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CLAUDIUS-2.jpg
81 viewsCLAUDIUS I As - 41/42 AD - Mint of Rome
Obv.: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR IMP
Bare head left
Rev.: S C across field, Minerva standing right, brandishing spear and holding shield on left arm.
Cohen 84var, RIC 100
g. 13,5 mm. 29,5
2 commentsMaxentius
TIBERIUS-5.jpg
34 viewsTIBERIUS - Provincial AE30 - 18/37 - Utica (Zeugitana)
Obv.: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII
Bare head left
Rev.: C VIBIO MARSO PR COS C CASSIVS FELIX A II VIR
Livia seated left, holding patera and sceptre. D D P P across field (Decreto Decurionvm Permissu Proconsulis)
g. 13,9 mm. 29,5
Sear GIC 302
Maxentius
DOMIZIAN-3.jpg
40 viewsDOMITIAN - Æ As - 90/91 AD.
Obv.: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XV CENS PER P P, laureate head right
Rev.: VIRTVTI AVGVSTI, S C across field, Virtus standing right, holding parazonium and sceptre, left foot on helmet.
Gs. 9 mm. 26,8
Maxentius
coin165.jpg
37 viewsCyzicus RIC 93.1 Constantine the Great. AD 331,
333-334. CONSTAN-TINOPLI, Helmeted & laureate
Constantinopolis bust left / Victory standing left on prow
of a galley, holding transverse across her body
spear & shield. Coin #165
cars100
carinus_emmett_4001.JPG
45 viewsCarinus
Alexandrian tetradrachm
A K M A KAPINOC CEB, Laureate and cuirassed bust right
Athena seated left on throne, with Nike on right hand and spear in left hand, shield beneath, LB across (year 2) 282-283AD
Emmett 4001, rated R3
1 commentstjaart
Constantine_I_OBVERSE.jpg
15 viewsOBVERSE - IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG
high-crested helmet, cuirassed, spear across right shoulder

REVERSE - VICTORIAE LAETE PRINC PERP
TWO VICTORIES RESTING SHIELD, INSCRIBED VOT P R ON ALTAR - CONCAVE ROUND TOP ALTAR, WITH GARLAND AND TOP DOT OF GARLAND JUST UNDER ROUND TOP.
UNKNOWN IN EX. ?? UNKNOWN MINT ??

DIMENSION = 19mm
WEIGHT = 3 grams
MATERIAL = BRONZE ?

SIMON C2
nerva_ric_II_94.jpg
19 viewsNERVA
AE As 97 AD.
28mm, 10.4 grams

OBV: IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P II COS III P P, laureate head right
REV: AEQVITAS AVGVST, Equity standing left with scales & cornucopiae.
S-C across field. Rome Mint
RIC-II-94
ziggy9
Domitian_ric_II_272.jpg
19 viewsDOMITIAN
AE As. 85 A.D.
28.3mm, 9.2 grams

OBV: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI, laureate bust right, wearing aegis
REV: SALVTI AVGVSTI, alter
S-C across fields. Rome Mint
RIC-II-272
ziggy9
titus_ric_II_122b.jpg
20 viewsTITUS
AE As. 80-81 A.D.
28mm, 10.8 grams

OBV: IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII, laureate head left
REV: AETERNIT AVG, Aeternitas standing right, foot on globe, holding scepter &cornucopiae.
S-C across fields. Rome Mint
RIC- II -122b
ziggy9
hadrian_ric_II_795.jpg
13 viewsHADRIAN
AE Dupondius 134 – 138 AD
30.3 mm, 20.2 grams

OBV: HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, bare head right.
REV: AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing left holding scales and rod.
S-C across field.
RIC- II-795
ziggy9
antoninus_pius_ric_II_916a.jpg
35 viewsANTONINUS PIUS
Sestertius. 153-154 AD
33.2mm, 22 grams

OBV: ANTONINVS AVG PI VS P P TR P XVII, laureate head right.
REV: LIBERTAS COS III, Libertas standing right, holding pileus and extending right hand.
S-C across field.
RI- III-916a
ziggy9
gordian_iii_ric_IVc_319a.jpg
28 viewsGORDIAN III
Sestertius. Rome mint. 240 AD.
34.6mm, 16.2 grams
OBV: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
REV: PAX AETERNA, Pax running left, holding branch and sceptre.
S-C across fields. RIC-IVc - 319a
ziggy9
4402530l.jpg
39 viewsslands off Attica. Aegina circa 350-338 BC. Drachm AR
Islands off Attica. Aegina circa 350-338 BC.
Drachm AR

17mm., 5,53g.

A-[I] across field, land tortoise with segmented shell / A-IΓI in upper sections of refined skew punch, to lower left, dolphin.

Milbank pl. III, 5; SNG Copenhagen 525; HGC 6, 444.
3 commentspaul1888
Sear-840.jpg
28 viewsHeraclius, with Heraclius Constantine. 610-641. Æ Follis (29mm, 8.63 g, 6h). Cyzicus mint, 1st officina. Dated RY 3 (AD 612/3). Crowned and draped figures of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine standing facing, each holding globus cruciger; cross above / Large M; cross above, A/N/N/O III (date) across fields; A//KYZ. DOC 175a; MIB 185; SB 840Quant.Geek
Boeotia_Drachm.jpg
38 viewsBoeotia, Federal Coinage, c. 304-294 BC, Drachm, 5.79g, 18mm. Boiotian shield decorated with vertical caduceus / Amphora; Δ-I across field; all within incuse square. BCD Boiotia 70; SNG Copenhagen 412 var. (pellet above amphora). Good Very fine, high relief and lovely tone1 commentspaul1888
Sear-328.jpg
10 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. Æ Decanummium (17mm, 3.46 g, 6h). Uncertain mint, possibly Perugia. Dated RY 26 (552/3). Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Large I; cross above, date across field; P. DOC 357; MIBE 101a; SB 328. VF, dark green patina, minor roughness. Rare.


Quant.Geek
Sear-664.jpg
11 viewsPHOCAS (602-610). Follis. Cyzicus. Dated RY 1 (602/3). Obv: Phocas, holding globus cruciger, and Leontia, holding cruciform sceptre, standing facing. Rev: Large M; cross above, A/N/N/O - I across field; KYZA. Sear 664. Condition: Good very fine. Weight: 13.74 g. Diameter: 30 mm.Quant.Geek
Sear-847.jpg
11 viewsHeraclius and Heraclius Constantine. A.D. 610-641. AE follis (25.80 mm, 6.21 g, 7 h). Seleucia Isauriae mint, 1st officina. Dated RY 7 (616/7). Crowned and draped facing busts of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, each holding globus cruciger / Crowned and draped facing busts of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, each holding globus cruciger / Large K; cross above, A below; A/N/N/O ςI (date) across field. SB 847; DOC 182a; MIB 195. VF.



The Seleucia Isauriae mint was in use between 615 and 618 to support Heraclius’ campaigns against the Sasanians
Quant.Geek
Sear-366.jpg
6 viewsJustin II, with Sophia. 565-578. Æ Half Follis (20mm, 6.62 g, 6h). Thessalonica mint. Dated RY 8 (572/3). Nimbate figures of Justin and Sophia seated facing on double throne, holding globus cruciger and cruciform scepter, respectively / Large K; cross above, date across field; TЄS. DOC 73; MIBE 70a; SB 366. Quant.Geek
47614q00.jpg
3 Tiberius, Utica, Zeugitana, Ex John Quincy Adams Collection30 viewsBronze dupondius, RPC I 739, F, holed, 13.158g, 29.8mm, 90o, Zeugitana, Utica mint, 298 - 30 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG IMP VIII, bare head left; reverse C VIBIO MARSO PRCOS III C SALLVSTIVS IVSTVS II, Livia seated right, scepter in left, patera in extended right, M - M / I - V across fields; with John Quincy Adams Collection tag from the Stack's Sale; scarce
RI0001
Ex John Quincy Adams Collection, 6th President of the United States, and His Descendants, ex Massachusetts Historical Society Collection, ex Stack’s Sale , 5-6 March 1971, lot 763.

Purchased from FORVM
Sosius
Caligula_As_3.jpg
4 Caligula As33 viewsGAIUS (CALIGULA)
Æ As (29mm, 11.75 g, 5h) Rome mint. Struck AD 40-41.

C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON AVG P M TR P IIII P P, Bare head left / VESTA, S-C across field, Vesta seated left on throne, holding patera and scepter.

RIC I 54, Cohen 29. VF, green patina, some roughness.

Ex CNG
RI0015
Sosius
Claudius_As_RIC_113.jpg
5 Claudius48 viewsClaudius. A.D. 41-54.
Æ as (29 mm, 12.16 g, 6 h). Rome, ca. A.D. 50(?)-54.

TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head of Claudius left / LIBERTAS AVGVSTA, S C across field, Libertas standing facing, head right, holding pileus and extending left hand.
RIC 113; BMCRE 204; Cohen -.
Unusual red, green and red-brown patina. Light porosity and chipping on obverse edge. Very fine.
Ex-Triskeles Auction, June 2013
RI0024
3 commentsSosius
Claudius_As_2.jpg
5 Claudius As39 viewsCLAUDIUS
AE As.

TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP P P, bare head left / Minerva advancing right, holding shield and brandishing a javelin, S-C across fields.

RIC 116; Sear 1862. aVF, roughness
RI0020
Sosius
Claudius_As.jpg
5 Claudius As32 viewsCLAUDIUS
AE As.

O: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP P P, bare head left.

R: Minerva advancing right, holding shield and brandishing a javelin, S-C across fields.

RIC 116; Sear 1862. aVF, roughness
RI0019
1 commentsSosius
image.jpg
6 Nero69 viewsNero. A.D. 54-68. Æ as (29 mm, 11.60 g, 6 h). Lugdunum, ca. A.D. 66. IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR P P P, bare head of Nero right, globe at point of neck / S C across field, Victory alighting left, holding shield inscribed [S P Q R]. RIC 543; WCN 593; BMC 381; Cohen 302. Medium brown patina with attractive earthen green deposits, light encrustations. Very fine.

Ex Triskeles Auctions
RI0039
3 commentsSosius
Nero_As_RIC_306.jpg
6 Nero AE As28 viewsNERO
AE As
NERO CAESAR AVG GERM IMP, laureate head right / PACE P R VBIQ PARTA IANVM CLVSIT S-C, the Temple of Janus, latticed window to l., garland hung across closed double doors on the right.
RIC 306, Sear5 #1974

On the rare occasions when Rome was not at war with a foreign enemy the doors of the 'Twin Janus' temple were ceremonially closed, an event which Nero commemorated extensively on the coinage of 65-67 A.D. -- David R. Sear, Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol 1
RI0042
Sosius
image~0.jpg
7 Galba35 viewsGalba. A.D.
68-69 AD
Æ as (27 mm, 10.29 g, 6 h). Rome.

O: IMP SER SVLP GALBA CAES AVG TR P, laureate head of Galba right

R: LIBERTAS PVBLICA, S C across fields, Libertas standing left, holding pileus and scepter.

RIC 328 var. (bare head); BMC 144; BN 160 (same dies). Dark brown and green patina, light roughness.

Good fine.

Ex Triskeles Auctions
RI0040
Sosius
ju167.jpg
Julian II, AE3 Constantinople RIC 167, 361-363 CE 16 viewsObverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust right, holding spear forward and shield.
Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines across field within wreath.
Dot CONSPB (palm) in ex. RIC VIII 167. 18.5 mm, 3.4 g.
NORMAN K
Trajan_Dupon_RIC_520.jpg
14 Trajan Dupondius17 viewsTRAJAN
Æ Dupondius, Struck ~103 AD.
IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, radiate bust right, drapery on far shoulder / S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, S C across field, Spes walking left, holding flower and raising skirt.
Sear 3222; RIC II 520; BMCRE 895; Cohen 461; Fine, reverse cleaning scratches
RI0121
Sosius
Hadrian_and_Sabina_Alex_Tet_-_Köln_1093_lg~0.jpg
15.25 Hadrian and Sabina63 viewsEGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian. AD 117-138. BI Tetradrachm (25mm, 12.94 g, 12h). Dated RY 18 (AD 133/4). Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Hadrian right / Draped bust of Sabina right, wearing stephane; L–IH (date) across field. Köln 1093; Dattari (Savio) 1255; K&G 32.572. VF, find patina, slight die shift on obverse.

Ex Classical Numismatic Group 34 (6 May 1995), lot 331.

Ex CNG eAuction 318
6 commentsSosius
Licinius_RIC_151.jpg
8 Licinius15 viewsLicinius I
AE3, Rome, 318-319 AD

IMP LIC-INIVS AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust right / ROMAE AETERNAE, Roma seated right, shield on lap inscribed X/V. P-R across fields. Mintmark: RQ.

RIC VII Rome 151, aVF
Sosius
20170927_121446.jpg
Amisos, Pontos, c. 85 - 65 B.C. Mithradates VI Eupator. 39 viewsObv. aegis with facing head of Medusa (gorgoneion) in center; Rev. AMI−ΣOY, Nike advancing right, holding palm frond across shoulders behind, A∆T monogram lower left.
19.7mm, 8.4 grams.
References: Sear 3642, BMC 72.
2 commentsCanaan
consita.jpg
Constantine I, AE3, RIC VII 8 Cyzicus15 viewsConstantine I, AE3, 317-320, Cyzicus, Officina 2
Obverse: IMP CONSTA_NTINVS AVG, Laureate, draped bust left, globe and scepter in left hand, map in right
Reverse: IOVI CONS_ERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing facing, head left, chlamys across left shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand, scepter in left
Wreath | S across fields
SMK in exergue
18.3mm, 3.5g
NORMAN K
conmarti.jpg
Constantine I, RIC VII 124 Ticinum17 viewsObverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: MARTI CONSERVATORI, Mars in military dress standing right with spear in hand with point on ground and his left hand on shield set on the ground, cloak across right shoulder. .
19. mm., 2.5 g. Mintmark: S dot T Ticinum mint.
NORMAN K
consol1.jpg
Constantine I, RIC VII 57 Rome14 viewsObverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: SOLI INV-I-CTO COMITI, Sol standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding globe, right hand raised.
19.5 mm., 3.0 g. Mintmark: R S Rome
NORMAN K
constantine19.jpg
Constantine, AE Follis, RIC VII 19 Rome, 303-337 CE.17 views
Obverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: SOLI INV-I-CTO COMITI, Sol standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding globe and raising right hand.
R-F across fields.
Mintmark R star S.

RIC VII Rome 19.
NORMAN K
tgtb.jpg
JULIAN II, RIC VIII 108 Sirmium 22 viewsJulian II, 361-363 CE. Æ 20.5 mm., 3.3 g. Sirmium mint.
Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust right, holding spear forward and shield.
Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines across field within wreath; ASIRM.; LRBC 1619. hard green patina
NORMAN K
1__licinius_I_.jpg
Licinius I 308-324 AD50 viewsAE Follis
Mint: Alexandria, Date- 321-324 AD
Obv: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left,chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on a globe in right hand & leaning on scepter with eagle, at left on ground an eagle with wreath in beak, to rightcaptive.
In right field: XII gamma = 12 1/2 denarii communes
Exergue: SMALA
Size: 3.5 gms;19 mm.
Ref:RIC VII, 28
3 commentsbrian l
lic171.jpg
Licinius I AE Follis, RIC 13 Nicomedia, 313-317 CE20 views
Obverse: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and eagle-tipped sceptre; eagle with wreath at foot left.
Officina letter B in right field.
Mintmark SMNT. Nicomedia 23.2 mm., 2.8 g.
NORMAN K
126.jpg
ΘEC in rectangular punch180 viewsMACEDON. Thessalonica. Nero. Æ 23. A.D. 54-68. Obv: NE(PΩNC)EBAΣΣ-TOΣKAIΣAP (sic.). Bare head left; countermark across neck. Rev: ΘECCAΛ-ONIKH-ΩN in three lines in oak-wreath, eagle at top. Ref: BMC -; RPC 1603 (5 pcs); Axis: 180°. Weight: 7.36 g. Note: The name and face of Nero have been erased (damnatio). CM: ΘEC in rectangular punch, 7 x 3 mm. Howgego 537 (7 pcs). Note: Howgego notes that the countermark was probably applied in A.D. 68/69, sanctioning coins of Nero. He also notes that the application of the countermark was not directly connected with the erasure of the name and face of Nero, since this was done to only one of the seven specimens he identified. Collection Automan.Automan
042n.jpg
ΛΓΓ179 viewsSYRIA: SELEUCIS & PIERIA. Gabala. Caracalla. Æ 22. A.D. 198-217. Obv: (AVKMAANTΩNEINOC) or similar. Laureate bust right; countermark across shoulder. Rev: Γ(ABAΛEΩ)N. Tyche standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia. Ref: BMC –Axis: 180°. Weight: 7.53 g. CM: ΛΓΓ in rectangular punch, 7.5 x 4 mm. Howgego 551 (5 pcs). Note: Howgego describes the countermark as either ΛΠ or ΛΓI, while this specimen reads ΛΓΓ. Collection Automan.Automan
00005x00~5.jpg
20 viewsROME
PB Tessera (20mm, 4.57 g, 12h). Saturnalia issue
Palm frond; IO S(AT) across fields
Wreath
Rostowzew 504; Rostowzew & Prou 100

Ex Classical Numismatic Group 55 (13 September 2000), lot 1201 (part of)
Ardatirion
2086459.jpg
10 viewsEGYPT, Uncertain
PB Tessera (18mm, 2.91 g, 5h)
Dated year 2 of an uncertain era
Uncertain figure standing facing, behing crowned by Victory standing left
Uncertain figure standing left, holding uncertain object in raised hand; to left, ram(?) standing right; retrograde [L] B across fields
Milne –; Dattari (Savio) –; Köln –

