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coin632.jpg
12 viewsSeleukid Kingdom AE21, 7.8 grm., BMC 65, 29
Antiochos VI minted in Antioch, Amphora
Coin #632
cars100
coin625.jpg
21 viewsEdessa AE25 BMC 158 The Kingdom of Edessa,
Abgar X, 242-243 AD. AE25 of Edessa. Laureate,
draped & cuirassed bust of Gordian III rt., star before /
Draped bust of Abgar right, bearded, wearing a diaded
emed tiara, star behind. Coin #625
cars100
coin639.jpg
16 viewsSeleukid Kingdom Coin #639cars100
Pseudo_Rhodian.jpg
93 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C., Pseudo-Rhodian Coinage; Silver drachm, Ashton Pseudo-Rhodian Mainland pp. 29 - 30, Larissa Hoard p. 241 (N. Greece), SNG Keckman 793 - 795 (Thessaly), SNG Cop suppl. 358 (Peraea Rodia), EF, rose toning on luster, uncertain Thessaly mint, weight 2.675g, maximum diameter 16.8mm, die axis 180o, magistrate Hermias, c. 171 - 170 B.C.; obverse head of Helios facing slightly right; reverse ERMIAS (magistrate), rose, with bud right, I - W flanking stem

Ex: Forum (coin and picture)
6 commentspaul1888
adadd.jpg
24 viewsCeltic, Bastarnae Tribe, Thrace, c. 220 - 160 B.C., Imitative of Macedonian Kingdom Type

The Bastarnae were an important ancient people of uncertain, but probably mixed Germanic-Celtic-Sarmatian, ethnic origin, who lived between the Danube and the Dnieper (Strabo, Geography, VII, 3,17) during the last centuries B.C. and early centuries A.D. The etymology of their name is uncertain, but may mean 'mixed-bloods' (compare 'bastard'), as opposed to their neighbours the East Germanic Scirii, the 'clean-' or 'pure-bloods.'

32899. Bronze AE 16, imitative of SNG Cop 1299 (Macedonian Kingdom, time of Philip V and Perseus, 221 - 168 B.C.), Fair/Fine, 2.168g, 16.3mm, obverse Celtic-style bust of river-god Strymon right; reverse Trident
Patrick O3
Philip_II.jpg
34 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C. Obv. Diademed head of Apollo right. Rev. ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ, nude young male rider on horse prancing right.Lee S
TAMAR_IRREGULAR_COINAGE.jpg
62 viewsGEORGIAN KINGDOM, QUEEN TAMAR (1184-1213 AD) Irregular copper coin. Obv.: Geometric designs, with legends in Georgian; including name T'amar. Rev.: Legends in Arabic letters. dpaul7
TAMAR___DAVIT_Regular_Coinage.jpg
77 viewsGEORGIAN KINGDOM, QUEEN TAMAR, (1184-1213 AD) K'ORONIKON, 420 = 1200 AD; Obv.: Bagratid royal emblem in the form of a standard, to left and right: Initials for T'amar and David; in the corners, Georgian date formula, K'K Ví K (420 of the Paschal cycle = AD 1200). Two Counterstamps. Rev.: Christian inscriptions in arabic script, which reads: 1st line: Malekat al-Malekaat(s) / 2nd line Jellal Al-Dunya Wal Din / 3rd line : Tamar Ibnat Kurki / 4th line : Zahir Al-Massih. Translation: Queen of Queens Glory of the World and Faith T'amar daughter of Giorgi Champion of the Messiah. Reference: LANG # 11.

Reverse inscriptions read :
ملكة الملكات
جلال الدنيا و الدين
تمار ابنة كوركى
ظهير المسيح
dpaul7
image00075.jpg
12 viewsParthian Kingdom. Vologases IV . A.D. 147-191. Æ 18 Dichalkon (17.89 mm, 3.53 g, 12 h). struck A.D. 154. Bust of Volgases IV facing with long, tapered beard, end cut square; wearing tiara with hooks on crest, horn on side and long, curved earflaps; to right, Seleucid date (= SE 466 = A.D. 154) / Nike seated left on column; palm in left field. Sellwood ICP 84.142; Shore --. VF, tan patina with greenish encrustation in recesses, edge split. Quant.Geek
ANCIENT_INDIA_-_KAKANI_COIN_OF_SUNGA_KINGDOM_-_CAST_COPPER_COIN_-_2_82gm0.jpg
9 viewsAntonivs Protti
Pseudo_Rhodian_Drachm.jpg
35 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Perseus. 179-168 B.C. AR drachm (15 mm, 2.60 g, 12 h). ca. 171/0 B.C. Aristokrates, magistrate. Head of Helios facing slightly right / P-O, rose with bud to left; in left field, club; above, magistrate's name: [ΑΡΙ]ΣΤΟΚΡΑΤΗΣ. R. J. H. Ashton, ""Clubs, Thunderbolts, Torches, Stars and Caducei: more Pseudo-Rhodian Drachms from Mainland Greece and the Islands,"" NC 162 (2002), 17 (A6/P5; this coin). Toned. Very fine.
Ex Naville V (18 June 1923), 2669. British Museum Duplicate, Ex: British Museum


The Pseudo-Rhodian drachms were struck, probably by the Macedonians under Perseus but possibly by the Romans, to pay for Mercenaries from Crete and Rhodes who would have been familiar with Rhodian coinage. The coins in the name of the magistrate Aristokrates with the club symbol in the field is the largest known individual issue of pseudo-Rhodian drachms from the Third Macedonian War, and used at least twenty-nine obverse dies.
paul1888
4170540A.jpg
9 viewsSRI LANKA (CEYLON), Native coinages. Kingdom of Ruhuna. Circa 3rd century BC–1st century AD. Lot of two (2) terracotta tokens. All coins: circular terracotta pieces incised with four lines at 90 degree angles on either side. (20mm, 2.43 g) and (16.5mm, 1.88 g). Ruhana N.13. Quant.Geek
4170540B.jpg
12 viewsSRI LANKA (CEYLON), Native coinages. Kingdom of Ruhuna. Circa 3rd century BC–1st century AD. Lot of two (2) terracotta tokens. All coins: circular terracotta pieces incised with four lines at 90 degree angles on either side. (20mm, 2.43 g) and (16.5mm, 1.88 g). Ruhana N.13. Quant.Geek
4170542.jpg
12 viewsSRI LANKA (CEYLON), Native coinages. Kingdom of Ruhuna. Circa 2nd century BC–2nd century AD. Æ 'Lakshmi plaque' (9.5x14.5mm, 1.18 g). Goddess standing facing, holding lotus and two stalks / [Railed swastika]. Ruhuna H.48; cf. MACW 5048ffQuant.Geek
4170541.jpg
15 viewsSRI LANKA (CEYLON), Native coinages. Kingdom of Ruhuna. Circa 2nd century BC–2nd century AD. Æ 'Lakshmi plaque' (11x22mm, 2.84 g, 6h). Goddess standing facing, holding lotus and two stalks / Railed swastika. Ruhuna H.40; cf. MACW 5048ffQuant.Geek
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ANCIENT-INDIA-KAKANI-COIN-OF-SUNGA-KINGDOM-CAST-COPPER-COIN-2-31gm Ref..Mitchiner 4381.14 viewsObv - Elephant Left , Torion, Swastik Indradavaja
Rev - Three arched Hill, Hollow Cross, Torion, Tree Railing
Antonivs Protti
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Antiochus III AE109 viewsSNGIs 615v
Seleucid Kingdom,
Antiochus III AE10.
Diademed head right /
BASILEWS ANTIOXOY, elephant standing left.
xokleng
Antiochus_IX.jpg
Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C.24 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C. Ae 18. Weight 5.2g. Obv: Diademed head rt. Rev: Pallas Athena rt. holding shield and spear ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ. BMC 93.23
Antiochus IX Eusebes, ruler of the Greek Seleucid kingdom, was the son of Antiochus VII Sidetes and Cleopatra Thea. Upon the death of his father in Parthia and his uncle Demetrius II Nicator's return to power (129 BC), his mother sent him to Cyzicus on the Bosporus, thus giving him his nickname. He returned to Syria in 116 BC to claim the Seleucid throne from half-brother/cousin Antiochus VIII Grypus, with whom he eventually divided Syria. He was killed in battle by the son of Grypus, Seleucus VI Epiphanes in 96 BC.
ddwau
Baktria.jpg
Baktria23 viewsAlexander the Great's empire split into rival Hellenistic kingdoms ruled by his generals. The most far-flung part was Baktria, his conquests in what is today Afghanistan, western India and Pakistan. Greek settlers ruled over a much larger indigenous population. As centuries went by, this isolated outpost of Greek culture combined elements of both Greek and native traditions, oftentimes reflected in their bilingual coins. The main mints include Aï Khanoum, Bactra, and Pushkalavati.2 commentsChristian T
Baktria,_Diodotos_I,_AR_tetradrachm_-_Holt_A6_4_(this_coin)~0.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Diodotos I, ca. 255/250-240 BC, AR Tetradrachm 27 viewsDiademed head of Diodotos I right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY Zeus advancing left hurling thunderbolt, eagle at feet, ΙΔΤ (Iota, Delta, Sampi) monogram in inner left field.

Holt A6.4 (this coin); Kritt A6 (plate 2 A6 this coin); CSE 1294 (this coin); SNG Lockett 3109 (this coin ID: SNGuk_0300_3109); Pozzi 2945 (this coin); ESM 717α (this coin); SNG ANS 77; SC 631.a; Bopearachchi 2E; Mitchiner 64d; Qunduz 6; HGC 9, 243.
Mint "A" - Ai Khanoum

(26 mm, 15.73 g, 6h).
Herakles Numismatics; ex- Houghton Collection (CSE 1294); ex- Lockett Collection (SNGLockett 3109); ex- Pozzi Collection: Naville Sale I (1921) 2945 (sold for CHF 35).

This coin has a very distinguished provenance and has been published as plate coin in four reference works.

The emission with the ΙΔΤ (Iota, Delta Sampi) mint control mark is the most abundant of the Diodotid issues, representing about 13% of known Diodotid precious metal coins. The same control carries over into the early coinage of Euthydemos, although eventually displaced by the PK control monogram after 208/6 BC when Antiochos III captured Ai Khanoum while Euthydemos remained besieged at Baktra, after which it appears that Baktra/Balkh assumed the role of primary royal mint in Baktria. In is notable that the Archaic Greek letter Sampi forms the bottom of the ΙΔΤ monogram. It is an Archaic Greek form of a double Sigma that persisted in Greek dialects of Asia Minor. Many Greek settlers from Asia Minor migrated to Baktria, including the illustrious ruler Euthydemos from Magnesia in either Lydia, or Ionia. The archaic Greek Sampi possibly traveled to Baktria with the earliest Greek settlers from Asia Minor.
n.igma
Macedonian_Kingdom_7.PNG
Demetrios Poliorketes 306-283 BC28 viewsMacedonia Kingdom Demetrios Poliorketes 306-283 BC

Obverse: Head of Demetrios right wearing crested Corinthian helmet

Reverse: Prow of galley right, BA above, monogram beneath
(SNG Cop. 1194) - VF/XF...

AE15 Salamis, 3.72 gm.
Macedonian Warrior
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Gordian III, The Kingdom of Edessa,33 viewsThe Kingdom of Edessa, Abgar X, 242-243 AD. AE25 of Edessa. Laureate, draped & cuirassed bust of Gordian III rt., star before / Draped bust of Abgar right, bearded, wearing a diadedemed tiara, star behind. ecoli
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Gordian III; Edessa, The Kingdom of Edessa;22 viewsThe Kingdom of Edessa, Abgar X, 242-243 AD. AE25 of Edessa. Laureate, draped & cuirassed bust of Gordian III rt., star before / Draped bust of Abgar right, bearded, wearing a diadedemed tiara, star behind. ecoli
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INDIA-Panchala-Kingdom-HALF-Karshapana-INDIRAMITRA-RARE-COIN-4-42gm 15 viewsObverse Lord Indra standing on a pedestal
Reverse Three Panchala symbols in a row, with name below in Brahmi script: Indramitrasa
Date c. 1st century BCE - 1st century CE (highly uncertain)
Weight 4.78 gm.
Diameter 16 mm.
Die axis 5 o'clock
Reference MAC 4539, Shrimali Type A
Comments The Panchala series is one of the most interesting of the ancient India coin series, because it is quite long and the kings are named on them. Unfortunately, we know very little about the chronology. The order of kings is not known and even the dates of the series are still debated. It appears the series belongs in the post-Mauryan period, but further details are still unavailable.

You can see a catalog of Panchala coins on the CoinIndia website.
Antonivs Protti
DSC01834.JPG
INDIA-Panchala-Kingdom-HALF-Karshapana-INDIRAMITRA-RARE-COIN-4-6gm 13 viewsObverse Lord Indra standing on a pedestal
Reverse Three Panchala symbols in a row, with name below in Brahmi script: Indramitrasa
Date c. 1st century BCE - 1st century CE (highly uncertain)
Weight 4.78 gm.
Diameter 16 mm.
Die axis 5 o'clock
Reference MAC 4539, Shrimali Type A
Comments The Panchala series is one of the most interesting of the ancient India coin series, because it is quite long and the kings are named on them. Unfortunately, we know very little about the chronology. The order of kings is not known and even the dates of the series are still debated. It appears the series belongs in the post-Mauryan period, but further details are still unavailable.

You can see a catalog of Panchala coins on the CoinIndia website.
Antonivs Protti
agrippa1.jpg
Judean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa I, 37-44 CE20 viewsBronze Prutah, Hendin 1244, Meshorer TJC 120
Jurusalem mint, 41-42 CE.
Obverse: AGRIPA BACILEOC (king Agrippa) umbrella-like canopy with fringes.
Reverse: Three heads of barley between two leaves, flanked by L-s (year 6)
17.0 mm., 2.12 g.
sold 1-2018
NORMAN K
Kingdom_of_Bithynia__Prusias_II.jpg
Kingdom of Bithynia. Prusias II7 viewsAE22, 4.85 grams
228-149 BC.
Head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy-wreath
ΒΑΖΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΡΟYΣΙΟΥ, centaur Chiron walking right, playing lyre, monogram beneath leg
HGC 7, 629; Rec gén 26;
JBGood
iersab.jpg
Kingdom of JERUSALEM. Struck during the siege of Jerusalem by Sibylla, Queen of Jerusalem and Balian of Ibelin in 1187 . Bi Denier .124 viewsKingdom of Jerusalem . Struck during the siege of Jerusalem by Sibylla, Queen of Jerusalem and Balian of Ibelin in 1187 . Bi Denier .
+ TVRRIS DAVIT (legend retrograde), Tower of David
+ SЄPVLChRVM DOMINI, view of the Church of the Holy Sepulcher
Slocum 288; cf. C.J. Sabine, “Numismatic iconography of the Tower of David and the Holy Sepulchre,” NC 1979, pl. 17, 3; N. du Quesne Bird, “Two deniers from Jerusalem, Jordan,” NumCirc LXXIII.5 (May 1965), p. 109; Metcalf, Crusades, p. 77; CCS 51.
Very Rare . Thirteen known example .
The Ernoul chronicle refers to Balian of Ibelin and the patriarch Heraclius of Jerusalem stripped the silver and gold edicule from the Church of the Holy Sepulcher for striking coins to pay those defending the city at it's last stand .
2 commentsVladislav D
alexanderIIIobol2.jpg
Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander the Great, 336-323 BC, AR obol.19 viewsKingdom of Macedon, Alexander the Great, 336-323 BC, AR obol.
Struck c. 336-323 BC, Head of Hecrules right, wearing
lion skin, knotted at base of neck. / Zeus, nude to waist, seated
left on ornate throne, holding eagle and scepter within dotted circle.
CANTANATRIX
Macedonian_Kingdom,_Alexander_III_The_Great,_AR_teradrachm_Amphipolis_Mint~0.jpg
Kings of Macedon, Alexander III the Great, 336-323 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Amphipolis Mint under Antipater91 viewsHead of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress.
AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; janiform head vase in left field. Graffiti in upper left field - Aramaic kaph (k) and sadhe (s).

Price 6; Troxell, Studies, Issue A3; SNG Cop 660; Muller 853.
Struck at Amphipolis in the period 332-329 BC.

(29 mm, 17.15 g, 2h)

This is one of the first emissions of Alexander’s coinage struck in his homeland, albeit about three years after he departed for Asia Minor. Recent scholarship places the start of Alexander’s distinctive coinage in 333/2 BC at Tarsos, in eastern Asia Minor, shortly after which the design was transferred to Macedonia where Alexander’s coinage was struck under the authority of his regent in Greece, Antipater. Die studies indicate that this coin was from the fourth tetradrachm emission of a mint in Macedonia, most probably Amphipolis. It was most probably struck in the period 332-329 BC. The Aramaic graffiti on the reverse, plus the obverse reverse rim test cut are pointers to the likelihood that this coin travelled beyond its location of issue in Macedonia, into the eastern Mediterranean where Aramaic was the main spoken language.
3 commentsn.igma
19700.jpg
Kroisos, Lydia22 viewsLydian Kingdom. Kroisos. Ca. 564/53-550/39 B.C. AR 1/12 stater (7 mm, 0.80 g). Sardes mint. Confronted foreparts of lion, on left, and bull, in right / Incuse square punch. Berk 26-7; SNG Kayhan 1020-1; Traité I 413. VF, toned.ecoli
philip359.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, Father of Alexander the Great 359-336 BCE30 viewsBronze AE Unit, SNG ANS 934, nice VF, Macedonian mint, 6.328g,
17.4mm, 0°, c. 359 - 336 B.C.E.
Obverse: head Apollo right wearing taenia.
Reverse: ΦIΛIΠΠOΥ, young male rider
atop horse prancing to right, LO monogram below.
18.0 mm, 7.01 g.
Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom,
but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great.
He personally selected the design of his coins.
NORMAN K
ADM_II_series_VIII-124.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom: Philip III Arrhidaios (323-317 BCE) AR Drachm, Abydus (ADM II series VIII, 124-5)23 viewsObv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Rev: ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ; Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on backless throne; right leg drawn back, feet on stool, eagle in right hand, scepter in left; branch upward in left field, horse leg left below throne
Dim: 17mm, 4.27 gm, 5h
Quant.Geek
1116226a.jpg
Mithradates II34 viewsParthian Kingdom, Mithradates II 123-88 BC, Drachm, 4.16g: Obv: Diademed bust of Mithradates left Rev: Archer seated right, legend around. Sellwood 27.1. Rhagae mint1 commentsecoli
Ptolmaic_Egypt_.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom14 viewsHellenistic coinage of the Ptolemies, after Alexander the Great. Principal mints include Alexandria in Egypt, Paphos and Sidon in Cyprus, and Sidon and Tyre in Phoenicia. 1 commentsAnaximander
Retarrifed_Vespasian_as.jpg
105 viewsROME. Titus. As Caesar, AD 69-79.
Æ As (20mm, 9.84 g, 6 h)
Rome mint. Struck AD 77-78.
Retarrifed under by the Ostrogothic kingdom in Italy as 42 nummi, 6th century AD.
Laureate head left; XLII (= mark of value, 42 nummi) carved before bust
Spes standing left, holding flower and raising hem of skirt
For host coin:cf. RIC II 1101. For revaluation: cf. Morrisson, Re-use 19; cf. MEC 1, 76 (Vespasian)

Ex Giamba Collection (Classical Numismatic Group 82, 16 September 2009), lot 1139
3 commentsArdatirion
DSC_0195.jpg
74 viewsINDONESIA, Kingdom of Srivijaya.
7th-13th centuries AD
Æ (17mm, 0.32 g).
Cirebon or Tegal area. Struck in the early 11th century
Xian Ping Yuan Bao in crude Hànzì
Blank
Zeno 124661


The kingdom of Srivijaya (San Fo Chi, in Chinese) apparently petitioned the Emperor Zhēnzōng of China, seeking protection from the Chola Kingdom and permission to strike coins. This type, known only from recent finds near Palembang, likely represents the earliest native coinage of that area.
1 commentsArdatirion
charles2-denier-melle3.JPG
D.621 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 1a, Melle)25 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
Denier (Melle, class 1a, 840-864)

Silver, 1.70 g, 21 mm diameter, die axis 9h

O/ +CΛRLVS REX FR; cross pattée
R/ META / • / LLVM

Class 1 of Charles the Bald's coinage is made of totally different types of coins, which may reflect the state of the kingdom after 3 years of civil war and the division of the Empire.

Class 1a: mint in the field, with a linear legend
Class 1b: bust
Class 1c: city gate
Class 1d: KRLS monogram
Class 1e: temple

Coupland suggests that this particular scarce type (with META/LLVM on the reverse) had been minted from June 848, just after Charles the Bald finally defeated his nephew Pippin II for Aquitaine's control. The aim of minting a special type like this was to show a clear difference with the previsous coinage of Pippin II. A little later, Charles the Blad went on with the typical coinage of Melle (monogram ; circular mint name).
1 commentsDroger
charles2-gdr-curtisasonien.JPG
D.375 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 2, Courcessin?)35 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
GDR denier (Courcessin?, class 2, 864-875)

Silver, 1.43 g, 19 mm diameter, die axis 12h

O/ +GRΛTIΛ D-I REX; carolingian monogram
R/ +I.CVRTISΛSONIEH; cross pattée

In 864, Charles the Bald promulgated the edict of Pîtres, huge reform whose aim was to protect the kingdom from Viking raids. It also reinforced royal authority on minting, and created a new type of deniers . The new coins could be only struck at 10 mints (Palace, Chalon sur Saône, Melle, Narbonne, Orléans, Paris, Quentovic, Reims, Rouen and Sens). This limitation had never been applied, more than 110 mints struck the new coinage. This can be understood as a lack of control of the central autority. However it seems that several mints shared dies... Grierson and Blackburn proposed that only 10 main mints produced dies and partially outsourced coinage production ?
On the obverse is written GRATIA D-I REX (GDR) around a carolingian monogram. The alliance with Roman Church goes on... The reverse already existed for Class 1, with the mint name around a cross pattée.
Class 2 of Charles' coinage is made of these GDR deniers.

The precise localization of the mint in Normandie (north of France) is still not clear. According to Grierson and Blackburn, Courti(s) Sasonien(sis) may come from some groups of Saxons settled in northern part of Gaul.
Droger
louis3-denier-tours.JPG
D.1041 Louis III (denier, Tours)31 viewsLouis III, king of the Franks (879-882)
Denier (Tours)

Silver, 1.78 g, 19 mm diameter, die axis 12h

O/ +IIISIRICORDIΛ DI REX; Louis' monogram (legend beginning at 3h)
R/ +HTVR◊NES CIVITAS; croix pattée

Louis III became king of West Francia at 16 after his father Louis II died quite young. As he was the only living son of Charles II, Louis II had inherited the full kingdom of West Francia from his father. At opposite, when Louis II died, his sons Louis III and Carloman II divided the kingdom into a northern part for Louis III and a southern part for his brother Carloman II. During his reign, Louis III (in alliance with his brother) achieved military successes, especially against Vikings. However, Louis III's reign didn't last long. Louis III died inadvertently at 19 while chasing a girl on his horse. He hit violently the lintel of a door with his head.
Louis III's coinage is hard to distinguish from Louis II's. Both bear the same name et both reigns were very short. Three kinds of coins can be found:
* coins with legend LVDOVICS REX and a KRLS monogram : these coins have been found for northern and southern mints and are consequently given for Louis II;
* coins with a LVDOVICVS monogram ; they have only been found for the northern mints, and are consequently supposed to be Louis III's;
* coins of Toulouse with LV/DO, imitating the ones of Charles emperor with CA/RL. The attribution to Louis II seems to be straightforward due to the southern position.
The legend of the coin is different from the traditional Gratia di Rex, but still shows a religious origin. However its success remained very limited, with some scare coins of Louis III and Eudes.
3 commentsDroger
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"8 Zhu" Ban Liang of Qin Kingdom (Eastern Zhou Dynasty)24 viewsMinted 300-220 BCE.

Two huge Chinese characters - Ban Liang ("Half an ounce"), no rims or other marks / Blank, no rims. Unfiled edges.

This very large thin coins of variable weight were made under the very late Zhou dynasty - they are local issues, and might belong either to the late "Warring States" period or the early Qin period.

31mm, 3.52 grams. Hartill #7.4.
Belisarius
opium weights.jpg
'Opium weights'87 viewsSet of five hintha bird weights (a Brahmani Duck (Hamsa) emblem of the Mon kingdom with duck’s bill, crested comb, bulging eyes, side wings and upturned tail standing with 2 legs and rear post on a tapered hexagonal base with serrated edge). These are sometimes referred to as cock weights or opium weights. The bases are hexagonal - probably from Burma or surrounding The lighest one is 15g and they double up from there

Likely late 18th or early 19th century

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
Nabatea Incierta Plomo.jpg
01-01 - INCIERTO21 viewsPlomo 13 x 12 mm 1.3 gr.

Anv: Cabeza de Zeus viendo a derecha.
Rev: Toro avanzando a izquierda. Con leyenda sobre él.

Referencias: Hoover, O.D., 2006. A Reassessment of Nabatean Lead Coinage in Light of New Discoveries, Numismatic Chronicle, Vol.166, 2006, pp.105-119, pl.27-30. (Thanks boazin)
mdelvalle
Antíoco I, Soter.jpg
02-02 - Antioco I Soter (281 - 261 A.C.)42 viewsDespués de la muerte de Alejandro Magno, sus generales se repartieron el imperio, siendo protagonistas durante veinte años de grandes luchas y peleas por obtener el poder. Fueron los llamados diádocos, (διάδοχοι) o sucesores. La lucha entre ellos para obtener el poder y la hegemonía duró casi cincuenta años, hasta el 281 adC en que murió el último de los diádocos, Seleuco I Nikátor. Después de estos antiguos generales gobernaron los llamados epígonos (επίγονοι), que significa los nacidos después.
Antíoco I Sóter (que quiere decir 'salvador') (324 adC-261 adC) era hijo del fundador de la dinastía Seléucida, Seleuco I Nicátor y de Apame, princesa sogdiana y nieta de Espitamenes. Se casó con su madrastra, Estratónice. Era uno de estos epígonos a que se refiere la Historia. Se le conoce sobre todo por su triunfo frente a los gálatas en Asia Menor (pueblo galo procedente de Europa que se asentó aquí en el siglo III adC), cuya invasión supo detener a tiempo. Los gálatas venían de una expedición contra los griegos y habían sido vencidos por ellos. Pero al amparo de esta invasión frustrada se fueron formando pequeños Estados independientes que se irán consolidando durante los reinados de los reyes sucesores de Antíoco. Fue enemigo de otro de los epígonos, Ptolomeo II de Egipto y en las luchas que mantuvo contra él Antíoco perdió grandes extensiones de terreno además de que el rey egipcio consiguiera también la hegemonía sobre el mar Mediterráneo. Murió en combate durante la guerra que mantuvo contra Eumenes I, gobernador del reino de Pérgamo en Asia Menor. A Antíoco I le sucedió su hijo Antíoco II Teos (el dios).(Wikipedia)
AE 17 mm 5.8 gr.

Anv: Busto con diadema viendo a derecha.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY" - Zeus de pié de frente viendo a izquierda sosteniendo estrella ? en mano derecha extendida y cetro en izquierda.

Ceca: Antioquía en Orontes
Referencias:
mdelvalle
augustusAE19.jpg
027 BC-14 AD - AUGUSTUS & RHOEMETALKES I AE19 - struck 11 BC-12 AD171 viewsobv: BACILEWS POIMHTALKOY (diademed head of Rhoemetalkes right)
rev: KAICAPOC CEBACTOY (bare head of Augustus right)
ref: RPC 1718, SNGCop 1192, BMC 7-9, Moushmov 5782, Jurukova 200.
mint: Byzantion (?), Thracian Kingdom
5.47gms, 19mm

History: The Hellenistic kingdom of Thrace broke up in the 1st century BC - conquered by Rome. Rhoemetalkes I was awarded the kingdom of Thrace by the Romans in 11 BC. After his death in 12 AD, the emperor Augustus divided Thrace between Rhoemetalkes son & brother.
berserker
Nabatea Aretas II Meshorer 1.jpg
03-05 - Aretas III (82-67 A.C.)111 viewsAE 14 x 15 mm 2.9 gr.

Anv: Cabeza de Atenas viendo a derecha, con yelmo y largo cabello de puntos.
Rev: Nike viendo a izquierda, portando un objeto incierto en mano izquierdo y corona en derecha Creciente y "Λ"(A?) en campo izq.

Ceca: Damasco – Syria

Referencias: Meshorer #1
mdelvalle
Nabatea Aretas IV y Phasael.jpg
04-02 - Aretas IV (9 A.C. - 40 D.C.)29 viewsEste tipo fue acuñado en nombre de Aretas IV y su hijo Phasael.
AE14 13 x 12 mm 2.1 gr.

Anv: Cabeza laureada de Aretas viendo a derecha.
Rev: Hoja de palma a izquierda, dos cornucopias apareadas a der. Debajo Monograma en arameo "PS" (Phasael hijo de Aretas).

Acuñada: Posiblemente esta serie haya sido acuñada en el año del nacimiento de Cristo.
Ceca: Petra

Referencias: SNG ANS 6.1430 - Meshorer #61
mdelvalle
Nabatea Aretas IV.jpg
04-05 - Aretas IV (9 A.C. - 40 D.C.)21 viewsAE 13 x 12 mm 1.9 gr.

Anv: Cabeza laureada de Aretas con pelo largo, vistiendo ornamentos en su cabeza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas. Entre los cuernos monograma en arameo "HR" (Het Ros = Aretas).

Ceca: Petra

Referencias: Sear GICTV #5701 Pag.560 - B.M.C. Vol.28 (Arabia) #27 Pag 9 - Meshorer #67
mdelvalle
foto5.jpg
04-07 - Aretas IV (9 A.C. - 40 D.C.)23 viewsAE 14 mm 3.4 gr.

Anv: Cabeza laureada de Aretas con pelo largo viendo a derecha. Monograma en arameo al frente derecha "H" (Het).
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas. Entre ellos monograma en arameo "H" (Het).

Meshore indicates het right on the obverse. Schmitt-Korte, NC 1990, indicates the het right is not present but also identifies a new varitey (Schmitt-Korte 43) with het left on the obverse. The het right on the obverse is clear on this specimen. (Forum Catalog)

Ceca: Petra

Referencias: B.M.C. Vol.28 #30 Pag 9 - SNG ANS 6.1432 - Meshorer #70 - Sear GICTV #5701 Pag.560
mdelvalle
foto6.jpg
04-09 - Aretas IV (9 A.C. - 40 D.C.)26 viewsAE 12 x 13 mm 1.2 gr.

Anv: Cabeza laureada de Aretas con pelo largo viendo a derecha. Sin Monograma al frente derecha.
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas. Entre ellos monograma en arameo "H" (Het).

Meshore indicates het right on the obverse. Schmitt-Korte, NC 1990, indicates the het right is not present and also identifies a new varitey (Schmitt-Korte 43) with het left on the obverse. We have had all three types - het left, het right and none at all. The het right on the obverse is not present on this specimen. (Forum catalog)

Ceca: Petra

Referencias: Sear GICTV #5701 Pag.560 - B.M.C. Vol.28 #30 Pag 9 - Meshorer #70 var.
mdelvalle
foto8.jpg
04-12 - Aretas IV (9 A.C. - 40 D.C.)22 viewsEste tipo fue acuñado en nombre de Aretas IV y su esposa/hermana? Shuqailat.
AE 17 x 14 mm 3.0 gr.

Anv: Bustos conjugados laureados y vestidos de Aretas IV y su Reina Shaquilath viendo a derecha."Letras arameas en el campo".
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas. Entre ellas leyenda en arameo "ARETAS, SHUQAILAT" (En 2 líneas entre los cuernos HRTT/SQY y una debajo LT).

Acuñada: 39 - 40 D.C.
Ceca: Petra

Referencias: Sear GICTV #5699 Pag.560 - B.M.C. Vol.28 #15-20 Pag 8 - SNG ANS #6.1438-43 - Meshorer #114 - SNG Copenhagen #127-131
mdelvalle
foto7.jpg
04-14 - Aretas IV (9 A.C. - 40 D.C.)18 viewsEste tipo fue acuñado en nombre de Aretas IV y su esposa/hermana? Shuqailat.
AE 17 x 16 mm 3.8 gr.

Anv: Bustos conjugados laureados y vestidos de Aretas IV y su Reina Shaquilath viendo a derecha."Letras arameas en el campo".
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas. Entre ellas leyenda en arameo "ARETAS, SHUQAILAT" (En 2 líneas entre los cuernos HRTT/SQY y una debajo LT).

Acuñada: 39 - 40 D.C.
Ceca: Petra

Referencias: Sear GICTV #5699 Pag.560 - B.M.C. Vol.28 #15-20 Pag 8 - SNG ANS #6.1438-43 - Meshorer #114 - SNG Copenhagen #127-131
mdelvalle
foto9.jpg
04-16 - Aretas IV (9 A.C. - 40 D.C.)24 viewsEste tipo fue acuñado en nombre de Aretas IV y su esposa/hermana? Shuqailat.
AE 15 x 13 mm 2.4 gr.

Anv: Bustos conjugados laureados y vestidos de Aretas IV y su Reina Shaquilath viendo a derecha."Letras arameas en el campo".
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas. Entre ellas leyenda en arameo "ARETAS, SHUQAILAT" (En 2 líneas entre los cuernos HRTT/SQY y una debajo LT).

Acuñada: 39 - 40 D.C.
Ceca: Petra

Referencias: Sear GICTV #5699 Pag.560 - B.M.C. Vol.28 #15-20 Pag 8 - SNG ANS #6.1438-43 - Meshorer #114 - SNG Copenhagen #127-131
mdelvalle
foto11.jpg
04-20 - Malichus II (40 - 70 D.C.)24 viewsEste tipo fue acuñado en nombre de Malichus II y su esposa/hermana? Shuqailat II.
AE 12 x 14 mm 3.1 gr.

Anv: Bustos conjugados laureados y vestidos de Malichus II y su Reina (y hermana?) Shaquilath II viendo a derecha. Gráfila de puntos.
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas y fileteadas. Entre ellas leyenda en arameo "MALICHUS / SHUQAI / LAT" (En 2 líneas entre los cuernos y una debajo). Grafila de puntos.

Ceca: Petra

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.2 #5703 Pag.560 - B.M.C. Vol.28 #4-5 Pag 11 - SNG ANS #6.1444 - Meshorer #140A
mdelvalle
foto12.jpg
04-22 - Malichus II (40 - 70 D.C.)23 viewsEste tipo fue acuñado en nombre de Malichus II y su esposa/hermana? Shuqailat II.
AE 13 x 14 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: Bustos conjugados laureados y vestidos de Malichus II y su Reina (y hermana?) Shaquilath II viendo a derecha. Gráfila de puntos.
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas y fileteadas. Entre ellas leyenda en arameo "MALICHUS / SHUQAI / LAT" (En 2 líneas entre los cuernos y una debajo). Grafila de puntos.

Ceca: Petra

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.2 #5703 Pag.560 - B.M.C. Vol.28 #4-5 Pag 11 - SNG ANS #6.1444 - Meshorer #140A
mdelvalle
foto10.jpg
04-24 - Malichus II (40 - 70 D.C.)21 viewsEste tipo fue acuñado en nombre de Malichus II y su esposa/hermana? Shuqailat II.
AE 14 x 15 mm 2.4 gr.

Anv: Bustos conjugados laureados y vestidos de Malichus II y su Reina (y hermana?) Shaquilath II viendo a derecha. Gráfila de puntos.
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas y fileteadas. Entre ellas leyenda en arameo "MALICHUS / SHUQAI / LAT" (En 2 líneas entre los cuernos y una debajo). Grafila de puntos.

Ceca: Petra

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.2 #5703 Pag.560 - B.M.C. Vol.28 #4-5 Pag 11 - SNG ANS #6.1444 - Meshorer #140A
mdelvalle
foto13.jpg
04-30 - Rabbel II (70 - 106 D.C.)28 viewsEste tipo fue acuñado en nombre de Rabbel II y su esposa/hermana? Gamilath.
AE 16 mm 3.0 gr.

Anv: Cabezas conjugadas laureadas de Rabbel II y su Reina (y hermana?) Gamilath viendo a derecha. Él con pelo largo y ornamentos sobre su cabeza.
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas y fileteadas. Entre ellas leyenda en arameo "RABBEL / GAMILATH" (En 2 líneas entre los cuernos).

Acuñada: 76 - 102 D.C.
Ceca: Petra

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.2 #5706 Pag.560 - B.M.C. Vol.28 #3-7 Pag 13 - SNG ANS #6.1447-50 - Meshorer #163a
mdelvalle
foto14.jpg
04-32 - Rabbel II (70 - 106 D.C.)25 viewsEste tipo fue acuñado en nombre de Rabbel II y su esposa/hermana? Gamilath.
AE 17 x 15 mm 3.1 gr.

Anv: Cabezas conjugadas laureadas de Rabbel II y su Reina (y hermana?) Gamilath viendo a derecha. Él con pelo largo y ornamentos sobre su cabeza.
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas y fileteadas. Entre ellas leyenda en arameo "RABBEL / GAMILATH" (En 2 líneas entre los cuernos).

Acuñada: 76 - 102 D.C.
Ceca: Petra

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.2 #5706 Pag.560 - B.M.C. Vol.28 #3-7 Pag 13 - SNG ANS #6.1447-50 - Meshorer #163a
1 commentsmdelvalle
Seleuco III, Soter Cerauno.jpg
05-02 - Seleuco III, Soter Cerauno (226 - 223 A.C.)52 viewsSeleuco III Sóter Cerauno (? - 223 adC). Rey de la dinastía seleúcida, hijo mayor de Seleuco II Calinico, a quien sucedió. Su apelativo Cerauno significa “el Rayo”. Su reinado fue breve (apenas tres años, desde el 225 adC). Decidió llevar a cabo el plan que su padre no pudo realizar en vida: enfrentar al rey Atalo I de Pérgamo, aliado de Antioco Hierax, hermano de Seleuco Calinico y tio suyo, el cual había muerto hace poco, pero que había ayudado a Atalo, quien había aprovechado la situación para expandir sus fronteras y conquistar toda el Asia Menor.
En el transcurso de esta campaña realizada en la región del Tauro, Seleuco III murió asesinado víctima de la traición de uno de sus oficiales llamado Nicanor, en complicidad con el galo Apaturios (223 adC).
Fue sucedido por su hermano Antíoco III Megas, contando con el apoyo de Aqueo, pariente del difunto rey quien había tenido gran influencia durante su reinado. Aqueo rechazó la corona que le ofrecieron las tropas y prefirió gobernar como regente del imperio. Nombró a Molón gobernador de las provincias superiores y él se reservó el Asia Menor; combatió con éxito contra Atalo I y lo confinó en Pérgamo, de modo que suyo fue el mérito de ganar la guerra que había empezado Seleuco III. (Wikipedia)
AE 12 mm 2.0 gr.

Anv: Busto de Artemisa viendo a der. Grafila de puntos.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣEΛEYKOY" - Apolo sentado a izquierda en ónfalo (Piedra semicilíndrica centro del culto de Apolo en Delfos, fetiche de basalto y altar de la madre tierra de la religión micénica) con flecha en mano derecha levantada y apoyando la izquierda en un arco. "CE / Λ" en campo izquierdo y "AP" (Monograma) en exergo.

Ceca: Antioquía en Orontes

Referencias: B.M.C. Vol.4 (Seleucid Kings of Syria) #8 Pag.22 - Sear GCTV Vol.2 #6929 Pag.646 - SNG Spaer #518 - Newell E.T. (Western Seleucid Mints) #1036
mdelvalle
Antíoco IV, Epiphanes.jpg
08-02 - Anti­oco IV, Epiphanes (175 - 164 A.C.)68 viewsAntíoco IV Epífanes (Αντίοχος Επιφανής en griego, 215 adC-163 adC) fue rey de Siria de la dinastía Seléucida desde c. 175 adC-164 adC.
Era hijo de Antíoco III Megas y hermano de Seleuco IV Filopator. Originalmente fue llamado Mitríades, pero adoptó el nombre de Antíoco tras su ascensión al trono (o quizás tras la muerte de su hermano mayor, también Antíoco).
Subió al trono tras la muerte de su hermano Seleuco IV Filopátor que gobernó durante poco tiempo antes que él, hasta que Heliodoro, tesorero suyo, lo mató por ambición. Había vivido en Roma según los términos de la paz de Apamea (188 adC), pero acababa de ser intercambiado por el hijo y legítimo heredero de Seleuco IV, el futuro (Demetrio I Sóter). Antíoco se aprovechó de la situación, y junto con su otro hermano Antíoco, se proclamó rey con el apoyo de Eumenes II de Pérgamo y el hermano de éste, Atalo I. Su hermano Antíoco sería asesinado pocos años después.
Por su enfrentamiento con Ptolomeo VI, que reclamaba Coele-Syria, atacó e invadió Egipto, conquistando casi todo el país, con la salvedad de la capital, Alejandría. Llegó a capturar al rey, pero para no alarmar a Roma, decicidió reponerlo en el trono, aunque como su marioneta. Sin embargo, los alejandrinos habían elegido al hermano de éste, Ptolomeo VII Euergetes como rey, y tras su marcha decidieron reinar conjuntamente. Esto le obligó a reinvadir el país, y así el 168 adC, repitiendo la invasión, con su flota conquistaba Chipre. Cerca de Alejandría se encontró con el cónsul romano Cayo Popilio Laenas, instó a abandonar Egipto y Chipre. Cuando Antíoco replicó que debía consultarlo con su consejo, Popilio trazó un círculo en la arena rodeándole y le dijo: "píensalo aquí". Viendo que abandonar el círculo sin haber ordenado la retirada era un desafío a Roma decidió ceder con el fin de evitar una guerra.
A su regreso, organizó una expedición contra Jerusalén, qué saqueo cruelmente. Según él Libro de los Macabeos, promulgó varias ordenanzas de tipo religioso: trató de suprimir el culto a Yahveh, prohibió el judaísmo suspendiendo toda clase de manifestación religiosa y trató de establecer el culto a los dioses griegos. Pero el sacerdote judío Matatías y sus dos hijos llamados Macabeos consiguieron levantar a la población en su contra y lo expulsaron. La fiesta judía de Jánuca conmemora este hecho.
Antíoco, en campaña contra el Imperio Parto, envió varios ejércitos sin éxito. Mientras organizaba una expedición punitiva para retomar Israel personalmente le sobrevino la muerte. Le sucedió su hijo Antíoco V Eupátor.
Su reinado fue la última época de fuerza y esplendor para el Imperio Seleúcida, que tras su muerte se vio envuelto en devastadoras guerras dinásticas. (Wikipedia)

AE (Canto aserrado) 15 mm 3.5 gr.

