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Search results - "goat,"
DenMnFonteio.jpg
28 viewsDenarius - 85 BC. - Mint of Rome
MN FONTEIVS C. f. - Gens Fonteia
Ob.: Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right, M FONTEI CF behind, thunderbolt below, monogram below chin (ROMA or Argento Publico?)
Rev.: Infant Genius riding goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, filleted thyrsos below.
Gs. 3,6 mm. 20
Cr353/1a, Sear RCV 271.

Maxentius
DenThorioBalbo.jpg
32 viewsDenarius - 105 BC.
L. THORIVS BALBVS - Gens THORIA
Obv.: Head of Juno Sospita in goat skin. I.S.M.R. (Iunoni Sospitae Magnae Reginae)behind
Rev.:Bull charging right, T above, L THORIVS / BALBVS below.
Gs. 3,75 mm. 19,7x21,3
Craw. 316/1, Sear RCV 192
1 commentsMaxentius
DenRoscioFabato.jpg
34 viewsDenarius Serratus 64 or 62 BC. - Mint of Rome
L. ROSCIVS FABATVS - Gens Roscia
Obv.: Head of Juno Sospita in goat skin, L ROSCI below, symbol behind (Shield)
Rev.:Girl standing right feeding serpent before, symbol to left (helm), FABATI in ex.
gs. 3,9 mm. 18,2x17,4
Crawford 412/1; Sear RCV 363, Grueber I 3394.



1 commentsMaxentius
DenCRenio.jpg
19 viewsDenarius - 138 BC. - Rome mint
C. RENIVS - Gens Renia
Obv.:Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind
Rev.: Juno Caprotina in biga of goats right, C RENI below goats, ROMA in ex.
Crawf. 231/1, Sear RCV 108, Grueber I 885
Maxentius
DenSerratoLPapio.jpg
26 viewsDenarius Serratus - 79 BC - Rome mint
Obv.: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goatskin, symbol behind (amphora with two handles and string)
Rev.:Gryphon dancing right, symbol below (ampulla), L PAPI in ex.
Gs. 3,8 mm. 18,28x19,64
Crawf. 384/1, Sear RCV 311, Grueber 2977

1 commentsMaxentius
26531q00.jpg
100 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Prieur 720 (1 example), SNG Paris 2331, Weber -, VF, 13.043g, 26.9mm, 180o, Aegeae mint, 132 - 133 A.D.; obverse AUTOKR KAIS TRAIA ADRIANO SEB P P, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ETOUS •QOR• AIGEAIWN, eagle standing facing on harpe, wings spread, head turned right, goat in ex; rare;

Aegeae issued tetradrachms only during the reigns of Hadrian and Caracalla. The issues were probably related to visits of these emperors to the town or to its famous sanctuary of Asclepius. -- The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253 by Michel and Karin Prieur

ex FORVM
dealer's picture
1 commentsareich
philip_II_goat.jpg
48 views1 commentspaul1888
dionysus_goat.jpg
17 viewsMacedonia, Thessalonica, AE20. Head of young Dionysos right, wreathed in ivy / goat or stag standing rightLee S
Julia_Dom_Moushmov_6261.jpg
1.5 Julia Domna17 viewsJulia Domna
AE25 of Edessa, Macedonia.

ΙΟΥΛΙΑ ΔΟMNA CEB, draped bust right / ΕΔΕC/CΕΩΝ (below), Roma Nikephoros seated l. on cuirass, shield behind, goat to l., Tyche of Edessa behind, crowning her with wreath.

Moushmov 6261; BMC 20; Mionnet Supp. III, 443.
Sosius
Gallienus_RIC_207_-_Goat.jpg
7 Gallienus19 viewsGallienus
AE Antoninianus, "Zoo Issue"

GALLIENVS AVG IOVI CONS AVG, Radiate head right / Goat standing left. Digamma in exergue.

RIC 207, Göbl 730
Sosius
ThoriusBalbus.jpg
#L. Thorius Balbus. 105 BC. AR Denarius32 viewsRome mint. ISMR behind, head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin headdress / L THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue, bull charging right.

"The obverse refers to the the cult of Juno Sospita at Lanuvium, the moneyer's birthplace. The reverse is likely a play on the moneyer's name (Taurus sounds like Thorius). Cicero described L. Thorius Balbus as a man who lived in such a manner that there was not a single pleasure, however refined or rare, that he did not enjoy. This is one of the most common republican denarii." -- Roman Silver Coins edited by David Sear and Robert Loosley
ancientone
Greek_-_Uncertain_Northern_Greek_2.jpg
30 viewsNORTHERN GREECE, Uncertain
PB Tessera (16mm, 3.96 g)
Goat standing right
Bunch of grapes hanging from vine

Ex Classical Numismatics Group 85 (15 September 2010), lot 330b
Ardatirion
elagabal_pan_2C.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS45 views218 - 222 AD
AE 26.5 mm 9.24 g
O: Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: Pan, with horns and legs of a goat, standing left, looking right, holding pedum and syrinx; left foot on panther lying on its back.
MOESIA INFERIOR, Nicopolis ad Istrum AMNG 1933
laney
elagabal_pan_pelle.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS22 views218 - 222 AD
AE 26.5 mm 9.24 g
O: Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: Pan, with horns and legs of a goat, standing left, looking right, holding pedum and syrinx; left foot on panther lying on its back.
MOESIA INFERIOR, Nicopolis ad Istrum AMNG 1933
laney
normal_philip_ii_goat_copy~0.jpg
(0247) PHILIP II42 views PHILIP II
(as Augustus)
247 - 249 AD
(Struck 248 AD)
AE SESTERTIUS 18.27 g
O: IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R: [SAECV]LARES AVGG [SC]
GOAT STANDING L
ROME
RIC 264a (S)
Ex. HJBerk
1 commentslaney
0009.jpg
0009 - Denarius Papia 79 BC108 viewsObv/Head of Juno Sospita r., wearing goatskin, symbol behind.
Rev/Gryphon dancing r., symbol below, L PAPI in ex.

Ag, 19.9mm, 3.82g
Moneyer: L. Papius.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 384/1 [dies o/r: 211/211] - Syd. 773 - Calicó 1057 - RCV 311 - RSC Papia 1 - Cohen Papia 1
ex-Numismática Saetabis
1 commentsdafnis
0018.jpg
0018 - Denarius Thoria 105 BC52 viewsObv/ISMR, head of Juno Sospita r. in goat skin.
Rev/Bull charging r., C above, THORIVS below, BALBVS in ex.

Ag, 20.0mm, 3.93g
Moneyer: L. Thorius Balbus.
Mint: Gallia Cisalpina.
RRC 316/1 [dies o/r: 450/562] - Syd. 598 - BMCRR 1615 - Calicó 1300 - Cohen Thoria 1 - RCV 192 - RSC Thoria 1
ex-CNG
1 commentsdafnis
0022.jpg
0022 - Denarius Domitian 80 AC115 viewsObv/CAESAR DIVI F DOMOTIANVS COS VIII, Domitian laureate head r.
Rev/PRINCEPTS (IVV)ENTVTIS, goat standing l. in laurel-wreath.

Ag, 19.1mm, 3.30g
Mint: Rome.
RIC IIa/267 [C] - RCV 2675 - BMCRE 88 - RSC 390
ex-Meister & Sonntag, auction S2, lot 219
6 commentsdafnis
Fontius-Syd-724.jpg
005. Mn. Fonteius, Cf15 viewsDenarius, ca 85-84 BC, Auxiliary Italian mint.
Obverse: MN FONTEI CF / Bust of Vejovis with hair in loose locks; thunderbolt below; AP monogram under chin.
Reverse: Winged Cupid or Genius seated on goat; caps of the Dioscuri above; thyrsus with fillet below; all within a laurel wreath.
3.89 gm., 20 mm.
Syd. #724; RSC #Fonteia 9; Sear #271.

Vejovis was an ancient deity whose early function was forgotten. At his shrine in Rome, his statue portrayed him as a young beardless youth with a goat. By the time this coin was issued, he was identified with Pluto, the god of the underworld. He was probably a god of expiation since a goat was sacrificed to him once a year. We know from other sources that this goat sacrifice was expiatory in nature.
Callimachus
DSC02767_cut_a.JPG
02 - Gordian III Tetradrachm #232 views-
--
Roman Empire
AR Tetradrachm of Emperor Gordian III (238 - 244 AD)

(Titles in Greek)
obv: Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from behind.

rev: Eagle standing facing, head left, holding wreath in beak.
Beneath, crescent moon above ram running left, head reverted.

Weight: 10.9 Grams
--
-
rexesq
Domitian_AR-Den_CAESAR-dot-DIVI-F-DOMITIANVS-COS-VII_PRINCEPS_IVVENTVTIS_Roma-RIC-267-new-49_(Titus)_C-390_80-AD_Scarce_Q-001_axis-_h__-_mm__g-s.jpg
024b Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0267, RIC II(1962) 0049(Titus), AR-Denarius, Rome, PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Cretan goat standing left, Scarce!, #1131 views024b Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0267, RIC II(1962) 0049(Titus), AR-Denarius, Rome, PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Cretan goat standing left, Scarce!, #1
avers:- CAESAR•DIVI-F-DOMITIANVS-COS-VII, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- PRINCEPS-IVVENTVTIS, Cretan goat standing left within laurel wreath.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0267, RIC II(1962) 0049(Titus) p-122, RSC 390, BMC 88,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Philip-II-RIC-224.jpg
03. Philip II as Augustus.12 viewsAntoninianus, 248 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP PHILIPPVS AVG / Radiate bust of Philip II.
Reverse: SAECVLARES AVGG / Goat (or Moose/European Elk) walking; III in exergue.
4.23 gm., 22 mm.
RIC #224; Sear #9275.

The animal on the reverse of this coin is called a goat in most coin catalogues. However, a recent theory suggests that it is a European Elk (same as the American Moose) which is depicted rather than a goat.
Callimachus
Rep_AR-Den-Ser_L_Roscius-Fabatus_Head-Juno-Sospita-r_-lizard-behind-L_ROSCI-below_Girl-Snake-in-ex-FABATI_Crawford-412-1_Syd-915_Rome_64-BC_Q-001_axis-1h_17,5-19,5mm_3,00g-s.jpg
064 B.C., L. Roscius Fabatus, Republic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 412/1, Rome, Maiden and Snake, FABATI, #186 views064 B.C., L. Roscius Fabatus, Republic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 412/1, Rome, Maiden and Snake, FABATI, #1
avers: Juno Sospita right, wearing goat-skin headdress; L ROSC below; behind, lizard,
reverse: Maiden standing right, feeding snake holding itself erect before her, control symbol tortoise walking right on own ground line in left field, FABATI in exergue.
exergue: -/-//FABATI, diameter: 17,5-19,5 mm, weight: 3,00g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 64 B.C., ref: Crawford 412/1,
Q-001
quadrans
Rep_AR-Den_MN-Fonteius_MN-FONTEI-CF_Laur-head-of-Apollo_CF_below_chin_Cupid-on-goat-right_Crawford-353-1c_Syd-724a_Rome_85-BC_Q-001_axis-7h_19,5-20,5mm_3,99g-s.jpg
085 B.C., Mn. Fonteius C.f., Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 353/1, Rome, Winged figure on goat right, #1103 views085 B.C., Mn. Fonteius C.f., Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 353/1, Rome, Winged figure on goat right, #1
avers: Laureate head of Apollo Veiovis right, below, thunderbolt, behind, MN•FONTEI (MN ligate), before, C•F.
reverse: Winged figure on goat right; above, pilei, in ex. thyrsus; laurel wreath as a border.
exergue: -/-//thyrsus, diameter: 19,5-20,5 mm, weight: 3,99g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 85 B.C., ref: Crawford-353/1c, Syd-724a, Fonteia 10,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
85a.jpg
085a Valerian II. AR antoninianus28 viewsobv: P LIC VALERIANVS CAES rad. drp. bust r.
rev: IOVI CRESCENTI child Jupiter riding r. on goat
hill132
85b.jpg
085b Valerian II. AR antoninianus40 viewsobv: P LC VALERIANVS CAES rad. drp. bust r.
rev: IOVI CRESCENTI child Jupiter riding r. on goat
hill132
Gallienus_AE-Ant_GALLIENVS-AVG_JOVI-CONS-AVG_Szi_RIC-181var_C-_Rome_253-268-AD_Q-0001_11h_20-22mm_3,64ga-s.jpg
090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 207, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//ς, IOVI CONS AVG, Goat right, #169 views090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 207, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//ς, IOVI CONS AVG, Goat right, #1
avers:- GALLIENVS-AVG, Radiate head right.
revers:-IOVI CONS AVG, Goat standing or walking right,
exergo:-/-//ς (=). (officina mark), diameter: 20-22mm, weight: 3,64g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 260-268 A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-207, p-, RSC-341, Sear(2005)Vol.III.-10236,
Q-001
quadrans
Gallienus_AE-Ant_GALLIENVS-AVG_JOVI-CONS-AVG_Szi_RIC-181var_C-_Rome_253-268-AD_Q-002_11h_19-21mm_3,01ga-s.jpg
090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 207, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//ς, IOVI CONS AVG, Goat right, #2126 views090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 207, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//ς, IOVI CONS AVG, Goat right, #2
avers:- GALLIENVS-AVG, Radiate head right.
revers:- IOVI-CONS-AVG, Goat standing or walking right,
exergo:-/-//ς , diameter: 19-21mm, weight: 3,01g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 260-268 A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-207, p-, RSC-341, Sear(2005)Vol.III.-10236,
Q-002
quadrans
Gallienus_AE-Ant_GALLIENVS-AVG_DIANAE-CONS-AVG_Gamma_RIC-181var_C-_Rome_253-268-AD__Q-0yx_7h_18-20,5mm_2,56g-s.jpg
090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 207, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//ς, IOVI CONS AVG, Goat right, #3141 views090b Gallienus (253-268 A.D.), Sole Reign, RIC V-I 207, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, -/-//ς, IOVI CONS AVG, Goat right, #3
avers:- GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate head right.
revers:-IOVI CONS AVG, Goat standing or walking right,
exergo:-/-//ς (=). (officina mark), diameter: 18-20,5mm, weight: 2,56g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 260-268 A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-207, p-, RSC-341, Sear(2005)Vol.III.-10236, Göbl-0731b,
Q-003
quadrans
092_Valerianus_II_,_RIC_V-I_01,_AR-Ant,_VALERIANVS_CAES,_IOVI_CRESCENTI,__Cologne,_RSC-16,_257-58_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_21-23mm,_3,50g-s.jpg
092 Valerian-II (256-258 A.D. Caesar), AR-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 01, Cologne, IOVI CRESCENTI, Jupiter riding goat Amalthea right, Scarce! #178 views092 Valerian-II (256-258 A.D. Caesar), AR-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 01, Cologne, IOVI CRESCENTI, Jupiter riding goat Amalthea right, Scarce! #1
avers: VALERIANVS CAES, Radiate, draped bust right.
reverse: IOVI CRESCENTI, Jupiter riding goat Amalthea right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21,0-23,0mm, weight: 3,50g, axis: 6h,
mint: Cologne, date: 257-258 A.D., ref: RIC V-I 01, p-118, RSC-16, Scarce!,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Valerianus-II__AR-Ant_P-LIC-VALERIANVS-CAES_IOVI-CRESCENTI_RIC-V-I-13_C-29_253-55-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_20,5mm_3,07g-s.jpg
092 Valerian-II (256-258 A.D. Caesar), AR-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 013, Rome, IOVI CRESCENTI, Jupiter riding goat Amalthea right, Scarce! #196 views092 Valerian-II (256-258 A.D. Caesar), AR-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 013, Rome, IOVI CRESCENTI, Jupiter riding goat Amalthea right, Scarce! #1
avers:- P-LIC-VALERIANVS-CAES, Radiate, draped bust right.
revers:- IOVI-CRESCENTI, Jupiter riding goat Amalthea right.
exergo: -/-//--, diameter: 20,5mm, weight: 3,07g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 253-255 A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-13, p-118, C-29, Scarce!,
Q-001
quadrans
Valerianus-II__AR-Ant_P-LIC-VALERIANVS-CAES_IOVI-CRESCENTI_RIC-V-I-13_C-29_253-55-AD_Q-002_1h_20-21mm_3,43ga-s.jpg
092 Valerian-II (256-258 A.D. Caesar), AR-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 013, Rome, IOVI CRESCENTI, Jupiter riding goat Amalthea right, Scarce! #2127 views092 Valerian-II (256-258 A.D. Caesar), AR-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 013, Rome, IOVI CRESCENTI, Jupiter riding goat Amalthea right, Scarce! #2
avers:- P-LIC-VALERIANVS-CAES, Radiate, draped bust right, seen from front.
revers:- IOVI-CRESCENTI, Jupiter riding goat Amalthea right.
exergo: -/-//--, diameter: 20-21mm, weight: 3,43g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 253-255 A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-13, p-118, C-29, Scarce!,
Q-002
quadrans
105_B_C_,_L_Thorius_Balbus,_AR-den,_ISMR,_Head_of_Juno_Sospita_r_,_L_THORIVS_BALBVS,_Bull_r_,_K,_Cr_316-1,_Syd-598,_Thoria_1,_Sear_192,_Q-001,_6h,_18,5-20,5mm,_3,74g-s.jpg
105 B.C., L.Thorius Balbus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 316/1, Rome, L•THORIVS/BALBVS in two line, Bull charging right, #1133 views105 B.C., L.Thorius Balbus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 316/1, Rome, L•THORIVS/BALBVS in two line, Bull charging right, #1
avers: ISMR abbreviated legend behind the head of Juno Sospita right, wearing a goat-skin headdress.
reverse: L•THORIVS/BALBVS in two line, Bull charging right, control letter "K" above.
exergue: -/-//L•THORIVS/BALBVS, diameter: 18,5-20,5mm, weight: 3,83g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 105 B.C., ref: Crawford 316/1, Sydenham 598, Sear 192, Thoria 1,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
RI_107ag_img.jpg
107 - Gallienus - RIC 20738 viewsObv:– GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONS AVG, Goat walking right
Minted in Rome (//S) . A.D. 257-259
Reference:– RIC 207
1 commentsmaridvnvm
0010-057.jpg
1117 - L. Thorius Balbus, Denarius79 viewsRome mint, 105 BC
Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing a goat's skin, ISMR behind
Bull charging right, L above (control letter), L. THORIVS BALBVS in two lines at exergue
3.93 gr
Ref : RCV # 192, RSC, Thoria # 1
3 commentsPotator II
PhilippusRR.jpg
113/112 BC L. Marcius Philippus142 viewsL Marcius Philippus
ROMA monogram
Head of King Philip V of Macedon right, wearing helmet decorated with goat's horns, Φ below chin

L PHILIPPVS
Equestrian statue right on tablet with inscription. Horseman carrying laurel-branch flower at horses feet. (XVI monogram) below tablet.

Rome 113/112 BC

3.96g

Crawford 293/1. Sydenham 551. Marcia 12.

Ex Calgary-Coin

This is the first Roman coin to depict an historical person instead of a personification or deity. The money’s ancestor L. Marcius Q.f. Philippus negotiated a treaty between Rome and Philip V of Macedon.
5 commentsJay GT4
0010-064-2000.jpg
1274 - L. Procilius L.F., Denarius27 viewsRome mint, 80 BC
Head of Juno Sospita right, clad in goat’s skin, S . C behind
Juno Sospita in biga right holding spear and shield. A snake below biga. [L. PROCILI. F] at exergue
19,5 mm - 3.89 gr
Ref : RCV # 307, RSC, Procilia # 2
1 commentsPotator II
1794_Norwich_halfpenny.JPG
1794 AE Halfpenny, Norwich, Norfolk.40 viewsObverse: R • CAMPIN • HABERDASHER. Stocking and glove above crossed knife and fork; in exergue, •GOAT•LANE•/NORWICH.
Reverse: HALFPENNY. Britannia, portrayed as a helmeted, plumed and draped female figure wearing a breastplate emblazoned with the union flag, seated facing left on tea-chest; her right hand resting on a terrestrial globe and her left arm on an anchor; a crowned lion, it's head turned facing, reclining left at her feet; in exergue, 1794.
Edge: “CURRENT EVERY WHERE ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦".
Diameter: 29mm
Dalton & Hamer: 21

Issued by Robert Campin, a haberdasher with a business in Goat Lane, Norwich, this token was probably manufactured by Peter Kempson in Birmingham, the dies engraved by Thomas Wyon.
*Alex
ValerianIIIoviCr.jpg
1da Valerian II20 views253-255

Son of Gallienus

Antoninianus

Radiate draped bust, right, VALERIANVS CEAS
IOVI CRESCENTI, infant Jupiter on goat.

RIC 13
Blindado
PhilipV.jpg
221-179 BC - Philip V - Sear 1394 - Two Goats Reverse108 viewsKing: Philip V of Macedonia (r. 221-179 BC)
Date: 221-179 BC
Size: AE19
Condition: Mediocre

Obverse: Diademed head of Artemis Tauropoulos right

Reverse: AMΦIΠΩΛITΩN above and beneath two goats contending.

Amphipolis, Thrace (Macedonia)
Sear 1394; Lindgren II 934; BMC 36; SNG Cop. 62; ANS 116
4.83g; 19.9mm; 15°
Pep
rjb_val9_02_09.jpg
25613 viewsValerian II, caesar 256-58 AD
AR antoninianus
Gallic (Trier?) mint
Obv "VALERIANVS CAES"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "IOVI CRESCENTI"
Infant Jupiter seted on a goat right
RIC 3
mauseus
1396_P_Trajan_RPC3329.jpg
3329 CILICIA, Aegeae. Trajan 98-99 AD Ekklesia seated1 viewsReference.
RPC III, SNG Levante 1710-1, Haymann 33

Issue Year 145 (ΕΜΡ)

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΟΡΑ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟΝ ΚΑΙϹΑΡΑ
Laureate head of Trajan, r.

Rev. ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ ΕΚΚΛΗϹΙΑ
Ekklesia seated, l., holding patera and rudder; in field, l., ΕΜΡ; in exergue, goat

23.22 gr
33.60 mm
12h
okidoki
291_P_Hadrian_RPC3333.jpg
3333 CILICIA, Aegeae. Hadrian. Tetradrachm 117-18 AD Eagle standing27 viewsReference
RPC III, 3333; Prieur 718; SNG France 2329

Issue Year 164 (ΔΞΡ)

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕΒ
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r., with paludamentum, seen from front

Rev. ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ ΕΤΟΥС ΔΞΡ
Eagle standing three quarters l., head r., wings spread, on harpe; in exergue, goat kneeling, right

13.09 gr
26 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
645_P_Hadrian_RPC3335.jpg
3335 CILICIA, Aegeae. Hadrian. Tridrachm 117-18 AD Amaltheia standing26 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3335; SNG Levante 1714 = SNG von Aulock 5450; SNG France 2328; Prieur 716

Issue Year 164 (ΔΞΡ)

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., with drapery on l. shoulder.

Rev. ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ [ΕΤΟΥС ΔΞΡ]
Amaltheia standing facing, head r., holding cornucopia in r. hand and infant Zeus presenting her with wreath in l.; at her feet, r., goat kneeling, head turned back.

9.97 gr
23 mm
12h

Note.
CNG eAuction 375 2016 estate Thomas Bentley Cederlind. Ex Cederlind 165 (1 August 2012), no. 155; Gorny & Mosch 200 (10 October 2011), lot 2223.
1 commentsokidoki
743_P_Hadrian_RPC3336.jpg
3336 CILICIA, Aegeae. Hadrian. Tridrachm 117-18 AD Athena standing25 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3336; SNG Levante 1715; SNG France 2327; Prieur 714

Issue Year 164 (ΔΞΡ)

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., with drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ ΕΤΟΥС ΔΞΡ
Athena standing l., holding in r. hand patera over goat, r. head turned back, l. hand resting on shield; behind, spear

8.99 gr
25 mm
12h

Note.
The kneeling goat on the coin is a play on words as the city name sounds like the Greek word for goats.
okidoki
646_P_Hadrian_RPC3338.jpg
3338 CILICIA, Aegeae. Hadrian. Tridrachm 117-18 AD Head of Alexander34 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3338; Prieur 715A (this coin); SNG France 2326; SNG Levante –

Issue Year 164 (ΔΞΡ)

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., with drapery on l. shoulder.

Rev. ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ ΕΤΟΥС ΔΞΡ
Head of Alexander with taenia, r.; below, goat, l., head turned back.

10.05 gr
25 mm
12h

Note.
CNG eAuction 375 2016, estate of Thomas Bentley Cederlind. Ex Cederlind 159 (31 May 2011), lot 136; Gorny & Mosch 156 (5 March 2007), lot 1802.
2 commentsokidoki
551_P_Hadrian_RPC3348.jpg
3348 CILICIA, Aegeae. Hadrian. Tetradrachm 132-33 AD Eagle standing18 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3348; Prieur 720; SNG France 2231; SNG Levante 1718.

Issue Year 179 (ΘΟΡ)

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕΒ Π Π
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r.

Rev. ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ ΕΤΟΥС ΘΟΡ
Eagle standing three quarters l., head r., wings spread, on harpe; below, goat, kneeling right.

13.3 gr
31 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
465_P_Hadrian_Prieur721.jpg
3349 CILICIA, Aegeae. Hadrian. Tetradrachm 133-34 AD Eagle standing47 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3349; Prieur 721; SNG France 2230-32; SNG Levante 1719.

Issue Year 180 (ΠΡ)

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΑΡ ΚΑΙΣ ΤΡΑΙΑ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟ ΣΒ ΠΠ
laureate, cuirassed bust right, seen from front, fold of cloak on front shoulder / AIGEAIWN ETOYS .PP., eagle standing front, head right, on harpe, goat in ex..

Rev. ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ ΕΤΟΥΣ.ΠΡ
Eagle standing facing on harpe, head right; in exergue, goat kneeling right.

14.06 gr
27 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
rjb_2011_04_05.jpg
35318 viewsM N Fontei C F ; c.85 BC
AR denarius
Obv "MN FONTEI C F AP"
Laureate head of Apollo right, thunderbolt below
Rev Cupid on goat right, pilei above, thyrsus below, all within wreath
Rome mint
Crawford 353
mauseus
Valerian-II-RIC-3.jpg
51. Valerian II.12 viewsAntoninianus, 256 - 258 AD, Cologne mint.
Obverse: VALERIANVS CAES / Radiate bust of Valerian II.
Reverse: IOVI CRESCENTI / The infant Jupier siting on a goat.
3.16 gm., 22 mm.
RIC #3; Sear #10731.

In all of Roman coinage, this coin of Valerian II is the only coin which has this reverse legend and type.

According to legend, the infant Zeus (Jupiter, Jove) was hidden in the cave of Dicte on Crete where he was suckled by a goat. He was hidden from his father Cronus, who intended to eat him just as he had swallowed all of Zeus' other siblings, to escape the prophesy that he would be succeeded by his son.
Callimachus
791_P_Hadrian_Emmett833_6~0.JPG
5315 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Tetradrachm 121-22 AD Dikaiosyne standing11 viewsReference.
Emmett 833.06; RPC III, 5315; Dattari 1357; Goats 826; Kampmann / Ganschow 32,183.

Issue L Ϛ = year 6

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙ - ΑΔΡΙΑ СƐΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., drapery on l. shoulder; to r crescent.

Rev. L Ϛ
Dikaiosyne standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae.

12.90 gr
22 mm
12h

Note.
Fritz Rudolf Künker eLive Auction 41 lot 174
okidoki
Plancia.jpg
55 BC Gn. Plancius154 viewsCN PLANCIVS AED CVR SC
Head of Macedonia right, wearing causia

Cretan goat standing right, bow and quiver behind
IIZ (old museum number?) in Ex.

Rome 55 BC
3.46g

Sear 396, RRC 432/1

Ex-Canadian Coin

Gnaeus Plancius was a friend of Cicero and strikes this coin as curule aedile. The type recalls his military service in Crete under the Proconsul Q. Metellus. He was also a military tribune under C. Antonius. He later returned to Macedonia as questor under the Propraetor L. Appuleius Saturninus. While serving as Questor in Thessalonia Plancius courageously took in Cicero as a guest in his official residence. Earlier that year (January or Early February of 58 BC.) Cicero was exiled from Italy and Rome because of the Tribune Clodius' legislation which confiscated Cicero's property and forced him to stay 400 miles out of the city of Rome. Clodius was eventually killed along the Appian Way by his rival Milo. Cicero took up the case for the defense of Milo unsuccessfully. In 54 BC Cicero defended Gn. Plancius in a court case (Pro Plancio) in which A. Laterensis accused Plancius of illegally organizing voting clubs (Colegia) to sway the elections and of bribery. Cicero was able to get Plancius acquitted and wrote his Pro Plancio which outlined his speeches and lines of questioning.
7 commentsJay GT4
310_P_Hadrian_Emmett1196_.jpg
5701 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Dichalkon 126-27 AD Pan left holding pedum/lagobalon21 viewsReference.
Emmett 1196.11; Milne 1238; Köln 972; RPC III, 5701

Issue L ΙΑ = year 11

Obv. no legend.
Laureate head right.

Rev. LI-A (Year 11)
Pan, advancing left holding pedum/lagobalon

2.03 gr
14 mm

Note.
There are two sub-varieties: Pan with pedum (e.g. BMC 700-701, 2879) and Pan of Mendes with club and pedum (BMC 702, 2878).

Half man and half goat, a spritely horned Pan holds one of his usual attributes in his upraised right hand – a throwing stick or lagobolon used for hunting rabbits, one of the god’s favorite animals. In his left hand he carries a small bag, perhaps to secure the quarry. Pan is known for his prowess in hunting smaller rather than larger game, the pursuit of which was presided over by Artemis as ultimate goddess of the hunt.
okidoki
754_P_Hadrian_Emmett1196.JPG
5701 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Dichalkon 126-27 AD Pan of Mendes with club and pedum 16 viewsReference.
Emmett 1196.11; RPC III, 5701; (BMC 702, 2878 Club ); Köln 973

Issue L ΙΑ = year 11

Obv. no legend.
Laureate head right.

Rev. LI-A (Year 11)
Pan of Mendes with club and pedum

2.1 gr
15 mm
12h

Note.
There are two sub-varieties: Pan with pedum (e.g. BMC 700-701, 2879) and Pan of Mendes with club and pedum (BMC 702, 2878).