Ex London Ancient Coins 36 (15 July 2014), lot 147
Ardatirion
nerva.jpg
(0096) NERVA15 views96 - 98 AD
struck 97 AD
Copper as, 28.3 mm; 10.735 g RIC II 83, BMCRE III 130, Cohen II 68, BnF III 116, Hunter I -, SRCV II
O: IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right;
R: FORTVNA AVGVST (good fortune of the Emperor), Fortuna standing left, rudder held by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field;
Rome mint; RIC II 83, BMCRE III 130, Cohen II 68, BnF III 116, Hunter I -, SRCV II --from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren
(ex Forum)
laney
trajan_sest_spqr_rescd.jpg
(0098) TRAJAN36 views98 - 117 AD
Struck 114 - 116 AD
AE Sestertius 33.5 mm; 26.73 g
O: IMP CAES NER TRAIANO OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate and draped bust right
R: SENATVS POPVLVSQVE ROMANVS, S C across field, Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopiae.
Rome. RIC II 672, BMCRE 1022; Cohen 352
laney
HADRIAN_PIETAS.jpg
(0117) HADRIAN27 views117 - 138 AD
AE AS 27 mm 10.43 g
O: Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right
R: Pietas standing left, raising both hands in prayer before altar, PIE-AVG and S-C across fields.
laney
hadrian_isis_egypt.jpg
(0117) HADRIAN40 views117-138 AD
(struck 133-134 AD)
Æ Drachm 34 mm 21.58 gm
O: laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right;
R: Isis Pharia standing right, wearing chiton, peplos and headdress of horns, disk and plumes, billowing sail in both hands and under left foot, sistrum in right; I / L - H across lower fields (year 18)
Alexandria, Roman Egypt
SNG Cop. 384; BMC Alexandria p. 89, 754 var; Köln.1118
laney
didumen_homonoia_stat_long.jpg
(0217) DIADUMENIAN30 views217 - 218 AD
AE 25 mm; 12.22 g
Magistrate Statius Longinus
O: K M OPEL ANTWNI DIADOUMENIANOC, bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right
R: VP CTATIOV LONGINOU NIKOPOLITWN, PR-OC across fields, ICTRW in ex, Homonoia standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae.
Nikopolis ad Istrum.
d.s.
laney
marsyas_lao_res.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS24 views218 - 222 AD
AE 24 mm; 11.15 g
O: Laureate, draped bust right
R: COL LAODIC--, Marsyas standing left, wine-skin over shoulder, right hand raised, D-E across fields
Syria, Laodicea ad mare; cf. Lindgren Coll. I, 2095
laney
elagab_antioch_tyche_b.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS15 views218-222
Æ 25mm., 11.74g.
O: AVT K M AV ANTWNINOC Laureate head r. , with slight drapery.
R: ANTIOXЄΩNM()KO Tyche seated l. on rocks, holding grain ears; below, river god Orontes swimming l.;
Δ-Є and S-C across field
Syria, Antioch; cf Butcher 476
laney
SEV_ALEX_SERAP.jpg
(0222) SEVERUS ALEXANDER (as Caesar)38 views222 - 235 AD
struck ca. 222 AD
BI TETRADRACHM 22 mm 11.82 g
Dated RY 5 of Elagabalus (AD 221/2)
O: Bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from front
R: Sarapis standing facing, head right, with hand on hip, holding sceptre; L-E (date) across fields.
EGYPT, ALEXANDRIA
Köln 2398; Dattari 4247; Milne 2859; Emmett 3082
laney
philip_tyche_blk.jpg
(0244) PHILIP I29 views244-249 AD.
AE 30.5 mm, 13.12 g
O: AYTOK KMAI IOVLI PHILIPPOC CEB, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
R: ANTIOXEWN MHTRO KOLWN, turreted, veiled bust of Tyche of Antioch right, star beneath back of neck, ram leaping right
above, D-E over S-C across fields.
Seleucis and Pieria, Antiochia
BMC Galatia 524-.
laney
phil_2_tyche_antioch.jpg
(0247) PHILIP II (as Caesar)12 views244-247 AD Caesar
247 - 249 Augustus
Æ 8 Assaria 30mm, 18.72g.
O: Bareheaded, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: Turreted, veiled and draped bust of Tyche right; Δ-E/S-C across fields; above, ram leaping right, head left;
Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch
laney
Untitled-1_blk.jpg
(0253) VALERIAN I30 views253 - 260 AD
Capitolene games issue
AE 26.5 mm, 19.34 g
O: IMP CAES P LIC VALERIANVS [PF AVG], laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
R: CER SACR CAP OEC ISEL HEL, COL-HEL across fields, male athlete standing facing, head right, holding palm branch, right hand in a selection urn.
Coele Syria, Heliopolis
Cohen 329
laney
cl_goth_mars_ultor_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS21 views268 - 270 AD
AE 17.5 mm max. 2.47 g
O: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right;
R: MARS VLTOR, Mars walking right, holding spear in right hand and spear across shoulder in left, H in right field
Rome mint; RIC V 67
(EB)
laney
tacitus_alexandria_res.jpg
(0275) TACITUS--ALEXANDRIA29 views275 - 276 AD
Potin Tetradrachm 21 mm 7.03 g
Obverse: A K KL TAKITOC CEB, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right
Reverse: ETOYC-A (year 1)across fields, eagle standing left, head right, with wreath in its beak.
ALEXANDRIA, ROMAN EGYPT
Milne 4502 / Dattari 551
laney
numerian_athena.jpg
(0283) NUMERIAN16 views283 - 284 AD
Billon tetradrachm 19.3 mm max., 7.732 g
O: A K M A NOVMEPIANOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind;
R: Athena seated left on high backed throne, wearing crested helmet, Nike in right, shield leaning against throne, L - B* (year 2) across fields
Alexandria mint; Milne 4719; Curtis 1939; Dattari 5608; BMC Alexandria p. 319, 2464 var. (star)
(ex FORUM)
laney
max_egypt_res.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS29 views286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.
Struck 287/8 AD
Billon potin tetradrachm 18 mm 7.51 g
O: K M A OYA MAXIMIANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: Homonoia standing left, raising right, double cornucopia in left, L -G (year 3) across fields
Egypt, Alexandria mint
BMC 2561, Curtis 2091 , Milne 4855
laney
maximianus_alexandria_b_res.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS--ALEXANDRIA32 views286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D
Struck 294/295 (Year 10)
AE TETRADRACHM 20.5 mm 6.44 g
O: MAXIMI_ANOC CEB Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind
R: Nike flying right, wreath upward in right hand, palm in left over shoulder L / I across fields
ALEXANDRIA, ROMAN PROVINCIAL EGYPT
Emmett 4147; Milne 5181 var; Curtis 2105 var; BMC 2585 var

laney
licinius_sol_res.jpg
(0308) LICINIUS28 views308 - 324 AD
Struck 315 - 316 AD
AE Follis 19.5 mm, 3.16 g
O: IMP LICINIVS PF AVG - Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right
R: SOLI INVICTO COMITI - Sol standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, with raised right hand and holding globe in left; R in left field, F in right field
Rome mint
laney
licin_iovi_w.jpg
(0308) LICINIUS26 views308 - 324 AD
Struck 317 - 320 AD
AE 17.5 mm, 3.38 g
O: IMP LICI_NIVS AVG, Laureate bust left in imperial mantle, mappa in right hand, globe and scepter in left
R: IOVI CONS_ERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing facing, head left, naked but for chlamys across left shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand, scepter in left, bound captive before, S in right field; SMANT in exergue
Antioch mint RIC VII, 27 (R1)
laney
licinius_iovi_cap.jpg
(0308) LICINIUS I23 views308 - 324 AD
AE 18.5 mm 3.00 g Struck 317-320, Officina 8
O: IMP LICI_NIVS AVG Laureate bust left in imperial mantle, mappa in right hand, globe and scepter in left
R: IOVI CONS_ERVATORI AVGG Jupiter standing facing, head left, naked but for chlamys across left shoulder, Victory on globe in right hand, scepter in left, bound captive before, H in right field SMANT in exergue,
Antioch RIC VII, 27
laney
crispus_0702.jpg
(0317) CRISPUS35 views317 - 326 AD
AE 18 mm 3.84 g
O: DN FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, cuirassed bust right
R: PROVIDEN-TIAE CAESS, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe & leaning on scepter; pellet over Gamma in right field, palm branch in left field
SMN in exe. Nicomedia
RIC VII 32 (R2)
laney
caligula_vesta.jpg
(04) CALIGULA28 views37-41 AD
Struck 37-38 AD
AE as 26 mm. 9/7 g
O: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT, bare head left.
R: VESTA above, S C across field, Vesta seated left, holding patera and sceptre.
Rome; Cohen 27. RCV 1803.
1 commentslaney
claudius_ceres_res.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (CERES)24 views41 - 54 AD
AE 27 mm, 11.71 g
O: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP Bare headed bust of Claudius left
R: CERES AVGVSTA; SC IN EXE. Seated figure of Ceres left wearing veil, holding corn ear in right hand and torch across knee with left hand.

(Probably an unofficial imitative; note backward S in CERES and backward C in the SC on reverse.)
laney
claudius_minerva_13res.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)26 views41-54 AD
Struck 24 X 25 mm, 9.47 g
O: Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
claudius_minerva_11_blkres.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)23 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
Æ As 30 mm, 7.86 g
O: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
claudius_minerva_9res.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)25 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
Æ As 28 mm, 12.01 g
O: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
claudius_minerv_7res.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)22 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
Æ As 25 X 28 mm, 7.42 g
O: Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
claudius_miner_9_blkres.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)26 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
Æ As 28 mm, 10.31 g
O: Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
claud_minerv_4_res.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)26 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
Æ As 29.5 mm, 9.91 g
O: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
claud_miner_6res.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)24 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
Æ As 26.5 mm, 10.67 g
O: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
claud_miner_5_res.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)23 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
Æ As 26.5 X 31 mm, 9.94 g (double strike)
O: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
claud_miner_3_res.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)36 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
Æ As 26 mm, 11.34 g
O: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
claud_miner_1_res.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)30 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
Æ As 25.5 mm, 9.73 g
O: [TI CLAVDIVS] CAESAR AVG P M T[R P IMP], Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
claud_min_2_res.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)35 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
Æ As 26.5 mm, 8.06 g
O: [TI C]LAVDIVS CAESA[R AVG P M TR P IMP], Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
1 commentslaney
claud_miner_12_beires.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)28 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
Æ As 26.5 X 28 mm, 9.44 g
O: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
claud_min_old_res.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)26 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
Æ As 27 mm 7.34 g
O: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Bare head left
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
clau_min_cm_resb.jpg
(05) CLAUDIUS (MINERVA)31 views41-54 AD
Struck 41-42 AD
AE 30 mm max., 10.66 g
O: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Bare head left; PR countermark
R: S-C across fields, Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding shield
Rome mint, RIC I 100
laney
nero_altar_b.jpg
(06) NERO19 views54 - 68 AD
AE 27 mm; 11.38 g
O: NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM PM TRP, laureate head left
R: S-C across fields, large altar with two doors and surmounted by ornaments, PROVIDENT in ex.
Balkan mint, possibly Perinthos
RIC (1923) 440; RPC 1761; Cohen 255; WCN p. 245, Moesia 2
laney
VITELLIUS_RED.jpg
(09) VITELLIUS31 views VITELLIUS
69 AD
AE As
O: A VITELLIVS IMP GERMAN, laureate bust left
R: LIBERTAS RESTITVTA, S-C across field, Libertas, draped, standing facing, head right, holding pileus in right hand and scepter in left.
Spanish, Tarraco?
laney
P.Licinius Nerva voting.jpg
(500a113) Roman Republic, P. Licinius Nerva, 113-112 B.C.86 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC: P. Licinius Nerva. AR denarius (3.93 gm). Rome, ca. 113-112 BC. Helmeted bust of Roma left, holding spear over right shoulder and shield on left arm, crescent above, * before, ROMA behind / P. NERVA, voting scene showing two citizens casting their ballots in the Comitium, one receiving a ballot from an attendant, the other dropping his ballot into a vessel at right. Crawford 292/1. RSC Licinia 7. RCTV 169. Nearly very fine. Ex Freeman and Sear.

Here is a denarius whose reverse device is one that celebrates the privilege and responsibility that is the foundation of a democratic society; it is a forerunner to the L. Cassius Longinus denarius of 63 B.C. Granted, humanity had a long road ahead toward egalitarianism when this coin was struck, but isn't it an interesting testimony to civil liberty's heritage? "The voter on the left (reverse) receives his voting tablet from an election officer. Horizontal lines in the background indicate the barrier separating every voting division from the others. Both voters go across narrow raised walks (pontes); this is intended to ensure that the voter is seen to cast his vote without influence" (Meier, Christian. Caesar: A Biography. Berlin: Severin and Siedler, 1982. Plate 12). This significant coin precedes the Longinus denarius by 50 years.

J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
2 commentsCleisthenes
Antoninus_Pius.jpg
*SOLD*40 viewsAntoninus Pius AE/AS

Attribution: Unpublished variety of PIETAS AVG As
Date: AD 145-147
Obverse: ANTONINVS AVG-PIVS PP TRP COS IIII, laureate, cuirassed, and draped bust r.
Reverse: PI-E-TAS AVG, Pietas stg l. holding patera in r. hand, l. arm in fold of dress,
S-C across fields
Size: 25mm
Weight: 10.4 grams
Noah
Nerva.jpg
*SOLD*38 viewsNerva AE/As

Attribution: RIC 77, Cohen 7, BMC 127
Date: AD 96-98
Obverse: IMP NERVA CAES AVG PM TRP COS III P P, laureate head r.
Reverse: AEQVITAS AVGVST, Aequitas stg. facing, head l., scales in r. hand, cornucopiae in l. hand, S-C across fields
Size: 25.8 mm
Weight: 9.4 grams
Noah
Nero.jpg
*SOLD*33 viewsNero AE As

Attribution: RIC 413, Lugdunum
Date: AD 62-66
Obverse: NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP PP, laureate bust r.
Reverse: VICTORIA AVGVSTI, Victory advancing l. holding wreath and palm frond,
SC across fields
Size: 29.5mm
Weight: 14.5 grams
ex-Forvm
Noah
Tiberius.jpg
*SOLD*27 viewsTiberius AE 29

Attribution: RPC 738, Zeugitana, Utica
Date: AD 28-29
Obverse: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG IMP VIII, bare head l.
Reverse: C VIBIO MARSO PR COS II SEX TADIVS FAVSTVS IIV, veiled figure of Livia seated r. holding scepter & patera M-M and I-V across fields
Size: 29.3 mm
Weight: 12.38 grams
ex-Forvm
Noah
Hadrian.jpg
*SOLD*83 viewsHadrian AE Dupondius

Attribution: RIC 654
Date: AD 117-138
Obverse: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, radiate head r.
Reverse: COS III, Equity stg. l. holding scales & cornucopiae, S-C across fields
Size: 25 mm
Weight: 9.01 grams
ex-Forvm
6 commentsNoah
Galba.jpg
*SOLD*35 viewsGalba Copper As

Attribution: RIC I 431, Cohen 274, rare
Date: AD 68-69
Obverse: SER GALBA IMP CAESAR AVG PON MA TR P, laureate head r.
Reverse: legionary eagle on thunderbolt between two military standards, S-C across fields
Size: 26.7 mm
Weight: 9.2 grams
ex-Forvm
1 commentsNoah
Carausius.jpg
*SOLD*15 viewsCarausius Antoninianus

Attribution: RIC 482, Unattributed mint
Date: AD 290-293
Obverse: IMP C CARAVSIVS PF I AVG, draped, cuirassed, and radiate bust r.
Reverse: PAX AVG, Pax stg. l. holding olive branch & vertical scepter, S-P across fields
Size: 23.8 mm
Weight: 3.58 grams
ex-Forvm
Noah
Caligula.jpg
*SOLD*25 viewsCaligula AE/AS

Attribution: RIC 38, Cohen 27, BMCRE 46
Date: AD 37-38
Obverse: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT, bare head l.
Reverse: VESTA, Vesta seated l., holding patera and scepter, large S-C in across fields
Size: 27.4 mm
1 commentsNoah
commodus777.jpg
*SOLD*18 viewsCommodus AE Sestertius

Attribution: RIC 525, scarce
Date: AD 188-189
Obverse: M COMMODVS ANT P FELIX AVG BRIT, laureate head r.
Reverse: IOVI IVVENI P M TR P XIIII IMP VIII COS V P P, Jupiter standing facing l., holding thunderbolt and scepter, eagle at feet, S-C across fields
Noah
Sept_Sev.jpg
*SOLD*20 viewsSeptimius Severus AE Sestertius

Attribution: RIC 741, scarce
Date: AD 197-198
Obverse: L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP X, laureate head r.
Reverse: MARTI PACIFERO P M TR P V COS II P P, Mars standing facing l., foot on cuirass, holding branch and reversed spear, S-C across fields
Noah
Augsburg_2_kreuzer_1625.jpg
*SOLD*30 viewsFerdinand II Augsburg - 2 Kreuzers

Attribution: KM #16
Date: AD 1625
Obverse: AVGVSTA VINDELICORVM Ω, bush on pedestal, 1625 across fields
Reverse: FERDINAND II. D G ROM IMP S AVG, black eagle with two heads, shield with 2 (kreuzers)
Noah
Antonius_Pius.jpg
*SOLD*17 viewsAntoninus Pius AE/As

Attribution: RIC III, 1024
Date: AD 158-159
Obverse: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P XXII, laureate head r.
Reverse: FORTVNA OBSEQENS, Fortuna standing l. holding patera and rudder set on a prow in r. hand cornucopia in l., S-C across fields, COS IIII in exergue
Size: 23 mm
Weight: 10.21 grams
Noah
57633q00.jpg
*SOLD*18 viewsAntoninus Pius Copper As

Attribution: RIC III 860a, scarce
Date: AD 148-149
Obverse: AVG PIVS P P TR P XII, laureate head r.
Reverse: FELICITAS AVG, COS III, Felicitas stg facing, head l., long caduceus in r., grain(?) in l., S-C across field
Size: 28.8 mm
Weight: 9.75 grams
ex-Forvm
Noah
Vespasian_1.jpg
*SOLD*10 viewsVespasian Orichalcum dupondius

Attribution: RIC II 1191, Lugdunum
Date: AD 72
Obverse: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII, radiate head r.,
globe at point of bust
Reverse: PAX AVG, Pax stg l., sacrificing with r. from patera over burning altar, caduceus and branch in l., S - C across fields
Size: 8 mm
Weight: 10.6 grams
ex-Forvm
Noah
57639q00.jpg
*SOLD*23 views Amisos, Pontos AE 20
Attribution: cf. SNG BM Black Sea 1177 ff.; BMC Pontos p. 19, 69 ff.; SGCV II 3642, (double struck)
Date: 85-65 BC
Obverse: Aegis with facing head of Gorgon in center
Reverse: AMI-SOU, Nike advancing r., holding palm frond across shoulders behind, monograms to l. and r.
Size: 23.1 mm
Weight: 7.77 grams
ex- Beast Coins, ex- Marcantica, ex-Forvm
Noah
valerianAntioch.jpg
-Pisidia, Antioch. Valerian I. AD 253-260.48 viewsÆ 22mm. Radiate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind / ANTIO-C-H-I COL, S-R across field, vexillum surmounted by an eagle, between two standards. Krzyzanowska VII/18; SNG France 13162 commentsancientone
367Hadrian_RIC14.jpg
0002 Mule Hadrian Denarius Roma 117 AD Concordia66 viewsReference.
RIC-; C. -;

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA
Laureate, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front

Rev. DIVI NER NEP PM TRP COS CONCORD in exergue.
Concordia seated left, patera in right hand, resting left elbow on statue of Spes, cornucopiae under chair

3.19 gr
20 mm
6h

Note.
Obv. like RIC 9c or BMC 17
Rev. like RIC 14 or BMC 33
4 commentsokidoki
Augustus_AR-Den_CAESARI_AVGVSTO-S_P-Q_R_RIC-119_C-279_Spain_c-18-BC_Q-001_axis-7h_18-19mm_3,35g-s.jpg
002 Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 119, Spain, AR-Denarius, Temple with four columns, S•P-Q•R across the field,320 views002 Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 119, Spain, AR-Denarius, Temple with four columns, S•P-Q•R across the field,
avers:- CAESARI-AVGVSTO, Laureate head right.
revers:- No legend, Temple with four columns, currus with legionary eagle within, S•P-Q•R across the field.
exe:S•P/Q•R//--, diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 3,35g, axis: 7h,
mint: Spain, date: 18 B.C., ref: RIC I 119, C-279,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Augustus_Tetradrachm_IMP-CAESAR_AVGVSTVS_RIC-_C-x_X_xx-AD__Q-001_28,5mm_10,16g-s.jpg
002 Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 490, Pergamum, AR-Cistophoric Tetradrachm, AVGVSTVS, Six grain ears tied in a bundle,265 views002 Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 490, Pergamum, AR-Cistophoric Tetradrachm, AVGVSTVS, Six grain ears tied in a bundle,
avers:- IMP-CAESAR, Beared head right, littus to right.
revers:- No legend - AVGV STVS across fields, Six grain ears tied in a bundle.
exe: AVGV/STVS//--, diameter: 28,5mm, weight: 10,16g, axis: h,
mint: Pergamum?, date: 25-20 B.C., ref: RIC-I-490, C-32a?,
Q-001
quadrans
179Hadrian__RIC2b.jpg
003 Hadrian Denarius Roma 117 AD Trajan and Hadrian standing vis-à-vis80 viewsReference
Strack 1; RIC III 3; C. 1009; RIC II, 2b

Bust B1

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO OPT AVG GER DAC
Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, balteus strap over shoulder and across chest

Rev. PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AVG F P M TR P COS P P
Trajan standing, delivering globe to Hadrian standing, left facing him; both are laureate and togate and hold rolls in their left hands.