Anv: Busto velado de Laodicea IV (Esposa de Seleuco IV y Hermana de Antíoco IV) viendo a der. Grafila de puntos.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY" - Cabeza de elefante a izquierda, proa de galera a izquierda (El elefante simboliza las aspiraciones orientales de los reyes de Seleucia además de ser una de las grandes armas de su arsenal y la proa su importancia como ciudad puerto).

Ceca: Seleucia de Pieria (Costa N. de Siria - Puerto de Antioquía) o Akke Ptolomais

Referencias : B.M.C. Vol.4 (Seleucid Kings of Syria) #3 Pag.43 - SC#1477.2 - Houghton #113 - HGS #684-6 Pag.9 - SNG Spaer #1017-40 - SNG Cop #184 - Hoover #685
1 commentsmdelvalle
LarryW1834.jpg
100 Kingdom of Bosporus, Rhescuporis II (III), AD 211–22688 viewsElectrum stater, 7.84g, nearly EF
Struck AD 215/6 at Panticapaeum
BACIΛEWC PHCKOVΠOPIΔOC, diademed and draped bust right; club before / Laureate and draped bust of bearded Caracalla right, BIΦ below.
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
Ex; Freeman & Sear
MacDonald 555/2; Frolova 200, pl. 45, 14 (same dies); Sear GIC 5482v (date)
2 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
11-Alex-Pella-P527.jpg
11. "Pella": Tetradrachm in the name of Alexander the Great.34 viewsTetradrachm, ca 280 - 275 BC, "Pella" mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. Monogram under throne, Triton at left.
16.95 gm., 29 mm.
P. #527.

Following the overthrow of Demetrios Poliorketes by Lysimachos in 288 BC, there was a period of about a dozen years where no ruler was able to establish himself for any length of time in Macedonia. In 277 BC, Antigonos Gonatas achieved a victory over Gallic invaders in Thrace, and that enabled him to claim his father's throne. He ruled until 239 BC and the Macedonian kingdom prospered during his reign.
This coin was issued about the time Antigonos became king and established his own coinage. The decade 280 - 270 BC was a troubled one for the area due to the Gallic invasions (279 - 276 BC), and coins in the name of Alexander the Great from this decade are not common.
Callimachus
Trajse31-2.jpg
114 AD: Trajan's comprehensive political settlement in the East256 viewsOrichalcum sestertius (25.16g, 34mm, 6h) Rome mint. Struck AD 116.
IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC PARTHICO PM TRP COS VI PP laureate draped bust, rricht
REGNA ADSIGNATA / S C [in ex.] Trajan seated left on platform, prefect and soldier standing; three kings standing before
RIC 666 [R]; Cohen 325; BMC 1043; Foss (Roman Historic Coins) 104/67

Trajan assigns kingdoms to client princes in the East in AD 114. The three kings are presumably of Armenia, Mesopotamia and Parthia
4 commentsCharles S
HENRY_II_Tealby_AR_Penny.JPG
1154 - 1189, HENRY II, AR 'Tealby' Penny, Struck 1158 - 1163 at Canterbury (?), England33 viewsObverse: (HE)NRI • R(EX• A -). Crowned facing bust of Henry II, his head facing slightly to the left, holding sceptre tipped with a cross potent in his right hand. Crown has three vertical uprights each topped by a fleur-de-lis.
Reverse: + (ROGI)ER : ON : (C)A(NT) surrounding short cross potent within beaded circle, small cross potents in each quarter. Moneyer: Rogier, cognate with the modern English name of Roger. Mintmark: Cross potent.
Uncommonly clear Class A bust
Diameter: 20mm | Weight: 1.3gms | Die Axis: 4
Flan chipped and cracked
SPINK: 1337

For the first few years of Henry II's reign the coins of King Stephen continued to be produced, but in 1158, in order to restore public confidence in the currency, a new 'cross and crosslet' coinage was introduced in England which was of sufficient importance for the contemporary chroniclers to record that 'a new money was made, which was the sole currency of the kingdom.' While this coinage was acceptable in terms of weight and silver quality, it is notorious for its ugly appearance, bad craftsmanship and careless execution. In fact the 'Tealby' coinage is among the worst struck of any issue of English regal coinage, so much so that collectors consider it something of a bonus if they are able to make out the name of the moneyer, or the mint, from the letters showing.
The cross and crosslet type coinage of King Henry II is more often called 'Tealby' because of the enormous hoard of these coins which was found in late 1807 at Bayons Manor farm near Tealby in Lincolnshire. This hoard, which originally amounted to over 5,700 pieces, was first reported in the Stamford Mercury of the 6th November 1807, but unfortunately the majority of the coins, more than 5,000 of them, were sent to be melted at the Tower of London and only some 600 pieces were saved for national and important private collections.
A total of 30 mints were employed in the initial 'Tealby' recoinage, however once the recoinage was completed only 12 mints were permitted to remain active and this marks the beginning of the gradual decline in the number of mints which were used to strike English coins.
The 'Tealby' issue continued until 1180 when a new style coin of much better workmanship, the short-cross penny, was introduced.
2 comments*Alex
King_John_AR_Penny.JPG
1199 – 1216, John, AR Short cross penny, Struck 1205 - 1216 at Winchester, England22 viewsObverse: HENRICVS REX around central circle enclosing a crowned, draped and bearded facing bust of the king holding a sceptre tipped with a cross pommee in his right hand, bust extending to edge of flan.
Reverse: +ANDREV•ON•WI around voided short cross within circle, crosslets in each quarter. Moneyer: Andrev, cognate with the modern English name of Andrew.
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 1.2gms | Die Axis: 4
Class 5b
SPINK: 1351

The class four type short cross pennies of Henry II continued to be struck during the early years of John's reign, but in 1205 a recoinage was begun and new short cross pennies of better style replaced the older issues. Sixteen mints were initially employed for this recoinage but they were reduced to ten later on. All John's coins continued to bear his father's (Henry II) title of henricvs rex.

John was King of England from 1199 until his death in 1216. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the first Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.
John, the youngest of the five sons of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, was not expected to inherit significant lands which resulted in him being given the nickname John Lackland. However, after the failed rebellion of his elder brothers between 1173 and 1174, John became Henry's favourite child. He was appointed Lord of Ireland in 1177 and given lands in England and on the continent. John's elder brothers William, Henry and Geoffrey died young and when Richard I became king in 1189, John was the potential heir to the throne. John unsuccessfully attempted a rebellion against Richard's administration whilst his brother was participating in the Third Crusade but despite this, after Richard died in 1199, John was proclaimed King of England.
Contemporary chroniclers were mostly critical of John's performance as king, and his reign has been the subject of much debate by historians from the 16th century onwards. These negative qualities have provided extensive material for fiction writers since the Victorian era, and even today John remains a recurring character within popular culture, primarily as a villain in films and stories regarding the Robin Hood legends.
2 comments*Alex
1205_-_1216_John_AR_Penny_Dublin.JPG
1199-1216, John, AR Penny, Struck 1207 – 1211 at Dublin, Ireland10 viewsObverse: IOHANNES REX around triangle enclosing a crowned and draped facing bust of King John holding, in his right hand, a sceptre tipped with a cross pommée which extends through the side of the triangle into the legend. Quatrefoil to right of bust.
Reverse: ROBERD ON DIVE around triangle containing sun over crescent moon and a star in each angle. Cross pattée at apex of each point of the triangle and above legend on each of the three sides. Moneyer: Roberd, cognate with the modern English name of Robin.
Third issue “REX” coinage, struck to the same weight and fineness as the English standard.
This was the only coinage struck by King John in his own name.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 1.2gms | Die Axis: 4
SPINK: 6228

John was King of England from 1199 until his death in 1216. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the first Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.
John, the youngest of the five sons of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, was not expected to inherit significant lands which resulted in him being given the nickname John Lackland. However, after the failed rebellion of his elder brothers between 1173 and 1174, John became Henry's favourite child. He was appointed Lord of Ireland in 1177 and given lands in England and on the continent. John's elder brothers William, Henry and Geoffrey died young and when Richard I became king in 1189, John was the potential heir to the throne. John unsuccessfully attempted a rebellion against Richard's administration whilst his brother was participating in the Third Crusade but despite this, after Richard died in 1199, John was proclaimed King of England.
King John contracted dysentery at Lynn in 1216 but, just before his death, he managed to dictate a brief will. This will still survives and as part of it John requested: "I will that my body be buried in the church of St. Mary and St. Wulfstan of Worcester".
Some of King John's favourite hunting grounds were in Worcester, at Kinver and Feckenham, and he had a special affection for Saint Wulfstan, one of the two great Anglo-Saxon saints whose shrines and tombs were also at Worcester. Both Saint Wulfstan and Saint Oswald can be seen in miniature beside the head of the effigy of King John on his tomb.
Medieval effigies usually show the subject in the prime of life, however the effigy on King John's tomb is unique in that not only is it a life-like image of him, it is also the oldest royal effigy in England.
King John's tomb has been opened twice, once in 1529 and again in 1797. At the first opening it was said that John's head was covered with a monk's cowl, however it is now thought that this was probably his coronation cap. When the tomb was opened for the second time the antiquarians responsible discovered that a robe of crimson damask had originally covered the king's body but, by 1797, most of the embroidery had deteriorated. They also found the remains of a sword which lay down the left side of the body along with parts of its scabbard.
3 comments*Alex
Demetrio II, Nicator.jpg
12-02 - Demetrio II, Nicator (1er.Reino 145 - 139 A.C.)56 viewsDemetrio II Nicátor de la dinastía Seléucida, fue rey de Siria en dos períodos: 146 - 139 A.C. y 129 - 126 A.C. Huyó a Creta tras la derrota y muerte de su padre, Demetrio I Sóter, pero regresó después, proclamándose rey. Fue puesto en fuga casi inmediatamente por el general Diodoto, que primero proclamó rey a un hijo de Alejandro Balas, Antíoco VI Dioniso, y luego a sí mismo con el nombre de Trifón. Demetrio marchó en guerra contra el rey de Partia, Mitrídates I, siendo derrotado y capturado en 139 A.C.
En 129 fue puesto en libertad, con la esperanza de provocar una guerra entre él y su hermano Antíoco VII Evergetes. Sin embargo, Antíoco murió antes de que estallara el conflicto, con lo que Demetrio II se proclamó rey de nuevo. Poco después fue derrotado y muerto por el rey de Egipto Ptolomeo VIII, que sostenía al usupador Alejandro Zabinas. Le sucedió su hijo Seleuco V Filométor, bajo la regencia de su viuda Cleopatra Tea. (Wikipedia)

AE 18 x 19 mm 4.9 gr.

Anv: Busto con diadema de Demetrio II viendo a derecha. Grafila de puntos.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΔHMHTPIOY – TYPIΩN (por Tiro)" - Popa de Galera (Simboliza el poderío naval de Tiro Fenicia bajo los Seléucidas).

Acuñación: 145/4 A.C.
Ceca: Seleucia en Tiro - Fenicia

Referencias: Houghton #753 – SNG Spaer #1722 - B.M.C. Vol.4 (Seleucid Kings of Syria) #20-22 Pag.60 - Sear GCTV Vol.2 #7070 Pag.661 - SNG Israel #1708.
mdelvalle
HENRY_III.JPG
1216 – 1272, Henry III, AR Penny, Struck 1248 - 1250 at London, England (Long cross type)44 viewsObverse: HENRICVS REX : III. Crowned bust of Henry III facing within circle of pellets. Mintmark: Six pointed star.
Reverse: NICOLE ON LVND. Voided long cross dividing legend into quarters, trefoil in each quarter of inner circle. Moneyer: Nicole, cognate with the modern English name of Nicholas. The surname Nicole originates in the Netherlands where it was notable for its various branches, and associated status or influence. The modern given name Nicole is a French feminine derivative of the masculine given name Nicolas.
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 1.3gms | Die Axis: 6
SPINK: 1363

The First Barons' War (1215–1217) was a civil war in England in which a group of rebellious barons led by Robert Fitzwalter and supported by a French army under the future Louis VIII of France, waged war against King John of England. The war resulted from King John's refusal to accept and abide by the Magna Carta, which he had been forced to put his seal to on 15th June 1215, as well as from Louis' own ambitions regarding the English throne.
It was in the middle of this war that King John died leaving his son, the nine year old Henry III (who had been moved to safety at Corfe Castle in Dorset along with his mother, Queen Isabella) as his heir.
On his deathbed John appointed a council of thirteen executors to help Henry reclaim the kingdom, requesting that his son be placed into the guardianship of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke. The loyalists decided to crown Henry immediately to reinforce his claim to the throne. William knighted the boy, and Cardinal Guala Bicchieri, the papal legate to England, then oversaw his coronation at Gloucester Cathedral on 28th October 1216. In the absence of the archbishops of either Canterbury or York, Henry was anointed by the bishops of Worcester and Exeter, and crowned by Peter des Roches, bishop of Winchester. During the civil war the royal crown had been lost, so instead, the ceremony used a simple gold corolla belonging to Queen Isabella. In 1217, Henry's forces, led by William Marshal, finally defeated the rebels at the battles of Lincoln and Sandwich.
Henry's early rule was dominated first by Hubert de Burgh, 1st Earl of Kent and Justiciar of England and Ireland, then by Peter des Roches, and they re-established royal authority after the war. In 1225 Henry promised to abide by the final and definitative version of the Magna Carta, freely authenticated by the great seal of Henry III himself, which protected the rights of the major barons and placed a limit on royal power. It is the clauses of this, the 1225 Magna Carta signed by Henry III, not the King John Magna Carta of 1215, which are on the Statute Books of the United Kingdom today.
4 comments*Alex
1280_-1286_Alexander_III_AR_Penny_SCOTLAND.JPG
1249 - 1286, Alexander III, AR Penny, Struck 1280 - 1286 at Roxburgh, Scotland16 viewsObverse: + ALEXANDER DEI GRA . Crowned head of Alexander III facing left within circle of pellets; sceptre topped with fleur-de-lis before. Cross potent in legend.
Reverse: REX SCOTORVM +. Long cross pattée dividing legend into quarters, with three pierced mullets of six points and one mullet of seven points in quarters of inner circle. The total of 25 points is indicative of the mint of Roxburgh.
Class Mb with unbarred “A”, wider portrait and cross potent mintmark in legend.
Roxburgh only accounts for some 9% of Alexander's second coinage so issues from this mint are quite rare.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 1.0gm | Die Axis: 3
SPINK: 5054

Alexander III's reign saw the introduction of the round halfpenny and farthing to Scottish medieval coinage.
Following the English recoinage of Edward I in 1279, Alexander introduced his second coinage which began in 1280 and ended when he died in 1286. This coin was therefore struck between those dates.

Alexander III was born at Roxburgh, he came to the throne when he was just 7 years old following the death of his father, Alexander II.
At the age of ten, in 1251, Alexander married Margaret, daughter of Henry III of England. Henry seized the opportunity to demand from his son-in-law homage from the Scottish kingdom. Alexander did not comply but In 1255, after a meeting between the English and Scottish kings at Kelso, he was compelled to consent to the creation of a regency representative of both monarchs.
The early years of Alexander III’s reign were dominated by a power struggle between the two factions, but when he reached the age of 21 he was able to rule in his own right. His first action was to claim control of the Western Isles which were then under the domination of Norway. The Norwegian King Haakon rejected the claim, and in 1263, responded with a formidable invasion force which sailed around the west coast of Scotland and halted off the Isle of Arran. Alexander craftily delayed negotiations until the autumn storms began which resulted in the Norwegian ships being greatly damaged. Haakon, losing patience, attacked the Scots at Largs, but the battle proved indecisive and his position became hopeless. The Norwegians set sail for home but Haakon died en route, on Orkney, towards the end of the year. In 1266, at the Treaty of Perth, Norway formally ceded the Western Isles and the Isle of Man to Scotland in return for a monetary payment.
Alexander, when only 44 years old, met his end on the night of 19th March 1286. After entertaining guests at Edinburgh Castle he decided that night that he would return home to his wife near Kinghorn. His aides advised against it because there was a storm and the party would have to travel in darkness for many miles along a treacherous coastal path. Alexander was determined to travel anyway and ignored his advisors. It is not clear what happened, but it seems he got separated from the rest of his group and his horse lost its footing in the dark. The following day Alexander's body, and that of his horse, was found on the shore at the foot of the cliffs, the King's neck was broken. In 1886, a monument to him was erected in Kinghorn, on the side of the cliffs, at the approximate location of Alexander's death.
Alexander had no heirs, which ultimately led to a war with England that lasted almost thirty years.
1 comments*Alex
c36.jpg
13. Seleucid Kingdom, Antiochos VII Euergetes Sidetes, Antioch 27 viewsBronze AE 19, SNG Spaer 1902, SGCV II 7098 var, Antioch mint, Sep 138 - Aug 137 B.C.; obverse head of Eros right, wreathed with myrtle; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOΥ EΥEΡΓETOΥ, head-dress of Isis, apluster or branch above EOP (year 175) below, ΔI monogram outer leftecoli
Edward_III_AR_Penny.JPG
1327 - 1377, EDWARD III, AR Penny, Treaty Period, struck 1361 – 1369 at London, England9 viewsObverse: + EDWARDVS REX ANGLI. Crowned bust of Edward III facing within circle of pellets. Cross pattée in legend.
Reverse: CIVITAS LONDON. Long cross dividing legend into quarters, trefoil and annulet in each quarter of inner circle.
This coin was struck during the period of the Treaty of Brétigny under which Edward III renounced his claim to the French throne.
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 1.0gms | Die Axis: 10
SPINK: 1630

Edward III was King of England from January 1327 until his death. He is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. During his long reign Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His reign also saw vital developments in legislation and government, in particular the evolution of the English parliament, though it also saw the ravages of the Black Death.
Edward was crowned at the age of fourteen after his father was deposed by his mother, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer. But at the age of seventeen he led a successful coup d'état against Mortimer, whom he executed, and began his personal reign.
In 1337, after a successful campaign in Scotland, Edward declared himself the rightful heir to the French throne which started what was to become known as the Hundred Years' War. Following some initial setbacks, the first part of this war went exceptionally well for England, the victories at Crécy and Poitiers led to the highly favourable Treaty of Brétigny in which, though Edward renounced his claim to the French throne, England made great territorial gains. However Edward's later years were marked by international failure and domestic strife, largely as a result of his inactivity and poor health.
Around 29 September 1376 Edward fell ill with a large abscess and, after a brief period of recovery, the king died of a stroke at Sheen on 21 June. He was succeeded by his ten-year-old grandson, King Richard II, since the Black Prince, Edward's son and Richard's father, had predeceased Edward on 8 June 1376.
2 comments*Alex
ROBERT_II_AR_Groat_of_Perth.JPG
1371 – 1390, Robert II, AR Groat minted at Perth, Scotland4 viewsObverse: + ROBERTVS DEI GRA REX SCOTORVM. Crowned bust of Robert II facing left, sceptre topped with a lis and with a star at its base before, within double tressure of six arches broken at the king's neck, small trefoils in spandrels, surrounded by beaded inner circle. Mintmark, cross pattée in legend and small crosses in spaces between words. The whole within beaded outer circle.
Reverse: + DnS PTECTOR MS ┼ LIBATOR MS (God is my protector and redeemer) / VILLA DE PERTh X. Long cross pattée dividing two concentric legends separated by two beaded circles into quarters, pierced mullet in each quarter of inner circle. Mintmark, cross pattées in both inner and outer legends, but cross set as saltire in inner legend, small cross over crescent after DnS in outer legend. The whole within beaded outer circle.
Diameter: 30mm | Weight: 3.87gms | Die Axis: 12
SPINK: 5136 | SCBI: 35, 460-72

Robert II's coinage was maintained at the same standard and in the same general style as that of David’s last issue, but coins were struck at Perth and Dundee in addition to those of the Edinburgh mint.

Robert II was the first Scottish king of the Stewart line, he was the son of Walter, the sixth hereditary High Steward of Scotland, and of Marjorie Bruce, daughter of Robert the Bruce. Robert II acted as regent during part of the period of imprisonment in England of David II and was himself imprisoned in England when Edward III was declared to be David’s successor. The Scots never accepted this arrangement and, after several years of secret negotiations between David II and Edward III, in 1370 Robert was released. He peacefully succeeded to the throne on David II's death the following year.
Robert II succeeded to the throne at the age of 54 and was viewed by many in his kingdom as past his best. In November 1384 he was effectively deposed by his eldest son John, Earl of Carrick. John, however, was seriously injured after being kicked by a horse, and Robert II's second son, Robert, Earl of Fife, later the Duke of Albany, was appointed as Guardian of Scotland instead. Robert II died at Dundonald Castle on 19 April 1390, and was buried at Scone. He was succeeded by his son John, who confusingly took the name Robert III, probably because in Scotland "John" was a name too closely associated with John Balliol, the erstwhile protégé of Edward I.
*Alex
1421_Henry_V_AR_Double-Turnois.JPG
1413 - 1422, Henry V, Billon Niquet (Double Tournois) struck in 1421 at Rouen, France25 viewsObverse: + H REX ANGL HERES FRANC. Crowned lion passant facing left, fleur-de-lis above. Pellet mintmark below first letter of legend = Rouen mint.
Reverse: + SIT NOME DNI BENEDICTV. Cross pattée with lis in angles and lombardic 'h' in centre.
Diameter: 24mm | Weight: 1.9gms | Die Axis: 9
SPINK: 8162 | Duplessy: 441

This Anglo-Gallic coin, colloquially called a “leopard” after its obverse design, bears the titles of Henry V as king of England and heir to the French kingdom.

Henry V was King of England from 1413 until his sudden death on 31st August 1422. He is thought to have died from dysentery contracted during the siege of Meaux in France. He was 36 years old and had reigned for nine years. He was the second English monarch of the House of Lancaster.
During the reign of his father, King Henry IV, Henry had acquired an increasing share in England's government due to his father's declining health. After his father's death in 1413, Henry assumed control of the country and asserted the pending English claim to the French throne.
In 1415, Henry embarked on war with France in the ongoing Hundred Years' War between the two countries. Despite his relatively short reign, Henry's outstanding military successes, most notably in his famous victory at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415, made England one of the strongest military powers in Europe.
In 1420, after months of negotiation with Charles VI of France, the Treaty of Troyes was signed recognising Henry V as regent and heir apparent to the French throne. To seal the pact Henry married Charles' daughter, Catherine of Valois. Henry's sudden death however, prevented the prospect of the English King taking the French throne from ever taking place.
Immortalised in the plays of Shakespeare, Henry V is known and celebrated as one of the great warrior kings of medieval England.
2 comments*Alex
Alexander II, Zabinas.jpg
15-02 - Alejandro II, Zabinas (128 - 123 A.C.)28 viewsUsurpador sostenido por el rey de Egipto Ptolomeo VIII
AE 17 x 18 mm 7.6 gr.

Anv: Busto con diadema viendo a derecha. Grafila de puntos.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY” – Joven Dionisio (Baco) de pié de frente viendo a izquierda sosteniendo cántaro en mano derecha y thyrsus (Vara enramada cubierta de hojas de hiedra que suele llevar como cetro Baco) en izquierda. Fecha Seléucida en campo izquierdo.

Acuñación: 129 - 125 A.C.
Ceca: Antioquía

Referencias: B.M.C. Vol.4 (Seleucid Kings of Syria) #16 Pag.82 Plate 22 #6 - Sear GCTV Vol.2 #7125 Pag.667 – SNG Spaer #2375
mdelvalle
Theo1Ae3Ant.jpeg
1505b, Theodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. (Antioch)69 viewsTheodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC 44(b), VF, Antioch, 2.17g, 18.1mm, 180o, 9 Aug 378 - 25 Aug 383 A.D. Obverse: D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: CONCORDIA AVGGG, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, r. foot on prow, globe in l., scepter in r., Q and F at sides, ANTG in ex; scarce.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.



Cleisthenes
Theod1GlrMan.jpg
1505c, Theodosius I, 379 - 395 A.D. (Constantinople)78 viewsTheodosius I (379 - 395 AD) AE3. 388-394 AD, RIC IX 27(a)3, Third Officina. Seventh Period. 20.27 mm. 4.8gm. Near VF with black and earthen patina. Constantinople. Obverse: DN THEODO-SIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right; Reverse: GLORIA-ROMANORVM, Theodosius I standing, facing, holding labarum and globe, CONSB in exergue (scarcer reverse). A Spanish find.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Cleopatra Thea y Antioco VIII.jpg
16-02 - Anti­oco VIII, Grifo (125 - 96 A.C.)42 viewsAntiochus VIII Epiphanes/Callinicus/Philometor, Hijo de Demetrio II Nicátor y Cleopatra Thea, su apodo Grypus significa nariz de gancho.
Antíoco VIII Grifo de la dinastía Seléucida, fue rey de Siria entre 125 A.C. - 96 A.C. Sucedió a su hermano Seleuco V Filométor, tras ser éste asesinado por la madre de ambos, Cleopatra Tea. Esta intentó envenenarle, pero Antíoco la obligó a beberse su propio veneno. Hubo de combatir contra Antíoco IX Eusebio, con el que finalmente compartió el reino. Fue asesinado en 96 A.C., quedando Antíoco IX como único rey. Sin embargo, varios de sus hijos llegaron a reinar posteriormente.

AE 12 mm 1.4 gr.

Anv: Bustos apareados y laureados de Dioskouri. ” * “ arriba.
Rev: "ANTIOXEΩN / EN ΠTOΛEMAI" a derecha de una cornucopia, "IEPAΣ AΣYΛOY"? a izquierda y "LΠI" fecha seleuciana en exergo.

Acuñada: 125 - 96 A.C.
Ceca: Ake Ptolomais - Fenicia (Ubicado al norte de Haifa - en esta época formaba parte de los reinos Seléucidas)

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.2 #6047 var / 6046 Pag.555 - B.M.C. Vol.26 (Phoenicia) #10 Pag.129 - Houghton 810 - Hen #414
mdelvalle
James_I_AR_Sixpence.JPG
1603 - 1625, JAMES I (JAMES VI of Scotland), AR Sixpence struck in 1605 at London2 viewsObverse: IACOBVS•D:G:MAG:BRIT:FRA:ET•HIB:REX. Crowned and armoured bust of James I of England facing right, VI in field behind bust and mintmark (Rose) in legend above.
Reverse: •QUAE•DEVS•CONIVNXIT•NEMO•SEPARET• Square topped shield bearing the arms of England, Scotland and Ireland; 1605 above. Mintmark (rose) in legend.
Second coinage (1604 – 1619) and fourth bust with long square cut beard.
Diameter: 26mm | Weight: 2.8gms | Die Axis: 10
SPINK: 2658

The sixpence was first introduced during the reign of Edward VI in 1551, it had a facing portrait of the king with a rose to the left and the denomination VI to the right.
With the accession of James VI of Scotland to the throne of England, reigning there as James I, the royal titles and the coat of arms were altered on the coinage. The Scottish lion rampant and the Irish harp now made their appearance in the second and third quarters of the royal coat of arms of the newly formed United Kingdom and, from 1604, MAG BRIT replaced ANG SCO in the King's titles.

The infamous “Gunpowder Plot” took place on November the fifth in the year this coin was struck. The plot, to blow up the English Houses of Parliament, was foiled when a Justice of the Peace, Sir Thomas Knyvet, was secretly informed of a Catholic plot and, after giving orders for a search of the area, discovered Guy Fawkes in a cellar below the Parliament building. Thirty-six barrels of gunpowder were found and Guy Fawkes was arrested for treason and charged with trying to kill King James along with the members of Parliament who were scheduled to sit together next day.
Guy Fawkes, also known as Guido Fawkes, was tortured and questioned over the next few days and eventually confessed. He was sentenced to being hung, drawn and quartered. However, immediately before his execution on the 31st of January 1606 he fell from the scaffold where he was about to be hanged and broke his neck, so avoiding the agony of the mutilation that followed.
Guy Fawkes has become synonymous with the Gunpowder Plot which has been commemorated in Britain on the 5th of November ever since. His effigy is traditionally burned on a bonfire, usually accompanied by a fireworks display.
When I was young, on the run-up to “bonfire night”, children used to make their own “Guy” and then tout it through the streets with cries of “Penny for the Guy” something like today's Hallowe'en “trick or treat”. But this has pretty much died out now having been replaced by officially staged events.
*Alex
verus_dup_RIC1445.jpg
161-169 AD - LUCIUS VERUS AE dupondius - struck 165-166 AD28 viewsobv: L VERVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX (radiate head right)
rev: TR POT VI IMP III COS II (parthian captive seated right at base of trophy, hands tied behind back, arms before), S-C in field
ref: RIC III 1445 (M.Aurelius) (C), C202 (3frcs)
mint: Rome
12.08gms, 24mm
Scarce

History: Between 162 and 166 Verus was in the East, nominally commanding a campaign against the Parthian empire for the control over the Armenian kingdom. Statius Priscus, Avidius Cassius and Martius Verus generals were entrusted with real command of the legions. Cassius led the overall campaign, destroyed the city of Seleucia on the Tigris and burned to the ground the palace at the capital Ctesiphon; Priscus led the invasion of Armenia that took the capital of Artashat (Artaxata); Martius Verus is limited only to the mention of his name by the ancients, but he was later the governor of Cappadocia. Lucius Verus received the title Parthicus Maximus in Aug. 165 AD.
berserker
Saladin_A788.jpg
1701a, Saladin, 1169-11932046 viewsAYYUBID: Saladin, 1169-1193, AR dirham (2.92g), Halab, AH580, A-788, lovely struck, well-centered & bold, Extremely Fine, Scarce.

His name in Arabic, in full, is SALAH AD-DIN YUSUF IBN AYYUB ("Righteousness of the Faith, Joseph, Son of Job"), also called AL-MALIK AN-NASIR SALAH AD-DIN YUSUF I (b. 1137/38, Tikrit, Mesopotamia--d. March 4, 1193, Damascus), Muslim sultan of Egypt, Syria, Yemen, and Palestine, founder of the Ayyubid dynasty, and the most famous of Muslim heroes.

In wars against the Christian crusaders, he achieved final success with the disciplined capture of Jerusalem (Oct. 2, 1187), ending its 88-year occupation by the Franks. The great Christian counterattack of the Third Crusade was then stalemated by Saladin's military genius.

Saladin was born into a prominent Kurdish family. On the night of his birth, his father, Najm ad-Din Ayyub, gathered his family and moved to Aleppo, there entering the service of 'Imad ad-Din Zangi ibn Aq Sonqur, the powerful Turkish governor in northern Syria. Growing up in Ba'lbek and Damascus, Saladin was apparently an undistinguished youth, with a greater taste for religious studies than military training.
His formal career began when he joined the staff of his uncle Asad ad-Din Shirkuh, an important military commander under the amir Nureddin, son and successor of Zangi. During three military expeditions led by Shirkuh into Egypt to prevent its falling to the Latin-Christian (Frankish) rulers of the states established by the First Crusade, a complex, three-way struggle developed between Amalric I, the Latin king of Jerusalem, Shawar, the powerful vizier of the Egyptian Fatimid caliph, and Shirkuh. After Shirkuh's death and after ordering Shawar's assassination, Saladin, in 1169 at the age of 31, was appointed both commander of the Syrian troops and vizier of Egypt.

His relatively quick rise to power must be attributed not only to the clannish nepotism of his Kurdish family but also to his own emerging talents. As vizier of Egypt, he received the title king (malik), although he was generally known as the sultan. Saladin's position was further enhanced when, in 1171, he abolished the Shi'i Fatimid caliphate, proclaimed a return to Sunnah in Egypt, and consequently became its sole ruler.

Although he remained for a time theoretically a vassal of Nureddin, that relationship ended with the Syrian emir's death in 1174. Using his rich agricultural possessions in Egypt as a financial base, Saladin soon moved into Syria with a small but strictly disciplined army to claim the regency on behalf of the young son of his former suzerain.
Soon, however, he abandoned this claim, and from 1174 until 1186 he zealously pursued a goal of uniting, under his own standard, all the Muslim territories of Syria, northern Mesopotamia, Palestine, and Egypt.

This he accomplished by skillful diplomacy backed when necessary by the swift and resolute use of military force. Gradually, his reputation grew as a generous and virtuous but firm ruler, devoid of pretense, licentiousness, and cruelty. In contrast to the bitter dissension and intense rivalry that had up to then hampered the Muslims in their resistance to the crusaders, Saladin's singleness of purpose induced them to rearm both physically and spiritually.

Saladin's every act was inspired by an intense and unwavering devotion to the idea of jihad ("holy war")-the Muslim equivalent of the Christian crusade. It was an essential part of his policy to encourage the growth and spread of Muslim religious institutions.

He courted its scholars and preachers, founded colleges and mosques for their use, and commissioned them to write edifying works especially on the jihad itself. Through moral regeneration, which was a genuine part of his own way of life, he tried to re-create in his own realm some of the same zeal and enthusiasm that had proved so valuable to the first generations of Muslims when, five centuries before, they had conquered half the known world.

Saladin also succeeded in turning the military balance of power in his favour-more by uniting and disciplining a great number of unruly forces than by employing new or improved military techniques. When at last, in 1187, he was able to throw his full strength into the struggle with the Latin crusader kingdoms, his armies were their equals. On July 4, 1187, aided by his own military good sense and by a phenomenal lack of it on the part of his enemy, Saladin trapped and destroyed in one blow an exhausted and thirst-crazed army of crusaders at Hattin, near Tiberias in northern Palestine.

So great were the losses in the ranks of the crusaders in this one battle that the Muslims were quickly able to overrun nearly the entire Kingdom of Jerusalem. Acre, Toron, Beirut, Sidon, Nazareth, Caesarea, Nabulus, Jaffa (Yafo), and Ascalon (Ashqelon) fell within three months.

But Saladin's crowning achievement and the most disastrous blow to the whole crusading movement came on Oct. 2, 1187, when Jerusalem, holy to both Muslim and Christian alike, surrendered to the Sultan's army after 88 years in the hands of the Franks. In stark contrast to the city's conquest by the Christians, when blood flowed freely during the barbaric slaughter of its inhabitants, the Muslim reconquest was marked by the civilized and courteous behaviour of Saladin and his troops. His sudden success, which in 1189 saw the crusaders reduced to the occupation of only three cities, was, however, marred by his failure to capture Tyre, an almost impregnable coastal fortress to which the scattered Christian survivors of the recent battles flocked. It was to be the rallying point of the Latin counterattack.

Most probably, Saladin did not anticipate the European reaction to his capture of Jerusalem, an event that deeply shocked the West and to which it responded with a new call for a crusade. In addition to many great nobles and famous knights, this crusade, the third, brought the kings of three countries into the struggle.

The magnitude of the Christian effort and the lasting impression it made on contemporaries gave the name of Saladin, as their gallant and chivalrous enemy, an added lustre that his military victories alone could never confer on him.

The Crusade itself was long and exhausting, and, despite the obvious, though at times impulsive, military genius of Richard I the Lion-Heart, it achieved almost nothing. Therein lies the greatest-but often unrecognized--achievement of Saladin. With tired and unwilling feudal levies, committed to fight only a limited season each year, his indomitable will enabled him to fight the greatest champions of Christendom to a draw. The crusaders retained little more than a precarious foothold on the Levantine coast, and when King Richard set sail from the Orient in October 1192, the battle was over.

Saladin withdrew to his capital at Damascus. Soon, the long campaigning seasons and the endless hours in the saddle caught up with him, and he died. While his relatives were already scrambling for pieces of the empire, his friends found that the most powerful and most generous ruler in the Muslim world had not left enough money to pay for his own grave.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
H.A.R. Gibb, "The Arabic Sources for the Life of Saladin," Speculum, 25:58-72 (1950). C.W. Wilson's English translation of one of the most important Arabic works, The Life of Saladin (1897), was reprinted in 1971. The best biography to date is Stanley Lane-Poole, Saladin and the Fall of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, new ed. (1926, reprinted 1964), although it does not take account of all the sources.
See: http://stp.ling.uu.se/~kamalk/language/saladin.html
Ed. J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
1792_NORFOLK___NORWICH_HALFPENNY.JPG
1792 AE Halfpenny Token. Norwich, Norfolk.21 viewsObverse: MAY NORWICH FLOURISH •. The arms of Norwich consisting of a three turreted gateway over a lion with raised paw; PRO BONO PUBLICO in smaller letters below.
Reverse: NORFOLK AND NORWICH HALFPENNY•. The Duke of Norfolk’s coat of arms; below shield, 1792.
Edge: PAYABLE AT N • BOLINGBROKES HABERDASHER & C • NORWICH • X •.
Diameter: 29mm | Axis: 12
Dalton & Hamer: 15

This token was issued by Nathaniel Bolingbroke, a haberdasher and silversmith with a business in the market place in Norwich, the manufacturer and diesinker are uncertain.

Norwich, a city in England, is situated on the River Wensum and is the regional administrative centre and county town of Norfolk. During the 11th century, Norwich was the largest city in England after London, and one of the most important places in the kingdom. Until the Industrial Revolution, Norwich was the capital of the most populous county in the country and vied with Bristol as England's second city.
*Alex
Norwich_halfpenny_1811.JPG
1811 AE HALFPENNY, Norwich, Norfolk.42 viewsObverse: NORWICH MDCCCXI. The arms of Norwich consisting of a heraldic shield containing a three towered castle above a lion passant.
Reverse: NEWTON SILVERSMTH AND JEWELLER. Britannia standing facing right, holding spear and shield, behind her, at her side, lion walking right.
Edge: Centre grained.
Diameter: 27mm
Davis 26 | Withers 923

Issued by Francis Newton, a silversmith and Jeweller in Norwich. This is possibly the same Francis Newton (or a close relative) who, in a circular to bankers, was declared bankrupt by solicitors Messrs Bignold, Pulley and Mawe of New Bridge Street, at a meeting in the Rampant Horse Inn, Norwich on 5th August, 1835.

Norwich is situated on the River Wensum and is the regional administrative centre and county town of Norfolk. During the 11th century, Norwich was the largest city in England after London, and one of the most important places in the kingdom. Until the Industrial Revolution, Norwich was the capital of the most populous county in the country and vied with Bristol as England's second city.
*Alex
Elizabeth_2_50_New_Pence_1976.JPG
1976 ELIZABETH II DECIMAL CuNi FIFTY PENCE8 viewsObverse: ELIZABETH.II D.G.REG.F.D.1976. Draped bust of Elizabeth II, wearing tiara, facing right.
Reverse: NEW PENCE. Britannia seated facing right, left hand holding laurel branch, right holding trident and resting on shield; recumbent lion behind at her feet; 50 in exergue.
Proof issue struck from polished dies.
Diameter 30mm | Weight 13.5gms
SPINK: 4223 PROOF

This portrait of Elizabeth II was designed by Arnold Machin (1911 - 1999), although his design was approved in June 1964 it was not used for United Kingdom coinage until 1968, after which his portrait of Elizabeth II was used on all British decimal coins until 1984. The tiara which the Queen is shown wearing on this coin had been given to her as a wedding present from her grandmother, Queen Mary.
*Alex
Elizabeth_2_50_Pence_1989.JPG
1989 ELIZABETH II DECIMAL CuNi LARGE FIFTY PENCE6 viewsObverse: ELIZABETH II D.G.REG.F.D.1989. Diademed bust of Elizabeth II facing right.
Reverse: FIFTY PENCE. Britannia seated facing right, left hand holding laurel branch, right holding trident and resting on shield; recumbent lion behind at her feet; 50 in exergue.
Proof issue struck from polished dies with frosted highlights.
Diameter 30mm | Weight 13.5gms
SPINK: 4351 PROOF (Large module)

This "Third Portrait" of Elizabeth II was Raphael Maklouf's first coin design and it was used on the coinage from 1985 to 1997 inclusive. Raphael Maklouf was born in Jerusalem in 1937 and came to the United Kingdom after the Second World War. The Royal diadem which the Queen is shown wearing on this coin is the one she wears on her way to and from the State Opening of Parliament.
*Alex
Elizabeth_2_50_Pence_1997.JPG
1997 ELIZABETH II DECIMAL CuNi SMALL FIFTY PENCE6 viewsObverse: ELIZABETH II D.G.REG.F.D.1997. Diademed bust of Elizabeth II facing right.
Reverse: FIFTY PENCE. Britannia seated facing right, left hand holding laurel branch, right holding trident and resting on shield; recumbent lion behind at her feet; 50 in exergue.
Proof issue struck from polished dies with frosted highlights.
Diameter 27.3mm | Weight 8.0gms
SPINK: 4351 PROOF (Small module)

This "Third Portrait" of Elizabeth II was Raphael Maklouf's first coin design and it was used on the coinage from 1985 to 1997 inclusive. Raphael Maklouf was born in Jerusalem in 1937 and came to the United Kingdom after the Second World War. The Royal diadem which the Queen is shown wearing on this coin is the one she wears on her way to and from the State Opening of Parliament.
*Alex
TrajanDenArabia.jpg
1cb Conquests of Trajan: Arabia9 viewsTrajan
98-117

Denarius

Portrait, right, IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P
Arabia and camel, SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI

Trajan annexed the Nabatean kingdom of Petra in 106.

RIC 245

Blindado
Demetrio III, Philopator - Nike.jpg
20-02 - Demetrio III, Philopator Soter (Eukairos) (95 al 88 A.C.)23 viewsHijo de Antíoco VIII y nieto de Demetrio II, con la ayuda de Tolomeo X, Rey de Egipto, recupera parte de los dominios sirios de su padre en 95 A.C., asentando su corte en Damasco, desde donde trata de acrecentar sus dominios, venciendo en batalla incluso al Rey Macabeo Alejandro Jannaeus, pero la hostilidad del pueblo judío lo obligó a retirarse. Intentando destronar a su hermano Filipo I Philadelphus, fue derrotado por Arabes y Partos, fue hecho prisionero por el Rey Mitrídates II, Rey de los Partos, hasta su muerte en el año 87 A.C.

AE 19 mm 6.1 gr.

Anv: Busto radiado de Demetrio viendo a derecha. Grafila de puntos.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΔHMHTPIOY OEOΨ ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ “ - Nike (Victoria) avanzando a derecha. Fecha de acuñación en exergo "ΘIΣ" = SE 219 (94/3 A.C.)

Acuñación: 94 - 93 A.C.
Ceca: Damasco en Siria

Referencias: LSM. #117 – SNG Spaer #2856-8 - SC #2454. 1-12
mdelvalle
Demetrio III, Philopator - Hermes sobre base.jpg
20-04 - Demetrio III, Philopator Soter (Eukairos) (95 al 88 A.C.)18 viewsHijo de Antíoco VIII y nieto de Demetrio II, con la ayuda de Tolomeo X, Rey de Egipto, recupera parte de los dominios sirios de su padre en 95 A.C., asentando su corte en Damasco, desde donde trata de acrecentar sus dominios, venciendo en batalla incluso al Rey Macabeo Alejandro Jannaeus, pero la hostilidad del pueblo judío lo obligó a retirarse. Intentando destronar a su hermano Filipo I Philadelphus, fue derrotado por Arabes y Partos, fue hecho prisionero por el Rey Mitrídates II, Rey de los Partos, hasta su muerte en el año 87 A.C.
AE 17 mm 3.9 gr.