Half man and half goat, a spritely horned Pan holds one of his usual attributes in his upraised right hand – a throwing stick or lagobolon used for hunting rabbits, one of the god’s favorite animals. In his left hand he carries a small bag, perhaps to secure the quarry. Pan is known for his prowess in hunting smaller rather than larger game, the pursuit of which was presided over by Artemis as ultimate goddess of the hunt.
okidoki
Nero AE Sestertius.jpg
706a, Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.74 views6, Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D. AE setertius, Date: 66 AD; RIC I 516, 36.71 mm; 25.5 grams; aVF. Obverse: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG PONT MAX TR POT PP, Laureate bust right; Reverse: S C, ROMA, Roma seated left, exceptional portrait and full obverse legends. Ex Ancient Imports.

NERO (54-68 A.D.)

It is difficult for the modern student of history to realize just how popular Nero actually was, at least at the beginning of his reign. Rome looked upon her new Emperor with hope. He was the student of Seneca, and he had a sensitive nature. He loved art, music, literature, and theatre. He was also devoted to horses and horse racing—a devotion shared by many of his subjects. The plebs loved their new Emperor. As Professor of Classics Judith P. Hallett (University of Maryland, College Park) says, “It is not clear to me that Nero ever changed or that Nero ever grew-up, and that was both his strength and his weakness. Nero was an extraordinarily popular Emperor: he was like Elvis” (The Roman Empire in the First Century, III. Dir. Margaret Koval and Lyn Goldfarb. 2001. DVD. PBS/Warner Bros. 2003).

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University

Introduction and Sources
The five Julio-Claudian emperors are very different one from the other. Augustus dominates in prestige and achievement from the enormous impact he had upon the Roman state and his long service to Rome, during which he attained unrivaled auctoritas. Tiberius was clearly the only possible successor when Augustus died in AD 14, but, upon his death twenty-three years later, the next three were a peculiar mix of viciousness, arrogance, and inexperience. Gaius, better known as Caligula, is generally styled a monster, whose brief tenure did Rome no service. His successor Claudius, his uncle, was a capable man who served Rome well, but was condemned for being subject to his wives and freedmen. The last of the dynasty, Nero, reigned more than three times as long as Gaius, and the damage for which he was responsible to the state was correspondingly greater. An emperor who is well described by statements such as these, "But above all he was carried away by a craze for popularity and he was jealous of all who in any way stirred the feeling of the mob." and "What an artist the world is losing!" and who is above all remembered for crimes against his mother and the Christians was indeed a sad falling-off from the levels of Augustus and Tiberius. Few will argue that Nero does not rank as one of the worst emperors of all.

The prime sources for Nero's life and reign are Tacitus' Annales 12-16, Suetonius' Life of Nero, and Dio Cassius' Roman History 61-63, written in the early third century. Additional valuable material comes from inscriptions, coinage, papyri, and archaeology.


Early Life
He was born on December 15, 37, at Antium, the son of Cnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbusand Agrippina. Domitius was a member of an ancient noble family, consul in 32; Agrippina was the daughter of the popular Germanicus, who had died in 19, and Agrippina, daughter of Agrippa, Augustus' closest associate, and Julia, the emperor's daughter, and thus in direct descent from the first princeps. When the child was born, his uncle Gaius had only recently become emperor. The relationship between mother and uncle was difficult, and Agrippina suffered occasional humiliation. But the family survived the short reign of the "crazy" emperor, and when he was assassinated, it chanced that Agrippina's uncle, Claudius, was the chosen of the praetorian guard, although there may have been a conspiracy to accomplish this.

Ahenobarbus had died in 40, so the son was now the responsibility of Agrippina alone. She lived as a private citizen for much of the decade, until the death of Messalina, the emperor's wife, in 48 made competition among several likely candidates to become the new empress inevitable. Although Roman law forbade marriage between uncle and niece, an eloquent speech in the senate by Lucius Vitellius, Claudius' closest advisor in the senatorial order, persuaded his audience that the public good required their union. The marriage took place in 49, and soon thereafter the philosopher Seneca [[PIR2 A617]] was recalled from exile to become the young Domitius' tutor, a relationship which endured for some dozen years.

His advance was thereafter rapid. He was adopted by Claudius the following year and took the name Tiberius Claudius Nero Caesar or Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus, was preferred to Claudius' natural son, Britannicus, who was about three years younger, was betrothed to the emperor's daughter Octavia, and was, in the eyes of the people, the clear successor to the emperor. In 54, Claudius died, having eaten some poisoned mushrooms, responsibility for which was believed to be Agrippina's, and the young Nero, not yet seventeen years old, was hailed on October 13 as emperor by the praetorian guard.


The First Years of Rule
The first five years of Nero's rule are customarily called the quinquennium, a period of good government under the influence, not always coinciding, of three people, his mother, Seneca, and Sextus Afranius Burrus, the praetorian prefect. The latter two were allies in their "education" of the emperor. Seneca continued his philosophical and rhetorical training, Burrus was more involved in advising on the actualities of government. They often combined their influence against Agrippina, who, having made her son emperor, never let him forget the debt he owed his mother, until finally, and fatally, he moved against her.

Nero's betrothal to Octavia was a significant step in his ultimate accession to the throne, as it were, but she was too quiet, too shy, too modest for his taste. He was early attracted to Poppaea Sabina, the wife of Otho, and she continually goaded him to break from Octavia and to show himself an adult by opposing his mother. In his private life, Nero honed the musical and artistic tastes which were his chief interest, but, at this stage, they were kept private, at the instigation of Seneca and Burrus.

As the year 59 began, Nero had just celebrated his twenty-first birthday and now felt the need to employ the powers which he possessed as emperor as he wished, without the limits imposed by others. Poppaea's urgings had their effect, first of all, at the very onset of the year, with Nero's murder of his mother in the Bay of Naples.

Agrippina had tried desperately to retain her influence with her son, going so far as to have intercourse with him. But the break between them proved irrevocable, and Nero undertook various devices to eliminate his mother without the appearance of guilt on his part. The choice was a splendid vessel which would collapse while she was on board. As this happened, she swam ashore and, when her attendant, having cried out that she was Agrippina, was clubbed to death, Agrippina knew what was going on. She sent Nero a message that she was well; his response was to send a detachment of sailors to finish the job. When she was struck across the head, she bared her womb and said, "Strike here, Anicetus, strike here, for this bore Nero," and she was brutally murdered.

Nero was petrified with fear when he learned that the deed had been done, yet his popularity with the plebs of Rome was not impaired. This matricide, however, proved a turning point in his life and principate. It appeared that all shackles were now removed. The influence of Seneca and Burrus began to wane, and when Burrus died in 62, Seneca realized that his powers of persuasion were at an end and soon went into retirement. Britannicus had died as early as 55; now Octavia was to follow, and Nero became free to marry Poppaea. It may be that it had been Burrus rather than Agrippina who had continually urged that Nero's position depended in large part upon his marriage to Octavia. Burrus' successor as commander of the praetorian guard, although now with a colleague, was Ofonius Tigellinus, quite the opposite of Burrus in character and outlook. Tigellinus became Nero's "evil twin," urging and assisting in the performance of crimes and the satisfaction of lusts.


Administrative and Foreign Policy
With Seneca and Burrus in charge of administration at home, the first half-dozen years of Nero's principate ran smoothly. He himself devoted his attention to his artistic, literary, and physical bents, with music, poetry, and chariot racing to the fore. But his advisors were able to keep these performances and displays private, with small, select audiences on hand. Yet there was a gradual trend toward public performance, with the establishment of games. Further, he spent many nights roaming the city in disguise, with numerous companions, who terrorized the streets and attacked individuals. Those who dared to defend themselves often faced death afterward, because they had shown disrespect for the emperor. The die was being cast for the last phases of Nero's reign.


The Great Fire at Rome and The Punishment
of the Christians
The year 64 was the most significant of Nero's principate up to this point. His mother and wife were dead, as was Burrus, and Seneca, unable to maintain his influence over Nero without his colleague's support, had withdrawn into private life. The abysmal Tigellinus was now the foremost advisor of the still young emperor, a man whose origin was from the lowest levels of society and who can accurately be described as criminal in outlook and action. Yet Nero must have considered that he was happier than he had ever been in his life. Those who had constrained his enjoyment of his (seemingly) limitless power were gone, he was married to Poppaea, a woman with all advantages save for a bad character the empire was essentially at peace, and the people of Rome enjoyed a full measure of panem et circenses. But then occurred one of the greatest disasters that the city of Rome, in its long history, had ever endured.

The fire began in the southeastern angle of the Circus Maximus, spreading through the shops which clustered there, and raged for the better part of a week. There was brief success in controlling the blaze, but then it burst forth once more, so that many people claimed that the fires were deliberately set. After about a fortnight, the fire burned itself out, having consumed ten of the fourteen Augustan regions into which the city had been divided.

Nero was in Antium through much of the disaster, but his efforts at relief were substantial. Yet many believed that he had been responsible, so that he could perform his own work comparing the current fate of Rome to the downfall of Troy. All his efforts to assist the stricken city could not remove the suspicion that "the emperor had fiddled while Rome burned." He lost favor even among the plebs who had been enthusiastic supporters, particularly when his plans for the rebuilding of the city revealed that a very large part of the center was to become his new home.

As his popularity waned, Nero and Tigellinus realized that individuals were needed who could be charged with the disaster. It so happened that there was such a group ready at hand, Christians, who had made themselves unpopular because of their refusal to worship the emperor, their way of life, and their secret meetings. Further, at this time two of their most significant "teachers" were in Rome, Peter and Paul. They were ideal scapegoats, individuals whom most Romans loathed, and who had continually sung of the forthcoming end of the world.

Their destruction was planned with the utmost precision and cruelty, for the entertainment of the populace. The venue was Nero's circus near the Mons Vaticanus. Christians were exposed to wild animals and were set ablaze, smeared with pitch, to illuminate the night. The executions were so grisly that even the populace displayed sympathy for the victims. Separately, Peter was crucified upside down on the Vatican hill and Paul was beheaded along the Via Ostiensis. But Nero's attempt, and hope, to shift all suspicion of arson to others failed. His popularity even among the lower classes was irrevocably impaired.

[For a detailed and interesting discussion of Nero’s reign please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/nero.htm]

The End - Nero's Death and its Aftermath
Nero's and Tigellinus' response to the conspiracy was immediate and long-lasting. The senatorial order was decimated, as one leading member after another was put to death or compelled to commit suicide. The year 66 saw the suicides of perhaps the most distinguished victims of the "reign of terror," Caius Petronius and Thrasea Paetus. Petronius, long a favorite of Nero because of his aesthetic taste, had been an able public servant before he turned to a life of ease and indolence. He was recognized as the arbiter elegantiae of Nero's circle, and may be the author of the Satyricon. At his death, he left for Nero a document which itemized many of the latter's crimes. Thrasea, a staunch Stoic who had been for some years an outspoken opponent of Nero's policies, committed suicide in the Socratic manner. This scene is the last episode in the surviving books of Tacitus' Annals.

In the year 68, revolt began in the provinces. . . the end of Nero's reign became inevitable. Galba claimed the throne and began his march from Spain. Nero panicked and was rapidly abandoned by his supporters. He finally committed suicide with assistance, on June 9, 68, and his body was tended and buried by three women who had been close to him in his younger days, chief of whom was Acte. His death scene is marked above all by the statement, "Qualis artifex pereo," (What an artist dies in me.) Even at the end he was more concerned with his private life than with the affairs of state.

The aftermath of Nero's death was cataclysmic. Galba was the first of four emperors who revealed the new secret of empire, that an emperor could be made elsewhere than in Rome. Civil war ensued, which was only ended by the victory of the fourth claimant, Vespasian, who established the brief dynasty of the Flavians. The dynasty of the Julio-Claudians was at an end.

Nero's popularity among the lower classes remained even after his death.

. . . .

It is not excessive to say that he was one of the worst of Rome's emperors in the first two centuries and more of the empire. Whatever talents he had, whatever good he may have done, all is overwhelmed by three events, the murder of his mother, the fire at Rome, and his savage treatment of the Christians.

Precisely these qualities are the reasons that he has remained so well known and has been the subject of many writers and opera composers in modern times. These works of fiction particularly merit mention: Henryk Sienkiewicz's Quo Vadis, one of the finest works of the 1907 Nobel Laureate in Literature, and John Hersey's The Conspiracy. Nero unquestionably will always be with us.

Copyright (C) 2006, Herbert W. Benario.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

1 commentsCleisthenes
LPapi.jpg
79 BC L Papius Serrated denarius53 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right clad in goat's skin control symbal behind (bakers shovel), bead and reel in border

L PAPI
Gryphon leaping right control symbol (bakers oven) below, bead and reel border

trade guild: cooks and bakers

3.75g

Rome
79 BC

Sear 311 RRC 89

ex-ANE

Plate coin 89:www.bonannocoins.com/l_papius/l_papius_db.php

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
Papius3.jpg
79 BC L Papius Serrated denarius78 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right clad in goat's skin control symbal behind (half of fat fish), bead and reel in border

L PAPI
Gryphon leaping right control symbol (fish) below, bead and reel border

trade guild: fishmongers

3.91g

Rome
79 BC

Sear 311 RRC 39

ex-ANE

To see the amazing variety of control marks on this series: www.bonannocoins.com/l_papius/l_papius_db.php

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
LPapi2.jpg
79 BC L Papius Serrated denarius56 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right clad in goat's skin control symbal behind (base of column), bead and reel in border

L PAPI
Gryphon leaping right control symbol (Corinthian capital) below, bead and reel border

Trade guild: Builders

3.9g

Rome
79 BC

Sear 311 RRC 89

Ex-Calgary Coin

To see the amazing variety of control marks on this series:
www.bonannocoins.com/l_papius/l_papius_db.php

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
Antoniniano Galieno RIC 207.jpg
82-06 - GALIENO (253 - 268 D.C.)32 viewsBillon Antoniniano 20 mm 2.3 gr.

Anv: "GALLIENVS AVG" - Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONS AVG" - Macho Cabrío caminando hacia la derecha. "digamma" en exergo.
Este tipo fué acuńado en 267/268 D.C. para conmemorar votos a Júpiter invocando su protección contra la revuelta de Aureolo.


Acuńada 267 - 268 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias:
Göbl #731b - RIC Vol.V Parte I #207 Pag.149 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #10235 - Sear RCTV (1988) #2965 - Cohen Vol.V #344 Pag.378 - DVM #100 Pag.245 - RSC Vol.IV #344 Pag.73
mdelvalle
Göbl_731b_Antoniniano_Galieno.jpg
82-10 - GALIENO (253 - 268 D.C.)18 viewsAE Antoniniano 20 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "GALLIENVS AVG" - Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONS AVG" - Macho Cabrío caminando hacia la derecha. "digamma"=6 en exergo.
Este tipo fué acuńado en 267/268 D.C. para conmemorar votos a Júpiter invocando su protección contra la revuelta de Aureolo.

Acuńada 267 - 268 D.C.
Ceca: 6to.taller de Roma

Referencias: Göbl #731b - RIC Vol.V Parte I #207 Pag.149 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #10235 Pag.292 - Sear RCTV (1988) #2965 - Cohen Vol.V #344 Pag.378 - DVM #100 Pag.245 - RSC Vol.IV #344 Pag.73 - Hunter #110
mdelvalle
AntoseRIC608.jpg
9. Juno Sospita, goddess of Lavunium62 viewsĆ Sestertius, 28,89g, Ř 31mm, 12h, minted AD 140, Rome
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PI-VS P P TR P COS III, laurate head right
Rev.: IVNONI SISPITAE around, S C in field, Juno Sospita with goat skin head dress, advancing right preceded by snake, brandishing javelin and holding shield, pinched in the middle.
RIC 608 (scarse); BMCRE 1248; Cohen 473; Foss 56

This issue is part of a series of coins struck between 140 and 144 figuring scenes from ancient Roman legends. Juno Sospita was the godess of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Pius, and one of the most ancient figures in the Roman pantheon.
1 commentsCharles S
janiforme.jpg
?67 viewsObv.: male mature/young janiform head
rev.: goat walking right

Same obv. die :
http://www.acsearch.info/record.html?id=129275

Well... Actually, it's a fake ! Too bad.
3 commentsGinolerhino
Gallienus_32.jpg
A37 viewsGallienus Antoninianus

Attribution: RIC 207k
Date: AD 267-268
Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG; radiate bust r.
Reverse: IOVICONS AVG; goat stg. l.; stigma in exergue
Size: 17 mm
Weight: 2.5 grams

Gallienus’ coinage is perhaps best know by the issuance of his Zoo series. Each coin type depicts a mythical or real animal on the reverse as a dedication to a specific Roman deity: Diana (doe, stag, antelope/gazelle), Apollo (centaur, gryphon), Sol (Pegasus/winged horse, bull), Jupiter (goat), Liber Pater (panther/tigress), Neptune (capricorn, hippocamp), Juno (doe/elk/capreolus), Mercury (hippocamp/criocamp), Hercules (lion, boar).

“The vast majority of Zoo coins were produced at the mint of Rome, with a few rare examples coming from Siscia. Each officina produced a different coin within the series, with some producing a second, less common type also. Occasionally you'll find an animal with the "wrong" officina mark. These are fascinating, and the rarity leads us to believe that they represented mistakes, perhaps when a die engraver was transferred from one workshop to another. He gets the right animal, but the wrong officina. Or maybe one workshop was falling behind, so another was temporarily enlisted to help catch up on the quota?” – from Jim’s page on Coins of Gallienus' Zoo at http://www.ruark.org/coins/Zoo/#ZooLinks
Noah
corinthMarcusBellerophon2.jpg
Achaea. Corinthia, Corinth. Marcus Aurelius Ć 26mm. Bellerophon.84 views Obv: Laureate head right.
Rev: CLI COR Bellerophon riding Pegasos flying right, attacking a chimaera, facing right.
BCD 706; SNG Copenhagen -.

Bellerophon in Greek mythology was "the greatest hero and slayer of monsters, alongside Cadmus and Perseus, before the days of Heracles", whose greatest feat was killing the Chimera, a monster that Homer depicted with a lion's head, a goat's body, and a serpent's tail: "her breath came out in terrible blasts of burning flame.
The replacement of Bellerophon by the more familiar culture hero Perseus was a development of Classical times that was standardized during the Middle Ages and has been adopted by the European poets of the Renaissance and later.
ancientone
aegira.jpg
ACHAIA, Achaean League, Aigeira. c. 167-146 BC231 viewsAR Hemidrachm, Obv: Laureate head of Zeus r. Rx: Forepart of goat r. over monograms Achaean League AX monogram with AL to left, KI to right; all within laurel wreath, tied below. Rare. Ex John Twente Animal Collection; ex Craig Whitford NBD Bank Money Museum Collection Part II, lot 87. VF/EF, 2.49g. BCD-399 (same rev. die), Agrinion-571a, Clerk-16, Benner-Aigeira-5. HJBerk BBS 159, lot 166.2 commentsCGPCGP
Aegee_Cilicia_Hadrian_Silver_Tetra.JPG
Aegee Cilicia Hadrian Silver Tetradrachm127 viewsHadrian 117 - 128 AD
Aegee Cilicia Mint
Silver tetradrachm 13.9 gram
Obverse: Bust Right
Reverse: Eagle standing facing Head Left _25000

Aegeae
Prieur 721 Hadrian AR Tetradrachm of Cilicia, Aegeae. Year 180 = 133/134 AD. AYTOKP KAIS TRAIA ADRIANO SEB P P, laureate, cuirassed bust right, seen from front, fold of cloak on front shoulder / AIGEAIWN ETOYS .PP., eagle standing front, head right, on harpe, goat in ex.

http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/ric/hadrian/_aegeae_AR4Drachm_Prieur_721.jpg

6 commentsAntonivs Protti
4.jpg
Aelius, Laodiceia ad Lycum, Zeus Aseis with goat, AE2731 viewsLaodiceia ad Lycum AE27
Obv: ΛOVKIOC AIΛIOC KAICAP, bare head right;
Rev: ACЄIC ΛAOΔIKЄΩN, Zeus Aseis standing left, right hand above goat
B.M.C. 25. 311,201
areich
12187643_1022107541145388_3508276178395110819_n.jpg
Aeolis, Aegae AE17. 2nd - 1st Century BC. 16 viewsLaureate head of Apollo right [c/m eagle with spread wings in round countermark] / AIGAEWN, goat standing right. BMC 10, SNG Cop 10.
17mm, 3,8 gr.
Antonivs Protti
aegae.jpg
Aeolis, Aegae. AE13, 300-200 BC. 46 viewsObv: helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev.: Forepart of goat standing right.
13mm., 2.7g.
ancientone
aegae~0.jpg
Aeolis, Aegae. Apollo/goat 19 viewsObv: Laureate head of Apollo right.
Rev: AIΓAE, head of goat right.
Ć8
3rd cent. BC
ancientone
coins67.JPG
AEOLIS, Aigai 50 viewsAigai is an ancient Greek site in Turkey, situated at a rather high altitude almost on top of the Mount Gün (Dağı), part of the mountain chain of Yunt (Dağları) in western Anatolia in the location of the present village of Yuntdağı Köseler, depending Manisa central district, although the easier road to the site departs from İzmir's Aliağa district center, though the bifurcation for Şakran township. Aigai lived its brightest period under the Attalid dynasty that ruled from nearby Pergamon in the 3rd century and 2nd century B.C.

Aeolis (Ancient Greek Αιολίς Aiolís) or Aeolia (IPA [iːˈoʊlɪə]) (Ancient Greek Αιολία Aiolía) was an area that comprised the west and northwestern region of Asia Minor, mostly along the coast, and also several offshore islands (particularly Lesbos), where the Aeolian Greek city-states were located. Aeolis incorporated the southern parts of Mysia which bounded it to the north, Ionia to the south, and Lydia to the east. In early times, the Aeolians' twelve most important cities were independent, and formed a league: Cyme (also called Phriconis), Larissae, Neonteichos, Temnus, Cilla, Notium, Aegiroessa, Pitane, Aegeaeae, Myrina, Gryneia, and Smyrna (Herodotus, 1.149).

According to Homer's description, Odysseus, after his stay with the Cyclopes, reached the island of Aiolos, who provided him with the west wind Zephyr.

AEOLIS, Aigai. Circa 3rd Century BC. Laureate head of Apollo right / Head of goat right. SNG Copenhagen 4

Ebay
ecoli
AAEVb_small.png
Aeolis, Aigai Ć911 viewsAeolis, Aigai.

4th-3rd centuries BC.

9mm., 0.99g.

Laureate head of Apollo right

Head of goat right

References:

AAEV
RL
Aeolis_Aigai_Hermes_goat_AE12_2_71g.jpg
Aeolis, Aigai, Hermes / goat, AE1245 views12mm, 2.71g
obv: draped bust of Hermes right, wearing petasos
rev: AIΓAEΩN; forepart of goat right; monograms above and to right
(SNG Copenhagen 14)
2 commentsareich
DSC05429.JPG
Aigai53 viewsObverse: Apollo laureate right
Reverse: goat
SGCV II 4168
1 commentsCGPCGP
DSC05427.JPG
Aigai33 viewsObverse: Apollo laureate right
Reverse: goat's head right
3 commentsCGPCGP
Aigai_AE.jpg
Aigai - AE12 views3rd century BC
laureate head of Apollo right
goat head right
SNGvA 1593; BMC Troas p. 95, 6-8 var. (with ethnic)
Johny SYSEL
aigai_goat.jpg
Aigai, AE 10, Apollo/ goat30 viewsAIOLIS. Aigai. 3rd century BC. Ć 10mm (1.05 g). Laureate head of Apollo right / Goat head right. SNG Munich -; SNG von Aulock 1593. Reddish-brown patina. Ex VauctionsPodiceps
goat.jpg
Aigai, AE 8, Apollo/ goat 7 viewsAIOLIS, AIGAI. 3 c. BC. Ć (0,92 g, 8 mm) Vs: Laureate head of Apollo right. Rs: Head of Goat right. SNG Cop. 5; SNG v. Aulock 1593. Podiceps
aigai~0.jpg
Aigai, Aeolis, AE 14.6, Bust of Hermes r./ ΑΙΓΑΕΩΝ 
Forepart of goat right12 viewsAIOLIS. Aigai. 3rd century B.C. Ć 14.6mm, 2.49g. Head of Hermes r. 
ΑΙΓΑΕΩΝ, Forepart of goat r.; monograms. 
Cf. Weber 5467 (different monograms). Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
aigai_apollo_goat_lyre_cm.jpg
Aigai, Aeolis, AE 16.8, Bust of Athena r. cm lyre/ ΑΙΓΑΕΩΝ 
goat standing right29 viewsAIOLIS. Aigai. 2nd-1st century B.C. Ć 16.8mm, 3.85g. Head of Apollo laureate r.; countermark: Lyra 
ΑΙΓΑΕΩΝ 
Goat standing r.
 BMC 96, 10. Ex Gerhard Rohde,Podiceps
aigeiai_a-horz.jpg
Aigeai, Cilicia. AE14 126/127 A.D.24 viewsHelmeted bust of Athena right.
Goat kneeling left; EOP (date) above.
Pedja R
83307q00_Aigeai_Cilicia_E_19,_SNG_Levante_1666.jpg
Aigeai; Head of Athena r./ goat kneeling left; AE1910 viewsAigeai, Cilicia, c. 130 - 77 B.C. Bronze AE 19, SNG Levante 1666, BMC Cilicia - , SNG Cop -, Aigeai mint, 3.467g, 18.9mm, 0o, c. 130 - 77 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet, hair in long curls on neck, border of dots; reverse “ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ ΤΗΣΙΕΡΑΣ [KAIAUTONOMOU]”, goat kneeling left, monogram right; Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
g3.JPG
Ainos, Thrace16 views440-412 B.C.
Silver Diobol
1.19 gm, 11.5 mm
Obv.: Head of Hermes right, wearing petasos.
Rev.: Bearded goat standing right, coiled serpent before, AIN above.
Sear 1567 v.; HGC 3II, 1274 v.;
[May, Ainos 176-204; AMNG II 303; SNG Copenhagen 405]
Jaimelai
Ainos,_Thrace_AR_Diobol.jpg
AINOS, THRACE AR Diobol 23 viewsCirca 427-424 BC. (1,16 g. - 11 mm)
Vs: Head of Hermes right, wearing petasos.
Rs: Goat standing right, ivy leaf to right. _8637
Antonivs Protti
aigai_k.jpg
Aiolis, Aigai5 viewsAE10 0.9g, 11h; c. 3rd Century BC
Obv.: Laureate head of Apollo right.
Rev.: Head and neck of a goat, AIΓAE behind.
Reference: SNG von Aulock 1593; SNG Copenhagen 1.
John Anthony
21426.jpg
Aiolis, Aigai9 viewsAiolis, Aigai. 3rd century B.C. AE 18 (18.3 mm, 4.01 g, 10 h). Head of Apollo right / AIΓAEΩN, Goat standing right. SNG Cop 10; SNG von Aulock 1596. aVF. Scarce.ecoli
4094_(1)_4095_(1).jpg
Aiolis, Aigai, AE10, Head of Goat13 viewsAE10
Aiolis, Aigai
Greece
2nd Century BC
10.0mm
O: NO LEGEND; Laureate head of Apollo, right.
R: NO LEGEND; Head of goat, right.
SNG Cop 4; BMC 6-8; Sear 4166.
Mark Reid/The Time Machine
Chicago Coin Expo 4/6/17 4/17/17
Nicholas Z
4092_(1)_4093_(1).jpg
Aiolis, Aigai, AE14, ΑΙΓΑΙΕΩΝ7 viewsAE14
Aiolis, Aigai
Greece
2nd - 1st Century BC
14.0mm
O: NO LEGEND; Head of Hermes, right, wearing petasos.
R: ΑΙΓΑΙΕΩΝ; Forepart of goat, right.
Exergue: Monogram: HVP ΠΑφ ?
SNG Cop 14
Mark Reid/The Time Machine
Chicago Coin Expo 4/6/17 4/17/17
Nicholas Z
Macedon_AlexanderI_SNG-ANS_33_gf.jpg
Alexander I. 460-451 BC. 6 viewsMacedon, Alexander I. 460-451 BC. AR Tetradrachm (12.83 gm) of Aigai, light Thraco-Mac. stdd. Mounted horseman r., wearing kausia, carrying two lances, r. / Forepart of goat ("aigos" in a pun on Aigai) with head reverted, in incuse square.  gVF.  Pegasi 123 #66. SNG ANS 8 #33; HGC 3.1 #769; Raymond Macedonian Grp III #114; SNG Alpha Bank 73; SNG Berry 66; SNG Cop -; Svoronos Macedoine VI #12 (plate XIII #20). Anaximander
Amphipolis,_Dionysos___goat,_AE20.JPG
Amphiipolis goat29 viewsMacedonia, Amphiipolis. 20mm, 5.4g. Obverse: wreathed head of Dionysos right. Reverse: AMPHIPOLITWN, goat standing right. SNG Copenhagen 80. ex areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
amphipolis_artemis-goats.jpg
AMPHIPOLIS43 viewsAMPHIPOLIS - (168 – 149 B.C.) AE 22. Amphipolis is a city founded by the Atheninians back in 436 B.C. on the river Strymon, very close to the Aegean Sea. Obv.: Head of Artemis Tauropolos right, bow & quiver at shoulder. Rev.: Two goats on their hind legs, contending, face to face. Legend in Greek: ΑΜΦΙΠΟΛΙΤΟΝ. 7.37 g. Ref.: D. Sear. Greek coins and their values, Vol. 1, p. 142, 1394
dpaul7
AMPHIPOLIS_Dionysis-goat.jpg
AMPHIPOLIS34 viewsAMPHIPOLIS - AE 25. 196-168 b.c. Head of young Dionysos right wreathed with ivy. Reverse: ΜΑΚΕ/ΔΟΝΩΝ above and below goat standing right; two monograms in field above, another to left; ΑΜΦΙ mongram to right. Reference: Sear 1392. 9.92 g. dpaul7
Amphipolis,_Macedon_Athena_-_Goats.jpg
Amphipolis, Macedon ca. 168-149 BC.17 viewsAmphipolis, Macedonia, ca. 168-149 BC. Ae 21 to 23mm. Weight 6.93g. Obv: Head of Artemis right. Rev: ΑΜΦΙΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ, two goats standing on their hind legs, butting heads. Minted for Amphipolis in Macedon circa 168-149 BC. Amphipolis was founded by the Athenians in 436 BC to protect their mining interests in the north. The city surrendered to the Spartan general Brasidas in 424 BC. The city preserved its independence until 357, when it was captured by Philip II of Macedon. This piece was minted following the dissolution of the Macedonian monarchy and the establishment of four separate Macedonian republics in 168 BC. The obverse of this type depicts the diademed head of Artemis Tauropolis facing right, with bow and quiver at her shoulder. The reverse type features two goats on their hind legs, contending, face to face, with the Greek legend ΑΜΦΙΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ in the fields. Sear Greek 1394.ddwau
19711q00.jpg
Amphipolis, Macedonia103 viewsBronze AE 21, S 1394, VF, Amphipolis mint, 6.847g, 21.2mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Artemis Tauropolis right, bow and quiver at shoulder; reverse , two goats on their hind legs, contending, facing;
ex-Wallace Widtman collection .
ex-Forum Ancient Coins
Purchased 09/2007
1 commentsJohnny
amph_goats_pan.jpg
Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 168 - 149 B.C.62 viewsBronze AE 20, SGCV I 1394; (SNG Cop 62), weight 7.8 g, max. diameter 21.75 mm, Amphipolis mint, Roman rule, c. 168 - 149 B.C.; Obv. diademed head of Artemis Tauropolos right, bow and quiver at shoulder; Rev. ΑΜΦΙΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ, two goats on their hind legs, contending head to head. Green patina, very worn.