2.89 gr
18 mm
6h
okidoki
996Hadrian_Strack3_eastern.jpg
004 Hadrian Denarius 117 AD Trajan and Hadrian standing vis-à-vis eastern mint34 viewsReference.
Strack *3; Paris 4616

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA
Laureate, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front.

Rev. PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AVG F P M TR P COS P P ADOPTIO in exergue
Trajan holding with both hands, Hadrian's right hand; left hand on hip

2.73 gr
18 mm
6h

Note.
This early series celebrates the adoption of Hadrian by Trajan, therefore legitimizing Hadrian's succession to the people.
on Rome Mint Trajan or both would hold a volumen/rolls
2 commentsokidoki
2_(1).jpg
004c CLAUDIUS23 viewsEMPEROR: Claudius
DENOMINATION: As
OBVERSE: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P. P., bare head left
REVERSE: Minerva standing right, brandishing javelin and holding shield / S C across field
DATE: Ad 50-54
MINT: Roma
WEIGHT: 10.57 g
RIC: 116
Barnaba6
coin307.JPG
005. CLAUDIUS24 viewsClaudius AE As. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR IMP, bare head left / S-C across field, Minerva standing right, brandishing spear and holding shield on left arm. Cohen 84.

ecoli
coin50~0.JPG
005. Claudius 26 viewsClaudius AE As. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR IMP, bare head left / S-C across field, Minerva standing right, brandishing spear and holding shield on left arm. Cohen 84.

ecoli
007_Antonia_ANTONIA_AVGVSTA_TI_CLAVDIVS_CAESAR_AVG_P_M_TR_P_IMP_RIC-I_92_(Claudius)_C-6_BMC-166_41-50-AD_Q-001_10h_26,5mm_9,54y-s.jpg
007 Antonia (?-37 A.D.), RIC I 092 (Claudius), Rome, AE-As(?), (Claudius) Claudius, togate, standing left, S C at sides,138 views007 Antonia (?-37 A.D.), RIC I 092 (Claudius), Rome, AE-As(?), (Claudius) Claudius, togate, standing left, S C at sides,
Antonia, mother of Claudius. Died 37 AD.
avers:- ANTONIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Antonia right.
revers:- TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, S-C across field, Claudius, togate, standing left, holding simpulum.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 26,5mm, weight: 9,54g, axes:10h,
mint: Rome, date: Struck circa 41-50 A.D., ref: RIC I 92 (Claudius), Cohen 6, BMCRE 166 (Claudius),
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Germanicus_AE-Dup_GERMANICVS-CAESAR_SIGNIS-RECE-DEVICTIS-GERM_S-C_RIC-57_-7_BMC-94_40-41-AD_Q-001_27mm_12,77g-s.jpg
009 Germanicus (15 B.C.-19 A.D.), RIC I 057, Rome, AE-Dupondius, SIGNIS RECEPT/DEVICTIS GERM, Germanicus advancing left, 692 views009 Germanicus (15 B.C.-19 A.D.), RIC I 057, Rome, AE-Dupondius, SIGNIS RECEPT/DEVICTIS GERM, Germanicus advancing left,
"My Father received the title as conqueror of Germany from the Senate and people of Rome".
avers:- GERMANICVS CAESAR, Germanicus in triumphal quadriga right.
revers:- SIGNIS-RECEPT/DEVICTIS-GERM, large S-C across field, Germanicus advancing left holding eagle-tipped sceptre.
date: Struck under Caligula 40-41AD.
mint: Rome
diameter: 27mm
weight: 12,77g
ref: RIC-57, C-7, BMC-94,
Q-001
12 commentsquadrans
0093.jpg
0093 - Denarius Valeria 82 BC30 viewsObv/ Draped bust of Victory r., wearing pendant earring and necklace, (control letter behind).
Rev/ C VAL FLA (VAL in ligature) on l., IMPERAT on r., EX SC across lower fields, aquila between signa exhibiting vexilla marked H (for hastati) and P (for principes).

Ag, 18.2 mm, 3.47 g
Moneyer: C. Valerius Flaccus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 365/1a [dies o/r: 36/39 (var. 1a --> 1c)] - Syd. 747a
ex-Tintinna, auction e9, lot 1108
1 commentsdafnis
philip-I_tetradrachm_bust-left-cuirassed-w-balteus_obv_09_rev_06.jpg
01 - Philip I Tetradrachm - Laureate bust left, wearing balteus, seen from front, cuirassed14 viewsPhilip I Tetradrachm. Regnal Year: 4

obv: Laureate and cuirassed bust left, wearing balteus (sword belt that hangs over the shoulder and across the chest). Seen from the front.
rev: Eagle facing left, tail right, holding wreath in beak and standing on city name.
SC below.

ex Sphinx Numismatics
rexesq
antioch_philip-I_tetradrachm_bust-seen-from-front-cuirassed_01.jpg
01 - Philip I Tetradrachm - Laureate bust left, wearing balteus, seen from front, cuirassed.41 viewsPhilip I Tetradrachm. Regnal Year: 4

obv: Laureate and cuirassed bust left, wearing balteus (sword belt that hangs over the shoulder and across the chest). Seen from the front.
rev: Eagle facing left, tail right, holding wreath in beak and standing on city name.
SC below.

ex Sphinx Numismatics
3 commentsrexesq
philip-I_tetradrachm_bust-left-cuirassed-w-balteus_obv_09_cut.JPG
01 - Philip I Tetradrachm - Laureate bust left, wearing balteus, seen from front, cuirassed.12 viewsPhilip I Tetradrachm. Regnal Year: 4

obv: Laureate and cuirassed bust left, wearing balteus (sword belt that hangs over the shoulder and across the chest). Seen from the front.
rev: Eagle facing left, tail right, holding wreath in beak and standing on city name.
SC below.
rexesq
philip-I_tetradrachm_bust-left-cuirassed-w-balteus_obv_05.jpg
01 - Philip I Tetradrachm - Laureate bust left, wearing balteus, seen from front, cuirassed..10 viewsPhilip I Tetradrachm. Regnal Year: 4

obv: Laureate and cuirassed bust left, wearing balteus (sword belt that hangs over the shoulder and across the chest). Seen from the front.
rev: Eagle facing left, tail right, holding wreath in beak and standing on city name.
SC below.

*Bad photos, bad lighting, camera trouble.... hard to show the true colour of this coin with my camera.
rexesq
philip-I_tetradrachm_bust-left-cuirassed-w-balteus_obv_02.jpg
01 - Philip I Tetradrachm - Laureate bust left, wearing balteus, seen from front, cuirassed..10 viewsPhilip I Tetradrachm. Regnal Year: 4

obv: Laureate and cuirassed bust left, wearing balteus (sword belt that hangs over the shoulder and across the chest). Seen from the front.
rev: Eagle facing left, tail right, holding wreath in beak and standing on city name.
SC below.

*Bad photos, bad lighting, camera trouble.... hard to show the true colour of this coin with my camera.
rexesq
trajan_AR-denarius_providentia_3_08grams_00.JPG
01 - Trajan AR Denarius - PRO VID across field. 'Heroic Bust'101 viewsEmperor Trajan ( 98 - 117 A.D.)
Silver Denarius, Rome Mint.

obv: IMP CAES NER TRAIAN OPTIM AVG GER DAC PARTHICO - Laureate bust right, seen from the front. Slight drapery on far shoulder.
rev: P M TR P COS VI P P SPQR - Providentia standing holding long sceptre and holding hand over globe. PRO-VID across field

Weight: 3.08 Grams.
6 commentsrexesq
trajan_AR-denarius_aeternitas-holding-heads-of-sol-and-luna_o_02_r_02.JPG
01 - Trajan Silver Denarius - AET AVG - Head of Sol and Luna64 viewsRoman Empire, Emperor Trajan (98 - 117 A.D.)
Silver Denarius, Rome Mint. 3.2 Grams.
-----
obv: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P - Laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder.
rev: COS V P P SPQR OPTIMO PRINC - Aeternitas standing facing, head left holding the head of Sol (the Sun god) in her right hand and the head of Luna (the Moon Goddess) in her left hand.
AET AVG - across fields on either side of Aeternitas.
---------
RIC 91, RSC 3
4 commentsrexesq
trajan_AR-denarius_aeternitas-holding-heads-of-sol-and-luna_o_03_r_03.JPG
01 - Trajan Silver Denarius - AET AVG - Head of Sol and Luna48 viewsRoman Empire, Emperor Trajan (98 - 117 A.D.)
Silver Denarius, Rome Mint. 3.2 Grams.
-----
obv: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P - Laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder.
rev: COS V P P SPQR OPTIMO PRINC - Aeternitas standing facing, head left holding the head of Sol (the Sun god) in her right hand and the head of Luna (the Moon Goddess) in her left hand.
AET AVG - across fields on either side of Aeternitas.
---------
RIC 91, RSC 3
1 commentsrexesq
trajan_AR-denarius_aeternitas-holding-heads-of-sol-and-luna_rev_03.jpg
01 - Trajan Silver Denarius - AET AVG - Head of Sol and Luna. Reverse.15 viewsRoman Empire, Emperor Trajan (98 - 117 A.D.)
Silver Denarius, Rome Mint. 3.2 Grams.
-----
obv: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P - Laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder.
rev: COS V P P SPQR OPTIMO PRINC - Aeternitas standing facing, head left holding the head of Sol (the Sun god) in her right hand and the head of Luna (the Moon Goddess) in her left hand.
AET AVG - across fields on either side of Aeternitas.
---------
RIC 91, RSC 3
rexesq
trajan_AR-denarius_aeternitas-holding-heads-of-sol-and-luna_rev_04.jpg
01 - Trajan Silver Denarius - AET AVG - Head of Sol and Luna. Reverse.17 viewsRoman Empire, Emperor Trajan (98 - 117 A.D.)
Silver Denarius, Rome Mint. 3.2 Grams.
-----
obv: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P - Laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder.
rev: COS V P P SPQR OPTIMO PRINC - Aeternitas standing facing, head left holding the head of Sol (the Sun god) in her right hand and the head of Luna (the Moon Goddess) in her left hand.
AET AVG - across fields on either side of Aeternitas.
---------
RIC 91, RSC 3
rexesq
0100.jpg
0100 - Denarius Furia 63 BC28 viewsObv/ Bust of Ceres r., wheat-ear behind; ear of barley before; III-VIR across fields; BROCCHI below.
Rev/ Curule chair between fasces; L FVRI CN F above.

Ag, 20.7 mm, 3.94 g
Moneyer: L. Furius Cn. f. Brocchus .
Mint: Rome.
RRC 414/1 [dies o/r: 110/122] - Syd. 902a
ex-Jesús Vico, auction 125, lot 221
dafnis
Caligula_AE-As_C-CAESAR-AVG-GERMANICVS-PON-M-TR-POT_VESTA_S-C_RIC-38_BMC-46_C-27_Rome-40-41-AD_Q-001_27mm_10,34g-s.jpg
011 Gaius (Caligula) (37-41 A.D.), RIC I 038, Rome, AE-As, VESTA, S-C, Vesta seated left on throne, #1364 views011 Gaius (Caligula) (37-41 A.D.), RIC I 038, Rome, AE-As, VESTA, S-C, Vesta seated left on throne, #1
avers: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT, Bare head left.
reverse: VESTA, Vesta seated left on throne, holding patera and scepter. S-C across the field,
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 27mm, weight: 10,34g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 40-41, ref: RIC I 038, BMC-46, C-27,
Q-001
quadrans
Germanicus_AE-AS_C-CAESAR-DIVI-AVG-PRON-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IIII-P-P_VESTA_S-C_RIC-54_BMC-73_C-29_Rome-39-40-AD_Q-001_axis-7h_26-28mm_10,25g-s.jpg
011 Gaius (Caligula) (37-41 A.D.), RIC I 054, Rome, AE-As, VESTA, S-C, Vesta seated left on throne,301 views011 Gaius (Caligula) (37-41 A.D.), RIC I 054, Rome, AE-As, VESTA, S-C, Vesta seated left on throne,
avers: C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON AVG P M TR P IIII P P, Bare head left.
reverse: VESTA, Vesta seated left on throne, holding patera and scepter. S-C across the field,
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 26-28mm, weight: 10,25g, axes: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 39-40, ref: RIC I 054, BMC-73, C-29,
Q-001
quadrans
Claudius_AE-Quadrans_TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG_P_N_R_PON-M-TRP-IMP-COS-DES-IT__S-C_RIC-I-84_C-70_Rome-AD_Q-001_h_17-88mm_g-s.jpg
012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 085, Rome, AE-Quadrans, PON M TR P IMP COS DES IT, S•C across fields, 196 views012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 085, Rome, AE-Quadrans, PON M TR P IMP COS DES IT, S•C across fields,
avers:- TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG, Hand with scales, PNR below.
revers:- PON-M-TR-P-IMP-COS-DES-IT, S•C across fields.
exe: S•C//--, diameter: 17-18mm, weight: g, axis:- h,
mint: Rome, date: 41 A.D., ref: RIC-I-085, C-71,
Q-001
quadrans
Claudius_AE-AS_TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP_LIBERTAS-AVGVSTA_S-C_RIC-I-097_C-47_BMC-145-Rome-41-50-AD_Q-001_7h_28,5-29,5mm_11,05ga-s.jpg
012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 097, Rome, AE-As, LIBERTAS AVGVSTA, Libertas, S/C//--, #1137 views012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 097, Rome, AE-As, LIBERTAS AVGVSTA, Libertas, S/C//--, #1
avers:- TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Bare head of Claudius left .
revers:- LIBERTAS AVGVSTA, Libertas standing facing, head right, holding pileus in right hand, S—C across in lower fields.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 28,5-29,5mm, weight: 11,05g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 41-50 A.D., ref: RIC I 097, C 47, BMC 145, Sear 1859,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Claudius_AE-As_TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP_S-C_RIC-I-100_C-84_Rome-41-50_Q-001_29mm_10,33g-s.jpg
012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 100, Rome, AE-As, S-C, Minerva, 355 views012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 100, Rome, AE-As, S-C, Minerva,
avers:- TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP, Bare head left.
revers:- No legend - Minerva advancing right, holding javelin and round shield; S C across fields.
exerg: , diameter: 29mm, weight: 10,33g, axis:- h,
mint: Rome, date: 41-50 A.D., ref: RIC-I-100, C-84,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Claudius_AE-AS_TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP-P-P_CONSTANTIAE-AVGVSTi_S-C_RIC-I-111_C-14_Rome-42-43AD_Q-001_11h_29-30mm_11,58g-s.jpg
012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 111, Rome, AE-As, CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI, Constantia standing left, S C across fields,178 views012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 111, Rome, AE-As, CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI, Constantia standing left, S C across fields,
avers:- TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP-P-P, Bare head left.
revers:- CONSTANTIAE-AVGVSTI, Constantia standing left leaning on scepter; S C across fields.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 29-30mm, weight: 11,58g, axis:- 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 42-43 A.D., ref: RIC-I-111, C-14,
Q-001
quadrans
Claudius_AE-AS_TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP-P-P_LIBERTAS-AVGVSTA_S-C_RIC-I-113_C-47_Rome-50-54-_Q-001_27-28mm_10,94g-s.jpg
012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 113, Rome, AE-As, LIBERTAS AVGVSTA, Libertas, #1392 views012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 113, Rome, AE-As, LIBERTAS AVGVSTA, Libertas, #1
avers:- TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP-P-P, Bare head left.
revers:- LIBERTAS-AVGVSTA - Libertas standing, facing, holding pileus and raising hand; S C across fields.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: 10,94g, axis:- h,
mint: Rome, date: 41-50 A.D., ref: RIC-I-113, C-47,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Claudius--Q-001pa-s.jpg
012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 113, Rome, AE-As, LIBERTAS AVGVSTA, Libertas, #293 views012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 113, Rome, AE-As, LIBERTAS AVGVSTA, Libertas, #2
avers:- TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP-P-P, Bare head left.
revers:- LIBERTAS-AVGVSTA - Libertas standing, facing, holding pileus and raising hand; S C across fields.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis:- h,
mint: Rome, date: 41-50 A.D., ref: RIC-I-113, C-47,
Q-002
quadrans
Claudius_AE-AS_TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP-P-P_S-C_RIC-I-116_C-84_Rome-50-54_Q-001_29mm_12,09g-s.jpg
012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 116, Rome, AE-As, S-C, Minerva, 443 views012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 116, Rome, AE-As, S-C, Minerva,
avers:- TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP-P-P, Bare head left.
revers:- No legend - Minerva advancing right, holding javelin and round shield; S C across fields.
diameter: 29mm,
weight: 12,09g,
axis:- h,
mint: Rome,
date: 50-54 A.D.
ref: RIC-I-116, C-84,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Antonius_Felix_procurator,_AE-16,_Prutah__Jerusalems_Israel_Palm_Hedin-652,_54_AD_Q-001_0h,_2,28_g_,_16_mm-s~0.jpg
012p Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), Judaea, Antonius Felix Procurator, under Claudius, (52-60 A.D.), AE-16(Prutah), Hedin 652, BRIT, Six branched palm tree,93 views012p Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), Judaea, Antonius Felix Procurator, under Claudius, (52-60 A.D.), AE-16(Prutah), Hedin 652, BRIT, Six branched palm tree,
avers:- NEPΩ KΛAV KAICP, Two crossed shields and spears.
revers:- BRIT, Six branched palm tree bearing two bunches of dates, L-IΔ, K-AI across field.
exerg: L/IΔ//K/AI, diameter: 16,0mm, weight: 2,28g, axes: 0h,
mint: Judaea, date: Dated Year of Claudius (Year 14 = 54 A.D.) ref: Hedin 652,
Q-001
quadrans
Nero,_RIC_I_214,_AE-AS,_NERO_CLAVD_CAESAR_AVG_GER_P_M_TR_P_IMP_P_P,_GENIO_AVGVSTI,_S-C,_I,_Sear_1977,_WCN_269,_BMC_252,_Rome_63AD,Q-001,_6h,_22-23mm,_4,82g-s.jpg
014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0214, Lugdunum, AE-As, S/C//--, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, 66 views014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0214, Lugdunum, AE-As, S/C//--, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left,
avers: NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, Laureate head right.
reverse: GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, sacrificing from patera over altar, and holding cornucopiae, S C across fields.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 22,0-23,0mm, weight: 4,82 (!)g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 63A.D., ref: RIC I 214, Sear 1977, BMC 252,
Q-001
quadrans
Nero_AE-AS_IMP-NERO-CAESAR-AVG-GERM_PACE-PR-VBIQ-PARTA-IANVM-CLVSIT_S-C_RIC-348_C-_Rome_66-AD_Q-001_6h_27mm_11,14g-s.jpg
014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0348, Rome, AE-As, PACE PR VBIQ PARTA IANVM CLVSIT, S-C,114 views014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0348, Rome, AE-As, PACE PR VBIQ PARTA IANVM CLVSIT, S-C,
avers: IMP-NERO-CAESAR-AVG-GERM, Laureate head left.
revers: PACE-PR-VBIQ-PARTA-IANVM-CLVSIT, View of one front of the temple of Janus, with latticed window to left, and garland hung across closed double doors on the right, S C across fields.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 27mm, weight: 11,14g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 66 AD., ref: RIC-348, C-,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Nero_AE-AS_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0351, Rome, AE-As, S-C, Victory flying left,97 views014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0351, Rome, AE-As, S-C, Victory flying left,
avers: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG GERM, Laureate head right.
revers: Victory flying left, holding shield inscribed SPQR. S C across fields.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 66A.D., ref: RIC-351, BMCRE 246, WCN 296,
Q-001
quadrans
Nero_AE-AS_IMP-NERO-CAESAR-AVG-P-MAX-TR-P-P-P_GENIO-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-533_C-_Lugdunum_66-AD__Q-001_h_28mm_9,79g-s.jpg
014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0464, Lugdunum, AE-As, GENIO AVGVSTI,131 views014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0464, Lugdunum, AE-As, GENIO AVGVSTI,
avers: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR P P P, Laureate head right.
reverse: GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, sacrificing from patera over altar, and holding cornucopiae, S C across fields.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 28mm, weight: 9,79g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 66 AD., ref: RIC-464, C-,
Q-001
quadrans
Nero_AE-Dup_IMP-NERO-CAESAR-AVG-P-MAX-TR-P-P-P_VICTORIA-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-522_C-343_Lugdunum_66-67-AD__Q-001_h_29-30mm_16,22g-s.jpg
014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0522, Lugdunum, AE-Dupondius, VICTORIA AVGVSTI,128 views014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0522, Lugdunum, AE-Dupondius, VICTORIA AVGVSTI,
avers: IMP-NERO-CAESAR-AVG-P-MAX-TR-P-P-P, Laureate head right.
revers: VICTORIA-AVGVSTI, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm; S C across fields.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 29-30mm, weight: 16,22g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 66-67 A.D., ref: RIC-522, C-343,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Nero_AE-AS_IMP-NERO-CAESAR-AVG-P-MAX-TR-P-P-P_S-C_RIC-xx_BMC-xx_C-xx_Rome-40-41-AD_Q-001_h_29-30mm_8,19g-s.jpg
014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0544, Lugdunum, AE-As, S-C, Victory flying left,84 views014 Nero (54-68 A.D.), RIC I 0544, Lugdunum, AE-As, S-C, Victory flying left,
avers: IMP-NERO-CAESAR-AVG-P-MAX-TR-P-P-P, Bare head left, globe at point of bust.
revers: Victory flying left, holding shield inscribed SPQR. S C across fields.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 29-30mm, weight: 8,19g, axis: h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 66A.D., ref: RIC-544, BMC 388, C 303, CBN 171.
Q-001
quadrans
42Hadrian__RIC4c.jpg
015 Hadrian Denarius Roma 117 AD Concordia37 viewsReference
Strack 3; RIC III, 15; C.250; RIC II, 4