Anv: Busto radiado de Demetrio viendo a derecha. Grafila de puntos.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΔHMHTPIOY ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ “ - Hermes desnudo de pié sobre una base, de frente viendo a izquierda, sosteniendo Hoja de Palma en mano derecha extendida y caduceo en la izquierda.

Acuñación: 96 - 95 A.C.
Ceca: Damasco en Siria

Referencias: BMC 4#5 Pag.101 – SNG Spaer #2871/79 - SC #2456.1-6 - HGC 9 #1312
mdelvalle
Demetrio III, Philopator - Hermes.jpg
20-06 - Demetrio III, Philopator Soter (Eukairos) (95 al 88 A.C.)17 viewsHijo de Antíoco VIII y nieto de Demetrio II, con la ayuda de Tolomeo X, Rey de Egipto, recupera parte de los dominios sirios de su padre en 95 A.C., asentando su corte en Damasco, desde donde trata de acrecentar sus dominios, venciendo en batalla incluso al Rey Macabeo Alejandro Jannaeus, pero la hostilidad del pueblo judío lo obligó a retirarse. Intentando destronar a su hermano Filipo I Philadelphus, fue derrotado por Arabes y Partos, fue hecho prisionero por el Rey Mitrídates II, Rey de los Partos, hasta su muerte en el año 87 A.C.
AE 17 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: Busto radiado de Demetrio viendo a derecha. Grafila de puntos.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΔHMHTPIOY OEOΨ ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ “ - Hermes desnudo de pié a izquierda, sosteniendo Hoja de Palma en mano derecha extendida y caduceo en la izquierda.

Acuñación: 95 - 88 A.C.
Ceca: Damasco en Siria

Referencias: SNG Spaer, #2840 – 2844 - SC #2455 - SNG Uk # 0408_5821 - BMC 4 #6 var. Pag.101
mdelvalle
w9~1.JPG
205. Severus Alexander; Bostra, Arabia17 viewsSeverus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Bostra, Arabia

Bronze AE 19, SNG ANS 1218-1220, aF, 4.27g, 19.3mm, 180o, Bostra mint, IMP CAES M AVB SEV ALEXANDER AVG, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse COLONIA BOSTRA, draped and turreted bust of Tyche left holding cornucopia; Bostra was the northern capital of the Nabataeans, until Trajan annexed the kingdom. It was then capital of Provincia Arabia, where the Third Legio Cyrenaica was garrisoned. The emperor Philip was born in Bostra and designated the city a metropolis.

Ex- CNG sale 143, Lot: 340
ecoli
Antíoco XII, Dionysos - Apolo.jpg
23-02 - Anti­oco XII, Dionysos Epiphanes Philopator Kaliniko (87/6 - 84 A.C.)36 viewsAntíoco XII Dioniso fue un rey de Siria de la dinastía seleúcida, hermano de Demetrio III, al que sucedió tras ser éste capturado por los partos. Fue el ultimo rey seleúcida en el sur de Siria, debido a la decadencia irremediable de los reinos helenísticos, debido a que había problemas en todas partes, sus hermanos estaban enzarzados en guerras fraticidas o habían sido derrotados por Tigranes el Grande y se habían convertido en poco más que una dinastía de reyezuelos macedonios sin ningún poder efectivo. Debido a todo ello y al afán de controlar las rutas comerciales, los árabes nabateos se atrevieron a atacar uno a uno a los debilitados reinos seleúcidas, por lo que Antíoco XII se vio obligado a reclutar un ejército de grecomacedonios y mercenarios sirios que marcharon con la esperanza de expulsar a los árabes y ampliar los acosados dominios seleúcidas. En consecuencia, se dirigió al combate contra los nabateos con un ejército mal pertrechado, como si se dirigiera a una escaramuza insignificante contra una tribu sin poder en la época de los grandes seleúcidas. Al tercer día de marcha los ejercitos se encontraron: los grecosirios agotados de Antíoco XII y los bien pertrechados y descansados árabes. Como era de esperar, los seleúcidas fueron contundentemente derrotados en la batalla subsiguiente. Antíoco XII cayó en la batalla y poco después los nabateos tomaron igualmente Damasco con lo cual el territorio quedó en poder árabe, del que ya no llegaría a salir jamás. La poblacion griega se diluyó totalmente entre los invasores, aunque hubo intentos de reconquistar Damasco por parte del sobrino de Antíoco, Filipo II Filorromano, hijo del hermano de Antíoco Filipo I Filadelfo; pero poco después Filipo II fue asesinado por orden de los romanos, lo que significó el fin definitivo de los seleúcidas y el inicio de la provincia romana de Siria.(Wikipedia)

AE 18 mm 5.0 gr.

Anv: Busto barbado y diademado de Antíoco viendo a derecha. Grafila de puntos.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ KAΛΛINIKOY” ( de Rey / Antíoco / Dios Hacedor de manifiestos / Padre amante / Vencedor de finas batallas) - Apolo desnudo de pié a izquierda, sosteniendo hoja de palma en mano derecha extendida y descansando la izquierda sobre un trípode.

Acuñación: 86 - 84 A.C.
Ceca: Damasco en Siria

Referencias: LSM.141 (ANS) - B.M.C. Vol.4 (Seleucid Kings of Syria) #1 Pag.102 Plate 27 #1 - Sear GCTV Vol.2 #7200 Pag.675 - Lindgren III #1124 (referencia cruzada con Houghton #870)
mdelvalle
Antíoco XII, Dionysos - Zeus.jpg
23-04 - Antioco XII, Dionysos Epiphanes Philopator Kaliniko (87/6 - 84 A.C.)37 viewsAntíoco XII Dioniso fue un rey de Siria de la dinastía seleúcida, hermano de Demetrio III, al que sucedió tras ser éste capturado por los partos. Fue el ultimo rey seleúcida en el sur de Siria, debido a la decadencia irremediable de los reinos helenísticos, debido a que había problemas en todas partes, sus hermanos estaban enzarzados en guerras fraticidas o habían sido derrotados por Tigranes el Grande y se habían convertido en poco más que una dinastía de reyezuelos macedonios sin ningún poder efectivo. Debido a todo ello y al afán de controlar las rutas comerciales, los árabes nabateos se atrevieron a atacar uno a uno a los debilitados reinos seleúcidas, por lo que Antíoco XII se vio obligado a reclutar un ejército de grecomacedonios y mercenarios sirios que marcharon con la esperanza de expulsar a los árabes y ampliar los acosados dominios seleúcidas. En consecuencia, se dirigió al combate contra los nabateos con un ejército mal pertrechado, como si se dirigiera a una escaramuza insignificante contra una tribu sin poder en la época de los grandes seleúcidas. Al tercer día de marcha los ejercitos se encontraron: los grecosirios agotados de Antíoco XII y los bien pertrechados y descansados árabes. Como era de esperar, los seleúcidas fueron contundentemente derrotados en la batalla subsiguiente. Antíoco XII cayó en la batalla y poco después los nabateos tomaron igualmente Damasco con lo cual el territorio quedó en poder árabe, del que ya no llegaría a salir jamás. La poblacion griega se diluyó totalmente entre los invasores, aunque hubo intentos de reconquistar Damasco por parte del sobrino de Antíoco, Filipo II Filorromano, hijo del hermano de Antíoco Filipo I Filadelfo; pero poco después Filipo II fue asesinado por orden de los romanos, lo que significó el fin definitivo de los seleúcidas y el inicio de la provincia romana de Siria.(Wikipedia)

AE 20 mm 8.6 gr.

Anv: Busto barbado y diademado de Antíoco viendo a derecha. Grafila de puntos.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ KAΛΛINIKOY” ( de Rey / Antíoco / Dios Hacedor de manifiestos / Padre amante / Vencedor de finas batallas) - Zeus Nicéforo (Nike-phoros portador de victoria, victorioso) de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, desnudo de la cintura para arriba, sosteniendo Nike en mano derecha extendida y descansando la izquierda sobre cetro.

Acuñación: 86 - 84 A.C.
Ceca: Damasco en Siria

Referencias: SNG Spaer #2884 - 2888 - Newell LSM. #137 - B.M.C. Vol.4 (Seleucid Kings of Syria) #6 Pag.102 Plate 27 #4 - Sear GCTV Vol.2 #7198var. Pag.675 - Houghton #866 - SC #2478
mdelvalle
Antíoco XII, Dionysos - Nike.jpg
23-06 - Antíoco XII, Dionysos Epiphanes Philopator Kaliniko (87/6 - 84 A.C.)27 viewsAntíoco XII Dioniso fue un rey de Siria de la dinastía seleúcida, hermano de Demetrio III, al que sucedió tras ser éste capturado por los partos. Fue el ultimo rey seleúcida en el sur de Siria, debido a la decadencia irremediable de los reinos helenísticos, debido a que había problemas en todas partes, sus hermanos estaban enzarzados en guerras fraticidas o habían sido derrotados por Tigranes el Grande y se habían convertido en poco más que una dinastía de reyezuelos macedonios sin ningún poder efectivo. Debido a todo ello y al afán de controlar las rutas comerciales, los árabes nabateos se atrevieron a atacar uno a uno a los debilitados reinos seleúcidas, por lo que Antíoco XII se vio obligado a reclutar un ejército de grecomacedonios y mercenarios sirios que marcharon con la esperanza de expulsar a los árabes y ampliar los acosados dominios seleúcidas. En consecuencia, se dirigió al combate contra los nabateos con un ejército mal pertrechado, como si se dirigiera a una escaramuza insignificante contra una tribu sin poder en la época de los grandes seleúcidas. Al tercer día de marcha los ejercitos se encontraron: los grecosirios agotados de Antíoco XII y los bien pertrechados y descansados árabes. Como era de esperar, los seleúcidas fueron contundentemente derrotados en la batalla subsiguiente. Antíoco XII cayó en la batalla y poco después los nabateos tomaron igualmente Damasco con lo cual el territorio quedó en poder árabe, del que ya no llegaría a salir jamás. La poblacion griega se diluyó totalmente entre los invasores, aunque hubo intentos de reconquistar Damasco por parte del sobrino de Antíoco, Filipo II Filorromano, hijo del hermano de Antíoco Filipo I Filadelfo; pero poco después Filipo II fue asesinado por orden de los romanos, lo que significó el fin definitivo de los seleúcidas y el inicio de la provincia romana de Siria.(Wikipedia)

AE 16 mm 4.6 gr.

Anv: Busto barbado y diademado de Antíoco viendo a derecha. Grafila de puntos.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ KAΛΛINIKOY” ( de Rey / Antíoco / Dios Hacedor de manifiestos / Padre amante / Vencedor de finas batallas) - Nike (Victoria) avanzando a derecha, sosteniendo corona en mano derecha extendida y rama de palma en la izquierda.

Acuñación: 86 - 84 A.C.
Ceca: Damasco en Siria

Referencias: SNG Spaer (Israel) 2890 var – 2894 - Babelon E. Vol.1, pl.XXVIII, 14 - Sear GCTV Vol.2 #7201 Pag.675
mdelvalle
philippos II  021.JPG
359-336 BC Philip II30 viewsMacedonian KIngdom Philip II 359-336 b.c
AE Quarter Unit
Obverse:Head of Herakles right
Reverse:FILIPPOY up and down of club

10.79mm 1.35gm

SNG COP 620
maik
philippos II  015.JPG
359-336 BC PhilipII30 viewsMacedonian KIngdom Philip II
AE Double Unit

Obverse:Head of Apollo right
Reverse:Youth on horse prancing, FILIPPOY above , E below
21.80mm 8.64gm
maik
coin274.JPG
509. Jovian21 views09. Jovian39 viewsJovian was born at Singidunum in A.D. 330, the son of the commander of Constantius II's imperial bodyguards. He also joined the guards and by A.D. 363 had risen to the post that his father had once held. He accompanied the Roman Emperor Julian on the disastrous Mesopotamian campain of the same year against Shapur II, the Sassanid king. After a small but decisive engagement the Roman army was forced to retreat from the numerically superior Persian force. Julian had been mortally wounded during the retreat and Jovian seized his chance. Some accounts have it that on Julian's death Jovian's soldiers called out "Jovianus!" The cry was mistaken for "Julianus", and the army cheered Jovian, briefly under the illusion that the slain Emperor had recovered from his wound.

Shapur pressed his advantage and Jovian, deep inside Sassanid territory, was forced to sue for peace on very unfavourable terms. In exchange for safety he agreed to withdraw from the provinces east of the Tigris that Diocletian had annexed and allow the Persians to occupy the fortresses of Nisbis, Castra Maurorum and Singara. the King of Armenia, Arsaces, was to stay neutral in future conflicts between the two empires, and was forced to cede some of his kingdom to Shapur. The treaty was seen as a disgrace and Jovian rapidly lost popularity.

After arriving at Antioch Jovian decided to hurry to Constantinople to consolidate his position.

Jovian was a Christian, in contrast to his predecessor Julian the Apostate, who had attempted a revival of paganism. He died on February 17, 364 after a reign of eight months.

Jovian AE3. D N IOVIA NVS P F AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / VOT V MVLT X inside wreath
ecoli
TiberiusHierapolis.jpg
703b, Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia107 viewsBronze AE 16, RPC I 2966 (1 specimen), F, Phrygia, Hierapolis, 3.300g, 15.6mm, 0o; Obverse: TIBEPIOC KAISAR, laureate head right; Reverse: IERAPOLEITWN ZOSIMOS [...], Apollo Archegetes (Lairbenos) standing left, playing lyre; reverse countermarked with star of six rays, in oval punch, 2.5 x 3.5 mm, Howgego 445 (3 pcs, 1 of which from this magistrate); dark patina; very rare. Ex FORVM.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

TIBERIUS (A.D. 14-37)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

The reign of Tiberius Claudius Nero (b. 42 B.C., d. A.D. 37, emperor A.D. 14-37) is a particularly important one for the Principate, since it was the first occasion when the powers designed for Augustus alone were exercised by somebody else. In contrast to the approachable and tactful Augustus, Tiberius emerges from the sources as an enigmatic and darkly complex figure, intelligent and cunning, but given to bouts of severe depression and dark moods that had a great impact on his political career as well as his personal relationships. His reign abounds in contradictions. Despite his keen intelligence, he allowed himself to come under the influence of unscrupulous men who, as much as any actions of his own, ensured that Tiberius's posthumous reputation would be unfavorable; despite his vast military experience, he oversaw the conquest of no new region for the empire; and despite his administrative abilities he showed such reluctance in running the state as to retire entirely from Rome and live out his last years in isolation on the island of Capri. His reign represents, as it were, the adolescence of the Principate as an institution. Like any adolescence, it proved a difficult time.

. . . .

It is all but inevitable that any historical assessment of Tiberius will quickly devolve into a historiographical assessment of Tacitus. So masterful is Tacitus's portrayal of his subject, and so influential has it been ever since, that in all modern treatments of Tiberius, in attempting to get at the man, must address the issue of Tacitus's historiographical methods, his sources, and his rhetoric. The subject is too vast to address here, but some points are salient. Tacitus's methods, especially his use of innuendo and inference to convey notions that are essentially editorial glosses, makes taking his portrayal of Tiberius at face value inadvisable. Further, his belief in the immutable character of people -- that one's character is innate at birth and cannot be changed, although it can be disguised -- prevents him from investigating the possibility that Tiberius evolved and developed over his lifetime and during his reign. Instead, Tacitus's portrayal is one of peeling back layers of dissimulation to reach the "real" Tiberius lurking underneath.

Overall, Tiberius's reign can be said to show the boons and banes of rule by one man, especially a man as dark, awkward, and isolated as Tiberius. For the people of the provinces, it was a peaceful and well-ordered time. Governors behaved themselves, and there were no destructive or expensive wars. In the domestic sphere, however, the concentration of power in one person made all the greater the threat of misbehavior by ambitious satellites like Sejanus or foolish friends like Piso. Furthermore, if the emperor wished to remain aloof from the mechanics of power, he could do so. Administrators, who depended on him for their directions, could operate without his immediate supervision, but their dealings with a man like Sejanus could lead to disaster if that man fell from grace. As a result, although he was not a tyrant himself, Tiberius's reign sporadically descended into tyranny of the worst sort. In the right climate of paranoia and suspicion, widespread denunciation led to the deaths of dozens of Senators and equestrians, as well as numerous members of the imperial house. In this sense, the reign of Tiberius decisively ended the Augustan illusion of "the Republic Restored" and shone some light into the future of the Principate, revealing that which was both promising and terrifying.

[For the complete article please refer to http://www.roman-emperors.org/tiberius.htm]

By Garrett G. Fagan, Pennsylvania State University.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.


Hierapolis in History

Usually said to be founded by Eumenes II, king of Pergamum (197-159 BC), Hierapolis may actually have been established closer to the 4th century BC by the Seleucid kings.

The name of the city may derive from Hiera, the wife of Telephus (son of Hercules and grandson of Zeus), the mythical founder of Pergamum. Or it may have been called the "sacred city" because of the temples located at the site. (The name Pamukkale is sometimes used just to refer to the white terraces, but the modern name of the whole area is also Pamukkale.)

With Colossae and Laodicea, Hierapolis became part of the tri-city area of the Lycus River valley. Hierapolis was located across the river from the other two cities and was noted for its textiles, especially wool. The city was also famous for its purple dye, made from the juice of the madder root.

The hot springs at Hierapolis (which still attract visitors today) were believed to have healing properties, and people came to the city to bathe in the rich mineral waters in order to cure various ailments.

Hierapolis was dedicated to Apollo Lairbenos, who was said to have founded the city. The Temple of Apollo that survives in ruins today dates from the 3rd century AD, but its foundations date from the Hellenistic period.

Also worshipped at Hierapolis was Pluto, god of the underworld, probably in relation to the hot gases released by the earth (see the Plutonium, below). The chief religious festival of ancient Hierapolis was the Letoia, in honor of the the goddess Leto, a Greek form of the Mother Goddess. The goddess was honoured with orgiastic rites.

Hierapolis was ceded to Rome in 133 BC along with the rest of the Pergamene kingdom, and became part of the Roman province of Asia. The city was destroyed by an earthquake in 60 AD but rebuilt, and it reached its peak in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD.

Famous natives of Hierapolis include the Stoic philosopher Epictetus (c.55-c.135 AD) and the philosopher and rhetorician Antipater. Emperor Septimus hired Antipater to tutor his sons Caracalla and Geta, who became emperors themselves.

Hierapolis had a significant Jewish population in ancient times, as evidence by numerous inscriptions on tombs and elsewhere in the city. Some of the Jews are named as members of the various craft guilds of the city. This was probably the basis for the Christian conversion of some residents of Hierapolis, recorded in Colossians 4:13.

In the 5th century, several churches as well as a large martyrium dedicated to St. Philip (see "In the Bible," below) were built in Hierapolis. The city fell into decline in the 6th century, and the site became partially submerged under water and deposits of travertine. It was finally abandoned in 1334 after an earthquake. Excavations began to uncover Hierapolis in the 19th century.

Hierapolis in the Bible

Hierapolis is mentioned only once in the Bible, when St. Paul praises Epaphras, a Christian from Colossae, in his letter to the Colossians. Paul writes that Epaphras "has worked hard for you and for those in Laodicea and in Hierapolis" (Colossians 4:12-13). Epaphras was probably the founder of the Christian community at Hierapolis.

Ancient tradition also associates Hierapolis with a biblical figure, reporting that Philip died in Hierapolis around 80 AD. However, it is not clear which Philip is menat. It could be Philip the Apostle, one of the original 12 disciples, who is said to have been martyred by upside-down crucifixion (Acts of Philip) or by being hung upside down by his ankles from a tree.

Or Philip could be Philip the Evangelist, a later disciple who helped with administrative matters and had four virgin-prophetess daughters (Acts 6:1-7; 21:8-9). Early traditions say this Philip was buried in Hierapolis along with his virgin daughters, but confusingly call him "Philip the Apostle"! In any case, it seems a prominent person mentioned in Acts did die in Hierapolis.
http://www.sacred-destinations.com/turkey/hierapolis-pamukkale.htm

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
CLAUD34LG.jpg
705a, Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D.62 viewsClaudius. 42-43 AD. AE As.
Claudius. 42-43 AD. AE As (29 mm, 10.87 g). Obverse: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head right; Reverse: CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI / S - C, Constantiae in military dress standing left, holding spear; RIC I, 111; aVF. Ex Imperial Coins.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

CLAUDIUS (41-54 A.D.)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

Ti. Claudius Nero Germanicus (b. 10 BC, d. 54 A.D.; emperor, 41-54 A.D.) was the third emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. His reign represents a turning point in the history of the Principate for a number of reasons, not the least for the manner of his accession and the implications it carried for the nature of the office. During his reign he promoted administrators who did not belong to the senatorial or equestrian classes, and was later vilified by authors who did. He followed Caesar in carrying Roman arms across the English Channel into Britain but, unlike his predecessor, he initiated the full-scale annexation of Britain as a province, which remains today the most closely studied corner of the Roman Empire. His relationships with his wives and children provide detailed insights into the perennial difficulties of the succession problem faced by all Roman Emperors. His final settlement in this regard was not lucky: he adopted his fourth wife's son, L. Domitius Ahenobarbus, who was to reign catastrophically as Nero and bring the dynasty to an end. Claudius's reign, therefore, was a mixture of successes and failures that leads into the last phase of the Julio-Claudian line.

Robert Graves' fictional characterization of Claudius as an essentially benign man with a keen intelligence has tended to dominate the wider public's view of this emperor. Close study of the sources, however, reveals a somewhat different kind of man. In addition to his scholarly and cautious nature, he had a cruel streak, as suggested by his addiction to gladiatorial games and his fondness for watching his defeated opponents executed. He conducted closed-door (in camera ) trials of leading citizens that frequently resulted in their ruin or deaths -- an unprecedented and tyrannical pattern of behavior. He had his wife Messalina executed, and he personally presided over a kangaroo court in the Praetorian Camp in which many of her hangers-on lost their lives. He abandoned his own son Britannicus to his fate and favored the advancement of Nero as his successor. While he cannot be blamed for the disastrous way Nero's rule turned out, he must take some responsibility for putting that most unsuitable youth on the throne. At the same time, his reign was marked by some notable successes: the invasion of Britain, stability and good government in the provinces, and successful management of client kingdoms. Claudius, then, is a more enigmatic figure than the other Julio-Claudian emperors: at once careful, intelligent, aware and respectful of tradition, but given to bouts of rage and cruelty, willing to sacrifice precedent to expediency, and utterly ruthless in his treatment of those who crossed him. Augustus's suspicion that there was more to the timid Claudius than met the eye was more than fully borne out by the events of his unexpected reign.

The possibility has to be entertained that Claudius was a far more active participant in his own elevation than traditional accounts let on. There is just reason to suspect that he may even have been involved in planning the murder of Gaius (Caligula). Merely minutes before the assassination of Gaius, Claudius had departed for lunch; this appears altogether too fortuitous. This possibility, however, must remain pure speculation, since the ancient evidence offers nothing explicit in the way of support. On the other hand, we can hardly expect them to, given the later pattern of events. The whole issue of Claudius's possible involvement in the death of Gaius and his own subsequent acclamation by the Praetorian Guard must, therefore, remain moot . . . yet intriguing

Copyright 1998, Garrett G. Fagan.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
LarryW2235.jpg
7276 Nikomedes IV, Philopator, 94-74 BC134 viewsSilver tetradrachm, 34.4mm, 15.61g, EF
Diademed head right / BAΣIΛEΩΣ EΠIΦANOYΣ NIKOMHΔOY, Zeus standing left holding wreath and sceptre, eagle on thunderbolt over monogram and date EΣ (year 205 or 94 BC) in inner left field.
Ex: Forvm Ancient Coins
Sear 7276; BMC Pontus, page 215, #1; SNG von Aulock 265; SNG Cop 650
My personal favourite of this small collection because of the finely detailed portrait, 'perfect' toning, and minor imperfections like small die breaks that for me, add 'character.'
Note (courtesy Joe Sermarini): During the first year of his reign, Mithradates, king of Pontus, expelled him and placed his younger brother Socrates on the throne. The next year he was restored by the Roman army under Aquilius. Aquilius was later defeated and killed and in 88 BC, Mithradates destroyed Nikomedes' army forcing him to flee to Italy. Nikomedes' throne was again restored when Rome defeated Mithradates in 84 BC. He died childless and his will left his kingdom to Rome.
Lawrence Woolslayer
John_Comenus-Ducas_Sear_2208.jpg
75. John Comenus-Ducas, Kingdom of Thessalonica20 viewsKingdom of Thessalonica.
John Comenus-Ducas
AE 17mm small module trachy
1237-1244 AD.

O: IC-XC to left and right of Christ, bust facing

R: IW.., John, no beard, half length figure, standing, holding labarum-headed sceptre and akakia.

SB 2208; DOC 23.

ID'ed with help from FORVM member OrthdoxCoins. Thanks!
Sosius
30744.jpg
8. Antiochos IV Epiphanes8 viewsSeleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes. 175-164 B.C. AE 14 (14.2 mm, 3.15 g, 1 h). Antioch, 175-172 B.C. Veiled and diademed bust of Laodike IV right / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY, elephant's head left, monogram below. SC 1407; SNG Spaer 969. aVF.ecoli
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8. Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochos IV, Epiphanes. 175-164 BC. 30 viewsecoli
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8. Seleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes20 viewsSeleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes. 175-165/4 B.C. Ake-Ptolemais. Diademed, radiate head right / BASILEW[S] ANTIOCOU, Nike in biga galloping left; monogram below horses. SNG Spaer 1141; Spaer, Ake p. 139, type 2. g43

Ex- CNG sale 143, Lot: 340

ecoli
coin352.JPG
8. Seleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes24 viewsSeleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes. 175-165/4 B.C. Ake-Ptolemais. Diademed, radiate head right / BASILEW[S] ANTIOCOU, Nike in biga galloping left; monogram below horses. SNG Spaer 1141; Spaer, Ake p. 139, type 2. g45

Ex- CNG sale 143, Lot: 340
ecoli
coin807.JPG
8. Seleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes24 viewsSeleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes. 175-165/4 B.C. Ake-Ptolemais. Diademed, radiate head right / BASILEW[S] ANTIOCOU, Nike in biga galloping left; monogram below horses. SNG Spaer 1141; Spaer, Ake p. 139, type 2. g45

Ex- CNG sale 143, Lot: 340

ecoli
1341_P_Hadrian_RPC878.jpg
878 BOSPORUS, Kingdom of the Bosporus Hadrian 123-24 AD Cotys II11 viewsReference.
RPC III, 878; Anokhin 471; MacDonald 422

Issue Year ΚY (420)

Obv. ΒΑϹΙΛΕⲰϹ ΚΟΤΥΟϹ
Diademed and draped bust of Cotys II, right

Rev. ΚΥ
Laureate head of Hadrian, right

7.71 gr
19 mm
1h
1 commentsokidoki
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Ağ Qoyunlu: Ya'qub (1478-1490 CE) AR Tanka, NM, ND (Album-2522)12 viewsObv: Within cartouche, السلطان العادل يعقوب خان (the Just Sultan, Ya’qub Khan); below, خلد الله ملکه (May Allah preserve his kingdom) where mint name is usually found; margin unread
Rev: Within square, فمن يعمل مثقال ذرة خيرا يره (He who does the weight of one grain of good shall see it); in margin, ابو بكر عمر عثمان علي (the Rashidun - Abu Bakr, Umar, Uthman, Ali)
SpongeBob
achaemenid_kingdon.jpg
Achaemenid Kingdom107 viewsAchaemenid Kingdom. Darios I to Xerxes II. Ca. 485-420 B.C. AR siglos. Good Fine. Persian king or hero in kneeling/running stance right, holding spear and bow / Incuse punch. Carradice type IIIb/A-B. dpaul7
Persian_Empire_siglos_c_450_BC.jpg
Achaemenid Kingdom33 viewsAchaemenid Kingdom, Persia. Time of Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II. Circa 485-420 BC. AR Siglos (15mm, 5.53 g). Obv.: Persian king or hero in kneeling-running stance right, holding spear and bow. Rev.: Incuse punch. Eye counterstamp on rim. Reference: Carradice Type IIIb C. Ex Ardatirion collection.dpaul7
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Achaemenid Kingdom, West Asia Minor, Artaxerxes II - Darius III, AR Siglos.10 viewsLydia 375-336 B.C. 5.47g - 14.8mm.

Obv: Persian king or hero in kneeling-running stance right, three annulets on breast of kandys, holding dagger and bow, quiver with arrows over shoulder. Back to back crescent ountermark on the left.

Rev: Irregular incuse punch mark.

Carradice type IV (late) C: Carradice plate XV, 46 ff.; BMC Arabia p. 171, 172 ff., pl. XXVII, 18 - 19; BMC 42 Countermark.

Christian Scarlioli
31121.jpg
Achaemenid Kingdom. Artaxerxes I to Artaxerxes II12 viewsAchaemenid Kingdom. Artaxerxes I to Artaxerxes II. Ca. 450-375 B.C. AR siglos (15.69 mm, 4.84 g). Persian king or hero in kneeling-running stance right, holding spear and bow / Rectangular incuse punch. Carradice Type IIIb; SNG Kayhan 1029. Fine, rough.ecoli
adaios.jpg
Adaios; Apollo/ tripod67 viewsThracian Kingdom. Adaios. Ca. 275-225 B.C. Æ 26mm (10.76 g, 9 h). Laureate head of Apollo right / Tripod; to left, AE monogram above S. Peter p. 237; SNG BM 324-5 var. (upper monogram); SNG Stancomb 296 var. (same). VF, green and red patina. Ex Frank L. Kovacs (Vauctions)Podiceps
AE_drachm_of_Apurva_Chandra_Deva_(ca_1340-1351_(AD),_Kangra_Kingdom.jpg
AE drachm of Apurva Chandra Deva (ca.1340-1351 (?) AD), Kangra Kingdom86 views0600
Stylized horseman right / Stylized bull, inscriptions above ("Sri Apurva Chandra"). Scarce. Much nicer than these usually are. 14mm, 3.6 grams. "The Catalogue of Katoch rulers of Kangra"#148.
Kangra is a district is in the western part of Himachal Pradesh, in the low foothills of the Himalayas. It was the place of an ancient Hindu Kangra Kingdom. The kings of Kangra are almost unknown in history, their existence was shadowy and the dating of their reigns is tentative.Their coins are fairly scarce, not well-studied and difficult to find
Antonio Protti
AE_drachm_of_Rupa_Chandra_II_(second_half_of_the_14th_century),_Kangra_Kingdom.jpg
AE drachm of Rupa Chandra II (second half of the 14th century), Kangra Kingdom 88 views1295 Stylized horseman right, Sri above (not visible) / Stylized bull, inscriptions above ("Sri Rupa"), only partially visible, as always. Scarce. Much nicer than these usually are. 14mm, 3.6 grams. "The Catalogue of Katoch rulers of Kangra"#335 or similar.

Rupa Chandra II is known to have been a contemporary of the Sultan of Delhi Firuz Shah Tughluq (1351-1388 AD). The exact dates of the reign of Rupa Chandra II are not known.
Kangra is a district is in the western part of Himachal Pradesh, in the low foothills of the Himalayas. It was the place of an ancient Hindu Kangra Kingdom. The kings of Kangra are almost unknown in history, their existence was shadowy and the dating of their reigns is tentative.Their coins are fairly scarce, not well-studied and difficult to find.
Antonio Protti
s-l500.jpg
Aiolis, Kyme. (Circa 2nd century B.C.) 23 viewsAE 16, 3.74 g

Obverse: Artemis standing right, holding long torch, clasping hands with the Amazon Kyme, standing left, holding short transverse scepter

Reverse: Two figures, Apollo and Kyme, in crested helmets and military garb, Apollo holding lance or long spear, standing in slow quadriga right.

Grose:7908; SNG von Aulock 7698; SNG München 512; SNG Copenhagen 113.

Kyme was an Aeolian city in Aeolis (Asia Minor) close to the kingdom of Lydia. The Aeolians regarded Kyme as the largest and most important of their twelve cities, which were located on the coastline of Asia Minor (modern-day Turkey). Little is known about the foundation of the city to supplement the traditional founding legend. According to legend, it was founded by the Amazon Kyme.
Nathan P
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Al-Kamil Muhammad I, AV Dinar80 viewsISLAMIC KINGDOMS. Ayyubid. Al-Kamil Muhammad I, AH 615-635 (1218-38), AV Dinar, AH 633.
A-811.
Caffaro
83218q00_Seleukid_Kingdom,_Alexander_I_Balas,_150_-_145_B_C__apollo.jpg
Alexander I Balas, Apollo examining arrow; AE 1813 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 150 - 145 B.C. Bronze AE 18, Houghton and Lorber 1805(1), SNG Spaer 1449, Apamea on the Orontes mint, 4.699g, 18.5mm, 0o, obverse head of Alexander the Great as Herakles right wearing lion scalp headdress; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ”, Apollo standing left, examining arrow in right, resting left on grounded bow, palm frond outer left, o“Δ”E monogram right. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
38854q00_Seleukid_Kingdom,_Alexander_I_Balas,_150_-_145_B_C__owl.jpg
Alexander I Balas, Owl; AE 1615 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 150 - 145 B.C. Bronze AE 16, Houghton and Lorber II 1794, SNG Spaer -, Fair, Antioch mint, 3.948g, 16.4mm, obverse diademed head of Alexander right, dot border; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ”, owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, uncertain control marks in ex. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Alexander_I_Balas.JPG
Alexander I, Balas, 152 - 145 BC97 viewsObv: No legend, diademed head of Alexander I facing right.

Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ / AΛEΞANΔPOY / ΘEOΠATOPOΣ / EYEPΓETOY, Apollo seated left on an omphalos, holding an arrow in his right hand and resting his left hand on a bow placing on the ground; HΡΑΚ in monogram in exergue.

Silver Drachm, Antioch mint, 152 - 145 BC

4.1 grams, 17.5 mm, 0°

GCV II 7035, Newell SMA 178

(special thanks to rover1.3 for additional information on this coin)
2 commentsSPQR Coins
Seleucid_Alexander_I_GCV_7040.JPG
Alexander I, Balas, 152 - 145 BC36 viewsObv: No legend, head of Alexander I facing right wearing a crested helmet.

Rev: BAΣIΛEΩE on right, AΛEΞANΔPOY on left, Nike standing left, crowning the King's name with a laurel wreath and holding a palm; corn-ear in field to left, monogram before Nike.

Æ 19, Antioch mint, c. 150 - 145 BC

6.6 grams, 19.38 mm, 0°

GCV II 7040

(special thanks to rover1.3 for additional information)
2 commentsSPQR Coins
Seleucid_Alexander_I_GCV_7030~0.JPG
Alexander I, Balas, 152 - 145 BC38 viewsObv: Diademed head of Alexander Balas facing right within a fillet border.

Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ / AΛEΞANΔPOY in two lines on the right, ΘEOΠATOPOΣ / EYEPΓETOY in two lines on the left; Zeus seated left, in his right hand he holds Nike who is raising a laurel wreath, and in his left hand he holds a scepter, monograms in outer and inner fields; date ΔΞP (Seleucid year 164) in exergue.

Silver Tetradrachm, Antioch mint, 149 - 148 BC

16.1 grams, 30.7 mm, 0°

GCV II 7030, Newell SMA 142

Ex: FORVM
SPQR Coins
42845Seleukid_Kingdom,_Alexander_II_Zabinas.jpg
Alexander II Zabinas, Athena standing l. AE 2031 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Alexander II Zabinas, 128 - 122 B.C. Bronze AE 20, Houghton and Lorber II 2233.1b, SNG Spaer 2303 - 2304, F, Antioch mint, 6.623g, 20.5mm, 0o, obverse radiate and diademed head of Alexander II right; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ”, Athena standing left, spear in left, Nike in extended right, shield at base of spear, EY monogram / cornucopia in inner left field. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Alexander_II_Zebina.jpg
Alexander II Zebinas 128 - 123 B.C.13 viewsAlexander II Zebinas, Seleukid kingdom, 128 - 123 B.C. Antioch mint. Ae 15.8~16.1mm. 3.58g. Obv: Prow of galley right, the two pilei of Dioscuri surmounted by stars above. Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ to right and left of tripod lebes, two palm branches and urn in the lebes, A and quiver/club to left, Π to right. Hoover 1176; BMC 31. SNG Spaer 2347, CSE 308ddwau
Alexander_II_Zabinas~2.jpg
Alexander II Zebinas 128-123 BC10 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Alexander II Zebinas serrated-edge Ae16 -18. Weight 5.37g. 128-123 BC, Antioch mint. Head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, winged Tyche standing left on prow, wearing modius on head, holding rudder & cornucopia, SNGCop 373ddwau
Alexander_II_Zabinas~1.jpg
Alexander II Zebinas 128-123 BC17 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Alexander II Zebinas serrated-edge Ae16 -18. Weight 5.37g. 128-123 BC, Antioch mint. Head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ, winged Tyche standing left on prow, wearing modius on head, holding rudder & cornucopia, SNGCop 373ddwau
alextetcoll1.jpg
Alexander III 'The Great'38 viewsKingdom of Macedon
Alexander III 'The Great' (336-323 BCE)
AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 16.75g)
Amphipolis mint c. 336-323 BCE
Lifetime issue

O: Head of Herakles right wearing lion's skin

R: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; dolphin in left field

Price 73; Müller 539
Salaethus
Alexander_Zeus_3b.jpg
Alexander III 'The Great' | Zeus - Macedonian Kingdom, AR Drachm, 337 to 323 BC.79 views
Alexander III 'The Great' | Zeus - Silver drachm

Obv: Head of Alexander in guise of Herakles, wearing lion-skin headdress, right-facing.
Rev: Zeus enthroned, nude to waste, left-facing, holding and gazing at eagle in outstretched right hand, scepter in raised left hand; monogram TI before the god, below the eagle - second eagle below the monogram(?): [A]LEXANDROY down-vertical in right field.

Exergue: None.

Mint: Sardis
Struck: 310-301 BC. (Posthumous issue)

Size: 14.9 x 15.9 mm.
Weight: 4.27 grams.
Die axis: 0°

Condition: Quite fine. Beautiful, bright, clear, lustrous with subtle but distinctive toning. Nicely centered, well struck with excellent images, legend and monogram, in fine relief.

Refs:*
Müller 186.
Reference: Price - 2617
Tiathena
Alexander_III.jpg
Alexander III 336 - 323 B.C.20 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Alexander III, the Great, 336 - 323 B.C. Ae 11.7~12.1mm. 1.67g. Obv: Herakles head in lionskin headdress. Rev: AΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOY, bow and bowcase above, club and monogram below.ddwau
AlexIIIObol.jpg
Alexander III AR Hemiobol25 viewsKingdom of Macedon, Alexander III 'the Great' AR Hemiobol. Uncertain Eastern mint, circa 325-300 BC. 0.56g, 9mm
O: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
R: Bow, quiver and club; monogram in field.
- Cf. Price 4013-4014.
Nemonater
AlexanderTheGreate.jpg
Alexander III The Great15 viewsArgead Dynasty

Kingdom of Macedon (336 - 323 BC)

Obverse: Herakle's head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp, headdress tied at neck.

Reverse: Bow, quiver and club, Basilews written between.
Pericles J2
Macedonian_Kingdom_1.PNG
Alexander III the Great 334-310 B.C6 viewsMacedonian Kingdom Alexander III the Great 334-310 B.C.

Obverse: Macedonian shield; around, five double crescents with five pellets between each; in centre, thunderbolt.

Reverse: B - A on either side of Crested Macedonian helmet, thunderbolt below.

17mm 4.66 grams
Macedonian Warrior
Lifetime_Issue!_Signed_by_the_artist_EX_FORVM~0.jpg
Alexander III The Great Lifetime Issue Drachm ! Signed by the artist 123 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Alexander III The Great, 336 - 323 B.C.




Silver drachm, Price 2090A, ADM I 80 (same dies), VF, 4.214g, 16.0mm, 0o, Miletos mint, lifetime issue, c. 325 - 323 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck, K on lion's jaw behind Herakles' ear; reverse ALEXANDROU, Zeus seated left, legs uncrossed, right leg forward, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, monogram before;

EX; FORVM Ancient Coins ' Shop.


Lifetime Issue! Signed by the artist!(?) The K behind Herakles ear had traditionally been identified as the signature of the artist. Matt Kreuzer, however, believes the K (the Greek numeral 20) was used c. 325 B.C. to introduce the Attic drachm to Miletos by indicating either that 20 of these was equal to a gold stater, or that one of these drachm was equal to 20 of the 3 to 4 gram bronzes circulating at the time.


*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

**This coin is considered as Best of The Type :
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-108526


From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
price1959.jpg
Alexander III The Great, drachm; Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, Price 195933 viewsAlexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Silver drachm, Price 1959, SNG Cop 965, VF/F, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, 3.889g, 17.0mm, 0o, posthumous, c. 319 - 305 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse “ALEXANDROU”, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long vertical scepter in left, right leg drawn back, “PA” monogram right, AT monogram under throne, B outer right (off-flan). Ex FORVMPodiceps
alexander.jpg
Alexander III the Great, Lifetime issue83 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue, 19mm
Obverse: Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion headdress tied at neck
Reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, club above, bow inside case below
4 commentsDk0311USMC
ATG_bust_Pergamon.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C.143 viewsAlexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC), better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

"Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.
Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr Joann Fletcher (http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml)
Cleisthenes
ATGlifetimeDrachmLydiaSardes.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Lifetime Issue106 viewsSilver drachm, Price 2553, VF, 4.297g, 16.4mm, 0o, Lydia, Sardes mint, c. 334 - 323 B.C. Lifetime Issue; Obverse: Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Reverse: BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, scepter in left, EYE monogram left, rose under throne. Ex FORVM.