Artemis Tauropolos was an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshipped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians by Iphigenia. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis in Athens. - Wikipedia
Steve E
56128p00.jpg
Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 168 - 149 B.C.16 viewsBronze AE 17, 4.247g, 17.6mm, 0o, Amphipolis mint, c. 168 - 149 B.C.
Obv: Ivy-wreathed head of Dionysos right.
Rev: AMFIPO/LEITWN, Goat standing right.
Well centered on a broad flan.
Ref: BMC Macedonia p. 48, 40 - 41; AMNG III 51, SNG Cop -; SNG Evelpidis -
VF
Scarce
mjabrial
BOTH_GONATAS.jpg
Antigonas 11 Gonatas Tetradrachm c 270 / 239 BC8 viewsObv: Head of horned Pan left, wearing goat skin, lagobolon over shoulder, within double solid circle on Macedonian shield decorated with 7 stars with 8 rays within double crescents.
Rev: Ins: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ Athena Alkidemos advancing left, holding shield with Gorgoneion head and hurling thunderbolt. Helmet inner left, Rare MTY monogram inner right
Amphipolis Mint 17.10gm 30.5 mm
cicerokid
philip_II_ric224elk.jpg
Antoninianus; SAECVLARES AVGG, elk walking left, III in ex. RIC 2249 viewsPhilip II Antoninianus. 248 AD. IMP PHILIPVS AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right / SAECVLARES AVGG, elk walking left, III in ex. RIC 224, RSC 72, Sear RCV III: 9275. Sear points out that many sources have mistakenly identified the animal as a common goat and that the elk (Alces alces) is the most suitable candidate in the context of showing exotic animals in the arena to celebrate the 1000 anniversary of Rome’s founding.Podiceps
ANTON-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius AE Sestertius RIC III 60826 viewsObv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P COS III
laureate head right with slight drapery on left shoulder
Rev: IVNONI SISPITAE S-C
Juno Sospita advancing right, wearing goatskin, preceded by
serpent on ground, brandishing spear and holding long shield
33mm 27gm
1 commentsOWL365
AntoSe94~0.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 608, Sestertius of AD 140-144 (Juno Sospita)73 viewsĆ sestertius (26.6g, 32mm, 12h) Rome, AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PI[-]VS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
Rev.: IVNONI SISPITAE (around) S C (in field) Juno Sospita wearing goat skin advancing right preceded by a snake, brandishing javelin and holding shield which is pinched in the middle.
RIC 608 (scarce), Cohen 473, BMC 1248, Strack 837; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 201 (7 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4186
ex Künker Auction 153 (March 2009)

This issue is part of a series of coins struck in preparation of the 900th anniversary of Rome, figuring scenes from Ancient Roman legends. Juno Sospita was the goddess of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Pius, and one of the most ancient figures in the Roman pantheon.
Charles S
Antose96.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 608, Sestertius of AD 140-144 (Juno Sospita)54 viewsĆ Sestertius (28.89g, Ř31mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
Rev.: IVNONI SISPITAE (around edge) S C (in field) Juno Sospita wearing goat skin advancing right preceded by a snake, brandishing javelin and holding shield which is pinched in the middle.
RIC 608 (Scarce), Cohen 473, BMC 1248; Strack 837; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 201 (7 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4186
ex iNumis, Paris, March 2009

This issue is part of a series of coins struck in preparation of the 900th anniversary of Rome, figuring scenes from Ancient Roman legends. Juno Sospita was the goddess of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Pius, and one of the most ancient figures in the Roman pantheon.
Charles S
Selge_Pisidia_GCV_5478.JPG
Asia Minor, Pisidia27 viewsObv: No legend, Gorgoneion facing with long hair, resembling Apollo or Helios, no tongue protruding.

Rev: Head of Athena facing right, wearing a crested helmet, an astragalos* behind.

Note: An astragalos was a gaming piece made from the knuckle bone of a sheep or a goat. It was used in antiquity for divination and games in a manner similar to dice.

Silver Trihemiobol, Selge mint, 3rd Century BC

0.89 grams, 10.5 mm, 45°

GCV 5478
1 commentsSPQR Coins
Barberini_Faun_front_Glyptothek_Munich_218_n2.jpg
Barberini Faun (Drunken Satyr) located in the Glyptothek in Munich, Germany226 viewsThe life-size marble statue known as the Barberini Faun or Drunken Satyr is located in the Glyptothek in Munich, Germany. A Faun is the Roman equivalent of a Greek Satyr. In Greek mythology, satyrs were human-like male woodland spirits with several animal features, often a goat-like tail, hooves, ears, or horns. Satyrs attended Dionysus. The position of the right arm over the head was a classical artistic convention indicating sleep. The statue is believed to have once adorned Hadrian's Mausoleum. The historian Procopius recorded that during the siege of Rome in 537 the defenders had hurled down upon the Goths the statues adorning Hadrian's Mausoleum. When discovered, the statue was heavily damaged; the right leg, parts of both hands, and parts of the head were missing. Johann Winckelmann speculated that the place of discovery and the statue's condition suggested that it had been such a projectile.
Joe Sermarini
rustic_gem_g17.jpg
BCC g1786 viewsRoman Gem Stone
Intaglio 1st-4th cent.CE
Caesarea Maritima
Herdsman kneeling to left milking
goat. Palm branch, above, and
bush? before goat. Convex on
front and back faces, with beveled edge.
Chipped, somewhat eroded on the face,
back highly polished.
Translucent Red /White Carnelian
Gem size: 14x11.5 mm. 0.91gm.
cf. Anit Hamburger, "Gems from Caesarea Maritima",
Atiqot English Series, Vol. VIII, 1968, #148-#150.
v-drome
C_RENIUS.jpg
C RENIUS AR Denarius Cr231/1. Goat Biga16 viewsOBVERSE: Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind
REVERSE: Juno Capriotina in biga of goats right, C RENI below goats, ROMA in ex.
3.6g, 16mm

Struck at Rome 138 BC
Legatus
0069.jpg
C. Renius , Denarius13 viewsRRC. 231/1
138 b.c.

Juno in Biga of Goats, w. Diadem, sceptre & reigns
Ex Gorny & Mosch, Auction 232, Lot 240 - Ex Varesi, April 1990.
Norbert
C_Renius~0.jpg
C. Renius - AR denarius11 viewsRome
˛144 BC
ą138 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
X
Juno Caprotina in biga of goats right holding whip, scepter and reins
C·RENI
ROMA
ąCrawford 231/1, SRCV I 108, Sydenham 432, RSC I Renia 1
˛Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex London Coin Galleries

Reverse refers to Lanuvium where moneyer's family came from and where the sanctuary of Juno was situated.
Johny SYSEL
C__Renius.png
C. Renius – Renia-159 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC C Renius, 138 BC, AR Denarius (3.84 gm) Helmeted head of Roma right "X" behind. Juno Caprotina in a biga of goats right "C RENI" below "ROMA" in exergue. Renia 1, Crawford 231/1, RCV 108, Syd 4321 commentsBud Stewart
C.Renius_Cr231.1.jpg
C. Renius, Crawford 231/153 viewsC. Renius, gens Renia
AR - denarius, 3.92g, 15.33mm
Rome, 138 BC
obv. Head of Roma,wearing decorated and winged Attic helmet, r.
X behind
rev. Juno Caprotina in goats biga galopping r., holding reigns and sceptre in l. hand
and whip in r. hand.
beneath C.REN[I]
in ex. ROMA
Crawford 231/1; Sydenham 432; Renia 1
VF, toned, small, struck on small flan

For more informations please look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'!
Jochen
ben5~0.jpg
Capricorn274 viewsAR cistophoric tetradrachm. (12.07 gm). Ephesus mint, 25-20 BC. Bare head right. IMP CAESAR / Capricorn right, head left, holding cornucopiae ,AVGUSTVS below ; all within laurel wreath. RIC I 480; Sutherland Group VI, 241a (O35/R45-same reverse die); RSC 16.
Triton VII, Lot: 847.
AIGIPAN (or Aegipan) was one of the goat-footed gods known as Panes. When the gods fled from the monstrous giant Typhoeus and hid themselves in animal form, Aigipan assumed the form of a fish-tailed goat. Later he came to the aid of Zeus in his battle with creature, by stealing back his stolen sinews. As a reward the king of the gods placed him amongst the stars as the Constellation Capricorn. The mother of Aigipan, Aix (the goat), was perhaps associated with the constellation Capra.


benito
rjb_2009_09_02.jpg
Caria - Halikarnassos7 viewsAR hemiobol
Late 5th/early 4th cent BC
O - Male head right with Carian inscription
R - Head of goat right
SNG Tubingen 3319ff, cfSNG Kayhan 996-7
mauseus
rjb_greek17_08_07.jpg
Caria - Halikarnassos14 viewsAR obol
5th cent BC
O - Forepart of goat leaping left, A before
R - Forepart of winged horse left
SNG Cop 336v, SNG Turkey I 768, SNG Keckman I 39

mauseus
Strymon4.jpg
Celtic imitation of Macedon AE 2259 viewsoverstrike

Serdi region
? (original Macedonian issue 185-168 BC)
head of rivergod Strymon right
wide trident
type: (A?)5B
imitation of: SNG Copenhagen 1298-9 var.
8,37g 22-20mm

original coin probably is:

Thessalonica
158-31 BC
head of Dionysos with ivy wreath right
goat standing right
ΘEΣΣA_ΛO / N_IK_HΣ
(NE) / ? other monograms
Sear #1466; BMC Macedonia p. 110, 10 - 16

Head of goat and one ivy-leaf under Strymon's head are slightly visible.


Imitations from Serdi region weren't used to fool Macedonian traders but as their own currency. This coin is one of overstrikes on official Macedonian coins which prooves this theory.
Johny SYSEL
Strymon5.jpg
Celtic imitation of Macedon AE 2253 viewsoverstrike

Serdi region
? (original Macedonian issue 185-168 BC)
head of rivergod Strymon right
wide trident
MAKE / ?ΔONΩN?
H countermark
type E3A
imitation of: SNG Copenhagen 1298-9 var.
6,70g 22mm

Wave on Strymon's face is relic of original coin also there is slightly visible inscription (perpendicular to trident).

original coin probably is:

Thessalonica
158-31 BC
head of Dionysos with ivy wreath right
goat standing right
ΘEΣΣA_ΛO / N_IK_HΣ
(NE) / ? other monograms
Sear #1466; BMC Macedonia p. 110, 10 - 16

Imitations from Serdi region weren't used to fool Macedonian traders but as their own currency. This coin is one of overstrikes on official Macedonian coins which prooves this theory.
Johny SYSEL
Strymon40.jpg
CELTIC, Celtic imitation - AE 22201 viewsoverstrike

Serdi region
? (original Macedonian issue 185-168 BC)
head of rivergod Strymon right
wide trident
type: (A?)5B
imitation of: SNG Copenhagen 1298-9 var.
8,37g 22-20mm

original coin probably is:

Thessalonica
158-31 BC
head of Dionysos with ivy wreath right
goat standing right
ΘEΣΣA_ΛO / N_IK_HΣ
(NE) / ? other monograms
Sear #1466; BMC Macedonia p. 110, 10 - 16

Head of goat and one ivy-leaf under Strymon's head are slightly visible.

Imitations from Serdi region weren't used to fool Macedonian traders but as their own currency. This coin is one of overstrikes on official Macedonian coins which prooves this theory.
Johny SYSEL
Strymon30.jpg
CELTIC, Celtic imitation - AE 22180 viewsoverstrike

Serdi region
? (original Macedonian issue 185-168 BC)
head of rivergod Strymon right
wide trident
MAKE / ?ΔONΩN?
type: type E3A
imitation of: SNG Copenhagen 1298-9 var.
6,70g 22mm

Wave on Strymon's face is relic of original coin also there is slightly visible inscription (perpendicular to trident).
original coin probably is:

Thessalonica
158-31 BC
head of Dionysos with ivy wreath right
goat standing right
ΘEΣΣA_ΛO / N_IK_HΣ
(NE) / ? other monograms
Sear #1466; BMC Macedonia p. 110, 10 - 16

Imitations from Serdi region weren't used to fool Macedonian traders but as their own currency. This coin is one of overstrikes on official Macedonian coins which prooves this theory.
Johny SYSEL
cimaera77.jpg
CHIMAERA281 viewsAR Hemidrachm. Sikyon ( Peloponessos ). c. 330-320 BC. 2,86 grs. 8h. Chimaera advancing left, right paw raised. ΣI below / Dove flying left.
BMC 119.

Spawned by Typhoeus and Echidna, the Chimaera had three heads - lion, goat, and snake .Its body was also mixed having the front part of a lion, middle of a goat, and snake for a tail. It breathed fire. It ravaged Lycia, killing cattle and setting fires until it was killed by Bellerophon
2 commentsbenito
Sikyonia,_Sikyon,_AR_Triobol.jpg
Chimaera and Dove 253 viewsSikyonia, Sikyon, 330/20-280 BC, AR Triobol
Chimaera standing left; ΣI below. / Dove flying left; Δ above tail feathers. BCD Peloponnesos 298 (this coin); BMC 112 var.; SNG Copenhagen 61 var. (ΔI on reverse) - very rare variant.
(15 mm, 2.99 g, 7h)
CNG; ex- BCD Collection; LHS 96 (8 May 2006) Lot 298.

The Chimaera, featured on the obverse of this coin, was a mythical fire-breathing beast; a composite of a lion, a goat and a snake. In myth, it inhabited Lycia in Asia Minor. It’s sighting was considered to be a portent or omen of storms, shipwrecks and natural disasters. The Chimaera’s representation in the arts is wholly Greek. It evolved to become a decorative motif in the region around Corinth. The pairing of a motif that forebodes disaster on the obverse, with a dove, the symbol of Aphrodite, goddess of love on the reverse is curious. Perhaps this was a metaphor for the ancients’ view of the double-sided nature of life?
2 commentsLloyd T
aigai.jpg
Cilicia, Aigai. Circa 102/1 BC. Æ 18, Athena/ Goat17 viewsCilicia, Aigai. Circa 102/1 BC. Ć 18, 2/3 unit (3.2 g). Helmeted head of Athena right / AIΓEAIΩN THΣ IEPA KAI AYTONOMOY, Goat kneeling left. Monogram over. Bloesch 178. SNG Levante 1666.Podiceps
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Cilicia, Aigeai, Hadrian, SNG Levante 171430 viewsHadrian, AD 117-138
AR - tetradrachm (tridrachm?), 26mm, 10.46g
struck AD 117/118 (year 164)
obv. AVTOKR KAIC TRAIANOC - ADRIANOC CEB
bust, slightly draped on l. shoulder, laureate, r.
rev. AIGEAIWN (in l. field) - ETOVC DZR (= year 164 of Caesarean era = AD 117/118)
Nymph Amaltheia as city-goddess with kalathos and in long garment, stg. facing,
head turned r., holding cornucopiae in r. arm and infant Zeus in l. arm, who wants
to crown her with a wreath in raised r. hand; r. beside her a goat r. looking back.
SNG Levante 1714; SNG Paris 2328; SNG von Auock 5450; Prieur 716
rare, about VF

This type, struck in the first year of Hadran's reign, shows a remarkable rev. depiction: The infant Zeus crowns Amaltheia with a wreath. This is an allusion to the myth of Zeus who was fed by Amaltheia in the shape of a goat. The goat is a symbol for Aigeai as a familiar pun, because goat is Greek AIX, AIGOS.
Jochen
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Cilicia, Aigeai. Circa 130-77 BC. Ć19mm9 viewsObv: Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet.
Rev: Goat kneeling left; monogram right.
SNG Levante 1653; SNG France -; SNG von Aulock -.
ancientone
Kelenderis_AR9-10_0_76g.jpg
Cilicia, Kelenderis50 views4th century BC
9-10mm, 0.76g
obv: horse rearing right
rev: KE[Λ]; goat kneeling left, looking back over shoulder
3 commentsareich
Cilicia,_Kelenderis__3rd_cent__BC__AR_Obol,_Horse,_KE,_Goat,_SNG_France_116-7,_SNG_Levante_29_,_Q-001,_9h,_9mm,_0,76g-s.jpg
Cilicia, Kelenderis, (3rd.century B.C.), SNG Levante 029, AR-Obol, -/KE//--, Kentaur/Goat(?) kneeling left,66 viewsCilicia, Kelenderis, (3rd.century B.C.), SNG Levante 029, AR-Obol, -/KE//--, Kentaur/Goat(?) kneeling left,
avers: Horse prancing right within beaded circle.
reverse: KE, Kentaur/Goat(?) kneeling left, head right.
exergue: -/KE//--, diameter: 9,0mm, weight: 0,76g, axes: 9h,
mint: Cilicia, Kelenderis, date: 3rd.century B.C., ref: SNG Levante 029, SNG France 116-7,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
kelenderis2.jpg
Cilicia, Kelenderis, obol69 views9mm, 0.72g
obv: forepart of Pegasos right
rev: goat kneeling right, head reverted
(SNG France 2, -;
SNG Levante I, 27;
SNG Pfälzer Privatsammlung 6, Ziegler, -;
BMC 21.56.30
Sear 5536 var.;)

ex Roland Müller collection, ex Rutten & Wieland
1 commentsareich
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CILICIA, Kelenderis. AR Stater75 viewsCirca 430-420 B.C. 10.63 grams. Obverse: nude youth (ephebus) dismounting from horse rearing left. Reverse: goat kneeling left, head turned right, ivy branch above. Casabonne Type 2, Celenderis 14 (same dies). SNG BN 48 (same dies, but letter removed on obverse). SNG von Aulock 5624 (same dies). Near EF, lightly toned. Well struck.
Ex CNG
One of the most underrated Ancient Greek coin because of its static iconography and (seemingly) insignificance of the place where it came from (only few ancient sources mentioned the city of Kelenderis located in Cilicia in Asia Minor-aside from few facts we know that it was the easternmost member of the Delian League and founded by the Greeks from Samos in the 8th century B.C. on an earlier Phoenician settlement). One need to take another glance to discover and marvel at the remarkable level of artistry put into the design on these series of coins of Kelenderis that might otherwise get overlooked.
4 commentsJason T
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CILICIA. Celenderis. Ca. 425-350 BC. AR stater16 viewsCILICIA. Celenderis. Ca. 425-350 BC. AR stater (20mm, 10.84 gm, 3h). NGC XF 4/5 - 4/5. Persic standard, ca. 425-400 BC. Youthful nude male rider, reins in right hand, kentron in left, dismounting from horse prancing left; A below / KEΛ, goat with long whiskers kneeling left, head right; two long stalks above, one terminating in flower, the other in large ivy leaf, all in incuse circle. SNG France 2, 46.2 commentsMark R1
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CILICIA. Celenderis. Ca. 425-350 BC. AR stater (20mm, 10.69 gm, 9h)14 viewsCILICIA. Celenderis. Ca. 425-350 BC. AR stater (20mm, 10.69 gm, 9h). VF. Persic standard, ca. 425-400 BC. Youthful nude male rider, holding reins in right hand and kentron in left, dismounting from horse prancing to left; A below / KEΛ, goat with long whiskers kneeling left, head right; two long stalks above, one terminating in flower, the other in large ivy leaf, all in incuse circle. BMC -. SNG France 2, 46. Mark R1
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CN Plamcivs AR Denarius, Cr 432/1, Diana20 viewsOBV: Head of Diana Planciana right, wearing petasus, earring, and necklace
REV: Cretan goat standing right; bow and quiver behind
3.6g, 18mm

Minted at Rome, 55BC
1 commentsLegatus
CN_PLANCIVS.jpg
CN Plamcivs Fourree Denarius, Cr 432/1, Diana25 viewsOBV: Head of Diana Planciana right, wearing petasus, earring, and necklace
REV: Cretan goat standing right; bow and quiver behind
2.67g
Ex CNG
Minted at Rome, 55BC
Legatus
Plancia_1a_img.jpg
Cn. Plancius, denarius18 viewsObv:– Head of Diana Planciana right, wearing petasus.
Rev:– Cretan goat right; bow and quiver behind
Minted in Rome B.C. 55.
Reference(s) – RSC Plancia 1. RRC 432/1. Syd 933

Weight 4.05g. 18.80mm.
maridvnvm
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Cn.PLANCIUS50 viewsAR denarius. 55 BC. 3.52 gr. Head of Macedonia right, wearing kausia. CN PLANCIUS before. AED CVR S C behind. / Cretan goat standing right, bow and quiver behind. Craw. 432/1. RSC Plancia 1. Smyth XII/14.
I & L Goldberg.2002.
2 commentsbenito
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Cn.PLANCIUS 31 viewsAR denarius. 55 BC. 3.52 gr. Head of Macedonia right, wearing kausia. CN PLANCIUS before. AED CVR S C behind. / Cretan goat standing right, bow and quiver behind. Craw. 432/1. RSC Plancia 1. Smyth XII/14.
benito
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Cr 231/1 AR Denarius C. Renius8 views138 BCE Rome mint
o: Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind
r: Juno (Caprotina?) in biga of goats right, C. RENI below goats, ROMA in exergue.
Renia 1. 3.73 gm 18.00 mm
What can one say about a type that prominently features goats pulling a cart? Apparently a great deal if you are one of the great Republican numismatists and historians, who have a wide variety of explanations for why one of the more serious goddesses is being pulled around in a goat chariot on a fairly common coin. Crawford spends half a page saying why his predecessors are wrong to say the reverse depicts "Juno Caprotina" or other variations on the type. However, all he concludes is that it has something to do with Juno and and something to do with a goat, but not apparently "Juno of the Goat". This is one of those explanations in Crawford that leave something to be desired, such as clarity.

However, clarity is not a problem with this coin, which is nearly perfect except for the awkward chip in the flan from separation from the strip. I feel that the worker who separated the coins really tried to get the best out of this one.
PMah
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Cr 379/2 AR Denarius L. Procilius 7 views80 BCE
o: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin; SC behind
r: Juno Sospita in biga right, hurling spear and holding shield; serpent below, L PROCILI F in ex.
Crawford 379/2; RSC Procilia 2
Serrate Denarius
3.92g. (8h).
PMah
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Cr 412/1 AR Denarius Serratus L. Roscius Fabatus 30 viewsRome, 64 BCE
o: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat-skin headdress; pileus of the Dioscuri surmounted by star behind, L•ROSCI below
r: Female standing right facing serpent; [control mark in left field], FABATI in ex
Crawford 412/1; Roscia 3
(3.82g, 19mm, 4h) bankers marks
I should add that I am rather fond or appreciative of bankers' marks. They show the extremely practical nature of any ancient transaction. Imagine if even a small portion of our transactions had to undergo human scrutiny at the level of negating the value of the transaction for every participant, plus the prior and succeeding transactions!
1 commentsPMah
10137v.jpg
Crawford 412/1, Roman Republic, L. Roscius Fabatus, Denarius serratus137 viewsRoman Republic (Rome mint 64 BC.), L. Roscius Fabatus.
AR Denarius (3.82 g, 18-19 mm).
Obv.: L.ROSCI , below head of Juno Sospita to right, wearing goat skin headdress; behind symbol: fountain basin.
Rev.: FABATI (in ex.), maiden standing right, feeding snake coiled erect before her; to left, well-head.
Crawford 412/1 (Symbol pair 102) ; Sydenham 915 ; Babelon Roscia 3 .

Juno Sospita was one of the names of the goddess Juno, emphasizing her role as protector of women, marriage, and childbirth ('Sospita' = 'she who saves'). The cult of Juno Sospita (or 'Sispes') was important in Lanuvium. She wore a goat-skin headdress and carried a spear and a shield.
At Lanuvium, Juno Sospita had a temple which was guarded by a serpent. Every year a maiden would offer cakes to the serpent. If it accepted, this was a sign that the girl was a virgin. Its refusal was an evil omen and a year of sterility was to be feared.
L.Roscius Fabatus was born at Lanuvium and was a "new man" (the first to ennoble his family by entering the Senate). In 55, he held the tribuneship. Roscius was co-author of a measure to further Caesar's plans for agrarian and municipal reform. He was a Caesarian legate in Gaul after 54, where he commanded the 13th legion. In 49, he held the praetorship and was involved as a messenger in the events of that year, which led to the fatal rupture between Caesar and Pompey. In one of his letters, Cicero reported Roscius was killed at the Forum Gallorum in 43 during the war of Mutina.
The coins of this moneyer are the last to exhibit edge serrations as a regular practice. He also utilized a large number of paired die control symbols, one for each side, which represented almost 250 everyday objects. In this, he appears to have taken an earlier moneyer, L.Papius, c. 78, as a model. Curiously, the moneyer's name on the coin is in the genitive, " . . . of Roscius Fabatus", perhaps implying "coinage of Roscius Fabatus."

my ancient coin database
8 commentsArminius
cretan_goat.jpg
CRETAN GOAT101 viewsAR denarius. 55 BC. 3.52 gr. Head of Macedonia right, wearing kausia. CN PLANCIUS before. AED CVR S C behind. / Cretan goat standing right, bow and quiver behind. Craw. 432/1. RSC Plancia 1. Smyth XII/14.benito
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Cyclades, Syros mint, BMC Crete pg. 123, 1 var. (no wreath)45 viewsCyclades, Syros mint, 3rd Century B.C. AE, 17mm 3.32g, SNG Copenhagen -; BMC Crete pg. 123, 1 var. (no
wreath); Laffaille 404 var. (same); Weber 4719 var. (same), (SG) Number sg3152
O: Horned and bearded head of Pan right
R: ΣVPI, bearded goat standing left; grain ear before, wreath(?) below
casata137ec
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Diodotus Tryphon, AE19, BAΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΤΡΥΦΩΝΟΣ16 viewsAE19
Diodotus Tryphon
King: 142 - 138BC
19.0mm 5.40gr 12h
O: NO LEGEND; Diademed head right, no border.
R: BAΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΤΡΥΦΩΝΟΣ ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΟΡΟΣ; Spiked Macedonian helmet left, with cheek guards, adorned with goat's horn above the visor.
SNG Spaer 1825
JAZ Numismatics/John Zielinski Auction 138, Lot 5.
8/16/18 12/5/18
Nicholas Z
domi_goat_rev.JPG
Domitian RIC II Rome 4971 viewsAR 18 mm 3.1 grams 80 AD
OBV ::CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII, laureate head right
REV ::PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Cretan goat standing left in laurel wreath.
ex :: none
REF :: RIC II Rome 49, RSC 390, BMC 88
Purchased 12/09


Minted while Domitian was Caesar under Titus
3 commentsJohnny
domitian as caesar goat wreath.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-267125 viewsAR Denarius, 3.09g
Rome Mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII•; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Goat standing l., in laurel-wreath.
RIC 267(C). BMC 88. RSC 390. BNC 73.
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, August 2007.

Issued during Titus' reign, this coin's reverse depicts Amalthea, the Cretan goat which nursed the infant Jupiter. An obvious allusion to Domitian being the next in line to the throne.

A nicely centered coin in decent shape of this unusual reverse type. A welcome addition to my growing Domitian as Caesar denarii.
1 commentsVespasian70
TRIC267_Dom_as_C.jpg
Domitian as Caesar under Titus RIC II T026740 viewsDomitian as Caesar under Titus. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 80-81 A.D. (18 mm, 3.39 g.) Obv: CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII, laureate head right. Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, goat standing left within laurel wreath. RIC II T267; BMC T88; RSC 390. 2 commentsLucas H
Domitian_as_Caesar_under_TItus__RIC_II_T0267V.jpg
Domitian as Caesar under Titus RIC II T0267V39 viewsDomitian as Caesar under Titus. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 80-81 A.D. (3.28g, 18.0mm, 6h) Obv: CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII, laureate head left. Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, goat standing left within laurel wreath. RIC II T267 Variant (head left) (R2).

An interesting variant on the right facing common coin minted under Titus after the deification of Vespasian. I thought this might be a unique example, but Curtis Clay was aware of a previous example sold by Lucernae, on eBay, 25 Nov. 2013. With a weight of 2.46g.

This example is well centered and has full legends. Given the wear, it was well circulated, and others are bound to surface.
1 commentsLucas H
Domitian_RIC_267.jpg
Domitian Denarius A.D. 80 RIC 267 [Titus], RSC 390, BMC 8848 viewsCAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII, laureate head right / PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Cretan goat standing left in laurel wreath.
Maximum Diameter: 18.0 mm
Weight: 3.39 g
5 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
EB0047b.JPG
EB0047 Zeus / AX Monogram9 viewsAchaean League, Aegira Peloponessos, Hemidrachm, 196-146 BC.
Obverse: Head of Zeus right.
Reverse: Large AX monogram, forepart of goat above, AΛ-KI, all in wreath.
References: Agrinion Hoard 323.
Diameter: 17mm, Weight: 2.347g.
EB
EB0352_scaled.JPG
EB0352 Juno Sospita / L THORIVS BALBVS, Bull16 viewsL. Thorius Balbus, Denarius. 105 BC.
Obv: ISMR abbreviated legend behind head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat-skin headdress.
Rev: Bull charging right; L THORIVS BALBVS legend in two lines in exergue, control letter V above.
References: Crawford 316/1; Syd. 598; Thoria 1; Sear 192.
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 3.929 grams.
EB
EB0356_scaled.JPG
EB0356 Apollo Vejovis / Cupid on goat19 viewsMn Fonteius Cf Denarius. 85 BC.
Obv: Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right, thunderbolt below, M FONTEI behind, symbol (CF?) below chin.
Rev: Cupid on goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, thyrsus in ex.
References: Syd 724a, Cr353/1c.
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 3.991 grams.
EB
Z2207LG.jpg
Elagabalus from Panias61 viewsElagabalus --AE25, Caesaria Panias. R: Pan standing with three goats, all sharing a common head. cf. Meshorer, Ya'akov, Coins of Caesarea Panias, in Israel Numismatic Journal 8, 1984-85, page 57 no. 59 (Julia Soaemias). Thanks to David Hendin and Pat Lawrence for assistance on attribution!featherz
2 goats.JPG
Every petting zoo needs a few goats255 viewsThis one is already in my gallery
Bronze AE 21, S 1394, VF, Amphipolis mint, 6.847g, 21.2mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Artemis Tauropolis right, bow and quiver at shoulder; reverse , two goats on their hind legs, contending, facing;
ex-Wallace Widtman collection .
ex-Forum Ancient Coins
Purchased 09/2007
1 commentsJohnny
fonteia.JPG
Fonteia67 viewsMn Fonteius Cf Denarius. 85 BC. Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right, M FONTEI CF behind, thunderbolt below, ROMA monogram below chin / infant Genius riding goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, filleted thyrsos below. Cr353/1a, Syd 724.