Bust B1

Obv: IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIAN OPT AVG GER DAC.
Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, balteus strap over shoulder and across chest.

Rev: PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AVG F P M TR P COS P P in exergue CONCORD.
Concordia seated left, patera in right hand, resting left elbow on statue of Spes standing on cippus, cornucopiae under chair.

3.0 gr.
18 mm
12h
okidoki
017,_Galba,_AE-As,_SER_GALBA__IMP_AVG,_LIBERTAS_PVBLICA,_RIC-372,_Rome,_68-69AD,_Rare,_Q-001,_6h,_25-27,5mm,_9,72g-s.jpg
017 Galba (68-69 A.D.), RIC I 0372, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, LIBERTAS PVBLICA, Libertas standing facing, head left,66 views017 Galba (68-69 A.D.), RIC I 0372, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, LIBERTAS PVBLICA, Libertas standing facing, head left,
avers: SER•GALBA IMP•AVG, Laureate head right, with a globe at point of bust.
reverse: LIBERTAS PVBLICA, Libertas standing facing, head left, holding pileus in extended right hand, cradling vindicta in the left arm. S C across the field.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 25,0-27,5mm, weight: 9,72g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 68-69 A.D., ref: RIC-372, p-,
Q-001
quadrans
t3070.JPG
020 Tiberius 39 viewsTiberius Æ As. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII, Laureate head left / PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXXVII, S-C across field, Winged caduceus. RIC 59, Cohen 22, BMC 120Randygeki(h2)
Vespasian_AR-Denar_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII_VES-TA_RIC-II-50p-20_RIC-new-360_C-574_Rome_72-73AD_Q-001_axis-6h_17mm_3,26g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0360, RIC (1962) 050, Rome, AR-Denarius, VES TA, Vesta standing left, #1272 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0360, RIC (1962) 050, Rome, AR-Denarius, VES TA, Vesta standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII, Laureate head right.
revers:- VES-TA, No legend - Vesta standing left, holding simpulum and scepter, VES TA across fields.
exe: - /-//--, diameter: 17 mm, weight: 3,26 g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 72-73 A.D., ref: RIC 0360, RIC (1962) 050, C-574, BMC 71,
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Denar_IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG_COS-VII_RIC-xx_Q-001_18mm_3,30g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0847, RIC (1962) 099a, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS VII, Eagle standing on an altar, head left, #1263 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0847, RIC (1962) 099a, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS VII, Eagle standing on an altar, head left, #1
avers:- IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- No legend - Eagle standing on an altar, head left, COS VII across fields.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,30g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: -- A.D., ref: RIC 0847, RIC (1962) 099a, Sear 2287, RSC 121, BMC 180,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AE-Sest_IMP-CAES_VESPAS-AVG-P-M-TR-P-P-P-COS-III_PAX-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-II-437old-243new_C-327_71-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_32mm_27,52g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0243, RIC II(1962) 437, Rome, AE-Sestertius, PAX AVGVSTI, S-C, Pax standing left,322 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0243, RIC II(1962) 437, Rome, AE-Sestertius, PAX AVGVSTI, S-C, Pax standing left,
avers: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG P M TR P P P COS III, Laureate head right.
reverse: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, holding olive branch and cornucopiae, S C across fields.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 32,0mm, weight: 27,52g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 0243, RIC II(1962) 437, C-327,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AE-As_IMP-CAES_VESPASIAN-AVG-COS-III_AEQVITAS-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-II-482old-287new_C-13_71-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_25-25,5mm_8,42g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0287, RIC II(1962) 482, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, #1355 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0287, RIC II(1962) 482, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, #1
avers: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, Laureate head right.
reverse: AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, holding scales and scepter, S C across fields.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 25-25,5mm, weight: 8,42g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 0287, RIC II(1962) 482, C-13, BMC 600, Sear 2356,
Q-001
6 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AE-As_IMP-CAES_VESPASIAN-AVG-COS-III_AEQVITAS-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-II-482old-287new_C-13_71-AD_Q-002_6h_27-28mm_9,79g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0287, RIC II(1962) 482, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, #2154 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0287, RIC II(1962) 482, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, #2
avers: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, Laureate head right.
reverse: AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, holding scales and scepter, S C across fields.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 27,0-28,0mm, weight: 9,79g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 0287, RIC II(1962) 482, C-13, BMC 600, Sear 2356,
Q-002
quadrans
Vespasian_AE-Dup_IMP-CAES_VESP-AVG-P-M-T_P-COS-VII_FELICITAS-PVBLICA_S-C_RIC-578old-887new_C-155_76-AD__Q-001_27mm_13,00g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0887, RIC II(1962) 578, Rome, AE-Dupondius, FELICITAS PVBLICA, S-C, Felicitas standing left,319 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0887, RIC II(1962) 578, Rome, AE-Dupondius, FELICITAS PVBLICA, S-C, Felicitas standing left,
avers: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M T P COS VII, Radiate head right.
reverse: FELICITAS PVBLICA, S C across fields; Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopia.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 27,0mm, weight: 13,00g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 76 A.D., ref: RIC² 0887, RIC II(1962) 578, C-155,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
020_RIC_II_890,_Vespasian,_AE-As,_IMP_CAES_VESPASIAN_AVG_COS_VII,_AEQVITAS_AVGVST,_S-C,_RIC_II_580-old,_C-4,_76_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_25-25,5mm,_11,20g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0890, RIC II(1962) 5802, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, AEQVITAS AVGVST, Aequitas standing left, #168 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0890, RIC II(1962) 5802, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, AEQVITAS AVGVST, Aequitas standing left, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPA AVG COS VII, Laureate head right.
reverse: AEQVITAS AVGVST, Aequitas standing left, holding scales and scepter, S C across fields.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 25-25,5mm, weight: 11,20g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 0890, RIC II(1962) 580, C , BMC , Sear ,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Titus_AE-Dup_T-CAES-VESPAS-dot-IMP-dot-P-dot-TRP-COS-II_S-C_ROMA_RIC-xx_C-xx_Rome_80-AD__Q-001_axes-h_27mm_3,28g-2-s.jpg
022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), AE-Dupondius, RIC Not in !!!, RIC II(1962) Not in !!! (Vespasian), Roma, S-C, ROMA, Roma seated left, Not listed in RIC !!!, Rare !, 503 views022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), AE-Dupondius, RIC Not in !!!, RIC II(1962) Not in !!! (Vespasian), Roma, S-C, ROMA, Roma seated left, Not listed in RIC !!!, Rare !,
avers:- T CAES VESPAS•IMP•P•TRP COS II, Radiate head right.
revers:- Roma seated left, holding wreath and parazonium, S-C across the field, ROMA in exergo.
exerg: S/C//ROMA, diameter: 27mm, weight: x,xxg, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 72 A.D., ref: RIC Not in !!!, RIC II(1962) Not in !!! (Vespasian), C-Not in !!!,
Q-001

"Titus' coins with obverse legend T CAES VESPAS IMP P TR P COS II were struck in year 72, first issue.No ROMA reverse is listed in RIC for Titus in this issue, so you may have found a new type! "by FlaviusDomitianus. Thank you FlaviusDomitianus.
""Titus' issue of bronze coins with COS II and the abbreviations CAES VESPAS is altogether rare. RIC 411-417 only lists two sestertius types, R2 and R3; one dupondius type, FELICITAS PVBLICA, R2, unfortunately not illustrated, it would be nice to compare the obverse die with your coin; and four As types, all R2.

The same ROMA reverse die of your coin was apparently also used for dupondii with other obverse legends:

RIC 396, pl. 31, Vespasian COS IIII.

RIC 438, pl. 34, Titus CAES VESPASIAN P TR P COS II; also pl. 34, RIC 436 (rev. only), which should have ROMA around edge and SC in exergue, but in fact has ROMA in exergue and S - C in field, so seems to be another example of RIC 438.

