mint: epicentre Muntenia
8.04gms, 22mm

Tetradrachm of geto-dacian tribes.
Description of this type see my East celtic coins topic at the Classical Numismatics
berserker
22125a.jpg
22125 Caracalla/Dea Caelestis29 viewsANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Laureate bust right, draped.
INDVLGENTIA AVGG IN CARTH
Dea Caelestis, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, riding lion over waters.
RIC 130a. 3.00g, 17mm, 6h
Ex Roma Numismatics
AD 204
2 commentsBlayne W
OTA300-14-2.jpg
23. Celtic AR tetradrachm - SATTELKOPFPFERD type - c.125-75 BC397 viewsobv: stylized, laureated Lysimachos head right
rev: horse walking left with stylized rider made up of three dots and a leg. All within incuse - somewhat scyphate
ref: Göbl OTA 300-14; Slg. Lanz 648ff; Pink 305; Preda: Varteju-Bucarest type
mint: epicentre Muntenia
7.53gms, 21mm

Tetradrachm of geto-dacian tribes.
Description of this type see my East celtic coins topic at the Classical Numismatics
berserker
1343_P_Sabina_RPC2544.jpg
2544 LYDIA, Saitta Sabina, Dionysos standing8 viewsReference.
RPC III 2544; Wa 5172; Paris 1060; BMC -; SNG Cop. -; SNG v. Aulock 8246

Obv. ϹΑΒΕΙΝΑ ϹΕΒΑϹΤΗ
Draped bust of Sabina, right

Rev. ϹΑΙΤΤΗΝΩΝ
Dionysus standing l., holding cantharus in his r. hand, l. resting on thyrsus; at his feet, panther

4.10 gr
18 mm
6h

Note.
ex Slg. Rolf Jovy, erworben 1968 von Münzen & Medaillen
1 commentsokidoki
rjb_2012_07_08.jpg
260a20 viewsQuietus 260-1 AD
AR antoninianus
Eastern mint
Obv "IMP C FVL QVIETVS PF AVG"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "INDLGENTIAE AVG"
Indulgentia seated left
RIC 5
mauseus
ClGtV18.jpg
268-270 AD - Claudius Gothicus - RIC V 018 - ANNONA AVG33 viewsEmperor: Claudius Gothicus (r. 268-270 AD)
Date: 268-270 AD
Condition: aFine
Denomination: Antoninianus

Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Imperator Caesar Claudius Emperor
Bust right; radiate and cuirassed

Reverse: ANNONA AVG
The Emperor provides wheat.
Annona standing left, foot on prow, holding ears of corn and cornucopiae.

Rome mint
RIC V Claudius Gothicus 18; VM 5
2.52g; 21.6mm; 0°
Pep
ClGtV32or33.jpg
268-270 AD - Claudius Gothicus - RIC V 032 or 033 - FELICITAS AVG27 viewsEmperor: Claudius Gothicus (r. 268-270 AD)
Date: 268-270 AD
Condition: Fine
Denomination: Antoninianus

Obverse: IMP (C?) CLAVDIVS AVG
Imperator Emperor Claudius
Head right; radiate

Reverse: FELICITAS AVG
The Emperor provides happiness and success.
Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopia.
"B" in right field (Rome mint, second officina)

RIC V 32 or 33, VM 10
2.47g; 21.8mm; 180°
Pep
ClGtV91or92.jpg
268-270 AD - Claudius Gothicus - RIC V 091 or 092 - PROVIDENT AVG30 viewsEmperor: Claudius Gothicus (r. 268-270 AD)
Date: 268-270 AD
Condition: Fair/VF
Denomination: Antoninianus

Obverse: IMP (C?) CLAVDIVS AVG
Imperator Emperor Claudius
Bust right; radiate and draped or cuirassed

Reverse: PROVIDENT AVG
The Emperor has foresight.
Providentia standing left, leaning on column.
"XII" in right field

Rome mint
RIC V Claudius Gothicus 91 or 92
3.72g; 18.1mm; 165°
Pep
ClGtV104.jpg
268-270 AD - Claudius Gothicus - RIC V 104 - VICTORIA AVG27 viewsEmperor: Claudius II Gothicus (r. 268-270 AD)
Date: 268-270 AD
Condition: Fine
Denomination: Antoninianus

Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Imperator Caesar Emperor Claudius
Bust right; radiate and cuirassed

Reverse: VICTORIA AVG
The Emperor is victorious.
Victory standing left, holding wreath and palm.

Rome mint
RIC V Claudius Gothicus 104; VM 35
3.38g; 20.1mm; 0°
Pep
ClGtV187.jpg
268-270 AD - Claudius Gothicus - RIC V 187 - PROVIDEN AVG33 viewsEmperor: Claudius Gothicus (r. 268-270 AD)
Date: 268-270 AD
Condition: Fair
Denomination: Antoninianus

Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG
Imperator Claudius Emperor
Bust right; radiate and cuirassed

Reverse: PROVIDEN AVG
The Emperor has foresight.
Providentia standing left, holding baton and cornucopiae; at foot, globe.
"II" in right field

Siscia mint, second officina
RIC V Claudius Gothicus 187
2.83g; 21.0mm; 345°
Pep
1232_P_Hadrian_RPC2767var_.JPG
2767 CILICIA, Syedra. Hadrian, Goddess standing14 viewsReference.
RPC III 2767 var.; SNG Levante Suppl. 73 var.; SNG France 632 var.; SNG Pfalz 1153-1154 var

Obv. AYT AΔPIANOC KAICA
Laureate and cuirassed bust right

Rev. CYE-ΔP/N ω
Goddess wearing long chiton standing facing, head l., holding patera in r. hand, l. resting on sceptre

3.54 gr
20mm
12h

Note.
Obv. legend: AYT, not AYTO; rev. legend: ΕⲰ-Ν is retrograde
ex Slg. Dr. Theodor Grewer
1 commentsokidoki
513_P_Hadrian_RPC_2818.JPG
2818 PISIDIA, Selge Hadrian AE 24 two styrax-trees23 viewsReference.
RPC 3, 2818; BMC 68-69

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΑΙСΑΡ
laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r., with paludamentum, and Triskeles countermark

Rev. СΕΛ-ΓΕΩΝ
large quadrangular base on which two styrax-trees in boxes; l. and r., altar

7.42 gr
23 mm
5h
okidoki
513_P_Hadrian_RPC_2818~0.JPG
2818 PISIDIA, Selge Hadrian AE 24 two styrax-trees4 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2818; BMC 68-69; c/m Triskeles countermark

Rev. СΕΛ-ΓΕΩΝ
large quadrangular base on which two styrax-trees in boxes; l. and r., altar

7.42 gr
23 mm
6h
okidoki
347_P_Hadrian.jpg
2819 PISIDIA, Selge Hadrian AE 20 Thunderbolt and club22 viewsReference.
RPC 3, 2819; SNG France 2010-12

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΑΙСΑΡ
laureate bust right

Rev. CEΛΓΕΩΝ/SELGEWN
Winged thunderbolt between bow and club

6.21 gr
20 mm
12h
okidoki
240_P_Hadrian__SNG_france_2010.jpg
2820 PISIDIA, Selge Hadrian AE 20 Thunderbolt25 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2820; SNG France 2010

Obv. ΗΑΔΡΙΑΝ ΚΑΙCAP,
laureate bust right countermark Triskeles

Rev. CEΛΓΕΩΝ
thunderbolt, bow with stag heads on top.

3.87 gr
19 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
rjb_2009_12_11.jpg
28620 viewsMaximianus I 286-305 AD
AE antoninianus
Rome Mint
IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
IOVI FVLGERATORI
Jupiter standing left, eagle at feet to left
-/-/XXIΓ
RIC 510
mauseus
IMG_2647.JPG
3 Constans29 viewsConstans
officina 1; 348-350 CE 4.13g
D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG Rosette diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand.
FEL TEMP REPAR-ATIO Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points up and to the right.
PLG in ex
VIII Lyons 85; LRBC 178
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Z2157LG.jpg
308b. Saloninus (AD 258-260)149 viewsSon of Gallienus

Publius Licinius Cornelius Saloninus (242 - 260) was Roman Emperor in 260. His full title was IMP CAESAR CORNELIUS LICINIUS SALONINUS VALERIANUS PF INVICTUS AUG.

Saloninus was born around the year 242. His father was the later emperor Gallienus. In 258 Saloninus was appointed Caesar by his father (just like his older brother Valerian II, who had then just died, two years earlier was) and sent to Gaul, to make sure his father's authority was respected there. Saloninus lived in Cologne during that time of his life.

In 260 (probably in july) Saloninus and his protector, the praetorian prefect Silvanus, had an argument with the usurper Postumus about the distribution of some booty. Both fled to Cologne with some loyal troops and were besieged by Postumus. The troops elevated Saloninus to the rank of Augustus but the city was soon captured by Postumus, and both Saloninus and Silvanus were murdered. Gallienus, being on the other side of the empire could do nothing to stop him. Saloninus was probably emperor for about one month only.

AE Antoninianus (as Caesar)
OB: Radiate, draped bust, right
SALON. VALERIANVS NOB. CAES.
REV: Spes presenting flower to Saloninus
SPES PVBLICA
RIC, Vol. V, Part 1, #36
Antioch mint
1 commentsecoli73
Z2173LG.jpg
309b. Valerian II (AD 256-258)104 viewsCornelius Licinius Valerianus, also known as Valerian II, was the eldest son of the Roman emperor, Gallienus.

Valerian was raised to the title of Caesar shortly after his father was raised to co-emperor with his father, Valerian. He was killed somewhere around the year 257, possibly by Ingenuus who had been charged with his education.

Valerian II (AD 256-258)
AE Antoninianus (AD 255)
OB: Radiate, draped bust, right
VALERIANVS NOBIL CAES.
REV: Prince standing left, holding shield and spear, and crowning trophy
PRINC. IVVENTVTIS
RIC, Vol. V, Part 1, #49
Antioch mint
ecoli73
Sestercio ANTONINO PIO RIC 904.jpg
31-32 - ANTONINO PIO (138 - 161 D.C.)55 viewsAE Sestercio 33 x 31 mm 23.0 gr.

Anv: "ANTONINVS AVG [PIVS P P TR P XVI]" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "INDVLGENTIA [AVG COS IIII]" - Indulgencia sentada a izquierda levantando su brazo derecho y portando cetro en izquierdo.

Acuñada 152 - 153 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #904 Pag.139 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #4183 Pag.221 - BMCRE #1920 - Cohen Vol.II #452 Pag.314 - DVM #75 Pag.138
mdelvalle
RIC_904_Sestercio_Antonino_Pio.jpg
31-40 - ANTONINO PIO (138 - 161 D.C.)16 viewsAE Sestercio 33 x 31 mm 23.0 gr.

Anv: "ANTONINVS AVG [PIVS P P TR P XVI]" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "INDVLGENTIA [AVG COS IIII]" - Indulgencia sentada a izquierda levantando su brazo derecho y portando cetro en izquierdo.

Acuñada 152 - 153 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #904 Pag.139 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #4183 Pag.221 - BMCRE IV #1920 Pag.320 - Cohen Vol.II #452 Pag.314 - DVM #75 Pag.138
mdelvalle
coin252.JPG
312a. Marius28 viewsMarius. AD 269. AE antoninianus.

Marcus Aurelius Marius was emperor of the Gallic Empire in 268.

According to later tradition, he was a blacksmith by trade who rose through the ranks of the Roman army to become an officer. After the death of Postumus he seized power, reportedly for two or three days, before being killed by a sword of his own manufacture.

This tradition is probably partially or entirely incorrect. Based upon the number of coins he issued, a more accurate length for his reign would be at least two or three months. Marius is listed among the Thirty Tyrants in the Historia Augusta.

Denomination : Bronze Antoninianus. Mint : Cologne.

Reference : RIC 5, part 2, page 377 #9. Sear-3155

Size : 16.9 x 18.0 mm Weight : 3.12 grams.

Grade : VF slightly off-centre.

Obverse : Radiate bust of Marius right, with IMP C M AVR MARIVS P F AVG around (the first half of the inscription is off the flan, but IVS P F AVG is clear.

Reverse : Felicitas standing left holding a caduceus and cornucopiae, with SAEC FELICITAS around.

At a glance one could confuse this coin with Postumus, as both Postumus and Marius have similar portraits and the part of the obverse inscription visible could be MVS P F AVG with the first part of the M off the flan. However, Postumus never issued this reverse type, so the coin can only be a Marius. (Description/Coin - Ex- Calgary Coins)
ecoli
4746LG.jpg
320. Carus122 viewsMarcus Aurelius Carus (c. 230 - late July/early August, 283), Roman emperor (282-283), was born probably at Narbona (more correctly, Narona -- now the ruins at Vid, Croatia) in Illyria, but was educated at Rome. He was a senator, and had filled various civil and military posts before he was appointed prefect of the Praetorian Guard by the emperor Probus. After the murder of Probus at Sirmium, Carus was proclaimed emperor by the soldiers.

Although Carus severely avenged the death of Probus, he was himself suspected of having been an accessory to the deed. He does not seem to have returned to Rome after his accession, but contented himself with an announcement of the fact to the Senate.

Bestowing the title of Caesar upon his sons Carinus and Numerian, he left Carinus in charge of the western portion of the empire, and took Numerian with him on the expedition against the Persians which had been contemplated by Probus. Having defeated the Quadi and Sarmatians on the Danube, Carus proceeded through Thrace and Asia Minor, conquered Mesopotamia, pressed on to Seleucia and Ctesiphon, and carried his arms beyond the Tigris.

His hopes of further conquest were cut short by his death. One day, after a violent storm, it was announced that he was dead. His death was variously attributed to disease, the effects of lightning, or a wound received in a campaign against the Huns. However it seems more probable that he was murdered by the soldiers, who were averse to further campaigns against Persia, at the instigation of Arrius Aper, prefect of the Praetorian Guard.

VF/VF Carus AE Antoninianus / Virtus
Attribution: VM 16
Date: 282-283 AD
Obverse: IMP C M AVR CARVS P F AVG, radiate bust r.
Reverse: VIRTVS AVGGG, Carus receiving globe from Jupiter
Size: 20.32 mm
Weight: 2.7 grams
Description: An attractive Carus ant
ecoli73
RPC_11059_Filipopolis_Marco_Aurelio.jpg
33-53 - MARCO AURELIO como Cesar de Antonino Pio (139 - 161 D.C.)15 viewsFILIPOPOLIS en Tracia
(Hoy Plovdiv en Bulgaria )

AE Tetrassaria? 24 mm 8.6 gr

Anv: ”AVPHΛIOC OVHPOC KAICAP” – Busto vestido y a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: ”ΦIΛIΠΠO-ΠOΛEITΩN” – Bonus Eventus desnudo estante de frente, sacrificando con Pátera sobre un Altar a sus pies a su derecha .

Acuñada: 139-161 D.C.

Referencias: RPC IV #11059 - Moushmov #5128 A - Mouchmov, Ph. #96a Pag.224 - Lindgren I #841
mdelvalle
RPC_7444_Filipopolis_Marco_Aurelio.jpg
33-54 - MARCO AURELIO (161 - 180 D.C.)10 viewsFILIPOPOLIS en Tracia
(Hoy Plovdiv en Bulgaria )

AE Assarión? 19 mm 5.0 gr

Anv: ”AV KAI M AVP ANTONEINOC” – Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: ”ΦIΛIΠΠO-ΠOΛEITΩN” – Homonoia/Concordia estante a izquierda, portando Pátera en mano derecha y Cornucopia en izquierda.

Acuñada: 161-180 D.C.

Referencias: RPC IV #7444 - BMC III #11 - Moushmov #5144
mdelvalle
1235_P_Hadrian_Pseudo_RPC3300.JPG
3300 CILICIA, Tarsus, Pseudo-autonomous under Hadrian, Tyche and Zeus14 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3300; SNG France 1424-1429; SNG Levante -; SNG Pfalz 133

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝωΝ ΤΑΡϹΕωΝ
Zeus seated, l., holding Victory and resting on sceptre

Rev. ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΕΩϹ
Tyche of the City, turreted and veiled, seated, r., on seat decorated with foreleg and wing of sphinx, holding ears of corn and poppy-head; at her feet, river-god Kydnos,
crowned with sedge, swimming, r.; the whole in wreath

11.99 gr
27 mm
12h

Note.
ex Slg. Dr. Theodor Grewer
1 commentsokidoki
34-Aethelred-II.jpg
34b. Aethelred II.39 viewsPenny, 991-997, Lincoln mint.
Obverse: ÆÐELRED REX ANGLOX / Bust of Aethelred, scepter in front of face.
Reverse: +COLGRIM M-O LIN / Cross with the letters CRVX in angles.
Moneyer: Colgrim.
1.15 gm., 20 gm.
North #770; Seaby #1148
1 commentsCallimachus
353.jpg
353.jpg31 viewsRemi in Gallia, Région de Reims, ca. 60-40 BC.,
Æ 21 (19-21 mm / 5,45 g), bronze, axes irregular alignment ↑↖ (ca. 320°),
Obv.: [AT]ISOS (downwards before) / [RE]MOS (downwards behind) , beardless head facing left, four-pointed floral ornament behind - Tête à gauche, un torque au cou. Légende devant et derrière la tête. Fleur à quatre pétales derrière la nuque, grènetis.
Rev.: lion at bay left, dolphin below - Anépigraphe. Lion élancé à gauche, la queue entre les pattes et enroulée jusqu'au-dessus du dos. Une esse au-dessus de la croupe, grènetis.
DT. 596 ; LT. 8054 var. ; BMC Celtic 71 ; Scheers 147 ; Allen 'Coins of the Celts', illustrated as nos. 446 and 447 .

thanks to Alan ("Manzikert") for the id

Les Rèmes étaient l'un des peuples les plus puissants de la Gaule et les fidèles alliés des Romains. Le territoire des Rèmes s'étendait sur l'actuelle Champagne, le long de l'Aisne. Ils avaient pour voisins les Atuatuques, les Trévires, les Médiomatriques, les Lingons, les Suessions, les Bellovaques et les Nerviens. Ils dénoncèrent à César la coalition des peuples belges de 57 avant J.-C. dont faisaient partie, les Suessions qui partageaient les mêmes lois et les mêmes magistrats. Leur principal oppidum était Bibrax. La capitale de la civitas à l'époque gallo-romaine était Durocortorum (Reims).