2 commentsrmon
Fonteia_9_CNG149Lot_304.jpg
Fonteia 942 viewsFonteia 9 (85BC) moneyer Mn. Fonteius (brother of Crawford 347?)

Denarius
Ob:Laureate head of Apollo right below fulmen behind MN(ligate) ∙ FONTEI ∙ C ∙ F (NT(ligate) downwards before monogram for Apollo (?), border of dots
Rev: Cupid on goat right above pilei in exergue thyrsus around laurel wreath, border of dots

BMCRR I 2476

Sydenham 724a

Crawford 353/1a

Northumberland Tablet VII 21
obv note “…has been designated Apollo vejovius. But as Ovid alludes to his not having the fulmen till the conflict with the Titans, and as Eckhel produces a copy with EX before AP- and reads it ex argento publico- the meaning is uncertain.”
Rev note: “This has been called Cupid, but there is no attribute of bow or arrow, whence Havercamp is of the opinion that the thyrsus denotes Bacchus, while Eckhel thinks it is the Etruscan Vejovius himself- the goat being a sacrifice peculiar to him.
On the whole the device seems to elude to the native haunts of the moneyer, for the curetes who guarded the little Jupiter were the Dioscuri, whose pilei and myrtle are here seen, and who were worshipped at Tusculum with special honor. Moreover, although the thyrsus is certainly an attribute of Bacchus, the myrtle belongs to the twins, and they may therefore have been considered the Dii Penates of the gens.”

Crawford: Monogram under chin Apollo; reverse is clearly Dionysiac. Grueber and Sydenham believe that the monogram under obverse head is Roma not Apollo. Head also Vejovis with winged genius on reverse.

Ex: CNG ex: Harry Strickhausen (misattributed by CNG; monograph under chin faint, but legible) 19mm, 3.93g
2 commentsPetrus Elmsley
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Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)16 viewsSRCV 10236, RIC V S-207, Göbl 731b, Van Meter 100

BI Antoninianus, 3.53 g., 21.87 mm. max., 0°

Rome mint, sixth officina, tenth emission, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.), in 267-268 A.D.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.

Rev: IOVI CONS AVG, goat standing right. ς (stigma) in exergue.

Issued in 267-268 A.D. to commemorate vows to Jupiter invoking his protection against the revolt of Aureolus.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB1.
Stkp
RIC_Gallienus_RIC_V_S_207_goat_right.jpg
Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)9 viewsSRCV 10236, RIC V S-207, Göbl 731b, Van Meter 100

BI Antoninianus, 3.22 g., 19.26 mm. max., 0°

Rome mint, sixth officina, tenth emision, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.), in 267-268 A.D.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.

Rev: IOVI CONS AVG, goat standing right, ς (stigma) in exergue.

Issued in 267-268 A.D. to commemorate vows to Diana invoking his protection against the revolt of Aureolus.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB1.
Stkp
RIC_Gallienus_RIC_V-S_207_goat_l.jpg
Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)21 viewsSRCV 10235, RIC V-S 207, Göbl 730l, Van Meter 99.

BI Antoninianus, 2.74 g., 21.29 mm. max., 180°

Rome mint, sixth officina, tenth emission, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.), in 267-268 A.D.

Obv: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right.

Rev: IOVI CONS AVG, goat standing left, ς (stigma) in exergue.

Issued in 267-268 A.D. to commemorate vows to Jupiter the Protector, invoking his protection against the revolt of Aureolus. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection, believing that, as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored those in positions of authority similar to his own. The infant Jupiter was suckled by the goat Amaltheia on Mount Ida.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB1.
1 commentsStkp
Gallien 5.jpg
Gallienus - antoninianus12 views[GAL]LIENVS AVG.
IOVI CO[NS. AVG.] , goat walking left (no exergue ?)
Ginolerhino
ID0250.jpg
Gallienus - Bull Left22 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head left with radiate crown
Reverse:- SOLICONSAVG, Bull left
Exergue:- XI
RIC 285var GOBL 748c CUNETIO 1407var CMR 27a+11

The left facing bull is one of the rarest type in the zoo series. CMR gives it a rarity value of R4 indicating that there are 2 to 5 known examples. The left facing standard type of bust is equally rare. In CMR there are only two types of reverses recorded with it, the right face bull and the left facing goat, again both have the rarity value of R4 indicating that there are 4 to 10 known examples of zoo series having this bust.

This coin combines both and is the only known example, a real rarity amongst the rare :)
nogoodnicksleft
0148_MERGED2~0.jpg
Gallienus - Capreolus24 viewsObverse:- [GA]LLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- IVNONICONSAVG, Combination of Goat/Stag Left
Exergue:- Delta
RIC 224 GOBL 725b CUNETIO Not listed

Rare Gallienus mule with reverse of Salonina

Provenance :- Purchased from Harlan J Berk
nogoodnicksleft
goatrt.jpg
Gallienus - Goat24 viewsGhengis_Jon
gallienus-goat.jpg
Gallienus - Goat20 viewsRoman Imperial, Gallienus Billon Antoninianus, (267-268 AD), 4.2g, 22.0mm

Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate head right.

Reverse: IOVI CONS AVG, Goat standing or walking left.

Refernce: RIC 207

Ex: Holding History Coins +photo
Gil-galad
ID0192_Merged_Goat.jpg
Gallienus - Goat Left33 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right cuirassed bust with radiate crown one tie over shoulder
Reverse:- IOV[I]CO[NSAV]G, Goat left
Exergue:- Stigma
RIC 207 GOBL 730S CUNETIO ????

Another rare example of the cuiraissed bust with one tie over the shoulder. There are 5 recorded examples in Gobl for this bust (type CV1) but none marked against the left facing Goat reverses. In my collection there is one example of a left facing griffin (also not recorded in Gobl) with the same bust.
nogoodnicksleft
0014_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Goat Left36 viewsObverse:- [GA]LLIE[NV]SAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- IOVICONSAVG, Goat left
Exergue:- Stigma (off flan)
1 commentsnogoodnicksleft
ID0134_MERGED.jpg
Gallienus - Goat Left22 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- IOVICON[SA]VG, Goat left
Exergue:- Stigma
nogoodnicksleft
ID0147_MERGED.jpg
Gallienus - Goat Left34 viewsObverse:- [GA]LLIENVS[AVG], Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- [IOVICON]SAVG, Goat left
Exergue:- Stigma

Possibly an ex-museum piece
2 commentsnogoodnicksleft
0104_Merged2.jpg
Gallienus - Goat Right26 viewsObverse:- GALL[IENV]SAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- IOVIC[ON]SAVG, Goat right
Exergue:- Stigma
nogoodnicksleft
0015_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Goat Right18 viewsObverse:- GALLI[ENV]SAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- [IOVICON]SAVG, Goat right
Exergue:- Stigma
nogoodnicksleft
095-gallienus.jpg
Gallienus AE Antoninianus11 viewsAntoninianus
Obv: GALLIENVS AVG;
Rev: IOVI CONS AVG; goat walking l
Issued ca. 267-68 AD, to commemorate vows to Jupiter invoking his protection against the revol of Aureolus.
Tanit
gallienus_RIC207.jpg
GALLIENUS AE antoninianus - 267-268 AD (sole reign)53 viewsobv: GALLIENVS AVG (radiate head right)
rev: IOVI CONS AVG (goat standing right), Stigma in ex.
ref: RIC Vi 207, RSC 341
mint: Rome
2.53gms, 20mm

In this coin the goat is a personification of Amalthea, a nymph who nursed the infant Jupiter with goats milk. Interesting O letter on the reverse, perhaps IAVI (sic!)
2 commentsberserker
Gallienus~0.jpg
Gallienus Antoninianus618 viewsGallienus Antoninianus

Attribution: RIC 207k
Date: 267-268 AD
Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG; radiate bust rt.
Reverse: IOVICONS AVG; goat stg. lt.; stigma in exergue
Size: 17 mm
Weight: 2.5 grams
Noah
gallienus_left.jpg
Gallienus Antoninianus 9 viewsGALLIENVS AVG Radiate head left
IOVI CONS AVG Goat standing right

23mm. 3.71g.

RARE Left BUST variation of RIC 207
Britanikus
Gallienus17.JPG
GALLIENUS Antoninianus, RIC VI 207, Goat16 viewsOBV: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right
REV: IOVI CONS AVG, goat standing or walking left, Digamma in ex.
3.8g, 22mm

Minted at Rome 267-8 AD
Legatus
gallienus_cabra.png
Gallienus RIC 20710 viewsGallienus Billon Antoninianus.
Rome 267-268 AD.
GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right /
IOVI CONS AVG, goat standing or walking left,
Digamma in ex.
xokleng
GALLIEN-3.jpg
Gallienus RIC V-1 20714 viewsObv: GALLIENVS AVG
radiate bust right
Rev: IOVI CONS AVG
goat walking right digamma in ex
19mm 2.7gm
OWL365
gallienus_goat_left.JPG
Gallienus RIC V-1, Rome 18158 views21 mm 3.5 grams
OBV :: GALLIENVS AVG. Radiate, cuirassed bust right
REV :: DIANAE CONS AVG. Antelope walking left
EX :: XII
RIC V-1, Rome 181
Purchased 08/2008


Johnny
gallienus_goat_walking_right.jpg
Gallienus RIC V-1, Rome 207 (S)69 viewsAE 18-20 mm 2.6 grams
OBV :: GALLIENVS AVG . Radiate head right
REV :: IOVI CONS AVG .bearded goat walking right
EX :: ς
RIC V-1, Rome 207 (S)
Purchased forvm auctions 12/2010

Johnny
Zoo_opt.jpg
Gallienus' Zoo45 viewsCentaur, Panther, Hippocamp, Antelope, Pegasus, Gryphon, Stag, GoatLegatus
gallienus_iovi.jpg
Gallienus, AE antoninianus. Rome. Sole reign. AD 261-262.9 viewsGallienus, AE antoninianus. Rome. Sole reign. AD 261-262. GALLIENVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right / IOVI CONS AVG, Goat standing left. Mintmark ς. RIC V-1, Rome 207; Goebl 0730k; Sear 10235.RIC 207, rad.cuir.

3.11g. 21mm.

Britanikus
4615_4616.jpg
Gallienus, Antoninianus, IOVI CONS AVG10 viewsAE Antoninianus
Gallienus
Augustus: 253 - 268AD
Issued: 267 - 268AD
22.5 x 19.0mm
O: GALLIENVS AVG; Radiate head, right.
R: IOVI CONS AVG; Goat advancing right.
Exergue: Digamma
Rome Mint
RIC V-1, Rome 207, radiate; RSC 341; Sear 10236.
Aorta: 493: B40, O10, R133, T145, M5.
Holding History Coins
4/10/14 3/7/17
Nicholas Z
DF9F7537-E013-4581-8BE2-093EE694D8BF.jpeg
Gallienus, Goat14 viewsGALLIENVS AVG,
radiate head right

IOVI CONS AVG,
goat standing or walking right

ς in ex.

RIC 207, RSC 341
Robin Ayers
GALLIEN-23-ROMAN.jpg
Gallienus, RIC V(1)-207.K Rome21 viewsBillon Antoninianus
Rome mint, 267-268 A.D.
21mm, 2.76g
RIC V(1)-207, RSCv.4-344, RCVv.3-10236

Obverse:
GALLIENVS AVG
Radiate head right

Reverse:
IOVI CONS AVG
Digamma in exergue
Goat walking right.
1 commentsrubadub
Plancia_1.JPG
Gnaeus Plancius14 viewsObv: CN. PLANCIVS AED CVR SC, Head of Macedonia (sometimes identified as Diana) facing right.

Rev: Goat standing right, quiver and bow behind.

Silver Denarius, Rome Mint, 55 BC

4.2 grams, 18.7 mm, 180°

RSC Plancia 1, S396
Matt Inglima
Gnaeus_Plancius.jpg
Gnaeus Plancius - AR denarius5 viewsRome
˛54 BC
ą55 BC
head of Macedonia or Diana Planciana right wearing causia
CN·PLANCIVS / AED·CVR·S·C
agrimi standing right, bow and quiver left
ąCrawford 432/1, SRCV I 396, Sydenham 932, RSC I Plancia 1
˛Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,1g
ex Aureo & Calicó

The agrimi is the wild goat of Crete. This moneyer used symbols of Macedonia and Crete on his coinage because these were places where he had spent some time during his career. If the obverse depicts Diana Planciana than it commemorates temple of Diana Planciana with statue which was paid by moneyer in 55 BC. The temple stood between Quirinal and Viminal.
Johny SYSEL
goat.JPG
goat36 viewsFonteia Denarius1 commentsGhengis_Jon
FONTEIA_1.JPG
Goat265 viewsDenarii of Mn Fonteius Cf; 85 BC
Ghengis_Jon
goatrt~0.jpg
Goat171 viewsRIC V-1 Rome 207 (Gallienus)
Bearded goat walking right
Ghengis Jon
Philip_II_Saeculares.JPG
Goat - Philip II Antoninianus. A.D.248122 viewsObverse: IMP PHILIPPVS AVG. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Philip II facing right, seen from behind.
Reverse: SAECVLARES AVGG. Goat walking left; in exergue, III (officina 3).
RIC IV iii : 224

This coin is one of a series of coins struck by Philip I and Philip II in A.D.248 to commemorate the 1000th anniversary of Rome. Many of these coins depict the various animals, brought from all over the Empire, which were displayed in the arena during the games celebrating this event.
*Alex
Kelenderis_Cilicia_Stater.jpg
GREEK, Cilicia, Kelenderis, Stater c. 425 - 350 B.C.147 viewsSilver stater, SNG Levante 23 (same dies); SNG Cop 83 (same dies); SNGvA 5631 (same dies); BMC Lycaonia p. 54, 20 ff. var. (no dolphin); SNG BnF 66 var. (same), VF, superb style, well centered, light toning, 10.685g, 20.9mm, 270o, Kelenderis mint, c. 425 - 350 B.C.; obverse nude horseman facing sidesaddle on horse rearing right, whip in right; reverse KELEN, goat kneeling right, looking back, dolphin right in exergue.

Kelenderis was a port town, one of the oldest in Cilicia, described in Hellenistic and Roman sources as a small, but strong castle. The rider on the obverse may be Castor, who was not only a horse trainer but also the protector of sailors, an appropriate type for a port town.

*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.
From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
2 commentsSam
86211q00.jpg
GREEK, Kelenderis, Cilicia, c. 410 - 375 B.C.18 viewsGS86211. Silver stater, Casabonne type 4; BMC Cilicia p. 55, 25 & pl. X, 3; cf. SNG BnF 75 (KEΛEN); Celenderis Hoard-; SNG Levante -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aEF, attractive style, centered on a tight flan, die wear and minor die cracks, marks, weight 10.800 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 30o, Celenderis mint, c. 410 - 375 B.C.; obverse young man riding sideways on horse galloping right, preparing to dismount(?), nude, whip in right hand, bridle in left hand; reverse goat crouching left on dotted exergue line, head turned looking back right, KEΛ[E?] above; very rare late issue with rider right and goat leftJoe Sermarini
gx10-s.jpg
Greek, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V (221-179 B.C.), SNG Cop 1250, AE-21, Pella mint, Two goats kneeling right,213 viewsPhilip V., Macedonia, Kings, (221-179 B.C.), SNG Cop 1250, AE-21, Pella mint, Two goats kneeling right,
avers:- Head of young Herakles right, clad in lion's skin.
revers:-Two goats kneeling right side by side, BA above, Φ below.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 21 mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Philippos V., Pella mint, date: 221-179 B.C., ref: SNG Cop 1250,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
phoenecia_sidob.png
GREEK, PHOENICIA, Sidon, Time of Baalshallim I-Ba'ana, c.425-402 BC44 viewsPHOENICIA, Sidon, Time of Baalshallim I-Ba'ana, (c.B.C. 425-402), silver eighth shekel (0.75 g),
Obv. galley in front of three city towers, lion below.
Rev. King of Persia standing right, drawing bow, incuse head of Bes to left, incuse head of goat or ibex to right.
S.5933, Elayi & Elayi 362-448, Betlyon 9, BMC 14 [p.142].
CNG Electronic Auction 170, Aug. 8, 2007, (lot 122); Noble Sale 105 Lot 4073
chance v
Aigospotamoi_AE20~0.jpg
GREEK, Thrace, Aigospotamoi, ca. 300 BC, Ć 20 114 viewsHead of Demeter left wearing stephane decorated with a laurel wreath and vine.
AIΓΟΣΠΟ Goat standing left, eight-rayed star beneath.
BMC Thrace, p. 187, 2 var. (star); SNG Copenhagen 850 var. (star).
(20 mm, 7.76 g, 12h).
Unique with the star symbol beneath goat and amongst the finest examples known of the single coinage emission from Aigospotamai.

Aigospotamoi (Goat Streams) is the site of two small rivulets flowing across a small plain from the hinterland of Gallipoli peninsula into the southwestern corner of the Sea of Marmara (the ancient Propontis) at its junction with the northern mouth of the Hellespont, a few kilometres to the northeast of the modern day township of Gallipoli (Gelibolu). In late summer of 405 BC it was the site of a naval engagement between the Peloponnesian and Athenian fleets. The Peloponnesian fleet lead by the brilliant Spartan general Lysander destroyed the Athenian fleet. The destruction of the Athenian navy at Aigospotamoi enabled the Peloponnesians to place a stranglehold on the Black Sea grain trade to Athens. The resultant starvation of the city brought to an end the 27 year long Peloponnesian War within six months.
5 commentsLloyd T
griffin.JPG
Gryphon27 viewsPapia Denarius AR circa 79 BC
Head of Juno Sospita r., wearing goat's skin.
Gryphon prancing r.

Craw 384.1
Ghengis_Jon
00hadreagle7.jpg
HADRIAN97 viewsAR tetradrachm. Aegeae (Cilicia). 133 - 134 A.D. 13.6 grs. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. AΥTOKΡ KAIΣ TΡAIA AΔΡIANO ΣEB ΠΠ / Eagle standing facing on harpe, wings spread, head turned right, goat in exergue. ETOΥΣ•ΠΡ• AIΓEAIΩN.
Prieur 721. SNG Levante 1719.
benito
00hadreagle7~0.jpg
HADRIAN25 viewsAR tetradrachm. Aegeae (Cilicia). 133 - 134 A.D. 13.6 grs. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. AΥTOKΡ KAIΣ TΡAIA AΔΡIANO ΣEB ΠΠ / Eagle standing facing on harpe, wings spread, head turned right, goat in exergue. ETOΥΣ•ΠΡ• AIΓEAIΩN.
Prieur 721. SNG Levante 1719.

2 commentsbenito
vuohi3.jpg
Hadrian & goat11 viewsHadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Aegeae, Cilicia
Silver tetradrachm, Prieur 715, Weber -, Aegeae mint, 9.729g, 23.1mm, 0o, 117 - 118 A.D.; obverse AYTOKP KAIC TRAIANOC ADRIANOC CEB, laureate bare-chest bust right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse ETOYC DXR AIGEAIWN, diademed head of Perseus (or Alexander the Great) right, goat below; ex FORVM. The domestic goat (Capra aegagrus hircus) is a subspecies of wild goat Capra aegagrus aegagrus. Playing with the word for goat in Greek (and Latin) produced associations with other words with aego-, aeg- and ego- (and there are many of those in Greek). In any case the cute little goat found its way to these Aegean coins.

Podiceps
CHOICE_HADRIAN_SILVER_TETRADRACHM_FROM_CILICIA,_133_AD.JPG
HADRIAN SILVER TETRADRACHM FROM CILICIA, 133 AD313 viewsHadrian Tetradrachm, Aegaei in Cilicia
Silver Tetradrachm, Cilicia, Aegaei, 27 mm, 14 grams.
Hadrian AR Tetradrachm of Cilicia, Aegeae. Year 180 = 133/134 AD. AYTOKP KAIS TRAIA ADRIANO SEB P P, laureate, cuirassed bust right, seen from front, fold of cloak on front shoulder / AIGEAIWN ETOYS .PP., eagle standing front, head right, on harpe, goat in ex.
SNG Levante1719, SNG France 2230-32, Prieur 721.
6 commentsAntonivs Protti
Had__tet__pan.jpg
Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Aegeae, Cilicia mint91 viewsSilver tetradrachm, (Prieur 720), (SNG Paris 2331), Aegeae mint, weight 13.48g, max. diameter 26.6mm, 132 - 133 A.D.; Obv. AΥTOKΡ KAIΣ TΡAIA AΔΡIANO ΣEB Π Π (mostly off flan), laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Rev. ETOΥΣ •ΘOΡ(year 179=132/3 A.D)• (AIΓEAIΩN mostly off flan), eagle standing facing on harpe, wings spread, head turned right, recumbent goat r. in ex.

Background info. courtesy Forvm Ancient Coins

Aegeae issued tetradrachms only during the reigns of Hadrian and Caracalla. The issues were probably related to visits of these emperors to the town or to its famous sanctuary of Asclepius. -- The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253 by Michel and Karin Prieur

The recumbent goat was the symbol for the city of Aegeae. It was a pun on AIGEAIWN (of the city of Aegeae) and AIGEIWN (of the goats). -- The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253 by Michel and Karin Prieur

2 commentsSteve E
Hadrian_P715~0.JPG
Hadrian, 117 - 138 AD40 viewsObv: AYTOKP KAIC TPAIANOC Α∆ΡΙΑΝΟC CEB, laureate, bare-chested bust of Hadrian facing right, drapery on left shoulder.

Rev: ETOYC ∆ΞΡ ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ, diademed head of Perseus or Alexander the Great (?) facing right, goat below.

Silver Tetradrachm, Aegeae mint, 117 - 118 AD

10.1 grams, 24.5 mm, 0°

Prieur 715

Ex: FORVM
1 commentsSPQR Coins
hadrian_aegeae_p721.jpg
Hadrian, Aegeae, Cilicia, tetradrachm, Prieur 7214 viewsHadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Aegeae, Cilicia
Silver tetradrachm, Prieur 721, SNG Levante 1719, Weber -, VF, Aegeae mint, 13.430g, 25.5mm, 180o, 133 - 134 A.D.; obverse “ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙΣ ΤΡΑΙΑ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟ ΣΕΒ Π Π”, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse “ΕΤΟΥΣ”•“ΠΡ”• “ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ”, eagle standing facing on harpe, wings spread, head turned right, goat in ex. Ex FORVM

Podiceps
Himera_litra.jpg
Himera litra; manheaded monster/ Nude youth on goat7 viewsSICILY, HIMERA, 450-420 B.C. Silver litra 0,8g, 12mm. Obv: Winged forepart of a manheaded monster left. Rev: Nude youth on goat prancing left. SNG Cop. 310. Podiceps
Himera, Sicily- AE Tetras.JPG
Himera, Sicily- AE Tetras22 viewsAE Tetras, 420-410 BC
Himera, Sicily
Obverse: Youthful Pan riding goat left, blowing conch shell. Three pellets below.
Reverse: Nike Flying Left
15mm, 2.26gm
Calciati pg42-31
Jerome Holderman
Ionia_Klazomenai_1.PNG
Ionia Klazomenai 400 BC3 viewsIonia Klazomenai 400 BC

Obverse.Head of Athena right Wearing Corinthian Style Helmet


Reverse.Goat Recumbent right


20mm
Macedonian Warrior
magnesia_ad_maeandrum_philippI_Schultz472.jpg
Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum, Philip I, Schultz 47231 viewsPhilipp I, AD 244-249
AE 34, 15.4g
struck under grammateus Aur. Musaius
obv. AYT KM IOY - FILIPPOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. [EPI] GR AVR MOYCAI - OY MAGNH / TWN (in ex.)
Dionysos, stg. l., holding thyrsos in l. hand and pouring wine from kantharos
with r. hand; rape-wine over his r. shoulder; l. at his feet a small Satyr playing
with the panther, leaping l.; at his r. side a dancing maenad wearing chiton
and beating her tympanon, looking l.
ref.: S.Schultz Nr.472, pl.31 ( 1 ex. in Paris, unique, from same die pair); Dieudonne RN 1901, S.439, 53 (corr.); Bernhart JNG 1949, 1037; Coll. Paris 1573; Imhoof JIAN 1908, S.177
Very rare, F, some roughness
The satyr, barely seen, looks like a goat, leaping l.!
Thanks to Curtis Clay and Archivum for the attribution!
Jochen
Thasos.jpg
ISLAND OFF THRACE. Thasos62 viewsCirca 480-463 B.C. AR Stater (21mm, 8.80gm). Le Rider, Thassienes 5; HPM pl. X, 12; HGC 6, 331; SNG Copenhagen 1010-2. Obverse: Ithyphallic satyr advancing right, carrying off protesting nymph. Reverse: quadripartite incuse square. VF, toned.

Ex CNG

The motif of the satyr abducting a maenad appears on several northern Greek coins. In the case of Thasos, an island just off the coast of Thrace in northern Greece, this Dionysiac motif serves to promote the island's famous wine. Satyrs belong to the retinue of Dionysos, the god of wine. They are only interested in drinking wine and having sex, usually with the maenads, the female followers of Dionysos. Satyrs are commonly represented as half-man, half-horse or goat, often with a horse tail and pointy horse ears. On the obverse of this coin, however, the satyr has mostly human traits, except for his goat legs. In addition, his bestial nature is made clear by means of his nudity (which visibly contrasts with the maenad's modest chiton), his obvious sexual arousal, and the fact that he is trying to abduct a maenad against her will, as evidenced by raising her right arm in protest (and about to slap her abductor!). The overtly sexual displays seen on many early Greek coins can be disconcerting to the modern eye, viewing them through the lens of centuries of Christian fulminations against ‘paganism’ and its erotic excesses. These scenes are at their most graphic in northern Greece, for example, on the archaic coins of Lete and the island of Thasos, showing the interplay of nymphs and satyrs. The towns and tribes of this region were only newly introduced to the ‘civilizing’ influences of the south, and were still close to their roots in farming and herding cultures. Their gods were not the Olympian super beings, but the spirits of nature, and the emphasis was on celebrating the fecundity of fields and flocks. Thasos gained its enormous wealth by virtue of its local silver mines as well as mines it controlled on the Thracian mainland opposite the island city-state. According to Herodotos (VI, 46), the city derived 200-300 talents annually from her exploitation of this mineral wealth. Such source of the sought-after white metal attracted foreign interest on the mines. The famous of these was when Athens attacked Thasos, ironically one of its members in the Delian League, in 465 B.C. with a single purpose in taking control of these mines. Additionally, Thasos gained much material wealth as a producer and exporter of high quality wines, which was tightly regulated by the government, and it was perhaps due to this trade in wine that her coinage spread throughout the Aegean making it a widely recognized and accepted coinage in distant lands.

2 commentsJason T
salonina~1.jpg
IVNONI CONS AVG, deer walking left, “Δ” in ex. RIC 15 Rome5 viewsSalonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D. Bronze antoninianus, SRCV III 10643, Göbl MIR 36, 725; RIC V 15, VF/F, Rome mint, 3.038g, 20.5mm, 0o, 267 - 268 A.D.; obverse COR SALONINA AVG, diademed and draped bust right, crescent behind; reverse IVNONI CONS AVG, deer walking left, “Δ” in ex. The animal appears to have the beard of a goat but on some examples branched antlers are clear. It is an odd deer. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Procilia1obre.JPG
Juno (Sospita)222 views* AR Denarius Procilia 1, moneyer L. Procili F.
* Rome 80 BC
* Obv: Laur. head of Jupiter. To l.: S•C.
* Rev: Cult statue of Juno Sospita, stg. r., wearring goatskin and holding shield in l.hand, and hurling spear with r.hand; before snake, behind: L•PROCILI / F downwards.
* 18,5 mm
* Crawford 379/1.
Gert
AntoSe94.jpg
Juno Sospita140 viewsorichalcum sestertius (26.6g) Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
ANTONINVS AVG PI[-]VS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
IVNONI SISPITAE (around edge) S C (in field) Juno Sospita wearing goat skin advancing right preceded by a snake, brandishing javelin and holding shield which is pinched in the middle.
RIC 608 (Scarce), Cohen 473, BMC 1248

Juno Sospita was the goddess of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Pius, and one of the most ancient figures in the Roman pantheon.
Charles S
Stater.jpg
Kelenderis, Cilicia, c. 425 - 350 B.C.102 viewsSilver stater, SNG Levante 23 (same dies); SNG Cop 83 (same dies); SNG v. Aulock 5631 (same dies); BMC p. 54, 20 ff. var (no dolphin); SNG France 66 var (no dolphin), VF, holed, toned, Celenderis mint, weight 10.726g, maximum diameter 22.2mm, die axis 0o, obverse nude horseman facing sidesaddle on horse rearing right, whip in left; reverse KELEN, goat kneeling right, looking back, exergue line of dots dolphin right in ex;

Ex Forum
1 commentsPhiloromaos
Kelenderis_Cilicia_Stater~0.jpg
Kelenderis, Cilicia, Stater c. 425 - 350 B.C.134 viewsSilver stater, SNG Levante 23 (same dies); SNG Cop 83 (same dies); SNGvA 5631 (same dies); BMC Lycaonia p. 54, 20 ff. var. (no dolphin); SNG BnF 66 var. (same), VF, superb style, well centered, light toning, 10.685g, 20.9mm, 270o, Kelenderis mint, c. 425 - 350 B.C.; obverse nude horseman facing sidesaddle on horse rearing right, whip in right; reverse KELEN, goat kneeling right, looking back, dolphin right in exergue.