Titus CAES VESPASIAN PON TR POT (instead of P TR P) COS II: my collection ex G. Hirsch 229, 2003, lot 2219; not in RIC."" by Curtis Clay, Thank you Curtis.
5 commentsquadrans
Titus_79-81-AD_AE-AS_IMP-T-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-TR-P-COS-VIII_AEQVITAS-AVGVST_S-C_RIC-II-121b_RIC-new-215_C-5_Rome-80-81_Scarce_Q-001_6h_27-27,5mm_10,73g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0215, RIC II(1962) 0121b, AE-As, Roma, AEQVITAS-AVGVST, Aequitas standing left, Scarce!, #1174 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0215, RIC II(1962) 0121b, AE-As, Roma, AEQVITAS-AVGVST, Aequitas standing left, Scarce!, #1
avers: IMP-T-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-TR-P-COS-VIII, Laureat head left.
revers: AEQVITAS-AVGVST, Aequitas standing left, holding scales and sceptre. S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 27-27,5mm, weight: 10,73g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 80-81 AD, ref: RIC 0215, RIC II(1962) 0121b p-130, C-5, BMCRE 204,
Q-001
quadrans
Titus_79-81-AD_Q-001_27-29mm_12,76ga-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0226, RIC II(1962) 0126, AE-As, Roma, GENI P R, S/C//--, Genius standing left, Scarce!, #1299 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0226, RIC II(1962) 0126, AE-As, Roma, GENI P R, S/C//--, Genius standing left, Scarce!, #1
avers:- IMP T CAES VESP AVG P M TR P COS VIII, Laureate head left.
revers:- GENI P R, Genius, naked to waist, standing facing, looking left by a garlanded altar, holding patera and cornucopiae. S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 27-29mm, weight: 12,76g, axis:- h,
mint: , date: , ref: RIC 0226, RIC II(1962) 0126 p-130, C-96, BMC 210,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Domitian_AE-AS_CAESAR-AVG-F-DOMITIAN-COS-V_No-legend_S-C_RIC-II-723Vesp_RIC-New-Vesp_C-_Rome-77-78-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_25,5-27,5mm_9,74g-s.jpg
024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 1053, RIC II(1962) 0723(Vespasian), AE-As, Rome, No legend, S-C, Spes left, #1233 views024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 1053, RIC II(1962) 0723(Vespasian), AE-As, Rome, No legend, S-C, Spes left, #1
avers:- CAESAR-AVG-F-DOMITIAN-COS-V, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- No legend, Spes walking left, in right holding flower, with left raising fold of robe, S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 25,5-27,5mm, weight: 91,74g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome ???, date: 77-78 A.D., ref: RIC 1053, RIC II(1962) 0723(Vespasian) p-99,
Q-001
quadrans
Domitian_AE-Sest_CAES-DIVI-AVG-VESP-F-DOMITIAN-COS-VII_PAX-AVGVST_S-C_RIC-II-155b_RIC-New-Titus-288_C-343_Rome-80-AD_Q-001_6h_32,5-34mm_22,33ga-s.jpg
024b Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0290, RIC II(1962) 0155a(Titus), AE-Sestertius, Rome, PAX-AVGVST, S-C, Pax left, #1164 views024b Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0290, RIC II(1962) 0155a(Titus), AE-Sestertius, Rome, PAX-AVGVST, S-C, Pax left, #1
avers:- CAES-DIVI-AVG-VESP-F-DOMITIAN-COS-VII, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- PAX-AVGVST, Pax standing left, holding branch and cornucopia, S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 32,5-34mm, weight: 22,33g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome , date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0290, RIC II(1962) 0155a(Titus) p-135,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
Domitian_AE-AS_CAES-DIVI-VESP-F-DOMITIAN-COS-VII_S-C_RIC-II-169b_RIC-New-348_C-_Rome-80-81-AD_Rare_Q-001_6h_25,5-26,5mm_10,63g-s.jpg
024b Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0348, RIC II(1962) 0169b(Titus), AE-As, Rome, No legend, S-C, Minerva left, #1121 views024b Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0348, RIC II(1962) 0169b(Titus), AE-As, Rome, No legend, S-C, Minerva left, #1
avers: CAES-DIVI-VESP-F-DOMITIAN-COS-VII, Laureate head of Domitian left.
revers: No legend, Minerva standing left, holding thunderbolt and spear, shield at her side. S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 25,5-26,5mm, weight: 10,63g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome , date: 80-81 A.D., ref: RIC 0348, RIC II(1962) 0169b(Titus) p-138, C-443,
Q-001
quadrans
Domitian_AE-AS_IMP-CAES-DOMITIAN-AVG-GERM-COS-XI_MONETA-AVGVST_RIC-new-303-Rome-85-AD_Q-001_26-28mm_11,34g-s.jpg
024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0303, RIC II(1962) 0270, AE-As, Rome, MONETA AVGVST, S-C, Moneta standing left, #1319 views024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0303, RIC II(1962) 0270, AE-As, Rome, MONETA AVGVST, S-C, Moneta standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-CAES-DOMITIAN-AVG-GERM-COS-XI, Laureate head of Domitian right, wearing aegis.
revers:- MONETA-AVGVSTI, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae, S-C across the field.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 26-28mm, weight: 11,34g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 85 A.D., ref: RIC 0303, RIC II(1962) 0270 p-188, C-325 corr.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Domitian_AE-AS_IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-COS-XI-CENS-PER-P-P_FORTVNAE-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-II-299bvar-Rome-85-AD-Rare_Q-001_axis-7h_26-28mm_9,87g-s.jpg
024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0415, RIC II(1962) 0299b, (revers legend var.), AE-As, Rome, FORTVNA(E)-AVGVSTI (!!!), S-C, Rare !!!,338 views024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0415, RIC II(1962) 0299b, (revers legend var.), AE-As, Rome, FORTVNA(E)-AVGVSTI (!!!), S-C, Rare !!!,
avers:- IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-COS-XI-CENS-PER-P-P, Laureate head of Domitian right, wearing aegis.
revers:- FORTVNA(E)-AVGVSTI (!!!), Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopiae, S-C across the field.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 26-28mm, weight: 9,87g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 85 A.D., ref:RIC 0415, RIC II(1962) 0299b p-192, (revers legend var.), Rare!,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Domitian_AE-AS_IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-COS-XII-CENS-PER-P-P_MONETA-AVGVSTI_RIC-493-Rome-86-AD_Q-001_26-28mm_10,20g-s.jpg
024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0493, RIC II(1962) 0335, AE-As, Rome, MONETA AVGVSTI, S-C, Moneta standing left, #1318 views024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0493, RIC II(1962) 0335, AE-As, Rome, MONETA AVGVSTI, S-C, Moneta standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-COS-XII-CENS-PER-P-P, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- MONETA-AVGVSTI, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae, S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 26-28mm, weight: 10,20g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 86 A.D., ref: RIC 0493, RIC II(1962) 0335 p-196, C-327,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
quadrans-Q-009_h_mm_ga-s.jpg
024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0502, RIC II(1962) 0310, AE-Quadrans, Rome, Corn-ears and poppies, #175 views024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0502, RIC II(1962) 0310, AE-Quadrans, Rome, Corn-ears and poppies, #1
avers:- IMP-DOMITIAN-AVG-GE[RM COS XII], Diademed (with ears) draped bust of Ceres (Domitia) right.
revers:- Associated sheaf of three poppies and four ears, S-C across the field.
diameter: mm, weight: axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 86 A.D., ref: RIC 0502, RIC II(1962) 0310 p-194, BMCRE 370, C-18,
Q-001
quadrans
Domitian_AE-AS_IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-COS-XV-CENS-PER-P-P_VIRTVTI-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-II-397_RIC-New-709_C-656_Rome-90-91-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_26,5-28mm_11,48g-s.jpg
024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0709, RIC II(1962) 0397, AE-As, Rome, VIRTVTI AVGVSTI, S-C, Virtus standing right, #1271 views024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0709, RIC II(1962) 0397, AE-As, Rome, VIRTVTI AVGVSTI, S-C, Virtus standing right, #1
avers:- IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-COS-XV-CENS-PER-P-P, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- VIRTVTI-AVGVSTI, Virtus standing right, holding parazonium and sceptre, left foot on helmet, S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 26,5-28mm, weight: 11,48g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 90-91 A.D., ref: RIC 0709, RIC II(1962) 0397 p-203, C 656, BMC 452
Q-001
quadrans
Domitian_AE-AS_IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-COS-XVI-CENS-PER-P-P_MONETA-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-II-408_RIC-New-756_C-333_Rome-92-94-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_27-28mm_10,84g-s.jpg
024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0756, RIC II(1962) 0408, AE-As, Rome, MONETA AVGVSTI, S-C, Moneta standing left, #1286 views024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0756, RIC II(1962) 0408, AE-As, Rome, MONETA AVGVSTI, S-C, Moneta standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-COS-XVI-CENS-PER-P-P, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- MONETA-AVGVSTI, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae, S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 26-28mm, weight: 10,84g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 92-94 A.D., ref: RIC 0756, RIC II(1962) 0408 p-205, C-333,
Q-001
quadrans
quadrans-Q-005_h_mm_ga-s.jpg
026 Nerva (96-98 A.D.), RIC II 112var., Rome, AE-Quadrans, S/C//--, Winged caduceus,76 views026 Nerva (96-98 A.D.), RIC II 112var., Rome, AE-Quadrans, S/C//--, Winged caduceus,
avers: IMP NERVA CAES AVG, modius with three grain-ears.
reverse: Winged caduceus, S-C across the field.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 15-15,5mm, weight: 2,35g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 96-98 A.D., ref: RIC II 112var., C-138, BMC ,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Nerva_AE_As_IMP-NERVA-CAES-TRAIAN-AVG-GERM-PM_TR-POT-COS-II_S-C_RIC-393-C-612_98-AD_Q-001_6h_27,5-28,5mm_12,25g-s.jpg
026 Nerva (96-98 A.D.), RIC II 393, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, TR POT COS II, Pietas veiled and draped standing left, Rare!184 views026 Nerva (96-98 A.D.), RIC II 393, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, TR POT COS II, Pietas veiled and draped standing left, Rare!
avers: IMP NERVA CAES TRAIAN AVG GERM P M, Laureate head right.
reverse: TR POT COS II, Pietas veiled and draped standing left, sacrificing over a lighted altar. S-C across the field.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 27,5-28,5mm, weight:12,25g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 98 A.D., ref: RIC II 393, p-, C-612, Rare!
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Traianus_fouree-Denarius_IMP-CAES-NER-TRAIANO-OPTIMO-AVG-GER-D_P-M-TR-P-COS-VI-P-P-SPR-Q-PT_PRO-VID_RIC-_C-_Q-001_18-20mm_3,02g-s.jpg
027 Traianus (98-117 A.D.), AR-Denarius, RIC II 365v, Rome, P M TR P COS VI P P SPR Q PT, PRO-VID, Plated (Fouree),68 views027 Traianus (98-117 A.D.), AR-Denarius, RIC II 365v, Rome, P M TR P COS VI P P SPR Q PT, PRO-VID, Plated (Fouree),
avers: -IMP-CAES-NER-TRAIANO-OPTIMO-AVG-GER-D, Laureate, draped bust right.
revers: -P-M-TR-P-COS-VI-P-P-SPR-Q-PT, PRO-VID,Providentia standing left, raising hand over globe and holding scepter; PRO VID across fields.
exergo:-/-//--, diameter:20mm, weight:3,02g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 117 A.D., ref:RIC-II-365var.???,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Traianus_fouree-Denarius_IMP-AES-NER-TRAIANO-OPTIMO-AVG-GER-D_P-M-TR-P-COS-VI-P-P-SPR-Q-PT_PRO-VID_RIC-_C-_Q-001_h_18-20mm_3,02ga-s.jpg
027 Traianus (98-117 A.D.), RIC II 0365var., Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P COS VI P P SPR Q PT, PRO/VID//--, Plated (Fouree),62 views027 Traianus (98-117 A.D.), RIC II 0365var., Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P COS VI P P SPR Q PT, PRO/VID//--, Plated (Fouree),
avers: -IMP-CAES-NER-TRAIANO-OPTIMO-AVG-GER-D, Laureate, draped bust right.
revers: -P-M-TR-P-COS-VI-P-P-SPR-Q-PT, PRO-VID,Providentia standing left, raising hand over globe and holding scepter; PRO VID across fields.
exergo:PRO/VID//--, diameter:20mm, weight:3,02g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 117 A.D., ref:RIC-II-365var.???,
Q-001
quadrans
Traian_AE-AS_IMP-CAES-NERVA-TRAIAN-AVG-GERM-PM_TR-POT-COS-III-P-P_S-C_RIC-687-C_Rome-107-AD_Q-001_axis-xh_28mm_x,xxg-s.jpg
027 Traianus (98-117 A.D.), RIC II 0417, Rome, AE-As, TR POT COS III P P, SP/QR, /S-C, Victoria,115 views027 Traianus (98-117 A.D.), RIC II 0417, Rome, AE-As, TR POT COS III P P, SP/QR, /S-C, Victoria,
avers:- IMP-CAES-NERVA-TRAIAN-AVG-GERM-PM, Laureate, head right.
revers:- TR-POT-COS-III-P-P, Victoria, advancing left, carrying shield inscribed SP/QR, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 28mm, weight: x,xxg, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 99-100 A.D., ref: RIC-II-417-p-274, C-628,
Q-001
quadrans
027_Traianus_(98-117_A_D_)_Billon-Tetradrachm,_G-160-61_D-251-52_Milne-560_Alexandria,__L-E_Eagle-r__Q-001_0h_23mm_12,93g-s.jpg
027p Traianus (98-117 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, G-160-161, D-251-252, Egypt, Alexandria, Eagle standing right,70 views027p Traianus (98-117 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, G-160-161, D-251-252, Egypt, Alexandria, Eagle standing right,
avers:- AYT-KAIΣ-NEP-TPAIAN-ΣEB-ΓEPM, Laureate head right.
revers:- No legend, Eagle standing right, wings closed, L-E across field.
exe: L/E//--, diameter: 23mm, weight: 12,93g, axis: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: Dated year (L-E) 5 = 101-102 A.D., ref: Geissen-450-451, Dattari-705, Kapmann-Ganschow-27.31-p-86, Milne-560,
Q-001
quadrans
027.JPG
030 Caligula37 viewsGaius Caligula Æ As. Struck 37-8 AD. C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT, bare head left / VESTA above, S C across field, Vesta seated left, holding patera and sceptre. Cohen 27.RIC 38 sear5 #1803