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the 13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
alex3_miletos_pan.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Miletos mint89 viewsBronze AE 1/4 Unit, Price 2102Ab, weight 1.1g, max. diameter 11.65 mm, Miletos mint, Posthumous issue c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obv. Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝ∆ΡΟ[Υ], bow in case above, club and stalk of grain below. Dark brown and green patina with some earthen residue. Appears to have little or no wear! (much better in hand) Very scarce denomination from this mint.1 commentsSteve E
25643q00.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Ancient Counterfeit41 viewsFouree silver plated didrachm, cf. Price 3603 (official, Babylon mint, 325 -323 B.C., very rare), F, plating breaks, 4.936g, 17.2mm, 270o, obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ALEXAND[POY], Zeus seated left, legs uncrossed, holding eagle and scepter; M in left field, monogram below throneCaffaro
Macedonian Kingdom 1a img.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue, Silver tetradrachm, Price 3599 (same dies) 168 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:- Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:- ALEXANDROU, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, monogram and M below throne;
Price 3599 (same dies), Müller 67, 17.206g, 25.9mm, 255o, Babylon mint, lifetime issue, c. 325 - 323 B.C.;
EF, obverse off-center;

Dies by 'The Alexander Dekadrachm Master'. From the same highly-skilled hand as the famous dekadrachms, including Price 3598, with which this shares all symbols and their arrangement. A massive issue of coinage was struck for the mass-weddings of the soldiers of Alexander the Great to Persian women, and their subsequent return to Macedonia. The best style of the lengthy issue of Alexander coinage
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1a_img.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue, Silver tetradrachm, Price 3599 (same dies)96 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:- Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:- ALEXANDROU, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, monogram and M below throne;
Price 3599 (same dies), Müller 67, 17.206g, 25.9mm, 255o, Babylon mint, lifetime issue, c. 325 - 323 B.C.;
EF, obverse off-center;

Dies by 'The Alexander Dekadrachm Master'. From the same highly-skilled hand as the famous dekadrachms, including Price 3598, with which this shares all symbols and their arrangement. A massive issue of coinage was struck for the mass-weddings of the soldiers of Alexander the Great to Persian women, and their subsequent return to Macedonia. The best style of the lengthy issue of Alexander coinage

Ex-Forum

Old coin - new photo.

Click to zoom.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1a_img~0.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue, Silver tetradrachm, Price 3599 (same dies)53 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:- Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:- ALEXANDROU, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, monogram and M below throne;
Price 3599 (same dies), Müller 67, 17.206g, 25.9mm, 255o, Babylon mint, lifetime issue, c. 325 - 323 B.C.;
EF, obverse off-center;

Dies by 'The Alexander Dekadrachm Master'. From the same highly-skilled hand as the famous dekadrachms, including Price 3598, with which this shares all symbols and their arrangement. A massive issue of coinage was struck for the mass-weddings of the soldiers of Alexander the Great to Persian women, and their subsequent return to Macedonia. The best style of the lengthy issue of Alexander coinage

Ex-Forum

Updated image using new photography setup.
maridvnvm
Alexander_III_The_Great_Lifetime_Issue_Ionia_,_Miletos_Mint_.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue. Ionia, Miletos mint.32 viewsSilver Drachm, Müller Alexander 763; SNG Cop 895; SNG Alpha Bank 629; SNG Saroglos 771; SNG München - ; Price 2090, Choice good Very Fine , as found Superb Fine Style, toned, centered, bumps and marks, Ionia, Miletos mint, weight 4.004g, maximum diameter 18.0mm, die axis 0o, struck between 325 - 323 B.C.,.
Obverse ; head of Alexander the Great as Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck.
Reverse ; AΛEΞAN∆POY ( means " Of Alexander " in Ancient Greek ), Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right leg forward, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter topped with lotus vertical behind in left hand, ∆H monogram left.


*Lifetime issue. This coin was issued during the lifetime and rule of Alexander the Great. Most Alexander coins were issued after his death.

*Alexander the great believed if the world ruled by one king or leader , will be better for all.
Alexander the great was considered a god after his death.



FORVM Ancient Coins. / From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
3 commentsSam
AlexTheGreatMemphisTet.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Possible Lifetime Issue106 viewsThis is the same coin in my collection, different picture, as the Alexander tetradrachm listed as [300mem].

Silver tetradrachm, Price 3971, VF, 16.081g, 26.1mm, 0o, Egypt, Memphis mint, c. 332 - 323 or 323 - 305 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, legs crossed, eagle in right, scepter in left, rose left, DI-O under throne. Ex Pavlos S. Pavlou. Ex FORVM, "The Memphis issues are among the finest style Alexander coins. Experts disagree on the date of this issue. Some identify it as a lifetime issue and others as a posthumous issue (Joseph Sermarini).

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsJames Fitzgerald
alexander_III_price_1560.jpg
Alexander III, drachm, Price 156032 viewsAlexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Silver drachm, Price 1560, SNG Cop 972, nice VF, Troas, Abydus? mint, 4.229g, 17.4mm, 0o, posthumous, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse “ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ”, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, long vertical scepter in left, right leg drawn back, ME monogram left, ivy leaf under throne. Price attributes this coin to Abydus but notes that the attribution can be made "only with caution." ex FORVMPodiceps
Alexander_price1799.jpg
Alexander III, drachme, Price 179922 viewsMacedonian kingdom, Alexander III, Colophon, Price 1799

Obv.: Head of Heracles wearing lionskin
Rev.: Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre ; wreath at left ; ALEXANDROU at right ; N beneath throne
1 commentsSteff V
Alex_tetra.jpg
Alexander III, tetradrachm; Celtic imitation57 viewsCeltic imitation of: The Macedonian Kingdom. Alexander III, the Great, 336-323 B.C. Tetradrachm, 15,43 g Sear GCV II: 6721 var., testmarks. Below eagle sigma.5 commentsPodiceps
Macedon_Alexander_1.jpg
Alexander III, the Great52 viewsMacedonian Kingdom
Alexander (III) the Great
AE13
c.323-315 BC
Salamis, Cyprus
(no legend)
Facing gorgon at center of ornamented Macedonian shield
B | A
Macedonian helmet
Caduceus in exergue
13mm
Price 3158; Müller --
WindchildPunico
hendin471.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze lepton, Hendin 47125 viewsJudean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze lepton, Hendin 471, Fair, Jerusalem mint, 1.224g, 13.1mm, 78 - 76 B.C.; obverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ” (of King Alexander), anchor upside-down in circle, L KE (year 25) near anchor points; reverse Aramaic inscription, King Alexander Year 25, star of eight rays surrounded by diadem of dots. Ex FORVMPodiceps
hendin_469.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze prutah, Hendin 4699 viewsJudean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze prutah, Hendin 469, F, Jerusalem mint, 1.365g, 14.5mm, 95 - 76 B.C.; obverse “BASILEWS ALEXANDROU” (of King Alexander), around anchor; reverse , eight ray star surrounded by diadem (or wheel), Hebrew inscription 'Yehonatan the king' between rays. Jannaeus' anchor coins were probably struck after the conquest of the coastal cities (with the exception of Ashkelon) in 95 B.C. The anchor probably publicized the annexation of these areas. -- Ancient Jewish Coinage by Yaakov Meshorer. Ex FORVMPodiceps
hendin_473-4.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze prutah, Hendin 473-4745 viewsJudean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze prutah, Hendin 473 - 474, Fair, Jerusalem mint, 2.260g, 14.1mm, 0o, obverse Hebrew inscription, Yehonatan the High Priest and the Council of the Jews, within wreath; reverse, double cornucopia adorned with ribbons, pomegranate between horns. Ex FORVMPodiceps
hendin_474.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze prutah, Hendin 4744 viewsJudean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC Q17, Hendin 474, VF, Jerusalem mint, 1.628g, 14.1mm, 0o, obverse Hebrew inscription, Yehonatan the High Priest and the Council of the Jews, surrounded by wreath; reverse, double cornucopia adorned with ribbons, pomegranate between horns. Ex FORVMPodiceps
hendin478.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze prutah, Hendin 4788 viewsJudean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze prutah, Hendin 478, overstruck on an earlier prutot, aF, Jerusalem mint, 1.92g, 14.6mm, 180o, obverse Hebrew inscription, Yonatan the High Priest and the Council of the Jews, within wreath; reverse, double cornucopia with pomegranate between horns. This type has been reattributed from Hyrcanus II to Alexander Jannaeus by Hendin and Shachar in 'The Identity of YNTN on Hasmonean Overstruck Coins and the Chronology of the Alexander Jannaeus Types,' Israel Numismatic Research 3, 2008: 87-94. It appears this type was overstruck on earlier coins of Alexander Jannaeus that had never been released from the mint. Ex FORVMPodiceps
alex_j_prutah_h478.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze prutah, Hendin 4784 viewsJudean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC T6, Hendin 478, VF, Jerusalem mint, 1.824g, 16.1mm, obverse Hebrew inscription, Yonatan the High Priest and the Council of the Jews, within wreath; reverse , double cornucopia with pomegranate between horns; nice centering and strike, overstruck on an earlier prutah, partly uncleaned. Ex FORVMPodiceps
tessera.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Lead tessera (2), Hendin 4768 viewsJudean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Lead tessera, Hendin 476, VG, Transjordan mint, 5.62g, 16.7mm, 95 - 76 B.C.; obverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ” (of King Alexander), anchor (upside-down as if hanging on the side of a boat) inside circle; reverse, traces of Aramaic inscription, King Alexander, with a border of dots; encrusted in earthen 'desert' patina; scarce. Meshorer reports the lead tesserae of Alexander Janus are found almost exclusively in Transjordan, as was this example. Ex FORVMPodiceps
lead_tessera.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Lead tessera, Hendin 47611 viewsJudean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Lead tessera, Hendin 476, F, Transjordan mint, 3.412g, 16.3mm, 95 - 76 B.C.; obverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ” (of King Alexander), anchor (upside-down as if hanging on the side of a boat) inside circle; reverse, traces of Aramaic inscription, King Alexander, with a border of dots; encrusted in earthen 'desert' patina; scarce. Lead tesserae (tokens) were issued by the monarch to the poor to be redeemed for food and other commodities. Meshorer reports the lead tesserae of Alexander Janus are found almost exclusively in Transjordan, as was this example. Ex FORVM1 commentsPodiceps
lead_tessera_H476.jpg
Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Lead tessera, Hendin 4768 viewsJudean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 103 - 76 B.C. Lead tessera, Hendin 476, F/VG, Transjordan mint, 4.62g, 17.5mm, 95 - 76 B.C.; obverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ” (of King Alexander), anchor (upside-down as if hanging on the side of a boat) inside circle; reverse , traces of Aramaic inscription, King Alexander, with a border of dots; encrusted in earthen 'desert' patina; scarce. Lead tesserae (tokens) were issued by the monarch to the poor to be redeemed for food and other commodities. Meshorer reports the lead tesserae of Alexander Janus are found almost exclusively in Transjordan, as was this example. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Alexander_the_Great.jpg
Alexander the Great24 viewsMacdonian Kingdom
336-323BC
AR tetradrachm
15.52g
Price 2930
Samson L2
price3143.jpg
Alexander the Great24 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Alexander III 'the Great' Æ18.
Salamis mint, struck c.332-323 BC.
Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress;
Rev: ΣA over Club / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / quiver (gorytos) within bow / A below.
Price 3143; SNG Cop. 1049; BMC (Cyprus) 86-7.
(dealer's image, with thanks)
OldMoney
Macedonian_Kingdom_4.PNG
Alexander the Great9 viewsKingdom of Macedonia, Alexander the Great

Macedonian Mint, c. 335-323 BC

Obverse: Head of Hercules right, wearing lion skin knotted at base of neck.

Reverse:ALEXANDROU above Club, Caduceus Above Bowcase.

Mueller 541, SNG Cop. 1057.

Weight: 5,5 grams Size: 17 mm Material: Orichalcum
Macedonian Warrior
Alexander_III_4d.jpg
Alexander the Great * Colophon, Ionia, 337 to 323 BC. Silver drachm148 views
Alexander III * Colophon, Ionia, Macedonian Kingdom * AR drachm

Obv: Portrait head of Alexander right, wearing the lion's skin in style of Herakles.
Rev: Zeus enthroned seated left, holding a scepter in left hand, arm raised, and eagle in his right hand, arm extended to front, with [A]ΛEXANΔΡOY vertical in left field. Interesting set of mint marks: Male lion's head left-facing in left field, above ornate Φ - ornate pentagram below the throne.

Exergue: (None)

Mint: Colophon
Struck: 301-297 BC.
* Posthumous issue
* Issued under Lysimachos

Size: 17.34 x 17.18 mm.
Weight: 4.11 grams
Die axis: 180°

Condition: Apparent in photo which is quite faithful to the coin in hand. Very lovely bright and clear silvery luster.

Refs:*
Price 1836d

1 commentsTiathena
Alex_great_ae_eagle.jpg
Alexander the Great AE18, eagle24 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great AE18. 3,7 g, Head of young Hercules facing right in lion skin / ALEXANDROU, eagle standing right on thunderbolt, looking back. Sear 6743 var, Forrer/ Weber 2142.1 commentsPodiceps
Alexander the Great half unit, 334 BC.JPG
Alexander the Great half unit, 334 BC38 viewsAlexander the Great
Kingdom of Macedon
AE - half unit, 15mm
Pella or Amphipolis, 334 BC
Macedonian shield; around, five double crescents with five pellets between each; in center, eagle
B-A on either side of crested Macedonian helmet
SNG Cop 1120
Ardatirion
Macedonian_Kingdom_1g_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, Alexander III, silver drachm, Abydus, Struck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos39 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, lion right looking left in left field, Ivy Leaf beneath throne
Minted in Abydus mint. c. 310-301 BC. Struck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos.
Reference:– Price 1554. Müller 327. Thomson ADM II series XIV, 206-215.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1f_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, Alexander III, silver drachm, Abydus, Struck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos30 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, MI monogram in left field, Ivy Leaf beneath throne
Minted in Abydus mint. circa 310-301 BC. Struck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos.
Reference:– Price 1527. Müller 254. Thomson ADM II series XIV, 247-65.
maridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1i_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, Alexander III, silver drachm, Colophon 38 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, K in left field, F throne
Minted in Colophon mint. c. 310-301 BC
Reference:– Price cf 1823 (K monogram / F). Müller -
maridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1h_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, Alexander III, silver drachm, Magnesia ad Maeandrum, struck under Philip III Arrhidaios37 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, bee right in left field; spear head in right field
Minted in Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint. circa 323-319 BC under Philip III Arrhidaios.
Reference:– Price 1936
maridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1e_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, Alexander III, silver tetradrachm, Marathus 79 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– BASILEOS ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, Anchor, EP monogram in left field, HD monogram beneath throne
Minted in Marathus mint.c. 323-300 BC
Reference:– Price 3438.

ex Coincraft, London
3 commentsmaridvnvm
drach2.jpg
Alexander The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, (336 - 323 B.C.)77 viewsAR Drachm
Posthumous
O: Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck.
R: ΑΛΕΞΑΝ∆ΡΟΥ, Zeus seated left, right leg drawn back, eagle in right, long vertical scepter in left, X within Ω left, KH under throne.
Mylasa mint 310-300 B.C.
4.1g
16mm
Price 2480
1 commentsMat
Macedonian_Kingdom_1d_img.jpg
Alexander the Great, silver tetradrachm, Phaselis 57 viewsObv:– Head of (Alexander the Great as) Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress knotted at base of neck
Rev:– ALEXANDPOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and scepter in left, IA/F in left field
Minted in Phaselis mint. Civic issue, dated CY 11 (208/7 BC).
Reference:– Price 2849.
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom,_Alexander_III,_AE19_bow____clubJPG.JPG
Alexander the Great: club with bow in case25 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Alexander III, ca. 300 BC, 19mm, 6.7g. Obverse: bust of Heracles wearing a lion sking right. Reverse: club with bow in case below - ALEXANDROU between, monogram at top. SG 6739. ex areich, photo credit areich

Podiceps
Alexander Zabinas - SG 7128.JPG
Alexander Zabinas - SG 712838 viewsSeleukid Kingdom
AE21, 128-123 BC
Obverse: Head right, clad in lion skin headdress.
Reverse:BASILEWS ALEXANDPOY, Nike advancing left with wreath and palm. Monogram left.
21mm, 9.0 gm.
Sear Greek 7128; BMC, Seleucid Kings of Syria, pg 83 and plate XXII, #10
Jerome Holderman
48293q10.jpg
Alyattes trite89 viewsLydian Kingdom, Alyattes II or Uncertain King Before Kroisos, c. 610 - 561 B.C.
Electrum trite, Weidauer Group XVI, 86-89 var; SNG von Aulock 2868, Rosen 655, aVF, Sardeis mint, weight 4.682g, maximum diameter 13.0mm, c. 610 - 561 B.C.; obverse head of roaring lion right, with knob and rays atop snout, 'V' style mane; reverse irregular divided rectangular incuse;
1 commentsCaffaro
Amyntas_III_Diobol.jpg
Amyntas III Diobol -- 393-369 BC15 views1.161 g, 10.5 mm, 0°
Pella Mint
Silver Diobol; Grainy, Edge Chips
Minted During the Reign of Amyntas III
SNG ANS 94; SNG Alpha Bank 200; AMNG III 3

Obverse: Head of Herakles Wearing Nemean Skin Headdress Right.
Reverse: AMYNTA, Within Linear Square, Eagle Stands Left, Head Looking Back Right

Amyntas III, son of Arrhidaeus and father of Philip II, was king of Macedon in 393 BC, and again from 392 to 370 BC. In 393, he was driven out by the Illyrians, but in the following year, with the aid of the Thessalians, he recovered his kingdom. He is historically considered the founder of the unified Macedonian state. Through his youngest son, Philip II, he was paternal grandfather to Alexander the Great.
___________________________________
FORVM purchase; how could I resist a nice coin of Alexander the Great's grandfather?
Hydro
Macedonian_Amyntas_III,_393-369BC_AE16.JPG
Amyntas III eagle36 viewsMacedonian Kingdom: Amyntas III, 393-369 B.C. AE16
16 mm, 4.35 g. Obverse: Bust of Heracles wearing lion-skin headdress right. Reverse: AMYNTA; Eagle standing right devouring a snake. Lindgren I, 1265; Sear 1512. ex areich, photo credit areich
1 commentsPodiceps
amyntas_III_diobol.jpg
Amyntas III, AR diobol; Herakles/ eagle14 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Amyntas III, c. 393 - 369 B.C. Silver diobol, SNG ANS 94, VF, porous, 1.171g, 10.4mm, 0o, obverse head of Herakles right clad in lion's scalp; reverse AMYNTA, eagle stands left, head looking back right, linear square; scarce. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Amyntas_III.jpg
Amyntas III. 393-370/69 B.C.15 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Amyntas III. 393-370/69 B.C. Ae 16mm, 3.73g. Aigai or Pella mint. Obv:Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress. Rev: AMYNT, eagle standing right, attacking serpent. SNG ANS 100-9; SNG Alpha Bank
214-30; AMNG 7.
ddwau
Amyntas_eagle.jpg
Amyntas III; Herakles/ Eagle; AE1611 viewsMacedonian Kingdom: Amyntas III, 393-369 B.C. AE16. 16mm, 3.0g. Obverse: Bust of Heracles wearing lion-skin headdress right. Reverse: AMYNTA; Eagle standing right devouring a snake. Lindgren I, 1265; Sear 1512.Podiceps
w0265.jpg
Anchor234 viewsSyria, Seleucid Kingdom. AE-17 mm, 4.47 grs. AV: Head of Helios(?) to right. RV: Apollo(?) to left, altar behind, traces of legend. Circular CM: Anchor. Collection: Mueller.1 commentsAutoman
ADAM-Seleucid-AE19-AntiochusVIII-011000.jpg
Ancient Greece: Seleucid Kingdom, bronze AE19 of Antiochus VIII, ca. 121-96 BC19 viewslordmarcovan
DSC01989.JPG
ANCIENT INDIA - KAKANI COIN OF SUNGA KINGDOM - CAST COPPER COIN - 2.46 gm 14 viewsSunga kingdom CA 150-100 AD..copper kakani obverse Elephantleft,torion,swastik,Indradvaja,Reverse 3 Arch hill,hollow cross,torion,tree railing..Ref..Mitchiner 4381.Antonivs Protti
ANCIENT_INDIA_-_KAKANI_COIN_OF_SUNGA_KINGDOM_-_CAST_COPPER_COIN_-_2_82gm.jpg
ANCIENT INDIA - KAKANI COIN OF SUNGA KINGDOM - CAST COPPER COIN - 2.82gm15 views___900Antonivs Protti
DSC01491.JPG
ANCIENT INDIA - KAKANI COIN OF SUNGA KINGDOM - CAST COPPER COIN - 3.03 gm12 viewsSunga kingdom CA 150-100 AD..copper kakani obverse Elephantleft,torion,swastik,Indradvaja,Reverse 3 Arch hill,hollow cross,torion,tree railing..Ref..Mitchiner 4381.Antonivs Protti
DSC01402.JPG
ANCIENT INDIA KAKANI COIN OF SUNGA KINGDOM - CAST COPPER COIN - - 3.18 gm11 viewsObv - Elephant Left , Torion, Swastik Indradavaja
Rev - Three arched Hill, Hollow Cross, Torion, Tree Railing
Ref..Mitchiner 4381.
Antonivs Protti
Hendin-1150.jpg
Ancient Judaea, Hasmonean Kingdom: Alexander Jannaeus (103-76 BCE) Æ Prutah (Hendin-1150)36 viewsObv: Paleo-Hebrew inscription (Yehonatan the King) among the rays of an eight-pointed star, all within a diadem.
Rev: Greek inscription BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY (of King Alexander) around an inverted anchor.
1 commentsSpongeBob
Hendin-1148.jpg
Ancient Judaea, Hasmonean Kingdom: Alexander Jannaeus (103-76 BCE) Æ Prutah, Jerusalem (Hendin 1148)11 viewsObv: 'Yehonatan the King' (Paleo-Hebrew), lily, within circular beaded border
Rev: [B]AΣIΛEΩ AΛE[ΞANΔPOY], inverted anchor within circle

From the Dr. Patrick Tan Collection
Quant.Geek
Hendin-1148(1).jpg
Ancient Judaea, Hasmonean Kingdom: Alexander Jannaeus (103-76 BCE) Æ Prutah, Jerusalem (Hendin 1148)9 viewsObv: 'Yehonatan the King' (Paleo-Hebrew), lily, within circular beaded border
Rev: [B]AΣIΛEΩ AΛE[ΞANΔPOY], inverted anchor within circle
Quant.Geek
Hendin-1137.jpg
Ancient Judaea, Hasmonean Kingdom: John Hyrcanus I (134-104 BCE) Æ Prutah, Jerusalem (Hendin 1137)15 viewsObv: Paleo-Hebrew in five lines within wreath
Rev: Double cornucopiae adorned with ribbons, pomegranate between horns; no monogram
Quant.Geek
Hendin-1244.jpg
Ancient Judaea, Herodian Kingdom: Agrippa I (37-44 CE) Æ Prutah, Jerusalem, RY 6 (Hendin 1244; TJC 120)9 viewsObv: BACIΛEOC AΓPIΠΠA; umbrella-like canopy
Rev: Three grain ears; across field, date L ς
Quant.Geek
Hendin-1169.jpg
Ancient Judaea, Herodian Kingdom: Herod I (40 BCE-4 CE) Æ 8 Prutot, Uncertain mint in Samaria, RY 3 (Hendin 1169; TJC 44)28 viewsObv: Helmet with cheek guards surmounted by star; above to either side, palm branch
Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ HPΩΔOY; tripod lebes; in left field, L Γ; in right field, monogram
1 commentsQuant.Geek
Hendin_1170.jpg
Ancient Judaea, Herodian Kingdom: Herod I (40 BCE-4 CE) Æ Prutah, Uncertain mint in Samaria, RY 3 (Hendin 1170; TJC 45)10 viewsObv: Shield with decorated rim.
Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ HPΩΔOY, crested helmet; in left field, date (L Γ); in right field, monogram

From the Dr. Patrick Tan Collection
Quant.Geek
Hendin-1197.jpg
Ancient Judaea, Herodian Kingdom: Herod II Archelaos (4 BCE-6 CE) Æ Half Prutah, Jerusalem (Meshorer 72c; Hendin 1197; RPC I 4916)9 viewsObv: HPW; prow of galley facing left, circle of dots
Rev: EΘN within wreath, circle of dots
Quant.Geek
Antigonos_Gonatas.jpg
Antigonos Gonatas20 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Antigonos Gonatas, 277 - 239 B.C. Bronze AE 16, SGCV II 6786, SNG Cop 1208 (larger module), aVF, 2.634g, 16.0mm, 0o, obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse B - A, Pan advancing right, erecting trophy, K left, ANTI monogram beneath Pan; scarce small denomination. ex FORVM Podiceps
12211065_1022095374479938_889716659_o.jpg
Antigonos Gonatas, 277-234 BC, AE 18 mm. Macedonian Kingdom.22 viewsHelmeted head of Athena head right / B-A, Pan erecting trophy right, Q to right, ANT monogram below.
SNGCop 1206cf
Antonivs Protti
Antigonus_I_Monophthalmus.jpg
Antigonus I Monophthalmus30 viewsAntigonus I Monophthalmus, Silver drachm, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, 17.9mm, 4.120g, Price 1979, Müller Alexander 555, SNG Cop,
OBV: Herakles' head right, clad in lion-skin head-dress;
REV: AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle raised high in extended right,
long scepter vertical behind in left, A within wreath over B left, IAY monogram under throne;

EX: Forum Ancient Coins

RARE

Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C.,
he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus,
answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C.
Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. - Wikipedia
1 commentsRomanorvm
soter.jpg
Antiochos I Soter, AE 15, Apollo on omphalos19 viewsAntiochos I Soter - Apollo on omphalos. Antioch Mint, 280-261 BCE. Size and weight: 15mm, 3.86g. 
Obverse: Head of Antiochos I right with elderly features. 
Reverse: Nude Apollo seated left on omphalos, holding arrows in left hand, resting right hand on bow. Monograms to left and right. 
BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY 
Reference: Sear GCV 6878. A coin of the Seleukid kingdom with a black patina. On the reverse, Apollo is seated on the Omphalos, a mystical stone said to be at the navel of the world, in his famous shrine at Delphi. Apollo was famed for his skill with his silver bow and, among other attributes, was a god of archery. Ex MoremothPodiceps
Seleukid_Kingdom,_Antiochos_I,_280_-_261_B_C_.JPG
Antiochos I, Macedonian shield/ Elephant; AE 1813 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos I, 280 - 261 B.C. Mesopotamia, Carrhae mint, 18mm, 4.08g. Obverse: Macedonian shield decorated with gorgon's head. Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOΥ in ex, elephant walking right. Attribution: cf. SNG Spaer 257. Ex areich; photo credit areich
Podiceps
antiochos_II.jpg
Antiochos II Theos, Apollo/ Tripod, AE 1619 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C. Bronze AE 16, SNG Spaer 360 - 362 or similar, VF, green patina, Sardes mint, 5.444g, 16.1mm, 0o, 261 - 246 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, hair falling in spiral curls; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ”, tripod, anchor right below, monograms in fields. Ex FORVM Podiceps
83306q00_Seleukid_Kingdom,_Antiochos_II_Theos,_261_-_246_B_C__sardes_tripod.jpg
Antiochos II Theos, Sardes; Head of Apollo r./ tripod, anchor between legs; AE1737 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C. Bronze AE 17, Houghton and Lorber 522.1a, Sardes mint, 4.244g, 17.0mm, 0o, obverse laureate head of Apollo right, hair falling in spiral curls; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ”, tripod, anchor between legs below, monogram in outer left, “ΜΙΛ” in outer right field. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
IMG_0061.JPG
Antiochos III Megas, Seleukid Kingdom, 222–187 BC. AE15mm, Sardeis mint.21 viewsAntiochos III Megas, Seleukid Kingdom, 222–187 BC.
Obv. Laureate head of Apollo right.
Rev. BASILEWS ANTIOCOU to left and right of Apollo standing left, examining arrow and resting left elbow on tripod. Monogram in left field.
Ref. SC 983; HGC. V9. 518.
Lee S
22864_Antiochos_III,_223_-_187_B_C_,_Sardes,_Lydia.jpg
Antiochos III; AE11; Head of Apollo/ Elephant left12 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos III, 223 - 187 B.C., Sardes, Lydia. Bronze AE 11, Houghton and Lorber 979, cf. SNG Spaer 613 ff., Newell WSM 1114, 1.468g, 10.8mm, 0o, obverse Apollo head right; reverse “BASILEWS ANTIOCOU”, Elephant left, anchor flukes up in left field. Newell attributed this type to Antioch. Houghton and Lorber assign it to Sardes based on control links. This coin was purchased in a group that appeared to be part of a hoard that included coins mostly from Ionia and Lydia, supporting the re-attribution to Sardes. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
antiochos_IV_poseidon.jpg
Antiochos IV Epiphanes, Ba’al-Berit, AE 219 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C. Bronze AE 21, Houghton and Lorber II 1449(4) (same dies), SNG Spaer 1077, Sawaya 28 - 59, aF, Berytus mint, 4.864g, 20.8mm, 0o, c. 168 - 164 B.C.; obverse radiate and diademed head of Antiochos IV right, CI behind; reverse Phoenician script "of Laodicea, mother in Canaan" left, “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ” right, Ba'al-Berit (Poseidon) standing facing, phiale in right, trident in left, “Λ / Α” left, “ΟΦ” monogram right; scarce. Ba’al-Berit, the local god of Berytus, was assimilated to the Greek Poseidon. Ex FORVMPodiceps
antiochos_IV.jpg
Antiochos IV Epiphanes, Eagle17 viewsSeleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes. 175-164 B.C. Æ drachm (34 mm, 34.01 g, 1 h). Antioch on the Orontes, 169-168 B.C. Laureate head of Serapis right, wearing Osiris cap / Eagle standing right on thunderbolt. SC 1413; SMA 59; CSE 118. VF, green patina, porous. This coin belongs to a larger series of "Egyptianizing" coins struck by Antiochos IV at Antioch between his two campaigns in Egypt. Unlike regular Seleukid coinage they employ the large size and Egyptian types used in the closed circulation zone of Ptolemaic Egypt. It has been suggested that they commemorated his first Egyptian victory in 169 and were intended to conserve Seleukid silver stores. It is also possible that the "Egyptianizing" series was struck with an eye towards adopting an Egyptian style coinage system following the planned annexation of Egypt to the Seleukid Empire. Any such plan was never realized as the Romans forced Antiochos IV to evacuate Egypt in 168 B.C. 
Ex. Frank L. Kovacs (Vauctions) . Podiceps
antiochos_IV_hera.jpg
Antiochos IV Epiphanes, Hera, AE1516 viewsSELEUKID KINGDOM, ANTIOCHOS IV EPIPHANES 175-163 B.C. AE. 15mm, 2.98g. 
Obverse: Radiate head of Antiochos IV right. Λ over B to the left. Fillet border. 
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOV 
Hera standing facing, veiled and draped, holding a tall torch or sceptre in her right hand. 
Reference: Sear GCV 6994; SNG Spaer 1130-1138. Ex MoremothPodiceps
valjakko.jpg
Antiochos IV Epiphanes; Nike in Biga, AE2033 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos IV, Epiphanes, 175 - 168 B.C.
Bronze AE 20, SNG Spaer 1141, VF, Galilee, Ake Ptolemais mint, 5.2184g, 19.5mm, 0o; obverse radiate head of Antiochos IV right; reverse BASILEWS ANTIOHOI, Nike in galloping biga left, monogram below horses. ex FORVM
2 commentskaitsuburi
Antiochos_IV.jpg
Antiochos IV, Epiphanes, 175 - 164 BC39 viewsObv: No legend, radiate head of Antiochos facing right.

Rev: BAΣIΛEΩE above, ANTIOXOY in exergue, Nike in fast biga left, monogram between horse's legs.

Æ 21, Ake-Ptolemaïs mint, after 173/2 BC

6.78 grams, 20.4 mm, 0°

SC 1484.2
2 commentsSPQR Coins
Antiochos_VI_Dionysos.JPG
Antiochos VI, Dionysos, 145 - 142 BC157 viewsObv: No legend, diademed, radiate head of Antiochos VI facing right.

BAΣIAEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY / EΠIΦANOYΣ / ΔIONYΣOY, Apollo seated left on an omphalos holding an arrow in his right hand and resting his left hand on a bow placed on the ground; A/Π between his legs; OP ΣTA (Year 170) in exergue.

Silver Drachm, Antioch mint, 143 - 142 BC

4.3 grams, 17.5 mm, 0°

GCV II 7073, Newell SMA 250, SNG Isreal 1766
6 commentsSPQR Coins
AntiochosVII_tetradrachm_AR29-32_16_29g.jpg
Antiochos VII (in the name of) tetradrachm, c. 130 - 80 BC85 views29-32mm, 16.29g
obv: diademed head right
rev: Athena standing left, Nike in right, spear and shield in left, ligate ∆Ι / A left, Nike extends wreath into laurel wreath border
From FORVM Ancient coins: Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII.

CLICK PICTURE FOR A HIGHER-QUALITY VERSION
1 commentsareich
Antiochos_VII_(posthumous_Cappadocian_issue,_reigned_138–129_BCE)_tetradrachm_(AR).png
Antiochos VII (posthumous Cappadocian issue, reigned 138-129 BCE) tetradrachm (AR)143 viewsObv.: Diademed head of king Rev.: BASILEWS ANTIOXOY EYEPGETOY (Athena Nikephoros std. within laurel wreath) Field: Monogram above A, phi in right side of field Diameter: 28 mm Weight: 16,43 g SC 2143.2; HGC 9, 1068

These tetradrachms were probably issued in the Kingdom of Cappadocia to fund the usage of Syrian mercenaries. Antiochos VII could be called the last great Seleucid king. He undertook several successful campaigns in the East to reclaim territory lost to the Parthian advance. After his death, however, the Seleucid Empire was rapidly confined to Syria.
1 commentsNick.vdw
Antiochos_VII_Euergetes.jpg
Antiochos VII Euergetes65 viewsFRONT/ Bust of Eros right. BACK / BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU, Headdress of Isis, scepter as monogram to left; aplustre and date EOP below. Minted in the Selukid Kingdom. Struck 138-129 BC. Ref: SNG UK 1301.617-620; BMC 52 (British Museum Catalog #52).

EX ; Andreas Reich


From the Sam Mansourati Collection
2 commentsSam
Seleucid_Antiochos_VII_GCV_7096.JPG
Antiochos VII, Euergetes, 138 - 129 BC53 viewsObv: No legend, diademed head of Antiochos VII facing right; fillet border.

Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY in two lines on right, EYEPΓETOY on left; Nike advancing left holding a wreath and supporting the fold on her dress, monogram in exergue.

Silver Drachm, Antioch mint, c. 138 - 129 BC

4.3 grams, 18.6 mm, 0°

GCV II 7096, Newell SMA 304 (var.)
1 commentsSPQR Coins
Seleucid_Antiochos_VII_GCV_7098.JPG
Antiochos VII, Euergetes, 138 - 129 BC23 viewsObv: No legend, Winged bust of Eros facing right, wreathed with myrtle

Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY on right, EYEPΓETOY on left, Headdress of Isis, crescent and Seleucid date (missing detail) below.

Æ 19, Uncertain mint, c. 138 - 129 BC

5.8 grams, 18.5 mm, 0°

GCV II 7098
SPQR Coins
antiochos_VII_leo.jpg
Antiochos VII, Euergetes; Lion/ club13 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos VII, Euergetes (Sidetes), 138 - 129 B.C. Bronze AE 15, SNG Spaer 1906 ff. (various dates and symbols), F, 3.171g, 13.6mm, obverse lion head right; reverse “BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU”, club. Ex FORVMPodiceps
IMG_9254.JPG
Antiochos VIII7 viewsSeleucid Kingdom, Antiochos VIII 121-96 BC, Tetradrachm, 15.64g: Obv: Diademed head of Antiochos VIII right Rev: Zeus standing left holding a star and leaning on a staff, two monograms to left, "Eqp" in exergue "BASILEWS ANTIOXOY EPIFANOYS" all within a wreath. Porous, EQP = year 195 = 118/7 BC, Damascus mint, SC 2322.5ecoli
Seleucid_Antiochos_VIII_GCV_7054.JPG
Antiochos VIII, Grypos (sole reign), 121 - 96 BC58 viewsObv: No legend, diademed and radiate head of Antiochos VIII facing right.

Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY on right, EΠIΦANOYΣ; on left, Eagle standing left, scepter in background.

Æ 18, Antioch mint, c. 121 - 120 BC

6.1 grams, 18.7 mm, 0°

GCV II 7154
3 commentsSPQR Coins
Antiochos_VIII_GCV_7139.JPG
Antiochos VIII, Grypos (with Cleopatra Thea), 125 - 121 BC37 viewsObv: No legend, diademed, radiate head of Antiochos facing right.

Rev: BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ / KΛEOΠATRAΣ on right, KAI / BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY on left, owl facing, perched on an overturned amphora, qp (Seleucid date 190 = 124 - 123 BC) below.

Æ 19, Antioch mint, 124 - 123 BC

6.2 grams, 17 x 19 mm, 0°

GCV II 7139, SNG Spear 2443
1 commentsSPQR Coins
Antiochus_XII.jpg
Antiochos XII 87-84 BC21 viewsAntiochus XII 87–86/5 BC, Damascus mint Ae 22mm, Weight 7.1g. Obv: Beardless diademed bust of Antiochus XII right. Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ ΚΑΛΛΙΝΙΚΟΥ – Tyche standing left with palm branch in right hand and cornucopia in left, dotted border. Reference: SC 2, 2476; SNG Israel I, Nos. 2900–2902. SPAER 2897

Antiochus XII Dionysus (Epiphanes/Philopator/Callinicus), a ruler of the Greek Seleucid kingdom who reigned 87–84 BC, was the fifth son of Antiochus VIII Grypus and Tryphaena to take up the diadem. He succeeded his brother Demetrius III Eucaerus as separatist ruler of the southern parts of the last remaining Seleucid realms, basically Damascus and its surroundings.

Antiochus initially gained support from Ptolemaic forces and was the last Seleucid ruler of any military reputation, even if it was on a local scale. He made several raids into the territories of the Jewish Hasmonean kings, and tried to check the rise of the Nabataean Arabs. A battle against the latter turned out to be initially successful, until the young king was caught in a melee and killed by an Arab soldier. Upon his death the Syrian army fled and mostly perished in the desert. Soon after, the Nabateans conquered Damascus.

Antiochus' titles - apart from Dionysos - mean respectively (God) Manifest, Father-loving and Beautiful Victor. The last Seleucid kings often used several epithets on their coins.
ddwau
Antiochus_III~8.jpg
Antiochus III 223-187 B.C.20 viewsSeleucid Kingdom, Antiochus III 223-187 B.C. Ae 17.6~18.7mm. 4.43g. Obv: Macedonian shield with gorgoneion in central boss. Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOΥ, Elephant advancing right; monogram A under belly. SC 1089.3; HGC 9, 490.1 commentsddwau
Antiochus_III~4.jpg
Antiochus III 223-187 B.C.14 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III, 223-187 BC, e 19.9~20.8mm. 10.18g. Antioch Mint. OBV: Laureate head of Apollo r. REV: Elephant r. surmounted by mahout, tripod behind. Countermark, horse head in square punch. Houghton 76.ddwau
Antiochus_III~7.jpg
Antiochus III 223-187 B.C.7 viewsSeleucid Kingdom, Antiochus III, 223-187 BC, Ae 12.7~13.5mm. 1.81g. Sardes Mint. OBV: Laureate head of Apollo r. with long spiral curls on neck. REV: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOΥ, elephant l. Primary control (in ex.): M. Ref: SC 981.1; SNG Cop 161ddwau
Antiochus_III~9.jpg
Antiochus III 223-187 B.C.10 viewsSeleucid Kingdom, Antiochus III 223-187 B.C. Ae 16.5~17.0mm. 4.73g. Obv: Macedonian shield with gorgoneion in central boss. Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOΥ below, Elephant advancing right; Control mark under belly. Anchor above. SC 1089.3; HGC 9, 490.ddwau
Antiochus_III~11.jpg
Antiochus III 223-187 B.C.7 viewsSeleucid Kingdom, Antiochus III 223-187 B.C. (Ae 16.7~17.2mm. 3.93g., 17.4~17.6mm. 4.01g.) Obv: Macedonian shield with gorgoneion in central boss, dotted border. Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOΥ below, Elephant advancing right,anchor above, dotted border; SC 1089; HGC 9, 490.ddwau
Antiochus_III~2.jpg
Antiochus III, 223 - 187 B.C.11 viewsSeleucid Kingdom, Antiochus III, 223 - 187 B.C. Bronze AE 23.4~26mm., 11.66g, 0°, Antioch on the Orontes mint, c. 204 - 197 B.C. Obv: Laureate head of Apollo, with features of Antiochus III, right. Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOΥ, Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right, resting left on grounded bow, symbols left. Houghton 1048(1), SNG Spaer 561
Ref : http://www.acsearch.info/record.html?id=231908, http://www.acsearch.info/record.html?id=225801
ddwau
Antiochus_IV.jpg
Antiochus IV Epiphanes 175 - 164 BC22 viewsAntiochus IV Epiphanes "God Manifest" c. 215 BC – 164 BC) ruled the Seleucid Empire from 175 BC until his death in 164 BC. He was a son of King Antiochus III the Great. His original name was Mithradates (alternative form Mithridates); he assumed the name Antiochus after he ascended the throne.
Antiochos IV Epiphanes. Seleukid Kingdom AE 12mm, 2,88gr. Veiled bust of Laodike IV right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY, elephant's head left. No symbols in fields. Hoover 685; SC 1421-1422.
ddwau
selucida.jpg
Antiochus IV Epiphanes, Seleucid kingdom – 175-164 B.C AE 16mm 11 viewsAntiochus IV Epiphanes, Seleucid kingdom – 175-164 B.C
Quasi-municipal coin of Antioch
Obv. Radiate head of Antiochos right.
Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟXΟΥ ΘΕΟY ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟYΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ Zeus standing right, head left, right arm outstretched.
Ref. Houghton 133.