Kelenderis was a port town, one of the oldest in Cilicia, described in Hellenistic and Roman sources as a small, but strong castle. The rider on the obverse may be Castor, who was not only a horse trainer but also the protector of sailors, an appropriate type for a port town.

*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
3 commentsSam
philip_v_goats_res.jpg
KINGS OF MACEDON--PHILIP V47 views221 - 179 BC
20.5 mm 8.13 g
O: Head of young Heracles in lionskin headdress right
R: Two goats recumbent, side by side. BA above. F beneath; grain ear below r
1 commentslaney
pella_goats_a.jpg
KINGS OF MACEDON--PHILIP V AND PERSEUS32 viewsCa. 187 BC- 168 BC
AE 16 mm 5.40 g
O: Draped bust of Pan right; at shoulder, logobolon
R: Two goats recumbent right; above, monogram/PEL; all within wreath
PELLA, MACEDON
laney
Papia_1c_edge.JPG
L Papius Denarius Serratus28 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Compass
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Drill
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.

An uneven strike with an off-centre reverse spoils what would otherwise have been a very pleasing coin.

This image illustrates the uneven strike. You can see the thickness of the coin varying from left (where there was little or no pressure) to right (where the main pressure from the strike took place).
maridvnvm
Papia1.JPG
L Papius Denarius Serratus, 79 BC49 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right, wearing goatskin, symbol behind
Gryphon dancing right, symbol below, ex. L PAPI
Syd 773, Cr384/1, Papia 1
This coin has been identified as a cast fake that has emerged in the last year.
whitetd49
Papia 1a img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC -40 viewsDenarius Serratus
Obv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Barbed spear head.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Elephant head.
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC -. Babelon 149. BMCRR -
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia1b_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC -121 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Dolphin wrapped around anchor.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Hippocamp
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC -. Babelon -. BMCRR -.

A previously unknown symbol pair.
8 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1e_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC -18 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Shoe.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Sandal
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC -. Babelon -. BMCRR -.
3.78g. 19.71 mm. 180 degrees.

An unpublished symbol pair with five examples currently known. This is likely the best of the five examples. (Richard Schaefer)
maridvnvm
Papia_1e_img~0.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC -41 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Shoe.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Sandal
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC -. Babelon -. BMCRR -.
3.78g. 19.71 mm. 180 degrees.

An unpublished symbol pair with five examples currently known. This is likely the best of the five examples. (Richard Schaefer)
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1b_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC -63 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Dolphin wrapped around anchor.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Hippocamp
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC -. Babelon -. BMCRR -.

A previously unknown symbol pair and the only known example.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1p_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 01329 viewsDenarius Serratus
Obv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, cooking pot with hook.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, triple flesh-hook
Minted in Rome from B.C. 79.
Reference:– RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 13. Babelon 13. BMCRR 35. CNR: 1/049.

A "Stannard" weight adjustment scoop on the reverse
maridvnvm
Papia_1g_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 01921 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, hunter's net
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, two spears
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 19. Babelon 100. BMCRR 19.
maridvnvm
Papia_1g_img~0.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 01940 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, hunter's net
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, two spears
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 19. Babelon 100. BMCRR 19.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1k_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 05223 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, goblet.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, winsekin? shoe?
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 52. Babelon 96. BMCRR 52. CNR: 1/042.

Symbols listed as goblet/wine-skin by Sydenham. coppa/calzatura (cup/shoe) by CNR
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1t_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 064 30 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, forepart of lion.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, forepart of bull
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 64. Babelon 77. BMCRR 64. CNR unknown
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1n_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 06927 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, shepherd's crook.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, mask of Pan
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference:– RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 69. Babelon 2. BMCRR 69. CNR: unknown.

Trade guild: farmers and shepherds
maridvnvm
Papia_1q_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 07027 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, lock
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, key
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 70 Babelon 61. BMCRR 70. CNR: 1/027.

trade guild: metal workers
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1i_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 07628 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, owl
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, crow with open wings or eagle
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 76. Babelon 76. BMCRR 12.
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1i_img~0.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 07645 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, owl
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, crow with open wings or eagle
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 76. Babelon 76. BMCRR 12.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
papia_1w_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 08445 viewsDenarius Serratus
Obv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, sandal.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, sandal
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 84. Babelon 17. BMCRR 84. CNR 1/041
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1s_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 08820 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, whelk shell or conch.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, scallop shell
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 88. Babelon 14. BMCRR 88. CNR: -.
maridvnvm
Papia_1o_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 09241 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, crossbow bolt.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, front view of crossbow
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference:– RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 92. Babelon 75. BMCRR 92. CNR: unknown.

Some obverse corrosion
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1z_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 09421 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, spindle.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, distaff
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 94. Babelon 34. BMCRR 94. CNR 1/015
Weaver's guild

3.71g. 18.77 mm. 0 degrees.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1d_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 10919 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Lamp with spout
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Lamp feeder
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 109. Babelon -. BMCRR 109.
3.12g. 18.44 mm. 0 degrees

A modern cast fake.
Slightly uneven toning.
maridvnvm
Papia_1f_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 1117 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, tall cup
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, jug
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 11. Babelon -. BMCRR 11

This symbol pair is one of only two known to be produced from more than a single die pair with two die pairs known for this symbol pair.
maridvnvm
Papia_1f_img~0.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 1125 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, tall cup
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, jug
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 11. Babelon -. BMCRR 11

This symbol pair is one of only two known to be produced from more than a single die pair with two die pairs known for this symbol pair.
maridvnvm
Papia_1aa_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 12235 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, coiled serpent.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, dog
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 122 Babelon 9. BMCRR unknown. CNR unknown

ex SteveX6 collection

3.42g. 18.68 mm. 180 degrees.
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1r_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 12831 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, chopper.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, scissors
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 128 Babelon 26. BMCRR -. CNR: -.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
papia_1v_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 13119 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, plumb line.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, mason's level
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 131. Babelon 31 BMCRR unlisted. CNR 1/032
maridvnvm
papia_1y_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 13419 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, aplustre.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, prow
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 134. Babelon -. BMCRR 47.

3.81g. 19.07 mm. 180 degrees.
maridvnvm
Papia_1l_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 14728 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, altar
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, lighted altar
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 147. Babelon 69. BMCRR Unknown. CNR: Unknown
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1h_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 15018 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Harpa
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Winged Petasos
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 150. Babelon 149. BMCRR -.

Symbols of Mercury.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1h_img~0.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 15030 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Harpa
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Winged Petasos
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 150. Babelon 149. BMCRR -.

Symbols of Mercury.
maridvnvm
papia_1ab_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 19316 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, horse's head.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, donkey's head
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 193. Babelon unlisted. BMCRR unlisted. CNR unknown
maridvnvm
Papia_1c_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 20431 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Compass
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Drill
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 204. Babelon -. BMCRR -
3.85g. 20.41 mm. 180 degrees

An uneven strike with an off-centre reverse spoils what would otherwise have been a very pleasing coin.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1c_img~0.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 20434 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Compass
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Drill
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 204. Babelon -. BMCRR -
3.85g. 20.41 mm. 180 degrees

An uneven strike with an off-centre reverse spoils what would otherwise have been a very pleasing coin.
maridvnvm
papia_1x_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 2158 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, base of column.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, corinthian capital
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 21. Babelon 81. BMCRR 21. CNR 1/034

3.41 gms

Stannard weight correction scoop on reverse
5 commentsmaridvnvm
papia_1u_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 3124 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, crowbar.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, dolabrum (pickaxe)
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 31. Babelon 32 BMCRR 31. CNR 1/07
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1m_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 7522 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Modius.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Modius
Minted in Rome from B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 75. Babelon 8. BMCRR 75. CNR: 1/009.
maridvnvm
Papia_1j_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 9928 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Funnel strainer.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, hydria (two-handled vase).
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 99. Babelon unlisted. BMCRR 99.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
L__Philippus_1.jpg
L PHILIPPUS ROMAN REPUBLIC; GENS MARCIA AR Denarius, Cr293/121 viewsOBVERSE: Head of Philip V of Macedon right, wearing diademed royal Macedonian helmet with goat horns; monogram of Roma behind, F below chin
REVERSE: L. PHILIPPVS on tablet below statue of equestrian, carrying laurel-branch; flower below horse; mark of value in exergue
Rome 113-112 BC
3.8g, 20mm
1 commentsLegatus
L_Pompomius_Molo.jpg
L POMPONIUS MOLO AR Denarius Cr 334/1, Numa Pompilius14 viewsOBV: Laureate head of Apollo right; L POMPON MOLO around
REV: Numa Pompilius standing right before altar preparing to sacrifice a goat which is being held by a youth; NVMA POMPIL in exergue


Struck at Rome, 97 BC
Legatus
25691.jpg
L Procilius: AR Denarius, 80 B.C. 24 viewsObv: S C behind hea dof Juno Sospita r, wearing goat's skin / Juno Sospita in biga r, holding shield and hurling spear, serpent erect below horses.

Cr. 379/2



1 commentsSkySoldier
Desktop951.jpg
L ROSCIUS FABATUS; GENS ROSCIA AR Serrate Denarius 16 viewsOBVERSE: Head of Juno Sospita in goat skin, L ROSCI below, amphora or capis to left
REVERSE: Girl standing right feeding serpent before, sea shell(?) to left, FABATI in ex.
Rome 59 BC
3.7g, 18mm
Cr 412/1; Syd 915
1 commentsLegatus
Julius_Bursio_Crawford352_1a.jpg
L. Julius Bursio, Crawford 352/1a82 viewsL. Julius Bursio, gens Julia
AR - Denar, Rome 85 BC
obv. head of Apollo Vejovis, laureate and winged, r. trident and symbol (wing)
behind
rev. Victory in quadriga r., holding wreath in outstretched hand, symbol above horses
L IVLIO BVRSIO in ex.
Crawford 352/1a; Sydenham 728
about EF

The obverse shows the role that Vejovis played in the cult of the gens Julia in Bovillae. It proofs too that the boy riding on the goat of Vejovis types is 'young Jupiter', because Vejovis was called in Bovillae 'pater'!
2 commentsJochen
L__Marcius_Philippus.jpg
L. Marcius Philippus - AR denarius12 viewsRome
ą113 BC
˛113-112 BC
helmet, diademed bust of Philip V king of Macedon right with goat's horns
(ROMA)
Φ
equestrian statue right, holding laurel branch, flower below
L·PHILIPPVS
(XVI)
ąCrawford 293/1, SRCV I 170, Sydenham 551, RSC I Marcia 12
˛Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex aurea

Reverse shows equestrian statue of L. Marcius Q. f. Philippus who had concluded a peace treaty with Philip V of Maced in 197 BC.
Moneyer was good speaker and important politician. He was tribune 104 BC, consul 91 BC. He was against granting of citizenship to Roman allies what led to Civil war.

"... A final intriguing element on the coinage of the Philippi which unites it across half a century and the shift in emphasis from Makedonian to Roman royalty, is the flower which appears in the same place on the reverses of RRC 293 and 425 (beneath the hooves of the horseman and the equestrian statue of Q. Marcius Rex). Crawford (RRC, 308) calls attention to the Roman tradition about the conception of Mars (legendary ancestor of clan Marcia) when Juno was fertilised by a flower. But to accomodate the distinctively Makedonian theme of RRC 293, it might be preferable to see it as a lily and already understood as a generic symbol of royal blood. This notion seems to originate with the shift of the Achaemenid seat of government from Persepolis to Susa (literally, the city or place of the lily), and this flower is found on both Hasmonaean and Seleukid royal coinage in Hellenistic times before eventually finding its way into the Merovingian and eventually the Capetian regalia. ..." Mark K.P. from McCabe's sites.
Johny SYSEL
Marcia_1b_img.jpg
L. Marcius Philippus, denarius20 viewsObv:- Head of Macedonian King Philip V right in helmet covered with goat’s skin and decorated with goat’s horns and diadem, identifying Phi below chin, ROMA (RMA in ligature) above and behind head
Rev:- Equestrian statue, rider carrying branch, L • PHILIPPVS on raised tablet below, thereunder mark of value XVI (in monogram)
Minted in Rome ca. B.C. 100
Reference:- RRC 293/1. RCV 170. Syd 551. RSC Marcia 12.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papius.jpg
L. Papius - AR serratus denarius7 views˛Sardinia
ąRome
˛78 BC
ą79 BC
head of Juno Sospita right waering goat skin; bucket behind
Gryphon springing right; jug below
L.PAPI
ąCrawford 384/1 (symbol 11); Sydenham 773; Papia 1; British museum 1902,0206.106
˛Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
ex Solidus

Gens Papia was Samnite origin and family came from Lanuvium.
Johny SYSEL
Papius_Denarius~0.jpg
L. Papius 79b.c. Denarius 12 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right wearing goat's skin, symbol behind. Reverse. Gryphon prancing right, symbol below, L. PAPI in exergue
Philoromaos
Papius_Celsus~0.jpg
L. Papius Celsus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
45 BC
head of Juno Sospita right. wearing goat skin
wolf right placing stick on fire, eagle left fanning flames with its wings
CELSVS·III·VIR
L.PAPIVS
Crawford 472/1, RSC I Papia 2
3,9g
ex Solidus

Reverse depicts a founder myth from Lanuvium.

"While Lavinium was building, the following omens are said to have appeared to the Trojans. When a fire broke out spontaneously in the forest, a wolf, they say, brought some dry wood in his mouth and threw it upon the fire, and an eagle, flying thither, fanned the flame with the motion of his wings. But working in opposition to these, a fox, after wetting his tail in the river, endeavoured to beat out the flames; and now those that were kindling it would prevail, and now the fox that was trying to put it out. But at last the two former got the upper hand, and the other went away, unable to do anything further. Aeneas, on observing this, said that the colony would become illustrious and an object of wonder and would gain the greatest renown, but that as it increased it would be envied by its neighbours and prove grievous to them; nevertheless, it would overcome its adversaries, the good fortune that it had received from Heaven being more powerful than the envy of men that would oppose it. These very clear indications are said to have been given of what was to happen to the city; of which there are monuments now standing in the forum of the Lavinians, in the form of bronze images of the animals, which have been preserved for a very long time.
...
This myth according to Dionysios occured not in Lanuvium but in Lavinium. And there too the group depicting the myth should have been found. This localisation seems to be an error of the author. On the obv. of this coin appears Juno Sospita. the main centre of her worshipping was Lanuvium, not Lavinium. The allusion to this myth at Horace (Hor. epod. 3, 27, 4) appears directly after the mention of Lanuvium. The confusion of these two sites is not astonishing. Lanuvium and Lavinium were swapped very often and in important documents too like the Fasti. The strong connection with Aeneas in this story of Dionysios can be explained as addition of the author who doesn't miss the chance to beautify the myth. Dionysios ascribes an old age to the myth but this can't be looked at as reliable. But rather a group of statues whose meaning has been lost may be the reason of this aetiological myth (Krumme)." - Jochen's Coins of mythological interest
Johny SYSEL
papius_Cr472_1.jpg
L. Papius Celsus, Crawford 472/163 viewsL. Papius Celsus, gens Papia
AR - denarius, 18mm, 3.66g
Rome, 45 BC
obv. Head of Juno Sospita, wearing goat-skin, r.
rev. She-wolf r., with a wood stick in her mouth for throwing it in fire, which is burning r. before her, on its r. side an eagle stg. l., fanning the fire with his wings.
above CELSVS.III.VIR
in ex. L.PAPIVS
ref. Crawford 472/1; Sydenham 964; Papia 2
VF, attractive toning

The rev. depicts a scene from the founder myth of Lanuvium. For more information please look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'.
Jochen
pmdogeagle.jpg
L. PAPIUS CELSUS.21 viewsAR denarius. 45 BC. 3,74 grs. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin headdress / She-wolf standing right, dropping stick on incipient fire while eagle, standing left, fans flames with wings. CELSVS III VIR above. L.PAPIVS in exergue.
Craw 472/1. RSC Papia 2.

1 commentsbenito
195.jpg
L. Papius Denarius Serratus (2) - Juno Sospita with Griffin (Crawf. 384/1) 33 viewsAR Denarius
Rome, 79 BC
3.84g

Obv: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin; symbol (tall cup) behind

Rev: Griffin springing right; symbol (one handled jug) below; L• PAPI in exergue.

Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1, Grueber type 11

Roma Numismatics E-Sale 52, Lot 679
From the R.C. Vermeer Collection;
Naville Numismatics 34, 17 September 2017, lot 422.
ex. Elvira Clain Stefanelli (1914-2001) collection, curator of the National Numismatics Collection at the Smithsonian
3 commentsOptimo Principi
181.jpg
L. Papius Denarius Serratus - Juno Sospita with Griffin (Crawf. 384/1)44 viewsAR Denarius
Rome, 79 BC
3.93g

Obv: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin; symbol (stick with strap?) behind

Rev: Griffin springing right; symbol (bowling ninepin?) below; L• PAPI in exergue.

Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1 (symbols 44); Grueber type 96

Roma Numismatics Auction XV, 380
ex. Roma Numismatics Auction VI, 765.
3 commentsKained but Able
L__Papius.png
L. Papius – Papia-148 viewsRoman Republic, L. Papius 79 B.C., Silver Denarius Serratus, (3.43g., 24mm), Rome mint, head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin headdress, to left, control mark behind, rev., Griffin springing right, control mark below, RCV 311; Crawford 384/1; Sydenham 773; CNR 1/106; Papia 11 commentsBud Stewart
Pomponius_Molo2.jpg
L. Pomponius Molo - AR denarius8 viewsRome
˛93 BC
ą97 BC
laureate head of Apollo right
L·POMPON_MOLO
Numa Pompilius holding litus, standing right before altar preparing to sacrifice a goat which is being held by a youth
NV(MA)·PO(MP)IL
ąCrawford 334/1, SRCV I 214, RSC I Pomponia 6, Sydenham 607
˛Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,46g
ex Aurea Numismatika
Johny SYSEL
Procilus_denarius.jpg
L. Procilius 80b.c. Denarius23 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin S.C. behind. Reverse. Juno Sospita as last but in a biga right, serpent below horses, L. PROCILI. F in exergue.Philoromaos
L_Procilius.jpg
L. Procilius L.f. - AR denarius8 views˛Minturnae?
ąRome
ą˛80 BC
laureate head of Jupiter right
S·C
Juno Sospita standing right, wearing goat skin, holding spear and shield; snake to the right
L.PROCILI / F
ąCrawford 379/1, SRCV I 306, Sydenham 771, RSC I Procilia 1
˛Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
Procilius_Juno.jpg
L. Procilius L.f. - AR serratus denarius10 views˛Sardinia
ąRome
ą˛80 BC
head of Juno Sospita right wearing goat skin
S·C
Juno Sospita in biga right holding spear, reins and shield; snake below
L.PROCILI.F
ąCrawford 379/2, SRCV I 307, Sydenham 772, RSC I Procilia 2
˛Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Gitbud and Naumann

Juno Sospita offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. She was often called upon by infertile women to aid in conception. Juno Sospita had a two temples at Rome, but her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. Her statue there, as described by Cicero and as depicted on coinage, wore a goatskin coat with a goat-horned headdress. Her attribute, the serpent, inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not, was destroyed.
Johny SYSEL
L__Procilius_L_f_.jpg
L. Procilius L.f. - Procilia-2228 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC L. Procilius L.f. Silver denarius serratus, VF, Italian mint, (4.109gm, maximum diameter 19.4mm, die axis 180o) 80 B.C.; obverse head of Juno Sospita clad in goat skin right, S C (senatus consulto - authorized by special decree of the Senate) behind; reverse Juno Sospita in a biga right, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake below, L.PROCILI.F in exergue. SRCV 307, Sydenham 772, Crawford 379/2, RSC I Procilia 25 commentsBud Stewart
procilius_Crawford379.2.jpg
L. Procilius, Crawford 379/263 viewsL. Procilius, gens Procilia
AR - Denarius Serratus, 21mm, 4.14g
Rome, 80 BC
obv. Head of Juno Sospita, wearing goat skin, r.
S.C behind
rev. Juno Sospita, wearing shield and spear, in galloping biga r., beneath snake
in ex. L.PROCILI.F
Crawford 379/2; Sydenham 772; Procilia 2
about VF

L. Procilius generally is identified as the senator who was condemned because of its bad administration. Furthermore it is suggested that he is the historian Procilius. Else nothing is known about the gens Procilia. She seems to be from Lavinium as suggested by her motives.
Jochen
Fabati.jpg
L. Roscius Fabatus104 viewsDenarius serratus 59 BC

Head of Juno Sospita in goat skin,
L ROSCI below, behind controlmark.

Girl standing right feeding serpent before,
controlmark to left, FABATI in ex.

Crawford 412/1; Syd 915.
2 commentsSergius Silus
3.jpg
L. Roscius Fabatus (c.59BC) Serrated Denarius33 viewsL. Roscius Fabatus (c.59BC)
Denarius Serratus 3.89g 15mm
Obv: head of Juno Sospita (r) goat skin headdress
Control symbol behind.
Rev: Maiden feeding serpent, FABATI in exg.
Control symbol behind(club?)
Crawford 412/1; Sydenham 915; RSC Roscia 3.
RCV 363.
One of my favorites. Unsure of control symbols.
sean c2
74061q00.jpg
L. Roscius Fabatus – Roscia-339 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC L. Roscius Fabatus Silver denarius serratus, (Italian provincial mint); Rome, 3.888g, 18.3mm, 135o, c. 64 B.C.; obverse head of Juno Sospita right, clad in goat's skin, jug(?) and column or candelabrum (control symbols) behind, L ROSCI below; reverse Girl standing left feeding snake, low table or bench (control symbol) left, FABATI in exergue; RSC I Roscia 3; SRCV I 336; Crawford 412/1, symbols 16; BMCRR 3411; Sydenham 9151 commentsBud Stewart
roscius_fabatus_Crawford412.1.jpg
L. Roscius Fabatus, Crawford 412/170 viewsRoman Republic, L. Roscius Fabatus, gens Roscia
AR - denarius serratus, 18.10mm, 3.8g
Rome, 59 BC*
obv. bust of Juno Sospita wearing goat-skin cap, r., behind modius
beneath L.ROSCI
bankers mark in r. field
rev. Virgin in long clothes stg. r., feeding snake, which erects before her in several
coils, behind cista
in ex. FABATI
Crawford 412/1 (symbols 23); Sydenham 915; Roscia 3; Albert 1329
scarce, toned VF, appealing silver
Pedigree:
ex Harlan J. Berk

* Dated 64 B.C. by Crawford and hence also by Roman Silver Coins , Volume I. The revised date is based on the outstanding analysis of the Messagne Horad by Alan Walker and Charles Hersh, ANS Museum Notes No. 29, New York, 1984, pp. 103-134

For more information look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'.
Jochen
Juno_Sospita.JPG
L. Roscius Fabatus. AR Denarius51 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right in goat skin headdress, L ROSCI below, wine decanter(?) below design behind

Maiden feeding serpent, FABATI in exergue, three legged stool behind.

Crawford 412/1. Sydenham 915.

Lucius R. Fabatus was a military officer and politician who began his political career as moneyer in 64BC. He served on Caesar's staff in Gaul and commanded LEG XIII. He later returned to the Senate and served as Procurator in 49BC. He died a Roman's death in combat against Marc Anthony's Legions at the Battle Of Forum Gallorum on 14/15th April 43BC.

ex- Areich, Photo Areich.

3 commentsWill Hooton
roscius_fabatus.jpg
L. Roscius Fabatus: snake feeding15 viewsDenarius serratus. L. Roscius Fabatus, 64 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, clad in goat's skin, control-symbol behind, L ROSCI below. Rev: maiden standing right, feeding snake erect before her, control-symbol behind, FABATI in ex. RRC 412/1. CRR 915. Sear RCV I: 363, RSC Roscia 3.1-2, partly corroded.Podiceps
3430379.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus20 viewsL. Thorius Balbus. 105 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.98 g, 8h). Rome mint. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat-skin headdress / Bull charging right; K above. Crawford 316/1; Sydenham 598; Thoria 1. Good VF, toned, test cut on edge, banker’s mark on reverse. ecoli
Thorius_Balbus.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus35 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right clad in goat skin
ISMR behind

Rev.
Bull charging right H above THORIVS below
BALBVS in ex

Rome 105 BC
3.76g

Sear 191; Craw., 316/1; Bab., 1; Syd., 598

ex-Calgary coins

C. Thorius Balbus was Born a native of Lanuvium. Cicero describes him as a man who lived in such a manner that there was not a single pleasure, however refined or rate, that he did not enjoy. He is possibly the son of M. Aclius Balbus (168 B.C.) A coin was minted in honor of L. Thorius Balbus. On the front is the head of Juno Sospita, a god whose worship was of great antiquity in Lanuvium, and the letters I.S.M.R. On the reverse is L.THORIVS BALBVS with a bull rushing forward.
1 commentsJay GT4
L_Thorius_Balbus.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
˛102 BC
ą105 BC
head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin headdress
I·S·M·R (Ivno Seispes Mater Regina)
bull charging right
B
L·THORIVS
BALBVS
ąCrawford 316/1, SRCV I 192, Sydenham 598, RSC I Thoria 1 British Museum: R.7899
˛Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Aurea auctions

Juno Sospita (=Savior) was goddes of fertility and protector of women. She was main deity in Lanuvium.
Bull - Taurus - is pun for moneyer's name Thorius.
Moneyer served as legate under Q. Caecilius Metellus in Spain 79 BC. Cicero wrote that he had lived as there was no pleasure in life.
Johny SYSEL
Thoria_Balbus Cr316.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus - denarius49 viewsL. Thorius Balbus. 105 BC. AR Denarius, 3.91 g; obv. I(uno) S(ospita) M(agna) R(egina), Head of Juno wearing goat's skin; rev. Bull charging right; T above, L. THORIVS below, BALBVS in linear border in exergue; Crawford 316/1.1 commentsPriscian
L__Thorius_Balbus.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus - Thoria-1100 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC L. Thorius Balbus, C.105 BC, Denarius (3.96 gm) Rome mint, head of Juno Sospita right, wearing horned goat skin headdress, I•S•M•R downward behind; reverse bull charging right, H (control letter) above, L•THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue SRCV I 192, Sydenham 598, Crawford 316/1, RSC I Thoria-15 commentsBud Stewart
L__THORIUS_BALBUS.jpg
L. THORIUS BALBUS AR Denarius Cr 316/1; GENS THORIA18 views OBV: Head of Juno wearing goat-skin headdress, acronym I. S. M. R. behind
REV: Bull charging right, F. above, L THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue
3.92g, 19mm

Struck at Rome, 195 BC
Legatus
L__THORIUS_BALBUS_2.jpg
L. THORIUS BALBUS ROMAN REPUBLIC; GENS THORIA AR Denarius4 viewsOBVERSE: Head of Juno Sospita wearing goat-skin headdress, acronym I. S. M. R. behind.
REVERSE: Bull charging right, E above, L THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue
Struck at Rome 105 BC
3.75g, 20mm
Cr 316/1, Sydenham 598, Thoria 1
Legatus
0085.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus. Denarius. 56 viewsL. Thorius Balbus AR Denarius.

RRC 316/1
105 BC. (?)

Av: Head of Juno Sospita in goat skin, ISMR (Juno Sispes Mater Regina) behind
Rv: Bull charging right, C above, THORIVS below, BALBUS in ex.

This moneyer was a native of Lanuvium and Cicero describes him as a man who lived in such a manner that there was not a single pleasure, however refined or rare, that he did not enjoy. Juno was worshipped at this city as the protectress of women, especially in pregnancy. The rushing bull is a type parlant of the moneyer's name.

ex Asta del Titano M3, lot#138
1 commentsNorbert
pmpapius.jpg
L.PAPIUS CELSUS46 viewsAR denarius. 45 BC. 3,74 grs. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin headdress / She-wolf standing right, dropping stick on incipient fire while eagle, standing left, fans flames with wings. CELSVS III VIR above. L.PAPIVS in exergue.
Craw 472/1. RSC Papia 2.
benito
Marcia_12.JPG
Lucius Marcius Philippus42 viewsObv: Bust of Philip V of Macedon facing right, wearing a diademed helmet ornamented with goat's horns; ɸ below chin; ROMA monogram behind.

Rev: Equestrian statue facing right on a tablet inscribed L. PHILIPPVS; XVI monogram in exergue.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, c. 113 - 112 BC

3.82 grams, 20 mm, 315°

RSC Marcia 12, S170

Ex: FORVM
2 commentsSPQR Coins
Roscia_3.JPG
Lucius Roscius Fabatus 30 viewsObv: L ROSCI below head of Juno Sospita facing right, wearing a goat's skin, currycomb behind.

Rev: Female standing right, feeding a serpent erect before her; horse's hoof behind; FABATI in exergue.

Note: The reverse scene depicts the events that occurred yearly at Lanuvium at the festival in honor of Juno Sospita, when a virgin was lowered into the grotto under the temple with food for the serpent who dwelt there. If the girl selected for the ceremony was chaste, then she returned safely to her home, where there was rejoicing. If she was not chaste she was killed by the serpent.

- Excerpt from Roman Silver Coins Volume 1, by H. A. Seaby

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 64 BC

3.9 grams, 18.5 mm, 180°

RSC Roscia 3, S363
1 commentsSPQR Coins
amphip_artemis_goats.jpg
MACEDON, AMPHIPOLIS17 viewsca 168 - 149 BC
AE 21 mm, 5.89 g
O: Diademed head of Artemis Tauropolos right, bow and quiver at shoulder;
R: AMΦIΠOΛITΩN surrounding two goats on their hind legs, contending head to head
Amphipolis mint; cf SNG Cop 62, SGCV I 1394
1 commentslaney
Amphipolis.jpg
MACEDON, AMPHIPOLIS AE195 viewsOBVERSE: Laureate head of Zeus left
REVERSE: Two rampant goats
Struck at Amphipolis 187-168 BC
6.6g, 19mm
SNG ANS 118
Legatus
Amphaxatis.jpg
MACEDON. Under Roman Rule. Gaius Publilius, Quaestor. 168-166 B.C.16 viewsMACEDON. Under Roman Rule. Gaius Publilius, Quaestor. 168-166 B.C. Ć 19.5~20.8mm. 7.48g. Obv: Wreathed head of Dionysos right. Rev: TAMI-OΥ ΓAIOΥ Π-OΠΛIΛ-IOΥ, goat standing right; monogram before. MacKay, "Bronze Coinage in Macedonia, 168-166 BC," ANSMN 14, pg. 6, pl. IIII, 4; SNG Copenhagen 1321.ddwau
Capture~5.PNG
Macedonia Thessalonica11 viewsMacedonia Thessalonica Bronze 18mm 149-31 B.C.