The Remi were a Belgic people of north-eastern Gaul (Gallia Belgica). The Romans regarded them as a civitas, a major and influential polity of Gaul, The Remi occupied the northern Champagne plain, on the southern fringes of the Forest of Ardennes, between the rivers Mosa (Meuse) and Matrona (Marne), and along the river valleys of the Aisne and its tributaries the Aire and the Vesle.
Their capital was at Durocortum (Reims, France) the second largest oppidum of Gaul, on the Vesle. Allied with the Germanic tribes of the east, they repeatedly engaged in warfare against the Parisii and the Senones. They were renowned for their horses and cavalry.
During the Gallic Wars in the mid-1st century BC, they allied themselves under the leadership of Iccius and Andecombogius with Julius Caesar. They maintained their loyalty to Rome throughout the entire war, and were one of the few Gallic polities not to join in the rebellion of Vercingetorix.
Arminius
Denario_Lucilla_RIC_786.jpg
36-02 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)87 viewsAR Denario 19 x 17 mm 2.7 gr.

Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucila (7 de marzo de 150 - 182) fue la hija mayor del emperador romano Marco Aurelio y Faustina la Menor y hermana de Cómodo. En el año 164 d. C., el emperador Marco Aurelio casó a su hija Annia Lucilla, con su socio en el poder y hermano de adopción Lucio Aurelio Vero. Después de la muerte del emperador Lucio Vero en 169, Lucila se volvió a casar, esta vez con Claudius Pompeianus y se entregó al desenfreno y depravación, viviendo incluso una incestuosa relación con su hermano Cómodo. El emperador Cómodo sufrió numerosos complots y después de descubrir algunos de ellos, empezó un periodo de terror en el que numerosas personalidades influyentes fueron acusadas y condenadas a muerte. Incluso sus más allegados, como su esposa Crispina y su hermana Lucila fueron acusadas de traición, deportadas a Caprea (isla de Capri) y más tarde asesinadas. Lucila había realmente conspirado junto con un grupo de senadores, pero durante el año 182 fue descubierta y murió en Capri, por orden de emperador. Los senadores líderes también fueron ejecutados. [Fuente WIKIPEDIA]

Anv: "LVCILLA AVGVSTA"- Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS VICTRIX" - Venus estante a izquierda portando Victoriola en la mano derecha extendida y apoyando la izquierda en un escudo.

Acuñada 166 - 169 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #786 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5492 – BMCRE IV #353 - Cohen Vol.III #89 Pag.222 - DVM #15 Pag.158 – RSC II #89 - MIR.18/45 -4
mdelvalle
RIC_786_Denario_Lucila.jpg
36-02 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)12 viewsAR Denario 19 x 17 mm 2.7 gr.

Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucila (7 de marzo de 150 - 182) fue la hija mayor del emperador romano Marco Aurelio y Faustina la Menor y hermana de Cómodo. En el año 164 d. C., el emperador Marco Aurelio casó a su hija Annia Lucilla, con su socio en el poder y hermano de adopción Lucio Aurelio Vero. Después de la muerte del emperador Lucio Vero en 169, Lucila se volvió a casar, esta vez con Claudius Pompeianus y se entregó al desenfreno y depravación, viviendo incluso una incestuosa relación con su hermano Cómodo. El emperador Cómodo sufrió numerosos complots y después de descubrir algunos de ellos, empezó un periodo de terror en el que numerosas personalidades influyentes fueron acusadas y condenadas a muerte. Incluso sus más allegados, como su esposa Crispina y su hermana Lucila fueron acusadas de traición, deportadas a Caprea (isla de Capri) y más tarde asesinadas. Lucila había realmente conspirado junto con un grupo de senadores, pero durante el año 182 fue descubierta y murió en Capri, por orden de emperador. Los senadores líderes también fueron ejecutados. [Fuente WIKIPEDIA]

Anv: "LVCILLA AVGVSTA"- Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS VICTRIX" - Venus estante a izquierda portando Victoriola en la mano derecha extendida y apoyando la izquierda en un escudo.

Acuñada 166 - 169 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #786 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5492 – BMCRE IV #353 Pag.432 (Plate 59 #10) - Cohen Vol.III #89 Pag.222 - DVM #15 Pag.158 – RSC II #89 Pag.234 - MIR.18/45 -4
mdelvalle
1163Hadrian_RIC361.JPG
361 Hadrian Denarius Roma 134-38 AD Indulgentia42 viewsReference.
RIC 361; C. 845

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P
Laureate, head right

Rev. INDVLGENTIA AVG COS III
Indulgentia, draped, seated left on throne, holding out right hand and holding transverse sceptre in left

3.29 gr
18 mm
6h
4 commentsokidoki
1185Hadrian_RIC365.jpg
365 Hadrian Denarius Roma 134-38 AD Patientia28 viewsReference.
RIC 365; Strack 202; Cohen 1010

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P
Laureate head right.

Rev. PATIENTIA AVGVSTI COS III
Patientia, seated left on low seat, holding out right hand and holding transverse sceptre in left

3.18 gr
17 mm
6h

Note.
BMCRE 525, pl. 57.9 (same reverse die). Cohen 1010 ;RIC II 365
The Reka Devnia hoard contained two specimens of this type, one like ours and one with a draped bust. Strack 202 records the two Reka Devnia coins in Sofia, BMCRE 525, two specimens in Paris, and only three others: Gnecchi Collection, L.A. Lawrence, and Ball VI, 1932, lot 1355. This is the sole appearance of the personification Patientia on Roman coins. Apparently her name was not well received, because it was very soon changed to INDVLGENTIA AVG, and with the new name the identical type, seated female figure extending right hand and holding scepter, was struck in substantial quantity. As Strack and Mattingly suggested, the sense of the Patientia type, since it was soon to be renamed Indulgentia, may have been "endurance of other people's troubles rather than one's own" (BMCRE III, p. cxli).
2 commentsokidoki
RIC_13a_Denario_Pertinax_FORO.jpg
39 - 02 - Pertinax (31/12/192 - 28/3/193 D.C.)32 viewsAR Denario 16 x 17 mm 3.0 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAES P HELV - PERTIN AVG" -Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VOT DECEN TR P COS II" - Emperador togado y velado, estante a der., sacrificando con Pátera sobre un Altar/Trípode a der. y portando rollo en izquierda.

Acuñada: 2da. Emisión Ene.-Mar. 193 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC IVa #13a (R2) Pag.8 – Sear RCV II #6048 Pag.429 - Cohen Vol.III #56 Pag.396 - Salgado II/1 #4003.e Pag.67 - BMCRE V #24/5 Pag.4 - RSC III #56 Pag.2
mdelvalle
IMG_2801.JPG
4 Constantius II14 viewsConstantius II, AE 3, Constantinople, 348-50 AD, 2.04g. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP REPARATIO, radiate phoenix standing right on globe. Mintmark SLG
RIC VIII Lyons 92, R
Randygeki(h2)
coin264.JPG
403. Carausius37 viewsMarcus Aurelius Mausaeus Carausius (d. 293) was a Roman usurper in Britain and northern Gaul (286–293, Carausian Revolt).

Carausius was a man of humble origin, a Menapian from Belgic Gaul who distinguished himself during Maximian's campaign against the Bagaudae rebels in Gaul in 286. As a result, he was appointed to command the Classis Britannica, a fleet based in the English Channel, with the responsibility of eliminating Frankish and Saxon pirates who had been raiding the coast. However, he was suspected of keeping captured treasure for himself, and even of allowing the pirates to carry out raids and enrich themselves before taking action against them, and Maximian ordered his execution. In late 286 or early 287 Carausius learned of this sentence and responded by declaring himself Emperor of Britain and northern Gaul.

He could count on the alliegance of the three legions based in Britain, as well as one in northern Gaul. How he was able to win support from the army when his command had been sea-based is uncertain. The emperor briefly assumed the title Britannicus Maximus in 285, and the British towns of Wroxeter and Caistor by Norwich towns show signs of destruction around this time, so it is possible Carausius won the army's support during military action in Britain shortly before his rebellion. Alternatively, if the accusations of larceny are true, he could perhaps afford to buy their loyalty. He also appears to have appealed to native British dissatisfaction with Roman rule: he issued coins with legends such as Restitutor Britanniae (Restorer of Britain) and Genius Britanniae (Spirit of Britain).

Maximian, busy with wars on the Rhine, was unable to challenge him immediately, but in the Autumn of 288 he began massing troops and ships for an invasion. In 289 an invasion of Britain intended to dislodge him failed badly due to storms, although a naval defeat is also possible. An uneasy peace continued until 293, during which Rome prepared for a second effort to retake the province, while Carausius began to entertain visions of legitimacy and official recognition. He minted his own coins and brought their value in to line with Roman issues as well as acknowledging and honouring Maximian and then Diocletian. Coinage is the main source of information about the rogue emperor; his issues were initially crude but soon became more elaborate and were issued from mints in Londinium, Rotomagnus and a third site, possibly Colonia Claudia Victricensis. A milestone from Carlisle with his name on it suggests that the whole of Roman Britain was in Carausius' grasp.

It has been speculated (namely, by the historian Sheppard Frere) that the rebellion of Carausius endangered Diocletian's vision of a strong, centralized government based on his tetrarchy. In any case, by early 293 Constantius Chlorus had gained control of northern Gaul, including the rebel's stronghold and port of Bononia, on which Carausius was heavily dependent. Constantius built a mole across the harbour mouth to ensure it did not receive maritime aid.

Constantius also regained the allegiance of the rebellious Gallic legion and defeated the Franks of the Rhine mouth who seem to have been working in league with Carausius. Weakened by these setbacks, Carausius was assassinated, possibly at York, by his treasurer, Allectus.

aVF/aVF Carausius Antoninianus / Pax / Green Patina and Nice Style

Attribution: RIC 895
Date: 287-293 AD
Obverse: IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right
Reverse: PAX AVG, Pax standing left, holding branch and transverse sceptre.
Size: 20.91 mm
Weight: 3 grams
ecoli
helena.JPG
405a. Helena106 viewsFlavia Iulia Helena, also known as Saint Helena, Saint Helen, Helena Augusta, and Helena of Constantinople, (c.248 - c.329) was the first wife of Constantius Chlorus, and the mother of Emperor Constantine I. She is traditionally credited with finding the relics of the True Cross.

Many legends surround her. She was allegedly the daughter of an innkeeper. Her son Constantine renamed the city of Drepanum on the Gulf of Nicomedia as 'Helenopolis' in her honor, which led to later interpretions that Drepanum was her birthplace.

Constantius Chlorus divorced her (c.292) to marry the step-daughter of Maximian, Flavia Maximiana Theodora. Helena's son, Constantine, became emperor of the Roman Empire, and following his elevation she became a presence at the imperial court, and received the title Augusta.

She is considered by the Orthodox and Catholic churches as a saint, famed for her piety. Eusebius records the details of her pilgrimage to Palestine and other eastern provinces. She is traditionally credited (but not by Eusebius) with the finding of relics of the True Cross (q.v.), and finding the remains of the Three Wise Men, which currently reside in the Shrine of the Three Kings at Cologne Cathedral. Her feast day as a saint of the Orthodox Christian Church is celebrated with her son on May 21, the Feast of the Holy Great Sovereigns Constantine and Helen, Equal to the Apostles. Her feast day in the Roman Catholic Church falls on August 18.

At least 25 sacred wells currently exist in Britain that were dedicated to her. She is also the patron saint of Colchester.

Helena Follis. FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right / SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE, Securitas standing left, holding branch in right hand; PTR(crescent) in ex.
1 commentsecoli
claudius_diobol_RPC5151.jpg
41-54 AD - CLAUDIUS AE Diobol - struck 42-43 AD50 viewsobv: TI.KLAU.KAI.CEBAC.GERMA (laureate bust right, star before chin)
rev: AYTOKPA (hippopotamus walking right, in exergue LG; = year 3 = 42/3)
ref: Milne 100, Koln 84, RPC 5151, BMCGr 96v, Dattari 166
mint: Alexandria
11.85 gms, 25 mm
Rare
berserker
RIC_10_Denario_DIDIA_CLARA_Foro.jpg
42 - 02 - Didia Clara (Augusta 28/03 a 01/06/193 D.C.)27 viewsAR Denario
18 mm - 2.46 gr. - 6 hs.

Anv: DIDIA CLA-RA AVG, Busto vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: HILA-R - T-EMPOR, Hilaritas estante de frente, viendo a izquierda, portando larga hoja de palma en mano der. y cornucopia en izq.

Hija de Didio Juliano, Emperador que asumió su cargo luego de haberlo ganado en una subasta organizada por la guardia Pretoriana, y que solo gobernó por 66 días.

Acuñada: Mayo-Junio 193 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias Bilbliográficas: RIC IV #10D (R4) Pag.16, Plate I #19 - Seaby RSC #3 Pag.4 - BMCRE #14ss Pag.14 - Cohen III #3 Pag.403 - Sear RCTV II # 6086 Pag.435 - Vagi #1680 - Hunter #1 Pag.6 - DVM #2 Pag.174 - Salgado MRDS II/1 #4042 Pag.71
mdelvalle
Decentius-Lug-137.jpg
42. Decentius.43 viewsAE2, 351 - 353, Lugdunum mint.
Obverse: DN DECENTIVS NOB CAES / Bust of Decentius.
Reverse: VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE / Two Victories holding wreath inscribed VOT V MVLT X. Between them: SP
Mint mark: RSLG
4.71 gm., 22 mm.
RIC #137; LRBC #228; Sear #18882.
1 commentsCallimachus
RIC_2_Denario_Clodio_Albino.jpg
45 - 02 - Clodio Albino (195 - 197 D.C.)28 views "Como Cesar de Septimio Severo"
AR Denario 18 x 17 mm 3.0 gr.

Anv: "D CLOD SEPT ALBIN CAES" - Busto a Cabeza desnuda, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "COS II" - Asclepio de pié a izq., su mano der. sobre la cabeza de una serpiente enrollada en un bastón.

Acuñada: 194 - 195 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #2 Pag.44 – Sear RCV Vol.II #6140 Pag.442 - Cohen Vol.III #9 Pag.416 - Salgado II/1 #4305.f Pag.122 - BMCRE V #88/9 Pag.35 (Plate 8 #1) - RSC III #9 Pag.14 - Hill CSS #138
mdelvalle
RIC_4_Denario_Clodio_Albino.jpg
45 - 04 - Clodio Albino (195-197 D.C.)20 views "Como Cesar de Septimio Severo"
AR Denario 19 mm 3.5 gr.

Anv: "D CLOD SEPT ALBIN CAES" - Busto a Cabeza desnuda, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FELICITAS COS II" - Felicitas de Pié a izquierda, portando caduceo en mano derecha y largo cetro vertical en izquierda..

Acuñada 2da. Emisión (Verano-otoño del 194 D.C.)
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #4 Pag.44 – Sear RCV Vol.II #6141 Pag.443 - Cohen Vol.III #15 Pag.417 - DVM #8 Pag. 177 - RSC III #15 Pag.14 - BMCRE V #91-2 Pag.36 (Plate 8 #3) - Hill CSS #108 - Salgado II/1 #4305.d Pag.122
mdelvalle
RIC_7_Denario_Clodio_Albino.jpg
45 - 07 - Clodio Albino (195-197 D.C.)15 views "Como Cesar de Septimio Severo"
AR Denario 18 x 17 mm 3.1 gr.

Anv: "D CLOD SEPT ALBIN CAES" - Busto a Cabeza desnuda, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "MINER PACIF COS II" - Minerva c/yelmo de pié a izq., portando rama en mano der. y descansando la izq. apoyada sobre un escudo. Una lanza descansando sobre su brazo izq.

Acuñada: 194 - 195 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #7 Pag.45 – Sear RCV Vol.II #6144 Pag.443 - Cohen Vol.III #48 Pag.420 - DVM #15/1 Pag. 177 - RSC III #48 Pag.15 - BMCRE V #98-102 Pag.37 (Plate 8 #6) - Hill CSS #119 - Salgado II/1 #4305.c Pag.122
mdelvalle
RSC_477_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-02a - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)14 viewsAR Denario 17x18 mm 2.4 gr.