Lee S
39902q00_Seleucid_Kingdom,_Antiochus_IV_Epiphanes,_175_-_164_B_C__Sidon.jpg
Antiochus IV Epiphanes, Sidon; galley; AE 2119 viewsSeleucid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C. Bronze AE 21, SNG Spaer 1079, Quasi-municipal, Sidon mint, 6.110g, 21.5mm, 0o, c. 168 - 164 B.C.; obverse diademed and radiate head of Antiochos IV right; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ”, galley left, “ΣΙΔΩΝΙΩΝ” and Phoenician script (of the Sidonians) below; rare type and especially with clear reverse legends. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Antiochus_IX~0.jpg
Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C.23 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C. Bronze Ae 17.5 to 18.5mm, weight 5.73, 6.15 & 4.98g. Obv: Winged bust of Eros right. Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ on right, ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ on left, Nike advancing left, wreath in extended right. Monogram left. Houghton-Lorber II 2388,ddwau
Antiochus_IX~1.jpg
Antiochus IX Philopator Kyzikenos, 114 - 96 B.C.11 viewsAntiochos IX, Seleukid kingdom, 114 - 95 B.C. Ae 19mm. 3.75g. Obv: Diademed and bearded head of Antiochus right. Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ to right and left of winged thunderbolt.ddwau
Antiochus_IX~2.JPG
Antiochus IX Philopator Kyzikenos, 114 - 96 B.C.21 viewsAntiochos IX, Seleukid kingdom, 114 - 95 B.C. Ae 18.2~18.8mm. 4.93g. Obv: Diademed and bearded head of Antiochus right. Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ to right and left of winged thunderbolt, monogram below. Sear 7170; Hoover 1248.ddwau
Antiochus_VI~2.jpg
Antiochus VI 144 - 142/1 B.C.16 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI, 144 - 142 or 141 B.C. Serrated, Ae 21.9~23.2mm. 4.29g. Antioch mint. Obv: Laureate and radiate head of Antiochus right. Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOΥ EΠIΦANOΥΣ ΔIONΥΣOΥ, panther walking left, broken arrow in mouth, right forepaw raised, ΣTA above hindquarters, cornucopia right. SNG Spaer 1773, SGCV II 7083, SC 2007b, Houghton 241.ddwau
Antiochus VI, 145-142 BC.JPG
Antiochus VI, 145-142 BC42 viewsAntiochus VI
Kingdom of Syria
AE serrate – 21mm
Antioch, 145-142 BC
Radiate head of Antiochus as Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy elephant advancing left
BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY ΣEB EΠIΦANOYΣ ΔIONYΣOY
Sear 7081
Ardatirion
Antiochos_VII.jpg
Antiochus VII Euergetes-Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C.13 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes (Sidetes). 138-129 B.C. Ae 13.1~15.5mm. 2.94g. Antioch mint. Obv: Lion's head right. Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ - EYEPΓETOY, club. SC 2068. SNG Israel 1938. Houghton 281-282.ddwau
Antiochus_VII~1.jpg
Antiochus VII Euergetes-Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C.10 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes (Sidetes). 138-129 B.C. Ae 13.0~13.6mm. 2.93g. Antioch mint. Obv: Lion's head right. Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ - EYEPΓETOY, club. SC 2068. SNG Israel 1938. Houghton 281-282.ddwau
Antiochus_VII~0.jpg
Antiochus VII Euergetes-Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C.10 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes (Sidetes). 138-129 B.C. Ae 14.3~16.7mm. 3.31g. Antioch mint. Dated (177 SE = 136/135 B.C.) Obv: Lion's head right. Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ - EYEPΓETOY, club, ∆ left, IOP below. SC 2068. SNG Israel 1938. Houghton 281-282.ddwau
antiochos_VII_lion.jpg
Antiochus VII, Lion/ Club, AE1515 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos VII, Euergetes (Sidetes), 138 - 129 B.C. Bronze AE 15, SNG Spaer 1906 ff. (various dates and symbols), 3.2g, 15mm, obverse lion head right; reverse “BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU”, club. Podiceps
antiochus_VIII_eagle.jpg
Antiochus VIII, Eagle, AE1944 viewsSeleucid Kingdom Antiochus VIII Grypos 121-96 B.C. 19mm, 5.0 g.
Obverse: Diademed head of Antiochus right. Reverse: BAΣІΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt. Date below (116-117 B.C.) Sear GCV II: 7154 var (date).
1 commentsPodiceps
antiochus_VIII_eagle~0.jpg
Antiochus VIII, Eagle, AE1935 viewsSeleucid Kingdom Antiochus VIII Grypos 121-96 B.C. 19mm, 5.0 g.
Obverse: Diademed head of Antiochus right. Reverse: BAΣІΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EΠIΦANOYΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt. Date below. Sear GCV II: 7154 var (date).
Podiceps
EgyptianHeartAmulet.jpg
ANTIQUITIES, Egypt, Stone Heart Amulet. c.2000 - 1700 B.C.78 viewsEgyptian Stone Heart Amulet, c. Middle Kingdom with etched veins.ancientcoins
H12.jpg
ANTIQUITIES, Egypt, Terracotta head of Hellenistic woman, 3rd C. B.C.22 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom/Terracotta head of Hellenistic woman.
Tanagra Style, 3rd Century B.C.
4.4 cm (1 3/4") tall; broken from a figure; mold made with hand tooling; very attractive.
Ex FORVM.
superflex
031313JSF020.jpg
ANTIQUITIES, Greek, Hellenistic period terracotta statue of a monkey15 viewsA very rare, genuine ancient Greek Hellenistic period terracotta statue of a monkey, dating to approximately 300 - 250 B.C.
The charming creaure is shown seated and clutching a cylindrical vessel under its left arm.
Possibly a votive piece which would have been dedicated at a temple or sanctuary, in thanks for, or in anticipation of a favor.
A fascinating and unusual piece of ancient Greek art.
Condition: Very good, age related encrustation, as shown. Unrestored.

Height: 3 3/4 inches

Provenance:

Ex. Collection of Mr. E. Ohly, United Kingdom.
superflex
Scarab.jpg
Antiquity New Kingdom Scarab of Tuthmosis III53 viewsNew Kingdom. 18th Dynasty. Tuthmosis III (circa 1504-1450 BC). Steatite scarab (14x10mm). Base engraved with the cartouche of Tuthmosis III; on the left, a Maat father and the crown of Lower Egypt. Intact, once glazed, pierced for mounting. Ex David Hendin collection. CNG Auction 93.

Scarabs were used as lucky and magical charms in ancient Egypt. Scarabs, such as this one, with the names of pharos, were particularly powerful, and were produced as protective amulets for the public. Hendin’s collection of scarabs were collected by him in Israel in the 1970s and 1980s.
2 commentsLucas H
Seleucid_Antiochos_IX_GCV_7173~0.JPG
Antochos IX, Kyzikenos, 113 - 95 BC16 viewsObv: No legend, winged bust of Eros facing right.

Rev: (BA)ΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY on right, (ΦIΛO)ΠATOPOΣ on left, Seleucid date BΣ (202) to left, Nike advancing left.

Æ 20, Mint uncertain possibly Phoenician, 111 - 110 BC

5.72 grams, 20 mm, 0°

GCV II 7173, SNG Spaer 2734
SPQR Coins
Ptolemy2Phil.jpg
AP Monogram262 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.
10785. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 714, SNG Cop 506-507, aVF, 14.08g, 26.5mm, 0o, Phoenicia, Sidon mint, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis, small D behind ear; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, SI left, AP countermark right; slightly frosty; $125.00
whitetd49
bakti.jpg
Apollodotus II (80 - 65 B.C.)27 viewsAR Drachm
Bactrian Kingdom
O: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩTPOΣ KAI ΦIΛOΠATPOΣ AΠOΛΛOΔOTOY; diademed and draped bust right.
R:Rev: "Maharajasa tratarasa Apaladatasa" in Karosthi; Athena Alkidemos advancing left, holding thunderbolt and aegis; monogram to right. 
2.21g
17mm
Bopearachchi Série 2D; SNG ANS 1544ff. 
2 commentsMat
Nabataean_Kingdom,_Aretas_III,_87_-_62_B_C_.jpg
Aretas III, 87 - 62 B.C. Bronze AE 16, Meshorer 118 viewsNabataean Kingdom, Aretas III, 87 - 62 B.C. Among the first Nabatean coins. After gaining Damascus, Aretas assumed the title Philhellenos to appease the Hellenistic population. He also adopted the Greek practice of striking coins. This coin is similar to Seleucid types that preceded it from the same mint. Bronze AE 16, Meshorer 1 (with crescent and L) or 1A (without crescent and L), aF, Damascus mint, 3.197g, 16.4mm, 0o, 84 - 71 B.C.; obverse head right with crested helmet, long hair as dotted lines; reverse , Nike standing left, uncertain object in left, wreath in right, crescent over “L” (=A) left (off flan?). Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Nabataean_Kingdom,_Aretas_III,_87_-_62_B_C_~0.jpg
Aretas III, 87 - 62 B.C. Bronze AE 16, Meshorer 19 viewsNabataean Kingdom, Aretas III, 87 - 62 B.C. Bronze AE 16, Meshorer 1 (with crescent and L) or 1A (without crescent and L), F, Damascus mint, 4.333g, 16.3mm, 0o, 84 - 71 B.C.; obverse head right with crested helmet, long hair as dotted lines; reverse , Nike standing left, uncertain object in left, wreath in right, crescent over “L” (=A) left (off flan?) Among the first Nabatean coins. After gaining Damascus, Aretas assumed the title Philhellenos to appease the Hellenistic population. He also adopted the Greek practice of striking coins. This coin is similar to Seleucid types that preceded it from the same mint. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Nabataean_Kingdom,_Aretas_III.jpg
Aretas III, 87 - 62 B.C. Bronze AE 16, Meshorer 28 viewsNabataean Kingdom, Aretas III, 87 - 62 B.C. Bronze AE 16, Meshorer 2, aF, Damascus mint, 4.568g, 15.3mm, 0o, 84 - 71 B.C.; obverse head right with crested helmet, long hair as dotted lines; reverse , Nike standing left, uncertain object in left, wreath in right, crescent over “L” (=A) left. Meshorer 2 is described as, "Extremely careless style. Same as [Meshorer] No.1. Generally difficult to distinguish the details. Many of these coins are of a debased weight and struck on irregular flans." Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Nabataean_Kingdom,_Aretas_III,_87_-_62_B_C.jpg
Aretas III, 87 - 62 B.C. Bronze AE 16, Meshorer Nabataean 1A9 viewsNabataean Kingdom, Aretas III, 87 - 62 B.C. Bronze AE 16, Meshorer Nabataean 1A (without crescent and L), F, Damascus mint, 3.176g, 14.7mm, 0o, 84 - 71 B.C.; obverse head right with crested helmet, long hair as dotted lines; reverse , Nike standing left, uncertain object in left, wreath in right, crescent over Λ (=A) left. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Nabataean_Kingdom,_Aretas_IV,_9_B_C__-_40_A_D__eagle.jpg
Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D. 33056. Bronze AE 11, Meshorer Nabataean 9311 viewsNabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D. Bronze AE 11, Meshorer Nabataean 93, F, Petra mint, 0.982g, 11.2mm, 0o, 5 - 6 A.D.; obverse Aretas' Aramaic monogram O / H (ayin / het) within wreath; reverse , eagle standing left, wings closed, H (Aramaic het) behind. Aretas' daughter was married to Herod Antipas, Herod the Great's son, and the Tetrarch of Galilee. This coin resembles a coin minted by King Herod and the reverse probably depicts the golden bird Herod placed above the entrance to the Jerusalem Temple. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
aretas_IV_queen.jpg
Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D. Bronze AE 12, Shaquilath; Meshorer 1198 viewsNabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D. Bronze AE 12, Aretas IV facing right, / Queen Shaquilath facing right, Meshorer 119. Podiceps
Nabataean_Kingdom,_Aretas_IV,_9_B_C__-_40_A_D_.jpg
Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D. Bronze AE 13, Meshorer 678 viewsNabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D. Bronze AE 13, Meshorer 67; BMC Arabia p. 9, 27, F, Petra mint, 1.955g, 13.7mm, 0o, obverse laureate head of Aretas right; reverse , two crossed cornucopias, HR (Het Ros = Aretas) between the horns. Aretas IV took the name Philopatris, lover of his people. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
aretas_IV_foure.jpg
Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D., Fouree silver plated drachm4 viewsNabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D., Ancient Counterfeit. Fouree silver plated drachm, cf. Meshorer Nabataean 99 - 111, BMC Arabia 11 - 12, and SGICV 5695 - 6 (official, Petra mint, 20 - 40 A.D.), F, illegal mint, 3.364g, 13.8mm, 45o, after 20 A.D.; obverse Aramaic, 'Aretas, king of the Nabataeans, lover of his people', laureate and draped bust of Aretas right; reverse Aramaic, 'Shuqailat, queen of the Nabataeans, year ?' (date off flan), jugate busts of Aretas and Shuqailat right. Aretas IV was the greatest of the Nabataean kings, ruling S. Palestine, most of Trans-Jordan, N. Arabia, and Damascus. Little is known of him because Nabataeans did not keep records. Paul mentions Aretas in connection with his visit to Damascus (2 Corinthians 11:32). Ex FORVMPodiceps
aretas_IV_eagle.jpg
Aretas IV, AE 11, Eagle; Meshorer 9313 viewsNabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D. Bronze AE 11, Meshorer Nabataean 93, Petra mint, 5 - 6 A.D.; obverse Aretas' Aramaic monogram O / H (ayin / het) within wreath; reverse, eagle standing left, wings closed, H (Aramaic het) behind.Podiceps
82000559.jpg
ARGOLIS, Argos33 viewsA Neolithic settlement was located near the central sanctuary of Argois, removed 45 stadia (8 km; 5 miles) from Argos, closer to Mycenae. The temple was dedicated to "Argivian Hera". The main festival of that temple was the Hekatombaia, one of the major festivals of Argos itself. Walter Burkert (Homo necans, p. 185) connected the festival to the myth of the slaying of Argus Panoptes by Hermes ("shimmering" or "quick"), and only secondarily associated with mythological Argus (or the toponym).

Argos was a major stronghold of Mycenaean times, and along with the neighbouring acropolis of Mycenae and Tiryns became a very early settlement because of its commanding positions in the midst of the fertile plain of Argolis.

During Homeric times it belonged to a follower of Agamemnon and gave its name to the surrounding district; the Argolid which the Romans knew as Argeia. The importance of Argos was eclipsed by nearby Sparta after the 6th century BC.[dubious – discuss]

Because of its refusal to fight or send supplies in the Graeco-Persian Wars, Argos was shunned by most other city-states.[citation needed] Argos remained neutral or the ineffective ally of Athens during the 5th century BC struggles between Sparta and Athens.

The Mythological kings of Argos are (in order): Inachus, Phoroneus, Argus, Triopas, Agenor, Iasus, Crotopus, Pelasgus (aka Gelanor), Danaus, Lynceus, Abas, Proetus, Acrisius, Perseus, Megapénthês, Argeus, and Anaxagoras. An alternative version (supplied by Tatiānus[2]) of the original 17 consecutive kings of Argōs includes Apis, Argios, Kriasos, and Phorbas between Argus and Triopas, explaining the apparent unrelation of Triopas to Argus.

After the original 17 kings of Argos, there were three kings ruling Argos at the same time (see Anaxagoras), one descended from Bias, one from Melampus, and one from Anaxagoras. Melampus was succeeded by his son Mantius, then Oicles, and Amphiaraus, and his house of Melampus lasted down to the brothers Alcmaeon and Amphilochus.

Anaxagoras was succeeded by his son Alector, and then Iphis. Iphis left his kingdom to his nephew Sthenelus, the son of his brother Capaneus.

Bias was succeeded by his son Talaus, and then by his son Adrastus who, with Amphiaraus, commanded the disastrous Seven Against Thebes. Adrastus bequethed the kingdom to his son, Aegialeus, who was subsequently killed in the war of the Epigoni. Diomedes, grandson of Adrastus through his son-in-law Tydeus and daughter Deipyle, replaced Aegialeus and was King of Argos during the Trojan war. This house lasted longer than those of Anaxagoras and Melampus, and eventually the kingdom was reunited under its last member, Cyanippus, son of Aegialeus, soon after the exile of Diomedes.

Argos played a role in the Peloponnesian war and beyond.

ARGOLIS, Argos. Circa 90-50 BC. AR Triobol (2.16 g, 1h). Trypis, magistrate. Forepart of wolf at bay right / Large A; T-PY/ΠI-C in two lines around, piloi of the Dioskouroi below crossbar; all within incuse square. BCD Peloponnesos 1169. VF, darkly toned.

Ex BCD Collection (not in previous BCD sales).

Ex-CNG eAuction 82, Lot: 559 110/150

ecoli
ariarethes_darchm.JPG
Ariarathes V Eusebes, Cappadocian Kingdom, 131 BC45 viewsAriarathes V Eusebes
Kingdom of Cappadocia
AR drachm – 3.78g
Cappadocia, 131 BC
diademed head r.
Athena Nicephorus standing l.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΡΙΑΡΑΘΟΥ ΕΥΣΕΒΟΥΣ, ΛB
Simonetta 12
SNG Cop sup. 644
Ardatirion
ariobarzanes I combined.JPG
Ariobarzanes I95 viewsKingdom of Cappadocia
AR Drachm 4.0 g 16- 18 mm Sears7302 ( var) 90 BC VF
OBV:: Diademed, Middle aged head right
REV:: Athena standing left, holding nike and spear. shield resting on ground
Regnal Year 6
Greek lettering in right and left fields and in exergue
purchased 03/2006
1 commentsJohnny
IMG_1069.JPG
Ariobarzanes III Drachm 23 viewsAR Drachm
Size: 17mm, Weight: 3.53 grams, Die Axis: 12h

Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariobarzanes III Eusebes
Circa 52 – 42 BCE

Obverse: Anepigraphic.
Diademed bust to right.

Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIOBAPZANOY EYΣEBOYΣ KAI ΦIΛOPΩMAIOY (of King Ariobarzanes, pious and friend of the Romans)
Athena Nikephoros standing left, spear and grounded shield to right. Star in crescent monogram to left, monogram to right, and IA date in exergue (year 11, 42 BCE).

Notes:
-Ariobarzanes III was the grandson of Mithradates VI of Pontos, and adopted the Pontic royal symbol of a star in crescent.
-Ariobarzanes III was allied with Pompey, but was allowed to keep his position under Julius Caesar. Following Caesar's assassination, he refused to aid Cassius. Cappadocia was invaded, and Ariobarzanes III was executed.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins, 2016
Pharsalos
capfoureeOR.jpg
Ariobarzanes III Eusebes (fouree)14 viewsUnofficial mint, Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariobarzanes III Eusebes, Philoromaios, Base metal plated w/ AR Drachm, C. 42 B.C., 3.28g 16mm, no ref.
R: Diademed, bearded head right
R: BAΣILEΩΣ APIOBARZANOY EUΣEBOY KAIΦIΛOPΩMAIOY, Athena standing left, holding Nike, with spear and shield, star & crescent moon left, date monogram right
casata137ec
Ariobarzanes_III,_Kingdom_of_Cappadocia,_AR_drachm,_52-42_BC.JPG
Ariobarzanes III, Kingdom of Cappadocia, AR drachm, 52-42 BC37 viewsAriobarzanes III
Kingdom of Cappadocia
AR drachm – 26mm
Cappadocia, 52-42 BC
Diademed head r.
Athena standing holding Nike, spear and shield, monogram r., star and crescent l.
BAΣIΛEΩΣ / APIOBAPZANOY / EYΣEBOYΣ / ΦIΛIPΩMAIOY
Simonetta 1a
Ardatirion
image02636.jpg
Armenian Kingdom of Sophene: Arsames II (ca. 230BC) One Chalcus (Nercessian Sophene-19b)123 viewsThis is a fairly recently published coin. It is similar to Nercessian-9, but the bust is facing left as opposed to right. It is mentioned in the following publication (it is in Armenian, but you can see the plates):

Nercessian, Y. T. “Coinage of the Armenian Kingdom of Sophene (ca. 260-70 B.C.)” in Armenian Numismatic Journal 37.3 (September 2011).

Obv: Head of Arsames facing left wearing tiara with flat top like a cap; a diadem encircles the head, ends in a bow, and hangs down neck. Border of dots
Rev: Caps of Dioscuri. Legend to the right, downward ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; to left downward ΑΡΣΑΜΟΥ
SpongeBob
Nercessian-8_.jpg
Armenian Kingdom of Sophene: Arsames II (ca. 230BC) One Chalcus (Nercessian-8 ; Nercessian Sophene-7)36 viewsSee the following article for more information:

Nercessian, Y. T. “Coinage of the Armenian Kingdom of Sophene (ca. 260-70 B.C.)” in Armenian Numismatic Journal 37.3 (September 2011).

Obv: Head of Arsames facing right wearing tiara with flat top like a cap; a diadem encircles the head, ends in bow, and hangs down from the neck. Border of dots
Rev: Eagle standing right holding thunderbolt. Legend to the right, downward ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; to left downward ΑΡΣΑΜΟΥ
SpongeBob
Nercessian-7.jpg
Armenian Kingdom of Sophene: Arsames II (ca. 230BC) Two Chalci (Nercessian-7; Nercessian Sophene-11ա)31 viewsSee the following article for more information:

Nercessian, Y. T. “Coinage of the Armenian Kingdom of Sophene (ca. 260-70 B.C.)” in Armenian Numismatic Journal 37.3 (September 2011).


Obv: Head of Arsames facing right wearing tiara with flat top like a cap; a diadem encircles the head, ends in bow, and hangs down from the neck. Border of dots
Rev: Nude figure standing and facing , right arm extending from elbow and left arm holding long club. Legend to the right, downward ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; to left downward ΑΡΣΑΜΟΥ
SpongeBob
tigranes_ii_res.jpg
ARMENIAN KINGDOM--TIGRANES II (THE GREAT)42 viewsKings of Armenia
95 - 58 BC
AE 13 mm, 2.25 g
O: Draped bust of Tigranes, right, wearing tiara
R: BASILEWS-BASILEWN/TIGRANO[Y] Grain ear
ref. Bedoukian 107
laney
ArsakesII.jpg
Arsakes II65 viewsAR Drachm (16mm, 4.09 g, 12h). Rhagai-Arsakeia(?) mint. Struck circa 211-209 BC. Head left, wearing bashlyk and earring / Archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, holding bow; to right, eagle standing facing, head left, with wings displayed; APΣAK•Y downward to left. Sellwood 6.1; A&S Type 6, obv. 6/1, rev. 6/2; Shore 4; Sunrise 241-3.

Arsakes II, son of Arsakes I, ascended the Parthian throne about 210 BC. At roughly the same time, the Seleukid king Antiochos III (223-187 BC) marched out of Ecbatana to recover the eastern Seleukid provinces that were lost to the young Parthian kingdom. Justin (41.5.7) comments that Arsakes II fought with admirable gallantry against Antiochos, and finally became his ally. Whether the Parthians resumed minting after the return of Antiochos returned to Ekbatana in 205 BC, after his Baktrian expedition, cannot be ascertained. It is possible that, until his defeat by the Romans at the Battle of Magnesia in 190/189 BC, Antiochos held sway over Iran at least as far east as the Baktrian frontiers and thus suppressed the circulation of non-Seleukid currencies. Unfortunately, the exact date and circumstances of the death of Arsakes II are unknown. The superb condition of the great majority of S6 drachms of Arsakes II implies that they were minted and almost immediately interred at around the time of Antiochos III’s eastern expedition to Parthia and Baktria in 209 BC (from CNG).
3 commentsThatParthianGuy
arsinoe_II.jpg
Arsinoe II; Head of Arsinoe right/ Eagle; Svoronos 35118 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Arsinoe II, c. 273 - 268 B.C. Bronze AE 16, 1/16th drachm?, Svoronos 351; Weiser -; SNG Copenhagen 100, Fair, edge broken, uncertain mint, 2.772g, 15.9mm, 0o, c. 264 BC; obverse veiled and diademed head of Arsinoë II right; reverse PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; wings open, “DI” above monogram before; rare. Arsinoe II (316 B.C. - July 270 B.C.) was the daughter of king Ptolemy I Soter, the founder of the Hellenistic state of Egypt, and his second wife Berenice I., As the wife of King Lysimachus, she was queen of Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. Later she was co-ruler of Egypt with her brother and husband Ptolemy II. Ex FORVMPodiceps
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Artabanos II, Drachm, King as archer18 viewsAR Drachm
Parthian Kingdom
Artabanos II
King: 10 - 38AD
21.0mm 3.67gr
O: NO LEGEND; Artabanos II, facing left.
R: NO LEGEND; King as archer, facing right.
Exergue: Monogram to right of king.
zurqieh_dubai 291239184302
11/15/14 4/30/17
1 commentsNicholas Z
Pergamon_23.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, Asklepios 24 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE16, 282 - 263 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: ΦΙΛΕΤΑΙΡΟΥ, Asklepios seated left, feeding snake out of patera.
AE, 3.01g, 15.7mm
Ref.: SNG France 1643-9; SNG von Aulock 1363.
Ex Bankhaus Aufhäuser 1989
Ex Dr. P. Vogl collection
Ex Pecunem Gitbud&Naumann Auction 42, Lot 194

shanxi
Pergamon_60.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, Asklepios, monogram, Δ11 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE16, 282 - 263 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: ΦΙΛΕΤΑΙΡΟΥ, Asklepios seated left, feeding snake out of patera, monogram left above and Δ below patera
AE, 4.24g, 18mm
Ref.:
shanxi
Pergamon_17.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, bow18 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE12, after 282 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with a griffin
Rev.: ΦIΛE/TAIΡOΥ, bow
AE, 12.3mm, 1.75g
Ref.: BMC Mysia p. 119, 54; SGCV II 7233
shanxi
G_280_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, bow, arrowhead5 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE12, after 282 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with a griffin
Rev.: ΦIΛE/TAIΡOΥ, bow, arrowhead within
AE, 13mm, 2.06g
Ref.:
shanxi
G_267_Pergamon.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, bow, barley grains10 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE13, 282 - 133 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: head of Athena right, wearing helmet
Rev.: ΦIΛE/TAIΡOΥ, bow, two barley grains left
AE, 2.06 g, 13 mm
Ref.:
shanxi
Pergamon_58.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, bow, circle below15 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE14, 281 - 197 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with a griffin
Rev.: ΦIΛE/TAIΡOΥ, bow, circle below
AE, 14mm, 1.93g
Ref.: BMC Mysia, p.119, 59
shanxi
G_297_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, bow, crescent7 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE12, 282 - 133 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: head of Athena right, wearing helmet
Rev.: ΦIΛE/TAIΡOΥ, bow, crescent right (below the E of ΦIΛE)
AE, 2.20 g, 12 mm
Ref.:
shanxi
Pergamon_47.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, bow, ivy leaf13 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE12, after 282 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with a griffin
Rev.: ΦIΛE/TAIΡOΥ, bow, ivy leaf right
AE, 12mm, 1.83g
Ref.:
shanxi
Pergamon_30.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, bow, monogram within15 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE12, 282 - 133 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with a griffin
Rev.: ΦIΛE/TAIΡOΥ, bow, tiny monogram within
AE, 11.8mm, 1.65g
Ref.: SNG Cop 349; BMC Mysia p. 119, 58
shanxi
Pergamon_53.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, bow, palm branch12 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE13, after 282 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with a griffin
Rev.: ΦIΛE/TAIΡOΥ, bow, palm branch below
AE, 13mm, 2.07g
Ref.: SNG STOCKHOLM 2087?
shanxi
Pergamon_36.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, bow, star in upper right field14 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE13, 282 - 133 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with a griffin
Rev.: ΦIΛE/TAIΡOΥ, bow, star in upper right field
AE, 13mm, 1.84g
Ref.: SNG von Aulock 1365
shanxi
Pergamon_54.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, serpent, ΔTP monogram 20 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE15, 282 - 263 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with a griffin
Rev.: [Φ]IΛETAI[ΡOΥ], Serpent coiled right, ΔTP monogram to left.
AE, 15mm
Ref.:
1 commentsshanxi
Pergamon_22.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, serpent, HP monogram15 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE15, 282 - 263 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with a griffin
Rev.: [ΦI]ΛETA[IΡOΥ], Serpent coiled right, HP monogram to left.
AE, 14.6mm, 2.49g
Ref.: SNG France 1650 var.
shanxi
G_284_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, Athena, serpent, PΠY (?) monogram9 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE15, 282 - 263 B.C.
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with a griffin
Rev.: [Φ]IΛETAIΡ[OΥ], Serpent coiled right, PΠY (?) monogram to left.
AE, 14mm, 3.56g
Ref.:
shanxi
Pergamon_56.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Philetairos, star13 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE9
Pergamene Kingdom, Philetairos
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing helmet
Rev.: [Φ]IΛE-TAIΡOΥ, star
AE, 9mm, 0.75g
Ref.: BMC Mysia 63
shanxi
bosporus_aspurgus.jpg
Aspurgus, c. 14 - 37 A.D., In the Name of Tiberius. Tiberius/ Aspurgus21 viewsKingdom of Bosporus, Aspurgus, c. 14 - 37 A.D., In the Name of Tiberius. Bronze 12 nummi, RPC I 1903 (14 examples), MacDonald 300, F, 7.000g, 22.7mm, 0o, c. 35 - 37 A.D.; obverse “TIBERIOS KAISAROS”, laureate head of Tiberius right; reverse, diademed head of Aspurgus right, IB before, uncertain monogram behind; brown tone. This coin and coins of Caligula (RPC 1904, “Gaius Caesar Germanicus” 14 examples known to RPC) were both struck with this date, with young portraits, about which RPC notes, “the pieces with the portraits of Tiberius and Caligula were probably made at the end of the reign; the Tiberian pieces are so similar to the Caligulan ones that it seems very likely that both were made within a short space of time.” Could the young portrait on the obverse be viewed as that of Tiberius Gemellus? The grandson of Tiberius was named joint-heir with Caligula in the will of the emperor. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Attalos_II__Philadelphos.jpg
Attalos II. Philadelphos 159-138 B.C.23 viewsMysia, Kingdom of Pergamon, Ae 14.7~15.8mm. 3.74g. struck under Attalos II, 159-138 BC. Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right. Rev: ΦIΛETAIΡOΥ, coiled serpent, head raised right. M in left field. BMC 78-80; Sear Greece 7228; SNG von Aulock 7455; SNG Stockholm 2093. SNG vA 7455, SNG Cop. 343; BMC 75ff. ddwau
Augustus.jpg
Augustus32 viewsAugustus, AE24, Kingdom of Thrace. BASILEWS ROIMHTALKOU, jugate heads of King Rhoemetalkes & Queen Pythodoris right / KAISAROS SEBASTOU, bare head of Augustus right.Britanikus
Augustus_.jpg
Augustus29 viewsAugustus, AE24, Kingdom of Thrace. BASILEWS ROIMHTALKOU, jugate heads of King Rhoemetalkes & Queen Pythodoris right / KAISAROS SEBASTOU, bare head of Augustus rightBritanikus
63761q00.jpg
Augustus89 viewsRoman Imperatorial
Octavian Caesar
(Reign as ‘Augustus’ 1st Emperor of the Roman Empire 27 BC-14 AD)
(b. 63 BC, d. 14 AD)


Obverse: Bare head of Octavian facing right

Reverse: IMP CAESAR, Facing head of Octavian on ithyphallic boundary stone of Jupiter Terminus, winged thunderbolt below

Reverse refers to Octavian's reestablishment of boundaries in the east after the battle of Actium and review of the client kingdoms established by Mark Antony (in particular return of Roman territory from Cleopatra and her children)

Silver Denarius
Minted in Italy 30-29 BC




Translations:

Imperatorial=The Imperatorial period extends from the outbreak of civil war between Julius Caesar and Pompey in January 49 BC and ends early 27 BC when Caesar's adopted heir Octavian was given the title "Augustus" by the Senate, effectively making him the sole ruler of the entire Roman territory. 

IMP CAESAR=Imperator(Commander-in-Chief) Caesar(Octavian took Julius Caesar’s name after he was posthumously adopted by him in 44 BC)


Reference
RIC I 269a
2 commentsSphinx357
augustus_greek.jpg
Augustus and king Rhoemetalces, Kingdom of Thrace14 viewsAE 18, Kingdom of Thrace, Greece
Obverse: KAIΣAΡOΣ ΣEBAΣTOΥ, bare head of Augustus right
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΡOIMHTAΛKOΥ, diademed head of Rhoemetalces I right
Dk0311USMC
604_RR_RPC_1_1711.JPG
Augustus, AE24, Kingdom of Thrace Jugate heads10 viewsReference.
SNG Cop 1190, SGI 5396. RPC 1, 1711

Obv. KAISAROS SEBASTOU
Bare head of Augustus right.

BASILEWS ROIMHTALKOU,
Jugate heads of King Rhoemetalkes & Queen Pythodoris right

6.87 gr
24 mm
h
okidoki
D1.jpg
Azes II - AR tetradrachm - Indo-Scythian Kingdom, c.60BC - c.AD5 80 viewsObverse:
King on horseback riding right, holding whip - 'BAΣIΛEΩΣ BAΣIΛEΩN MAΓAΛOΥ AZOΥ'

Reverse:
Zeus/Poseidon standing right, trident in left over shoulder, right extended, monogram left, Kharosthi letter "SI"
- 'Maharajasa rajarajasa mahatasa Ayasa' (in Kharosthi)

Ref: Mitchiner vol. 6, p. 541, type 828; Smithsonian 237; BMC 100
1 commentsXerxes King of Kings
Azes_II_BI_tetradrachm,_30-5_BC.JPG
Azes II BI tetradrachm, 30-5 BC68 viewsAzes II
Indo-Scythian Kingdom
BI tetradrachm
35-5 BC
Azes II on horseback r, holding whip and raising r. hand
Zeus standing l, holding Nike and sceptre.
Mitchiner 2406
2 commentsArdatirion
BACTRIA_DRACHM_HERMAIOS.jpg
BACTRIA, Indo-Greek Kingdom - Hermaios38 viewsBACTRIA, Indo-Greek Kingdom - Hermaios Circa 105-90 BC. AR Drachm (18mm, 2.37 g, 12h). Diademed and draped bust right / Zeus seated slightly left, holding scepter; monogram to left. *NOTE: My dates DO NOT agree with most sources, etc. I am following the new chronology.dpaul7
kushan_kaniskaI_Göbl766cf.jpg
Bactria, Kingdom of Kushans, Kanishka I, Göbl 766 cf.56 viewsKanishka I, AD 127-151
AE 22
obv. BACILEVC BACI - LEWN KANHiKOV (i should be read like sh as in Kushan)
Kanishka, bearded, wearing heavy Kushan cloak and trousers, long boots and
high hat, stg. facing, holding standard in l. hand and sacrificing with r. hand
over altar; from his shoulders emanating flames; club at feet r.(?)
rev. HLIOC
Helios, nimbate, stg. l., r. had hand raised in salvation gestus (Greek style)
left before monogram (tamgha) of Kanishka
cf. Göbl 766 (has HILOC in legend)
rare, good F/VF

Kanishka I was a very important ruler in South-East-Asia. While in his early years he was an adherent of syncretistic religions he later established Buddhism in his empire and became a crucial founder.
This type belongs to Kanishka's earlier years, because the legends are Greek. Later issues have legends in Kushan. Tamgha first was a brand for cattle, later it became a symbol for the nomadic clans too.
Jochen
DSC_1804.JPG
Bactria. Menander I Soter (ca. 155-130 BC). AR Indic drachm (17mm, 1h)7 viewsINDO-GREEK KINGDOMS. Bactria. Menander I Soter (ca. 155-130 BC). AR Indic drachm (17mm, 1h). NGC XF, brushed. Uncertain mint in the Paropamisadai or Gandhara. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ / MENANΔPOY, diademed, heroically nude bust of Menander left, seen from behind, aegis over left shoulder, hurling javelin with right hand / Maharajasa tratasara Menamdrasa (Kharosthi), Athena standing facing, head right, aegis on extended left arm, brandishing thunderbolt with right hand; monogram in left field. HGC 12, 188. Bopearachchi 6c.1 commentsMark R1
apollodotusardrach.jpg
Bactrian and Indo-Scythian Kingdoms, Apollodotos II (c.80-65 BC`12 views Obv. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ KAI ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ / AΠOΛΛOΔOTOY
Diademed, draped bust right
Rev. Kharoshthi script (Maharajasa tratarasa / Apaladatasa)
Athena Alkidemos standing left, wearing aegis, seen from behind, shield on outstretched left arm, hurling thunderbolt with right hand
Tau-rho monogram in left fieldm
Skyler
bactria_pan.jpg
Bactrian Kingdom, Apollodotos I, 174 - 160 B.C.75 viewsSilver square drachm; (Bop.4a, Mitchner 207f, SNG ANS 303); 165 -160 B.C. Weight 2.3 g., Max side measurment 16.57 mm., Obv. ΣΩTHPOΣ AΠOΛΛOΔOTOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ around, Elephant stg. r., AV monogram below; Rev. Karosthi legend around, Zebu bull stg. r., A below;. Toned with light encrustation. 4 commentsSteve E
Euthidemos_AE_.jpg
BAKTRIA – EUTHYDEMOS I – AE – HERAKLES – HORSE18 viewsBAKTRIA, Greco-Baktrian Kingdom. Euthydemos I Theos Megas. Circa 225-200/195 BC. Æ Double Unit (9,07g). Struck circa 225-208/6 BC. Bearded head of Herakles right / Horse prancing right.; HGC 12, 53.Antonivs Protti
5E764046-BA69-46A1-A28F-C9DC7537CC68.jpeg
Baktria, Indo-Greek kingdom. MENANDER I Soter 9 viewsBaktria, Indo-Greek kingdom. MENANDER I Soter AR Drachm. EF+. Athena Alkidemos.

Obverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΟΤΗΡΟΣ / ΜΕΝΑΝΔΡΟΥ. Diademed and draped bust right, wearing crested helmet adorned with bull's horn and ear.
Reverse: Athena Alkidemos advancing left, shield decorated with aegis over arm, hurling thunderbolt; monogram to right; Karosthi inscription around.

A precious exemplar of this interesting coin, issued by the mythic king Menander I, the most poweful ruler of the indo-greek kingdom of Baktria and the first western ruler to be converted to Buda´s faith.

EF+ condition, almost uncircullated, conserving absolutely full details in both sides, strong relief and high quality silver.

Bopearachchi 16I; SNG ANS 879-92. circa 155-130 b.C. 2,4 g - 17 mm
Mark R1
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Baktria, Indo-Greek kingdom. MENANDER I Soter AR Drachm. EF+. Bust to left holding spear.68 viewsObverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΟΤΗΡΟΣ / ΜΕΝΑΝΔΡΟΥ. Diademed heroic bust of Menander I to left, seen from behind, wearing aegis over shoulder and brandishing spear.
Reverse: Athena Alkidemos advancing left, shield decorated with aegis over arm, hurling thunderbolt; monogram to right; Karosthi inscription around.

Issued by the mythic king Menander I, the most poweful ruler of the indo-greek kingdom of Baktria and the first western ruler to be converted to Buda´s faith.

EF+ condition, practically uncircullated, conserving absolutely full details in both sides, very bold relief relief and high quality silver.

Bopearachchi 7B. Circa 155-130 b.C. 2,4 g - 16,5 mm
5 commentsMark R1
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Baktrian Kingdom, Agathokles I, ca. 185-170 BC, AR Tetradrachm 13 viewsEYΘYΔHMOY ΘEOY (Euthydemos God) Diademed head of Euthydemos right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕYONTOΣ AΓAΘOKΛEOYΣ ΔIKAIOY (of King Agathokles the Just) Herakles seated on rock, holding club set on rocks; ΦΩΛ monogram lower right field.

Bopearachchi 16B; SNG ANS 261, Mitchiner 145; HGC 12, 87.
This coin referenced in Frank L. Holt Lost World of the Golden King: In Search of Ancient Afghanistan p.203 and Chapter 8 end note 75.

(31 mm, 16.67 g, 12h).

Agathokles and Antimachos issued “pedigree” tetradrachms in the later years of the struggle for regency with Eukratides. Such coins sought to assert the legitimacy of the incumbent Euthydemid rulers through association with forbears and even unrelated predecessors back to Alexander.

An iron pin pierces this coin accompanied by the remains of an iron suspension loop that has been incompletely removed. This is the remains of an attachment placed in a manner to avoid defacing the image of Euthydemos. The careful attachment of this coin for its use as an item of display may have been an overt statement of loyalty to the Euthydemid line during the struggle with Eukratides.
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Baktrian Kingdom, Agathokles I, ca. 185-170 BC, Copper-Nickel Dichalkon 15 viewsHead of Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath, thyrsos over left shoulder
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ AΓAΘOKΛEOYΣ (of King Agathokles) Panther standing right with bell around neck, touching vine with raised paw, monogram ΦI to left

HGC 12, 94; Bopearachchi Series 5B; SNG ANS 9, 236; Mitchiner 147b (this coin illustrated); Sear GCV 7557 var.

(21 mm, 8.8 g, 12h).
Ancient Numismatic Enterprise; ex Duplicates of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

Agathokles, Euthydemos II, and Pantaleon minted copper-nickel coins in the period ca. 185-170 BC, the first such alloy coins to be produced. Nickel was not used again in coin production until the 19th century. The nickel content in these coins is variable in the range 7.5% to 20.2%. It is probable that locally available, rich deposits of copper-nickel ore were mined and smelted to produce the coinage. The short period of time in which such coins were minted suggests that the source of nickel rich copper was rapidly depleted. The silver appearance of the coinage probably enhanced its perceived value at a time when the Euthydemid Dynasty was struggling for survival against the usurper Eukratides. It may have even been considered a substitute for silver at a time when the latter was in short supply due to the conflict with Eukratides.
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Baktrian Kingdom, Agathokles I, ca. 185-170 BC, Æ Square Unit 14 viewsFemale Hindu deity Laksmi advancing left holding lotus, Rajane Agathukleyasa in Kharoshthi script.
BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΓAΘOKΛEOYΣ Lioness standing right, Greek inscription above and below.

SNG ANS 9, 246; Mitchiner 152; HGC 12, 98; Sear GCV 7558.

(18 x 19.5 mm, 11.6 g, 12h).
Ancient Imports.

This and the following Æ Square Unit of Pantaleon are amongst the first of the bilingual coins issued by the Graeco-Bactrian rulers south of the Hindu Kush.
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Baktrian Kingdom, Antimachos I, ca. 175-165 BC, AR Drachm29 viewsDiademed head of Antimachos right wearing kausia.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΘEOY ANTIMAXOY (of King Antimachos a God) Poseidon standing facing, holding trident and palm branch, KP monogram in lower right field.

Bopearachchi Series 2A; SNG ANS 9, 279; Mitchiner 124b; HGC 12; 109; Sear GCV 7545.

(19 mm, 4.2 g, 12h).
Freeman & Sear Mail Bid Auction 13, Aug. 2006, 278; from the F. Martin Post Collection.
1 commentsn.igma
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Baktrian Kingdom, Antimachos, AR Drachm62 viewsKaroshi legend around king on horseback.
BASILEWS NIKHFOROU ANTIMACOU
Nike advancing left with wreath and palm, mongram in left field.
SG 7546, 171-160 BC.
Early bilingual coin, with different languages on obverse and reverse.

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Baktrian Kingdom, Apollodotos I, ca. 175-165 BC Æ Quadruple Unit27 viewsΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ AΠΟΛΛΟΔΟΤΟY ΣΩΤHPOΣ (of King Apollodotos Savior) Apollo standing facing holding bow and arrow.
Tripod on stand in dotted square border outside which Maharajas Apaladasta Iradasa (of King Apollodotos Savior) in Kharoshthi script (reverse image in photo above is inverted).

Mitchiner 209a; Bopearachchi 6A; SNG ANS 9, 346; HGC 12, 41; Sear GCV 7594.