Obverse.Head of Dionysos right wreathed with ivy.

Reverse.NIKHS to left and right of goat standing right.
Macedonian Warrior
3~18.PNG
Macedonia Thessalonica14 viewsMacedonia,Thessalonica, AE19.

Obverse.Head of Zeus right

Reverse. QESSALONIKEWN, two goats butting heads
Macedonian Warrior
aigaitrihemiobol2.jpg
Macedonia, Aigai. Trihemiobol.14 viewsMacedonia, Aigai. Trihemiobol. 510-480 BC.
Obverse: goat kneeling head inverted
Reverse: quad. incuse square.
CANTANATRIX
aigaitrihemiobol1.jpg
Macedonia, Aigai. Trihemiobol.13 viewsMacedonia, Aigai. Trihemiobol. 510-480 BC.
Obverse: goat kneeling head inverted, pellets
Reverse: quad. incuse square.
CANTANATRIX
coins38.JPG
Macedonia, Amphipolis17 viewsMacedonia, Amphipolis. After 168 B.C.

Artemis / Two goats head butting. BMC 39
ecoli
Capture~0.PNG
Macedonia, Amphipolis17 viewsMacedonia, Amphipolis, AE22.

Obverse.Head of Artemis right

Reverse.AMFIPOLITWN, two goats standing on their hind legs, butting heads
1 commentsMacedonian Warrior
Macedon_Amphipolis_AE-20_Diademed_head_of_Artemis_Tauropolis_Two_goats_187-31-BC_SNG_Cop__Sear-1394_Q-001_0h_19-20mm_6,13ga-s.jpg
Macedonia, Amphipolis, (c.187-31 B.C.), AE-20, Sear #1394, AMΦIΠOLITΩN, two goats, #184 viewsMacedonia, Amphipolis, (c.187-31 B.C.), AE-20, Sear #1394, AMΦIΠOLITΩN, two goats, #1
avers:- Diademed head of Artemis Tauropolis facing right, with bow and quiver at her shoulder.
revers:- Two goats on their hind legs, contending, face to face, with the Greek legend AMΦIΠOLIT-ΩN, in the fields.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 19-20mm, weight: 6,13g, axes: 0h,
mint: Macedonia, Amphipolis, date: c.187-31 B.C., ref: Sear #1394,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Macedon_Amphipolis_AE-20_Diademed_head_of_Artemis_Tauropolis_Two_goats_187-31-BC_SNG_Cop__Sear-1394_Q-002_h_mm_g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Amphipolis, (c.187-31 B.C.), AE-20, Sear #1394, AMΦIΠOLITΩN, two goats, #266 viewsMacedonia, Amphipolis, (c.187-31 B.C.), AE-20, Sear #1394, AMΦIΠOLITΩN, two goats, #2
avers:- Diademed head of Artemis Tauropolis facing right, with bow and quiver at her shoulder.
revers:- Two goats on their hind legs, contending, face to face, with the Greek legend AMΦIΠOLIT-ΩN, in the fields.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-21,5mm, weight: 8,02g, axes: 0h,
mint: Macedonia, Amphipolis, date: c.187-31 B.C., ref: Sear #1394,
Q-002
quadrans
edessaMacedonCaracalla.jpg
Macedonia, Edessa. Caracalla AE25. Roma Nikephoros45 viewsObv: MAP AV AVT ANTWNEINOC, laureate draped bust right.
Rev: EDECC EWN , Roma Nikephoros seated left on cuirass, shield behind her, goat to left, behind her Tyche of Edessa, turreted, holding cornucopia, crowning her with wreath.
ancientone
Philip_V_,_Macedonia,_Kings,_(221-179_B_C_),_SNG_Cop_1250,_AE-21_Q-001_h_21mm_ga-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 032 Philip V., (221-179 B.C.), SNG Cop 1250, AE-21, Pella mint, Two goats kneeling right, #1147 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 032 Philip V., (221-179 B.C.), SNG Cop 1250, AE-21, Pella mint, Two goats kneeling right, #1
avers: Head of young Herakles right, clad in lion's skin.
reverse: Two goats kneeling right side by side, BA above, Φ below.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21 mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Philip V., Pella mint, date: 221-179 B.C., ref: SNG Cop 1250,
Q-001
quadrans
Philip_V_,_Macedonia,_Kings,_(221-179_B_C_),_SNG_Cop_1250,_AE-21_Q-002_h_21mm_ga-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 032 Philip V., (221-179 B.C.), SNG Cop 1250, AE-21, Pella mint, Two goats kneeling right, #2142 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 032 Philip V., (221-179 B.C.), SNG Cop 1250, AE-21, Pella mint, Two goats kneeling right, #2
avers: Head of young Herakles right, clad in lion's skin.
reverse: Two goats kneeling right side by side, BA above, Φ below.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21 mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Philip V., Pella mint, date: 221-179 B.C., ref: SNG Cop 1250,
Q-002
quadrans
mac3.jpg
Macedonia, Philip V. 221-179 BC.15 viewsAE20.
Head of Herakles, right, wearing lionskin.
Two goats kneeling. BA above.
Dino
mac2.jpg
Macedonia, Philip V. 221-179 BC.21 viewsAE20
Head of Herakles right, wearing lionskin.
Two goats kneeling. BA above.
Dino
3~5.PNG
Macedonia, Thessalonica13 viewsMacedonia, Thessalonica, AE22. 158-149BC.

Obverse.Head of young Dionysos right, wreathed in ivy

Reverse. QESSALO NIKHS, goat standing right, monogram above
Macedonian Warrior
Macedonia,Thessalonikca,_BMC_4,_AE-22,_Hermes_right,_Pan_standing_left,_after_160BC,_Q-001,_1h,_20-22mm,_9,07g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Thessalonica, (after 160 B.C.), AE-22, BMC 4, ΘEΣΣAΛO-NIKHΣ to left and right of Pan, #165 viewsMacedonia, Thessalonica, (after 160 B.C.), AE-22, BMC 4, ΘEΣΣAΛO-NIKHΣ to left and right of Pan, #1
avers: Laureate, draped bust of Hermes right, caduceus at the shoulder.
reverse: ΘEΣΣAΛO-NIKHΣ to left and right of Pan, naked, standing left, right hand raised to his head, goat-skin hanging from the left arm.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 20,0-22,0mm, weight:9,70g, axes:1h,
mint: Macedonia, Thessalonica, date: after 160 B.C., ref: BMC 4,
Q-001
quadrans
thessalonika_goat_b.jpg
MACEDONIA, THESSALONIKA23 viewsca 187 - 131 B.C.
AE 19 mm; 5.08 g
O: head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy
R: goat standing right;
Macedonia, Thessalonika; BMC Macedonia p. 110, 17 - 18
laney
thessalonik_dionys_goat.jpg
MACEDONIA, THESSALONIKA16 viewsca 187 - 131 B.C.
AE 21.5 mm max; 7.21 g
O: Head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy
R: Goat standing right;
Macedonia, Thessalonika
laney
thessalonica_goat.jpg
MACEDONIA, THESSALONIKA10 views187 - 31 BC
18.5 mm, 14.90 g
O: Head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy;
R: ΘEΣΣAΛONIKHΣ vertically to left and right of goat standing right
Macedonia, Thessalonika; SNG Cop 365, BMC Macedonia p. 110, 17 - 18
laney
IMG_0018.JPG
Macedonia, Thessaloniki53 viewsHead of Dionysos right wreathed with ivy / QESSALONIKI, goat standing right.
AE18. 6.0g.
SNGCop 365.
2 commentsDino
Dionysus.jpg
Macedonian Bronze of Dionysus 13 viewsA Macedonian bronze coin featuring Dionysus and a goat. Minted between 187-31 AD in either Roman influenced Macedon or the Roman province of Macedon. 18.9 mm 6.4 g.

Obverse: head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy

Reverse: QESSALONIKHS, goat standing right

Attribution: SNG Cop 365, BMC Macedonia p. 110, 17 - 18
chuy1530
SNG_Cop-1250.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom: Philip V (221-179 BCE) Ć Unit (SNG Alpha Bank 1090-1; Touratsoglou, Macedonia 14; SNG München 1163; SNG Cop. 1250-1251)20 viewsObv: Head of youthful Herakles to right, wearing lion skin
Rev: BA Φ; Two goats kneeling to right, corn of ear below
Quant.Geek
00761.jpg
Mn Fonteius C.f. (RSC I Fonteia 9, Coin #761)2 viewsRSC I Fonteia 9, AR Denarius, Rome, 85 BC
OBV: MN FONTEI C F; Laureate head of Vejovis right, thunderbolt below, Roma monogram below chin.
REV: Cupid seated on goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, thyrsus of Bacchus in exergue, all within laurel wreath.
SIZE: 20.0mm, 3.82g
MaynardGee
Fonteius.jpg
MN Fonteius C.F. Denarius17 viewsMn Fonteius C.F.
C. 85 BC
22.4mm 3.813gm
Rome mint
Ob: Mn FONTEI C F (MN and NT monogram)
Laureate head of Vejov right, thunderbolt below,
Roma monogram below chin
Rev: Cupid seated on goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above,
thyrsus of Bacchus in ex, all within laurel wreath
RSC l Fonteia 9, Sydenham 724,
BMCRR 2476, Crawford 353/1a,
SRCV l 271
sean c2
goat.jpg
MN FONTEIUS CF (85 B.C.)66 viewsAR Denarius
O: Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right, M FONTEI CF behind, thunderbolt below, ROMA monogram below chin.
R: Infant Genius riding goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, filleted thyrsos below.
Rome
4g
20mm
Cr353/1a
4 commentsMat
MN_FONTEIUS_CF_2.jpg
MN FONTEIUS CF Roman Republic AR Denarius Fonteia 9, Genius23 viewsOBV: Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right, M FONTEI CF behind, thunderbolt below, ROMA monogram below chin
REV: Infant winged Genius (or Cupid) seated on goat, standing right; pilei of the Dioscuri above; filleted thrysus in exergue; all within laurel wreath
3.87g, 20mm

Struck at Rome, 85 BC
Legatus
0035.jpg
Mn Fonteius Cf, Denarius13 viewsRRC 353/1c
85 b.c

Obv: MN.FONTEI CF; laureate head of Apollo or Veiovis to the right; below: thunderbolt.
Rev: Genius or Attis on goat to the right; above: pileii, in exergue: thyrsos; all in wreath.
3,94 gr.


Ex HDRauch 9te Fernauktion, 23.05.2005
Norbert
mnfontcr353-1cOR.jpg
Mn Fonteius Denarius, Cr. 353/1c. 45 viewsMn Fonteius Denarius, 85 B.C. AR, 21mm 3.77g, Cr. 353/1c.
Obv: MN FONTEI C•F Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis r, thunderbolt below
Rev: Cupid riding goat r., caps of the Dioscuri above, thrysos below, all within laurel wreath.
1 commentscasata137ec
26673.jpg
Mn Fonteius: AR Denarius, 85 B.C.19 viewsObv: Laureate head of Apollo r, thunderbolt below / Rev: Cupid riding r. on goat, caps of the Dioscuri above, thrysos below, all within laurel wreath.

Cr. 353/1a


1 commentsSkySoldier
4+.jpg
Mn. Fonteius25 viewsAR Denarius, 85 BC.
Obv: MN FONTEI C F, laur. hd. of Appolo r.
Rev: Cupid seated on goat stg. r., pilei of the Dioscuri placed on either side of the goat.
Tanit
Foneteia_MN_CF_85_Cr353.jpg
Mn. Fonteius - denarius18 viewsMn. Fonteius Cai filius. 85 BC. AR Denarius, 3.74g; obv. Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right, M FONTEI CF behind, thunderbolt below, ROMA monogram below chin; rev. infant Genius riding goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, filleted thyrsos below. Crawford 353/1a, Syd 724.Bartosz A
Mn_Fonteius.jpg
Mn. Fonteius C.f. - AR denarius6 viewsRome
ą˛85 BC
laureate head of Vejovis right, thunderbold below
(MN)·FO(NT)EI C·F
(ROMA)
Cupid seated on goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, thyrsus of Bacchus in exergue, all within laurel wreath
ąCrawford 353/1a, RSC I Fonteia 9, Sydenham 724, BMCRR 2476, SRCV I 271
˛Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
ex Gitbud and Naumann

Reverse probably depicts sculpture which stood near the temple of Vejovis on Capitol.
In spring, goats were sacrificed to Vejovis to avert plagues.
Johny SYSEL
AR_-_Fonteius-3.jpg
Mn. Fonteius C.f., AR Denarius11 views85BC
4.13 grams
Obv.: Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right, MN FONTEI CF behind, thunderbolt below, ROMA monogram below chin
Rev.: Infant Genius riding goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, filleted thyrsos below.
Cr #353/1a: Sear #271
This coin was purchased from Heritage Auction
NGC MS* - Strike 5/5 - Surface 5/5
Richard M10
Mn_Fonteius_Cf.jpg
Mn. Fonteius Cf - Fonteia-1070 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC Mn Fonteius Cf 85 BC Denarius (3.86 gm). Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right, thunderbolt below, M FONTEI behind, CF below chin / Cupid on goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, thyrsus in ex. Syd 724a, Cr353/1c, RCV 7213 commentsBud Stewart
fonteius_Crawford353.1d.jpg
Mn. Fonteius, Crawford 353/1d62 viewsMn. Fonteius, gens Fonteia
AR - denar, 4.05g
Rome 85 BC
obv. Head of Apollo Vejovis, laureate, r.
MN FONTEI behind (MN ligate)
CF below chin, [thunderbolt below]
rev. Infant winged Genius riding goat right, caps of the Dioscouri surmounted by
stars to ight and left, thyrsus below, all within laurel wreath.
Crawford 353/1d; Sydenham 724b; Fonteia 11
about EF

The reverse of this coin imitates a statue in the temple of Vejovis in Rome, with Genius riding the goat Amalthea. Jupiter was suckled by Amalthea on Mount Ida, and her horns gave rise to the cornucopiae.
Jochen
nikopolis_elagabal_AMNG1933.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 26. Elagabal, HrHJ (2018) 8.26.18.01 (plate coin)63 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 27, 13.03g, 26.49mm, 180°
struck under governor Novius Rufus
obv. [AVT K M AVR] - ANTWNINOC (NO ligate)
bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from front, laureate, r.
rev. VP NOB[IOV ROVF]OV NIKOPOLITWN PRO / C ICTRW
Pan, bearded, with horns and legs of goat, standing frontal, head r., treading
with l. foot on panther, laying on back to right; holding with r. hand lagobalon
over r. shoulder and nebris (pipe) in l. hand
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1933 (2 ex., Belgrad, Sofia)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3949 (but cites AMNG 1933 in error under #3948)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.26.18.1 (plate coin)
very rare (R7), good F, blue green patina

Lagobalon (lat. pedum) was a kind of boomerang for chasing small game.
This type seems to imitate the coins of Hadrianopolis where it occurs for Caracalla (Pick).
Jochen
EL_10.JPG
MYSIA, Kyzikos26 viewsMYSIA, Kyzikos
ca. 550-500 BC.
EL Hekte (1/6 stater); 10 mm, 2.28 grams
Obverse: Head of goat left; (tunny to right)
Reverse: Quadripartite incuse square
2 commentscmcdon0923
203.jpg
Nike (x2), Asklepios, Elagabalus, and Goat (x2)166 viewsCILICIA. Aegae. Caracalla (?). Ć 32. A.D. 198-217. Inscription illegible. Laureate head right; 4 countermarks: (1) on shoulder, (2) on head, (3) before face, (4) before neck.Inscription obliterated. Rev: Worn smooth; 2 countermarks. Weight:16.38 g. Note: The coin can be identified as being from Aegeae since this coin's countermarks were applied only to coins of that city. CM(1&5): Nike left, in circular punch, 6 mm. Howgego 258 (9 pcs). Note: The countermark was applied to both sides of all coins. CM(2): Bust of Asklepois right (?), in rectangular punch, 4 x 6 mm. Howgego 5 ? (1 pc). CM(3): Laureate bust right (Elagabalus), in oval punch, 4 x 7 mm. Howgego (11 pcs). Note: Likely applied during the reign of Elagabalus, since his coins were not countermarked. CM(4&6): Goat standing right (?), in roughly circular punch, 5 mm.Howgego 313 ? (7 pcs). Collection Automan.1 commentsAutoman
IMGP4573Osr2brcombo.jpg
Osroes II., ca. 190 AD14 viewsAE9, 1,3gr., 9,27mm;
Sellw. 88.5, Shore 636);
mint: Ekbatana, axis: 12h;
obv.: head, left, w/tiara w/long ear flap, hooks on crest and side, and diadem w/loop and 4 ribbons; mustache, long beard; 2-layer necklace, ear ring; dotted border 7 - 11h;
rev.: goat or sheep w/large curved horns gallopping left; dotted border 4 - 11h;

ex: B. Murphy, PA., ex: CNG, PA.
Schatz
IMGP4577Osr2br.jpg
Osroes II., ca. 190 AD15 views
AE8, 1,05gr., 8,42mm;
Sellw. 85.5, Shore 636;
mint: Ekbatana, axis: 12h;
obv.: head, left, w/tiara w/long ear flap, diadem, loop, and ribbons, top of tiara off flan; mustache, beard off flan; dotted border 13 - 14:30h;
rev.: goat or sheep w/larhe curved horns gallopping left; dotted border 11 - 17:30h;

ex: Canmoose Coins, CAN.
Schatz
ElagabalusPanobre~0.JPG
Pan332 viewsAE27 Elagabalus (218-222)
Nikopolis ad Istrum, consular legate Novius Rufus
Obv: AVT K M AVPH ANTΩNINOC. Laur. draped and cuir. bust r.R
Rev: VΠ NOBIOV ROVΦOV NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPO; In ex: CICTPΩ· Pan, stg.r., horned, holding rabbitcatcher (lagobalon) over shoulder, flute in hand, foot on panther lying supile on the ground.
27 mm / Porosity
Moushmov 1436
4 commentsGert
erf_rp3321.jpg
Pan259 viewsΑV ΚΑΙ ΠΟ ΛΙ ΓΑΛΛΙΗΝΟC, Laureate draped cuirassed bust right, large B before / Α[ΡΧ ΙΑ]CΟΝΟC CΙΛΒΟV ΤΑΒΗ / ΝΩΝ, Goat-legged horned Pan, dancing left, playing syrinx.

Tabae in Caria, Ć31, Gallienus, BMC 103
1 commentsflinn
Hermes.jpg
Paros, Cyclades AE1144 viewsHead r. / Goat l.
9.7 - 11.1 mm, 1.26 g

HGC6-680v, comp. HGC6-671
Pekka K
1_Sikyon_Lion-Dove.jpg
Peloponnesos-Sikyon; 400-330 BC17 viewsAR-Hemidrachm
Obv: Chimaera standing left, with heads of snake, lion & goat, raising forepaw. ΣΕ below.
Rev: Dove flying left.
Size: 16x14mm;2.56gms
Ref: BMC Peloponnesus vol.10,Pg.42,No.69/70
SNG Cop 57
Scan brings out all the Grainy/porousness,better in hand.
Graffiti in top wing of the dove "V".
3 commentsBrian L
Pendant_goat_Q001_39x25mm_7,09g-s.jpg
Pendant (???), goat AE, #01, Bronze Age ???, Rome ???,66 viewsPendant (???), goat AE, #01, Bronze Age ???, Rome ???,
size:39x25mm,
weight:7,09g,
Q-001
quadrans
RIC_23.jpg
Philip Arab10 viewsAv. IMP PHILIPPVS AVG
radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rv. SAECVLARES AVGG
Goat walking left, VI
RIC 23, 4,46g, Rom
Priscus
philip_ii_goat_copy.jpg
PHILIP II11 views(as Augustus)
247 - 249 AD
(Struck 248 AD)
AE SESTERTIUS 18.27 g
O: IMPMIVLPHILIPPVSAVG - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R: [SAECV]LARES AVGG [SC]
GOAT STANDING L
ROME
RIC 264a (S)
Ex. HJBerk
laney
Phil2goat.JPG
Philip II - Goat53 viewsIMP PHILIPPVS AVG
SAECVLARES AVGG
Goat left, III ex.
RIC 244, C 72
Rome, 248 AD
Ex. Lindgren
whitetd49
Phillip_V_-_goats.jpg
Philip V. 221-179 B.C.11 viewsKINGS OF MACEDON. Philip V. 221-179 B.C. Ae 20.3mm. 7.93g. Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress. Rev: B A above, Φ - below, (monograms left and right), two goats kneeling right.ddwau
Philip_V_pair_of_goats.JPG
Philip V; Heracles/ two goats13 viewsKings of Macedon, Philip V, 220-179 BC, 21mm, 6.95g. Obv Head of young Heracles right, rev. Two goats seated side by side. BA/F above and beneath. Sear GCVII: 6797. ex areich, photo credit areich1 commentsPodiceps
0320-201.jpg
Philippus II, Antoninianus 26 viewsAntoninianus minted in Rome, AD 248, 3rd officina, for the millenium
IMP PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate and draped bust right
SAECVLARES AVGG, goat walking left, III at exergue
4,59 gr
Cohen # 72, RCV # 9275
Potator II
phenica2.jpg
Phoenicia35 viewsSidon. Time of Baalshallim I-Ba’ana. 1/16 Shekel. Galley left before city wall / Persian king shooting bow; incuse head of goat (8mm,0.72g)1 commentsAndreas G
LaodiciaPhrygia.jpg
Phrygia, Laodicia ad Lycum. Pseudo-autonomous AE17. Zeus Aesis/goat18 views
Obv: ZEYC ACEIC, draped bust of Zeus right, wearing taenia.
Rev: LAODIKEWN, goat standing right.
2.41g, 17mm.
ancientone
bode-taler.JPG
POST MEDIEVAL, SWITZERLAND, SCHAFFHAUSEN, 1 TALER, 1621 (Goat Jumping)303 viewsSilver coin with 27,39 grams
Beda Angehro von Hagenwil
OBbv.: MONEDA.NOVA.SCAFVSENSIS 1621
Rev.: DEVS.SPESNOSTRA.EST.
Ref.: Km#26, Dav.: 4627
1 commentslincon r2
1463_Q_Philipus.jpg
Q. Marcius Philippus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
˛127 BC
ą129 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
(XVI)
Philip V galloping on horse right wearing Macedonian helmet with goat's horns
Q·PILIPVS
ROMA
ąCrawford 259/1, SRCV I 135, Sydenham 477, RSC I Marcia 11
˛Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Martí Hervera / Soler y Llach
Johny SYSEL
QMarciusPhillipus.jpg
Q. Marcius Philippus, 129 B.C.185 viewsSilver denarius, S 135, Craw 259/1, Syd 477, RSC Marcia 11, VF, 4.03g, 18.1mm, 180o, Rome mint, 129 B.C.; obverse head of Roma right in a winged helmet, X (XVI in monogram) behind; reverse Philip V, Macedonian king, galloping right, helmeted, holding spear, Macedonian helmet with goat’s horns behind, Q·PILIPVS below, ROMA in exergue;1 commentsb70
a08.jpg
Renia 1 - Biga of goats37 views138 B.C.
Silver Denarius
3.74 gm, 17.5 mm
Obv: X - Roma head right, helmeted.
Rev: C. RENI - Juno riding in biga of goats right.
Exe: ROMA
Rome mint: 138 BC
SEAR RCV I (2000), #108, page 94 - RRC 231/1
1 commentsJaimelai
Republican_Renius_Roma_BigaOfGoats_denar_AR16_3.36g_Cr-23-1_Syd432_Renia1.jpg
Renius, Roma, biga of goats, denar35 viewsDenarius, 138 BC, 3.36g. Cr-231/1, Syd-432, Renia 1. Obv: Head of Roma r., X behind head; Rx: Juno Caprotina in biga of goats r., C.RENI below goats, ROMA in exergue. . Areas of wear on obverse. Small chip out of coin on right edge, but does not detract from coins overall beauty. Good silver. Almost complete images in both sides. Nicely centered. Fine/aVF

ex HJB
1 commentsareich
denarius.jpg
Republic L Papius Denarius Serratus.65 viewsL Papius Denarius Serratus. 79 BC, Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goatskin, symbol behind / Gryphon dancing right, symbol below, L PAPI in ex.

Sear5 311, Syd 773, Cr384/1.

2 commentsTanit
RIC_T_267_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0267 Domitianus34 viewsObv: CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII, Laureate head right
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Goat standin left, in laurel wreath
AR/Denarius (17.96 mm 2.75 g 6 h) Struck in Rome 80-81 A.D.
RIC 267 (C) Titus, BMCRE 88-90 (Titus), RSC 390
1 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
RIC_T_267A_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0267A Domitianus59 viewsObv: CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII, Laureate head left
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Goat standin left, in laurel wreath
AR/Denarius (17.95 mm 2.46 g 6 h) Struck in Rome 80-81 A.D.
RIC 267 var (head left) Titus
1 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
RIC_619_Domitian.jpg
RIC 0619 Domitianus58 viewsObverse: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP VIII CENS PER P P - Radiate head right.
Reverse: COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC - S C (in exergue) - Domitian standing left, sacrificing over altar; to left victimarius with goat and sheep, flute player and lyre player standing right; in background six-column temple.
mm. 27,56 - g. 12,82 - die axis 6
RIC 2 619 (C) - Cohen 87/8 - Struck in Rome 88 a.D.
Celebrating the anniversary of the foundation of the city.
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
RIC_264a_Philippus_II.jpg
RIC 264a Philippus_II58 viewsObv: IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: SAECVLARES AVGG / S C (in exergue), Goat standing left
AE/Sestertius (29.04 mm 14.03 g 12h) Struck in Rome 248 A.D.
RIC 264a, Cohen 73
Purchased in 1985
1 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
Domitian_RIC_267.jpg
RIC 267 Domitian40 viewsCAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII
Laureate head right

PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS
Goat standing left in laurel wreath

Rome, 80-81 AD after the deification of Vespasian.

3.37g

RIC 267 (C)

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya

This is a nice example of the legend ending with a pronounced dot.
4 commentsJay GT4
Valerianus_II_02.jpg
RIC 5a, p.116, 3 - Valerian II, Jupiter, goat22 viewsValerianus II as Caesar
AR Antoninianus, AD 255
Obv.: VALERIANVS CAES, radiate and draped bust right
Rev.: IOVI CRESCENTI, young Jupiter seated facing on goat standing right.
Ag, 3.86g, 20.5mm
Ref.: RIC 3
shanxi
646_P_Hadrian_RPC3338~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Hadrian, CILICIA, Aegeae. Tridrachm 117-18 AD Head of Alexander66 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3338; Prieur 715A (this coin); SNG France 2326; SNG Levante –

Issue Year 164 (ΔΞΡ)

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., with drapery on l. shoulder.

Rev. ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ ΕΤΟΥС ΔΞΡ
Head of Alexander with taenia, r.; below, goat, l., head turned back.

10.05 gr
25 mm
12h
okidoki
Antose96~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Antoninus Pius Sestertius, RIC 60868 viewsĆ Sestertius (28.89g, Ř31mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
Rev.: IVNONI SISPITAE around, S C across field, Juno Sospita wearing goat skin advancing right preceded by a snake, brandishing javelin and holding shield which is pinched in the middle.
RIC 608; Cohen 473; BMCRE 1248; Strack 837; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 201 (7 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4186
ex iNumis, Paris, March 2009

This issue is part of a series of coins struck in preparation of the 900th anniversary of Rome, figuring scenes from Ancient Roman legends. Juno Sospita was the goddess of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Pius, and one of the most ancient figures in the Roman pantheon.
Charles S
PHILIP_II_ANTONINIANUS_GOAT.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, PHILIP II AR Antoninianus of Rome, Struck A.D.248.47 viewsObverse: IMP PHILIPPVS AVG. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Philip II facing right, seen from behind.
Reverse: SAECVLARES AVGG. Goat walking left; in exergue, III (officina 3).
Diameter: 22mm | Weight: 4.4gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC IV iii : 224
SCARCE

This coin is one of a series of coins struck by Philip I and Philip II in A.D.248 to commemorate the 1000th anniversary of Rome. Many of these coins depict the various animals, brought from all over the Empire, which were displayed in the arena during the games celebrating this event.

2 comments*Alex
Gallienus_RIC_V-207.jpg
Roman Imperial: Gallienus (253-268 CE) Antoninianus, Rome (RIC V 207; MIR 36, 731b; RSC 342 corr.)22 viewsObv: Radiate head right
Rev: Goat walking right; ς in exergue



1 commentsQuant.Geek
rjb_intag3_10_05.jpg
Roman intaglio80 viewsA Roman carnelian intaglio of a goat right, head turned left, below a tree to the left. Width 8 mm, height 6 mm2 commentsmauseus
rjb_2010_01_69.jpg
Roman lead seal52 viewsRoman lead seal, CMY//PNA in two lines, Goat(?) laying down right, head turned back below. Seal with the civic ethnic for Smyrna in the Balkans. For a similar seal (ethnic but no goat below) see RIB 2411.411 commentsmauseus
Roman_Republic_-_denarius,_97_BC,_L_Pompilius_Molo.JPG
Roman Republic - denarius, 97 BC, L Pompilius Molo40 viewsRoman Republic
L. Pomponius Molo, 97 BC
AR denarius – 18mm
Laureate head of Apollo r.
L POMPON MOLO
Numa Pompilius standing r. before altar, preparing to sacrifice a goat held by a youth
NVMA POMPIL in ex.
Crawford 334/1; Syd 607
Ardatirion
Roman_Republic_Mn__Fonteius_C_f_.jpg
Roman Republic / Mn. Fonteius C.f. 27 viewsRoman Republic / Mn. Fonteius C.f. / AR Denarius
Mn. Fonteius C.f. 85 BC. AR Denarius (18mm,3.9 gm). Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right / Infant Genius riding goat, caps of the Dioscuri on either side, thyrsos in exergue; all within laurel wreath. Crawford 353/2; Sydenham 726; Fonteia 12.Sear RCV 2000 #273. Lightly toned VF. The rarest the Mn. Fonteius denari.