Anv: "[L SEPT SEV] PE-RT AVG IMP VIII" – Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FORT R-EDVC" – Fortuna de pié a izquierda vistiendo Modius en la cabeza, portando timón en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y cornucopia en izquierda.

Esta emisión refiere a la partida de Severo para comenzar la Guerra contra Clodio Albino.

Acuñada 2da. Emisión 196 - 197 D.C.
Ceca: Laodicea ad Mare (Laodicée) Siria (Hoy cerca de Denizli Turquía.
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #477 Pag.155 – Sear (1988) #1752 Var. (Leyenda reverso) - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6281 var. (Leyenda reverso) Pag.459 – BMCRE Vol.6 Pag.111 Nota - Cohen Vol.IV #164 Pag.21 - RSC Vol. III #164 Pag.25 - DVM #34/1 Pag. - Salgado II/1 #4172.c.3 Pag.103
mdelvalle
RIC_99_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-03 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)16 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 2.8 gr.

Anv: "L SEPT SEV PERT [AVG] IMP VIIII" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "LIBERO PATRI" - Liber/Baco desnudo de pié de frente coronándose a si mismo con la mano derecha y portando thyrsus en izquierda. A sus piés una pantera.

Acuñada 4ta. Emisión 197 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.2da)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #99 Pag.103 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6307 var Pag.461 - BMCRE V #222-3 Pag.56 (Plate 10 #17) - Cohen Vol.IV #304 Pag.35 - RSC Vol. III #304 Pag.31 - DVM #73 Pag.184 - Hill CSS#280 - Salgado II/1 #4121.b Pag.83
mdelvalle
RIC_106_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-05 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)11 viewsAR Denario 15x17 mm 2.8 gr.

Anv: "L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP [VIIII]" – Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PROFEC-T-[IO AVG]" – El Emperador vestido militarmente galopando a derecha, portando una lanza en la mano derecha.

Esta emisión refiere a la salida hacia el Este del Emperador, para reasumir la conducción de la Guerra contra los Partos, después de derrotar a Clodio Albino en el Oeste.

Acuñada 4ta. Emisión 197 D.C.
Ceca: Roma Off. 4ta.
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #106D Pag.103 – Sear (1988) #1782 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6353 var. (Ceca) Pag.465 – BMCRE V #234-5 Pag.58 (Plate 11 #3) - Cohen Vol.IV #580 Pag.61 - RSC Vol. III #580 Pag.42 - DVM #129 Pag.186 - Hill CSS#2/277 – Foss #19 - Salgado II/1 #4122.i Pag.83
mdelvalle
RIC_118_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-06 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)12 viewsAR Denario 16 mm 3.1 gr.

Anv: "L SEPT SEV PERT - AVG IMP X" – Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PACI AE-TERNAE" – Pax (La Paz) sentada en un trono a izquierda, portando rama de olivo en mano de su brazo derecho extendido y cetro corto en la izquierda.

Esta emisión refiere a una Paz eterna luego de la terminación de la Guerra Civil contra Albino y la victoria sobre los Partos.

Acuñada 5ta. Emisión de princ. de 198 D.C.
Ceca: Roma Off. 2da.
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #118 Pag.105 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6319 Pag.462 – BMCRE V #253/4 Pag.61 (Plate 11 #14) - Cohen Vol.IV #357 Pag.40 - RSC Vol. III #357 Pag.35 - DVM #90 Pag.184 - Hill CSS#2/306 - Salgado II/1 #4122.s.1 Pag.83
mdelvalle
RIC_160c_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-07 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)10 viewsAR Denario 16.5 mm 2.3 gr.

Anv: "L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP X" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VICT AVG G COS II P P" - Victoria avanzando a izquierda portando corona de laureles en mano derecha y hoja de palma en izquierda.

Acuñada 5ta. Emisión princ de 198 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.2da)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #120c Pag.105 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6370 var Pag.467 - BMCRE V #258-60 Pag.62 (Plate 11 #17y18 - Cohen Vol.IV #694 Pag.72 - RSC Vol. III #694 Pag.45 - DVM #152 Pag.187 - Hill CSS#350 - Salgado II/1 #4122.t Pag.83
mdelvalle
RIC_135Ab_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-08 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)14 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 3.1 gr.

Anv: "L SEP SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "MONETA AVGG" - Moneta sentada a izquierda, sosteniendo balanza en mano derecha y cornucopia sobre brazo izquierdo.

Acuñada 3ra. Emisión 198 - 199 D.C.
Ceca: Laodicea ad Mare - Hoy Siria

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #135A (b) Pag.107 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6316 Pag.462 - BMCRE #669/70 Pag.287 (Plate 44 #11) - Cohen Vol.IV #342 Pag.39 - RSC Vol. III #345 Pag.34 - DVM #86 Pag.184 - Salgado II/1 #4178.f Pag.105
mdelvalle
RIC_171a_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-08a - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)15 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 2.8 gr.

Anv: "SEVERVS AVG PART MAX" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VIRT AVGG" - Virtus (La Virtud) estante a izquierda, portando Victoriola en mano derecha extendida y Jabalina y escudo en la izquierda.

Acuñada 7ma. Emisión princ. del 200 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #171a Pag.113 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6387 Pag.469 - BMCRE V #211-213 Pag.195 (Plate 32 #5) - Cohen Vol.IV #761 Pag.79 - RSC Vol. III #761 Pag.48 - DVM #172 Pag.188 - Hill CSS#433 - RC #1796 - Salgado II/1 #4123.o Pag.84
mdelvalle
RIC_176_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-08b - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)15 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "SEVERVS PIUS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PART MAX PM TR P VIIII" - Trofeo de armas flanqueado por dos cautivos.
Este reverso conmemora las grandes victorias sobre los Partos, obtenidas por el Emperador en el 198 D.C.

Acuñada 9na. Emisión, fase II (Fines del 201 D.C.)
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #176 Pag.114 (Plate 6 #11) - BMCRE #256-9 Pag.203 (Plate 33 #7) - Cohen Vol.IV #370 Pag.41 - RSC Vol. III #370 Pag.35 - DVM #95 Pag.184 - Salgado II/1 #4124.j.2 Pag.85
mdelvalle
RIC_201_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-08c - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)17 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 3.9 gr.

Anv: "SEVERVS PIUS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PM TR P XIIII COS III P P" - Genio desnudo estante a izquierda, sacrificando con Pátera sobre un altar engalanado y encendido a su derecha, y portando dos espigas de granos en mano izquierda.


Acuñada 11ava. Emisión 206 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #201 Pag.117 - BMCRE #493 Pag.253 (Plate 40 #7) - Cohen Vol.IV #475 Pag.50 - RSC Vol. III #475 Pag.38 - DVM #115/1 Pag.185 - Salgado II/1 #4128.d.1 var. (espigas vs doble cornucopia) Pag.86
mdelvalle
RIC_228_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-09 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)11 viewsAR Denario 18 x 20 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "SEVERVS PIUS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PM TR P XVII COS III P P" - Neptuno de pié a izquierda con su pié derecho sobre una roca y portando un tridente en mano izquierda

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión 209 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.1ra)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #228 Pag.120 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6346 Pag.464 - BMCRE #3-4 Pag.356/7 (Plate 53 #2) - Cohen Vol.IV #529 Pag.56 - RSC Vol. III #228 Pag.45 - DVM #122 Pag.186 - Hill CSS#1059 - Salgado II/1 #4133.g.1 Pag.87
mdelvalle
Denario Septimio Severo RIC 266D.jpg
46-11 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)32 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 2.8 gr.

Anv: "SEVERVS PIUS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "INDVLGENTIA AVGG // IN CARTH" en exergo (La Benevolencia del Augusto hacia Cartago) - La Diosa Celestial de Cartago sentada de frente sobre un león que corre hacia la derecha, sostiene un rayo en mano derecha y un cetro en la izquierda. Debajo se vé aguas saliendo de una roca. Esta acuñación recuerda algún favor especial de los Emperadores a Carthage, capital de la provincia nativa de los Severos. Parece estar conectada con el abastecimiento de agua de la ciudad (quizás un acueducto nuevo), pero los detalles no se saben. El diosa principal de Carthage era conocida por los romanos como "Dea Caelestis", la “Diosa celestial”, aunque no es nombrada en las monedas y de allí surge una pequeña duda si Ella realmente es quien monta el león.

Acuñada 17ava. Emisión 204 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.1ra)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #266D Pag.125 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6285 Pag.459 - BMCRE #335/8 Pag.218 - Cohen Vol.III #219 Pag.27 - DVM #47 Pag.183 - RSC Vol.III #222 Pag.28 - Hill CSS #655 - Foss #62
mdelvalle
RIC_266D_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-11 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)11 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 2.8 gr.

Anv: "SEVERVS PIUS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "INDVLGENTIA AVGG // IN CARTH" en exergo (La Benevolencia del Augusto hacia Cartago) - La Diosa Celestial de Cartago sentada de frente sobre un león que corre hacia la derecha, sostiene un rayo en mano derecha y un cetro en la izquierda. Debajo se vé aguas saliendo de una roca. Esta acuñación recuerda algún favor especial de los Emperadores a Carthage, capital de la provincia nativa de los Severos. Parece estar conectada con el abastecimiento de agua de la ciudad (quizás un acueducto nuevo), pero los detalles no se saben. El diosa principal de Carthage era conocida por los romanos como "Dea Caelestis", la “Diosa celestial”, aunque no es nombrada en las monedas y de allí surge una pequeña duda si Ella realmente es quien monta el león.

Acuñada 17ava. Emisión 204 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.1ra)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #266D Pag.125 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6285 Pag.459 - BMCRE #335/8 Pag.218 (Plate 35 #11y14) - Cohen Vol.III #219 Pag.27 - DVM #47 Pag.183 - RSC Vol.III #222 Pag.28 - Hill CSS #655 - Foss #62 - Salgado II/1 #4126.a.2 Pag.85
mdelvalle
RIC_278a_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-13 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)12 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 1.4 gr.

Anv: "SEVERVS PIVS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "LIBERALITAS AVG VI" - Liberalitas de pié de frente mirando a izquierda, portando un abaco (contador) en mano derecha y cornucopia en izquierda. Esta acuñación refiere al sexto donativo concedido al Pueblo por Severo en ocasión de la elevación de Geta como Co-Augusto, en el otoño del 209 D.C.

Acuñada Emisión Especial 6ta. Liberalidad (209 D.C.)
Ceca: Roma (Off.1ra)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #278a Pag.126 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6306 Pag.461 - BMCRE #349 Pag.220 - Cohen Vol.IV #298 Pag.34 - RSC Vol. III #298 Pag.31 - DVM #71 Pag.184 - Hill CSS#1024 - Foss #84 - Salgado II/1 #4133.j Pag.88
mdelvalle
RIC_288D_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-15 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)12 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 3.5 gr.

Anv: "SEVERVS PIUS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "RESTITVTOR VRBIS" (Restaurador de la Ciudad) - Roma sentada a izquierda sobre un escudo, sosteniendo Victoriola (Palladium) en mano derecha y Cetro en izquierda.

Acuñada E misión especial, fase I del 207 D.C., Serie I: Quimdecennalia (conclusión)
Ceca: Roma (Off.1ra)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #288D Pag.127 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6358 Pag.466 - BMCRE #360-1 Pag.221-2 (Plate 36 #12) - Cohen Vol.IV #606 Pag.63 - RSC Vol. III #606b Pag.43 - DVM #135 Pag.187 - Hill CSS#843 - Salgado II/1 #4131.f Pag.87
mdelvalle
Caesar~0.jpg
46-45 BC Gauis Julius Caesar91 viewsDiademed head of Venus right, small cupid at shoulder behind


CAESAR
trophy of Gallic arms between two seated male and female captives

Spain 46-45 BC

3.71g
Sear 1404

ex-Calgary coins

Minted for the Spanish campaign against the Pompey brothers, the obverse of this series is occupied by the head of Venus, ancestress of the Julia gens along with a small Cupid identifying her as Venus Genetrix. Caesar had recently dedicated a temple in the forum to her. The reverse revives the theme of victory in Gaul probably to remind his veteran legions of the glory and success in years past. These veterans who were overdue for discharge were now being called on to face the Pompeian threat for the third time in two and a half years.


SOLD Forum Auction May 2016
2 commentsJay GT4
RIC_390_denario_Julia_Domna.jpg
47-02 - JULIA DOMNA (194 - 217 D.C.)9 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 2.2 gr.
Esposa de Septimio Severo y madre de Geta y Caracalla.

Anv: "[IVL]IA PIA FELIX AVG" - Busto sin diadema y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VESTA" - Vesta velada de pié a izquierda, portando Victoriola (Palladium) en mano derecha y largo cetro vertical en izquierda.

Acuñada 213 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I (Caracalla) #390 Pag.274 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #7108 Pag.554 - BMCRE #C29/30 Pag.435 - Cohen Vol.IV #230 Pag.154 - RSC Vol. III #230 Pag.60 - DVM #55-2 Pag.192 - Hill CSS#554 - Cayón #48 - Salgado II/1 #4254.g Pag.119
mdelvalle
RIC_546_Denario_Julia_Domna.jpg
47-03 - JULIA DOMNA (194 - 217 D.C.)16 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 2.6 gr.
Esposa de Septimio Severo y madre de Geta y Caracalla.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA" - Busto sin diadema y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CERERI FRVGIF" - Ceres sentada en trono a izq., portando espigas en mano der. y larga antorcha en izq.

Acuñada 2da. Emisión (Grupo III) 200-202 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #546 Pag.166 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6576 Pag.492 - BMCRE V #12 Pag.158 (Pl.27 #6) - Cohen Vol.IV #14 Pag.107 - RSC Vol. III #14 Pag.53 - DVM #12 Pag.191 - Hill CSS#424 - Salgado II/1 #4208.a Pag.111
mdelvalle
RIC_560_Denario_Julia_Domna.jpg
47-04 - JULIA DOMNA (194 - 217 D.C.)11 viewsAR Denario 16.5 mm 1.9 gr.
Esposa de Septimio Severo y madre de Geta y Caracalla.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA" - Busto sin diadema y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IVNO REGINA" - Juno de pié a izquierda portando Patera en mano der. y Cetro vertical en izq., frente a ella un pavo real que la mira.

Acuñada 2da. Emisión (Grupo II) 195/8 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #560 Pag.168 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6589 Pag.493 - BMCRE V #42 Pag.162 (Pl.28 #1) - Cohen Vol.IV #97 Pag.113 - RSC Vol. III #97 Pag.55 - DVM #55/2 Pag.192 - Salgado II/1 #4202.b Pag.109
mdelvalle
RIC_561_Denario_Julia_Domna.jpg
47-05 - JULIA DOMNA (194 - 217 D.C.)11 viewsAR Denario 18 x 16 mm 3.1 gr.
Esposa de Septimio Severo y madre de Geta y Caracalla.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA" - Busto sin diadema y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "LAETITIA" - Laetitia (La Alegria) de pié a izquierda portando corona de laureles en mano derecha y timón en izquierda.

Acuñada 2da. Emisión 198 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.4ta)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #561D Pag.168 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6590 Pag.494 - BMCRE #S45/6 Pag.162 - Cohen Vol.IV #101 Pag.114 - RSC Vol. III #101 Pag.55 - DVM #28 Pag.191 - Hill CSS#352 - Salgado II/1 #4207.h Pag.111
mdelvalle
RIC_572_Denario_Julia_Domna.jpg
47-08 - JULIA DOMNA (194 - 217 D.C.)12 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.1 gr.
Esposa de Septimio Severo y madre de Geta y Caracalla.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA" - Busto sin diadema y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PIETAS AVGG" - Pietas (La piedad) velada de pié a izquierda colocando granos de incienso en una flama sobre un altar a derecha y portando botella de perfume en mano izquierda.

Acuñada 17ava. Emisión 204 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.6ta)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #572 Pag.170 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6600 Pag.494 - BMCRE #62/7 Pag.165 - Cohen Vol.IV #150 Pag.117 - RSC Vol. III #150 Pag.57 - DVM #39 Pag.192 - Hill CSS#660 - Salgado II/1 #4209.b Pag.111
mdelvalle
RIC_548__Denario_Forrado_Julia_Domna.jpg
47-09 - JULIA DOMNA (194 - 217 D.C.)8 viewsAE Limes denario 19 mm 3.6 gr.
Esposa de Septimio Severo y madre de Geta y Caracalla.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA" - Busto sin diadema y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "DIANA LVCIFERA" - Diana estante de frente viendo a izq., portando gran antorcha con ambas manos..

Acuñada 196 D.C.
Ceca: Laodicea ad Mare (Siria)

Referencias: RIC IVa #638 P.178 (Nota pie de página 373A P.272, Pl.13 #16), BMCRE V #598 P.277 (Pl.42 #18), Sear RCV II # 6578 P.493, Cohen IV #33 P.108, RSC III #33 P.53, DVM #15 P.191, Salgado II/1 #4226.b Pag.116
mdelvalle
RIC_641_denario_Julia_Domna.jpg
47-10 - JULIA DOMNA (194 - 217 D.C.)8 viewsAR Denario 20 mm 3.3 gr.
Esposa de Septimio Severo y madre de Geta y Caracalla.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA" - Busto sin diadema y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "LAETITIA" - Laetitia estante a izq., portando guirnalda en mano der. y timón apoyado en tierra en izq..