New photo
Randygeki(h2)
30_b.jpg
030b Hadrian. billion tetradrachm 13.6gm22 viewsobv: laur. bust r. drp. on l. shoulder-cresent
rev: Agathodaimon, coiled and stricking snake r. with caduceus and grain ear.
l-delta across field (date)
hill132
Hadrianus_fouree-Denarius_Q-001_18mm_2,83g-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), AR-Denarius, RIC II 013v, Rome, PARTH F DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS II P P, PIE-TAS, Plated (Fouree),65 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), AR-Denarius, RIC II 013v, Rome, PARTH F DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS II P P, PIE-TAS, Plated (Fouree),
avers: - IMP-CAESAR-TRAIAN-HADRIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers: -PARTHIC-DIVI-TRAIANA-AVG-P-M-TR-P-COS-II-P-P, PIE-TAS, Pietas standing left, raising hand; PIE TAS across fields.
exergo: -/-//--, diameter:18mm, weight:2,83g, axis:h,
mint: Rome, date:117 A.D., ref:RIC-13var.,???,
Q-001
quadrans
Hadrianus_fouree-Denarius_Q-001_h_18mm_2,83ga-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0013var., Rome, AR-Denarius, PARTH F DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS II P P, PIE-TAS, Plated (Fouree),66 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0013var., Rome, AR-Denarius, PARTH F DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS II P P, PIE-TAS, Plated (Fouree),
avers: - IMP-CAESAR-TRAIAN-HADRIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers: -PARTHIC-DIVI-TRAIANA-AVG-P-M-TR-P-COS-II-P-P, PIE-TAS, Pietas standing left, raising hand; PIE TAS across fields.
exergo: PIE/TAS//--, diameter:18mm, weight:2,83g, axis:h,
mint: Rome, date:117 A.D., ref:RIC-13var.,???,
Q-001
quadrans
Hadrian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-TRAIAN-HADRIANVS-AVG_P-M-TR-P-COS-II_FEL-AVG_RIC-II-40-p-_C-_-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_17mm_3,08g-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0040, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P COS II, FEL-AVG, Felicitas standing left,130 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0040, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P COS II, FEL-AVG, Felicitas standing left,
avers:-IMP-CAESAR-TRAIAN-HADRIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right, with draped left shoulder.
revers:-P-M-TR-P-COS-II, Felicitas standing left, with caduceus and cornucopiae, FEL - AVG across fields.
exerg: FEL/AVG//--, diameter: 17mm, weight: 3,08g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC II 40, p-, C-,
Q-001
quadrans
Hadrian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-TRAIAN-HADRIANVS-AVG_P-M-TR-P-COS-III_SAL-AVG_RIC-II--p-_C-_-AD_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0138, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P COS III, SAL-AVG, Salus standing left,98 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0138, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P COS III, SAL-AVG, Salus standing left,
avers:-IMP-CAESAR-TRAIAN-HADRIANVS-AVG, Laureate and draped (!!) bust right.
revers:-P-M-TR-P-COS-III, Salus standing left feeding serpent rising from altar, holding sceptre, SAL - AVG across fields.
exerg: SAL/AVG//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Rome, date: 119-122 A.D., ref: RIC II 138var, p-356, C-1323,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
032_Hadrianus_(117-138_A_D_),_RIC_II_0679,_AE-As,_HADRIANVS_AVGVSTVS,_COS_III,_Salus,_125-128_AD_Q-001_6h,_25,5-27mm,_10,5ga-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0679, Rome, AE-As, COS III, S/C//--, Salus standing right, feeding serpent, #1113 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0679, Rome, AE-As, COS III, S/C//--, Salus standing right, feeding serpent, #1
avers: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, Laureate head right.
revers: COS III, Salus standing right holding patera, feeding serpent in arms, S-C across fields.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 25,5-27,0mm, weight: 10,5g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 125-128 A.D., ref: RIC II 679, C-1370,
Q-001
quadrans
Hadrian_AE-Dupondius_HADRIANVS-AVG-COS-III-PP_ANNONA-AVG_S-C_RIC-II-796_C-166_134-AD_R-1_Q-001_axis-6h_25-26mm_11,65g-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0796a, Rome, AE-As, ANNONA AVG, S-C, Annona standing left, Rare !178 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0796a, Rome, AE-As, ANNONA AVG, S-C, Annona standing left, Rare !
avers:- HADRIANVS-AVG-COS-III-PP, Laureate head right.
revers:- ANNONA-AVG, Annona standing left holding corn ears over modius and rudder, S-C across the field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 25-26mm, weight: 11,65g, axes: 6h,
mint: , date: 134 A.D., ref: RIC-II-796a p-441, C-166,
Q-001
quadrans
Hadrian_AE-Dupondius_HADRIANVS-AVGVSTVS-PP_HILAR-I-TAS-PR_COS-III_S-C_RIC-II-974_C-820_-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_27,5mm_12,34g-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0974, Rome, AE-Dupondius, HILARITAS PR, COS-III, Hilaritas standing left,143 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0974, Rome, AE-Dupondius, HILARITAS PR, COS-III, Hilaritas standing left,
avers:- HADRIANVS-AVGVSTVS-PP, Radiate head right.
revers:-HILAR-I-TAS-PR, Hilaritas standing left, holding palm and cornucopia; child on either side, S-C, across the field.
exe: -/-//COS III, diameter: 27,5 mm, weight: 12,34g, axis: 5 h,
mint: Rome, date: 128-132 A.D., ref: RIC-II-974-p-469, C-820,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
035_Ant_Pius,_RIC_III_546,_ANTONINVS_AVG_PIVS_P_P,_TR_POT_COS_II,_S-C,_AE-Sest,_Roma,_139_AD,_Q-001,_5h,_31,5-32,5mm,_23,86g-s.jpg
035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0546, Rome, AE-Sestertius, TR POT COS II, Fides standing right, S-C,62 views035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0546, Rome, AE-Sestertius, TR POT COS II, Fides standing right, S-C,
avers: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, Laureate head right.
reverse: TR POT COS II, Fides standing right, holding corn-ears and dish of fruit, S-C across the field.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 31,5-32,5mm, weight: 23,86g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 139 A.D., ref: RIC III 546,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Ant_Pius-AE-Sest_ANTONINVS-AVG-PI-VS-P-P-TRP-COS-III_ANNONAdotAVG_S-C_RIC-597_C-34_Rome_142-AD_Q-001_axis-0h_32-33mm_29,18g-s.jpg
035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0597, Rome, AE-Sestertius, ANNONA•AVG, Annona standing right, S-C,178 views035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0597, Rome, AE-Sestertius, ANNONA•AVG, Annona standing right, S-C,
avers:- ANTONINVS-AVG-PI-VS-P-P-TR-P-COS-III, Laureate head right.
revers:-ANNONA•AVG, Annona standing right holding corn ears over modius and cornucopiae, prow behind, S-C across the field.
exe:S/C//--, diameter: 32-33mm, weight: 29,18g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 142 A.D., ref: RIC-III-597-p-, C-34,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Ant_Pius-AE-Sest_ANTONINVS-AVG-PI-VS-P-P-TRP-COS-IIII_SALVS-AVG_S-C_RIC-784_C-_Rome_-AD_Q-001_axis-0h_30-31mm_25,01g-s.jpg
035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0784, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS-AVG, Salus standing right, S-C,129 views035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0784, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS-AVG, Salus standing right, S-C,
avers:- ANTONINVS-AVG-PI-VS-P-P-TR-P-COS-IIII, Laureate head right.
revers:-SALVS-AVG, Salus standing right feeding serpent coiled around altar and holding rudder on globe, S-C across the field.
exe:S/C//--, diameter: 30-31mm, weight: 25,01g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-784-p-, C-,
Q-001
quadrans
035_Ant_Pius,_RIC_III_886,_ANTONINVS_AVG_PIVS_P_P_TR_P_XV,_SALVS_AVG_COS_IIII,_S-C,_AE-Sest,_Roma,_151-52_AD,_Q-001,_5h,_30-32,5mm,_21,53g-s.jpg
035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0886, Rome, AE-Sestertius, S/C//--, SALVS AVG COS IIII, Salus standing left,65 views035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0886, Rome, AE-Sestertius, S/C//--, SALVS AVG COS IIII, Salus standing left,
avers: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XV, Laureate head right.
reverse: SALVS AVG COS IIII, Salus standing left feeding serpent arising from altar, and leaning on staff, S-C across the field.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 30,0-32,5mm, weight: 21,53g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 151-152 A.D., ref: RIC III 886,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Ant_Pius-AE-As_ANTONINVS-AVG-PIVS-P-P-TR-P-XVII_ANNONA-AVG-COS-IIII_S-C_RIC-912_C-42_Rome_142-AD_Q-001_11h_27mm_9,20g-s.jpg
035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0912, Rome, AE-As, ANNONA-AVG-COS-IIII, Annona standing right, S-C,87 views035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0912, Rome, AE-As, ANNONA-AVG-COS-IIII, Annona standing right, S-C,
avers:- ANTONINVS-AVG-PIVS-P-P-TR-P-XVII, Laureate head right.
revers:-ANNONA-AVG-COS-IIII, Annona standing, holding corn ears and poppies over altar and modius, S-C across the field.
exe:S/C//--, diameter: 27mm, weight: 9,20g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 142 A.D., ref: RIC-III-912-p-, C-42,
Q-001
quadrans
Ant_Pius-AE-Sest_ANTONINVS-AVG-PIVS-P-P-TR-P-XVII_LIBERALITAS-VII_COS-IIII_S-C_RIC-III-905-p-139_C-525_Rome_152-3-AD_R_Q-001_0h_32-33mm_29,37g-s.jpg
035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0915, Rome, AE-Sestertius, LIBERALITAS VII, Antoninus seated left on platform, S-C, R!222 views035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0905, Rome, AE-Sestertius, LIBERALITAS VII, Antoninus seated left on platform, S-C, R!
avers:- ANTONINVS-AVG-PIVS-P-P-TR-P-XVII, Laureate head right.
revers: LIBERALITAS-VII, Antoninus seated left on platform on right: in front of him, Liberalitas satnding left, holding account-board and cornucopiae: below citizen standing right holding out fold of toga, S-C across the field, COS IIII in exergo.
exe:S/C//COS IIII, diameter: 32-33mm, weight: 29,37g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 152-153 A.D., ref: RIC-III-915-p-140, C-525-526, Rare !
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
Ant_Pius-AE-Sest_ANTONINVS-AVG-PIVS-P-P-IMP-II_TR-POT-XX-COS-IIII_S-C_RIC-III-967-p-145_C-1008_Rome_156-7-AD_R_Q-001_11h_30,5-31,5mm_25,47g-s.jpg
035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0967var., Rome, AE-Sestertius, TR POT XX COS IIII, Securitas seated left, S-C across the field ! 241 views035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0967var., Rome, AE-Sestertius, TR POT XX COS IIII, Securitas seated left, S-C across the field !
avers: ANTONINVS-AVG-PIVS-P-P-IMP-II, Laureate head right.
revers: TR-POT-XX-COS-IIII, Securitas seated left on chair formed by two cornucopiae, holding scepter, S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 30,5-31,5mm, weight: 25,47g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 156-157 A.D., ref: RIC-III-967var.( S-C across the field !)-p-145, C-1008,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Antoninus_-Pius-s.jpg
035b Anonymous AE Quadrans. Period of Domitian to Antoninus Pius (81-161 A.D.), RIC II 0019, Rome, AE-Quadrans, Couriass, S-C, Scarce !,125 views035b Anonymous AE Quadrans. Period of Domitian to Antoninus Pius (81-161 A.D.), RIC II 0019, Rome, AE-Quadrans, Couriass, S-C, Scarce !,
avers:- No legends, Helmeted and cuirassed bust of Mars right.
revers:- No legends, Couriass, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: , date: Period of Domitian to Antoninus Pius 81-161 A.D., ref: RIC II 19 p-218, C-26-27cf,
Q-001
quadrans
Faustina_sen_AE-Dup-or-As_DIVA-FAV-STINA_AVGV-STA_S-C_RIC-III-AP-1169b_C-80_Rome_after-141-AD_Q-001_5h_26-26,5mm_12,44ga-s.jpg
036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 1169b (A.Pius), Rome, AE-dupondius, AVGVSTA, Ceres standing left, Scarce !181 views036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 1169b (A.Pius), Rome, AE-dupondius, AVGVSTA, Ceres standing left, Scarce !
Wife of Antoninus Pius.
avers:- DIVA-FAV-STINA, Draped and veiled bust right.
revers:- AVGV-STA,Ceres standing left, holding corn ears and transverse long torch, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 26-26,5mm, weight: 12,44g, axis:5 h,
mint: Rome, date: after 141 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1169b (Antoninus Pius)-p-167, C-80, Scarce !,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Faustina-sen_AE-Dup_DIVA-FAV_STINA__AVG_V_STA_S-C_RIC-000_C-000_Q-001_27-28mm_11,75g-s.jpg
036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 1173a (A.Pius), Rome, AE-dupondius, AVGVSTA, Ceres, Scarce !103 views036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 1173a (A.Pius), Rome, AE-dupondius, AVGVSTA, Ceres, Scarce !
Wife of Antoninus Pius.
avers:- DIVA-FAV_STINA, Draped bust right.
revers:- AVGV_STA, Ceres standing left, holding torch in right hand, sceptre in left, S-C across the field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: 11,75g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: after 141 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1173a (Antoninus Pius)-p-167, C-100,99, Scarce,
Q-001
quadrans
036_Faustina_sen_,_AE-As,_DIVA_FAV_STINA,_AVGV_STA,_S-C,_RIC_III_(Ant_Pius)_1180,_C_118,_Rome,_after_141_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_24-24,5mm,_9,4g-s.jpg
036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 1180 (A.Pius), Rome, AE-As, AVGVSTA, Vesta standing left, #1 63 views036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 1180 (A.Pius), Rome, AE-As, AVGVSTA, Vesta standing left, #1
Wife of Antoninus Pius.
avers: DIVA FAV STINA, Draped bust right.
reverse: AVGV STA, Vesta standing left, sacrificing from patera over flaming altar to left and holding palladium in the left hand, S-C across the field.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 24,0-24,5mm, weight: 9,4g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: after 141 A.D., ref: RIC III 1180 (Antoninus Pius), C 118,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Marc-Aurelius_AE-AS_AVRELIVS-CAE-SAR-AVG-P-II-F_TR-POT-III-COS-II_(Fides)_S-C_RIC--Ant-Pius-_C-_Rome_151-52-AD_Q-001_0h_27-27,5mm_10,81g-s.jpg
037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 1288b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-As, TR POT III COS II/S-C, Fides standing right,90 views037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 1288b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-As, TR POT III COS II/S-C, Fides standing right,
avers:- AVRELIVS-CAE-SAR-AVG-P-II-F, Bare headed, bust right.
revers:- TR-POT-III-COS-II, Fides standing right, holding two grain ears and a plate of fruit in her left, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 27-27,5mm, weight: 10,81g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date:148-149 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1288b (Ant.Pius), p-179, C-, Sear-,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Marc-Aurelius_AE-AS_AVRELIVS-CAES-AR-AVG-P-II-FIL_TR-POT-VI-C-OS-II_S-C_RIC-1305a-Ant-Pius-_C-638_Rome_151-52-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_26-27mm_8,66ga-s.jpg
037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 1305b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-As, TR POT VI COS II/S-C, Minerva standing left,93 views037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 1305b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-As, TR POT VI COS II/S-C, Minerva standing left,
avers:- AVRELIVS-CAES-AR-AVG-P-II-FIL, Bare headed, draped, (cuirassed?) bust right.
revers:- TR-POT-VI-C-OS-II, Minerva standing left, holding Victory, spear and resting against shield., S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 26-27mm, weight: 8,66g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date:151-52 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1305b?(Ant.Pius), p-182, C-638, Sear-,
Q-001
quadrans
037_Marcus_Aurelius_(139-161_A_D__as_Caesar,_161-180_A_D__as_Augustus),_AE-Sestertius,_RIC_III_959,_Rome,_TR_POT_XXII_IMP_V_COS_III,Q-001-g-s.jpg
037b Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0959, Rome, AE-Sestertius, TR POT XXII IMP V COS III, Victory advancing left,65 views037b Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0959, Rome, AE-Sestertius, TR POT XXII IMP V COS III, Victory advancing left,
avers:- M-ANTONINVS-AVG-ARM-PARTH-MAX, Laureate head, right.
revers:- TR-POT-XXII-IMP-V-COS III, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm, S-C across fields,
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 29,5-31mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date:168 A.D., ref: RIC-III-959, p-290, Cohen 819,
Q-001
quadrans
037_Marcus_Aurelius_(139-161_A_D__as_Caesar,_161-180_A_D__as_Augustus),_AE-Dupondius,_RIC_III_982,_Rome,-Q-001_g-s.jpg
037b Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0982, Rome, AE-Dupondius, SALVTI AVG COS III, Salus standing left,93 views037b Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0982, Rome, AE-Dupondius, SALVTI AVG COS III, Salus standing left,
avers: M-ANTONINVS-AVG-TR-P-XXIIII, Radiate, draped and cuirassed head right.
revers: SALVTI AVG COS III, Salus standing left, feeding serpent entwined around altar, and holding sceptre; S-C across fields.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 24-25mm, weight: 6,37g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date:169-70 A.D., ref: RIC III 982 p-292, Cohen 549, Kampmann 037.219, van Meter 34-145.
Q-001
quadrans
Marc-Aurelius_AE-Sest_IMP-M-ANTONINVS-AVG-TR-P-XXV_VOTA-SVSCEP-DECENN-II_S-C_COS-III_RIC-1017_C-1037_Rome_170-71-AD_Q-001_axis-h_35mm_x,xxg-s.jpg
037b Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 1017, Rome, AE-Sestertius, VOTA SVSCEP DECENN II, S/C//COS III, Emperor standing left, Scarce!203 views037b Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 1017, Rome, AE-Sestertius, VOTA SVSCEP DECENN II, S/C//COS III, Emperor standing left, Scarce!
avers:- IMP-M-ANTONINVS-AVG-TR-P-XXV, Laurate head right.
revers:- VOTA-SVSCEP-DECENN-II, Emperor standing left, sacrificing over tripod altar, S-C across the field, COS III in ex.
exerg: S/C//COS III, diameter: 32-33mm, weight: 28,69g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date:170-71 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1017-p-294, C-1037, Sear-,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Marc_Aurelius_AE-Dvp_M-ANTONINVS-AVG-GERM-SARM-TRP-XXXI_VICT-AVG-TR-POT-XX-IMP-IIII-COS-III_S-C_RIC-942_C-_Rome-166-AD_Q-001_axis-h_mm_21,xxga-s.jpg
037b Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 1186, Rome, AE-Dupondius, IMP-VIII-COS-III•P•P•, Trophy, at base a seated Sarmatian woman and man, S-C/ DE SARM, Rare !!!142 views037b Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 1186, Rome, AE-Dupondius, IMP-VIII-COS-III•P•P•, Trophy, at base a seated Sarmatian woman and man, S-C/ DE SARM, Rare !!!
Sarmatian victory commemoration for Marcus Aurelius.
avers:- M-ANTONINVS-AVG-GERM-SARM-TRP-XXXI, Radiate head right.
revers:- IMP-VIII-COS-III•P•P•, Trophy, at base a seated Sarmatian woman and man, S-C across the field, DE SARM in exergue.
exerg: S/C//DE SARM, diameter: 24-26mm, weight: 10,10g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date:176-77 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1186, p-306, C-168, Sear-, Rare!!!,
Q-001
5 commentsquadrans
Faustina-fil_AE-Dup_FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL_S-C_RIC-1405b-A-Pius-_C-207_Rome_145-146-AD_Q-001_5h_27mm_13,86ga-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!, #199 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!, #1
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head, band of pearls and necklace.
revers: No legend - Diana standing left, holding arrow and resting hand on bow, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 27mm, weight: 13,86g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 145-146 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1405b (Antoninus Pius), p-194, C-207,209,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Faustina-fil_AE-Dup_FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL_S-C_RIC-1405b-A-Pius-_C-207_Rome_145-146-AD_Q-002_6h_25-26mm_13,01ga-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!, #274 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!, #2
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head, band of pearls and necklace.
revers: No legend - Diana standing left, holding arrow and resting hand on bow, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 25-26mm, weight: 13,01g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 145-146 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1405b (Antoninus Pius), p-194, C-207,209,
Q-002
2 commentsquadrans
GI_038a_img.jpg
039 - Nerva Ar Drachm - SNG Cop. 4424 viewsObv:–AVTOKPAT NEPOYAC KAICAP CEBACT, Laureate bust right; L-Y across field
Rev:– YPATOY TRITOY, Two lyres (chelyes), owl above
Minted in Lycia, Lycian League. A.D. 97
Reference:– SNG Cop. 44; SNG von Aulock 4266; BMC Lycia p. 39, 6
 
Some surface lamination issues.
maridvnvm
GI_039a_img.jpg
039 - Trajan Billon tetradrachm - Milne 56613 viewsObv:- AVT KAIC NEP TRAIAN CEB ΓEPM, laureate head right
Rev:- eagle standing right, L - S across fields (year 6)
Minted in Alexandria 29 Aug 102 - 28 Aug 103 A.D.
Reference:- Milne 566, Dattari 707, SRCV II 3255 var (date)
maridvnvm
Lucilla_AE-As_LVCILLA_AVGVSTA_IVNO_S-C_RIC-III-_(Marc_Aur_)-1744-p353_C-33_Rome_166-67-AD_Q-001_axis-0h_24-26mm_10,72g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1744 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO, Iuno standing left and peacock, 143 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1744 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO, Iuno standing left and peacock,
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers:- LVCILLA_AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers:- IVNO, Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre, at her feet, peacock, S-C across the field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 24-26mm, weight: 10,72g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1744 (Marc.Aur.), p-353, C-33.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Lucilla_AE-As_LVCILLA_AVGVSTA_IVNO-REGINA_S-C_RIC-III-(M_Aur)-1752-p_C-_Rome_166-67-AD_Q-001_6h_23-26mm_9,44g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1752 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO REGINA, Iuno standing left and peacock, 87 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1752 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO REGINA, Iuno standing left and peacock,
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers:- LVCILLA_AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers:- IVNO-REGINA, Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre, at her feet, peacock, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 23-26mm, weight: 9,44g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1752 (Marc.Aur.), p-, C-.,
Q-001
quadrans
Lucilla,_RIC_III_(M_Aur)_1756,_AE-Sest,_LVCILLAE_AVG_ANTONINI_AVG_F,_PIETAS,_S-C,_C-54,_BMC_1161,_Rome,_161-62_AD,_Q-001,_1h,_29-30,5mm,_20,48g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1756 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-Sestertius, PIETAS, Pietas standing, head right, #166 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1756 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-Sestertius, PIETAS, Pietas standing, head right, #1
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
reverse: PIETAS, Pietas standing, head right, holding patera, altar before, S-C across the field.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 29,0-30,5mm, weight: 20,48g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 161-62 A.D., ref: RIC III 1756 (Marc.Aur.), C-54, BMC 1161
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
041a_Commodus,_RIC_III_1592,_Marc_Aur,_AE-Dupondius,_L_AVREL_COMMOD_VS_AVG_TR_P_III,__LIBERTAS_IMP_II_COS_P_P,_S-C,_p-,_Rome_179-AD,_Q-001_11h_23-24mm_12,26g-s.jpg
041a Commodus (166-180 A.D. as Caesar, 180-192 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 1592 (M.Aurel.), Rome, AE-Dup, LIBERTAS AVG IMP II COS P P, Libertas standing left,103 views041a Commodus (166-180 A.D. as Caesar, 180-192 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 1592 (M.Aurel.), Rome, AE-Dup, LIBERTAS AVG IMP II COS P P, Libertas standing left,
avers:- L•AVREL COMMODVS AVG TR P III, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- LIBERTAS AVG IMP II COS P P, Libertas standing left, holding pileus and sceptre, S-C, across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 23,0-24,0 mm, weight: 12,26 g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 179 A.D., ref: RIC III 1592, p-, (Marc. Aurelius),
Q-001
quadrans
Commodus_AE-Dup_L-AVREL-COMMODVS-AVG_IMP-II-COS-II-P-P_S-C_R_RIC-M-Aur-1604_C-229_Q-001_axis-6h_22-24mm_11,40g-s.jpg
041a Commodus (166-180 A.D. as Caesar, 180-192 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 1604 (M.Aurel.), Rome, AE-Dup, IMP II COS II P P, Minerva standing left,159 views041a Commodus (166-180 A.D. as Caesar, 180-192 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 1604 (M.Aurel.), Rome, AE-Dup, IMP II COS II P P, Minerva standing left,
avers:- L-AVREL-COMMODVS-AVG, Radiate head right.
revers:- IMP-II-COS-II-P-P (???), Minerva standing left, holding scepter, leaning on shield, sacrificing over altar to left, S-C, across the field.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 22-24 mm, weight: 11,40 g, axis: 6 h,
mint: Rome, date: 179 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1604, p-342, (Marc. Aurelius), C-229,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Commodus_AE-Sest_M-COMMODVS-ANTON-AVG-PIVS-BRIT_VOTA-SVSCEP-DECEN-P-M-TR-P-VIII-IMP-VII_COS-IIII-P-P_S-C_R_RIC-454a_C-990_Q-001_axis-5h_27-29mm_19,35g-s.jpg
041b Commodus (166-180 A.D. as Caesar, 180-192 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0454a, Rome, AE-Sestertius, VOTA SVSCEP DECEN P M TR P VIII IMP VII, Commodus togate, standing left, Scarce!117 views041b Commodus (166-180 A.D. as Caesar, 180-192 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0454a, Rome, AE-Sestertius, VOTA SVSCEP DECEN P M TR P VIII IMP VII, Commodus togate, standing left, Scarce!
avers:- M-COMMODVS-ANTON-AVG-PIVS-BRIT, Laureate head right.
revers:- VOTA-SVSCEP-DECEN-P-M-TR-P-X-IMP-VII, Commodus, togate, standing left sacrificing over a tripod. S_C across the field.
exe:S/C//COS-IIII-P-P, diameter: 27-29 mm, weight: 19,35 g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 184-85 A.D., ref: RIC-III-454a, p-418, , C-990, Scarce!
Q-001
quadrans
041_Commodus,_RIC_III-566,_AE-Sest,_M_COMMOD_ANT_P_FELIX_AVG_BRIT_P_P,_TEMPOR_FELIC_P_M_TR_P_XV_IMP_VIII_COS_VI,_S-C,_C_722,_190_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_26,5-28mm,17,12g-s.jpg
041b Commodus (166-180 A.D. as Caesar, 180-192 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0566, Rome, AE-Sestertius, TEMP FELIC P M TR P XV IMP VIII COS VI, S/C//--, Caduceus, two crossed cornucopiae, #164 views041b Commodus (166-180 A.D. as Caesar, 180-192 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0566, Rome, AE-Sestertius, TEMP FELIC P M TR P XV IMP VIII COS VI, S/C//--, Caduceus, two crossed cornucopiae, #1
avers: M COMMOD ANT P FELIX AVG BRIT PP, Laureate head right.
reverse: TEMP FELIC P M TR P XV IMP VIII COS VI, Caduceus between two crossed cornucopiae, S-C across the field.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 26,5-28,0 mm, weight: 17,12 g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 190 A.D., ref: RIC III 566, C-722, BMCRE 655, Sear 5807var.,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
042_Crispina_(__-183_A_D_),_AE-As,_CRISPINA_AVGVSTA__IVNO-LVCINA_S-C_RIC_III_680_C-24_BMC_433_(Comm_),_Rome,_Q-001_h_mm_ga-s.jpg
042 Crispina ( ?-183 A.D.), RIC III 0680 (Comm.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO LVCINA, Iuno standing left, Scarce !, #167 views042 Crispina ( ?-183 A.D.), RIC III 0680 (Comm.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO LVCINA, Iuno standing left, Scarce !, #1
Wife of Commodus.
avers:- CRISPINA-AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers:- IVNO-LVCINA, Iuno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, S-C across the field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 22,5-23,5mm, weight: 8,60g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-680 (Commodus), p-443, C-24, BMC-433, Scarce !,
Q-001
quadrans
042_Crispina_(_-183_A_D_)_AE-As_CRISPINA_AVGVSTA__IVNO-LVCINA_S-C_RIC_III_680-p-443_C-24_BMC_433_(Comm_)_Rome_Q-002_11h_24,5mm_9,86ga-s.jpg
042 Crispina ( ?-183 A.D.), RIC III 0680 (Comm.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO LVCINA, Iuno standing left, Scarce !, #272 views042 Crispina ( ?-183 A.D.), RIC III 0680 (Comm.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO LVCINA, Iuno standing left, Scarce !, #2
Wife of Commodus.
avers:- CRISPINA-AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers:- IVNO-LVCINA, Iuno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter:24,5mm, weight: 9,86g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-680 (Commodus), p-443, C-24, BMC-433, Scarce !,
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
042_Crispina_(__-183_A_D_),_AE-As,_CRISPINA_AVGVSTA__IVNO-LVCINA_S-C_RIC_III_682_C-_BMC__(Comm),_Rome,_Q-001_4h_25mm_12,29ga-s.jpg
042 Crispina ( ?-183 A.D.), RIC III 0682 (Comm.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO REGINA, Iuno standing left, Scarce !, #167 views042 Crispina ( ?-183 A.D.), RIC III 0682 (Comm.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO REGINA, Iuno standing left, Scarce !, #1
Wife of Commodus.
avers:- CRISPINA-AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers:- IVNO-REGINA, Iuno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 25mm, weight: 12,29g, axis: 4 h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-682 (Commodus), p-443, C- Not in, BMC-Not in
Q-001
quadrans
RI_044m_img.jpg
044 - Hadrian Ae Sestertius - RIC 0541a var.50 viewsObv:- IMP CAES DIVI TRA PARTH F DIVI NER NEP TRAIANO HADRIANO AVG, Laureate bust right with drapery on far shoulder, strap across chest from right to left shoulder
Rev:- PONT MAX TR POT COS, FORT RED/S C in two lines in exergue, Fortuna seated left holding rudder and cornucopiae
Minted in Rome. A.D. 117
Reference:– BMCRE 1111. Cohen 751 var. (cuirassed). RIC II 541a var. (cuirassed).