From the Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
15232280_220972304994522_5874890648111366370_n.jpg
Roman Republic Cn. Plancius moneyer19 viewsSilver Denarius (20mm, 3.95 gm.) Struck 55 B.C.
Head of Macedonia right, wearing causia. CN PLANCIVS before, AED CVR S C behind.
Cretan goat standing right, bow and quiver behind.
Reference: RRC 432/1. CRR 933. RSC Plancia 1. RRM 17.1-2.
Antonivs Protti
Roman_Republic.jpg
Roman Republic Denarius C. Renius21 views138 B.C C. Renius, 3.49g, 17mm
Rome Mint
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma right (X= 10 asses) behind
Reverse: Juno in a biga of goats right, C.RENI below, ROMA in ex
Dk0311USMC
rrepde18-2.jpg
Roman Republic, 105 BC, Thoria9 viewsAR Denarius (3,9g, 19x22mm, 8h). Rome mint. Struck 105 BC.
Monneyer: L.Thorius Balbus.
Obv.: I·S·M·R [behind], head of Juno Juno Sospita of Lanuvium facing right with goat skin
Rev.: L·THORIVS [below,] BALBVS [in exergue], Bull charging right.
Seaby (Roman Silver Coins I.): Thoria 1

Additional info. from Seaby: I.S.M.R. stands for Juno Sispes Mater Regina. Thorius Balbus was a native of Lanuvium and Cicero describes him as a man who lived in such a manner that there was not a single pleasure, however refined or rare, that he did not enjoy. Juno was worshipped at this city as the protectress of women, especially in pregnancy. The rushing bull is a type parlant of the moneyer's name. This is one of the commonest Roman Republican coins.
Charles S
cupid.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Fonteius, AR denarius, 85 B.C.52 viewsMn. Fonteius C. f. 85 BC. AR Denarius (3.78g). Rome mint.
MN. FONTEI behind, C. F under chin, laureate head of Apollo (Vejovis) right; thunderbolt below / Winged Cupid (Genius) riding goat right; caps of the Dioscuri above, thyrsus below, all within laurel-wreath.
Crawford 353/1a
2 commentschance v
Screenshot_2019-08-27_13_06_05.png
Roman Republic, Gens: Fonteia, Mn Fonteius Cf, AR Denarius.16 viewsRome 85 B.C. 2.96g - 18.4mm, Axis 4h.

Obv: [M•FONTEI] / CF - Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right, thunderbolt below, [M•FONTEI] behind, CF below chin.

Rev: Cupid on goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, thyrsus in ex.

Fonteia 10; Syd 724a; Cr353/1c.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli
Screenshot_2018-01-14_14_22_17.png
Roman Republic, Gens: Fontieia, Mn Fonteius Cf, AR Denarius.15 viewsRome 85 B.C. 3.88g - 20.3mm, Axis 12h.

Obv: M FONTEI CF - Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right, thunderbolt below, ROMA monogram below chin.

Rev: Infant Genius riding goat right, two caps of the Dioscuri above, filleted thyrsos below.

Fontieia 9; Cr353/1a; Syd 724.
Christian Scarlioli
Screenshot_2019-08-29_17_33_04.png
Roman Republic, Gens: Thoria, L. Thorius Balbus, AR Denarius.6 viewsRome 105 B.C. 3.83g - 21.1mm, Axis 9h.

Obv: I•S•M•R - Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat-skin headdress.

Rev: L•THORIVS BALBVS / V - Bull charging right; above, V.

Thoria 1; Crawford 316/1; Sydenham 598; Sear 192.
Christian Scarlioli
coin010.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L Thorius Balbus : 105BC - AR Denarius18 viewsObv: Head of Juno of Lanuvium r., wearing goat-skin; on left I.S.M.R
Rev: Bull charging r.; below, L. THORIVS / BALBUS; above, control mark V.
3.89g - 20mm - s.192

I.S.M.R "Juno. Sispes. Mater. Regina." meaning, Juno, Savior, Mother and Queen. Her statue, clad in a goat-skin, stood in Lanuvium, a Latin town 35km to the south of Rome, and from whence came the family of L Thorius Balbus.
jerseyjohnjames
coin014.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Pomponius Mollo - 97BC - AR (plated) Denarius41 viewsObv: Head of Apollo r., laur.; L. POMPON. MOLO.
Rev: Numa standing r., holding lintus before lighted alter, about to sacrifice a goat which is led by a youth; in ex., NVMA POMPIL
2.92g - 18mm - s.214

An obvious? fake, meant to deceive. Note the low weight. But when was it made? Was it official? or semi-official?
2 commentsjerseyjohnjames
Papia_combined.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Papius, AR Serrate Denarius13 viewsRome. The Republic.
L. Papius, 79 BCE.
AR Serrate Denarius (3.82g; 20mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Head of Juno Sospita, wearing goat skin headdress tied at neck, facing right; control symbol (aplustre) behind.

Reverse: Griffon leaping right; control symbol (prow stem), below; L•PAPI in exergue.

References: Crawford 384/1 (symbol pair 134); Sydenham 773; BMCRR 2981 (symbol pair 5); Papia 1 (symbol pair 47).

Provenance: Ex Herbert & Aphrodite Rubin Collection [Goldberg 96 (14 Feb 2017) Lot 1963]; bought from Ariadne Galleries in 1980’s; The Numismatic Auction Ltd. (Tradart) 1 (13 Dec 1982) Lot 203.

Papius is only known through his coins. Juno Sospita was a deity who’s temple was in Lanuvium, a Latin town 32 kilometers southeast of Rome, and it’s likely that Papius came from that town.

These denarii have paired obverse and reverse control symbols, with almost all symbol pairs appearing on only one set of dies (N.B.: I'm aware of at least one pair that appears on multiple dies). Crawford counts 211 die pairs. The paired control symbols have some loose relationship to one another, i.e. the bow and stern of a galley on this coin. Sydenham argued that the symbols were propaganda for popularist trade guilds. However, because of the breadth and variety of symbol material, Crawford rules-out any intended meaning. This same control system of paired symbols would be re-used 20 years later by another Lanuvian, L. Roscius Fabatus.
1 commentsCarausius
13729q00.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Papius. Denarius, 79 B.C.1001 viewsObv: Head of Juno Sospita right, clad in goat's skin, control-symbol behind head.
Rev: Gryphon leaping right, control-symbol below, L PAPI in exergue.
RSC Papia 1 | CRR 733 | RCV I : 311.
11 commentsthe_Apostate
1710181.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Procilius, AR Denarius15 viewsL. Procilius. 80 BC. AR Serrate Denarius (19mm, 3.77 g). Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin headdress / Juno Sospita, holding spear and shield, in biga right; serpent below. Crawford 379/2; Sydenham 772; Procilia 2. VF, toned, reverse banker’s mark.
FabiusMaximus
1680715l.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Procilius, AR Serrate Denarius - Crawford 379/216 viewsRome, The Republic.
L. Procilius, 80 BCE.
AR Serrate Denarius (3.77g; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: Head of Juno Sospita, wearing goatskin, facing right; S.C. behind.

Rev: Juno Sospita, holding shield and spear, in biga galloping right; snake below horses; L. PROCILI F in exergue.

References: Crawford 379/2; Sydenham 772; BMCRR 3150; Procilia 2.

Provenance: Ex Student and Mentor Collection [NAC 83 (20 May 2015) Lot 339]; privately purchased in 1968.

The letters S.C. on the obverse indicate that this coinage was a special issue, by decree of the Roman Senate, for an unknown purpose. Like the coins of Papius and Roscius Fabatus, the images of Juno Sospita on this coin suggests that Procilius was native of Lanuvium which was home of a cult to Juno Sospita. The snake on the reverse, alludes to the snake in the grotto of Juno Sospita’s Lanuvium temple. Each year, a girl was sent to the grotto to feed the sacred snake, and only a virtuous girl would survive the ordeal.

The reason for serrating the edge of certain Roman Republic denarius issues remains uncertain. Some moneyers issued both serrate and plain edged coins. The practice ended with the serrate issue by Roscius Fabatus in 59 BCE. Possible reasons for the serrations include:
• Proof that the coins were not plated.
• Confounding forgers.
• Making the coins look painful to swallow (reducing theft by mint workers).
• Artistic preference.

1 commentsCarausius
Republican_denarius.jpg
Roman Republic, L. Procilius, L.f., 80 B.C.54 viewsSilver denarius, SRCV I 306, Sydenham 771, Crawford 379/1, RSC I Procilia 1, VF, Italian mint, weight 3.781g, maximum diameter 17.6mm, die axis 90o, 80 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Jupiter right, S C (senatus consulto - authorized by special decree of the Senate) behind; reverse Juno Sospita standing right, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake before her, L.PROCILI.F behind

This coin has been stolen en route from Forum to me in the UK if canyone sees it could they let Joe know. Thanks

Ex Forum


Sospita was a surname of Juno in Latium. Her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. She also had two temples at Rome. Her statue, as described by Cicero, was covered with a goat skin. This statue may be the one now at the Vatican. Her attribute is the serpent, which inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not was destroyed
3 commentsPhiloromaos
Fabatus_k.jpg
Roman Republic, L. Roscius Fabatus20 viewsAR Serrate Denarius. 19mm. 3.6g, 6h; Rome, c. 59 BC
Obv.: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin; uncertain symbol behind.
Rev.: Female standing right feeding serpent to right; uncertain symbol behind.
Reference: Crawford 412/1 (symbols 215) / 16-373-215
2 commentsJohn Anthony
RosciaCombined.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Roscius Fabatus, AR Serrate Denarius20 viewsRome. The Republic.
L. Roscius Fabatus, 59 BCE.
AR Serrate Denarius (3.95g; 19mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Head of Juno Sospita, wearing goat skin headdress tied at neck, facing right; L•ROSCI, below; control symbol (two-handled cup or bowl) behind.

Reverse: Female figure feeding serpent from fold of cloak; control symbol (pileus/cap?) behind; FABATI in exergue.

References: Crawford 412/1 (Symbols 199?); Sydenham 915; BMCRR 3394 -3510; Roscia 2.

Provenance: Ex John Barton Collection; Aes Rude Chiasso 4 (6 Apr 1979), Lot 240.

Crawford dated the issue to 64 BCE, but Hersh and Walker brought that date down to 59 BCE based on their analysis of the Mesagne hoard. Harlan picks a median date of 62 BCE based on some prosopographic assumptions.

The moneyer would go on to serve as lieutenant for Caesar in Gaul in 54 BCE. In 49 BCE, he was elected praetor and intermediated between Pompey and Caesar. He was killed at Mutina in 43 BCE.

Juno Sospita was a deity who’s temple was in Lanuvium, a Latin town 32 kilometers southeast of Rome, and it’s likely that both Roscius and L. Papius, whose 79 BCE coinage is a model for Roscius’ issue, came from that town. The reverse depicts an annual rite of the Juno Sospita cult in which a girl is sent into the grotto beneath the temple to feed the sacred snake. Only chaste girls could survive the ordeal.

Like Papius’s coins, these denarii are struck on serrated flans – the last of the Roman Republic to be produced with this fabric. Like Papius’s coins, Roscius’ denarii have obverse and reverse control symbols that are paired, with no pair of symbols appearing on more than one pair of dies. On both Roscius’ and Papius’s coins, the paired control symbols have some loose relationship to one another. Roscius re-used many of Papius’s symbol pairs, but reversed their locations on the coins.

The symbol pair on my coin is very rare. As of 10/1/18, there are no matching examples on Acsearch, Coinarchives or CNG’s website database. The pair is unlisted in Babelon, Sydenham, BMCRR and Banti. It resembles symbol pair 199 in Crawford, although some differences are evident. In his manuscript on Roman Republican series marks, Charles Hersh includes a hand drawn entry AI within the section of previously unpublished Roscia symbol pairs that is a precise match for the symbols on this coin. He cites the Vienna Museum (38465) and Vatican Museum (5158) for that entry.
2 commentsCarausius
bpPI1H1Fonteius.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, M. Fonteius, Denarius, 85 BC75 viewsObv: M N FONTEI C F
Laureate head of Appolo, right. Thunderbolt below. Ligate AP under chin.
Rev: Anepigraphic.
Cupid (or a putto) seated on goat standing right. Pilei (freedom caps) of the Dioscuri above. Thyrsus (staff) of Bacchus in exergue. All within laurel wreath.
3.9 gm, 21.3 mm, Mint: Rome, S 271, RSC 9.
Comments: On obverse inscription the MN and NT are ligate. Full name expands to MaNius FONTEIus Capito (surname) Fonteia (gens). Reverse apparently a theme for the cult of Dionysis (Bacchus). The pilei are likely a play on the words 'Liber' (the deity giving the root word for modern libation) and 'Libertas' (freedom). However at this point at the beginning of the end of the Republic, they may hold a double entendre that is purely political.
Massanutten
AR_-_Fonteius-3~0.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Mn. Fonteius C.f.38 viewsAR Denarius
85BC
4.13 grams

Obv.: Laureate head of Apollo Vejovis right, MN FONTEI CF behind, thunderbolt below, ROMA monogram below chin
Rev.: Infant Genius riding goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, filleted thyrsos below.

Cr #353/1a: Sear #271
1 commentsRichard M10
DSC01123.JPG
Roman Republic, Pomponius Molo, Gens Numa, AR Denarius26 viewsSilver denarius, Crawford 334/1, SRCV 214, RSC I Pomponia 6, Sydenham 607, VF, porous, 3.413g, 19.3mm, 135o, Rome mint, c. 97 B.C.; obverse L•POMPON• - MOLO, laureate head of Apollo right; reverse Numa Pompilius standing right before altar at which he is about to sacrifice a goat held by a youth, NVMA POMPIL in ex; less common type, ex Freeman & Sear;

Ex FORVM
1 commentsSylvianus
Lead-Seal_Snail-Camel_Q-001_15,5x10,5_4,98g-s.jpg
Roman, Lead Seal, Snail and Camel, Crescent, #135,265 viewsRoman, Lead Seal, Snail and Camel, Crescent, #135,
Snail and Camel, Crescent.
weight: 4,98g,
diameter: 15,5x10,5mm,
date : cc. 300 A.D.,
" I think that's a camel rising from a shell. The reverse has a figure - probably a shepherd milking a - again probably - goat. The obverse fits into a beloved theme on engraved gems of a large animal rising from a shell (lion, elephant, pegasus, and your camel). Seals share iconography with engraved gems more than coins, so these images appear on lead as well. The reverse image is also well attested on gems. It is part of a wide range of pastoral images that appear on engraved stones. As for this seal, I would say it is definitely Roman. My guess would be around AD 300." by Gert. Thank you Gert.
Q-135
quadrans
RPC1936.jpg
RPC-1936-Vespasian100 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 13.41g
Antioch mint, 69 AD
Obv : AYTOKPAT KAIΣA OYEΣΠAΣIANOY; Bust of Vespasian, laureate, r., with aegis
Rev : ETOYΣ NEOY IEPOY A; Eagle standing r., on thunderbolt; in r. field, palm branch
RPC 1936 (2 spec.).
Ex CNG E418, 11 April 2018, lot 403.

According to Tacitus, Vespasian immediately struck gold and silver coins at Antioch after being proclaimed emperor by the legions in the East (Hist. II, 82). This coin dated regnal year one at Antioch ( July - September 69) must have been one of the first coins to bear Vespasian's portrait. The style is indeed early, similar to the year ten Syrian tetradrachms coined for Nero. Although traditionally attributed to Antioch, the style is strongly Alexandrian. It almost certainly was struck at Alexandria for circulation in Syria along side a parallel Antiochene issue. The goatskin aegis seen here is rare for Vespasian and exclusively appears on these early Alexandrian style tetradrachms. The eagle standing on thunderbolt is also unique to this issue for Vespasian. Only one obverse die is known for this year one type.

Attractive example with good toning.

7 commentsDavid Atherton
RPC1937asm.jpg
RPC-1937-Vespasian77 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 13.98g
Antioch mint, 69-70 AD
Obv : AYTOKPAT KAIΣA OYEΣΠAΣIANOY; Bust of Vespasian, laureate, r., with aegis
Rev : ETOYΣ NEOY IEPOY B; Eagle standing r., on thunderbolt; in r. field, palm branch
RPC 1937 (4 spec.).
Acquired from CGB, July 2015.

This RPC Group 1 tetradrachm was struck very early in Vespasian's reign. He is seen here with aegis, similar in appearance and style to those struck for Nero. The first tetradrachms at Antioch depicting Vespasian with aegis were struck for regnal year one (July - September 69), this year two coin (October 69 - September 70) was likely minted very soon afterward, perhaps Autumn of 69. The style is 'Alexandrian', indicating either the coin was struck at the Alexandria mint and then sent to Syria or, at the very least, the die was engraved there. Interestingly the aegis depicted on the portrait is a cloak (goat skin?) decorated with a snake on the shoulder, much more elaborately than the aegises engraved at Rome.

A fantastic early and rare portrait of the new emperor.
5 commentsDavid Atherton
Sagalassos~0.jpg
Sagalassos - AE 1313 viewsc. 1st century BC
laureate head of Zeus
two confronting goats standing on their hind legs, with forelegs on column
CAΓA
BMC Pisidia p. 241, 7; SGCV II 5469 var, SNGvA 5156 var
2,57g 13,5-12,5mm
Johny SYSEL
greek.jpg
Sagalassos, Pisidia, c. 1st Century B.C. AE 13mm18 viewsSagalassos, Pisidia, c. 1st Century B.C.
Obv. Laureate head of Zeus right.
Rev. Reverse two confronted goats standing on their hind legs, forelegs on cornucopia in center; CAΓA in exergue.
Lee S
sagalassos_goats.jpg
Sagalassos; Zeus/ Two goats confronted12 viewsSagalassos, Pisidia; First century B.C. - first century A.D. AE 13.5mm, 2.19g; Head of Zeus laureate r. / ΣΑΓΑ, Two goats (rams) confronted, standing on hind legs. Aulock 5157; Copenhagen 194; France 3, 1736. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
tryphonhelmetOR.jpg
Seleucid, Tryphon, BMC Seleucid Kings of Syria pg. 68, 857 viewsAntioch mint, Tryphon, c. 142-138 BC AE, 19mm 5.37 g 12h, BMC Seleucid Kings of Syria pg. 68, 8
O: Head of Tryphon r., diad.
R: BAΣIΛEΩΣ TPYΦΩOΣ AYTOKPATOPOΣ, Spiked Macedonian helmet adorned with wild goat horns; piloi of the Dioskouroi to inner left.

From the Stephen Glover Collection.

CNG E-Auction 264, Lot: 178

His handsome - in the heroic style of Alexander the Great- portraits, along with the very interesting legends "BAΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΤΡΥΦΩΝΟΣ ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΟΡΟΣ" (of King Tryphon, the Self Empowered)
are clear indicators of his very interesting, repressive personality.
During his short reign, the Seleukid Era dating system for dated coinage was abandoned in favor of the New Era (Tryphon's regnal years). A true usurper.

Newell's thoughts on SMA :

The Macedonian helmet chosen for the reverse type of all these issues, has direct reference to the claim of Tryphon that, - according to the time honored Macedonian custom,-
he was supposed to have been unanimously elected by free Macedonian soldiers in open assembly. There may also been intended a punning reference to his name, for in both
Homer and Hesiod a helmet is sometimes called Τρυφάλεια.

(Additional info and proper mint from Nikos or rover1.3 on the FORVM boards)
2 commentscasata137ec
HGC-1061(1).jpg
Seleukid Empire: Diodotos Tryphon (142-138 BCE) Ć Unit, Antioch on the Orontes (SC 2034.2a; HGC 9, 1061)21 viewsObv: Diademed head of Diodotos Tryphon right
Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΤΡΥΦΩΝΟΣ ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΟΡΟΣ; Spiked Macedonian helmet adorned with goat horn; in inner left field, aphlaston
Quant.Geek
HGC-1061.jpg
Seleukid Empire: Diodotos Tryphon (142-138 BCE) Ć Unit, Antioch on the Orontes (SC 2034.2a; HGC 9, 1061)19 viewsObv: Diademed head of Diodotos Tryphon right
Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΤΡΥΦΩΝΟΣ ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΟΡΟΣ; Spiked Macedonian helmet adorned with goat horn; in inner left field, aphlaston
Quant.Geek
Severus Annona.JPG
Septimus Severus, Annona33 viewsObverse: SEVERVS PIVS AVG - Laureate head right
Reverse: P M TR P XIII COS III P P - Annona st lt, holding corn ears over modius and in lt arm, a cornucopia
Mint : Rome
Date : AD 205
Reference : RIC IVi, 198, page 117 - Cohen 472 - SEAR RCV II (2002), #6338v, page 464
Grade : gVF
Weight : 2.44g
Denom : Denarius
Metal : Silver

Comments : The Roman emperors, in an attempt to alleviate poverty in the capital city, instituted a policy known as annona, which gave free grain to about a third of the population of Rome. The reverse shows the personification of the state sponsored system of grain distribution, the cornucopia, Latin term derived from two words, cornu meaning horn and copia meaning plenty, it is a symbol of prosperity and affluence, dating back to the 5th century BC. In Greek mythology, Amalthea brought Zeus up on the milk of a goat. It had the power to give to the person in possession of it whatever he or she wished for.
Bolayi
himera_r.jpg
SICILY, HIMERA27 viewsca 470-450 B.C.
AR litra 10 mm, 0.70 g, 12 h
O: Forepart of winged, bearded, and horned male sphinx left
R: IMEPAION, Pan riding goat left, brandishing lagobolon. SNG ANS 172-173; HGC 2, 451.
(ex Triskeles Auction)
1 commentslaney
4939.jpg
Sicily, Himera Bronze Hemilitron c. 420-407 B.C. 11 viewsSicily, Himera Bronze Hemilitron 21mm, 5.95 gm. c.420-407 B.C.
Obv: Nude rider on a goat right, blowing into conch, holding club and lion(?) skin; below, Corinthian helmet below.
Rev: Nike advancing left, holding open wreath in right hand, dress in left; six pellets (mark of value) to left.
Ref: Kraay, Bronze, group b, 2; CNS 27; SNG ANS 184 var. (grasshopper).
mjabrial
himeraOR.jpg
Sicily, Himera, BMC Sicily 43 (Himera)16 viewsSicily, Himera mint, Litra, c. 460-450 B.C. AR, 10mm 0.73g, BMC Sicily 43 (Himera)
O: Forepart of monster r., having the horn of a goat, the head of a bearded man, the paw of a lion, with lions head resting against shoulder, and a curled wing
R: Naked youth seated on he-goat, running l., he holds with l. hand the horn of goat, his r. arm raised to strike him with whip
casata137ec
sicilyCal-p42-31-4.jpg
Sicily, Himera, Bronze tetras, Calciati I, p. 42, 31/414 viewsHimera mint, Bronze tetras, Calciati I, p. 42, 31/4, 1.791g, 13.6mm, obverse nude rider prancing on goat left, blowing conch, three pellets between legs, grain kernel below; reverse [IMEΠAION], Nike advancing left, wings spread, aplustre in rightcasata137ec
Sikyonia_Sikyon.jpg
SIKYONIA SIKYON AR Hemidrachm, SNGCop 57, Dove21 viewsOBV: Chimaera standing left, with heads of snake, lion & goat, raising forepaw, SI below
REV: Dove flying left
2.6g, 17mm

Minted at Skyon, Fourth Century BC
Legatus
PHIL_2_GOAT.JPG
Struck A.D.248. PHILIP II. AR Antoninianus of Rome6 viewsObverse: IMP PHILIPPVS AVG. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Philip II facing right, seen from behind.
Reverse: SAECVLARES AVGG. Goat walking left; in exergue, III (officina 3).
Diameter: 22mm | Weight: 4.4gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC IV iii : 224
SCARCE

This coin is one of a series of coins struck by Philip I and Philip II in A.D.248 to commemorate the 1000th anniversary of Rome. Many of these coins depict the various animals, brought from all over the Empire, which were displayed in the arena during the games celebrating this event.
*Alex
schifhausen.jpg
SWITZERLAND - Schaffhausen52 viewsSWITZERLAND - Schaffhausen AR 3 Kreuzer, dated 1597. The obverse design shows a goat coming out of a building. Name and titles of Rudolph II. dpaul7
tarsos.jpg
Tarsos, Tyche/ Sandan standing on horned animal10 viewsTarsos, Cilicia, Roman Rule, 164 - c. 30 B.C. (possibly later). Bronze AE 20, SNG Levante 963, Fair, Maroneia mint, 2.610g, 13.8mm, 0o, obverse veiled and turreted bust of Tyche right, bead and reel border; reverse “ASK / GLU”, Sandan standing right on a horned goat-like animal walking right; rare. Ex FORVMPodiceps
roundel5.jpg
Terracotta Roundel39 viewsAn ancient red terracotta roundel, dating to the Byzantine period, approximately 500 CE. In this charming, rustic scene, a farmer, wearing a chiton or short tunic, is depicted standing beneath a date palm, pulling one of the branches down towards the ground to collect the thick bunches of fruit. To the right, a bird pecks at one of the bunches of dates, while a dog or a goat stands below, perhaps looking to catch some of the fallen fruit.

Biblical narratives are a popular theme of roundels from the Byzantine period, yet this roundel simply depicts a scene of everyday life, something that you might very well still see today in the modern areas of the Byzantine East.

Height: 3 1/2 inches
Length: 5 1/2 inches
Salaethus
667_Macedonia_Zeus_goats.JPG
Thessalonica - AE 216 views187-31 BC
laureate head of Zeus right
two goats butting heads
ΘE_Σ / Σ_A / Λ_ONIK_HΣ
SNG Cop 350. Moushmov 6595.
6,43g
Johny SYSEL
246_Thessalonica_Dionysos_goat.jpg
Thessalonica - AE 229 views187-31 BC
head of Dionysos with ivy wreath right
goat standing right
ΘEΣΣAΛ_O / N_IKH_Σ
(ΔH) / (ΓK)
Sear #1466;
6,48g
Johny SYSEL
thessalonica.jpg
Thessalonica, Macedonia, AE19. Zeus/Goats butting heads46 viewsThessalonica, Macedonia, AE19. Head of Zeus right / QESSALONIKEWN, two goats butting heads. SNG Cop 350. Moushmov 6595 ancientone
t16.JPG
Thessalonika, Macedonia47 viewsMacedonia, Thessalonika c. 168 BC and later
Dionysos with wreath of ivy / Goat standing right A / O / N IKH (or similar)
BMC 10 ff. G48
new pic
ecoli
kierion_SNGcop35.jpg
Thessaly, Kierion SNG Cop. 3546 viewsAE 15, Trihemiobol(?)
struck 400-344 BC
obv. (anepigraphic)
Head of Poseidon, with taenia, r.
rev. [KIERI] - EIW[N] (?)
Nymph Arne sitting r., head l., playing with astragali
SNG Copenhagen 35
vera rare, good F

Astragali are boneknuckles from sheep or goats and used like dices in acient times.
For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
Jochen
l_005.JPG
Thorius Balbus 30 viewsRoman Republic L. Thorius Balbus 105 B.C
AR denarius

Obverse:Head of Juno Sospita wearing goat skin
Reverse: Bull charging right;THORIUS BALBUS;N above

18.73 mm 3.78gm

Syd 598

Similar with obverse of Alexander "Herakles"
maik
rjb_2019_05_07.jpg
Thrace - Ainos9 viewsAR Diobol
440-412 BC
O - Head of Hermes right, wearing petasos
R - AINI, goat standing to right
mauseus
THRACE_Ainos_AR_Diobol.png
THRACE, Ainos. AR Diobol.17 viewsHead of Hermes right, wearing petasos / Goat standing right; club before.
Weight 1.10 Grams, maximum diameter 11 MM. VG.
Sam
0ABC9D1E-C445-4E5A-A6B2-F63E4DC5A32B.jpeg
Thrace, Pantikapaion, Tauric Chersonesos, 2nd - 1st Century B.C23 viewsPan is the Greek god of shepherds and flocks, fields, groves, mountain wilderness, and wooded glens, hunting, rustic music, theatrical criticism, and companion of the nymphs. He is connected to fertility and the season of spring. He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat and is usually represented in the form of a satyr, with a cloak of goat's skin, playing the Syrinx, or flute of seven pipes, and holding the pedum or pastoral staff.

GB88294. Bronze AE 18, MacDonald Bosporus 67, SNG Cop 32, SNG BM 890, SNG Stancomb 557, Anokhin 132, HGC 7 84, gVF, beveled obverse edge, casting sprue remnant, edge crack, scratches, reverse slightly off center, Pantikapaion (Kerch, Crimea) mint, weight 4.854g, maximum diameter 17.7mm, die axis 0o, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse head of Pan left; reverse ΠAN, head of bull left; ex Frascatius Ancient Coins
4 commentsMark R1
Thrace,_Thraco-Macedonian_Tribes,_Mygdones_or_Krestones_490-485_BC,_AR-Diobol,_Goat_kneeling_r_,_4-incuse_square,_SNG_ANS_60-4_(Aigai),_Q-001,_1h,_11,3-12,6mm,_0,93g-s.jpg
Thrace, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Mygdones or Krestones, (cc. 490-485 B.C.), SNG ANS 60-4 (Aigai), AR Diobol (or 1/8 Stater?), Quadripartite incuse square, Rare! #162 viewsThrace, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Mygdones or Krestones, (cc. 490-485 B.C.), SNG ANS 60-4 (Aigai), AR Diobol (or 1/8 Stater?), Quadripartite incuse square, Rare! #1
avers: Goat kneeling right, head left, 3 pellets around.
reverse: Quadripartite incuse square.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 11,3-12,6mm, weight: 0,93g, axes: 1h,
mint: Thrace, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Mygdones or Krestones, date: cc. 490-485 B.C.,
ref: Lorber, Goats issue 15; Topalov -; HPM pl. III, 14; SNG ANS 60-4 (Aigai),
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
DSC08135.jpg
THRACO-MACEDONIAN TRIBES, The Mygdones or Krestones. Circa 480-470 BC.98 viewsAR Diobol (1.0 gm).

THRACO-MACEDONIAN TRIBES, The Mygdones or Krestones. Circa 480-470 BC. AR Diobol (1.0 gm). Goat kneeling right, head reverted; solid rosette above, pellet to right / Quadripartite incuse square. Lorber, Goats, Issue 6; AMNG III 14 (Aigai); HPM pl. III, 16; Traité pl. XLIX, 8; SNG ANS -.
2 commentsDino
Titus_RIC_0985[vesp].jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 985 179 viewsAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome Mint, July 77 AD - December 78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIII in exergue; Goatherd std. l., milking goat l.
RIC 985 (R). BMC 230. RSC 103. BNC 204.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type had been one of my 'dream coins' since I started collecting Flavian denarii. A very tough coin to find and one I couldn't resist. Puzzling enough, it is listed as R by the RIC, as is the more common Vespasian version of the goatherd type. I think the Titus is a bit rarer.