Acuñada 198 D.C.
Ceca: Laodicea ad Mare (Siria)

Referencias: RIC IVa #641 P.272, BMCRE V #604 ss P.277 (Pl.43 #1), Sear RCV II # 6590 P.494, Cohen IV #101 P.114, RSC III #101 P.55, DVM #28 P.191, Salgado II/1 #4226.f Pag.116
mdelvalle
Scipio.jpg
47-46 BC Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio68 viewsQ METEL SCIPIO IMP
head of Africa right, laur. and clad in elephant's skin, corn-ear before, plough below

EPPIVS LEG F C

Naked Hercules standing facing right, hand on hip resting on club set on rock

North Africa
47-46 BC

Sear 1380/1

Born Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica. He was adopted by his uncle by marriage and father's second cousin Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius. He married Aemilia Lepida, daughter of Mamercus Aemilius Lepidus Livianus (son of the Censor Marcus Livius Drusus and wife Cornelia Scipio and adopted by Mamercus Aemilius Lepidus) and wife Claudia (sister of Appius Claudius Pulcher (Senior)), and was the father in law of Pompey the Great, married to his daughter Cornelia Metella, called Quinta Pompeia for being his fifth wife.

He was Tribune in 59 BC and became Consul with Pompey the Great in 52 BC. During Caesar's civil war, he served the party of Pompey and fought against Caesar and Marcus Antonius. In 49 BC he was sent as Proconsul to Syria and the following year he took part in the Battle of Pharsalus, where he commanded the center of the Republican battleline. After Pharsalus he fled to Africa were he commanded an army with Cato the Younger, losing in the Battle of Thapsus. After the defeat he tried to escape but was cornered by the fleet of Publius Sittius when he wrecked the ship as he tried to escape to the Iberian Peninsula, to continue to fight from there. He committed suicide by stabbing himself so he would not fall at the hands of his enemies.

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
47-John.jpg
47. John20 viewsPenny, London mint.
Obverse: HENRICVS REX / Crowned bust, facing, with sceptre at left.
Reverse: +ILGER . ON . LVND / Short cross voided, with quatrefoil in each angle.
Moneyer: Ilger.
1.46 gm., 18 mm.
North #970; Seaby #1351.

Classification from North Vol. 1, p. 163-64:
- Type 5 had oval eyes, two curls on each side enclosing a pellet, and five pearls on crown.
- Type 5a or 5b has a small X.
- Type 5b has a cross pattee as a mint mark on the reverse, and a normal S.

The difficulty in attribution stems from the fact that both Richard and John kept the name of their father (Henry II) on their coins.

Callimachus
RIC_9_Denario_Caracala.jpg
48-02 - CARACALLA Como Cesar de Septimio Severo (27/05/196 - 04/198 D.C.)7 viewsAR Denario 18 x 16 mm 2.9 gr.

Anv: "M AVR ANTON CAES PONTIF" - Busto a cabeza desnuda, vestido y viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IMPERII FELICITAS" - Felicitas (Felicidad) de pié a izquierda, sosteniendo caduceo en mano derecha y a un niño en el brazo izquierdo.

Acuñada 15ava. Emisión 197 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.9na)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #9 Pag.213, Sear RCTV Vol.II #6674 Pag.504, BMCRE V #199/201 Pag.52 (Pl.10 #9), Cohen Vol.IV #95 Pag.153, RSC Vol. III #95 Pag.67, DVM #28 Pag.195, Hill CSS#282, Salgado II/1 #4404.d P.126
mdelvalle
RIC_2_Denario_Caracala.jpg
48-03 - CARACALLA Como Cesar de Septimio Severo (27/05/196 - 04/198 D.C.)9 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "M AVR ANTONINVS CAES" - Busto a cabeza desnuda, vestido y viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SECVRITAS PERPETVA", Minerva estante a izq. con égida en el pecho, apoyando su mano der. en un escudo y portando lanza en la izq.

Acuñada 196/7 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.5ta)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #2 Pag.212 (Pl.11 #7), Sear RCTV Vol.II #6678 Pag.504, BMCRE V #181 Pag.50 (Pl.10 #1), Cohen Vol.IV #562 Pag.202, RSC Vol. III #562 Pag.83, DVM #89 Pag.198, Hill CSS#253, RC #1894, Salgado II/1 #4403.d P.125
mdelvalle
RIC_30a_Denario_Caracala.jpg
48-05 - CARACALLA (198 - 211 D.C.)10 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS" - Busto laureado, vestido y con coraza viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF TR P III" - Júpiter/Emperador, con corona radiada como sol, desnudo de pié a izquierda, con manto sobre hombro izquierdo, sosteniendo globo en mano derecha y lanza invertida en izquierdo.

Acuñada 7ma. Emisión 200 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.4ta)

Referencias: RIC IV Parte I #30a P.217, Sear RCTV Vol.II #6857 Pag.525, BMCRE #179/83 Pag.190, Cohen Vol.IV #413/415 Pag.186, RSC Vol. III #413/415 Pag.78, DVM #68 Pag.197, Hill CSS#434, Salgado II/1 4420.c.1 P.130
mdelvalle
RIC_88_Denario_Caracala.jpg
48-08 - CARACALLA (198 - 211 D.C.)10 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "ANTONINVS PIVS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF TR P X COS II" - Marte desnudo avanzando a derecha, con el manto volando al viento, portando lanza en mano derecha y trofeo en izquierda sobre el hombro.

Acuñada 25ava. Emisión 207 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.3ra)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #88 Pag.226, Sear RCTV Vol.II #6862 Pag.525, BMCRE #542/6 Pag.266, Cohen Vol.IV #431 Pag.188, RSC Vol. III #431 Pag.79, DVM #72-1 Pag.197, Hill CSS#845, Salgado II/1 #4422.o.2 Pag.132
mdelvalle
RIC_289e_Antoniniano_Caracala.jpg
48-15 - CARACALLA (198 - 211 D.C.)12 viewsAR Antoniniano 23 mm 4.8 gr.

Anv: "ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM" - Busto radiado, vestido y con coraza viendo a derecha, visto por detrás.
Rev: "P M TR P XX COS IIII P P" – Serapis estante de frente, viendo a izq., vistiendo Modius en su cabeza, portando una corona de espigas de trigo en mano del brazo der. Extendido y largo cetro vertical en izq.

Acuñada 217 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #289f Pag.255, Sear RCTV Vol.II #6780 Pag.516, BMCRE #187 var Pag.464 (Pl.72 #17), Cohen Vol.IV #383 Pag.183, RSC Vol. III #383, DVM #6/3 Pag.194, Hill CSS#1580, Salgado II/1 #4456.c.3 Pag.143
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RIC_367_Denario_Plautilla.jpg
49-02 - PLAUTILLA (202 - 205 D.C.)13 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.1 gr.
Esposa de Caracalla.

Anv: "PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA" - Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PIETAS AVGG" - Emperatriz/Pietas (La piedad) velada de pié a derecha, sosteniendo un niño en brazo izquierdo y portando un cetro en el derecho.

Acuñada 203 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC IVa #367 P.270, Sear RCTV II #7072 P.549, BMCRE #422/6 P.237, Cohen IV #16 P.248, RSC III #16 P.90, DVM #7 P.200, Hill CSS#607/8, Salgado II/1 #4487.c P.150
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Denario Geta RIC 18v.jpg
50-02 - GETA Como Cesar de Septimius Severus (198 - 209 D.C.)35 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "P SEPT GETA CAES PONT" - Busto a cabeza desnuda, vestido y viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PRINC IVVENTVTIS" (Principe joven) - Geta de pié a izquierda, con ropajes militares, sosteniendo un bastón de mando en mano derecha y cetro largo vertical en izquierda. Detrás suyo un trofeo sobre escudo.

Acuñada 7ma. Emisión 200 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.5ta)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #18 Pag.316 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #7196 Pag.565 - BMCRE #S234/9 Pag.198 - Cohen Vol.IV #157 Pag.270 - RSC Vol. III #157b Pag.97 - DVM #34-1 Pag.202 - Hill CSS#423 - Salgado II/1 #4507.c P.153
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RIC_18_Denario_Geta.jpg
50-02 - GETA Como Cesar de Septimius Severus (198 - 209 D.C.)14 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "P SEPT GETA CAES PONT" - Busto a cabeza desnuda, vestido y viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PRINC IVVENTVTIS" (Principe joven) - Geta de pié a izquierda, con ropajes militares, sosteniendo un bastón de mando en mano derecha y cetro largo vertical en izquierda. Detrás suyo un trofeo sobre escudo.

Acuñada 7ma. Emisión 200 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.5ta)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #18 Pag.316 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #7196 Pag.565 - BMCRE #S234/9 Pag.198 - Cohen Vol.IV #157 Pag.270 - RSC Vol. III #157b Pag.97 - DVM #34-1 Pag.202 - Hill CSS#423 - Salgado II/1 #4507.c P.153
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RIC_51_Denario_Geta.jpg
50-04 - GETA Como Cesar de Septimius Severus (198 - 209 D.C.)13 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "P SEPTIMIVS GETA CAES" - Busto a cabeza desnuda, vestido y viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PROVID DEORVM" (La providencia de Dios) - Providentia de pié a izquierda, portando una vara en mano derecha y cetro largo vertical en izquierda. A sus piés un globo.

Acuñada 23ava. Emisión 206 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.5ta)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #51 Pag.321 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #7195 Pag.565 - BMCRE #S458/63 Pag.246 - Cohen Vol.IV #170 Pag.271 - RSC Vol. III #170 Pag.97 - DVM #36 Pag.202 - Hill CSS#770 - Salgado II/1 #4509.a P.154
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501. Constantine I Lugdunum SARMATIA DEVICTA18 viewsObv: CONSTAN - TINVS AVG; head r. laureate.
Rev: SARMATIA - DEVICTA; Victory adv. r., carrying palm and trophy and spurning bound captive.
Mint mark: PLG crescent
19.8 mm, 3.1g.

RIC VII 209; R4
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501. Constantine I Lyons Sol14 viewsLyons

Originally, the important city in this area was that of Vienne, at a crossroads of Celtic trails, and port for the Greek trade. They had been largly Hellanised during the 2nd - 1st centuries BCE, then caught up in the conflicts involving Rome and Athens. Roman traders had settled there and competition started a revolt, driving the Romans to the north. At the present site of Lyons, they sought and received refuge from the Gallic tribe called Segusiavi. At that time, Lyons was just a tribe of Celts occupying the top of a hill, later to be called Fourviere. A Roman settlement was begun, and then later used by Julius Caesar to launch his campaigns against the Helvetii in 58 BCE.

The site of Lyons, being on a crossroads as well as a connection to the Mediterranean, was early recognised as being strategically important. In 43 BCE, the city of Lugdunum became an official Roman colony recognised by the Roman senate, founded by the governor of Gallia Comata (province of Comata), Lucius Munatius Plancus. Later, in 27 BCE, then Emperor Augustus divided Gallia Comata into three provinces, and Lugdunum became the capital of Gallia Lugdunensis. [The third province was Gallia Aquitania.]

Lyons became the financial center for taxation purposes of Aquitania and Lugdunum provinces, and an official mint was established there. Also, the state cult honoring Augustus [or the present Emperor] was established at Lyons, drawing many pilgrims and supplicants. Drusus, the father of Claudius, (born 10 BCE) was stationed at Lyons, being in charge of Gallia Comata. Also, a cohort of Roman policemen were stationed at lyons, to protect the mint. A bronze inscription found at Lyons records the speech given to the Roman Senate in 48 CE by Emperor Claudius, arguing for the acceptance of admission of senators from Gallia Comata.

Through Lyons [and Vienne] passed the great roads leading to the different regions of Gaul and towards Italy. Trade with Gaul, Britain and Germany passed through Lyons, mostly supplying Roman colonies on the the frontier. Later, these routes were paved by the Romans to facilitate trade and troop movement. Lyons became an important trade and military center. However, intercity rivalry with Vienne to the south never died, and indeed Vienne became jealous over time.

Lyons was burnt to the ground in 65 CE but quickly rebuilt. It prospered until 197 when it was sacked in a civil war. The city of Lyons had backed the unfortunate loser in a battle between two Roman generals. Cities to the south [Arles, Vienne, and to the north, Trier] took over the economic functions of Lyons; and the city of Lyons was again plundered 269. Lyons fought back, and the trade wars raged on, until early in the 4th century when the aqueducts of Lyons were destroyed. Without water, the hillsite of Lyons [the Fourviere Hill] became untenable. The merchants moved down to the city below, or out of the city entirely. The protection of Lyons was thus much more difficult. And the decline of the Roman Empire also spelled the decline of many of its cities.

RIC VII Lyons 34 C3

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501d. Hanniballianus92 viewsHanniballianus. A.D. 335-337.

Dalmatius's second son, Hannibalianus, was appointed Governor of Pontus, as well as Cappadocia and Lesser or Roman Armenia. Hannibalianus also received the title Rex Regum, which some scholars believe suggests that Constantine intended to install him as a client king over Persia once his contemplated campaign against Rome’s eastern enemy was brought to a successful conclusion. In a further gesture of reconciliation between the two branches of the imperial family, Hannibalianus was married to Constantia, one of Constantine's daughters.

Æ 15 mm (1.20 g). Constantinople, as Rex Regum, A.D. 336-337. FL HANNIBALLIANO REG[I], bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right / [SE]CVRITAS PVBLIC[A], river-god Euphrates reclining right, beside urn and reed; [CONSS]. RIC 147; LRBC 1034. Near VF/VF, attractive dark green patina with earthen highlights.
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504. CONSTANTIUS II Campgate Nicomedia22 viewsCONSTANTIUS II, as Caesar. 324-337 AD. Æ Follis (19mm - 3.21 g). Nicomedia mint. Struck 328-9 AD. FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust left / PROVIDEN-TIAE CAESS•, camp-gate with no doors and two turrets, star above; SMNB. RIC VII 158 note; LRBC -. Good VF, green patina with some spotty silvering. R5
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507a. Decentius86 viewsMagnus Decentius (d. 18 August 353) was a Roman usurper against Roman Emperor Constantius II.

Probably brother of Magnentius, Decentius was made Caesar by him in winter 350/351, and was consul in 352 and 353. When Magnentius was defeated by Constantius at the Battle of Mons Seleucus and killed himself, Decentius, who was leading reenfocement, hanged at Senonae.

Decentius as Caesar, AD 350-353, AE Double Cententionalis (25mm, 8.11g)
O: DN DECENTIVS NOB CAES; Cuirassed bust facing right.
R: SALVS DD NN AVG ET CAES; Large Chi-Rho flanked by A and w; LSLG in exergue.
RIC 155 (Scarce), VM 6.
This is a full weight AE1 size of this Christogram series.

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RIC_6_Denario_Macrino.jpg
51-01 - MACRINO (8/04/217 - 06/218 D.C.)14 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 2.9 gr.

Anv: "IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG" - Busto laureado vistiendo coraza y viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VOTA PVBL P M TR P" - Felicitas estante a izq. portando Caduceo en mano der y Cetro vertical en izq.

Acuñada desde abril a diciembre del 217 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte II #6 Pag.6 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #7369 Pag.589 - BMCRE Vol.V #2 Pag.494 - Cohen Vol.IV #147 Pag.304 - RSC Vol. III #147a Pag.106 - DVM #36 Pag.202 - Clay Issue #2 - Salgado II/1 #4606.a.1 Pag.162
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512. Procopius151 viewsProcopius (326 - May 27, 366), was a Roman usurper against Valentinian I, and member of the Constantinian dynasty.

According to Ammianus Marcellinus, Procopius was a native of Cilicia. On his mother's side, Procopius was cousin of Emperor Julian.

Procopius took part in the emperor Julian's campaign against the Persian Empire in 363. He was entrusted of leading 30,000 men towards Armenia, joining King Arsaces, and later return to Julian camp. At the time of Julian's death, there were rumors that he had intended Procopius to be his successor, but when Jovian was elected emperor by the Roman army, Procopius went into hiding to preserve his life. The ancient historians differ on the exact details of Procopius' life in hiding, but agree that he returned to public knowledge at Chalcedon before the house of the senator Strategius suffering from starvation and ignorant of current affairs.

By that time, Jovianus was dead, and Valentinian I shared the purple with his brother Valens. Procopius immediately moved to declare himself emperor. He bribed two legions that were resting at Constantinople to support his efforts, and took control of the imperial city. Shortly after this he proclaimed himself Emperor on September 28, 365, and quickly took control of the provinces of Thrace, and later Bithynia.

Valens was left with the task of dealing with this rebel, and over the next months struggled with both cities and units that wavered in their allegiance. Eventually their armies met at the Battle of Thyatira, and Procopius' forces were defeated. He fled the battlefield, but was betrayed to Valens by two of his remaining followers. Valens had all three executed May 27, 366.


Procopius - Usurper in the east, 365-6 , AE-3, Nicomedia mint


2.90g

Obv: Bust of Procopius, beared left "DN PROCOPIVS PF AVG"

Rev: Procopius standing head right, foot resting on a prow and leaning on a shield. "REPARATIO FEL TEMP" "SMNG" in the exergue.