Quite a scarce coin.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_044e_img.jpg
044 - Hadrian denarius - RIC -37 viewsObv:- IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, Laureate, heroically nude bust right, drapery on left shoulder, baldric strap around back of neck and across chest
Rev:-P M TR P COS II, FORT RED in exergue, Fortuna Redux, veiled, seated left, rudder in right hand, cornucopiae in left
Minted in Rome. A.D. 118
Reference:– RIC - (cf. RIC 41, but unlisted with this bust type)

Ex Harlan Berk. Ex- BeastCoins Hadrian collection.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Septimius-Severus_AE-Sestercius_IMP-CAEL-SEP-SEV-PERT-AVG-COS-xxx_P-M-TRPxxx_S-C_RIC-xxx_C-xx_Q-001_axis-5h_28,5mm_15,77g-s.jpg
049 Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), RIC IV-I ???, AE-Sestercius, P-M-TRPxxx, Victory advancing left,286 views049 Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), RIC IV-I ???, AE-Sestercius, P-M-TRPxxx, Victory advancing left,
avers:- IMP-CAEL-SEP-SEV-PERT-AVG-COS-xxx, Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- P-M-TRPxxx, Victory advancing left, holding wreath, S-C across the field,
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 28,5mm, weight: 15,77g, axis: 5h,
mint: , date: A.D., ref: ,
Q-001
quadrans
56_4_PanoramaBlack1.jpg
056/4 Subgroup 85 & 86A AE Triens60 viewsAnonymous. Ae Triens. Apulia. 212-208 BC. (9.08 g, 23.72 g) Obv: Helmeted head of Minerva right, four pellets above. Rev: ROMA, prow right, four pellets below.

Originally defined as Crawford 56/4, this type of Triens have been assigned to subgroup 85 & 86A. This is a Q or H triens, that is missing the Q or H. Andrew McCabe gives the subgroup the number F1 which has the following characteristics:

"Mint: Apulia. Second Punic war. Related to RRC 85 H, and RRC 86 anchor and Q. Obverses are in high relief. The general style, for examples Janus, or Hercules’ truncation, or the regular reverse prow, is like RRC 86 anchor and Q. Reverses of Sextans and Quadrans have either regular, or Luceria style, prows with a club in an elevated fighting platform. On regular reverses, the top and central keel lines join half way across prow. Flans are thin and broad akin to late issues of Luceria. All denominations As through Sextans are known."

"The regular reverse prow is tall (height/width) with a fighting platform and deck structure elevated more than usual, and there is always a line extending either side of the deck structure. The keel-lines are also distinctive, with the middle of the three lines always converging with the top line half way across the prow... These specific design features – especially the middle keel line converging with the upper line half way across the prow – are identical with and typical of the RRC 86A Q series from Apulia58... The obverses of all denominations are in high relief, and show high quality engraving."

"So a close geographic and timing link between the Anchor Q, H, L, L-T, CA and P coins can be posited. These coins are certainly a second Punic war issue from Apulia. It remains open for discussion which city minted these group F1 coins, presumably alongside the RRC 85 and RRC 86 issues."

This is one out of six specimens: "F1 Triens: 6 coins, mean 9.4 grams, heaviest 10.5 grams".

All quotes are from the work of Andrew McCabe.

Link to thread at Forvm Ancient Coins: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=90604.0

On this topic at Andrew McCabe's homepage: http://andrewmccabe.ancients.info/RRC056.html

I would strongly recommend anyone who wants to learn more about Roman Republican coins to give Andrew McCabe's homepage a visit.


1 commentsPaddy
165Hadrian__RIC10.jpg
058 Hadrian Denarius Roma 117 AD Fortuna53 viewsReference
Strack 14; RIC III, 58; C. 749a; BMC 20

Bust B1

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA
Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, balteus strap over shoulder and across chest.

Rev. PARTH F DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS
Fortuna, veiled, enthroned left, rudder in right hand, cornucopiae in left, FORT RED in exergue.

2.48 gr
19 mm
10h

Note.
"Imp(eratori) Caes(ari) Traian(o) Hadriano Aug(usto) Divi Tra(iani) / Parth(ici) f(ilio) Divi Ner(vae) nep(oti) p(ontifici) m(aximo) tr(ibunicia) p(otestate) co(n)s(uli) Fort(unae) red(uci)"
okidoki
063.jpg
060 LICINIUS I6 viewsEMPEROR: Licinius I
DENOMINATION: AE follis
OBVERSE: AD 317-320. IMP LICI-NIVS AVG, laureate bust left in consular robe, holding globe, sceptre and mappa
REVERSE: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and eagle-tipped sceptre. Palm branch angled, Z in right field
EXERGUE: SMN
DATE: 317-320 AD
MINT: Nicomedia
WEIGHT: 3.17 g
RIC: RIC VII Nicomedia 24
Barnaba6
062_Alex_Severus,_RIC_IV-II_558,_Rome,_AE-Sest,_IMP_SEV_ALEXANDER_AVG,_IOVI_CONSERVATORI_S-C,_222-231AD,_Q-001,_0h,_28-30,5mm,_20,81g-s.jpg
062 Alexander Severus ( 221-222 A.D. Caesar, 222-235 A.D. Augustus), RIC IV-II 558, Rome, AE-Sestertius, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left,139 views062 Alexander Severus ( 221-222 A.D. Caesar, 222-235 A.D. Augustus), RIC IV-II 558, Rome, AE-Sestertius, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left,
avers: IMP SEV ALEXANDER AVG, Laureate head right, slight drapery on far shoulder.
reverse: IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, protecting Alexander at foot left. S-C across the field.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 28,0-30,5mm, weight: 20,81g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 231 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 558, C. 74, BMC 692.
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Iulia-Mamaea_AE-Sest_IVLIA-MAMAEA-AVGVSTA_FECVNDITAS-AVGVSTAE_RIC-668_C-8_232AD_Q-001_axis-0h_29-31mm_22,74g-s.jpg
064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 668, Rome, AE-Sestertius, FECVNDITAS-AVGVSTAE, Juno standing left,123 views064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 668, Rome, AE-Sestertius, FECVNDITAS-AVGVSTAE, Juno standing left,
avers:- IVLIA-MAMAEA-AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right.
revers:- FECVNDITAS-AVGVSTAE, Fecunditas standing left extending hand to a child left and holding a cornucopiae, S-C across the field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 29-31mm, weight: 22,74g, axis:-0h,
mint: Rome, date: 232 A.D.,ref: RIC-IV-II-668, p-, C-8,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
129Hadrian__RIC13.jpg
067 Hadrian Denarius Roma 117 AD Pietas53 viewsReference.
Strack 17; RIC III, 67

Bust A4

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA
Laureate bare bust with drapery, and balteus

Rev. PARTH F DIVI NER NEP P M TR P COS PIE | TAS across fields
Pietas, veiled, standing facing, head left, right hand raised.

3.04 gr
19 mm
6h
okidoki
069.jpg
068 DECENTIUS21 viewsEMPEROR: Decentius
DENOMINATION: AE3
OBVERSE: DN DECENTIVS NOB CAES, bare-headed, cuirassed bust right
REVERSE: VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAES, two Victories standing facing each other, holding between them a wreath inscribed VOT V MVLT X on a column. S-V across fields
EXERGUE: RSLG
DATE: 350-353 AD
MINT: Lugdunum
WEIGHT: 4.99 g
RIC VIII Lyons 124
Barnaba6
85Hadrian__RIC13.jpg
068 Hadrian Denarius Roma 117 AD Pietas45 viewsReference.
Strack 17; RIC III, 68; C 1023

Bust B1

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA
Laureate bare bust with drapery, and balteus

Rev. PARTH F DIVI NER NEP PM TR P COS/ PIE-TAS across field.
Pietas, veiled, standing facing, head left, right hand raised.

3.25 gr
20 mm
6h
okidoki
Gordianus-III_AE-Sest_IMP-CAES-M-ANT-GORDIANVS-AVG_PROVIDENTIA-AVG_S-C_Roma-238-9-RIC-257_C-304_Q-001_axis-h_mm_17_91g-s.jpg
072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 257, AE-Sestertius, Rome, PROVIDENTIA AVG,174 views072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 257, AE-Sestertius, Rome, PROVIDENTIA AVG,
avers: IMP-CAES-M-ANT-GORDIANVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers: PROVIDENTIA-AVG, Providentia standing left, holding globe and scepter, S C across fields.
exe:S/C//--, diameter: 31,0-32,0mm, weight: 12,71g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 238-39 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-III-257,p-43, C-304-305,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Gordianus-III__AE-Sest_IMP-CAES-MANT-GORDIANVS-AVG_LIBERALITAS-AVG-II_S-C_Roma-240-RIC-269a_Q-001_17_91ga-s.jpg
072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 269a, AE-Sestertius, Rome, LIBERALITAS AVG II, 201 views072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 269a, AE-Sestertius, Rome, LIBERALITAS AVG II,
avers:- IMP-CAES-MANT-GORDIANVS-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- LIBERALITAS-AVG-II, Liberalitas standing left, holding coin counter and two cornucopiae; S-C across fields.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 28,0-30,0mm, weight: 17,91g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 240 A.D., ref: RIC-269a, C-136,
Q-001
quadrans
Gordianus-III__AE-Sest_IMP-GORDIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG_IOVI-STATORI_S-C_Roma-241-43-RIC-298a_Q-001_20_79ga-s.jpg
072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 298a, AE-Sestertius, Rome, IOVI STATORI, 125 views072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 298a, AE-Sestertius, Rome, IOVI STATORI,
avers:- IMP-GORDIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- IOVI-STATORI, Jupiter standing, facing, holding scepter and thunderbolt; S C across fields.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 27-30mm, weight: 20,79g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 241-243 A.D., ref: RIC-298a, C-111,
Q-001
quadrans
Gordianus-III__AE-Sest_IMP-GORDIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG_LAETITIA-AVG-N_S-C_Roma-241-43-RIC-300a_Q-001_20_05ga-s.jpg
072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 300a, AE-Sestertius, Rome, S/C//--, LAETITIA AVG N, Laetitia standing left, #1174 views072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 300a, AE-Sestertius, Rome, S/C//--, LAETITIA AVG N, Laetitia standing left, #1
avers: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reversre: LAETITIA AVG N, Laetitia standing left, holding wreath and anchor; S C across fields.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 28,5-32,0mm, weight: 20,05g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 241-243 A.D., ref: RIC IV-III 300a, C-122,
Q-001
quadrans
Gordianus-III_AE-As_IMP-GORDIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG_PM-T-R-P-IIII-COS-II-P-P_RIC-IV-III-305b-p-49_C-244-245_Rome_241-243-AD_Q-001_axis-1h_22,5-23mm_9,10g-s.jpg
072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 306b, AE-As, Rome, P M TR P IIII COS II P P, Gordian standing right,203 views072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 306b, AE-As, Rome, P M TR P IIII COS II P P, Gordian standing right,
avers: IMP-GORDIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG, Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed.
revers: P-M-TR-P-IIII-COS-II-P-P, Gordian standing right, in military dress, holding transverse spear and globe, S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 22,5-23mm, weight: 9,10g, axis: 0 h,
mint: Rome, date: 241-243 A.D.(4th Issue), ref: RIC IV-III 306b, p-49, C-254-255,
Q-001
quadrans
072_Gordianus-III__(238-244_A_D_),_RIC_IV_335a_AE-Sest,_IMP_GORDIANVS_PIVS_FEL_AVG,_SECVRIT_PERPET,_S-C,_Roma_243-44,_Q-001,_0h,_28-29mm,_19,28g-s.jpg
072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 335a, AE-Sestertius, Rome, S/C//--, SECVRIT PERPET, Securitas standing facing, head left, #175 views072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 335a, AE-Sestertius, Rome, S/C//--, SECVRIT PERPET, Securitas standing facing, head left, #1
avers: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reversre: SECVRIT PERPET, Securitas standing facing, head left, leaning on short column and holding sceptre with the right hand, S C across the fields.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 28,0-29,0mm, weight: 19,28g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 243-244 A.D., ref: RIC IV-III 335a, C-329,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
662_P_Hadrian_RPC732.jpg
0732 THRACE, Bizya, Hadrian Banquet scene32 viewsReference.
RPC III 732; Jurukova 8

Obv: ΑΥΤ ΤΡΑΙΑΝ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΑΙ СΕΒ.
Laureate bust right, with slight drapery, on shoulder, strap across chest

Rev: ΒΙΖΥΗΝΩΝ.
banquet scene: symposiast reclining l. on klinè; woman seated at his feet; on r., forepart of horse, l., right foreleg raised; on l., a boy.

10.30 gr
25 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
Cappadocia,_Caesarea,_073p_Tranquilina,_Syd-618,_AE_21,_CAB_T_#929;ANKY_#923;_#923;INA_AY_#915;,_MHTR_KAI_B_NE_ET-Z,_SGI_3864,_244_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_21mm,_6,28g-s.jpg
073p Tranquilina (241-244 A.D., Augusta), Cappadocia, Caesarea, Syd. 618, AE-21, MHTR KAI B NЄ, Six-grain ears, #149 views073p Tranquilina (241-244 A.D., Augusta), Cappadocia, Caesarea, Syd. 618, AE-21, MHTR KAI B NЄ, Six-grain ears, #1
Wife of Emperor Gordian III.
avers: CAB TΡANKYΛΛINA AYΓ, Diademed and draped bust right.
reverse: MHTR KAI B NЄ, Six-grain ears bound together, ЄT-Z across the field.
exergue: ЄT/Z//--, diameter: 21,0mm, weight: 6,28g, axis:0h,
mint: Cappadocia, Caesarea, date: Year=7, 244 A.D., ref: Syd-618,
Q-001
quadrans
074_Philippus_I__(244-249_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-2696,_D-4933,_Alexandria,_Cuirassed_bust_r_,_Eagle,_L-A_(RY-1),_243-4_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_22,0-23,0mm,_12,84g-s.jpg
074p Philippus I. (244-249 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, G-2696, D-4933, BI-Tetradrachm, L/A//--, Eagle standing left, #165 views074p Philippus I. (244-249 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, G-2696, D-4933, BI-Tetradrachm, L/A//--, Eagle standing left, #1
avers: A K M IOY ΦIΛIΠΠOC EYCEB, Laureate, and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle standing left, head turned right, holding wreath in beak. Date L-A across fields.
exergue: L/A//--, diameter: 22,0-23,0 mm, weight: 12,84 g, axis: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: Dated Year (L-A=1), 243-244 A.D., ref: Geissen-2696, Dattari-4933, Kapmann-Ganschow-74.01-p294, Milne 3521, Emmett 3480.
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
074_Philippus_I__(244-249_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-2715,_D-4935,_Alexandria,_Cuirassed_bust_r_,_Eagle,_L-G_(RY-3),_245-6_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_22,0-23,0mm,_12,28ga-s~0.jpg
074p Philippus I. (244-249 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, G-2715, D-4935, BI-Tetradrachm, L/Γ//--, Eagle standing left, #169 views074p Philippus I. (244-249 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, G-2715, D-4935, BI-Tetradrachm, L/Γ//--, Eagle standing left, #1
avers: A K M IOY ΦIΛIΠΠOC EYCEB, Laureate, and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle standing left, head turned right, holding wreath in beak. Date L-Γ across fields.
exergue: L/Γ//--, diameter: 22,0-23,0 mm, weight: 12,28 g, axis: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: Dated Year (L-Γ=3), 245-246 A.D., ref: Geissen-2715, Dattari-4935, Kapmann-Ganschow-73.34-p296, Milne 3631, Emmett 3480.
Q-001
quadrans
678_P_Hadrian_RPC757.JPG
0757 THRACE, Sestos, Hadrian, Lyre19 viewsReference.
RPC III, 757; McClean 4180; Varbanov 2982.

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΑΙСΑΡ
Laureate, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front

Rev. СΗСΤΙωΝ
Lyre

2.88 gr
16 mm
5h
okidoki
1141_P_Hadrian_RPC757.jpg
0757 THRACE, Sestos, Hadrian, Lyre9 viewsReference.
RPC III, 757; McClean 4180; Varbanov 2982.