It is quite obvious that this reverse is part of an agrarian propaganda series. Unlike the goat referring to Jupiter as seen on a denarius of Domitian as Caesar (RIC 267 (Titus), this type has rustic overtones.

I love this reverse, well centered and fairly clear. Unfortunately, I only have the old dealer's pic.
5 commentsVespasian70
caracalla_troas_lindgren331.jpg
Troas, Alexandreia, Caracalla, Lindgren 33169 viewsCaracalla AD 198-217
AE22, 6.1g
obv. ANTONINV - S PIVS AV
bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. GEN CO - L - AVG TRO
Genius standing facing, head l., holding cornucopiae in l. arm and statue of Apollo
in his outstretched r. hand.
Lindgren & Kovacs 331; Bellinger -
about VF
added to www.wildwinds.com

The statue is obviously a cult statue of APOLLO SMINTHEUS. This god was warshipped mainly in Alexandria/Troas. Its meaning is Apollo from Sminthia or Apollo the mouse-exterminator.
"Hear me,..., O god of the silver bow, that protects Chryse and holy Cilla and rulest Tenedos with thy might, hear me oh thou of Sminthe. If I have ever decked your temple with garlands, or burned your thigh-bones in fat of bulls or goats, grant my prayer, and let your arrows avenge these my tears upon the Danans."
(Iliad, I, 37-42, Samuel Butler)

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
1 commentsJochen
Antandros_trihemiobol.jpg
Troas, Antandros, trihemiobol84 viewsca. late 5th-early 4th century BC
11mm, 1.27g
obv: head of Artemis Astyrene right
rev: ANTA/N; goat standing right; grapes above
(SNG von Aulock 1491; SNG Copenhagen 216)
areich
IMG_0049.JPG
Tryphon 9 viewsSELEUKID KINGS of SYRIA. Tryphon. Circa 142-138 BC. Ć (18mm, 5.78 g, 1h). Antioch mint. Diademed head right / Spiked Macedonian helmet adorned with wild goat horns; aplustre to inner left. SC 2034.2a; HGC 9, 1061.

A military commander and leading supporter of the usurper Alexander I Balas, Diodotos placed Antiochos VI on the Seleukid throne following Balas' death. Two years later, upon the death of the young king, Diodotos took the throne himself, supposedly upon the acclamation of his troops. Unlike previous usurpers, Diodotos did not fabricate his lineage into the Seleukid house, but maintained that the Seleukid line had ended, and his was the beginning of a new era. He broke tradition by assuming the title autocrat rather than king, and took the name Tryphon ('the magnificent'). His reign proved very unpopular, and a new Seleukid claimant, Antiochos VII Sidetes, rose against him. Within three years Tryphon was defeated and killed.
ecoli
00valerianocabra.jpg
Valerian II95 viewsBI Antoninianus. Cologne 257-258 AD. 3,41 grs. Radiate and draped bust right. VALERIANVS CAES / Infant Jupiter seated facing on goat (Amalthea) standing right,his right hand raised. IOVI CRESCENTI.
RIC 3. RSC 26.
benito
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VALERIAN II21 viewsBI Antoninianus. Cologne 257-258 AD. 3,41 grs. Radiate and draped bust right. VALERIANVS CAES / Infant Jupiter seated facing on goat (Amalthea) standing right,his right hand raised. IOVI CRESCENTI.
RIC 3. RSC 26.
benito
valii.jpg
Valerian II (256 - 258 A.D.)35 viewsAR Antoninianus
O: VALERIANVS CAES, Radiate and draped bust right.
R: IOVI CRESCENNI, Infant Jupiter seated facing on goat (Amalthea) standing right,his right hand raised.
Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne) mint
4.34g
23mm
RIC 3 RSC 26
2 commentsMat
049.jpg
Valerian II Antoninianus27 viewsRIC Va 13 Rome, Sear5, 10727
3.55 g, 20 mm x 22 mm
P LIC VALERIANVS CAES, radiate draped bust right
IOVI CRESCENTI, Jupiter riding goat Amalthea right.
Mark Z
Valerian_II.png
Valerian II Antoninianus36 viewsValerian II Antoninianus

Obverse:
VALERIANVS CAES
Radiate, draped bust right

Reverse:
IOVI CRESCENTI
Jupiter riding goat right
3 commentsHarry G
valerianII_RIC3.jpg
VALERIAN II antoninianus - 253-255 AD28 viewsobv: VALERIANVS CAES (radiate and draped bust right)
rev: IOVI CRESCENTI (infant Jupiter seated facing, raising hand, on goat advancing)
ref: RIC Vi 3, RSC 26
mint: Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne), Lugdunum by RIC
2.42gms, 22mm

Publius Licinius Cornelius Valerianus was the eldest son of Gallienus and Salonina. He was made caesar under his father in 253, but died only 2 years later. It isn't clear how he died, but he was on the Danube frontier at the time. From his young portraits, he was perhaps 8 when he became caesar, and only 10 at his death.
berserker
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Valerian II AR Antoninianus, 256-258 AD19 viewsRoman Imperial, Valerian II AR Antoninianus, (256-258 AD), 1.9g, 22mm

Obverse: P LIC VALERIANVS CAES, Radiate draped bust right.

Reverse: IOVI CRESCENTI, Jupiter riding goat Amalthea right.

Reference: RIC 13

Ex: Holding History Coins
Gil-galad
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Valerian II, RIC V 382 viewsColonia Agrippinensis (Cologne) mint, Valerian II as Caesar Antoninianus, 253-255 A.D. AR, 22mm 3.83g, RIC V 3; MIR 36, 907e; RSC 26
O: VALERIANVS CAES, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust r.
R: IOVI CRESCENNI, Infant Jupiter seated facing, raising hand, on goat advancing r.
2 commentscasata137ec
0442-220.jpg
Valerian II, antoninianus - 005085 viewsCologne mint, AD 257-258
VALERIANVS CAES, radiate and draped bust of Valerian junior right
IOVI CRESCENTI, Young Jupiter on back of goat Amalthea right
3.66 gr
Ref : RCV # 10731, Cohen #26
1 commentsPotator II
Valerian_II_RIC_3~0.JPG
Valerian II, son of Gallienus21 viewsObv: VALERIANVS CAES, radiate, draped bust of Valerian II facing right.

Rev: IOVI CRESCENTI, an infant Jupiter seated facing, on a goat walking right.

Billon Antoninianus, Cologne mint, 257 - 258 AD

3.5 grams, 20.8 mm, 180°

RIC Vi 3, RSC 26, S10731, VM 5
Matt Inglima
vava.jpg
Valerianus II, Antoninianus49 viewsRome Mint,
VALERIANVS CAES, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
IOVI CRESCENTI, Jupiter, as a child, riding goat.
3,20
Ref: RIC 3
4 commentsbyzancia
Apollon-Cupid-Goat_Fonteius_3a.jpg
Vejovis | Cupid riding Goat, MN. Fonteius, AR Denarius, 84 BC.87 views
Vejovis | Cupid riding Goat, MN. Fonteius, Silver Denarius

Obv: Laureate head of Vejovis right, [C F] below chin, thunderbolt below head, MN.FONTEI.[C.F] behind.
Rev: Winged Cupid seated on goat, both right facing, twin caps of the Dioscurii above, thyrsus of Bacchus below, all within enclosing laurel wreath.

Exergue: Thyrsus

Mint: Rome
Struck: 84 BC.

Size: 22 mm.
Weight: 3.8 grm.
Die axis: 120°

Condition: Quite fine. Bright, clear lustrous silver with nice toning, particularly on the obverse. Clear, sharp devices and excellent relief.

Refs:*
Sear, 271
Sydham, 724a
Crawford, 353/1c
1 commentsTiathena
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Vespasian RIC II 097756 viewsVespasian 69-79 A.D. Rome Mint, July, 77 A.D.-Dec. 78A.D. (2.95g, 19.1m, 6h). Obv: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right. Rev: IMP XIX in exergue; Goatherd seated left, milking goat left. RIC II 977 (R), BMC 220, RSC 220.

A scarce reverse from Vespasian’s agricultural series. While worn, the reverse legend is complete, and the goatherd and his goat are clearly visible.

4 commentsLucas H
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Vespasian RIC-944121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: COS VIII in ex.; Pair of Oxen, under yoke, l.
RIC 944 (C). BMC 209. RSC 134a. BNC 185.
Acquired from Akropolis Coins, August 2007.

This reverse is part of an agrian programme Vespasian implemented. Most of the types issued around this time echo the same country theme (goat herder milking goat, modius, Sow and piglets, ect...). This is the rarer left facing bust of the type, which were minted by a ratio of 10:1 to the right facing busts.

A wonderful coin with a high relief reverse, sturdy portrait, and in a good style. A fine example of Flavian coinage. I was very happy to add this to the collection.
Vespasian70
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Vespasian RIC-964137 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD
Obv: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: ANNONA AVG; Annona, draped, seated l. on throne, adorned with corn-ears, feet on stool, holding on her lap a sack or corn-ears open, the ties, looped at one end, in her hands
RIC 964 (C2). BMC 295. RSC 28. BNC 258.

This reverse possibly belongs to a series of coins that outlineD an agricultural programme of the reign. Many other denarii were issued at the same time with a similar 'country' feel to them, notably: the modius reverse, Ceres either seated or standing, sow with piglets, goat-herd milking a she-goat, bull, and the two oxen reverse.

A wonderful coin in excellent condition. The obverse detail is so crisp, I'm inclined to believe that the die was used for aureii too.
2 commentsVespasian70
V977.jpg
Vespasian RIC-977193 viewsAR Denarius, 3.19g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD
Obv: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IMP XIX in exergue; Goatherd std. l., milking goat l.
RIC 977 (R). BMC 220. RSC 220. BNC 193.
Acquired from Ancient Delights, August 2012.

One of the more interesting types issued in the whole of Flavian denarii. The goatherd milking goat reverse was minted along side a series of agrarian themed types (sow and piglets, modius and grain ears) perhaps evoking a message of agricultural bounty. The message and meaning of the reverse must have been very clear to city dwelling Romans but the subtleties are lost on us. The same type was also minted for Titus as Caesar, both types are very rare.

I had a devil of time finding this type, let alone one in such wonderful condition. Most of the reverses on these are worn away, here the rough cloak of the goatherd is distinctly visible. This coin is an obverse and reverse die match with the RIC plate coin.
7 commentsDavid Atherton
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VI - Gallienus Antoninianus - Goat facing rigjt - IOVI CONS AUG - 6th Officina in exergue.44 views~
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Ancient Roman Empire
Emperor Gallienus ( 253 - 268 AD ) AR/BI Antoninianus.
Struck 267 - 268 AD. 6th Officinae.
"Jupiter, Conserver of the Emperor"
obv: GALLIENUS AUG - Radiate bust right, cuirassed. Seen from the Front.
rev: IOVI CONS AUG - Goat walking right.
Greek Numeral '6' below, in exergue.

Weight: 4.2 Grams
Size: 24 mm - 25 mm
~~~

** GREAT Extra Large photos, click on photograph for fullsize.**

~~~
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6 commentsrexesq
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ZEUS and AMALTHEA447 viewsBI Antoninianus. Cologne 257-258 AD. 3,41 grs. Radiate and draped bust right. VALERIANVS CAES / Infant Jupiter seated facing on goat (Amalthea) standing right,his right hand raised. IOVI CRESCENTI.
RIC 3. RSC 26.
The myth.
"Rhea, when she was heavy with Zeus, went off to Krete and gave birth to him there in a cave on Mount Dikte. She put him in the care of both the Kouretes and the nymphs Adrasteia and Ide, daughters of Melisseus. These Nymphai nursed the baby with the milk of Amaltheia, while the armed Kouretes stood guard over him in the cave, banging their spears against their shields to prevent Kronos from hearing the infant’s voice." Pseudo-Apollodorus.
She gave the god milk, but snapped her horn on a tree and was severed from half her loveliness. The Nympha picked the horn up, ringed it with fresh herbs, and took it fruit-filled to Jupiter’s lips. When he controlled the sky and sat on his father’s throne and nothing surpasses unconquered Jove, he made stars of the nurse and the nurse’s fruitful horn, which bears even now its mistress’ name." Ovid.


benito
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Zoo: Goat left, S in ex18 viewsGALLIENUS A.D. 253-268 Ć Antoninianus. Rev. IOVI CONS AVG, Goat walking left, S in exergue. 1.9gm 22x19mm Sear RCV III 10235 var. RSC341 Podiceps
41949_Gallienus_antoninianus,_Göbl_730b,_RIC_V_207_goat.jpg
Zoo; IOVI CONS AVG, bearded goat left, “ς” in ex, RIC V 20738 viewsGallienus, August 253 - 24 March 268 A.D. Bronze antoninianus, Göbl 730b, RIC V 207, Cohen 342, VF, soft strike, Rome mint, 2.745g, 22.3mm, 0o, 260 - 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse IOVI CONS AVG, bearded goat left, “ς” in ex; green patina. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
MarcusAureliusLiberalitas_sestertius.jpg
[905a] Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.139 viewsMARCUS AURELIUS AE [b[Sestertius. RIC 1222. 30mm, 24.5g. Struck at Rome, 177 AD. Obverse: M ANTONINUS AVG GERM SARM TR P XXXI, laureate head right; Reverse: LIBERALITAS AVG VII IMP VIIII COS III P P, Liberalitas standing left holding coin counter & cornucopia, SC in fields. Nice portrait. Ex Incitatus. Photo courtesy of Incitatus.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Marcus Aurelius (A.D. 161-180)

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University


Introduction and Sources
The Vita of the emperor in the collection known as the Historia Augusta identifies him in its heading as Marcus Antoninus Philosophus, "Marcus Antoninus the Philosopher." Toward the end of the work, the following is reported about him, sententia Platonis semper in ore illius fuit, florere civitates si aut philosophi imperarent aut imperantes philosopharentur (27.7), "Plato's judgment was always on his lips, that states flourished if philosophers ruled or rulers were philosophers." It is this quality of Marcus' character which has made him a unique figure in Roman history, since he was the first emperor whose life was molded by, and devoted to, philosophy (Julian was the second and last). His reign was long and troubled, and in some ways showed the weaknesses of empire which ultimately led to the "Decline and Fall," yet his personal reputation, indeed his sanctity, have never failed of admirers. Contributing to his fame and reputation is a slender volume of Stoic philosophy which served as a kind of diary while he was involved in military campaigns, the Meditations, a book which can be described as an aureus libellus, a little golden book.

The sources for understanding Marcus and his reign are varied but generally disappointing. There is no major historian. The chief literary sources are the biography in the Historia Augusta, as well as those of Hadrian, Antoninus, Verus, and Avidius Cassius. Debate about this collection of imperial biographies has been heated and contentious for more than a century. In all likelihood, it is the work of a single author writing in the last years of the fourth-century. The information offered ranges from the precisely accurate to the wildly imaginative.

Cassius Dio, who wrote in the decade of the 230s, produced a long history of the empire which has survived, for our period, only in an abbreviated version. Fourth century historians, such as Aurelius Victor and Eutropius, occasionally furnish bits of information. Marcus' teacher, Fronto, a distinguished orator and rhetorician, is extremely useful. Papyri, inscriptions, coins, legal writings, and some of the church writers, such as Tertullian, Eusebius, and Orosius, are very important. Archaeology and art history, with their interpretation of monuments, make the history of Marcus' principate literally visible and offer important clues for understanding the context of his actions.

Early Life
He was born M. Annius Verus on April 26, 121, the scion of a distinguished family of Spanish origin (PIR2 A697). His father was Annius Verus (PIR2 A696), his mother Domitia Lucilla (PIR2 D183). His grandfather held his second consulate in that year and went on to reach a third in 126, a rare distinction in the entire history of the principate, and also served Hadrian as city prefect. The youth's education embraced both rhetoric and philosophy; his manner was serious, his intellectual pursuits deep and devoted, so that the emperor Hadrian took an interest in him and called him "Verissimus," "Most truthful," by punning on his name. He received public honors from an early age and seems to have long been in Hadrian's mind as a potential successor. When Hadrian's first choice as successor, L. Ceionius Commodus, died before his adoptive father, the second choice proved more fruitful. The distinguished senator T. Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus, from Cisalpine Gaul, did succeed Hadrian, whose arrangements for the succession planned for the next generation as well. He required Antoninus to adopt the young Verus, now to be known as M. Aelius Aurelius Verus, as well as Commodus' son, henceforth known as L. Aelius Aurelius Commodus (PIR2 C606). The former was a bit more than seventeen years old, the latter was eight.

Career under Antoninus Pius
The long tenure of Antoninus Pius proved one of the most peaceful and prosperous in Roman history. The emperor himself was disinclined to military undertakings and never left Italy during his reign. Disturbances to the pax Romana occurred on the fringes of empire. Responses were decisive and successful, with legates in charge in the provinces. As a consequence, neither Caesar gained military experience nor was shown to the armies, a failing which later could have proved decisive and disastrous. Marcus rose steadily through the cursus honorum, holding consulates in 140 and 145, combining magistracies with priesthoods. He received the tribunicia potestas in 147, and perhaps also imperium proconsulare. Yet he never neglected the artes liberals. His closest contacts were with Fronto (c.95-c.160), the distinguished rhetorician and orator. His acquaintance included many other distinguished thinkers, such as Herodes Atticus (c.95-177), the Athenian millionaire and sophist, and Aelius Aristides (117-c.181), two of whose great speeches have survived and which reveal much of the mood and beliefs of the age. Yet it was Epictetus (c.50-c.120) who had the greatest philosophical impact and made him a firm Stoic. In the year 161 Marcus celebrated his fortieth birthday, a figure of noble appearance and unblemished character. He was leading a life which gave him as much honor and glory as he could have desired, probably much more than his private nature enjoyed, yet his life, and that of the empire, was soon to change. The emperor died on March 7, but not before clearly indicating to magistrates and senate alike his desire that Marcus succeed him by having the statue of Fortuna, which had been in his bedroom, transferred to Marcus. There was no opposition, no contrary voice, to his succession. He immediately chose his brother as co-emperor, as Hadrian had planned. From the beginning of the year they were joint consuls and held office for the entire year. Their official titulature was now Imperator Caesar M. Aurelius Antoninus Augustus and Imperator Caesar L. Aurelius Verus Augustus. The military qualities adumbrated by the word Imperator were soon much in demand, for the empire was under pressure in the year 161 in Britain, in Raetia, and in the east, where Parthia once again posed a significant danger.

The Parthian War (161-166)
The incursion in northern Britain and the difficulties along the Danube were soon satisfactorily managed by legates. The danger in the East was of a different magnitude. Tensions between Rome and Parthia had intensified in the last years of Antoninus' reign over control of Armenia, the vast buffer state which had often aroused enmity between the two powers, since each wished to be able to impose a king favorable to its interests. With Antoninus' death and the uncertainty attendant upon a new emperor (in this case two, a dyarchy, for the first time in Rome's history), the Parthian monarch, Vologaeses III, struck rapidly, placed his own candidate upon the Armenian throne, and inflicted severe setbacks upon the Roman forces sent to oppose him. Marcus decided to send his colleague Lucius Verus, whose imperial prestige would underscore the seriousness of the empire's response. Verus lacked military experience and was sorely lacking in the attributes of leadership and command; further, he was notorious for being chiefly interested in amusements and luxury. But Marcus surrounded him with several of the best generals at the empire's disposal, chief among them Avidius Cassius (c.130-175) (PIR2 A1402). From 162 on, Rome's successes and conquests were extensive and decisive. Most of Parthia's significant cities and strongholds, such as Seleucia and Ctesiphon, were stormed and destroyed, and the army's movements eastward recalled the movements of Alexander the Great some five centuries earlier. By 166, Parthia had capitulated and a Roman nominee sat on the Armenian throne. The victory appeared to be the most decisive since Trajan's conquest of Dacia, but, when Verus returned to Italy with his triumphant army, there came also a devastating plague, which had enormous effect on all provinces.
As is the case with all ancient diseases, it is almost impossible to identify this one. In all likelihood, however, it was smallpox; how severe the toll was is debated. Clearly, it cast a pall over the triumph celebrated by the two emperors, who were honored with the titles Armeniacus and Parthicus. The last years of this decade were dominated by efforts to overcome the plague and provide succour to its victims. But already in 166, the German tribes smashed the Danubian limes, threatening the empire's stability and even existence, more than Parthia had ever done. The first campaigns were punctuated by the death of Verus in 169, leaving Marcus as sole emperor. And so began the most difficult period of his life.

The German Wars
Early in 169, the Marcomanni and Quadi crossed the Danube, penetrated the intervening provinces, and entered Italy. The culmination of their onslaught was a siege of Aquileia. The effect upon the inhabitants of the peninsula was frightful. This was the first invasion of Italy since the late second century B.C., when the Cimbri and Teutones had been separately crushed by Marius. Perhaps more vivid in the collective imagination was the sack of Rome by the Gauls in 387, when the city was saved only by the payment of ransom.
The two emperors hastened north, after a rapid mobilization of forces, which included the drafting of slaves, since the manpower potential of the empire had been so impaired by the consequences of the plague and the losses and troop commitments in the East. Verus died while in the north; Marcus returned to Rome with the body and gave his brother full honors. He then turned north again and began his counterattacks against the barbarians. He did not know it at the time, but he was destined to spend most of his remaining years on the northern frontier. The only interlude was caused by revolt in the east.

We have no record of Marcus' ultimate intentions in these campaigns, yet the various stages were clear. First and foremost, the enemy had to be driven out of Italy and then into their own territory beyond the Danube. He strove to isolate the tribes and then defeat them individually, so that the ultimate manpower superiority of the empire and its greater skill in warfare and logistics could more easily be brought to bear. It was a successful strategy, as one tribe after another suffered defeat and reestablished ties with Rome. But it was a time-consuming and expensive operation, requiring the recruitment of two new legions, II Italica and III Italica, the construction of many new camps, such as the legionary fortress at Regensburg, with success accruing year by year. He intended to create two new provinces, Marcomannia and Sarmatia, thereby eliminating the Hungarian Plain and the headwaters of the Elbe as staging areas for invasion.

This steady, slow progress was interrupted in 175 by the action of the distinguished general Avidius Cassius, governor of Syria, who claimed the empire for himself. Whether he responded to a rumor of Marcus' death or, as gossip had it, conspired with Marcus' wife, the emperor's response was quick and decisive. Leaving the northern wars, he traveled to the East, but Avidius was killed before Marcus arrived in the region. After spending time settling affairs and showing himself to some of the provinces, with particular attention shown to Athens, where he was initiated into the Eleusinian mysteries, as Hadrian and Verus had been. He returned to Italy and soon answered the call to duty once more on the northern frontier. He took with him as colleague his son Commodus, now merely sixteen years old but already long since marked out as his father's intended successor. The military campaigns proved successful, but in the spring of 180, when Marcus died, at least one more year of warfare was necessary for the attainment of the grand enterprise. Marcus recommended to Commodus continuation of the war, but the new emperor was eager to return to Rome and the ease and luxury of the imperial court and entered into a peace agreement. Never again was Rome to hold the upper hand in its dealings with the Germanic tribes beyond the now reestablished borders of the empire.

Administrative and Religious Policy
Marcus was a conscientious and careful administrator who devoted much attention to judicial matters. His appointments to major administrative positions were for the most part admirable. Difficult tasks were put in the charge of the most capable men; he was not afraid of comparison with his subordinates. Social mobility continued as it had been under his predecessors, with men from the provinces advancing into the upper echelons of the Roman aristocracy. Those of humble birth could make a good career; such a one was Pertinax (126-193), a gifted general, who in early 193 became emperor for a space of less than three months.

The judicial administration of Italy was put in the hands of iuridici, who represented the emperor and thus spoke with his authority. This was a practice which had been established by Hadrian but had been allowed to lapse by Antoninus. The centralization of government continued apace. The imperial finances were sorely stretched by the almost continuous wars. Trajan had brought great wealth, Decebalus' treasure, into the empire after his conquest of Dacia. No such profit awaited Marcus. When preparing for the northern wars, he auctioned off much of the imperial palace's valuables. In spite of the enormous expenses of war, Commodus found ample funds upon his accession as sole emperor for his expenditures and amusements.

Although Marcus was a devoted thinker and philosopher, he was deeply religious, at least outwardly. The state cult received full honor, and he recognized the validity of other people's beliefs, so that the variety of religions in the vast extent of the empire caused no difficulties for inhabitants or government, with one significant exception. The Christians were not hampered by any official policy; indeed the impact of the church spread enormously in the second century. Yet their availability as scapegoats for local crises made them subject to abuse or worse. There was violence against them in 167, and perhaps the worst stain on Marcus' principate stemmed from the pogrom of Christians in Lugdunum in southern France in 177. He did not cause it, nor, on the other hand, did he or his officials move to stop it. Indeed, Tertullian called him a friend of Christianity. Yet the events were a precursor of what would come in the century and a quarter which followed.

Building Programs and Monuments
Many of Marcus' predecessors transformed the face of the capital with their building programs, either by the vast range of their undertaking or by the extraordinary significance of individual monuments. Others did very little to leave a tangible mark. Marcus fell into the latter group. There is record of very few monuments for which he and his brother were responsible. Very early in their reign they honored the deceased Antoninus with a column in the Campus Martius, no longer in situ but largely surviving. The shaft, which seems not to have been sculpted, was used for the restoration of Augustus' obelisk, now in Piazza Montecitorio, in the eighteenth century. The base, which was sculpted on all four sides, is now on display in the Vatican Museum. The chief feature is the apotheosis of the emperor and his long deceased wife, the elder Faustina, as they are borne to heaven. Also presented on this relief are two eagles and personifications of the goddess Roma and of the Campus Martius, represented as a young male figure.

There were three arches which commemorated the military achievements of the two emperors. No trace has been found of an early monument to Verus. Two arches later honored Marcus, both of which have disappeared but have left significant sculptural remains. The eight rectangular reliefs preserved on the Arch of Constantine came from one arch. Similarly, the three reliefs displayed in the stairwell of the Conservatori Museum on the Capitoline Hill came from another. One relief has disappeared from the latter monument.

Certainly the best known monument of Marcus' principate is the column, which rises from Piazza Colonna. It is twin to Trajan's column in height and design, although the artistic craftsmanship of the reliefs which envelop the shaft is much inferior. The subject is Marcus' campaigns against the Marcomanni and Sarmati in the years 172-75. The most interesting panel represents the famous rainstorm, when the army, overwhelmed by drought, was suddenly saved by the divine intervention of rain. Although begun in the latter part of the decade, the column was not completed until 193, when Septimius Severus had become emperor.

The famous equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, which survived the centuries near San Giovanni in Laterano because the rider was identified as Constantine, no longer greets the visitor to the Capitoline, where Michelangelo had placed it in the sixteenth century. It was removed in the 1980s because pollution was destroying it. After careful treatment and restoration, it is now displayed within the museum, with a replica placed in the center of the piazza.

Although outside Rome, mention should be made of the monumental frieze commemorating Lucius Verus' victory over the Parthians in 165. It was an ornament of the city of Ephesus; the extensive sculptural remains are now in the Ephesus Museum in Vienna.

Family
As part of Hadrian's plans for his succession, when Ceionius Commodus was his choice, Marcus was betrothed to the latter's daughter. But when Ceionius died and Antoninus became Hadrian's successor, that arrangement was nullified and Marcus was chosen for the Emperor's daughter, the younger Faustina (PIR2 A716). She had been born in 129, was hence eight years younger than he. They were married in 145; the marriage endured for thirty years. She bore him thirteen children, of whom several died young; the most important were a daughter, Lucilla, and a son Commodus. Lucilla was deployed for political purposes, married first to Lucius Verus in 164, when she was seventeen, and then, after his death, to Claudius Pompeianus Quintianus of Antioch, a much older man who was an important associate of her father /ii]PIR2 C973). Commodus became joint-emperor with his father in 177 and three years later ruled alone.

Faustina's reputation suffered much abuse. She was accused of employing poison and of murdering people, as well as being free with her favors with gladiators, sailors, and also men of rank, particularly Avidius Cassius. Yet Marcus trusted her implicitly and defended her vigorously. She accompanied him on several campaigns and was honored with the title mater castrorum. She was with him in camp at Halala in southern Cappadocia in the winter of 175 when she died in an accident. Marcus dedicated a temple to her honor and had the name of the city changed to Faustinopolis.

Death and Succession
In early 180, while Marcus and Commodus were fighting in the north, Marcus became ill. Which disease carried him off we do not know, but for some days Marcus took no food or drink, being now eager to die. He died on March 17, in the city of Vindobona, although one source reports that it was in Sirmium. His ashes were brought to Rome and placed in Hadrian's mausoleum. Commodus succeeded to all power without opposition, and soon withdrew from the war, thereby stymieing his father's designs and ambitions. It was a change of rulers that proved disastrous for people and empire. Dio called the succession a change from a golden kingdom to one of iron and rust.

Reputation
Gibbon called Marcus "that philosophic monarch," a combination of adjective and noun which sets Marcus apart from all other Roman emperors. His renown has, in subsequent centuries, suffered little, although he was by no means a "perfect" person. He was perhaps too tolerant of other people's failings, he himself used opium. The abundance of children whom his wife bore him included, alas, a male who was to prove one of Rome's worst rulers. How much better it would have been if Marcus had had no son and had chosen a successor by adoption, so that the line of the five good emperors, Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus, Marcus, could have been extended. It was not to be, and for that Marcus must accept some responsibility.

Yet he was a man of ability and a sense of duty who sacrificed his own delights and interests to the well-being of the state. He was capax imperii, he did his best, and history has been kind to him. As Hamlet said to Horatio, when awaiting the appearance of the ghost of his father,

"He was a man! Take him for all in all, I shall not look upon his like again." (I 2, 187-88)

His memory remains vivid and tactile because of the famous column, the equestrian statue, and his slender volume of thoughts, written in Greek, the Meditations, from which I choose two quotations with which to conclude:

"If mind is common to us, then also the reason, whereby we are reasoning beings, is common. If this be so, then also the reason which enjoins what is to be done or left undone is common. If this be so, law also is common; if this be so, we are citizens; if this be so, we are partakers in one constitution; if this be so, the Universe is a kind of Commonwealth." (4.4)

"At dawn of day, when you dislike being called, have this thought ready: 'I am called to man's labour; why then do I make a difficulty if I am going out to do what I was born to do and what I was brought into the world for?'" (5.1; both in Farquharson's translation)

Copyright (C) 2001, Herbert W. Benario.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
   
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