(22 x 21 mm, 12h).
CNG e-Auction 162, 11 Apr. 2007, 134.

Apollodotos was a contemporary of the later Euthydemid rulers, Agathokles, Pantaleon and Antimachos. His Greek coinage is rare with only less than a dozen portrait tetradrachm specimens known. Almost all of his coinage adhered to south Indian traditions, with bi-lingual Greek and Kharoshthi legends and non-portrait types struck on square flans, either elephant and bull on his silver, or Apollo and tripod on the bronze. From this coinage, which comprises the only evidence for his reign, it appears that Apollodotos administered his territories south of the Hindu Kush. The imagery on Apollodotos’ coins breaks with the tradition of the Euthydemid dynasty, portraying seated Athena on the tetradrachms (in the style of the reverse of Lysimachos coinage) and a standing Apollo on AE issues, reminiscent of the Seleukid coinage. Eukratides may have retained him as a provincial ruler through the struggle for power.
1 commentsn.igma
Baktria,_Demetriso_I,_AE_Double_.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Demetrios I, ca. 200-185 BC, Æ Dichalkon 12 viewsDraped bust of Herakles right, wearing oak wreath, with club over shoulder.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔHMHTPIOY Artemis, radiate, standing facing, holding bow and drawing arrow from quiver; monogram to inner right.

Bopearachchi 4C; SNG ANS 9, 204; HGC 12, 68; Sear GCV 7534.

(24 mm, 7.24 g, 12h).
CNG eAuction 337, 22 Oct. 2014, 169.
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Baktrian Kingdom, Diodotos I, ca. 255/250-240 BC, AR Tetradrachm 27 viewsDiademed head of the Diodotos I right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY (of King Antiochos). Zeus striding left, hurling thunderbolt in right hand, aegis over extended left arm; eagle standing in lower inner left, monogram in left field above eagle.

SC 628 (b); Holt A2 (Holt A2 example 2 = this coin); Bopearachchi 2E; Mitchiner 64c; Kritt, Dynastic Transitions Type A2 (Plate 1, page 19); HGC 9, 243. Mint “A”- Ai Khanoum ca. 255-250 BC.

(29 mm, 16.92 g, 6h).
Eukratides Ancient Numismatics: ex- William K. Raymond Collection; ex- Kovacs (1997)

The Kingdom of Baktria was created from the Seleukid province of Bactro-Sogdiana when the satrap Diodotos I began to act independently of the Seleukid king, Antiochos II around 256 BC. The first step towards independence came with the issue of coinage depicting Diodotos I, rather than the Seleukid king, Antiochos II. On their reverse the coins bear the image of a striding Zeus, rather than the Seleukid patron god Apollo. Yet the coinage maintains the legend ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY indicating nominal servitude to the Seleukid king. This legend remained unchanged despite the accession to the throne of Seleukos III in 246 BC. In effect, this denies any allegiance to the latter king, while at the same time attesting to the legitimacy of Diodotos’ claim to the throne via his initial appointment under Antiochos II. Following the death of Diodotos I around 240 BC his son, Diodotos II, adopted the title of king, altering the legend of the coinage to that of ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔIOΔITOY, an unequivocal statement of independence.
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Bactria,_Diodotos_I_posthumous_issue_Tetradrachm_.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Diodotos II, ca. 240-230 BC, AR Tetradrachm 11 viewsPosthumous diademed idealised head of Diodotos I right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔIOΔITOY (of King Diodotos). Zeus striding left, hurling thunderbolt in right hand, aegis over extended left arm; eagle standing at his feet.

Holt B2 (Holt B2 example 3 = this coin); Kritt B2; Bopearachchi 6A; SNG ANS 9, 87; Qunduz 8; HGC 12, 21. Struck ca. 230 BC at Mint "B" - Baktra.

(25 mm, 16.42 g, 6h).
CNG 778209; ex -CNG e-Auction 124, October 2005, 139 (incorrectly attributed as Holt B1); ex- Munz und Medaillen Fixed Price List 332 (1972).

The coin was struck shortly before Euthydemos overthrew Diodotos II. The idealised posthumous image of Diodotos I on the obverse was a statement of the legitimacy of the right of Diodotos II to the throne of Baktria, as the lineal successor to Diodotos I. This B2 issue is distinguished from the preceding B1 type by the absence of a wreath beneath the extended arm of Zeus on the reverse. Holt suggested that the removal of the wreath from coinage followed Diodotos II’s treaty with the Parthians. The wreath is believed to have been instituted as a celebration of Diodotos I victory over Arsaces in the previous decade and thus potentially perceived as an insult to the Parthians on consummation of the treaty.
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Baktrian Kingdom, Diodotos II, ca. 240-230 BC, Æ Double Unit5 viewsHead of Hermes right, wearing petasos.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔIOΔITOY (of King Diodotos). Athena facing, spear in right hand, shield in left.

HGC 12, 25; Bopearachchi Serie 12A; SNG ANS 9, 102; Mitchiner 79a; Holt H1; Kritt H1; Sear 7505. Ai Khanoum mint.

(20 mm, 7.12 g, 6h).
CNG eAuction 158, 14 Feb. 2007, 63.
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Baktrian Kingdom, Diodotos II, ca. 240-230 BC, Æ Double Unit 13 viewsLaureate head of Zeus right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔIOΔITOY Artemis right holding transverse torch; star to right.

HGC 12, 27; SNG ANS 9, 96; Mitchiner 82; Holt Ι2; Kritt Ι2; Sear GCV 7504 var. (hound at Artemis feet). Ai Khanoum mint.

(22 mm, 9.6 g, 6h).
Sayles & Lavender.

Artemis depicted on the reverse of this coin was the twin sister of Apollo and goddess of the Moon. A huntress with legendary skills in archery, she brought fertility to the land and special protection to women in childbirth. The historian Frank Holt wrote ‘A better patron goddess for a city such as Ai Khanoum could not have been found. It may only be coincidence, but the choice of Artemis as one female type for this city has a faint echo down through the ages. The ancient Greek name of the polis has vanished from history, but its current appellation derives from Turko-Uzbek and means “Lady Moon”. Local legends offer several explanations and identify various important women as the eponymous hero of the site. For example, local village women still bring votive offerings to a “Lady Moon”, protector of mothers and infants. Another “Lady Moon” was associated with irrigation canals and yet another with control over the rivers that flowed by the walls of the city. Such “modern” folktales reverberate with ancient echoes of Artemis/Anahita, goddess of the moon, mistress of the fertilizing waters, and guardian of women in childbirth.’
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Bactria,_Eukratides_I_Pedigree_Tetradrachm.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides I, ca. 171-145 BC, AR Tetradrachm 33 viewsΒΑΣΙΛΕYΣ MEΓAΣ EYKPATIΔHΣ Diademed and draped bust of a mature Eukratides right, wearing a crested helmet decorated with ear and horn of a bull.
HΛIOKΛIOΣ KAI ΛAOΔIKHΣ Co-joined busts facing right of Eukratides parents, Heliokles and Laodike, ΦΛΩ monogram to left.

Bopearachchi Series 15 A; SNG ANS 526-527; Mitchiner 182a; Qunduz 245-246; HGC 12, 133; Sear 7572.

(30 mm, 16.16 g, 12h).

Gorny & Mosch Giessener Munzhandlung Auction 126, October 2003, 1534.
The distinctive reddish black remnant patina of this coin is a characteristic of the silver coins from the Mir Zakah deposit. It is probably from this, the largest hoard of coins ever found, that the coin is derived.

This issue may have been inspired by the earlier “pedigree” coinage of Agathokles and Pantaleon, but equally likely given the many apparent anomalies associated with the issue, is that it was issued by the parents of Eukratides as statement of their position and prestige in Baktrian society. Heliokles’ bare head indicates that he was not a king, whereas the diadem on Laodike’s head suggests that she was of royal blood. Tarn identified her as a Seleukid princess, daughter of Seleukos II and sister of Antiochus III. On the other hand, Hollis in Laodike Mother of Eucratides of Baktria makes a plausible case that Laodike was the daughter of Antiochos III. Hollis argues that Eukratides was in this way connected to the Seleukid royal family and was perhaps facilitated by the latter in his endeavor to seize the Baktrian throne.

This coinage has a number of curious characteristics. The legend on this coin names Eukratides is in the nominative case, so that it serves to label his portrait rather than to identify him as the issuing authority of the coinage. The legend naming his parents, on the other hand, is in the genitive, normally used to indicate a filial relationship an argument supported by Hollis. However, it could also imply that Heliokles and Laodike had authorized the coinage. Both sides of the coin have defined filleted borders, unique in the coinage of Eukratides. All other issues bear only an obverse border around the image of the king. The fabric of these coins indicates that Heliokles and Laodike occupy the obverse, anvil struck side of the coin. Nevertheless, they are most frequently described in the opposite manner, in accord with the convention that the ruler occupies the obverse side of the coin.
1 commentsn.igma
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Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides I, ca. 171-145 BC, AR Tetradrachm 32 viewsDiademed bust of a youthful Eukratides right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ EYKPATIΔOY (of King Eukratides) Dioskouroi on horseback charging right, carrying spears and palm branches, PK monogram to lower right.

Bopearachchi Series1B; SNG ANS 9, 431; Mitchiner 168(f); Qunduz 108-114; HGC 12, 130; Sear GCV 7568.

(32 mm, 16.75 g, 12h).
From LWHT Col.; CNG 73, 13 Sep. 2006, 535.

Eukratides I came to power in a revolt against the Euthydemid dynasty commencing around 171 BC and continuing for a decade. He extended his dominion to include all of Baktria and its realms both north and south of the Hindu Kush. Around 145 BC, Eukratides was murdered by his one of his own sons, probably Plato. By this time Baktria was weakened by the protracted struggle for power. The demise of Eukratides provided a catalyst for Scythian nomads to cross the Oxus, eventually to overrun Baktria. The city of Ai Khanoum appears to have been amongst the first to fall to invaders. This is evidenced by the fact that no coins later than those of Eukratides have been found in the excavations at Ai Khanoum. Within a decade Baktria had fragmented, overrun by Scythian nomads from the north, with the possible exception of a small Greek enclave in the eastern foothills of the Hindu Kush and the associated valley passes that led to the south and the Kabul Valley. A small remnant Greek civilization remained for another century to the south of the Hindu Kush before being overrun.
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Baktria,_Eukratides_I_Tetradrachm.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides I, ca. 171-145 BC, AR Tetradrachm15 viewsDiademed and draped bust of a mature Eukratides right, wearing a crested helmet decorated with ear and horn of a bull.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ MEΓAΛOY EYKPATIΔOY (of King Eukratides the Great) Dioskouroi on horseback charging right, carrying spears and palm branches, ΦΛΩ monogram beneath hooves right.

Bopearachchi Series. 6 O; SNG ANS 9, 467; Mitchiner 177a; Qunduz 135-136; HGC 12, 131; Sear GCV 7570 var. (monogram).

(32 mm, 15.81 g, 12h).
HJB 151, Nov. 2006, 221; ex- Coin Galleries 21 Nov. 1974, 371.

The epithet MEΓAΛOY (Great) indicates that this coin was struck at the apogee of Eukratides power, following the complete conquest of the Baktria.
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Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides II, ca. 145-140 BC, AR Tetradrachm 28 viewsDiademed bust of Eukratides II r.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ EYKPATIΔOY Apollo standing l., arrow in his r. hand, in l. hand a bow resting on ground, monogram inner l. field.

Bopearachchi Series 3B; Mitchiner 173a (attributed to Eukratides I); SNG ANS 9, 625 (same dies); HGC 12, 162.

(31 mm, 16.62 g, 12h).

Harlan J. Berk Buy or Bid Sale 164 (Apr. 2009), Lot 251.
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Bactria,_Euthydemos_I_Tetradrachm_old_portrait.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Euthydemos I, ca. 230-200 BC, AR Tetradrachm 21 viewsDiademed head of an elderly Euthydemos right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ EYΘYΔHMOY Herakles seated left on rock, resting club on thigh, PK monogram in inner right field.

SNG ANS 9, 141-142; Kritt B17; Mitchiner 94a; Qunduz 19-20; HGC 12, 43; Sear GCV 7516.
Mint “B” – Baktra ca. 206-200 BC.

(26 mm, 15.92 g, 12h).
Realms Ancient Coins; ex- CNG.

The coinage portraits of Euthydemos range from youthful to elderly, reflecting the thirty year duration of his reign, which is inferred to have ended as early as 200 BC by recent workers (Kritt), or as late as 190 BC by earlier workers (Mitchiner). This portrayal probably represents the king in his sixties or seventies, after the invasion of Baktria by Antiochos III. The late life portrayal of Euthydemos is considered to be amongst the finest Hellenistic numismatic art. It shows a world weary, perhaps dissolute figure, for who the exercise of power has become as much a burden as a benefit. The Euthydemos series extending from youth to late life is almost unique in it’s true to life representation of the physical process of aging; the vitality and optimism of youth gradually replaced by the weariness of age, all captured in the progression of the portraits of Euthydemos.
1 commentsn.igma
Bactria,_Euthydemos_I_Tetradrachm_-_mature_portrait.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Euthydemos I, ca. 230-200 BC, AR Tetradrachm 14 viewsDiademed head of the mature Euthydemos right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ EYΘYΔHMOY (of King Euthydemos). Herakles seated left on rock, resting club on pile of rocks, monogram in inner right field. Die shift in lower field with some minor scratches.

Bopearachchi Series 5B; SNG ANS 9, 131; Kritt A14; Mitchiner 85c; Qunduz12-14; HGC 12, 40; Sear 7514.
Mint “A” - Ai Khanoum ca. 215-208 BC.

(29 mm, 16.96 g, 12h).
Pars Coins.

This depiction of Euthydemos on the obverse of this coin has a portrait quality. It probably closely approximates the features of the ruler in middle age.
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Bactria,_Euthydemos_I_Tetradrachm_-_youthful_portrait.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Euthydemos I, ca. 230-200 BC, AR Tetradrachm 21 viewsDiademed head of a relatively youthful Euthydemos right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ EYΘYΔHMOY Herakles seated left on rock, resting club on pile of rocks, monogram in inner right field, letter A in exergue.

Bopearachchi Series 5C; SNG ANS 9, 137 (same reverse die); Kritt, A8; HGC 12, 40.
Mint “A” - Ai Khanoum ca. 225-220/215 BC.

(29 mm, 16.7 g, 12h).
CNG 782054; ex- Semon Lipcer Coll.; ex- CNG 63, May 2003, 923.
1 commentsn.igma
Bactria,_Euthydemos_1_Tetradrachm_-_youthful_portrait.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Euthydemos I, ca. 230-200 BC, AR Tetradrachm 15 viewsDiademed youthful head right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ EYΘYΔHMOY (of King Euthydemos). Herakles seated left on rocks, holding club set on rocks; monogram lower right field.

Kritt A1; Bopearachchi 5B; SNG ANS 9,125; HGC 12, 40; Mitchiner 85c; Qunduz 10-11.
Mint “A” - Ai Khanoum ca. 230 BC.

(28 mm, 16.38 g, 6h).
CNG eAuction 170, 8 Aug. 2007, 138.

Euthydemos I overthrew Diodotos II around 230 BC. This coin is amongst the first issued by Euthydemos. The inverted die axes convention with which it was struck is a characteristic of Mint “A” (Ai Khanoum) in the preceding Diodotid era. This was changed to parallel die axes convention in the early years of the reign of Euthydemos. Late in Euthydemos reign, Antiochos III the Great, sought to reimpose Seleukid authority over Baktria. Euthydemos withstood a two year siege by Antiochos at the fortress city of Baktra in 208-206 BC at the conclusion of which Antiochos was forced to recognize an independent Baktria. Demetrios, the son of Euthydemos, succeeded the latter around 200 BC and extended the kingdom south into the Kabul Valley and northwest Pakistan. However, the Euthydemid dynasty was destroyed by Eukratides I who progressively deposed the successors of Demetrios I.

The reverse image of a “weary Herakles” on the Euthydemos series of tetradrachms is noteworthy for its antecedents in the Lydian issues of Antiochus II. The ancient historian Polybius noted that Euthydemos came from Magnesia. However, which of three possible cities or regions called Magnesia remains uncertain. Based on the similarity of the reverse image of Euthydemos’ silver coins with those of the Lydian types, it is inferred that he may have come from Magnesia ad Sipylum in Lydia where he could have been exposed to the” weary Herakles” issues prior to his migration to Baktria. Such being the case, Euthydemos could not have been born much later than 270 BC, in which case he would have been in his seventies at the time of his death. The aged portrait on the last of his coinage tends to confirm this inference.
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Bactria,_Euthydemos_I,_AE_Dichalkon_.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Euthydemos I, ca. 230-200 BC, Æ Dichalkon 20 viewsHead of Heracles right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ EYΘYΔHMOY above and below horse prancing right.

SNG ANS 9, 146-165; Kritt AK-1; Mitchiner 87; HGC 12, 53.
Ai Khanoum 225-208/6 BC.

(24 mm, ca. 8 g, 6h).

The fabric of this coin, characterized by its thick flan and beveled obverse edge, plus the 6 o’clock die axis, indicate that it is a product of the mint at Ai Khanoum. This coin type was the most abundant in the Ai Khanoum excavations with 48 examples recorded. The issue preceded the invasion of Baktria and the capture of Ai Khanoum by Antiochos III in 208-206 BC. Subsequent Euthydemid bronze coinage was restricted to the mint at Baktra/Balkh, typified by a coin fabric consisting of a thin flan.
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Bactria,_Pantaleon_AE.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Pantaleon I, ca. 185-180 BC, Æ Square Unit 24 viewsFemale Hindu deity Laksmi advancing left holding lotus, Rajane Patalevasa in Kharoshthi script.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠANTAΛEONT[OYΣ] Lioness standing right

SNG ANS 9, 265; Mitchiner 161; HGC 12, 105; Sear GCV 7564. Pushkalavati mint.

(22 x19 mm, 11.25 g, 12h).
Numismatic Fine Arts Dec. 1982, 254; ex-Superior Jun. 1978, 2387; ex- Bolender, Oct. 1946.

Pantaleon is inferred to have been a brother of Euthydemos II and Agathokles. Based on the numismatic evidence, he appears to have reigned for a brief period in co-regency with his other brother Agathokles and possibly his uncle Antimachos, following the death of Euthydemos II. His coinage is the rarest of the of the Euthydemid rulers, suggesting that he was quickly dispatched by the usurper Eukratides.
1 commentsn.igma
Bactrian_Antialkidas_GCV_7633.JPG
Baktrian Kingdom: Antialkidas, 145 - 135 BC26 viewsObv: Draped bust of Zeus facing right, thunderbolt over his left shoulder; BAΣIΛEΩΣ behind, NIKHΦOPOY above, ANTIAΛKIΔOY before.

Rev: Two palm branches between the caps of the Dioscuri; Karosthi legend around, monogram beneath, Σ in lower field.

Square Æ 18, Unknown mint, c. 145 - 135 BC

8.46 grams, 18.32 mm, 0°

GCV 7633, SNG ANS 1119-27
SPQR Coins
Baktrian_Menander_I_GCV_7603.JPG
Baktrian Kingdom: Menander I Soter, 160 - 145 BC32 viewsObv: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ MENANΔPOY, draped bust of Menander I, wearing a crested helmet, facing right.

Rev: Karosthi legend around, Athena Alkidemos advancing left brandishing a thunderbolt and holding a shieild, monogram in field to right.

Silver Drachm, c. 155 - 130 BC

2.47 grams, 17 mm, 0°

GCV 7603, SNG ANS 855-65
SPQR Matt
Baktrian_Menander_I_GCV_7602.JPG
Baktrian Kingdom: Menander I Soter, 160 - 145 BC32 viewsObv: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ MENANΔPOY, heroic bust of Menander I, viewed from behind, head turned left, wearing diadem and aegis, and thrusting a spear with his right hand.

Rev: Karosthi legend around, Athena Alkidemos advancing left, brandishing a thunderbolt and holding a shield, monogram in field to right.

Silver Drachm, c. 155 - 130 BC

2.43 grams, 18 mm, 0°

GCV 7602, SNG ANS 739-44
SPQR Matt
frederick_II.png
BCC 2352 viewsCrusader - Medieval BCC 23
Frederick II 1198-1250 CE
Kingdom of Sicily and Jeru-
salem 1229-1243 CE
Obv: +F.ROMANORVM
Yoke, below, I P R
Rev: IERSL.ET.SICIL.R
(Jerusalem and Sicily R.)
Cross with four crescents.
AR 16.5mm 0.8g Axis: 0
v-drome
valence_2_coins.png
BCC 25/2433 viewsCrusader - Medieval BCC 25 and BCC 24
Bishops of Valence,France
1157-1276 CE
Obv:VRBS.VALENT[IAI]
Stylized Angel?
Rev:+S.APOLLINARS
(St Apollinaris of Valence
d.520CE) Cross with one annulet.
The half coin has much sharper detail
than the second coin. It is slightly larger
than the whole coin at 18mm vs. 17mm,
but weighs almost the same at 0.55gm.
vs. 0.85 for the whole coin. The legend
on the obverse of the half coin begins at
7 o'clock in relation to the angel figure.
However, unlike any other coins of this
type that I have seen on-line, the obverse
legend on the full (complete) coin starts at
1 o'clock. The possibility has been raised
that original issues of this and other types
were circulating alongside locally made
copies in the Eastern Crusader kingdoms
at the time. Comments or information are
always welcome. I do not have any
reference books for this period.
v-drome
jerusalem_1.JPG
BCC 561 viewsCrusader Kingdom of Jerusalem
Amalricus Rex 1162-1174 CE
Rev: [D]E IER[VSALEM+]
Octastyle temple (Dome of the Rock)
10mm approx 0.9 g.
I have seen fragments with the same reverse
issued by his brother, Baldwin III 1144-1162 CE.
(or perhaps his son Baldwin IV)
I think all of these are extremely rare.
1 commentsv-drome
amaury_I.JPG
BCC 694 viewsCrusader Kingdom of Jerusalem
Amalricus Rex 1162-1174 CE
Obv:AMA[L]RICV[S]RE[X +]
Six pointed star of David
original diameter. approx.25mm.
original weight perhaps 8 to 10 grams.
These coins were apparently never issued
whole, and may have been cut up before leaving the mint. They
may have been intended as offerings for pilgrims. Any comments or
information would be appreciated. (the coin fragments match types
but are clearly from different individual coins).
2 commentsv-drome
alexander_II_BCC_gr3.jpg
BCC gr319 viewsSeleucid Kingdom
Alexander II Zabinas 128-123BCE
OBV: Diademed head of Alexander right.
Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ
Dionysus standing left, holding
kantharos and thyrsos.
In field, date: ΔΠΡ (183 =129/8 BCE)
19.5mm. 6.07gm. Axis: 0
Antioch ad Orontes, mint
Possible ref: SC 2229.1-3
v-drome
Demetrius_III_Gr4a.jpg
BCC Gr419 viewsSeleucid Kingdom
Demetrius III Eucaerus 96-87 BCE
Obv: Diademed head of
Demetrius right
Rev:ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΘΕΟΥ
ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟPΟΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ
Hermes standing left holding palm
and kerykeion.
Uncertain date and monogram to left.
AE17mm. 4.14gm. Axis: 0
Damascus mint
v-drome
nabataean_1.jpg
BCC NC122 viewsNabataean Kingdom - Petra
Rabbel II and Gamilat 70 - 106 CE
(Gamilat, queen 76-102CE)
Obv: Jugate busts of Rabbel II and Queen Shaquilat (!)
Rev:RB’L /GMLT Nabataean inscription in two lines
between crossed cornucopiae.
17x15mm. 1.67gm. Axis:0
This coin is a hybrid of an obverse die from the early part
of Rabbel II’s reign (Meshorer 146), combined with a later
reverse of Rabbel II and Queen Gamilat (Meshorer 163).
Reference: Meshorer 162, Rare.
(Thanks to John Anthony for the attribution)
v-drome
aimeryDeLusignanm40.jpg
Billion denier Aimery de Lusignan 1197-1205 CE and later to 1220.13 viewsObverse: Cross pattee, annulet in first and fourth quarters. AMALRICVS REX o
Reverse: + DE IERVSALEM holy Sepulchre
Mint: Jerusalem
Date: 1197-1205 CE
Longuet p. 171, Malloy 40.
16mm, .34g

Most likely minted during the period of the Third Crusade (1190-92) or later up to near 1225 or so. Hoards show that these debased deniers were issued in large numbers, and often recoined. Weights ranged from .20 to .70 grams and up to around 33% silver. The allusion to the previous fortunes of the Kingdom are represented by the Holy Sepulcher which had previously been in Latin Christian hands.
wileyc
BITHYNIA_PRUSIAS_I.jpg
BITHYNIA KINGDOM - Prusias I24 viewsBITHYNIA KINGDOM - Prusias I (228-185 B.C.) AE20. Laureate head of Apollo right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΡΟΥΣΙΟΣ either side of bow & quiver. BMC 209, 9. RecGen 17. Sear #7263.
dpaul7
prusiasII_SNGcop639_#1.jpg
Bithynia, Prusias I, SNG Copenhagen 639 #165 viewsKingdom of Bithynia, Prusias I., 183-149 BC
AE 20, 6.38g
obv. (anepigraphic)
Head of Dionysos, with ivy-wreath, r.
rev. Kentaur Cheiron, stg. r., holding Lyra with both hands, waving chlamys behind him
Monogram in lower r. field
SNG Copenhagen 639; BMC 9; SG 7266
about VF

For more information look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'
Jochen
prusiasII_SNGcop639_#2.jpg
Bithynia, Prusias I, SNG Copenhagen 639 #263 viewsKingdom of Bithynia, Prusias I., 183-149 BC
AE 20, 5.00g
obv. (anepigraphic)
Head of Dionysos, with ivy-wreath, r.
rev. Kentaur Cheiron, stg. r., holding Lyra with both hands, waving chlamys behind him
Monogram in lower r. field
SNG Copenhagen 639; BMC 9; SG 7266
about VF

For more information look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'
Jochen
1~9.PNG
Bithynian Kingdom Prusias II10 viewsBithynian Kingdom Prusias II 185-149 B.C.

Obverse.head right,wearing winged diadem.

Reverse.naked Hercules standing left, holding club and lion's skin
Macedonian Warrior
Bithynian_Kingdom,_King_Prusius_II.jpg
Bithynian kingdom, King Prusias II18 viewsAE17
185-149 B.C.
17mm, 4.93g
GCV-7268

Obverse:
Head of Prusius right, wearing winged diadem.

Reverse:
BAΣIΛEΩΣ
ΠPOYΣIOY
Herakles standing left, holding club in right and lion skin in left.
rubadub
1Bithynia.JPG
Bithynian Kingdom, Reign of Prusias I76 views228-185 BC
AE17 (3.88g)
O: Laureate head of Apollo right.
R: BAΣIΛEΩΣ and ΠPOYΣIOY on either side of quiver and bow.
SNG Cop 146; SNG von Aulock 250; Sear 7263; BMC 13 209,9
1 commentsEnodia
BOSP_KINGDOM_2_HEADS.jpg
BOSPORAN KINGDOM -- Queen Gepaepyris28 viewsBOSPORAN KINGDOM -- Queen Gepaepyris (37-39 AD) AE23 12 Nummi. BACIΛICCHC ΓHΠAIΠYPEΩC, diademed draped bust right / IB, veiled bust of Aphrodite Urania right, wearing calathus. MacDonald 306, Anokhin 326 var. dpaul7
BosporusRhomMed.jpg
BOSPORAN KINGDOM, Sauromates I30 viewsAD 93/4-123/4
AE 48 units (29mm, 10.84 gm, 12h)
Obv: diademed, draped bust of Sauromates left
Rev: nike advancing left, holding wreath, flanked by mark of value M-H, all within wreath
Ref: MacDonald 397/2.



2 commentsTIF
thothorses_2_k.jpg
Bosporan Kingdom, Tiberius Julius Thothorses, c. AD 278-308/95 viewsAE Stater, 20mm, 7.6g, 12h; Uncertain mint (Panticapaeum?), AD 290.
Obv.: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΘΟΘΩΡΣΟΥ; Diademed, draped bust of king right.
Rev.: Laureate head of Diocletian right, tamga in right field // ΖΠΦ (587 = 290 AD).
Reference: cf. Anokhin 735, Mionnet 2, 160ff.
Notes: eBay, 10/23/15, rq
John Anthony
2_bosporos_7_22_10.jpg
BOSPORUS KINGDOM21 viewslaney
034~1.JPG
Bosporus Kingdom71 viewsSauromates I
90 - 124 A.D.
Bronze 48 nummia
12.84 gm, 27 mm, 0°
Wreath on curule chair, shield and spear left, scepter topped by human head on right
TI OYΛIOY BACIΛEΩC [C]AYPOMATOY
Mark of value MH (48 nummia) within wreath
BMC 13 p. 60, 25 var.; SGICV 5457 var.
Panticapaeum Mint?
1 commentsJaimelai
bosporus_07_22_10A.jpg
BOSPORUS KINGDOM21 views315 - 342 AD
AE 18 mm max 6.89 g
O: BUST OF KING RHESKUPORIS V RIGHT
R: BUST OF ROMAN EMPEROR (PROBABLY CONSTANTINE) RIGHT
laney
BOSPORUS_KINGDOM_--_Rhoemetalkes_48_nummi.jpg
BOSPORUS KINGDOM -- Rhoemetalkes 12 viewsBOSPORUS KINGDOM -- Rhoemetalkes (c. 133-154 AD) . Æ 48 Nummia. Obv.: Draped and diademed bust right; trident before. ΒΑCΙΛΕΩC ΡΟΙΜΗΤΑΛΚΟΥ Rev.: MH within wreath. Reference: Frolova pp. 149-155; SNG Copenhagen 58. dpaul7
sauromates.jpg
BOSPORUS KINGDOM: Sauromates I71 viewsSauromates I - C. 93-124 A.D. bronze 48 Nummia. Obverse: Bust of king with long hair; ΒΑCΙΛΕΩC CAYPOMATOY. Reverse: Value mark of MH (48 Nummia) at sides of VIctory advancing left, holding wreath in extended hand. ex-Phil DeVicchi collection. SNG Cop. 39.dpaul7
BRAZIL Johannes X Reis.jpg
BRAZIL - Joao VI95 viewsBRAZIL - Joao VI (1818-1822) CU 10 Reis.
Obv.: JOANNES VI D G PORT ET BRAS ET ALG REX around crowned X/1822/.B. The X flanked by 4-petalled rosettes.
Rev.: PECUNIA TOTUM CIRCUMIT ORBEM around arms of Portugal/Brazil Kingdom.
Reference: KM-314.2
dpaul7
1819_2_Oboli_Ionia.JPG
BRITISH PROTECTORATE, GREEK IONIAN ISLANDS, 1819 GEORGE III AE 2 Oboli (Penny)19 viewsObverse: IONIKON KPATOΣ:. Winged lion of St. Mark standing left, head wearing nimbus crown facing, and holding Bible containing seven arrows in outstretched paw; 1819 below.
Reverse: BRITANNIA. Britannia seated on globe facing left, shield leaning at her side, right hand resting on her right knee and holding laurel-branch, left hand holding trident.
Edge: Plain
Diameter: 34mm (Penny) | Weight: 18.4gm | Die Axis: 6h
KM 33 | Pridmore 18
Very Rare

The dies for this coin were engraved by William Wyon and the coin was struck at the Royal Mint in London. This issue, the 2 Oboli, was only struck in 1819.

Britain issued coins for the Ionian Islands based on the obol, equal to a British half-penny, intermittently until 1862. One obol was equal to four lepta up until 1834 when it was revalued at five lepta.
The obol was replaced by the Greek drachma when the Ionian Islands were given to Greece.

The Ionian Islands were seized by the British from the French when the French fleet was defeated off the island of Zakynthos (Zante) in 1809. Britain immediately took possession of Zante, Cephalonia, Kythira and Ithaca and in 1810 took over Santa Maura as well. The islands of Corfu and Paxos remained occupied by the French until 1814 when they too surrendered to the British who then ruled all the islands until 1864.
With de facto British occupation the Ionian Islands were placed under the exclusive "amicable protection" of the United Kingdom. This arrangement was formalised in 1817 when the seven principal islands became the United States of the Ionian Islands formed as a British Protectorate. The seven main islands are represented by the seven arrows held by the winged lion of St. Mark depicted on the coins. The British greatly improved the islands' communications and introduced modern education and justice systems, but after Greek independence was established, the islanders pressed for union with Greece and they were ceded to Greece in 1864 as a gift of the United Kingdom to the newly enthroned King George.
*Alex
1820_2_Lepta_Ionia.JPG
BRITISH PROTECTORATE, GREEK IONIAN ISLANDS, 1820 GEORGE III AE 2 Lepta (Farthing)13 viewsObverse: IONIKON KPATOΣ:. Winged lion of St. Mark standing left, head wearing nimbus crown facing, and holding Bible containing seven arrows in outstretched paw; 1820• below.
Reverse: BRITANNIA•. Britannia seated on globe facing left, shield leaning at her side, right hand resting on her right knee and holding laurel-branch, left hand holding trident.
Edge: Plain
Diameter: 22mm (Farthing) | Weight: 4.67gm | Die Axis: 6h
KM 31 | Pridmore 21

The dies for this coin were engraved by William Wyon and the coin was struck at the Royal Mint in London.

Britain issued coins for the Ionian Islands based on the obol, equal to a British half-penny, intermittently until 1862. One obol was equal to four lepta up until 1834 when it was revalued at five lepta.
The obol was replaced by the Greek drachma when the Ionian Islands were given to Greece.

The Ionian Islands were seized by the British from the French when the French fleet was defeated off the island of Zakynthos (Zante) in 1809. Britain immediately took possession of Zante, Cephalonia, Kythira and Ithaca and in 1810 took over Santa Maura as well. The islands of Corfu and Paxos remained occupied by the French until 1814 when they too surrendered to the British who then ruled all the islands until 1864.
With de facto British occupation the Ionian Islands were placed under the exclusive "amicable protection" of the United Kingdom. This arrangement was formalised in 1817 when the seven principal islands became the United States of the Ionian Islands formed as a British Protectorate. The seven main islands are represented by the seven arrows held by the winged lion of St. Mark depicted on the coins. The British greatly improved the islands' communications and introduced modern education and justice systems, but after Greek independence was established, the islanders pressed for union with Greece and they were ceded to Greece in 1864 as a gift of the United Kingdom to the newly enthroned King George.
*Alex
1862_LEPTON.JPG
BRITISH PROTECTORATE, GREEK IONIAN ISLANDS, 1862 VICTORIA AE Lepton9 viewsObverse: IONIKON KPATOΣ•. Winged lion of St. Mark standing left, head wearing nimbus crown facing, and holding Bible containing seven arrows in outstretched paw; 1862• below.
Reverse: BRITANNIA•. Britannia seated facing right, right hand resting on shield at her side, left hand holding trident.
Edge: Plain
Diameter: 16.5mm | Weight: 1.75gm | Die Axis: 6h
KM 34

The dies for this coin were engraved by William Wyon and the coin was struck at the Royal Mint in London.

Britain issued coins for the Ionian Islands based on the obol, equal to a British half-penny, intermittently until 1862. One obol was equal to four lepta up until 1834 when it was revalued at five lepta.
The obol was replaced by the Greek drachma when the Ionian Islands were given to Greece.

The Ionian Islands were seized by the British from the French when the French fleet was defeated off the island of Zakynthos (Zante) in 1809. Britain immediately took possession of Zante, Cephalonia, Kythira and Ithaca and in 1810 took over Santa Maura as well. The islands of Corfu and Paxos remained occupied by the French until 1814 when they too surrendered to the British who then ruled all the islands until 1864.
With de facto British occupation the Ionian Islands were placed under the exclusive "amicable protection" of the United Kingdom. This arrangement was formalised in 1817 when the seven principal islands became the United States of the Ionian Islands formed as a British Protectorate. The seven main islands are represented by the seven arrows held by the winged lion of St. Mark depicted on the coins. The British greatly improved the islands' communications and introduced modern education and justice systems, but after Greek independence was established, the islanders pressed for union with Greece and they were ceded to Greece in 1864 as a gift of the United Kingdom to the newly enthroned King George.
*Alex
Vandal_ab.jpg
Bronze nummus - Vandal kingdom153 viewsVandal kingdom. Æ nummus (10 mm, 0.45 g). Obverse: Diademed and draped bust right. Reverse: Eagle or zoomorphic deity within wreath. Wroth 3:18.

Very rare. A similar coin in British Museum (Wroth 3:18) was purchased from Mr. J. Doubleday in 1849 and was believed to originate from Northern Africa. Probably struck in the Vandal kingdom during the time period from c. 450 to 530. One possibility is that the coin imitates Ostrogothic 10 nummi coins with an uppright eagle minted in Rome for Theoderic the great. The vandal king Thrasamund was married to Amalfrida, the sister of Theoderic, from 500 to 523 AD. The coin may perhaps have been struck during this time period. Another possibility is that the reverse shows the Egyptian god Anubis. Comments and alternative interpretations are welcome.

Ex Poncin collection; CNG 134, lot 455, 2006; Beast Coins Auction I, lot 205, 2009
3 commentsjbc
BULGARIAN.jpg
BULGARIA - IVAN ALEXANDER121 viewsBEAUTIFUL Medieval AR Grosh Jesus and Two Kings -- Bulgarian Kingdom -- Nice toned with high relief Silver grosh of Ivan Alexander (1331 - 1371 A.D.) 22 mm, 1.73 g. Obv.: Christ enthroned facing, hands raised in benediction. Monograms in Cyrillic on both sides. Rev.: Ivan Alexander (left) and Michael Asen (right) both sides of banner. Monograms in Cyrillic on both sides. dpaul7
BULGARIA IVAN STATIMIR.jpg
BULGARIA - Ivan Stratismir94 viewsBULGARIA Vidin Kingdom - Ivan Stratismir (1356 – 1396) Reduced silver Grosh, Vidin mint. Rare r4 mint mark grosh. This one is second emission with diameter 18 mm and weight 0.56 g. The first issue has same diameter but weight 1.40 g. This one has unusually good details.
Obv.: Bust of Jesus Christ facing. Legend in Bulgarian between two doted circles.
Rev.: The king enthroned facing. Flower (star?) as a mint mark in the lower field. Legend in Greek between two doted circles.
Ref.: A. Radushev, G. Jecov. Catalog of the Bulgarian Medieval Coins. p. 178, 1.14.4
1 commentsdpaul7
Bulgaria_AR_Grosch_Vidin-Kingdom_Ivan_Stracimir__1356_-_1397-_Q-001_17mm_0_62g.jpg
Bulgaria, Ivan Stracimir, (1356 - 1397 A.D.), Second Bulgarian Empire, Vidin Kingdom, AR-grosch, Moushmov 7542, 119 viewsBulgaria, Ivan Stracimir, (1356 - 1397 A.D.), Second Bulgarian Empire, Vidin Kingdom, AR-grosch, Moushmov 7542,
avers:- nimbate half length figure of Christ, right hand raised in benediction, book of gospels in left, IC - XC flanking head, legend around
revers:- Stracimar enthroned facing, nimbate, scepter in right, mappa in left, lis left and right, rosette between legs, legend around
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 17mm, weight: 0,62g, axis: h,
mint: Vidin, date: 1356 - 1397 A.D., ref: Moushmov 7542
Q-001
quadrans
MISC_Bulgaria_Stratsimir.jpg
Bulgaria, Second Empire, Vidin Kingdom. Ivan Stratsimir (1356-1396)13 viewsDimnik & Dobrinić 11/10.1.3; Raduchev & Zhekov 1.14.6; cf. Youroukova & Penchev 107; Ljubić III, 2; cf. Moushmov 7542.

AR Groši/grosh (described in older references as a half groši/grosh); Third Chronological Group, variant B; Vidin mint; struck circa 1380-1385; .74 g., 17.52 mm. max., 0°

Obv.: Nimbate bust of Christ with cross within halo, raising right hand in benediction and holding Gospel book in left hand, IC - XC (= Jesus Christ) across field, all within beaded circle, abbreviated legend +IW СRАЦИМИР ЦРББ (= Ivan Stratsimir Tsar of the Bulgars).

Rev.: Nimbate Ivan Stratsimir wearing domed crown seated facing, holding scepter decorated with a lily forming a trefoil (with the lily depicted in heraldic manner; i.e., the central petal stands upright but the side petals bend downward) in his right hand and an akakia in his left, axe between his feet, abbreviated legend +IW СRАЦИМИР ЦРББ (= Ivan Stratsimir Tsar of the Bulgars).

Ivan Alexander divided his kingdom between his two sons. Ivan Stratsimir received Vidin. In 1365, the Hungarian King Louis I of Anjou captured Vidin. Sratsimir and his family were held captive in Croatia for four years but in 1369 Sratsimir was restored to his throne under Hungarian overlordship. After the Ottoman invasion in 1388, he was forced to acknowledge Ottoman overlordship and garrisons. In 1396 Sratsimir and his subjects aligned themselves with the anti-Ottoman Crusade led by the Hungarian king Sigismund of Luxemburg. The crusade ended in disaster at the battle of Nikopol on September 25, 1396. By the end of 1397 Sultan Bayezid I approached Vidin and, assured by the promise of his safety, Ivan Stratsimir came out to meet him. On the order of Bayezid I, Ivan Stratsimir was arrested and conveyed to Bursa, while the Sultan confiscated the contents of the Vidin treasury. Sratsimir's fate is unknown. Vidin was likely annexed by the Ottoman Empire in 1397, but at least part of the realm remained under the control of Sratsimir's son and heir Constantine II.
Stkp
Funan_w.jpg
Burma, Pyu kingdom39 viewsAr Tanka, c.250-600 AD, 9.4 gm, 33 mm

1 commentsManzikert
0-tracia-cabyle.jpg
Cabyle- Thracia9 viewsTHRACIA - KINGDOM OF TYLIS -
KAVAROS Unité, (PB, Æ 20) c. 225-218 AC.
Thrace, Cabyle
Ref : GC. BMC. Cop.- SNG.
Bar416 WSC.304

xokleng
00caligula.jpg
CALIGULA42 viewsKingdom of Bosporus. 37-38 AD. AE 10,78 grs. Bare head of Caligula right. ΓAIOV KAICAPOC ΓEPMANIKOV / Diademed head of Aspurgus right. Monogram behind.
RPC I 1904. Anokhin 320
benito
00caligula~0.jpg
CALIGULA17 viewsKingdom of Bosporus. 37-38 AD. AE 10,78 grs. Bare head of Caligula right. ΓAIOV KAICAPOC ΓEPMANIKOV / Diademed head of Aspurgus right. Monogram behind.
RPC I 1904. Anokhin 320
benito
lg_caligula_thrace.jpg
Caligula (Augustus), Thracian Kings29 viewsCaligula (Augustus)
Reign of Rhoemetalkes III, Thracian Kingdom
AE 6.94g / 22.75mm / -
ΓΑΙΩΚΑΙΑΡΙ or ΓΑΙΩΚΑΙΣΑΡ - Bust left
Ρ-Σ; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - Nike r. with wreath and malm on globe
Mint: (38 - 46 AD)
Ref: RPC 1725; Gorny & Moshc 126, 13-14 Oct 2003 Lot 1659
Further references:
http://www.coinarchives.com/a/lotviewer.php?LotID=59717&AucID=63&Lot=1659
http://www.coinarchives.com/a/lotviewer.php?LotID=94344&AucID=101&Lot=1637
http://www.cervantesvirtual.com/servlet/SirveObras/44602782922868295254468/025000_0004.pdf
Scotvs Capitis
MACW-5271.jpg
Cambodia: Khmer Kingdom of Angkor (802-1369) Pb Six-Unit (MACW-5271)9 viewsObv: Circular flan with floral lotus design repeated four times around the central hole
Rev: as obverse
SpongeBob
coin118.JPG
Cappadocia, Caesarea; Gordian III24 viewsCappadocia, Caesarea, Gordian III 238-244 Æ26

The city has been continuously inhabited since perhaps c. 3000 BCE[citation needed] with the establishment of the ancient trading colony at Kultepe (Ash Mountain) which is associated with the Hittites. The city has always been a vital trade centre as it is located on major trade routes, particularly along what was called the Great Silk Road. Kültepe, one of the oldest cities in Asia Minor, lies nearby.