RIC 10
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Follis Constantino X SB01853.jpg
52-02 - Constantino X (25/12/1059 - 21/05/1067 D.C.)24 viewsAE Follis 26 x 30 mm 4.3 gr.

Anv: "EMMA - NOVHΛ", "IC - XC" (en campos izq. y derecho) - Cristo de pié de frente, vistiendo nimbus cruciger (Halo redondo con cruz que rodea su busto), Pallium (Tipo de capa o manto) y Collobium (Túnica especial sin mangas), sosteniendo el Libro de los Evangelios con ambas manos.
Rev: " ΕVΔO AVΓ - +RΘKWN TΔK " Emperador barbado a derecha y Emperatriz Eudocia a izquierda, de pié de frente vistiendo corona, Loros (Ropa elaboradamente adornada que constituye el vestido consular de los Emperadores) y Pendilia (Tiras de perlas que colgaban a ambos lados de la corona). Entre ellos Labarum (Lábaro, Enseña militar usado como estandarte imperial, con Crismón (Simbolo Chi-Ro) en su bandera), Cruz en el mastil y apoyado sobre una tarima con tres escalones.

Acuñada 1059 - 1067 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla

Referencias: Sear BCTV #1853 Pag. 363 - Bellinger D.O. Vol. III #8 - B.M.C.#18-31 - Ratto M.B.#2021/3 - Morrisson C.M.b.B.N. #1-29
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Moushmov_3575_DEULTUM_Diadumeniano.jpg
52-20 - DIADUMENIANO (Mayo/217 - Junio/218 D.C.)9 viewsAE Semis/Triasaría ?? 23 mm 7.2 gr.

Anv: "M OPEL ANTONINVS DIADV" - Busto a cab. desnuda con Paludamentum (capote militar), viendo a derecha.
Rev: "COL FL PAC DEVLT" – Nemesis estante a izq., portando balanza en mano der. y parazonium en izq. Rueda detrás a la der.

Acuñada 217 - 218 D.C.
Ceca: Deultum (Hoy Debelt en la Provincia de Burgas en el sureste de Bulgaria)

Referencias: Yurukova #83, Moushmov #3575
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RIC_225_AR_Denario_AQUILIA_SEVERA_Foro.jpg
56-02 - AQUILIA SEVERA (220-221 y 221-222 D.C.)24 views2da. y 4ta. esposa de Heliogábalo.

AR Denario 19 mm 2,73 gr.

Anv: "IVLIA AQVILIA SEVERA AVG" - Busto vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA" – Concordia estante a der., sacrificando con pátera en mano der. sobre un altar encendido y portando doble cornucopia en izq.

Ceca: Roma
Acuñada: 220-222 D.C.

Referencias: RIC Vol.IVb #225 Pag.47 (Plate III #10) - DVM #1 Pag.209 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #7679 var. Pag.621 – BMCRE V #185ss Pag.558 - Cohen Vol.IV #2 Pag.380 - RSC Vol. III #2a Pag.125 - Salgado II/1 #4751.b Pag.180
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Tetarterón Andronico I SB01987.jpg
59-05 - Andronico I (09/1183 - 12/09/1185 D.C.)28 viewsAE Tetarteron 18 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "MH - ΘV" (Madre de Dios) en campos izquierdo y derecho - Busto de la Virgen vista de frente, vistiendo nimbus (Halo redondo que rodea su busto), Pallium (Tipo de capa o manto) y Maphorium (Largo velo que cubre su cabeza y hombros), sosteniendo delante de Ella la cabeza nimbada de un Cristo niño mirando al frente.
Rev: " ANΔPONIKOC" Algo larga figura del Emperador de frente, vistiendo corona, Scaramagion y Sagion (Sago - capa corta romana de uso militar). Portando Labarum (Lábaro, Enseña militar usado como estandarte imperial), en mano derecha y Orbe con cruz en izquierda.

Acuñada 1183 - 1185 D.C.
Ceca: Tessalonica

Referencias: Sear BCTV #1987 Pag. 401 - Hendy CMBE pl.19.2 - B.M.C.#13-16 - Ratto M.B.#2171 - Morrisson C.M.b.B.N. #1-5
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604. Leo I388 viewsImperator Caesar Flavius Valerius Leo Augustus or Leo I of the Byzantine Empire (401–474), reigned from 457 to 474, also known as Leo the Thracian, was the last of a series of emperors placed on the throne by Aspar, the Alan serving as commander-in-chief of the army. His coronation as emperor on February 7, 457, was the first known to involve the Patriarch of Constantinople. Leo I made an alliance with the Isaurians and was thus able to eliminate Aspar. The price of the alliance was the marriage of Leo's daughter to Tarasicodissa, leader of the Isaurians who, as Zeno, became emperor in 474.

During Leo's reign, the Balkans were ravaged time and again by the West Goths and the Huns. However, these attackers were unable to take Constantinople thanks to the walls which had been rebuilt and reinforced in the reign of Theodosius II and against which they possessed no suitable siege engines.

Leo's reign was also noteworthy for his influence in the Western Roman Empire, marked by his appointment of Anthemius as Western Roman Emperor in 467. He attempted to build on this political achievement with an expedition against the Vandals in 468, which was defeated due to the treachery and incompetence of Leo's brother-in-law Basiliscus. This disaster drained the Empire of men and money.

Leo's greatest influence in the West was largely inadvertent and at second-hand: the great Goth king Theodoric the Great was raised at the Leo's court in Constantinople, where he was steeped in Roman government and military tactics, which served him well when he returned after Leo's death to become the Goth ruler of a mixed but largely Romanized people.

Leo also published a New Constitutions or compilation of Law Code[1], Constitution LV concerned Judaism: "JEWS SHALL LIVE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE RITES OF CHRISTIANITY. Those who formerly were invested with Imperial authority promulgated various laws with reference to the Hebrew people, who, once nourished by Divine protection, became renowned, but are now remarkable for the calamities inflicted upon them because of their contumacy towards Christ and God; and these laws, while regulating their mode of life, compelled them to read the Holy Scriptures, and ordered them not to depart from the ceremonies of their worship. They also provided that their children should adhere to their religion, being obliged to do so as well by the ties of blood, as on account of the institution of circumcision. These are the laws which I have already stated were formerly enforced throughout the Empire. But the Most Holy Sovereign from whom We are descended, more concerned than his predecessors for the salvation of the Jews, instead of allowing them (as they did) to obey only their ancient laws, attempted, by the interpretation of prophesies and the conclusions which he drew from them, to convert them to the Christian religion, by means of the vivifying water of baptism. He fully succeeded in his attempts to transform them into new men, according to the doctrine of Christ, and induced them to denounce their ancient doctrines and abandon their religious ceremonies, such as circumcision, the observance of the Sabbath, and all their other rites. But although he, to a certain extent, overcame the obstinacy of the Jews, he was unable to force them to abolish the laws which permitted them to live in accordance with their ancient customs. Therefore We, desiring to accomplish what Our Father failed to effect, do hereby annul all the old laws enacted with reference to the Hebrews, and We order that they shall not dare to live in any other manner than in accordance with the rules established by the pure and salutary Christian Faith. And if anyone of them should be proved to, have neglected to observe the ceremonies of the Christian religion, and to have returned to his former practices, he shall pay the penalty prescribed by the law for apostates."

Leo died of dysentery at the age of 73 on January 18, 474.

Bronze AE4, RIC 671, S 4340 var, VG, 1.17g, 10.3mm, 180o, Alexandria mint, obverse D N LEO P F AVG (or similar), pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Lion standing left, head right, cross above, ALEA in ex; very rare (R3); ex Forum
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Moushmov_2892_ANCHIALUS_Maximino_I.jpg
62-20 - MAXIMINO I (235-238 D.C.)19 viewsAnchialos/Anquialos, Tracia
Hoy Pomorie, Bulgaria, en la costa sur del Mar Muerto

AE26 26 mm 13.6 gr.

Anv: "AVT MAΣIMEINOC EVCEBHC AV", Cabeza laureada a derecha.
Rev: "AΓXIA-ΛEΩN", Demeter sentada a izq. en una Cesta Mística, portando espigas en mano der. y larga antorcha vertical en izq. donde se enrosca una serpiente.

Acuñada 235-238 D.C.

Referencias: Varbanov II #489 (R4) Pag.48, Moushmov #2892, Strack #596
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1038_P_Hadrian_RPC649.jpg
649 MACEDONIA, Amphipolis Hadrian AE 19 Artemis standing10 viewsReference.
RPC III, 649/4; BMC 100; Varbanov 3185; Lindgren 982; Moushmov 6075; cf. SNG ANS 182

Obv. ΚΑΙСΑΡ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС
laureate head of Hadrian, r.; to r., star

Rev. ΑΜΦΙΠΟΛΕΙΤωΝ
Artemis Tauropolos standing l., wearing kalathos, holding long torch in r. hand; on r., shield.

4.26 gr
19 mm
6h

Note.
From the Belgica Collection. Ex Gorny & Mosch 233 (6 October 2015), lot 1892.
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1104_P_Hadrian_RPC665.jpg
665 MACEDONIA, Philippi. Hadrian Divus Augustus and Divus Julius8 viewsReference.
RPC III, 665 var on bust; Varbanov 3782

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIA HADR[ ]
Laureate and cuirassed bust right, slight drapery on shoulder

Rev. COL AVG IVL PHILIP
Divus Augustus standing left on basis inscribed DIVVS/[AVG], raising hand; Divus Julius standing behind, crowning him with wreath; altar on either side

7.73 gr
23 mm
6h

Note.
From the Belgica Collection.
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RIC_84_Antoniniano_GORDIANO_III_foro.jpg
69-10 - GORDIANO III (238 - 244 D.C.)33 viewsAR Antoniniano
23 mm 5.1 gr. 8 hs.

Anv: "IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG" - Busto radiado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI STATORI" - Júpiter estante de frente viendo a der., portando largo cetro en mano der. y rayo en izq.

Acuñada 4ta. Emisión 241-243 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.2da.?)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IVc #84 Pag.25, Sear RCTV Vol.III #8615 Pag.118, Cohen Vol.V #109 Pag.32, RSC Vol. IV #109 Pag.4, DVM #20 Pag.224, Hunter #51, Salgado MREM #5114.f.2
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Filipo_I_BITINIA_Zeus.jpg
70 - 20 - 1 - FILIPO I (244 - 249 D.C.)37 viewsBITHYNIUM Bithynia

AE 28 mm 8.8 gr

Anv: ”M IOVLambda;IOC [ΦIΛIΠΠOC AVΓ]” – Busto laureado y vestido viendo a derecha, portando lanza y escudo.
Rev: ”BEITYNIEΩN AΔPIANΩN - ΛITΩN en exergo – Zeus sentado en un taburete a izquierda, portando patera en mano derecha y bastón de mando (staff) en izquierda.

Acuñada: 244 - 249 D.C.

Referencias: SLG LINDGREN I #105(1) - SNG AUL #340-411(2) - SNG POST #144(3)
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TiberiusTributePennyRICI30RSCII16aSRCV1763.jpg
703a, Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Tribute Penny of Matthew 22:20-2150 viewsSilver denarius, RIC I 30, RSC II 16a, SRCV 1763, gVF, Lugdunum mint, 3.837g, 18.7mm, 90o, 16 - 37 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM, Pax/Livia seated right holding scepter and branch, legs on chair ornamented, feet on footstool; toned. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Tiberius (A.D. 14-37)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

Introduction
The reign of Tiberius (b. 42 B.C., d. A.D. 37, emperor A.D. 14-37) is a particularly important one for the Principate, since it was the first occasion when the powers designed for Augustus alone were exercised by somebody else. In contrast to the approachable and tactful Augustus, Tiberius emerges from the sources as an enigmatic and darkly complex figure, intelligent and cunning, but given to bouts of severe depression and dark moods that had a great impact on his political career as well as his personal relationships.

. . . .

Early life (42-12 B.C.)
Tiberius Claudius Nero was born on 16 November 42 B.C. to Ti. Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla. Both parents were scions of the gens Claudia which had supplied leaders to the Roman Republic for many generations. . . [I]n 39 B.C., his mother Livia divorced Ti. Claudius Nero and married Octavian, thereby making the infant Tiberius the stepson of the future ruler of the Roman world. Forever afterward, Tiberius was to have his name coupled with this man, and always to his detriment.

. . . .

Accession and Early Reign (A.D. 14 - 23)
The accession of Tiberius proved intensely awkward. After Augustus had been buried and deified, and his will read and honored, the Senate convened on 18 September to inaugurate the new reign and officially "confirm" Tiberius as emperor. Such a transfer of power had never happened before, and nobody, including Tiberius, appears to have known what to do. Tacitus's account is the fullest. . . Rather than tactful, he came across to the senators as obdurate and obstructive. He declared that he was too old for the responsibilities of the Principate, said he did not want the job, and asked if he could just take one part of the government for himself. The Senate was confused, not knowing how to read his behavior. Finally, one senator asked pointedly, "Sire, for how long will you allow the State to be without a head?" Tiberius relented and accepted the powers voted to him, although he refused the title "Augustus."

. . . .

Tiberius allowed a trusted advisor to get too close and gain a tremendous influence over him. That advisor was the Praetorian Prefect, L. Aelius Sejanus, who would derail Tiberius's plans for the succession and drive the emperor farther into isolation, depression, and paranoia.

Sejanus (A.D. 23-31)
Sejanus hailed from Volsinii in Etruria. He and his father shared the Praetorian Prefecture until A.D. 15 when the father, L. Seius Strabo, was promoted to be Prefect of Egypt, the pinnacle of an equestrian career under the Principate. Sejanus, now sole Prefect of the Guard, enjoyed powerful connections to senatorial houses and had been a companion to Gaius Caesar on his mission to the East, 1 B.C. - A.D. 4. Through a combination of energetic efficiency, fawning sycophancy, and outward displays of loyalty, he gained the position of Tiberius's closest friend and advisor.

. . . .

[I]n a shocking and unexpected turn of events, [a] letter sent by Tiberius from Capri initially praised Sejanus extensively, and then suddenly denounced him as a traitor and demanded his arrest. Chaos ensued. Senators long allied with Sejanus headed for the exits, the others were confused -- was this a test of their loyalty? What did the emperor want them to do? -- but the Praetorian Guard, the very troops formerly under Sejanus's command but recently and secretly transferred to the command of Q. Sutorius Macro, arrested Sejanus, conveyed him to prison, and shortly afterwards executed him summarily. A witch-hunt followed. . . All around the city, grim scenes were played out, and as late as A.D. 33 a general massacre of all those still in custody took place.

Tiberius himself later claimed that he turned on Sejanus because he had been alerted to Sejanus's plot against Germanicus's family. This explanation has been rejected by most ancient and modern authorities, since Sejanus's demise did nothing to alleviate that family's troubles.

. . . .

The Last Years (A.D. 31-37)
The Sejanus affair appears to have greatly depressed Tiberius. A close friend and confidant had betrayed him; whom could he trust anymore? His withdrawal from public life seemed more complete in the last years. Letters kept him in touch with Rome, but it was the machinery of the Augustan administration that kept the empire running smoothly. Tiberius, if we believe our sources, spent much of his time indulging his perversities on Capri.

. . . .

Tiberius died quietly in a villa at Misenum on 16 March A.D. 37. He was 78 years old. There are some hints in the sources of the hand of Caligula in the deed, but such innuendo can be expected at the death of an emperor, especially when his successor proved so depraved. The level of unpopularity Tiberius had achieved by the time of his death with both the upper and lower classes is revealed by these facts: the Senate refused to vote him divine honors, and mobs filled the streets yelling "To the Tiber with Tiberius!" (in reference to a method of disposal reserved for the corpses of criminals).

Tiberius and the Empire
Three main aspects of Tiberius's impact on the empire deserve special attention: his relative military inertia; his modesty in dealing with offers of divine honors and his fair treatment of provincials; and his use of the Law of Treason (maiestas).

. . . .

Conclusion
. . . Tiberius's reign sporadically descended into tyranny of the worst sort. In the right climate of paranoia and suspicion, widespread denunciation led to the deaths of dozens of Senators and equestrians, as well as numerous members of the imperial house. In this sense, the reign of Tiberius decisively ended the Augustan illusion of "the Republic Restored" and shone some light into the future of the Principate, revealing that which was both promising and terrifying.

[For the entire article please refer to http://www.roman-emperors.org/tiberius.htm]

Copyright © 1997, Garrett G. Fagan. Used by permission.

"Some of the things he did are hard to believe. He had little boys trained as minnows to chase him when he went swimming and to get between his legs and nibble him. He also had babies not weaned from their mother breast suck at his chest and groin . . . "
(Suetonius. The Twelve Caesars. Trans. Robert Graves. London: Penguin Books, 1979. XLIV).

Jesus, referring to a "penny" asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible(Joseph Sermarini).


Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
CLAUD34LG.jpg
705a, Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D.63 viewsClaudius. 42-43 AD. AE As.
Claudius. 42-43 AD. AE As (29 mm, 10.87 g). Obverse: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head right; Reverse: CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI / S - C, Constantiae in military dress standing left, holding spear; RIC I, 111; aVF. Ex Imperial Coins.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

CLAUDIUS (41-54 A.D.)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

Ti. Claudius Nero Germanicus (b. 10 BC, d. 54 A.D.; emperor, 41-54 A.D.) was the third emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. His reign represents a turning point in the history of the Principate for a number of reasons, not the least for the manner of his accession and the implications it carried for the nature of the office. During his reign he promoted administrators who did not belong to the senatorial or equestrian classes, and was later vilified by authors who did. He followed Caesar in carrying Roman arms across the English Channel into Britain but, unlike his predecessor, he initiated the full-scale annexation of Britain as a province, which remains today the most closely studied corner of the Roman Empire. His relationships with his wives and children provide detailed insights into the perennial difficulties of the succession problem faced by all Roman Emperors. His final settlement in this regard was not lucky: he adopted his fourth wife's son, L. Domitius Ahenobarbus, who was to reign catastrophically as Nero and bring the dynasty to an end. Claudius's reign, therefore, was a mixture of successes and failures that leads into the last phase of the Julio-Claudian line.

Robert Graves' fictional characterization of Claudius as an essentially benign man with a keen intelligence has tended to dominate the wider public's view of this emperor. Close study of the sources, however, reveals a somewhat different kind of man. In addition to his scholarly and cautious nature, he had a cruel streak, as suggested by his addiction to gladiatorial games and his fondness for watching his defeated opponents executed. He conducted closed-door (in camera ) trials of leading citizens that frequently resulted in their ruin or deaths -- an unprecedented and tyrannical pattern of behavior. He had his wife Messalina executed, and he personally presided over a kangaroo court in the Praetorian Camp in which many of her hangers-on lost their lives. He abandoned his own son Britannicus to his fate and favored the advancement of Nero as his successor. While he cannot be blamed for the disastrous way Nero's rule turned out, he must take some responsibility for putting that most unsuitable youth on the throne. At the same time, his reign was marked by some notable successes: the invasion of Britain, stability and good government in the provinces, and successful management of client kingdoms. Claudius, then, is a more enigmatic figure than the other Julio-Claudian emperors: at once careful, intelligent, aware and respectful of tradition, but given to bouts of rage and cruelty, willing to sacrifice precedent to expediency, and utterly ruthless in his treatment of those who crossed him. Augustus's suspicion that there was more to the timid Claudius than met the eye was more than fully borne out by the events of his unexpected reign.

The possibility has to be entertained that Claudius was a far more active participant in his own elevation than traditional accounts let on. There is just reason to suspect that he may even have been involved in planning the murder of Gaius (Caligula). Merely minutes before the assassination of Gaius, Claudius had departed for lunch; this appears altogether too fortuitous. This possibility, however, must remain pure speculation, since the ancient evidence offers nothing explicit in the way of support. On the other hand, we can hardly expect them to, given the later pattern of events. The whole issue of Claudius's possible involvement in the death of Gaius and his own subsequent acclamation by the Praetorian Guard must, therefore, remain moot . . . yet intriguing

Copyright 1998, Garrett G. Fagan.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
roman_emperor_otho.jpg
708a, Otho66 viewsOtho (69 A.D.)
John Donahue
College of William and Mary

Introduction
In January 69 Otho led a successful coup to overthrow the emperor Galba. Upon advancing to the throne, he hoped to conciliate his adversaries and restore political stability to the Empire. These ambitions were never to be realized. Instead, our sources portray a leader never fully able to win political confidence at Rome or to overcome military anarchy abroad. As a result, he was defeated in battle by the forces of Vitellius, his successor, and took his own life at the conclusion of the conflict. His principate lasted only eight weeks.
Early Life and Career
Marcus Salvius Otho was born at Ferentium on 28 April 32 A. D. His grandfather, also named Marcus Salvius Otho, was a senator who did not advance beyond the rank of praetor. Lucius Otho, his father, was consul in 33 and a trusted administrator under the emperors Tiberius, Gaius and Claudius. His mother, Albia Terentia, was likely to have been nobly born as well. The cognomen "Otho" was Etruscan in origin, and the fact that it can be traced to three successive generations of this family perhaps reflects a desire to maintain a part of the Etruscan tradition that formed the family's background.
Otho is recorded as being extravagant and wild as a youth - a favorite pastime involved roving about at night to snare drunkards in a blanket. Such behavior earned floggings from his father, whose frequent absences from home on imperial business suggest little in the way of a stabilizing parental influence in Otho's formative years. These traits apparently persisted: Suetonius records that Otho and Nero became close friends because of the similarity of their characters; and Plutarch relates that the young man was so extravagant that he sometimes chided Nero about his meanness, and even outdid the emperor in reckless spending.
Most intriguing in this context is Otho's involvement with Nero's mistress, Poppaea Sabina, the greatest beauty of her day. A relationship between the two is widely cited in the ancient sources, but the story differs in essential details from one account to the next. As a result, it is impossible to establish who seduced whom, whether Otho ever married Poppaea, and whether his posting to Lusitania by Nero should be understood as a "banishment" for his part in this affair. About the only reliable detail to emerge is that Otho did indeed become governor of Lusitania in 59, and that he assumed the post as a quaestor, a rank below that of praetor or consul, the minimum usually required for the office. From here he would launch his initial thrust towards the imperial throne.
Overthrow of Galba
Nero's suicide in June 68 marked the end of the Julio-Claudian dynasty and opened up the principate to the prerogatives of the military beyond Rome. First to emerge was Servius Sulpicius Galba, governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, who had been encouraged to revolt by the praetorians and especially by Nymphidius Sabinus, the corrupt and scheming praetorian prefect at Rome. By this time Otho had been in Spain for close to ten years. His record seems to have been a good one, marked by capable administration and an unwillingness to enrich himself at the expense of the province. At the same time, perhaps seeing this as his best chance to improve his own circumstances, he supported the insurrection as vigorously as possible, even sending Galba all of his gold and his best table servants. At the same time, he made it a point to win the favor of every soldier he came in contact with, most notably the members of the praetorian guard who had come to Spain to accompany Galba to Rome. Galba set out from Spain in July, formally assuming the emperorship shortly thereafter. Otho accompanied him on the journey.
Galba had been in Rome little more than two months when on 1 January 69 the troops in Upper Germany refused to declare allegiance to him and instead followed the men stationed in Lower Germany in proclaiming their commander, Aulus Vitellius, as the new ruler. To show that he was still in charge Galba adopted his own successor, Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi Licinianus, an aristocrat completely without administrative or military experience. The choice meant little to the remote armies, the praetorians or the senate and particularly angered Otho, who had hoped to succeed Galba. Otho quickly organized a conspiracy among the praetorians with promise of a material reward, and on 15 January 69 they declared him emperor and publicly killed Galba; Piso, dragged from hiding in the temple of Vesta, was also butchered. On that same evening a powerless senate awarded Otho the imperial titles.
Otho's Principate in Rome
It is not possible to reconstruct a detailed chronology of Otho's brief eight and a half weeks as princeps in Rome (15 January-15 March). Even so, Galba's quick demise had surely impressed upon Otho the need to conciliate various groups. As a result, he continued his indulgence of the praetorian guard but he also tried to win over the senate by following a strict constitutionalist line and by generally keeping the designations for the consulship made by Nero and Galba. In the provinces, despite limited evidence, there are some indications that he tried to compensate for Galba's stinginess by being more generous with grants of citizenship. In short, Otho was eager not to offend anyone.
Problems remained, however. The praetorians had to be continually placated and they were always suspicious of the senate. On the other hand, the senate itself, along with the people, remained deeply disturbed at the manner of Otho's coming to power and his willingness to be associated with Nero. These suspicions and fears were most evident in the praetorian outbreak at Rome. Briefly, Otho had decided to move from Ostia to Rome a cohort of Roman citizens in order to replace some of Rome's garrison, much of which was to be utilized for the showdown with Vitellius. He ordered that weapons be moved from the praetorian camp in Rome by ship to Ostia at night so that the garrison replacements would be properly armed and made to look as soldierly as possible when they marched into the city. Thinking that a senatorial counter-coup against Otho was underway, the praetorians stormed the imperial palace to confirm the emperor's safety, with the result that they terrified Otho and his senatorial dinner guests. Although the praetorians' fears were eventually calmed and they were given a substantial cash payment, the incident dramatically underscored the unease at Rome in the early months of 69.
Otho's Offensive against Vitellius
Meanwhile, in the Rhineland, preparations for a march on Rome by the military legions that had declared for Vitellius were far advanced. Hampered by poor intelligence gathering in Gaul and Germany and having failed to negotiate a settlement with Vitellius in early 69, Otho finally summoned to Italy his forces for a counterattack against the invading Vitellian army. His support consisted of the four legions of Pannonia and Dalmatia, the three legions of Moesia and his own imperial retinue of about 9,000. Vitellius' own troops numbered some 30,000, while those of his two marshals, Aulus Caecina Alienus and Fabius Valens, were between 15,000 and 20,000 each.
Otho's strategy was to make a quick diversionary strike in order to allow time for his own forces to assemble in Italy before engaging the enemy. The strategy worked, as the diversionary army, comprised of urban cohorts, praetorians and marines all from Rome or nearby, was successful in Narbonese Gaul in latter March. An advance guard sent to hold the line on the Po River until the Danubian legions arrived also enjoyed initial success. Otho himself arrived at Bedriacum in northern Italy about 10 April for a strategy session with his commanders. The main concern was that the Vitellians were building a bridge across the Po in order to drive southward towards the Apennines and eventually to Rome. Otho decided to counter by ordering a substantial part of his main force to advance from Bedriacum and establish a new base close enough to the new Vitellian bridge to interrupt its completion. While en route, the Othonian forces, strung out along the via Postumia amid baggage and supply trains, were attacked by Caecina and Valens near Cremona on 14 April. The clash, know as the Battle of Bedriacum, resulted in the defeat of the Othonian forces, their retreat cut off by the river behind them. Otho himself, meanwhile, was not present, but had gone to Brixellum with a considerable force of infantry and cavalry in order to impede any Vitellian units that had managed to cross the Po.
The plan had backfired. Otho's strategy of obtaining victory while avoiding any major battles had proven too risky. Realizing perhaps that a new round of fighting would have involved not only a significant re-grouping of his existing troops but also a potentially bloody civil war at Rome, if Vitellius' troops reached the capital, Otho decided that enough blood had been shed. Two weeks shy of his thirty-seventh birthday, on 16 April 69, he took his own life.
Assessment
To be sure, Otho remains an enigma - part profligate Neronian wastrel and part conscientious military commander willing to give his life for the good of the state. Our sources are at a loss to explain the paradox. Perhaps, like Petronius, he saw it was safer to appear a profligate in Nero's court? In the final analysis, Otho proved to be an organized and efficient military commander, who appealed more to the soldier than to the civilian. He also seems to have been a capable governor, with administrative talents that recalled those of his father. Nevertheless, his violent overthrow of Galba, the lingering doubts that it raised about his character, and his unsuccessful offensive against Vitellius are all vivid reminders of the turbulence that plagued the Roman world between the reigns of Nero and Vespasian. Regrettably, the scenario would play itself out one more time before peace and stability returned to the empire.
Copyright (C) 1999, John Donahue
Edited by J.P.Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
LPapi.jpg
79 BC L Papius Serrated denarius53 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right clad in goat's skin control symbal behind (bakers shovel), bead and reel in border

L PAPI
Gryphon leaping right control symbol (bakers oven) below, bead and reel border

trade guild: cooks and bakers

3.75g

Rome
79 BC

Sear 311 RRC 89

ex-ANE

Plate coin 89:www.bonannocoins.com/l_papius/l_papius_db.php

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
Papius3.jpg
79 BC L Papius Serrated denarius78 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right clad in goat's skin control symbal behind (half of fat fish), bead and reel in border

L PAPI
Gryphon leaping right control symbol (fish) below, bead and reel border

trade guild: fishmongers

3.91g

Rome
79 BC

Sear 311 RRC 39

ex-ANE

To see the amazing variety of control marks on this series: www.bonannocoins.com/l_papius/l_papius_db.php

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
LPapi2.jpg
79 BC L Papius Serrated denarius56 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right clad in goat's skin control symbal behind (base of column), bead and reel in border

L PAPI
Gryphon leaping right control symbol (Corinthian capital) below, bead and reel border

Trade guild: Builders

3.9g

Rome
79 BC

Sear 311 RRC 89

Ex-Calgary Coin

To see the amazing variety of control marks on this series:
www.bonannocoins.com/l_papius/l_papius_db.php

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
Antoniniano_Aureliano_RIC_279.jpg
96-20 - AURELIANO (270 - 275 D.C.)33 viewsAE Antoniniano 23 x 22 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP AVRELIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado y con coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "ORI-ENS AVG]" – Sol radiado desnudo con su manto sobre el hombro izquierdo, caminando hacia la izquierda, levantando su brazo derecho extendido y sosteniendo un globo en la mano izquierda. A ambos lados dos prisioneros sentados y con sus manos atadas. El sol apoya su pié derecho en las ataduras del prisionero ubicado a su derecha. "XXIT" en exergo.

Acuñada 7ma. Emisión Jun/Sept. 274 D.C.
Ceca: Serdica (Off. 3ra.) – Sofia Bulgaria
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #279 Pag.296 - Cohen Vol.VI #145 Pag.190/1 - Göbl#256 k3 - La Venera. II.1/9974 (1 ex) - DVM # Pag. –
mdelvalle
RIC_279_Doble_Antoniniano_Aureliano.jpg
96-20 - AURELIANO (270 - 275 D.C.)6 viewsAE Antoniniano 23 x 22 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP AVRELIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado y con coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "ORI-ENS AVG]" – Sol radiado desnudo con su manto sobre el hombro izquierdo, caminando hacia la izquierda, levantando su brazo derecho extendido y sosteniendo un globo en la mano izquierda. A ambos lados dos prisioneros sentados y con sus manos atadas. El sol apoya su pié derecho en las ataduras del prisionero ubicado a su derecha. "XXIT" en exergo.

Acuñada 7ma. Emisión Jun/Sept. 274 D.C.
Ceca: Serdica (Off. 3ra.) – Sofia Bulgaria

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #279 Pag.296 - Cohen Vol.VI #145 Pag.190/1 - Göbl#256 k3 - La Venera. II.1/9974 (1 ex) - DVM #14 P.257
mdelvalle
Justinian-Con-S-163.jpg
96. Justinian I.19 viewsFollis (40 nummia), 541, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: DN IVSTINIANVS P P AVG / Helmeted and cuirassed bust, facing; holding globe and cruciger. Cross at right.
Reverse: Large M, cross above, ANNO XIIII at sides, Γ between legs of M.
Mint mark: CON
22.82 gm., 38 mm.
Sear #163.

The large M is the Greek numeral 40 -- i.e. 40 nummia is the coin's denomination. The smaller Γ is the Greek numeral 3 -- i.e. the 3'rd officina of the mint at Constantinople. ANNO XIIII is Latin for Year 14 -- the 14'th year of Justinian's reign (541 AD).
In 541, things were going bad for the Empire -- trouble with the Goths in Italy, the Bulgars ravaging the Balkans, and the Persians invading from the east. Bubonic plague swept across the eastern Mediterranean in 541, reaching Constantinople in May 542, before going on to Italy and Gaul.
Callimachus
rep33.jpg
A. Postumius A.f. Sp.n. Albinus. 81 BC. AR Serrate Denarius (19.4mm, 3.96 g, 11h).35 viewsRome mint. Veiled head of Hispania right / Togate figure standing left, raising hand, between aquila and fasces. Crawford 372/2; Sydenham 746; Postumia 8; Type as RBW 1393. Good VF, toned, obverse die bulge with resulting depression.

From the Andrew McCabe Collection. Ex Roma Special Auction May 2013 (21 May 2013), lot 1237; Bolaffi Ambassador (26 May 2011), lot 37.
The depression on the obverse shows signs of the struck design within the incuse. This may be the result of a die that bulged after it was engraved; impurities in the metal of the die itself caused it to “bubble,” creating the die bulge. Or perhaps the bulge was already on the face of the die, and instead of planing off the face of the die, the engraver simply engraved over it. [KKW]
1 commentsBritanikus
Antoniniano_Carino_RIC_Roma_264KADbis2.jpg
A103-08 - CARINO (Mar.283 - Set.285 D.C.)44 viewsAE Antoniniano 25 x 20 mm 3.5 gr.
Hijo mayor de Caro, acuñada como Augusto solo.

Anv: "IMP CARINVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y con coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PIETA-S AVG" – Mercurio de pié desnudo a izquierda, vistiendo petaso sobre la cabeza, portando bolsa en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y caduceo en el izquierdo, del que además cuelga su manto . "KAΔ" en exergo.

Acuñada 5ta.Emisión Nov. 284 D.C.
Ceca: Roma Italia (Off.4ta.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: Vol.V Parte II #264 Pag.171 - Cohen Vol.VI #72 Pag.391 - La Venera IV/3877 – Sear RCTV (2000) #12351 - DVM # Pag.
mdelvalle
RIC_264_Antoniniano_Carino.jpg
A103-08 - CARINO (Mar.283 - Set.285 D.C.)7 viewsAE Antoniniano 25 x 20 mm 3.5 gr.
Hijo mayor de Caro, acuñada como Augusto solo.