As Mazaca, the city served as the residence of the kings of Cappadocia. In ancient times, it was on the crossroads of the trade routes from Sinope to the Euphrates and from the Persian Royal Road that extended from Sardis to Susa. In Roman times, a similar route from Ephesus to the East also crossed the city.

The city stood on a low spur on the north side of Mount Erciyes (Mount Argaeus in ancient times). Only a few traces of the ancient site survive in the old town. The city was the centre of a satrapy under Persian rule until it was conquered by Perdikkas, one of the generals of Alexander the Great when it became the seat of a transient satrapy by another of Alexander's former generals, Eumenes of Cardia. The city was subsequently passed to the Seleucid empire after the battle of Ipsus but became once again the centre of an autonomous Greater Cappadocian kingdom under Ariarathes III of Cappadocia in around 250 BC. In the ensuing period, the city came under the sway of Hellenistic influence, and was given the Greek name of Eusebia in honor of the Cappadocian king Ariarathes V Eusebes Philopator of Cappadocia (163–130 BCE). Under the new name of Caesarea, by which it has since been known, given to it by the last Cappadocian King Archelaus[5] or perhaps by Tiberius,[6] the city passed under formal Roman rule in 17 BCE.
Walls of the Seljuk era Sahabiye Medresesi, built in 1267 by the Seljuk vizier Sahip Ata Fahreddin Ali.

Caesarea was destroyed by the Sassanid king Shapur I after his victory over the Emperor Valerian I in AD 260. At the time it was recorded to have around 400,000 inhabitants. The city gradually recovered, and became home to several early Christian saints: saints Dorothea and Theophilus the martyrs, Gregory of Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa and Basil of Caesarea.

Obv: Laureate bust of Gordian, right.
Rev: Agalma of Mount Argaeus set on altar. Year 243 AD
ecoli
CAPPADOCIA_Ariarathes_IX_AR_drachm.jpg
CAPPADOCIAN KINGDOM = Ariarathes IX28 viewsCAPPADOCIAN KINGDOM = Ariarathes IX AR drachm 99 - 85 B.C. Diademed head of Ariarathes IV right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΡΙΑΡΑΘΟΥ ΕΥΣΕΒΟΥΣ, Athena Nicephorus standing left, AN monogram in inner left field, date ΙΓ (regnal year 13 = 87 BC) in exergue. SNG Copenhagen 900–903; Simonetta 9a; BMC-6dpaul7
IMG_4009.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariarathes V 163-130 BC, Drachm31 viewsCappadocian Kingdom
Ariarathes V
Drachm 4.02g
Year GA = 130-129 BC. Young head right / BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΡIAΡAΘOY EYΣEBOYΣ, Athena standing left holding Nike & spear, resting hand on shield on ground to right. FAP monogram in left field, IH monogram in right field, date ΓA in ex.
HGC 7, 811
Dented flan
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Cappadocia_Arithes_V_Eusebes_Philopater_drachm.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariarathes V Eusebes Philopater4 viewsAR drachm
18mm, 4.08 grams
163-130 BC, regnal yr 32 (130 BC)
Diademed head of Ariarathes V right
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΡΙΑΡΑΘΟΥ EYΣEBOYΣ, Athena standing left, holding Nike and resting hand on grounded shield set behind her; spear held in crook of arm; monograms to outer left, inner left and outer right; date (BΛ) in exergue.
Simonetta 11 (Ariarathes IV); SNG Copenhagen suppl. 643. EF
JBGood
Antiochus.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII70 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Houghton II 655 (same dies), SNG Spaer -, Newell SMA -, gVF, weight 16.157g, maximum diameter 28.8mm, die axis 0o, posthumous, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border; reverse BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU, Athena standing left, Nike in right, spear and shield in left, ligate DI / A left, A inner left, G inner right, Nike crowns epithet, laurel wreath border; scarce;

Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII.

Ex Houghton collection
Ex Forum
1 commentsPhiloromaos
ant_pan.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochus VII77 viewsSilver tetradrachm, (Houghton II 642 ff., SNG Spaer 1855, Newell SMA 282), Weight 16.560g, Max. diameter 27.9mm, Obv. diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border; Rev. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXDOY EYEPΠETOY, Athena standing left, Nike in right, spear and shield in left, ligate ΔI / A left, Nike extends wreath into laurel wreath border. Toned, some light scratches.

EX. Forvm Ancient Coins

Background info, courtesy Forvm Ancient Coins;

Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII.

4 commentsSteve E
Cappadocian_Kingdom_1c_img.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, Drachm, Ariarathes VIII 21 viewsSilver Drachm
Obv:– Diademed head of Ariarathes VIII right
Rev:– BASILEWS ARIARAQOU EPIFANES, Athena standing left, holding Nike and leaning on shield, T to left
Kingdom of Cappadocia. 101-100 B.C.
Reference:– BMC 2
maridvnvm
Cappadocian_Kingdom_1b_img.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, Drachm, Ariobarzanes I 25 viewsSilver Drachm
Obv:– Diademed head of the Ariobarzanes I right
Rev:– BASILEWS ARIOBARZANOY FOLORWMAIOY, Athena standing left holding Nike, spear & shield resting on ground to right, GA monogram to left
Kingdom of Cappadocia. 95-63 B.C.
Reference:– BMC 3
maridvnvm
Cappadocian Kingdom 1a img.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, Tetradrachm, In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII59 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:– Diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border.
Rev:– BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU, Athena standing left, Nike in right, spear and shield in left, ligate DI / A left, Nike extends wreath into laurel wreath border
c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII, 138 - 129 B.C.
Ref:– Houghton II 642 (same dies), SNG Spaer 1855, Newell SMA 282

Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian king Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII.

Grey tone.

Ex-Forvm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Cappadocian_Kingdom_1a_img.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom, Tetradrachm, In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII18 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:– Diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border.
Rev:– BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU, Athena standing left, Nike in right, spear and shield in left, ligate DI / A left, Nike extends wreath into laurel wreath border
c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII, 138 - 129 B.C.
Ref:– Houghton II 642 (same dies), SNG Spaer 1855, Newell SMA 282

Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian king Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII.

Grey tone.

Ex-Forvm

Updated image using new photography setup.
maridvnvm
Ariarathes_x.jpg
CAPPADOCIAN KINGDOM. Ariarathes X (42–36 BC). AR drachm 18 views Obv. Diademed head of Ariarathes X right
Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΡΙΑΡΑΘΟΥ ΕΥΣΕΒΟΥΣ ΚΑΙ ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΟΥ (of king Ariarathes, Pious and Philadelphos), Athena Nicephorus standing left, trophy in inner left field, ΠΑΜΟ monogram above date E (regnal year 5 = 38 BC) in inner right field.
Simonetta 2, Special thanks to Rover1.3 for attribution
1 commentsSkyler
antiochos_VII_tetra.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom/ In the name of Antiochos VII; tetradrachm; Nike20 viewsCappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII, 138 - 129 B.C. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton II 651 ff. (different dies), SNG Spaer -, Newell SMA -, VF, grainy, 15.919g, 29.4mm, 0o, posthumous, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; obverse diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border; reverse “BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU”, Athena standing left, Nike in right, spear and shield in left, ligate “DI” / A left, ligate “OD” inner left, K inner right, Nike crowns epithet, laurel wreath border. Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII. Ex FORVMPodiceps
23712_cappadocia__antiochos_VII_tetratetradrachm,_Houghton_II_644.jpg
Cappadocian Kingdom/ In the name of Antiochos VII; tetradrachm; Nike15 viewsCappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C.; In the Name of the Seleukid King, Antiochos VII, 138 - 129 B.C. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton II 644 (same dies), SNG Spaer 1855, Newell SMA 282, VF, toned, 16.302g, 29.6mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of the Seleukid King Antiochos VII right, fillet border; reverse “BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EUERGETOU”, Athena standing left holding Nike, spear and shield, “DI” monogram above A left, Nike extends wreath into laurel wreath border. Oliver Hoover, in Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton, attributes this type to the Cappadocian Kingdom, c. 130 - 80 B.C. The symbols were used on Cappadocian royal coinage, the coins are found in Cappadocian hoards and a tetradrachm naming the Cappadocian King Ariarathes VII Philometor (116 - 99 B.C.) bears the obverse portrait of Antiochus VII. He notes they may have been struck to pay foreign (Syrian?) mercenaries who preferred the types of Antiochus VII. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
CAPPADOCIAN_KINGDOM_Ariarathes_V.jpg
CAPPADOCIAN KINGDOM: Ariarathes V AR Drachm13 viewsOBVERSE: Diademed head of Ariarathes V right
REVERSE: Athena standing left, holding Nike & resting hand on grounded shield, HDI monogram in outer left field, PAFI monogram in inner left field, HF monogram in outer right field, date GL in exergue
Struck at Cappadocia, Year 33 (= 130 BC)
4.2g, 18mm
SNG Copenhagen Suppl. 673–678. Simonetta p. 24, 20b
Legatus
Cappodocian_Kingdom_AR_Drachm__18mm__3_71g__under_Ariarathes_IX_Eusebes__101-87.jpg
Cappodocian Kingdom AR Drachm 18mm 3.71g under Ariarathes IX Eusebes 101-87 BC. 40 viewsO: His young diademed hd r.
R: Athena stg l. holding Nike in r. hand, spear + shield in l., BASILEWS/ARIARATHOY to r./l., EVSEBOVS below.
SG7297v(date). _2050
Antonivs Protti
9965.jpg
Carrhae in Mesopotamia, Septimius Severus, AE 24, Lindgren 2557122 viewsCarrhae in Mesopotamia, Septimius Severus, AE 24, 193-211 AD
Av.: CEΠTIMIOC [CE]OY.... , naked (laureate?) bust of Septimius Severus right
Rv.: ..Λ]OY KAPPH ΛKA... , front view of a tetrastyle temple, the temple of the moon god Sin, in the middle a sacred stone on tripod, on top of stone: crescent, standards (with crescents on top) on both sides inside the building; another crescent in the pediment.
Lindgren 2557 ; BMC p. 82, #4

The city and the region played an important role in roman history.

Carrhae / Harran, (Akkadian Harrânu, "intersecting roads"; Latin Carrhae), an ancient city of strategic importance, an important town in northern Mesopotamia, famous for its temple of the moon god Sin, is now nothing more than a village in southeastern Turkey with an archeological site.
In the Bible it is mentioned as one of the towns where Abraham stayed on his voyage from Ur to the promised land. Abraham's family settled there when they left Ur of the Chaldeans (Genesis 11:31-32).
Inscriptions indicate that Harran existed as early as 2000 B.C. In its prime, it controlled the point where the road from Damascus joins the highway between Nineveh and Carchemish. This location gave Harran strategic value from an early date. It is frequently mentioned in Assyrian inscriptions about 1100 BC, under the name Harranu, or "Road" (Akkadian harrānu, 'road, path, journey' ).
During the fall of the Assyrian Empire, Harran became the stronghold of its lasts king, Ashur-uballit II, being besiged and conquered by Nabopolassar of Babylon at 609 BC. Harran became part of Median Empire after the fall of Assyria, and subsequently passed to the Persian Achaemenid dynasty.
The city remained Persian untill in 331 BC when the soldiers of the Macedonian king Alexander the Great entered the city.
After the death of Alexander on 11 June 323 BC, the city was claimed by his successors: Perdiccas, Antigonus Monophthalmus and Eumenes. These visited the city, but eventually, it became part of the Asian kingdom of Seleucos I (Nicator), the Seleucid empire, and capital of a province called Osrhoene (the Greek term for the old name Urhai).
The Seleucids settled Macedonian veterans at Harran. For a century-and-a-half, the town flourished, and it became independent when the Parthian dynasty of Persia occupied Babylonia. The Parthian and Seleucid kings both needed the buffer state of Osrhoene which was part of the larger Parthian empire and had nearby Edessa as its capital. The dynasty of the Arabian Abgarides, technically a vassal of the Parthian "king of kings" ruled Osrhoene for centuries.

Carrhae was the scene of a disastrous defeat of the Roman general Crassus by the Parthians. In 53 BC. Crassus, leading an army of 50.000, conducted a campaign against Parthia. After he captured a few cities on the way, he hurried to cross the Euphrates River with hopes of receiving laurels and the title of “Emperor”. But as he drove his forces over Rakkan towards Harran, Parthian cavalry besieged his forces in a pincers movement. In the ensuing battle, the Roman army was defeated and decimated. The battle of Carrhae was the beginning of a series of border wars with Parthia for many centuries. Numismatic evidence for these wars or the corresponding peace are for instance the "Signis Receptis" issues of Augustus and the “Janum Clusit” issues of Nero.
Later Lucius Verus tried to conquer Osrhoene and initially was successful. But an epidemic made an annexation impossible. However, a victory monument was erected in Ephesus, and Carrhae/Harran is shown as one of the subject towns.
Septimius Severus finally added Osrhoene to his realms in 195. The typical conic domed houses of ancient Harran can be seen on the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Forum Romanum.
Harran was the chief home of the moon-god Sin, whose temple was rebuilt by several kings. Sin was one of the great gods of the Assurian-Babylonian pantheon.
Caracalla gave Harran the status of a colonia (214 AD) and visited the city and the temple of the moon god in April 217. Meanwhile the moon god (and sacred stones) had become a part of the Roman pantheon and the temple a place to deify the roman emperors (as the standards on both sides of the temple indicate).

Caracalla was murdered while he was on his way from Temple to the palace. If this had been arranged by Macrinus - the prefect of the Praetorian guard who was to be the new emperor – is not quite clear. On the eighth of April, the emperor and his courtiers made a brief trip to the world famous temple of the moon god. When Caracalla halted to perform natural functions, he was assassinated by one of his bodyguards, Julius Martialis, who had a private grudge against the ruler, because he had not been given the post of centurion.

In 296 AD Roman control was again interrupted when nearby Carrhae the emperor Galerius was defeated by the king Narses / the Sasanid dynasty of Persia. The Roman emperor Julianus Apostata sacrificed to the moon god in 363 AD, at the beginning of his ill-fated campaign against the Sassanid Persians. The region continued to be a battle zone between the Romans and Sassanids. It remained Roman (or Byzantine) until 639, when the city finally was captured by the Muslim armies.

At that time, the cult of Sin still existed. After the arrival of the Islam, the adherents of other religions probably went to live in the marshes of the lower Tigris and Euphrates, and are still known as Mandaeans.
The ancient city walls surrounding Harran, 4 kilometer long and 3 kilometer wide, have been repaired throughout the ages (a.o. by the Byzantine emperor Justinian in the sixth century), and large parts are still standing. The position of no less than 187 towers has been identified. Of the six gates (Aleppo gate, Anatolian, Arslanli, Mosul, Baghdad, and Rakka gate), only the first one has remained.

A citadel was built in the 14th century in place of the Temple of Sin. This lies in the south-west quarter of the ancient town. Its ruin can still be visited.

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
charibert-1.jpg
Charibert II23 viewsTremissis of Charibert II, king of Aquitaine 629-632
Mint: Banassac
Moneyer: Maximinus
Belfort 697
O: MAXIMIN VS M.
R: CHARIBERTVS REX

Merovingian inscribed tremissis of the short-reigned Charibert II, king of Aquitaine, part of the Merovingian kingdom. Merovingian France was made up of four large districts, which sometimes became kingdoms themselves: Austrasia, Neustria, Burgundy, and Aquitaine. Merovingian royalty frequently divided the large and somewhat unwieldy kingdom between male heirs, and Charibert's half brother Dagobert I received the lion's share. Things went on for a few years, but Charibert probably got greedy, and not content with Aquitaine set his sights on Neustria. This led to conflict with his half-brother, and most likely led to his death by assassination.

Royal coinage inscribed in the names of Merovingian monarchs are very rare. The more common (if you can call them that) ones include coins made in Banassac for Charibert II and Sigebert III. Coins are also known depicting the names of Theodebert, Dagobert, Childebert, and others.

Charibert was not considered a very successful king, and probably only a teenager or young adult at the time of his death. On this coin, his name appears on the reverse, while the moneyer is on the obverse, a possible slight to the monarch. His coinage is a small glimpse of an otherwise highly obscured period in medieval history

Ex- CNG 100 (lot 457), Dr. Lawrence A. Adams, M. Louis Teller
Nap
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CHIH-PAI23 viewsEPOCH OF THREE KINGDOMS
AD 221 TO 280
Minor Han (Shu) AD 221 - 265

CHIH-PAI
Bronze 100 shu
18mm, 1.32g
S-188
2 commentsSamson L2
L_SHU_GANG_TIAN.jpg
CHINA - 10 Kingdoms: Former Shu Kingdom92 viewsCHINA - 10 Kingdoms: Former Shu Kingdom, AE Cash, OBV.: Guang Tian Yuan Bao/REV.: Plain. Minted in 918 A.D. by Wang Jian (907-918 A.D.). Hartill #15.38.
David Hartill's book quotes Schjoth, saying: "The currency of father and son of the Wang family was coarse and vile. Those seen at the present day are unfinished, sometimes with a smooth reverse; sometimes with a rim. Wang Jian began his career as a village thief; he enlisted as a soldier, rose through the ranks, and by 901 was virtually an independent ruler, with his capital at Chengdu, in Sichuan. His regime provided a peaceful haven for artists and poets."
dpaul7
L_SHU_XIAN_KANG.jpg
CHINA - 10 Kingdoms: Former Shu Kingdom91 viewsCHINA - 10 Kingdoms: Former Shu Kingdom. AE Cash, OBV.: Xian Kang Yuan Bao/REV.: Plain. Minted 925 A.D. by Wang Yan (918-925 A.D.), son of Wang Jian. Hartill #15.46.dpaul7
SHU_WU_ZHU.jpg
CHINA - 3 KINGDOMS PERIOD - KINGDOM OF SHU94 viewsCHINA - 3 KINGDOMS PERIOD - KINGDOM OF SHU. This Wu Zhu was cast from AD 214 to 263 in the Kingdom Shu during the period of China's Three Kingdoms. Diameter: about 21.5 mm. w/ both inner and outer rims. It is Schjoth #224 or Fisher's Ding #525 or David Hartill #10.10.
dpaul7
CHINA_REPUBLIC_MIN_GUO_TONG_BAO_10_CASH.jpg
CHINA - Republic26 viewsCHINA - Republic (1911-1949) 1 Cash, circa 1912. Obv. legend: 民国通寳 = Min Guo Tong Bao (read top-bottom-right-left) meaning People's Kingdom (Republic of China) Precious Coin. Rev.: Dang Shi (Value Ten). Dongchuan, Yunnan Province Mint. Reference: Hartill 24.8.
*NOTE: This is one of the LAST of five official "Cash" coins (with square hole) cast in China, ending a tradition of well over 2,000 years!
dpaul7
normal_wuwu.jpg
China - Southern Han Dynasty32 viewsSouthern Han Kingdom, Wu Wu type, lead, c. 900-971 AD. 21.97 mm 2.0 g. Reference: Hartill 15.145. Ex Ardatirion collection.
Southern Han was a kingdom that existed during the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period (907-960) along China’s southern coast from 917 to 971. The Kingdom greatly expanded her capital city Hing Wong Fu, namely present-day Guangzhou. The Five Dynasties ended in 960 when the Song Dynasty was founded to replace the Later Zhou Dynasty. Through the 960s and 970s, the Song increased its influence in the south until finally it was able to force the Southern Han dynasty to submit to its rule in 971. The coinage produced by the Southern Hans is quite unique - the main coinage was lead, with 1 lead cash fixed in value as 1/100th of a copper cash. The circulation of the lead coins was restricted to towns (even nowadays, these lead coins are found mainly in large towns, most commonly in Guangzhou) while the copper coins are found in the coutryside. Many types of these lead coins are known. The coins are all scarce to very rare, with most of them surviving in low quality because of the hot wet climate of the regions.
dpaul7
wuwu.jpg
China - Southern Han Dynasty, Wu Wu type20 viewsSouthern Han Kingdom
Wu Wu type, lead, c. 900-971
Hartill 15.145

Based off of the Wu Zhu of the Western Han. A brilliant example of Chinese political continuity.
Ardatirion
14-8.jpg
China - Southern Tang Dynasty, Kai Yuan type under Li Yu, 961-978 AD31 viewsCHINA, Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms. Southern Tang Dynasty. Lǐ Hòuzhǔ, AD 961-975
Æ (25mm; 3.50 g)
Kai Yuan tong bao
Hartill 15.101
Ardatirion
TANG GUO.jpg
CHINA - Ten Kingdoms Period - Tang Guo90 viewsChina, Ten Kingdoms, Southern Tang Kingdom, Emperor Yuan Zu (Li Jing), AD 937-975 .Denomination: AE Cash, cast from 959. Obverse: Seal script, "Tang Guo tong bao". Reverse Plain. Weight 4.34gm Diameter 24.5mm. Reference -- Hartill 15.80 Grade VF.dpaul7
CHINA_Three_Kingdoms_Shu_Zhi_Bai_Wu_Zhu.jpg
CHINA - Three Kingdoms Period, Kingdom of Shu Zhi Bai Wu Zhu41 viewsCHINA - Three Kingdoms Period, Kingdom of Shu (221-263 AD) Zhi Bai Wu Zhu (Value One Hundred Wu Zhu) 25.07 mm., 2.7 g. Reference: Hartill #11.1dpaul7
s Coat of Arms.jpg
Chulalongkorn Coat of Arms16 viewsChulalongkorn (Rama V--Chakri Dynasty) Coat of Arms

Origin/Meaning:
The arms of the Kingdom of Siam were created during the reign of King Chulalongkorn the Great, Rama V, when the Kingdom was exposed to Western traditions, ideas, and also European threat of colonialism. King Chulalongkorn, who visited Europe twice, modernized Siam and adopted many of the European traditions to his court, including the use of heraldry.

On the top of the coat of arms is the Great Victory Crown of Thailand, the most important royal regalia and the symbol of kingship. Under the crown is the symbol of the Royal House of Chakri, the King's royal family, which is a disc intersected with a trident. The royal multi-tiered umbrellas of state are also present on either side of the crown. To both sides of the coat of arms are the other regalia, the royal sword and the royal baton. In the background is the draped robe - either the Royal robe of the King or the robe of the Order of Chulachomklao - an order created by the King. The supporters are two (again) mythical creatures, one is the Royal Lion, rajasiha, and the other is Elephant Lion, gaja-siha.

The shield itself is partitioned into three parts, signifying the Thai part of the Kingdom (the 3-headed elephant) on the top, the Laotian suzerainty (another elephant), and the Malay suzerainty (two "kris", or Malayan short swords).

The chain under the Arms is a necklace that is a part of the Order of Chulachomklao.
The ribbon under the Arms is inscribed with the motto (in Pali, the language of the Buddhist canon) which may be translated as "Unity brings happiness".

When the present seal (the Garuda) was made the State symbol, King Chulalongkorn's great arms were no longer used as a State symbol, however, it still adorns the hats of Thai police officers to this day.
Literature : Information provided by Apirat Sugondhabhirom
________________________________________
Sitemap © Ralf Hartemink 1996, -
Cleisthenes
Cilicia.JPG
Cilicia13 viewsCilicia Trachea became the haunt of pirates, who were subdued by Pompey in 67 BC following a Battle of Korakesion (modern Alanya), and Tarsus was made the capital of the Roman province of Cilicia. Cilicia Pedias became Roman territory in 103 BC first conquered by Marcus Antonius Orator in his campaign against pirates, with Sulla acting as its first governor, foiling an invasion of Mithridates, and the whole was organized by Pompey, 64 BC, into a province which, for a short time, extended to and included part of Phrygia. It was reorganized by Julius Caesar, 47 BC, and about 27 BC became part of the province Syria-Cilicia Phoenice. At first the western district was left independent under native kings or priest-dynasts, and a small kingdom, under Tarcondimotus, was left in the east; but these were finally united to the province by Vespasian, AD 72. It had been deemed important enough to be governed by a proconsul.

ancientone
olba_SNGparis807.jpg
Cilicia, Olba, quasi-autonomous, SNG Paris 80736 viewsAE 16, 4.52g
struck under Ajas, son of Teukros, archiereus of Olba and toparch of Kennatis and Lalassis, AD 11-12 (year 2)
obv. TOPARX / KENNAT / [L]ALAS / ET B
in dotted circle
rev. Thunderbolt
above ARXIER / AIANTOS
beneath TEVKROV
in dotted circle
SNG BN Paris 807; RPC I, 3729; Staffierie, Olba 15, 14
Very rare, about EF, glossy dark-green patina
Pedigree:
ex auction F.Sternberg AG Zürich XXV, 1991, lot 160
ex. auction M&M XVII, 2005, lot 965

Olba was for a long time a quasi-autonomous priest kingdom. It's main god was Zeus Olbios. Hence the thunderbolt on the rev.
Jochen
BOSPORAN_KINGDOM_MAKHARES.jpg
CIMMERIAN BOSPOROS KINGDOM, Makhares17 viewsCIMMERIAN BOSPOROS KINGDOM, Uncertain mint. Makhares. Governor of the Bosporos, circa 79-65 BC. Æ 27. Obv.: Wreathed head of young Dionysos right Rev.: Bowcase; monogram to left. MacDonald 180/3; SNG BM Black Sea 946-9 var. (monogram); HGC 7, 110 (Pantikapaion).
dpaul7
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-JnMHlEsnxln.jpg
Cimmerian Bosporos. Panticapaeum. (Circa 325-310 BC)22 viewsAE17 (4.07 gm)

Obverse: Head of bearded satyr left

Reverse: Π-A-N, head of bull left.

MacDonald 67. Anokhin 132.

Panticapaeum (Ancient Greek: Παντικάπαιον, translit. Pantikápaion, Russian: Пантикапей, translit. Pantikapei) was an ancient Greek city on the eastern shore of Crimea, which the Greeks called Taurica. The city was built on Mount Mithridat, a hill on the western side of the Cimmerian Bosporus. It was founded by Milesians in the late 7th or early 6th century BC.

This area eventually came to be ruled by the Spartocids, a Hellenized Thracian dynasty that ruled the Hellenistic Kingdom of Bosporus between the years 438–108 BC. They had usurped the former dynasty, the Archaeanactids, a Greek dynasty of the Bosporan Kingdom who were tyrants of Panticapaeum from 480 - 438 BC that were usurped from the Bosporan throne by Spartokos I in 438 BC, whom the dynasty is named after.

Spartokos I is often thought to have been a Thracian mercenary who was hired by the Archaeanactids, and that he usurped the Archaeanactids becoming "king" of the Bosporan Kingdom, then only a few cities, such as Panticapaeum. Spartokos was succeeded by his son, Satyros I, who would go on to conquer many cities around Panticapaeum such as Nymphaeum and Kimmerikon. Satyros's son, Leukon I, would go to conquer and expand the kingdom beyond boundaries his father ever thought of.

Ultimately, the Bosporan Kingdom entered into a decline due to numerous attacks from nomadic Scythian tribes in the subsequent centuries leading up to its fall.
Nathan P
Cleo_III.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, Alexandria, 19.8 mm, obol21 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1426, F, Alexandria mint, 6.557 g, 19.8 mm, 315o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolt, cornucopia left. ex FORVM

Podiceps
2_kotkaa.jpg
Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, AE 21.653 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1426 var (Alexandria), gVF, Paphos mint, 8.369g, 21.6mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolt, cornucopia left. ex FORVM1 commentsPodiceps
cleo_III_ja_pojat.jpg
Cleopatra III with sons, Zeus Ammon, 30.1 mm21 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. 32188. Bronze triobol, Svoronos 1424, SNG Cop 305 ff., SGCV II 7900 (all Ptolemy VI), VF, dark brown patina, 22.037g, 30.1mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left on thunderbolts, side by side, double cornucopia left. Among the most common of Ptolemaic coins, struck during the joint reign of Cleopatra III and her sons, Ptolemy IX then Ptolemy X. Svoronos 1424 has two very distinct varieties. The earlier 29 gram variety was found in quantity in the c. 160 B.C. CoinEx Hoard. In that hoard, there were none of this later, common, c. 23-24 gram variety. The two types are separated by about 50 years. ex FORVMPodiceps
cleo_paphos.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, dichalkon; Paphos, Cyprus14 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, gF, Paphos mint, 1.570g, 11.8mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; nice green patina. Ex FORVMPodiceps
cleo.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus20 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, F, Paphos mint, 1.190 g, 10.9 mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons. Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references. ex FORVMPodiceps
25363_Cleopatra_VII,_Philopator,_51_-_30_B_C_,_Paphos,_Cyprus_F.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus11 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, F, attractive patina, Paphos mint, 1.254g, 11.5mm, 270o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; crude, flan flaw. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
25389_Cleopatra_VII,_Philopator,_51_-_30_B_C_,_Paphos,_Cyprus_aF.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus13 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, aF, Paphos mint, 1.498g, 11.7mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; green patina. FORVM. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Cleopatra_VII.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus (2)10 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, VF, obverse off center, 1.660g, 13.5mm, 0o, Paphos mint, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references. ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Cleopatra_VII~0.JPG
Cleopatra VII41 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, 13mm, 1.7g, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus
OBV: diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure
REV: Double cornucopiae, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ
Kreuzer p. 44 first illustration, Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV), SNG Cop 649,

Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus,
assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references.
1 commentsRomanorvm
chola.jpg
Copper Massa of Chola Sinhalese Dynasty 1208-9 AD27 viewsObverse: King standing and sniffing lotus blossom in left hand and carrying lamp in right hand. Five balls or golas to right.
Reverse: Sitting king with lotus blossom and to right in 4 lines of Nagari script Sri Dharmasoka

Dharmasoka was a short-lived infant king of the Ponnaruwa kingdom which ruled Ceylon from the eighth to 13th centuries

The massa was a copper unit of about 4 grams. The basic design was retained for centuries and was used on both silver and gold issues as well. This coin is an exceptionally well preserved example of the type
daverino
Cotys II AE Sestertius.JPG
Cotys II, AE Sestertius, Bosporus Kingdom,28 viewsAE 48 Nummi, Bosporus Kingdom, 123-132 AD
Obverse: BACILEWC KOTYOC, Laureate and draped bust of Cotys II right.
Reverse: MH, Nike Advancing left with wreath and palm.
SNG Cop Volume 18 #50
25mm , 12.1gms
Jerome Holderman
Cotys II-2.JPG
Cotys II-239 viewsAE 48 Nummi, Bosporus Kingdom, 123-132 AD
Obverse: BACILEWC KOTYOC, Laureate and draped bust of Cotys II right.
Reverse: MH, Nike Advancing left with wreath and palm.
SNG Cop Volume 18 #50
24mm , 9.6 gms
Jerome Holderman
Countermark_Bee.jpg
Countermark Bee on Antiochos II 13 viewsCountermark Bee (Ephesos ?)
on worn
Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochos II Theos
261-246 B.C.
Obv.: Head of Apollo right, hair falling in curls
Rev.: [B]A[ΣIΛ]E[ΩΣ] ANTIOX[OΥ], tripod
AE, 14.4mm, 3g
shanxi
10039b.jpg
Crusader States, Normans of Sicily, William II, AD 1166-1189, AE Trifollaro, Spahr 117.75 viewsCrusader States, Sicily, William II, AD 1166-1189, AE Trifollaro (24-25 mm), 8,82 g.
Obv.: Facing head of lioness within circle of dots.
Re.: Palm tree with five branches and two bunches of dates, within circle of dots.
Biaggi 1231, Spahr 117 ; Grie 210 (Roger II); Thom 2480 .

William II of Sicily (1153-1189), called the Good, was king of Sicily and Naples from 1166 to 1189.
William was only thirteen years old at the death of his father William I, when he was placed under the regency of his mother, Margaret of Navarre.
Until the king came of age in 1171 the government was controlled first by the chancellor Stephen du Perche, cousin of Margaret (1166-1168), and then by Walter Ophamil, archbishop of Palermo, and Matthew of Ajello, the vice-chancellor.
William's character is very indistinct. Lacking in military enterprise, secluded and pleasure-loving, he seldom emerged from his palace life at Palermo. Yet his reign is marked by an ambitious foreign policy and a vigorous diplomacy. Champion of the papacy and in secret league with the Lombard cities he was able to defy the common enemy, Frederick I Barbarossa. In 1174 and 1175 he made treaties with Genoa and Venice and his marriage in February 1177 with Joan, daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine, marks his high position in European politics.
In July 1177, he sent a delegation of Archbishop Romuald of Salerno and Count Roger of Andria to sign the Treaty of Venice with the emperor. To secure the peace, he sanctioned the marriage of his aunt Constance, daughter of Roger II, with Frederick's son Henry, afterwards the emperor Henry VI, causing a general oath to be taken to her as his successor in case of his death without heirs. This step, fatal to the Norman kingdom, was possibly taken that William might devote himself to foreign conquests.
Unable to revive the African dominion, William directed his attack on Egypt, from which Saladin threatened the Latin kingdom of Jerusalem. In July 1174, 50,000 men were landed before Alexandria, but Saladin's arrival forced the Sicilians to re-embark in disorder. A better prospect opened in the confusion in Byzantine affairs which followed the death of Manuel Comnenus (1180), and William took up the old design and feud against Constantinople. Durazzo was captured (June 11, 1185). Afterwards while the army marched upon Thessalonica, the fleet sailed towards the same target capturing on their way the Ionian islands of Corfu, Cephalonia,Ithaca and Zakynthos. In August Thessalonica surrendered to the joint attack of the Sicilian fleet and army.
The troops then marched upon the capital, but the troop of the emperor Isaac Angelus overthrew the invaders on the banks of the Strymon (September 7, 1185). Thessalonica was at once abandoned and in 1189 William made peace with Isaac, abandoning all the conquests. He was now planning to induce the crusading armies of the West to pass through his territories, and seemed about to play a leading part in the Third Crusade. His admiral Margarito, a naval genius equal to George of Antioch, with 60 vessels kept the eastern Mediterranean open for the Franks, and forced the all-victorious Saladin to retire from before Tripoli in the spring of 1188.
In November 1189 William died, leaving no children. Though Orderic Vitalis records a (presumably short-lived) son in 1181: Bohemond, Duke of Apulia. His title of "the Good" is due perhaps less to his character than to the cessation of internal troubles in his reign. The "Voyage" of Ibn Jubair, a traveller in Sicily in 1183-1185, shows William surrounded by Muslim women and eunuchs, speaking and reading Arabic and living like "a Moslem king."

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
MISC_Cyprus_Lusignan_Janus.jpg
Crusader States. Lusignan Kingdom of Cyprus. Janus I (1398-1432). 10 viewsLampros 67, CCS 119a

BI denier, 0.55 g, 13.83 mm max, 90°

Obv.: + IAnUS ROI D, lion rampant left

Rev.: + IЄRV3ALEM, cross pattée
Stkp
MISC_Crusaders_Antioch_Bohemond_III_Metcalf_Class_C.JPG
Crusader States: Principality of Antioch. Bohemond III (1163-1201)87 viewsMetcalf Class C 388-391; Malloy 65-67

Billon Denier, struck circa 1163-1188, 18 mm

Obv: +BOANVNDVS [A ornamented with annulets, retrograde N’s], helmeted and mailed head left, crescent and star on either side.

Rev: +ANTIOCNIA [A’s ornamented with annulets, retrograde N’s], cross pattée, crescent in second quarter.

The Principality of Antioch was a crusader state created in 1098 during the First Crusade by Normans from Italy. In 1268, Baibars, the Mamluk Sultan of Egypt, took the city.

Bohemond (1144–1201), the “Stammerer” or the “Stutterer,” was the son of Constance of Antioch, the daughter of Bohemond II, by her first husband Raymond II of Poitiers, who was killed at the Battle of Inab in 1149 toward the end of the Second Crusade. She ruled as regent from 1149 until 1163, when Bohemond, with the assistance of King Baldwin III of Jerusalem, forced her to step down.

In 1164, Bohemond was captured by Nur ad-Din Zengi, who ruled the Syrian province of the Seljuk Empire, at the Battle of Harim. He was freed for a large ransom due to the intervention of King Amalric I of Jerusalem and Emperor Manuel I Comnenus. In 1192, after the fall of the Kingdom of Jerusalem following the battle of Hattin, Bohemond signed a truce with Saladin. Due to the truce, he remained neutral during the Third Crusade.

Bohemond clashed with Levon I of Armenia, who aspired to expand his kingdom. He was captured by Levon and forced to cede the Principality to Levon. However, the Antiochenes named Bohemond’s eldest son, Raymond IV of Tripoli, as their prince. Bohemond and Levon ultimately reconciled, and Raymond married Levon’s neice, Alice, who died shortly after giving birth to their son, Raymond-Roupen. Bohemond died in 1201 and the succession was disputed between his second son, Bohemond IV, and his grandson, Raymond-Roupen.
Stkp
crusaders.jpg
Crusaders coin, Armenian Kingdom Cilicia 12th-14th Cent. A.D.27 viewsObverse: King enthroned facing
Reverse: Lions flanking patriarchal cross
Unknown Ruler
Dk0311USMC
Crusaders,_Achaia,_Karl_II__(1285_-_1289),_Clarentza_mint,_K_R_PRINC_ACh_,_DE_CLARENTIA,_Q-001,_7h,_17,5-18,5mm,_0,97g-s.jpg
Crusaders, Achaia, Charles II. of Anjou (1285–1289 A.D.), AR-denar, Achaia, ͓̽ ✠ ͓̽DЄ͓̽CLΛRЄNTIΛ, Châtel tournois, #1118 viewsCrusaders, Achaia, Charles II. of Anjou (1285–1289 A.D.), AR-denar, Achaia, ͓̽ ✠ ͓̽DЄ͓̽CLΛRЄNTIΛ, Châtel tournois, #1
avers: ✠•K•R•PRINC'ΛCh•, Cross pattée, the legend flanked by •, and has unbarred Λ's.
reverse: ͓̽ ✠ ͓̽DЄ͓̽CLΛRЄNTIΛ, Châtel tournois.
diameter: 17,5-18,5mm, weight: 0,97g, axis: 7h,
mint: Clarentza, mint mark: ,
date:1285-1289 A.D., ref: Metcalf, Crusades,; Malloy CCS 12,
Q-001
"Charles II, known as "the Lame" (French le Boiteux, Italian lo Zoppo; 1254 – 5 May 1309), was King of Naples and Sicily, titular
King of Jerusalem, and Prince of Salerno.
He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence."
quadrans
110.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus . Anonymous denier 36 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus . Anonymous denier Janus (1398 - 1432) or John (1432- 58)
CCS 126
Vladislavs D
ccs28.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus , Henry I 1218-1253. Æ Fractional denier 58 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus , Henry I 1218-1253. Æ Fractional
Uncertain (Nicosia?) mint . 2.6 Gr.
+ hЄNRICVS: large cross pattée .
RЄX above entrance . Gateway with three crenelated towers and arched entrance.
CCS 28
Rare
Vladislav D
gles.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Guy of Lusignan, Lord of Cyprus, 1192 - 1194 Billon denier32 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Guy of Lusignan, Lord of Cyprus, 1192 - 1194 . Billon denier

Reverse : + DE CIPRO cross , pellets in upper right and lower left quarter, crescents in upper left and lower right angle .
Obverse : + REX GVIDO, gateway with battlements, star inside .
CCS 3
Vladislav D
gl.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Guy of Lusignan, Lord of Cyprus, 1192 - 1194 Billon denier36 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Guy of Lusignan, Lord of Cyprus, 1192 - 1194 Billon denier
reverse + DE CI•PRO, cross pattée , annulet in upper right and lower left quarter, pellet in upper left and lower right angle
obverse + REX GVIDO, gateway with battlements, star inside
CCS 3
Vladislavs D
24.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Henry II, 1285 - 1306 and 1310 - 1324 Billon denier39 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Henry II, 1285 - 1306 and 1310 - 1324 Billon denier
reverse + IhRL' m E D' ChIPR', lion of Cyprus rampant left
obverse + hEnRI:REI:DE:, cross pattée, pellet in each quarter.
CCs 66
Vladislavs D
cp.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Henry II, Second Reign 1310 - 1324 AR gros42 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Henry II, Second Reign 1310 - 1324 AR gros
4.6 gr
hENRI REI DE, enthroned king holding globus cruciger in left hand and scepter in right over shoulder .
+ IERUSAL'M E D ChIP cross of Jerusalem .
CCS 64 ; Metcalf "The silver coinage of Cyprus , 1285-1382" Pl. 17 , 7. die D
Very rare reverse legend variant .
1 commentsVladislav D
68129q00.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Hugh I , 1205-1218 35 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Hugh I , 1205-1218
Billon denier . 0.750g ; 16.3mm
Obverse: + • hVGO • REX •, cross pattée, crescent in upper left and lower right quarters, annulets in upper right and lower left quarter, pellet stops in legend .
Reverse : + • CYPRI •, gateway with battlements; struck with clashed dies, fragment of another coin attached to reverse .
CCS 12 ; Metcalf Class IV .
Ex Alex G. Malloy ; Ex A.J. Seltman ; Ex FORUM .
1 commentsVladislav D
cy.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Hugh I , 1205-1218 , under regency of Gautier de Montbeliard 1205-121058 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Hugh I , 1205-1218 , under regency of Gautier de Montbeliard 1205-1210 . Billon Denier.
0.59g
obverse + VGONIS RE, cross with crescent and pellet in 1st and
4th quarter and pellet in 2nd and 3rd quarter.
reverse + DE CIPRO, Gateway.
Ref:Schl.VI.5, Cox "Tripolis hoard" class 1, Ash.463, CCL 18.1-9, CCS 9a
Very Rare .
Vladislav D
32007q00.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Hugh III, 1267 - 128444 viewsBillon denier, Malloy 34, uneven strike .
O : + hVGVE: REI: DE:, cross pattée, double pellet stops, open E's
R : + IhRL' m:ED' ChIPR., lion rampant left, S-shaped tail ending outward, open C's and E's, pellet at end of legend
Ex FORUM ; Ex Sotheby's Auction 10-14-99 ; Ex John J. Slocum Collection.
Vladislavs D
A511FF90-CD5C-4ED6-B970-3AFA398F0614.jpeg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Hugh IV 1324-1359 AR gros16 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Hugh IV 1324-1359 AR gros
4.57 gr
HVGVE - REI DE , enthroned king holding globus cruciger in left hand and scepter in right over shoulder .
+IERVSAL'M E D' CHIPR cross of Jerusalem .
Metc. 752, Schlumb. VI, 24 var., CCS 67.
Plugged.
Ex G. Toderi, Florence, Listino 1, March 1972, Nr. 406.
Ex Erich Wäckerlin collection
Ex Münzen & Medaillen GmbH
Auction 47 lot 353
Vladislav D
sezin.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, James II 1460-147331 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, James II 1460-1473
AE.Sezin
Obverse : + IACOBUS.DEI GRACIA :REX , lion of Cyprus rampant left.
Reverse : + IERUSALEM:CYPRI ARMENIE, cross of Jerusalem.
Schl.VIII.24 ; CCS 163
Vladislav D
tr.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II 1369-1382 . AR . Gros Petit .36 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II 1369-1382 . AR . Gros Petit .
1.5 Gr.
PIE REROI (I?) King seated on small , low throne, wears cloak fastened with cruciform brooch at neck , holds scepter in right and orb in left hand . Below right shield with lion of Cyprus rampant left .
+IERU3ALEMEDCHIPRE or similar . Cross of Jerusalem
CCS 97 -99 var .
Rare .
Vladislav D
26s.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II, 1369 - 138233 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II, 1369 - 1382
obverse + PIERE. ROI D, Lion of Cyprus rampant left
reverse + IERUALEM, cross pattée, pellet in each quarter
CCS 104-106 ; Seltman, Num. Circ. (Feb 1968), p. 37.
Ex John J. Slocum Collection / Sotheby's Auction 10-14-99 lot 197
Vladislavs D
25s.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II, 1369 - 138234 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II, 1369 - 1382
obverse + PIERE. ROI D, Lion of Cyprus rampant left
reverse + IERUALEM, cross pattée, pellet in each quarter
CCS 104-106 ; Seltman, Num. Circ. (Feb 1968), p. 37.
Ex John J. Slocum Collection /Sotheby's Auction 10-14-99 lot 197
Vladislavs D
23.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II, 1369 - 138226 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II, 1369 - 1382
reverse + IERUALEM, cross pattée, pellet in each quarter
obverse + PIERE. ROI D, Lion of Cyprus rampant left
CCS 104-106 ; Seltman, Num. Circ. (Feb 1968), p. 37
Vladislavs D
p2.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II, 1369 - 138233 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II, 1369 - 1382
obverse + PIERE. ROI D, Lion of Cyprus rampant left
reverse + IERUALEM, cross pattée, pellet in each quarter
CCS 104-106 ; Seltman, Num. Circ. (Feb 1968), p. 37.
Vladislavs D
109.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II, 1369 - 138231 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II, 1369 - 1382
reverse + IERUALEM, cross pattée, pellet in each quarter
obverse + PIERE. ROI D, Lion of Cyprus rampant left
CCS 104-106 ; Seltman, Num. Circ. (Feb 1968), p. 37.
Vladislavs D
27.jpg
Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II, 1369 - 138230 viewsCrusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, Peter II, 1369 - 1382
reverse + IERUALEM, cross pattée, pellet in each quarter
obverse + PIERE. ROI D, Lion of Cyprus rampant left
CCS 104-106 ; Seltman, Num. Circ. (Feb 1968), p. 37
Vladislavs D
eJf8Y6dL9wXoa4bSG6j3c5PE2HBfPw.jpg
Crusaders. Lordship Beirut. Raymond of Tripoli (1184-1186). AE-Pougeoise49 viewsCrusaders. Lordship of Beirut. Raymond de Tripoli (1184-1186). AE-Pougeoise
Obverse: T.V.R.R.I.S.; tower of David, annulet each side of the tower
Reverse: + D.A.V.I.T.; eight pointed star

weight 0.69g – diameter 15 mm

Ref.: Schlumberger Pl. III, 26 (attributed to the kingdom of Jerusalem, Guy de Lusignan); Malloy et al. 2; Metcalf 206 f. ; Sabine, NC (1978), Type 2
Ex goancient
Vladislav D
cse-051LG.jpg
Crusaders. Lordship of Beirut. Raymond of Tripoli (1184-1186). AE-Pougeoise41 viewsCrusaders. Lordship of Beirut. Raymond of Tripoli (1184-1186). AE-Pougeoise
Obverse: T.V.R.R.I.S.; tower of David, annulet each side of the tower
Reverse: + D.A.V.I.T.; eight pointed star

weight 0.99g – diameter 16.0mm

Ref.: Schlumberger Pl. III, 26 (attributed to the kingdom of Jerusalem, Guy de Lusignan); Malloy et al. 2; Metcalf 206 f.
Ex BYZANTIUM COINS (Wolfgang Leimenstoll)
Vladislavs D
berth.jpg
Crusaders. Lordship of Beirut. Raymond of Tripoli (1184-1186). AE-Pougeoise33 viewsCrusaders. Lordship of Beirut. Raymond of Tripoli (1184-1186). AE-Pougeoise
Obverse: T.V.R.R.I.S.; tower of David, annulet each side of the tower
Reverse: + D.A.V.I.T.; eight pointed star
Ref.: Schlumberger Pl. III, 26 (attributed to the kingdom of Jerusalem, Guy de Lusignan); Malloy et al. 2; Metcalf 206 f.
1 commentsVladislav D
CYPRUS_JANUS_DENIER.jpg
CYPRUS - Crusader Kingdom64 viewsCYPRUS - Crusader Kingdom, Janus I (1398-1432) billon Denier. Obv.: Rampant Cyprus Lion; +DE CHIPRE E D ERI Rev.: Jerusalem Cross, +IANVS ROI DE CH. Reference: MALLOY-122.dpaul7
46705q00.jpg
Danubian Celts, Serdi Region, 168-31 B.C.17 views"Celtic imitative of a rare Macedonian issue struck under Philip V or Perseus, 187 - 168 B.C. The choice was appropriate for the Serdi Celts as the river Strymon runs through the Serdi region."

Bronze AE 22, Malloy Danubian Celts type H1A; imitative of a Macedonian Kingdom (Philip V or Perseus) type, 187 - 168 B.C., SNG Cop 1299, gF, nice olive green patina, 4.759g, 22.4mm, 180o, obverse reed-wreathed head of the river god Strymon right; reverse trident, stylized dolphin ornaments between the prongs and flanking shaft, blundered inscription similar to MAKEDONWN; scarce;
jimmynmu
71313q00.jpg
Danubian Celts, Serdi Region, 168-31 B.C.38 viewsVery rare coin, if anyone knows of another like it (with the river god facing left) please let me know!

Bronze AE 20, Malloy Danubian Celts type -2C; imitative of a Macedonian Kingdom (Philip V or Perseus) type, 187 - 168 B.C., SNG Cop 1299, VF, beautiful green patina, 6.760g, 20.0mm, 0o, tribal mint, 168 - 31 B.C.; obverse stylized head of the river god Strymon left; reverse trident, bar across near base of prongs, scroll-like ornaments between the prongs, monograms flanking shaft, counterclockwise retrograde blundered inscription similar to MAKEDONWN; the only example known to Forum with the river god's head left, an extremely rare variant and possibly unique;
jimmynmu
E.jpg
Danubian Celts, Serdi Region, Moesia, AE 21mm19 viewsDanubian Celts, Serdi Region, Moesia,
Imitative of a Macedonian Kingdom type, Philip V or Perseus, 187 - 168 B.C., SNG Cop 1299,
Obv. Reed-wreathed head of the river god Strymon right.
Rev. Trident.
Lee S
Darius_I_-_Xerxes_II_Siglos.jpg
Darius I-Xerxes II Siglos --485-420 BC9 views5.54 g, 14 mm
Silver Siglos; Bright Surfaces
Minted sometime between reigns of Darius I and Xerxes II
Carradice Type IIIb A/B (plate XII 16-26); BMC Arabia plate XXV, 17

Obverse: Persian King or Hero in Kneeling-Running Stance Right, Holding Spear and Bow.
Reverse: Rectangular Incuse Punch.

Cyrus the Great conquered the Lydian kingdom of Kroisos in 546 BC. The Persian Empire first struck coins with Lydian types until 510, when the Daric and Siglos were introduced, each bearing the same obverse design that earned the coinage its nickname, “Archers”. The gold Daric (8.3 g) and the silver Siglos (5.3 g) continued the Lydian weight standard, circulating mostly in Asia Minor. Over nearly two centuries their archaic types hardly changed; as they bear no legends, attribution by reign can be difficult. After Alexander the Great conquered the Persian Empire in 330 BC, Persians used Greek coins - first Alexander's imperial coinage, and then the royal Seleukid coinage that succeeded it.
_______________________
Not exactly a Greek coin, but the Persian Wars are incredibly significant in Greek history and inspired me to add this Siglos to my collection.
Hydro
83200q00_Macedonian_Kingdom,_Demetrios_I_Poliorketes_Tarsus.jpg
Demetrios I Poliorketes; Tarsos; Prow r. apluster, B A above, AN (ligate) X below; AE1122 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Demetrios I Poliorketes, 306 - 286 B.C. Bronze AE 11, Newell p. 50, 40; SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Cop -, Weber -, Cilicia, Tarsus mint, 1.649g, 11.8mm, 135o, 298 - 295 B.C.; obverse head of Demetrios right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet ornamented with bull horns; reverse , prow right, apluster right behind, B A above, AN (ligate) X below; rare. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
IMG_4669.jpg
Demetrios I Soter 11 viewsSeleukid Kingdom. Antioch on the Orontes. Demetrios I Soter 162-150 BC.
Drachm AR

18mm., 4,04g.
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
elephant~0.jpg
Demetrios I, 162-150 B.C. AE 16, Head of Horse Left/ Elephant’s Head Right19 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Demetrios I, 162-150 B.C. AE 16mm, 3.7g. Serrate. Obverse: Head of Horse Left. Reverse: Elephant’s Head Right. Ex David LiebertPodiceps
Seleucid_Demetrius_I_Soter_GCV_7014~0.JPG
Demetrios I, Soter, 162 - 150 BC60 viewsObv: No legend, diademed head of Demetrios I, with light beard, facing right, within a laurel wreath.

Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ΔHMHTPIOY, Tyche seated left, fully clothed, short scepter in right hand and a cornucopia in her left, the seat is supported by a winged tritoness; monogram on left.

Silver Tetradrachm, Antioch mint, c. 162 - 155/4 BC

16.4 grams, 31.2 mm, 0°

GCV II 7014, Newell SMA 81

Ex: FORVM
2 commentsSPQR Coins
42840_Demetrios_II.jpg
Demetrios II, 2nd Reign, c. 130 - 125 B.C. Nike walking left24 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Demetrios II, 2nd Reign, c. 130 - 125 B.C. Bronze AE 17, Houghton and Lorber 2170(1), SNG Spaer 2164 - 77, F, Antioch mint, 6.413g, 18.5mm, 0o, c. 130 - 125 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΟΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΘΕΟΥ ΝΙΚΑΤΟΡΟΣ”, Nike walking left holding wreath and palm branch, “Ξ ”in inner left, uncertain symbol in outer left field. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
42837_Demetrios_II.jpg
Demetrios II, 2nd Reign, c. 130 - 125 B.C. Nike walking left36 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Demetrios II, 2nd Reign, c. 130 - 125 B.C. Bronze AE 17, Houghton and Lorber 2170(1), SNG Spaer 2164 - 77, F, Antioch mint, 5.121g, 16.8mm, 0o, c. 130 - 125 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΟΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΘΕΟΥ ΝΙΚΑΤΟΡΟΣ”, Nike walking left, wreath in right, palm frond in left, “Ξ ”in inner left field, uncertain monogram in outer left. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
oB8L3KrmECc9ie6GwXj4B2yF7LTbZn.jpg
Demetrios or Demetrius I Soter, King of the Seleukid Empire of Syria, 162-150 BC. AR Tetradrachm68 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Demetrios I Soter AR Tetradrachm. Antioch mint, dated SE 159 = 154/3 BC. Diademed head right within wreath / Tyche seated left, holding sceptre & cornucopiae; winged Tritoness supporting throne, two monograms to outer left, date in ex.
Houghton 154
16.6 grams _15909
1 commentsAntonivs Protti
demetrios_poliorketes.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, 306 - 283 BC, AE 14, Prow of galley18 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Demetrios Poliorketes, 306 - 283 BC, 14mm, 2.7g. Mint in Caria. Obverse: Male head (Demetrios?) right, , wearing crested Corinthian helmet. Reverse, Prow of galley right; BA. SNGCop 1185cfPodiceps
Macedonian_Kingdom,_Demetrios_Poliorketes,_AE16.JPG
Demetrios Poliorketes, helmet28 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Demetrios Poliorketes, 306 - 283 BC, 16mm, 4.1g. Obverse: Macedonian shield, Demetrios' monogram in center. Reverse: BA-SI, Macedonian helmet SGCV II 6774, SNG Cop 1224. ex areich, photo credit areich

Podiceps
Macedonian_Kingdom_1c_img.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Macedonian Kingdom, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, Newell p. 97, 9176 viewsObv:– Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity
Rev:– BASILEOS DEMETRIOY, Poseidon standing left, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander), monogram left
Minted in Pella, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C.
Reference:– Newell p. 97, 91 and pl. VIII, 12, SNG Cop 1179 var.
17.0192g, 29.3mm, 45o

Ex-Harlan Berk. Ex-Forvm, where it was described as gVF, superb portrait, tight flan.
4 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1c_img~0.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Macedonian Kingdom, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, Newell p. 97, 9164 viewsObv:– Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity
Rev:– BASILEOS DEMETRIOY, Poseidon standing left, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander), monogram left
Minted in Pella, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C.
Reference:– Newell p. 97, 91 and pl. VIII, 12, SNG Cop 1179 var.
17.0192g, 29.3mm, 45o

Ex-Harlan Berk. Ex-Forvm, where it was described as gVF, superb portrait, tight flan.

Updated image of an old coin from my collection.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1c_img~1.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Macedonian Kingdom, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, Newell p. 97, 9156 viewsObv:– Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity
Rev:– BASILEOS DEMETRIOY, Poseidon standing left, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander), monogram left
Minted in Pella, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C.
Reference:– Newell p. 97, 91 and pl. VIII, 12, SNG Cop 1179 var.
17.0192g, 29.3mm, 45o

Ex-Harlan Berk. Ex-Forvm, where it was described as gVF, superb portrait, tight flan.

Updated image using new photography setup.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
prow.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Male head/ Prow15 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Demetrios Poliorketes, 306 - 283 B.C, 14mm, 2.7g. Mint in Caria. Obverse: Male head (Demetrios?) right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet. Reverse, Prow of galley right; BA. SNGCop 1185cfPodiceps
045.JPG
Demetrius I24 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Demetrius I AE21 Serrate. Bust of Artemis right, wearing stephane, bow and quiver at shoulder / BASILEWS DHMHTPIOY, bow & quiver. BMC 4Randygeki(h2)
Demetrios_I_-001.jpg
Demetrius I Soter, 162 - 150 B.C.13 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Demetrius I Soter, 162 - 150 B.C.
Bronze AE 20, Tyre mint, weight 5.27g, obv: diademed head of Demetrius right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ∆ΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ / ΤΥΡΙΩΝ, stern of a galley left, L∆ΝΡ (year 154) [159 - 158 B.C.] above, Phoenician inscription "of Tyre" in exergue;
ddwau
MISC_Denmark_Christian_IV_4_Skilling_1645_KM_133_1.JPG
Denmark. Christian IV (1588-1648)145 viewsHede 150, Schou 87, Sieg 53, KM 133.1

AR 4 skilling, 22 mm., dated 1645, struck by Heinrich Köhler at the Copenhagen mint

Obv: IIII • SKILLING • DANSKE, surrounding crowned monogram of Christian IV (4 within a C)

Rev: ••• / IUSTUS / יהוה (Jehovah) / IUDEX / 16 filament-hook (privy mark) 45, in four rows

Note: In 1643, toward the end of the Thirty Years War, Sweden launched a surprise attack upon Denmark which is called the Torstensson War (after Swedish general Lennart Torstensson). King Christian IV had to rapidly obtain funds to pay his mercenary troops to defend the kingdom against the advancing Swedes. Being short of funds, the emissions that are referred to as “hebræermønter” were issued with a reduced silver content; the silver content of the 4 skilling coin was reduced from .8500 fineness to .2500 (the king later pawned his royal crown and ordered that silver furniture from Frederiksborg Castle be melted to fund the war). Outraged over Sweden’s unannounced invasion, King Christian ordered that the coins bear a special reverse legend, in a mixture of Hebrew and Latin, which reads: “God is a righteous judge” (Psalm 7:12).
2 commentsStkp
Domitian_RIC_II_845.jpg
Domitian RIC II 084546 viewsDomitian. 81-96 A.D. AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. Rome Mint for Asia. 82 A.D. (10.73g, 25.2m, 6h). Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG P M COS VIII, laureate head r. Rev: DOMITIA AVGVSTA, bust of Domitia, draped, right, hair massed in front and long plait behind. RIC II 845. RPC 866.

Cistophoric tetradrachms show enough stylistic links that most agree they were minted in Rome, but for circulation in the East. Valued at 3 denarii, cistophori, named for the cista mystica, the basket of snakes used during the initiation rites for the cult of Dionysus, were the denomination of the kingdom of Pergamum in Asia Minor.
3 commentsLucas H
Eanred_ab.jpg
Eanred - Kingdom of Northumbria62 viewsEanred, king of Northumbria c. 810-840. Styca in billon (13 mm, 1.14 g) moneyer Daegberct. Obverse: EANRED REX, central cross. Reverse: DAEGBERCT, central cross. Reference: North 186.

Ex MISAB Auction 9, lot 1119.
2 commentsJan (jbc)
North-190.jpg
Early Anglo-Saxon, Kingdom of Northumbria: Æthelred II, 2nd reign (ca. 844-850) AE Styca (North-190; SCBC-868)25 viewsObv: +EDILRED REX. Small cross within circle
Rev: +EARDVVLF. Small cross with pellet in each angle
SpongeBob
SCBC-872.JPG
Early Anglo-Saxon, Kingdom of Northumbria: Archbishop Wigmund of York (837-849) Æ Irregular Styca (SCBC-872)8 viewsObv: +VcMVND APEP; Small central cross
Rev: +EDILVEVRD; Small central cross
SpongeBob
SCBC-870.jpg
Early Anglo-Saxon, Kingdom of Northumbria: Archbishop Wigmund of York (837-849) Æ Styca (SCBC-870)14 viewsObv: +VIGMVND; Small central cross
Rev: +COENRED; Small central cross
SpongeBob
SCBC-860.jpg
Early Anglo-Saxon, Kingdom of Northumbria: Eanred (810-841) BI Styca Phase Ib, Eoferwic (York) Mint (SCBC-860; Pirie, Guide 3.6a)6 viewsObv: EANREDREX around central cross pattée
Rev: +DAEGBERCT around central cross pattée
SpongeBob
SCBC-860(1).jpg
Early Anglo-Saxon, Kingdom of Northumbria: Eanred (810-841) BI Styca Phase Ib, Eoferwic (York) Mint (SCBC-860; Pirie, Guide 3.6c)10 viewsObv: +EANRED REX around central cross pattée
Rev: +EADVINI around central cross pattée
SpongeBob
SCBC-862.jpg
Early Anglo-Saxon, Kingdom of Northumbria: Eanred (810-841) Æ Styca (SCBC-862)24 viewsObv: +EANRED REX; Small central cross
Rev: +DIHTRA; Small central cross
SpongeBob
SCBC-862a.jpg
Early Anglo-Saxon, Kingdom of Northumbria: Eanred (810-841) Æ Styca (SCBC-862; BMC-24var)12 viewsObv: +EANRED RE; Small central cross
Rev: +LADVTEIS; Small central cross
SpongeBob
SCBC-862(1).jpg
Early Anglo-Saxon, Kingdom of Northumbria: Eanred (810-841) Æ Styca Phase II, Group C, Eoferwic (York) Mint (SCBC-862; Pirie, Guide 3.20f)5 viewsObv: +EANRED REX around central cross pattée
Rev: +MONNE around central cross pattée
SpongeBob
SCBC-800.jpg
Early Anglo-Saxon, Kingdom of Northumbria: Secondary Sceattas (ca. 710-720) AR Sceat, Series G, type 3a (Abramson-21.20; cf. SCBI 63 (BM), 431-4; North-43; SCBC-800)27 viewsObv: Diademed head right; cross pommée before; [pellets behind?]
Rev: Standard with central pellet-in-annulet, saltires in angles, pellets between saltires; pellets and crosses in margin
1 commentsSpongeBob
SCBC-865(1).jpg
Early Anglo-Saxon, Kingdom of Northumbria: Æthelred II (ca. 841-850) Æ Styca Phase II, Group A, Eoferwic (York) Mint (SCBC-865; Pirie, Guide 3.10g var)5 viewsObv: +EDIΓRED REX around central cross pattée
Rev: +ΓEOFτИ around central cross pattée

SpongeBob
SCBC-866.jpg
Early Anglo-Saxon, Kingdom of Northumbria: Æthelred II, 1st reign (ca. 841-850) Æ Styca Phase II, Group A, Eoferwic (York) Mint (SCBC-866; Pirie, Guide 3.10d)8 viewsObv: +EDELRED REX around central six-limbed cross
Rev: +LEOFDEτИ around central cross pattée with pellets in quarters
SpongeBob
SCBC-865.jpg
Early Anglo-Saxon, Kingdom of Northumbria: Æthelred II, 1st reign (ca. 841-850) Æ Styca Phase II, Group Cii, Eoferwic (York) Mint (SCBC-865; Pirie, Guide 3.26n)7 viewsObv: +EDIΓRED RE–X around central cross pattée
Rev: +VEИDEΓBERH around central pellet-in-annulet
SpongeBob
Lyonarchbishop12-13c_18mm107g.jpg
Early Feudal, Kingdom of Burgundy 12-13c7 viewsArchbishops Lyon
Cross
L-shaped Monogram
XII Century
AR denier
18mm
1.07
Rob. 4032
wileyc
EB0023b_scaled.JPG
EB0023 Apollo / Horseman8 viewsKingdom of Paeonia, Patraos AR Tetradrachm. 335-315 BC.
Obverse: Laureate head of Apollo right.
Reverse: Warrior on rearing horseback right, spearing enemy warrior who defends himself with raised shield.
References:
Diameter: 24.5mm, Weight: 12.743g.
EB
EB0087b_scaled.JPG
EB0087 Herakles / Zeus3 viewsKingdom of Macedonia, Alexander III AR Drachm. Sardes mint, struck under Antigonos I Monophthalmos ca 320-319 BC.
Obverse: Head of Herakles wearing lionskin headdress.
Reverse: Zeus seated left; in left field, TI above star.
References: Cf. Price 2626-2629.
Diameter: 17mm, Weight: 4.132g.
EB
EB0089b_scaled.JPG
EB0089 Herakles / Zeus13 viewsKingdom of Macedon, Alexander III, AR tetradrachm. Posthumous issue, year 26 = 187-188 BC.
Obverse: Head of Herakles right in lionskin headdress.
Reverse: AΛEΞANΔΡOY, Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre, right leg drawn back. AΣ over date K :Csquare: in left field, rectangular Seleukid countermark of anchor to right.
References: SNG Israel 1235, Price 2901.
Diameter: 32mm, Weight: 16.55g.
1 commentsEB
EB0094b_scaled.JPG
EB0094 Seleukos IV / Apollo4 viewsAntioch, Seleukos IV, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 187-175 BC
Obverse: Diademed head of Seleukos IV right.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣEΛEYKOY, Apollo seated left on omphalos, testing arrow in his right hand, left hand on bow set on ground to right; palm branch to left, ɸ in exergue.
References: SNG Spaer 839,840; BMC 11.
Diameter: 30mm, Weight: 16.434g.
EB
EB0095b_scaled.JPG
EB0095 Antiochos IV / Zeus5 viewsAntioch, Antiochos IV Epiphanes, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 170-164 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head right.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΘΕΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ, Zeus enthroned left, with Nike and sceptre.
References: Newell SMA 54.
Diameter: 31mm, Weight: 16.403g.
EB
EB0096b_scaled.JPG
EB0096 Antiochus IV / Apollo3 viewsAntiochus IV Epiphanes, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR drachm, Ekbatana mint, 175-164 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head right.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY, Apollo seated left on omphalos, holding arrow in right hand, left hand resting on bow, ? in inner left field.
References: Cf. SNGIs 1215.
Diameter: 17mm, Weight: 3.967g.
EB
EB0097b_scaled.JPG
EB0097 Antiochos V / Zeus2 viewsAntioch, Antiochos V, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 164-162 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head right.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EYΠATOΡOΣ, Zeus seated left on throne, holding Nike and sceptre. DI monogram in left field.
References: BMC 4, SNGIs 1244.
Diameter: 30.5mm, Weight: 15.537g.
EB
EB0098b_scaled.JPG
EB0098 Demetrios I / Tyche3 viewsAntioch, Demetrios I, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 162-150 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head right.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ – ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ, Tyche seated left on backless throne supported by winged tritoness, holding sceptre and cornucopiae; in left field, HP? and ATI monograms. In exergue, ΑΞΡ.
References: BMC 12?.
Diameter: 30mm, Weight: 15.747g.
EB
EB0099b_scaled.JPG
EB0099 Demetrios I / Tyche1 viewsAntioch, Demetrios I, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 162-150 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head right.
Reverse: Tyche seated left on throne with winged tritoness support, holding short sceptre & cornucopia, ΔΙ monogram (recut over earlier control) in outer left field.
References: Houghton 83, SNGIs 1256.
Diameter: 31mm, Weight: 16.262g.
EB
EB0100b_scaled.JPG
EB0100 Demetrios I / Tyche4 viewsAntioch, Demetrios I, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 162-150 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head right.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ – ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ, Tyche seated left on backless throne supported by winged tritoness, holding sceptre and cornucopiae; in left field, HP ligate and ATI monograms. In exergue, ΑΞΡ.
References: BMC 12? (same as EB0098).
Diameter: 31mm, Weight: 16.636g.
EB
EB0101b_scaled.JPG
EB0101 Demetrios I / Tyche3 viewsAntioch, Demetrios I Soter, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 162-150 BC
Obverse: Diademed head of Demetrios right, fillet border.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΔHMHTPIOY, Tyche seated left on omphalos, holding cornucopiae and arrow, monogram in outer left field.
References: BMC 33.
Diameter: 30.5mm, Weight: 15.785g.
EB
EB0103b_scaled.JPG
EB0103 Demetrios I / Cornucopiae1 viewsDemetrios I Soter, 162-150 BC, Antioch mint, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR drachm,
Obverse: Diademed head right; fillet border.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ – ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ, Cornucopiae; in exergue, control mark [] and ΑΞΡ.
References: BMC 36; Newell, SMA 120; SNG Israel (Spaer) 1279.
Diameter: 17mm, Weight: 4.107g.
EB
EB0104b_scaled.JPG
EB0104 Alexander I / Zeus3 viewsAntioch, SELEUKID KINGDOM, Alexander I Balas, AR Tetradrachm, 150-145 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head right.
Reverse: AΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEXANΔΡOY ΘEOΠATΡOΣ EYEΡΓETOY, Zeus seated left, holding Nike and sceptre; Φ in outer left field, PAT monogram in inner left field, date ΔΡ? in exergue.
References: Cf. Houghton 179.
Diameter: 31mm, Weight: 16.327g.
EB
EB0105b_scaled.JPG
EB0105 Alexander I / Apollo3 viewsAlexander I Balas 150-145 BC, Antioch, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR drachm.
Obverse: Diademed head right.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔΡOY ΘEOΠATOROΣ [EYEΡΓETOY], Apollo left on omphalos, [cornucopiae left], [date ΓΞΡ in ex].
References: -.
Diameter: 18mm, Weight: 4.093g.
EB
EB0106b_scaled.JPG
EB0106 Demetrius II / Eagle23 viewsDemetrius II, Tyre, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 145-140 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head of king right.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΔHMHTΡIOY, Eagle standing left, wings closed, palm over shoulder, ΓΠΡ monogram between legs. A over ΡE and Tyre monogram on club in left field, A ΣY monogram above ΓΠΡ in right field.
References: See the following for ΔΠΡ in right field: BMC (2nd reign) 4; Rouvier 1928; Babelon (Rois de Syrie), 1181; Mionnet V, 583.
Diameter: 27mm, Weight: 13.81g.
2 commentsEB
EB0107b_scaled.JPG
EB0107 Antiochus VII / Athena4 viewsAntiochus VII Sidetes, 139-129 BC, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, Cappadocian mint, posthumous issue.
Obverse: Diademed head of Antiochos right.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EYEΡΓETOY, Athena standing left holding Nike, spear and shield. ΔI monogram over A in outer left field. T - A across inner fields.
References: HGC 9, 1069. Lorber & Houghton 15-26. See also BMC 32-33; Hoover 1067; SG 7091-7092.
Diameter: 28mm, Weight: 16.356g.
EB
EB0108b_scaled.JPG
EB0108 Demetrius II / Eagle2 viewsDemetrius II, Tyre, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 145-140 BC. Dated year 184 of the local era.
Obverse: Diademed head of king right.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΔHMHTΡIOY, Eagle standing left, wings closed, palm over shoulder, ΓΠΡ monogram between legs. A over ΡE and Tyre monogram on club in left field, A ΣY monogram above ΓΠΡ in right field.
References: See the following (with ΔΠΡ in right field): BMC (2nd reign) 4; Rouvier 1928; Babelon (Rois de Syrie), 1181; Mionnet V, 583.
Diameter: 28mm, Weight: 13.333g.
EB
EB0109b_scaled.JPG
EB0109 Antiochos VIII / Zeus2 viewsAntiochos VIII Gryphos, Antioch, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 121-96 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head right (3rd reign).
Reverse: Zeus enthroned left holding Nike and sceptre (bankers mark over Nike).
References: Newell SMA 406; Babelon 1433; Pozzi 3022.
Diameter: 29mm, Weight: 15.068g.
EB
EB0110b_scaled.JPG
EB0110 Antiochos IX / Athena4 viewsAntiochos IX, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 113-95 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head right.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ// ANTIOXOΥ// ΦIΛO-ΠATOΡOΣ/ ΣIΔΩ/ IEΡ/ AΣΥ/ IΣ, Athena standing left, holding Nike and spear, monograms in left field.
References: BMC 6; Cop.416; CSE.725; Spaer 2732.
Diameter: 30mm, Weight: 15.977g.
EB
EB0111b_scaled.JPG
EB0111 Philip I / Zeus8 viewsPhilip I Philadelphus, Antioch, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 93-83(or 75) BC.
Obverse: Diademed head of Philip right.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛIΠΠOY EΠIΦANOYΣ ΦIΛAΔEΛΦOY to right and left of Zeus seated left, holding Nike and sceptre.
References: Cf. SEABY 7196, Newell 439.
Diameter: 26mm, Weight: 16.117g.
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EB0112 Philip I / Zeus4 viewsPhilip I Philadelphus, Antioch, SELEUKID KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, 93-83(or 75) BC.
Obverse: Diademed head of Philip right.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦIΛIΠΠOY EΠIΦANOYΣ ΦIΛAΔEΛΦOY to right and left of Zeus seated left, holding Nike and sceptre.
References: Cf. SEABY 7214.
Diameter: 26mm, Weight: 14.971g.
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EB0114 Mithradates VI / Stag8 viewsKingdom of Pontos. Mithradates VI Eupator AR Drachm. May-August 95 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head of Mithradates to right.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ EYΠATOPOΣ above and below Stag feeding to left; star within crescent to left, date and monogram in exergue; all within wreath.
References: Callataÿ D2/R1e; SNG von Aulock 6684. Extremely Rare, see this article by Roma Numismatics: http://romanumismatics.com/articles/article/kingdom-of-pontos-one-of-eleven-known-drachms-of-mithradates-vi.
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 3.855g.
Ex: JSD Ancient Coins.
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EB0115 Artabanus I, PARTHIAN KINGDOM21 viewsArtabanus 1, PARTHIAN KINGDOM (unknown mint), drm., 127-124 BC
Obv: Bust of king L.
Rev: Archer & 4-line legend
References: Sell. 20.1, Shore 59
Diameter: 19.5mm, Weight: 3.649 grams
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EB0116 Mithradates II / Archer6 viewsMithradates II 123-88 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, Ecbatana mint, AR Drachm.
Obverse: Medium bearded bust left wearing diadem, pellet-ended torque; behind bust, monogram [~~]; circular border of pellets.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΜΕΓΑΛΟΥ ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ, beardless archer wearing bashlyk and cloak seated right on omphalos, holding bow in right hand; no border.
References: Shore 76, Sell. 24.30.
Diameter: 22mm, Weight: 3.684g.
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EB0117 Mithradates II / Archer5 viewsEB0117 Mithradates II
Mithradates II 123-88 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm, Rhagae mint.
Obverse: Diademed bust left.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΝ ΜΕΓΑΛΟΥ ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ, 5-line legend around archer.
References: Shore 87, Sell. 27.1.
Diameter: 23mm, Weight: 3.936g.
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EB0118 Mithradates II / Archer7 viewsMithradates II 123-88 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm, Ekbatana mint.
Obverse: Bust, left, w/tiara and diadem, knot and 2 ribbons; mustache, long tapering beard; tiara w/earflap and 3 rows of pellets enclosing a six-pointed star; [earring], multi-turn torque w/2-pellet finial; cuirass.
Reverse: Archer, right, on throne, w/bow in 1 hand; exergual line; 5-line legend forming a square: BAΣIΛEΩΣ BAΣIΛEΩN MEΓAΛoY APΣAKoY EΠIΦANoYΣ.
References: Shore 97, Sell. 28.3, Seaby 7372.
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 4.014g.
See Best of Type:http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-142418
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EB0119 Mithradates II / Archer4 viewsMithradates II 123-88 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm, Ekbatana mint.
Obverse: Bust, left, w/tiara and diadem, knot and 2 ribbons; mustache, long tapering beard; tiara w/earflap and 3 rows of pellets enclosing a six-pointed star; earring, multi-turn torque w/2-pellet finial; cuirass.
Reverse: Archer, right, on throne, w/bow in 1 hand; exergual line; 5-line legend forming a square: BAΣIΛEΩΣ BAΣIΛEΩN MEΓAΛoY APΣAKoY EΠIΦANoYΣ.
References: Shore 97, Sell. 28.3, Seaby 7372.
Diameter: 21mm, Weight: 4.131g.
Ex: Alex G. Malloy.
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EB0120 Mithradates II / Archer4 viewsMithradates II 123-88 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm.
Obverse: Bust, left, w/tiara and diadem.
Reverse: 5-line legend around archer.
References: Shore 99?, Sell. 28.7?
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 3.600g.
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EB0121 Mithradates II / Archer4 viewsMithradates II 123-88 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm.
Obverse: Bust of king left.
Reverse: 5-line legend around archer.
References: -.
Diameter: 21mm, Weight: 3.86g.
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EB0122 Gotarzes I / Archer7 viewsGotarzes I 95-90 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm.
Obverse: Diademed bust of king left.
Reverse: 5-line legend around archer.
References: Shore 112, Sell. 33.3.
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 3.922g.
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EB0123 Gotarzes I / Archer5 viewsGotarzes I 95-90 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm.
Obverse: Diademed bust of king left.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΜΕΓΑΛΟΥ ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΘΕΟΠΑΤΡΟΥ ΝΙΚΑΤΟΡΟΣ, 5-line legend around archer.
References: Shore 113, Sell. 33.4.
Diameter: 21mm, Weight: 3.458g.
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EB0124 Orodes I / Archer6 viewsOrodes I 90-80 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm, Rhagae mint.
Obverse: Diademed bust of king left.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΜΕΓΑΛΟΥ ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΟΡΟΣ ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΕΛΛΗΝΟΣ, 7-line legend around archer.
References: Shore 122, Sell. 31.5, Seaby 7389.
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 3.722g.
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EB0125 Orodes I / Archer6 viewsOrodes I 90-80 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm, Rhagae mint.
Obverse: Diademed bust of king left.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΜΕΓΑΛΟΥ ΑΡ−ΣΑΚΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΟΡΟΣ ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΕΛΛΗΝΟΣ, 7-line legend around archer.
References: Shore 123, Sell. 31.6, Seaby 7390.
Diameter: 21mm, Weight: 4.156g.
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EB0126 Orodes II / Archer8 viewsOrodes II 57-38 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm, Ecbatana mint.
Obverse: Diademed bust of king left.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΝ ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΕΛΛΗΝΟΣ, 7-line legend around archer monogram.
References: Shore 223, Sell. 45.10.
Diameter: 20.5mm, Weight: 3.465g.
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EB0126.2 Orodes II / Archer7 viewsOrodes II 57-38 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm, Ecbatana mint.
Obverse: Short-bearded bust left wearing diadem and pellet-ended torque, crescent behind; (usually) no wart visible on forehead; circular border of pellets
Reverse: Beardless archer wearing bashlyk and cloak seated right on throne, holding bow in right hand; below bow, monogram [~]; no border; seven-line Greek inscription = ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΝ ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΕΛΛΗΝΟΣ.
References: Shore 222, Sell. 46.18.
Diameter: 21mm, Weight: 3.917g.
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EB0127 Orodes II / Archer7 viewsOrodes II 57-38 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm, Ecbatana mint.
Obverse: Diademed bust of king left.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΝ ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΕΛΛΗΝΟΣ, 7-line legend around archer monogram.
References: Shore 223, Sell. 45.10?
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 3.845g.
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EB0128 Orodes II / Archer9 viewsOrodes II 57-38 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm, Tambrax mint.
Obverse: Short-bearded bust left wearing diadem and pellet-ended torque, star before and crescent behind; no wart visible on forehead; circular border of pellets.
Reverse: beardless archer wearing bashlyk and cloak seated right on throne, holding bow in right hand; below bow, monogram TM; no border; seven-line Greek inscription = ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΝ ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΕΛΛΗΝΟΣ.
References: Shore -, Sell. 47.19.
Diameter: 20.5mm, Weight: 3.647g.
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EB0129 Orodes II / Archer9 viewsOrodes II 57-38 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm, Ecbatana mint.
Obverse: Bust left with pointed beard wearing diadem and griffin-ended torque; star before, crescent above star behind; wart visible on forehead; circular border of pellets.
Reverse: Beardless archer wearing bashlyk and cloak seated right on throne, holding bow in right hand; behind archer, anchor (A48iv); below bow, monogram AT; no border; seven-line Greek inscription = ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΝ ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΕΛΛΗΝΟΣ.
References: Shore 261, Sell. 48.9.
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 3.603g.
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EB0130 Phraates IV / King and Tyche6 viewsPhraates IV 38-2 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, Seleucia mint.
Obverse: Bare-headed bust left with pointed beard, royal wart on brow, segmented necklet, wearing diadem.
Reverse: King seated right on throne, receiving a palm branch from Tyche left, holding a cornucopia; Greek inscription ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΝ / ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ / ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ / ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΕΛΛΗΝΟΣ.
References: Shore 272, Sell. 51, Seaby 7466.
Diameter: 28.5mm, Weight: 10.931g.
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EB0131 Phraates IV / King and Tyche6 viewsPhraates IV 38-2 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, Seleucia mint.
Obverse: Bare-headed bust left with pointed beard, royal wart on brow, segmented necklet, wearing diadem.
Reverse: King seated right on throne, receiving a palm branch from Tyche left, holding a cornucopia; Greek inscription ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΝ / ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ / ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ / ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΕΛΛΗΝΟΣ.
References: Shore 272, Sell. 51, Seaby 7466.
Diameter: 28.5mm, Weight: 12.358g.
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EB0132 Phraates IV / King and Athena14 viewsPhraates IV 38-2 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, Seleucia mint.
Obverse: Diademed and draped bust left, wart on forehead.
Reverse: Phraates seated right on throne, Athena standing left before him, presenting diadem and holding scepter.
References: Sell. 52.5.
Diameter: 27mm, Weight: 10.783g.
1 commentsEB
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EB0133 Phraates IV / Archer9 viewsPhraates IV 38-2 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, unknown mint.
Obverse: Bare-headed bust left with pointed beard, wart on brow, segmented necklet, wearing diadem; eagle with wreath behind, star above crescent in front.
Reverse: Beardless archer seated right on throne holding bow, below bow monogram #26 (AT); ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΝ / ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ / ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ / ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΕΛΛΗΝΟΣ.
References: Sell. 54.
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 3.909g.
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EB0134 Phraates IV / Archer5 viewsPhraates IV 38-2 BC, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm, possibly Mithradatkart mint.
Obverse: Bare-headed bust left with pointed beard, wart on brow, segmented necklet, wearing diadem; eagle behind head.
Reverse: Beardless archer seated right on throne holding bow, below bow monogram #28. 7-line legend.
References: Sell. 52 (possibly 52.6).
Diameter: 21.5mm, Weight: 3.826g.
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EB0135 Artabanus II / Archer6 viewsArtabanus II 10-38 AD, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm, Ecbatana mint.
Obverse: Bare-headed bust left with medium square cut beard, wearing diadem with loop at the top and three ends, hair almost straight, earring visible; border of dots.
Reverse: beardless archer, seated right on throne; in right hand, bow; below bow monogram #26 (AT). 7-line legend.
References: Sell. 63.6.
Diameter: 21.5mm, Weight: 3.727g.
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EB0136 Artabanus II / Archer7 viewsArtabanus II 10-38 AD, PARTHIAN KINGDOM, AR Drachm, Ecbatana mint.
Obverse: Bare-headed bust left with medium square cut beard, wearing diadem with loop at the top and three ends, hair almost straight, earring visible; border of dots.
Reverse: beardless archer, seated right on throne; in right hand, bow; below bow monogram #26 (AT). 7-line legend.
References: Shore 341, Sell. 63.6.
Diameter: 21.5mm, Weight: 3.737g.
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