Anv: "IMP CARINVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y con coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PIETA-S AVG" – Mercurio de pié desnudo a izquierda, vistiendo petaso sobre la cabeza, portando bolsa en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y caduceo en el izquierdo, del que además cuelga su manto . "KAΔ" en exergo.

Acuñada 6ta.Emisión 284-285 D.C.
Ceca: Roma Italia (Off.4ta.)

Referencias: RIC Vb #264 (C) P.171, Cohen VI #72 P.391, La Venera IV/3877, Sear RCTV III #12351 P.515, Hunter #31, Pink pp.38-9 series 5-6
mdelvalle
Antoniniano Diocleciano RIC 220.jpg
A107-02 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)69 viewsAE Antoniniano 22 x 21 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONSERVAT" - Júpiter desnudo de pié a izquierda, el manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo, portando un rayo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda, protegiendo a una pequeña figura del Emperador ubicada a sus piés a izquierda. "QXXIT" en el exergo

Acuñada 285 D.C.
Ceca: Ticinum (Off. 4ta.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte II #220 Pag.243 - Cohen Vol.VI #206 Pag.436 - DVM #26 Pag.276
mdelvalle
RIC_220_Antoniniano_Diocleciano.jpg
A107-02 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)21 viewsAE Antoniniano 22 x 21 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONSERVAT" - Júpiter desnudo de pié a izquierda, el manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo, portando un rayo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda, protegiendo a una pequeña figura del Emperador ubicada a sus piés a izquierda. "QXXIT" en el exergo

Acuñada 285 D.C.
Ceca: Ticinum (Off. 4ta.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte II #220 Pag.243 - Cohen Vol.VI #206 Pag.436 - DVM #26 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV #12661 Pag.96 - Hunter iv #42
mdelvalle
Antoniniano_Diocleciano_RIC_284.jpg
A107-03 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)47 viewsAE Antoniniano 21 mm 3.8 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORD-IA MIL-ITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium (Parazonio, espada corta, ancha y sin punta, que como señal de distinción portaban los Jefes Militares, sujeta con la correa en el lado izquierdo de la cintura), recibiendo una Victoriola (Victoria sobre un globo) de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "dot XXI dot" en el exergo y "HA" en el campo central.

Acuñada: 292 D.C.
Ceca: Heraclea (Off. 1ra.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte II #284 Pag.249 - Cohen Vol.VI #34 Pag.419 - DVM #21 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3540
mdelvalle
RIC_284_Antoniniano_Diocleciano.jpg
A107-03 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)15 viewsAE Antoniniano 21 mm 3.8 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORD-IA MIL-ITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium (Parazonio, espada corta, ancha y sin punta, que como señal de distinción portaban los Jefes Militares, sujeta con la correa en el lado izquierdo de la cintura), recibiendo una Victoriola (Victoria sobre un globo) de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "dot XXI dot" en el exergo y "HA" en el campo central.

Acuñada: 292 D.C.
Ceca: Heraclea (Off. 1ra.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte II #284 Pag.249 - Cohen Vol.VI #34 Pag.419 - DVM #21 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3540 - Sear RCTV #12636 Pag.94 - Hunter iv p.clxxx
mdelvalle
Antoniniano Diocleciano RIC 256.jpg
A107-04 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)51 viewsAE Antoniniano 22 mm 3.9 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "XXI" en el exergo y "B" en el campo central.

Acuñada 293 - 295 D.C.
Ceca: Siscia (Off. 2da.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte II #256 Pag.246 - Cohen Vol.VI #33 Pag.419 - DVM #21 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3540
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RIC_306_Antoniniano_Diocleciano.jpg
A107-04 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)13 viewsAE Antoniniano 22 mm 3.9 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "XXI" en el exergo y "B" en el campo central.

Acuñada 293 - 294 D.C.
Ceca: Cízico (Off. 2da.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte II #306 Pag.253 - Cohen Vol.VI #33 Pag.419 - DVM #21 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3540 - Sear RCTV #12635P.94 - Hunter iv #60-62
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AE Radiado Diocleciano RIC 15a.jpg
A107-09 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)43 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 21 x 23 mm 2.4 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "KA" en el campo central.

Acuñada 295 - 297 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (Off. 1ra.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI #15a Pag.581 - Cohen Vol.VI #34 Pag.419 - DVM #49 Pag.277 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7037e Pag.53
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RIC_Not_in_Fraccion_radiada_Diocleciano.jpg
A107-09 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)17 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 21 x 23 mm 2.4 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "KΔ" en el campo central.

Acuñada 295 - 297 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (Off. 4ta.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI #15a var. (No para esta Oficina) Pag.581 - Cohen Vol.VI #34 Pag.419 - DVM #49 Pag.277 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7037e Pag.53 - Sear RCV IV #12834 Pag.112
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AE_Radiado_Diocleciano_RIC_15a,g.jpg
A107-10 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)33 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 21 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MI-LITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "KΓ" en el campo central.

Acuñada 295 - 297 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (Off. 3ra.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI #15a Pag.581 - Cohen Vol.VI #34 Pag.419 - DVM #49 Pag.277 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7037e Pag.53
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RIC_15a_Fraccion_radiada_Diocleciano.jpg
A107-10 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)16 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 21 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MI-LITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "KΓ" en el campo central.

Acuñada 295 - 297 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (Off. 3ra.)

Referencias: RIC VI #15a P.581, Cohen VI #34 P.419, DVM #49 P.277, Salgado MRBI III #7037e P.53, Sear RCV IV #12834 P.112
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AE Radiado Diocleciano RIC 16a.jpg
A107-11 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)45 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 20 mm 2.2 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "KΔ" en el campo central.

Acuñada 295 - 297 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (Off. 4ta.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI #16a Pag.581 - Cohen Vol.VI #34 Pag.419 - DVM #49 Pag.277 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7037e Pag.53
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RIC_13_21_Fraccion_radiada_Diocleciano.jpg
A107-11 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)11 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 20 mm 2.2 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "HΔ" en el campo central.

Acuñada 295 - 298 D.C.
Ceca: Heraclea (Off. 4ta.)

Referencias: RIC VI #13/21 Pag.531-2, Cohen Vol.VI #34 Pag.419, DVM #49 Pag.277, Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7037d Pag.53, Sear RCV IV #12833 Pag.112
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AE Radiado Diocleciano RIC 76a.jpg
A107-13 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)60 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 21 x 19 mm 2.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VOT / X X" - Leyenda en dos líneas dentro de una guirnalda de hojas. "B" en el campo central.

Acuñada 297 - 298 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 2da.)
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Roma) #76a Pag.359 - Cohen Vol.VI #541 Pag.476 - DVM #50 Pag.277 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7038a Pag.53
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RIC_77a_Fraccion_radiada_Diocleciano.jpg
A107-13 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)12 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 21 x 19 mm 2.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VOT / X X" - Leyenda en dos líneas dentro de una guirnalda de hojas. "B" en el campo central.

Acuñada 297 - 298 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 2da.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Roma) #76a (R) Pag.359 - Cohen Vol.VI #541 Pag.476 - DVM #50 Pag.277 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7038a Pag.53 - Sear RCV IV #12842 Pag.113
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Follis Diocleciano RIC 12a.jpg
A107-20 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)120 viewsAE Follis 26 mm 9.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIO POPVLI ROMANI" - Genio de pié a izquierda, desnudo salvo modius en la cabeza y chlamys colgando desde su hombro izquierdo, portando patera en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido, de la que cae cierto líquido y cornucopia en izquierda. "KΓ" en exergo.

Acuñada 294 - 305 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (Off. 4ta.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Cyzicus) #12a Pag.580 - Cohen Vol.VI #106 Pag.426 - DVM #41 Pag.277 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7031.l.2 Pag.52
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RIC_12a_Nummus_Diocleciano.jpg
A107-20 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)25 viewsAE Follis 26 mm 9.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIO POPVLI ROMANI" - Genio de pié a izquierda, desnudo salvo modius en la cabeza y chlamys colgando desde su hombro izquierdo, portando patera en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido, de la que cae cierto líquido y cornucopia en izquierda. "KΓ" en exergo.

Acuñada 294 - 305 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (Off. 3ra.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Cyzicus) #12a Pag.580 - Cohen Vol.VI #106 Pag.426 - DVM #41 Pag.277 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7031.l.2 Pag.52 - Sear RCV IV #12791 Pag.108
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RIC_19a_Nummus_Diocleciano.jpg
A107-22 - DIOCLECIANO (284 - 305 D.C.)16 viewsAE Follis 28 mm 10.0 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIO POPV-L-I ROMANI" - Genio de pié a izquierda, desnudo salvo modius en la cabeza y chlamys colgando desde su hombro izquierdo, portando patera en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido, de la que cae cierto líquido y cornucopia en izquierda. "HTΓ" en exergo.

Acuñada 297 - 298 D.C.
Ceca: Heraclea (Off. 3ra.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Heraclea) #19a Pag.531 - Cohen Vol.VI #106 Pag.426 - DVM #41 Pag.277 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7031.j.2 Pag.52 - Sear RCV IV #12787 Pag.108
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Antoniniano_Maximiano_RIC_371BIS.jpg
A111 -1 - MAXIMIANO (1er. Reinado 286 - 305 D.C.)61 viewsAntoniniano Pre-reforma 20 mm 4.3 gr.
M.AVRELIVS VALERIVS MAXIMIANVS – Emperador asociado por Diocleciano para que gobierne como “Augusto de Occidente”, hasta 305 D.C. cuando abdica.

Anv: "IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS PF AVG" - Busto con corona radiada, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "HERCVLI PACIFERO" – Hércules desnudo de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando una rama de olivo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y garrote y piel de león en la izquierda. "Δ" en campo izquierdo.

Acuñada: 287 - 288 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum – Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte II #371 Pag.263 – Cohen vol-VI #282 Pag.520 - DVM # Pag. - Salgado MRBI Vol.III # Pag.
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RIC_46b_Fraccion_radiada_Maximiano.jpg
A111 -10 - MAXIMIANO (286 - 305 D.C.)19 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 19 x 20 mm 2.6 gr.

Anv: "IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "Δ" en el campo central, "ALE" en exergo.

Acuñada 294 - 297 D.C.
Ceca: Alejandría (Off. 4ta.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Alexandria) #46b Pag.667 - Cohen Vol.VI #54 Pag.499 - DVM #45 Pag.278 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7087.g Pag.58 - Sear '88 #3639 - Sear RCTV IV #13317 Pag.167
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RIC_16b_Fraccion_radiada_Maximiano.jpg
A111 -12 - MAXIMIANO (286 - 305 D.C.)17 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 19 x 20 mm 2.6 gr.

Anv: "IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "KA" en el campo central.

Acuñada 295 - 297 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (Off. 1ra.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Cyzicus) #15b (C2) Pag.581 - Cohen Vol.VI #54 Pag.499 - DVM #45 Pag.278 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7087e Pag.58 - Sear RCTV IV #13315 Pag.166
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RIC_15b_Fraccion_radiada_Maximiano.jpg
A111 -14 - MAXIMIANO (286 - 305 D.C.)16 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 21 mm 2.9 gr.

Anv: "IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "KΕ" en el campo central.

Acuñada 295 - 299 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (Off. 5ta.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Cyzicus) #15b Pag.581 - Cohen Vol.VI #54 var. Pag.499 - DVM #45 Pag.278 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7087e Pag.58 - Sear RCTV IV #13315 Pag.166
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RIC_78_Fraccion_radiada_Maximiano.jpg
A111 -16 - MAXIMIANO (286 - 305 D.C.)15 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 20 x 18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "IMP C [MA]XIMIANVS PF AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VOT / · / XX" - Leyenda en dos líneas dentro de una guirnalda de hojas. "ε" en el campo central.

Acuñada 297 - 298 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 5ta.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Roma) #78 (C) Pag.359 - Cohen Vol.VI #676 Pag.562 - DVM #46 var Pag.278 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7088a Pag.58 - Sear RCTV IV #13323 Pag.167
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AE Radiado Maximiano RIC 15b.jpg
A111-02 - MAXIMIANO (286 - 305 D.C.)45 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 19 x 20 mm 2.6 gr.

Anv: "IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "KA" en el campo central.

Acuñada 295 - 297 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (Off. 1ra.)
Rareza: C2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Cyzicus) #15b Pag.581 - Cohen Vol.VI #54 Pag.499 - DVM #45 Pag.278 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7087e Pag.58
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AE Radiado Maximiano RIC 78.jpg
A111-04 - MAXIMIANO (286 - 305 D.C.)54 viewsAE Fracción radiada (post-reforma) 20 x 18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "IMP C [MA]XIMIANVS PF AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VOT / X X" - Leyenda en dos líneas dentro de una guirnalda de hojas. "ε" en el campo central.

Acuñada 297 - 298 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 5ta.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Roma) #78 Pag.359 - Cohen Vol.VI #676 Pag.562 - DVM #46 var Pag.278 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7088a Pag.58
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AE Radiado Constancio I RIC 15.jpg
A112-10 - CONSTANCIO I Como Cesar de Maximiano (293 - 305 D.C.)44 viewsAE Fracción radiada/Antoniniano ? 20 mm 2.9 gr.

Anv: "FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES" - Busto radiado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha. Visto desde atrás. (Busto no listado en RIC)
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Emperador de pié a derecha con vestimentas militares, portando en la mano izquierda un Parazonium, recibiendo una Victoriola de mano de Júpiter desnudo con su manto colgando de su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "H" en el campo central.

Acuñada ?
Ceca: Heraclea ?
Rareza: ?

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI NO LISTADA - Cohen Vol.VII #20 Pag.60 - DVM #16 (Antoniniano) Pag.280 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III NO LISTADA
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Follis Constancio I RIC Antiochia 55a.jpg
A112-20 - CONSTANCIO I Como Cesar de Maximiano (293 - 305 D.C.)78 viewsAE Follis 24 x 25 mm 9.1 gr.

Anv: "FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIO POPVLI ROMANI" - Genio de pié a izquierda, desnudo salvo modius en la cabeza y chlamys colgando desde su hombro izquierdo, portando patera en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido, de la que cae cierto líquido y cornucopia en izquierda. "ANT" en exergo, "K" en campo izquierdo y "A/V" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 300 - 301 D.C.
Ceca: Antiochia (Off.1ra)
Rareza: C2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Antiochia) #55a Pag.620 - Cohen Vol.VII #89 Pag.66 - DVM #25 var Pag.280 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7121.m Pag.61
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Follis Constancio I RIC 95a.jpg
A112-22 - CONSTANCIO I Como Cesar de Maximiano (293 - 305 D.C.)65 viewsAE Follis 29 x 27 mm 10.2 gr.

Anv: "CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIO POPVLI ROMANI" - Genio de pié a izquierda, desnudo salvo modius en la cabeza y chlamys colgando desde su hombro izquierdo, portando patera en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y cornucopia en izquierda. "T * " en exergo.

Acuñada 299 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.3ra)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Roma) #95a Pag.361 - Cohen Vol.VII #61 Pag.65 - DVM #25 Pag.280 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7121.f.3. Pag.61
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Follis_Galerio_RIC_Trier_357b.jpg
A113-18 - GALERIO Como Cesar de Diocleciano (293 - 305 D.C.)50 viewsAE Follis 26 x 25 mm 6.5 gr.

Anv: "MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIO POPV-LI ROMANI" - Genio de pié a izquierda, desnudo salvo modius en la cabeza y chlamys colgando desde su hombro izquierdo, portando patera en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido de la que cae cierto líquido y cornucopia en izquierda. "TR" en exergo, "B" en campo izquierdo y " * " en campo derecho.

Acuñada 298/9 D.C.
Ceca: Trier (Off.2da)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Trier) #357b Pag.289 - Cohen Vol.VII #78 Pag.109 - DVM #29 Pag.281 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7169. Pag.65 – Sear RCTV (1988) #3708
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Follis Galerio RIC Antiochia 59b.jpg
A113-20 - GALERIO Como Cesar de Diocleciano (293 - 305 D.C.)70 viewsAE Follis 27 x 25 mm 9.3 gr.

Anv: "GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIO POPVLI ROMANI" - Genio de pié a izquierda, desnudo salvo modius en la cabeza y chlamys colgando desde su hombro izquierdo, portando patera en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido de la que cae cierto líquido y cornucopia en izquierda. "ANT·" en exergo y "B" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 304 - 305 D.C.
Ceca: Antiochia (Off.2da)
Rareza: C2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Antiochia) #59b Pag.621 - Cohen Vol.VII #78 Pag.109 - DVM #29 var Pag.281 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7169.m. Pag.65
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Follis Galerio RIC Antiochia 95.jpg
A113-25 - GALERIO (305 - 311 D.C.)46 viewsAE Follis 25 x 24 mm 6.6 gr.

Anv: "IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIO IMPERATORIS" - Genio de pié a izquierda, desnudo salvo modius en la cabeza y chlamys colgando desde su hombro izquierdo, portando patera en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido, de la que cae cierto líquido y cornucopia en izquierda. "A" en campo izquierdo, "NT·" en exergo, y "Creciente (media luna)/ε" en campo derecho. Nótese la falla de acuñación: la "A" que debería encontrarse en el exergo como parte del nombre de la ceca "ANT", se encuentra en el campo izquierdo.

Acuñada 308 D.C.
Ceca: Antiochia (Off.5ta)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Antiochia) #95 Pag.629 - Cohen Vol.VII #47 Pag.107 - DVM #28a var Pag.281 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7269.j. Pag.75
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Follis_Galerio_RIC_Heraclea_37a.jpg
A113-26 - GALERIO (305 - 311 D.C.)41 viewsAE Follis 25 x 24 mm 5.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIO IMP-E-RATORIS" - Genio de pié a izquierda, desnudo salvo modius en la cabeza y chlamys colgando desde su hombro izquierdo, portando patera en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido, de la que cae cierto líquido y cornucopia en izquierda. "A" en campo izquierdo, " • HTΓ •" en exergo, y "Creciente (media luna)/ε" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 308/9 D.C.
Ceca: Heraclea (Off.3ra)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Heraclea) #37a Pag.535 - Cohen Vol.VII #47 Pag.107 - DVM #28a var Pag.281 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7269. Pag.75
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Follis Galeria Valeria RIC Nicomedia 57.jpg
A114-10 - GALERIA VALERIA (308 - 311 D.C.)36 viewsAE Follis 24 x 25 mm 6.6 gr.
Hija de Diocleciano y esposa de Galerio.

Anv: "GAL VALERIA AVG" - Busto con diadema, túnica y collar, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENERI VICTRICI CMH(Ligadas)" - Venus de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando una manzana en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y levantando su velo con mano izquierda. "SMNA" en exergo.

Acuñada 308 - 310 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Nicomedia) #57 Pag.562 - Cohen Vol.VII #13 Pag.130 - DVM #3 var Pag.282 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7303.c. var. Pag.77
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Follis Maximino II RIC Thessalonica 32a.jpg
A116-02 - MAXIMINO II Como Filius Augustorum (Hijo de los Augustos) (Oct./308 - 309 D.C.)31 viewsAE Follis 24 mm 6.0 gr.
Sobrino de Galerio.

Anv: "MAXIMINVS FIL AVGG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIO CAESARIS" - Genio de pié a izquierda, desnudo salvo modius en la cabeza y chlamys colgando desde su hombro izquierdo, portando patera en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido, de la que cae cierto líquido y cornucopia en izquierda. "·SM·TS·" en exergo, "*" en campo izquierdo y "Δ" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 308 - 309 D.C.
Ceca: Thessalonica (Off.4ta.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Thessalonica) #32a Pag.514 - Cohen Vol.VII #42 Pag.146 - DVM #12 var Pag.283 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7531.b. Pag.83
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Follis Maximino II RIC Nicomedia 69b.jpg
A116-12 - MAXIMINO II Como Augusto solo (311 - 313 D.C.)38 viewsAE Follis 20 mm 4.2 gr.
Sobrino de Galerio.

Anv: "IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONSERVATORI" - Júpiter desnudo de pié a izquierda, su manto (Chlamys) colgando de sus dos brazos, portando Victoriola en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "SMN" en exergo, "B" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 311 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.2da.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Nicomedia) #69b var (Sin águila a izq.) Pag.566 - Cohen Vol.VII #117 Pag.152 - DVM #16 Pag.283 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III NO LISTADA
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Follis Maximino II RIC Antiochia 164b.jpg
A116-14 - MAXIMINO II Como Augusto solo (311 - 313 D.C.)46 viewsAE Follis 21 x 20 mm 5.5 gr.
Sobrino de Galerio.

Anv: "IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIO AVGVSTI" - Genio de pié a izquierda, desnudo salvo modius en la cabeza y chlamys colgando desde su hombro izquierdo, portando Cabeza de Sol/Serapis en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y cornucopia en izquierda. "ANT" en exergo, "*" en campo izquierdo y "BI" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 312 D.C.
Ceca: Antiochia (Off.12ava.)
Rareza: C2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Antiochia) #164b Pag.643 - Cohen Vol.VII #17 Pag.144 - DVM #9 Pag.283 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7548.k. Pag.84
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Follis_Maximino_II_RIC_Alexandria_161b.jpg
A116-15 - MAXIMINO II Como Augusto solo (311 - 313 D.C.)49 viewsAE Follis 21 mm 4.6 gr.
Sobrino de Galerio.

Anv: "IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIO AVGVSTI" - Genio de pié a izquierda, desnudo salvo modius en la cabeza y chlamys colgando desde su hombro izquierdo, portando Cabeza de Serapis en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y cornucopia en izquierda. "ALE" en exergo, " * / N / Palma inclinada" en campo izquierdo y "B" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 312/3 D.C.
Ceca: Alejandria Egipto (Off.2da.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Alexandria) #160b Pag.685 - Cohen Vol.VII #20 Pag.144 - DVM #9 Pag.283 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III (No listadapara Alejandría) similar a #7548.k Pag.84
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Cuarto_Follis_Maximino_II_Antioch_Vagi_2955.jpg
A116-30 -Acuñacion Civica Anonima Semi-Autonoma (311 - 312 D.C.)39 viewsAE15 ¼ de Follis o Nummus 19 x 15 mm 1.2 gr.
Moneda tradicionalmente atribuida a Julian II hasta que J.Van Heesch en su artículo “The last Civic Coinages and the Religious Police of Maximinus Daza”, publicado en el Numismatic Chronicle vol.153 Pags. 66 y subsiguientes (1993), realiza un detallado estudio de este tipo de acuñación cívica anónima del cuarto siglo, donde demuestra que estas monedas se acuñaron bajos los auspicios de Maximino II Daya conmemorando “La Gran Persecución” de los Cristianos y por consiguiente la Victoria Pagana, al honrar con ellas a los antiguos dioses grecorromanos Júpiter, Apolo, Tyche, y Serapis. Recordemos que en dicha persecución (desde finales del 311 a finales del 312 D.C.) se cerraron Iglesias, encarcelando y/o desterrando a los cristianos. Esta campaña fue particularmente fuerte en Nicomedia, Antioquia y Alejandría, los tres centros principales del Imperio de Oriente. Estas persecuciones menguaron al año siguiente posiblemente como resultado de la preocupación de Maximino II al provocar abiertamente a los Emperadores Asociados de Occidente Constantino I y Licinio I.

Anv: "IOVI CONS - ERVATORI" – Júpiter semidesnudo, sentado en un trono a izquierda, portando globo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y largo cetro vertical en la izquierda.
Rev: "VICTOR - IA AVGG" – Victoria avanzando a izquierda, portando guirnalda en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y hoja de palma en la izquierda. "ANT" en exergo y "B" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 311 - 312 D.C.
Ceca: Antiochia (Off. 2da.)

Referencias: Cohen Vol.VIII #53 Pag.49 (Julián II) (10f) - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7952 Pag.94 – Vaggi #2955 - J.Van Heesch “The last Civic Coinages and the Religious Police of Maximinus Daza (1993)” #2.
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Follis Majencio RIC Ticinum 95.jpg
A117-12 - MAJENCIO (306 - 312 D.C.)44 viewsAE Follis 24 mm 6.1 gr.
Hijo de Maximiano, causó la crisis del sistema de la Tetrarquía, siendo proclamado “Principe”, luego César, y mas tarde Augusto, e invitando él mismo a su padre a reasumir el Imperio. Fue derrocado por las fuerzas conjuntas de Constantino I y Licinio.

Anv: "MAXENTIVS P F AVG" - Busto laureado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONSERV VRB SVAE" - Roma sentada de frente, viendo a izquierda, portando un globo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y largo cetro vertical en izquierda, dentro de un templo hexástilo (6 columnas). "P T" en exergo.

Acuñada Otoño 307 - primavera 308 D.C.
Ceca: Ticinum (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Ticinum) #95 Pag.294 - Cohen Vol.VII #28 Pag.168 - DVM #18 var Pag.284 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7653.a. Pag.89
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RIC_95_Follis_Numus_Majencio.jpg
A117-12 - MAJENCIO (306 - 312 D.C.)35 viewsAE Follis 24 mm 6.1 gr.
Hijo de Maximiano, causó la crisis del sistema de la Tetrarquía, siendo proclamado “Principe”, luego César, y mas tarde Augusto, e invitando él mismo a su padre a reasumir el Imperio. Fue derrocado por las fuerzas conjuntas de Constantino I y Licinio.

Anv: "MAXENTIVS P F AVG" - Busto laureado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONSERV VRB SVAE" - Roma sentada de frente, viendo a izquierda, portando un globo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y largo cetro vertical en izquierda, dentro de un templo hexástilo (6 columnas). "P T" en exergo.

Acuñada Otoño 307 - primavera 308 D.C.
Ceca: Ticinum (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Ticinum) #95 Pag.294 - Cohen Vol.VII #28 Pag.168 - DVM #18 var Pag.284 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7653.a. Pag.89
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RIC_210_Follis_Numus_Majencio.jpg
A117-13 - MAJENCIO (306 - 312 D.C.)15 viewsAE Follis 24 mm 6,1 gr.

Anv: "IMP C MAXENTIVS PF AVG " – Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONSERV VRB SVAE" - Roma sentada de frente, viendo a izq., portando globo en mano derecha y largo cetro vertical en izquierda, dentro de un templo hexástilo (6 columnas). "RBQ" en exergo.

Acuñada 308 - 310 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.4ta.)
Rareza: C2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Roma) #210 Pag.378 - Cohen Vol.VII #21 Pag.168 - DVM #19 Pag.284 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7653.c. Pag.89 - Sear '88 #3779
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Follis_Majencio_RIC_35.jpg
A117-16 - MAJENCIO (306 - 312 D.C.)38 viewsAE Follis 25 mm 7.1 gr.
Hijo de Maximiano, causó la crisis del sistema de la Tetrarquía, siendo proclamado “Principe”, luego César, y mas tarde Augusto, e invitando él mismo a su padre a reasumir el Imperio. Fue derrocado por las fuerzas conjuntas de Constantino I y Licinio.

Anv: "IMP C M[A]XENTIVS PF AVG " – Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AETE-RNITAS - [AVG] N” – Los Dioscuri (Castor y Pollux) desnudos de pié uno frente al otro, portando cetros largos verticales, sobre sus hombros un manto corto (Chlamys) y reteniendo a sus caballos por los frenos. "MOSTP" en exergo.

Acuñada 309 – 312 D.C.
Ceca: Ostia – (Ostia Antica, viejo puerto de Roma) -Italia
Rareza: C2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Ostia) 35 Pag.404 - DVM #14 Pag.284 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7656.a. Pag.89 – Cohen Vol.VII #5 Pag.166
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RIC_35_Follis_Numus_Majencio.jpg
A117-16 - MAJENCIO (306 - 312 D.C.)20 viewsAE Follis 25 mm 7.1 gr.
Hijo de Maximiano, causó la crisis del sistema de la Tetrarquía, siendo proclamado “Principe”, luego César, y mas tarde Augusto, e invitando él mismo a su padre a reasumir el Imperio. Fue derrocado por las fuerzas conjuntas de Constantino I y Licinio.

Anv: "IMP C M[A]XENTIVS PF AVG " – Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AETE-RNITAS - [AVG] N” – Los Dioscuri (Castor y Pollux) desnudos de pié uno frente al otro, portando cetros largos verticales, sobre sus hombros un manto corto (Chlamys) y reteniendo a sus caballos por los frenos. "MOSTP" en exergo.

Acuñada 309 – 312 D.C.
Ceca: Ostia – (Ostia Antica, viejo puerto de Roma) -Italia
Rareza: C2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Ostia) 35 Pag.404 - DVM #14 Pag.284 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7656.a. Pag.89 – Cohen Vol.VII #5 Pag.166 - Sear '88 #3776
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RIC_34_Follis_ROMULO_FORUM.jpg
A118-01 - ROMULO (309 - 312 D.C.)21 viewsAE Follis 16 mm 6,47 gr.
Hijo de Majencio y nieto de Galerio, muere a la edad de 14 años. A su muerte, fue deificado y su padre le dedicó el Templo del divo Rómulo en el Foro romano.

Anv: "DIVO ROMVLO N V BIS CONS" – Cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AETERNAE - MEMORIAE” – Águila estante a derecha, viendo a izquierda, sobre el domo de un templo con la puerta derecha abierta. "MOSTP" en exergo.

Acuñada 309 – 312 D.C.
Ceca: Ostia – (Ostia Antica, viejo puerto de Roma) -Italia

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Ostia) 34 Pag.404 - DVM #1 Pag.285 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7801.b Pag.93 – Cohen Vol.VII #6 Pag.183 - Sear RCTV IV #15050 Pag.356 - DROST #72 - Bauten S.26 f - Hill Monuments S.13 ff
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Follis Licinio I RIC Heraclea 73D.jpg
A119-05 - LICINIO I (308 - 324 D.C.)44 viewsAE Follis 22 x 20 mm 2.9 gr.

Anv: "IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG" - Júpiter desnudo de pié a izquierda, su manto (Chlamys) colgando de su hombro izquierdo, portando Victoriola en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. Aguila con una corona en el pico parada a sus piés, a izquierdo con la cabeza vuelta hacia Júpiter. "SMHT" en exergo, "Δ" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 313 D.C.
Ceca: Heraclea (Off.4ta.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Heraclea) #73 Pag.541 - Cohen Vol.VII #108 Pag.200 - DVM #15 var Pag.286 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8009.c.2. Pag.138
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Follis Licinio I RIC Nicomedia 15Z.jpg
A119-10 - LICINIO I (308 - 324 D.C.)38 viewsAE Follis 26 x 22 mm 3.9 gr.
Moneda doblemente golpeada, se visualiza en la leyenda del anverso entre las 10 y 12 hs. y en el reverso en el exergo

Anv: "IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONSERVATORI" - Júpiter desnudo de pié a izquierda, su manto (Chlamys) colgando de su hombro izquierdo, portando Victoriola en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. Aguila con una corona en el pico parada a sus piés, a izquierdo con la cabeza vuelta hacia Júpiter. "SMN" en exergo, "N/Z" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 313 - 317 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.7ma.)
Rareza: R2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Nicomedia) #15 Pag.601 - Cohen Vol.VII #70 Pag.196 - DVM #15 var Pag.286 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8009.d. Pag.138
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Follis Licinio I RIC Siscia 11A.jpg
A119-15 - LICINIO I (308 - 324 D.C.)37 viewsAE Follis 21 x 20 mm 2.8 gr.

Anv: "IMP LICINIVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONSERVATORI" - Júpiter desnudo de pié a izquierda, su manto (Chlamys) colgando de su hombro izquierdo, portando Victoriola en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. Aguila con una corona en el pico parada a sus piés, a izquierdo con la cabeza vuelta hacia Júpiter. "SIS" en exergo, "A" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 313 - 315 D.C.
Ceca: Siscia (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: R3

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Siscia) #11 Pag.423 - Cohen Vol.VII #73 Pag.196 - DVM #15 var Pag.286 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8010.a. Pag.139
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Follis Licinio I RIC Siscia 17D.jpg
A119-17 - LICINIO I (308 - 324 D.C.)41 viewsAE Follis 20 x 21 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONSERVATORI" - Júpiter desnudo de pié a izquierda, su manto (Chlamys) colgando de su hombro izquierdo, portando Victoriola en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. Aguila con una corona en el pico parada a sus piés, a izquierdo con la cabeza vuelta hacia Júpiter. "·SIS·" en exergo, "Δ" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 315 - 316 D.C.
Ceca: Siscia (Off.4ta.)
Rareza: R1

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Siscia) #17 Pag.424 - Cohen Vol.VII #66 Pag.195 - DVM #15 Pag.286 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8010.a. Pag.139
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Follis Licinio I RIC Siscia 17E.jpg
A119-19 - LICINIO I (308 - 324 D.C.)27 viewsAE Follis 20 x 22 mm 3.8 gr.

Anv: "IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONSERVATORI" - Júpiter desnudo de pié a izquierda, su manto (Chlamys) colgando de su hombro izquierdo, portando Victoriola en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. Aguila con una corona en el pico parada a sus piés, a izquierdo con la cabeza vuelta hacia Júpiter. "·SIS·" en exergo, "Ε" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 315 - 316 D.C.
Ceca: Siscia (Off.5ta.)
Rareza: R1

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Siscia) #17 Pag.424 (Partición leyenda del reverso S-E Ver pié de página) - Cohen Vol.VII #66 Pag.195 - DVM #15 Pag.286 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8010.a. Pag.139
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Follis Licinio I RIC Thessalonica 60A.jpg
A119-25 - LICINIO I (308 - 324 D.C.)30 viewsAE Follis 23 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG" - Busto laureado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN" - Júpiter desnudo de pié a izquierda, su manto (Chlamys) colgando de su hombro izquierdo, portando Victoriola en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. Aguila con una corona en el pico parada a sus piés, a izquierdo con la cabeza vuelta hacia Júpiter. "·TS·A·" en exergo.

Acuñada 312 - 313 D.C.
Ceca: Tessalonica (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Tessalonica) #60 Pag.519 - Cohen Vol.VII #124 Pag.201 - DVM #16 Pag.286 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8010.b. Pag.139
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Follis Licinio I RIC Thessalonica 60D.jpg
A119-27 - LICINIO I (308 - 324 D.C.)