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΑΙСΑΡ
Laureate, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front

Rev. СΗСΤΙωΝ
Lyre

2.76 gr
17 mm
12h
okidoki
Traianus-Decius_AE-Sest_IMP-C-M-Q-TRAIANVS-DECIVS-AVG_GENIVS-EXERC-ILLVRICIANI_RIC-IV-III-117a-p-122_249-251-AD_Q-001_0h_27,5-30mm_17_8g-s.jpg
079 Traianus Decius (249-251 A.D.), RIC IV-III 0117a, Rome, AE-Sestertius, GENIVS EXERC ILLVRICIANI, Genius standing left, #198 views079 Traianus Decius (249-251 A.D.), RIC IV-III 0117a, Rome, AE-Sestertius, GENIVS EXERC ILLVRICIANI, Genius standing left, #1
avers: IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
revers: GENIVS EXERC ILLVRICIANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia; standard to right. S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 27,5-30,0mm, weight: 17,8g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 249-251 A.D.,ref: RIC-IV-III-117a, C.53,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Traianus-Decius_AE-Semmis_IMP-CMQ-TRAIANVS-DECIVS-AVG_No-legend_S-C_RIC-IV-III-128_C-102_Rome_248-AD_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
079 Traianus Decius (249-251 A.D.), RIC IV-III 0128, Rome, AE-Semis, S/C//--, No legend, Mars standing left, Scarce! #1108 views079 Traianus Decius (249-251 A.D.), RIC IV-III 0128, Rome, AE-Semis, S/C//--, No legend, Mars standing left, Scarce! #1
avers:- IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- No legend, Mars standing left, resting hand on shield and holding spear, S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,88g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 248 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-III-128, p-126, Scarce!,
Q-001
quadrans
quadrans-Q-012_h_mm_ga-s.jpg
079 Traianus Decius (249-251 A.D.), RIC IV-III 0128, Rome, AE-Semis, S/C//--, No legend, Mars standing left, Scarce! #2105 views079 Traianus Decius (249-251 A.D.), RIC IV-III 0128, Rome, AE-Semis, S/C//--, No legend, Mars standing left, Scarce! #2
avers:- IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- No legend, Mars standing left, resting hand on shield and holding spear, S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 16,5-17,0mm, weight: 2,1g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 248 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-III-128, p-126, Scarce!,
Q-002
quadrans
1123Hadrian_RIC848.jpg
0848 Hadrian AS Roma 134-38 AD Cappadocia standing11 viewsReference.
RIC 848c; C. 205; BMC 1730; Strack 714.

Obv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
Bust of Hadrian, bare-headed, draped, right

Rev. CAPPADOCIA, S C across field
Cappadocia towered wearing tunic and cloak with tassels standing left holding a miniature of Mount Argaeus and a standard.

13.91 gr
28 mm
6h
okidoki
158Hadrian__RIC848c.jpg
0848 Hadrian AS Roma 134-38 AD Cappadocia standing27 viewsReference.
RIC 848c; C. 205; BMC 1730; Strack 714.

Obv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
Bust of Hadrian, bare-headed, draped, right

Rev. CAPPADOCIA, S C across field
Cappadocia towered wearing tunic and cloak with tassels standing left holding a miniature of Mount Argaeus and a standard.

11.24 gr
26 mm
12h

Note.
Ex Charles Darrah Collection of Flavian and Antonine Bronzes.
okidoki
Hadrian_Tet_Sol_00.JPG
09 - Hadrian Tetradrachm - Helios / Sol36 views
Ancient Roman Empire
Emperor Hadrian (117 - 138 AD)
Silver Tetradrachm of Alexandria, Egypt. Struck 129 - 131 AD.

(titles in Greek)
obv: Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed
rev: Radiate bust of Helios right, chlamys buckled over shoulder.
Regnal Year: Year 14 (129 - 131 AD) across fields.
1 commentsrexesq
Hadrian_Tet_Sol_02.jpg
09 - Hadrian Tetradrachm - Helios / Sol16 views
Ancient Roman Empire
Emperor Hadrian (117 - 138 AD)
Silver Tetradrachm of Alexandria, Egypt. Struck 129 - 131 AD.

(titles in Greek)
obv: Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed
rev: Radiate bust of Helios right, chlamys buckled over shoulder.
Regnal Year: Year 14 (129 - 131 AD) across fields.
rexesq
vitelliuscombined.jpg
09. VITELLIUS18 views69 AD
AE As
O: A VITELLIVS IMP GERMAN, laureate bust left
R: LIBERTAS RESTITVTA, S-C across field, Libertas, draped, standing facing, head right, holding pileus in right hand and scepter in left.
Spanish, Tarraco?
RIC I 43-
laney
111_036.JPG
090 Vespasian86 viewsVespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.
Silver denarius, RIC II part 1, 362; SRCV I 2317, BMCRE II 74, F, 2.879g, 17.2mm, 195o, Rome mint, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse VICTORIA AVGVSTI, Victory advancing right, crowning legionary standard with wreath with right, palm across shoulder in left.

"This type likely refers to the victory in Judaea but does not specifically identify that victory."
5 commentsRandygeki(h2)
457Hadrian_RIC22.jpg
092 Hadrian Denarius Roma 118 AD Pietas standing42 viewsReference.
Strack 31; RIC III, 92; C.1026; BMC 46

Bust D1

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate, draped and cuirassed with drapery covering breastplate right

Rev. P M TR P COS DES II
Pietas, veiled, standing left and raising right hand, PIE-TAS across fields.

3.37 gr
19 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
092_Valerian-II__(256-258_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-2991,_D-5373,_Alexdr,Eagle-l_L-__Q-001_11h_20,5-21,5mm_10,44g-s.jpg
092p Valerian-II. (256-258 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-2991, D-5373, Eagle left, L-Δ, across the field,67 views092p Valerian-II. (256-258 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-2991, D-5373, Eagle left, L-Δ, across the field,
avers:- Π-ΛΙΚ-ΚΟΡ-ΟVΑΛΕΡΙΑΝΟC-KAIC-CEB, Bare head right.
revers:-,Eagle left, head right, his beak wreath, L-Δ, across the field (year 4 Valerianus-I.),
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 20,5-21,5 mm, weight: 10,44g, axes: 11 h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 256-257 A.D., L-Δ, across the field (year 4 Valerianus-I.), ref: Geissen-2991, Dattari-5373, Kapmann-Ganschow-92.2-p324,
Q-001
quadrans
V1492.jpg
09b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1492112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: COS IIII across field; Eagle stg. facing on garlanded base, wings open, head r.
RIC 1492 (R). BMC 487. RSC 45c. RPC 1466 (3 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, group lot 806.

A delightful Domitian as Caesar denarius from the rare 'o' mint. RIC speculates the mysterious mint is Ephesus based on the use of the 'o' mint mark which was also used at that mint in its last known series in 74.

This reverse type of Eagle on garlanded base is known from Rome for Vespasian and Titus. A wonderful portrait accompanies this large flan specimen.


5 commentsDavid Atherton
0001JUL.jpg
1) Julius Caesar159 viewsDenarius, Rome, Moneyer P. Sepullius Macer, 44 BC, 4.03g. Cr-480/11, Syd-1072; Sear, Imperators-107b. Obv: Wreathed head of Caesar r., CAESAR before, D[IC]T PERPETVO behind. Rx: Venus standing l., looking downwards, holding Victory and scepter resting on star, P SEPVLLIVS behind, MACER downwards before. Same dies as Alfoldi, Caesar in 44 v. Chr., pl. LIII, 6-8. Banker's mark behind Caesar's eye. Good portrait. Some areas of flat striking, otherwise EF

Ex HJB - purchased on the Ides of March, 2011

Gaius Julius Caesar (Classical Latin: [ˈɡaː.i.ʊs ˈjuː.lɪ.ʊs ˈkaj.sar], July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC) was a Roman general, statesman, Consul and notable author of Latin prose. He played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire. In 60 BC, Caesar, Crassus and Pompey formed a political alliance that was to dominate Roman politics for several years. Their attempts to amass power through populist tactics were opposed by the conservative elite within the Roman Senate, among them Cato the Younger with the frequent support of Cicero. Caesar's conquest of Gaul, completed by 51 BC, extended Rome's territory to the English Channel and the Rhine. Caesar became the first Roman general to cross both when he built a bridge across the Rhine and conducted the first invasion of Britain.

These achievements granted him unmatched military power and threatened to eclipse the standing of Pompey, who had realigned himself with the Senate after the death of Crassus in 53 BC. With the Gallic Wars concluded, the Senate ordered Caesar to lay down his military command and return to Rome. Caesar refused, and marked his defiance in 49 BC by crossing the Rubicon with a legion, leaving his province and illegally entering Roman territory under arms. Civil war resulted, from which he emerged as the unrivaled leader of Rome.

After assuming control of government, Caesar began a program of social and governmental reforms, including the creation of the Julian calendar. He centralised the bureaucracy of the Republic and was eventually proclaimed "dictator in perpetuity". But the underlying political conflicts had not been resolved, and on the Ides of March (15 March) 44 BC, Caesar was assassinated by a group of senators led by Marcus Junius Brutus. A new series of civil wars broke out, and the constitutional government of the Republic was never restored. Caesar's adopted heir Octavian, later known as Augustus, rose to sole power, and the era of the Roman Empire began.

Much of Caesar's life is known from his own accounts of his military campaigns, and from other contemporary sources, mainly the letters and speeches of Cicero and the historical writings of Sallust. The later biographies of Caesar by Suetonius and Plutarch are also major sources. Caesar is deemed to be one of the greatest military commanders of history. Source: wikipedia
RM0001
13 commentsSosius
100105.jpg
1. Æ Aes Grave Triens266 viewsAnonymous. Circa 280-276 BC. Æ Aes Grave Triens (49mm, 106.35 gm). Thunderbolt; four pellets across field / Dolphin swimming right; four pellets below. Thurlow-Vecchi 3; Crawford 14/3; Haeberlin pl. 39, 7-10. VF, green patina.

Ex Cng Sale 100 lot 105 310/300

The triens (plural trientes) was an Ancient Roman bronze coin produced during the Roman Republic valued at one-third of an as (4 unciae).
ecoli73
LarryW1853.jpg
100 Constantius II, AD 337-36172 viewsGold solidus, 20mm, 4.00g, gF
Struck AD 355-360 at Arles
FL IVL CONSTAN-TIVS PERP AVG, helmeted, diademed and cuirassed facing bust, spear across shoulder in right, shield on left arm / GLORIA REI-PVBLICAE, Roma and Constantinopolis enthroned, holding wreath with VOT XXX MVLT XXXX in four lines, */KONSTAN in ex (TAN in monogram). Graffiti on obverse fields
Ex: Forum Ancient Coins
RIC 238
Lawrence Woolslayer
726_P_Hadrian_RPC1026.jpg
1026 BITHYNIA Caesarea Germanica Hadrian Ae 33 Zeus standing19 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1026; Rec 3

Obv. ΑΥΤΟ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΑΙСΑΡ СΕΒ
Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front

Rev. ΚΑΙΣΑΡΕΙΑΣ ΓΕΡΜΑΝΙΚΗΣ (in field), ΚΕΡ-ΣΟΝ
Zeus standing facing, head l., his r. hand resting on sceptre, his l. on his hip.

23 gr
33 mm
10h
okidoki
coin308.JPG
103b. Aelius23 viewsAelius. Caesar, AD 136-138. Æ As Rome mint. Struck under Hadrian, AD 137. Bare head right / Spes advancing left, holding flower and lifting skirt of dress; S C across field. RIC II 1067 (Hadrian).

Check
ecoli
coin120.JPG
104. Antoninus Pius23 viewsAntoninus Pius AE As, 139 AD.

Obv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS II, laureate head right
Rev: FELICITAS AVG, Felicitas standing facing, head left, holding caduceus and
branch, S-C across fields.

Check
ecoli
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3027,_D-5415,_Alexandria,_Eagle_standing_right,L-B_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3027, D-5415, L/B//--, Eagle standing right, #166 views104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3027, D-5415, L/B//--, Eagle standing right, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle standing right, head left with wreath in its beak, L-B across the field,
exergue: L/B//--, diameter: 21-22mm, weight: 11,21g, axes: 11 h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 269-270 A.D., Year 2. L-B., ref: Geissen- 3027, Dattari-5415, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.17-p-328,
Q-001
quadrans
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3028,_D-5417,_KG-104_16_Alexandria,_Eagle_standing_left,_L-B_,_269-270_(Y-2)-Q-001_0h_21-21,5mm_9,02g-s.jpg
104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3028, D-5417, L/B//--, Eagle standing left, #1114 views104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3028, D-5417, L/B//--, Eagle standing left, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle standing left, head right with wreath in its beak, L-B across the field,
exergue: L/B//--, diameter: 21-21,5mm, weight: 9,02g, axes: 0 h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 269-270 A.D., Year 2. L-B., ref: Geissen- 3028, Dattari-5418, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.16-p-328, Milne 4248, Curtis 1683, BMC-Alexandria 2333,
Q-001
quadrans
coins296.JPG
106. Commodus35 viewsCommodus Æ Sestertius. Struck 183 AD. M COMMODVS ANTO-NINVS AVG PIVS, laureate head right / SALVS AVG TR P VIII IMP VI COS IIII P P, S C across, Salus standing left, holding sceptre and feeding a snake from a patera. ecoli
109_Aurelianus_(270-275_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3056,_D-,_Alexdr_Vaballathus-l_,L-_#916;_Q-001_0h_21,5mm_10,28g-s.jpg
106p Aurelianus/Vaballathus (270-275 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3056, D-, -/LA//--, L/Δ//--, Vaballathus bust left, #1112 views106p Aurelianus/Vaballathus (270-275 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3056, D-, -/LA//--, L/Δ//--, Vaballathus bust left, #1
avers: A K Λ ΔOM AVPHΛIANOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, LA in left down.
reverse: I A C OVABAΛΛAΘOC AΘHN V AVT C P, Laureate and diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Vaballathus right, L-Δ across the field.
exergue: -/LA//--, L/Δ//--, diameter: 21,5mm, weight: 10,28g, axes:0 h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 270-271 A.D., LA/ LΔ Year 1 for Aurelianus, and Year 4 for Vaballathus, ref: Geissen-3056, Dattari-, Kapmann-Ganschow-106.67-p334,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
T-1888_107_Severina_AE-Ant-Silvered_SEVERI-NA-AVG(E2)_CONCO-RDIAE-MILITVM_(C-3)_R-B_XXI_RIC-4_RIC-T-1888_Rome_iss-12_off-2_275-AD_Q-001_4h_21-22mm_3,63g-s.jpg
107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-1888 (Estiot), RIC V-I 004, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, CONCORDIAE MILITVM, R/B//XXI, Concordia standing left, #1152 views107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-1888 (Estiot), RIC V-I 004, Rome, AE-Antoninianus, CONCORDIAE MILITVM, R/B//XXI, Concordia standing left, #1
avers:- SEVERI-NA-AVG, Empress right, diademed, draped, on a lunar crescent. (E2)
revers:- CONCO-RDIAE-MILITVM, Concordia standing left, holding standard in each hand."R-B" across the field.(Concordia 3)
exerg: R/B//XXI, diameter: 21-22mm, weight: 3,63g, axes:4h,
mint: Rome, iss-12, off-2, date: 275 A.D., ref: RIC-4., T-1888 (Estiot),
Q-001
quadrans
T-3203_107_Severina_AE-Ant-Silvered_SEVERINA-PF-AVG_CONCORDIA-AVG_V_XXI_RIC-19v__T-3203_Antioch_iss-7_off-5_275-AD_Q-001_0h_23mm_4,61g-s.jpg
107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-3203 (Estiot), RIC V-I 019var, Antioch, AE-Antoninianus, CONCORDIA AVG, V//XXI, Emperor and Empress, R!203 views107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-3203 (Estiot), RIC V-I 019var, Antioch, AE-Antoninianus, CONCORDIA AVG, V//XXI, Emperor and Empress, R!
avers:- SEVERINA-PF-AVG, Empress right, diademed, draped, on a lunar crescent. (E2)
revers:- CONCORDIA-AVG, Emperor togate (no laurel crown) standing right, clasping the hand of Empress standing left. (Emperor and Empress 1)
"A very interesting coin from the historical point of view as it belongs to the issues dating from Severina's interregnum after the assassination of Aurelian (september-november 275).
"As far as the organisation of coin production was concerned, we see that from the end of 274, certain officinae in some of the mints struck coins exclusively for Severina: this is the case with issues 2-4 at Lyon, issues 10-11 at Rome and issue 4 at Ticinum. After the death of Aurelian, the officinae are no longer shared between Aurelian and Severina: at Lyon, there is a 5th issue attested by coins in the name of Severina only, and the same applies to the 12th issue at Rome where the empress monopolizes the six active équipes, and the 5th issue at Ticinum, where all six officinae struck coins just for Severina. It is clear that the Empress as regent was exercising alone power and right to coin.
In fact the evidence shows that all eight mints that were active in the autumn of 275 across the Empire were producing issues in the name of Severina alone. The mint at Serdica struck coins for Severina with the legend Severina Augusta.The mint at Antioch exceptionally gave the Empress the titles P(ia) F(elix), normally reserved for emperors; on the reverse, the legend is changed from the plural form Concordia Augg (Augustorum) to the singular Concordia Aug, which may be expanded as Concordia Augustae. The type no longer shows the standard reverse, Aurelian shaking the hand of Concordia, but an anonymous male figure, now without laurel-wreath and sceptre, shaking the hand of Severina, who is easily recognizable by her characteristic hairdress and is shown in a larger size. At Alexandria, coins in the name of Severina continued to be struck as the mint received the news of Aurelian’s assassination, and stopped issuing his coins: the hoards from Karanis have 5 tetradrachms of the 7th year of Aurelian (that is after 29 August 275), but 25 of Severina."
(From the website Monnaies de l'Empire Romain / Roman Imperial Coinage 268-276 AD : http://www.ric.mom.fr/en/info/hist5#severine)"
by S. Estiot. Thank you S. Estiot.
exerg: V//XXI, diameter: 23mm, weight: 4,61g, axes: 0h,
mint: Antioch, iss-7, off-5, date: 275 A.D., ref: RIC-19var., T-3203 (Estiot), C-,
Q-001
quadrans
107_Severina_(270-275_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3103,_D-5506,_Alexandria,_ETOVC_-_S_(RY_6),_K_G_107_1,_274-275AD,_Q-001,_0h,_19,5-21mm,_7,37g-s~0.jpg
107p Severina (270-275 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, G-3102, D-5504, Bi-Tetradrachm, -/S//--, ЄTOYC, Eagle standing right, #155 views107p Severina (270-275 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, G-3102, D-5504, Bi-Tetradrachm, -/S//--, ЄTOYC, Eagle standing right, #1
avers: OVΛΠ CЄVHPINA CЄB, Diademed and draped bust right.
reverse: ЄTOYC-S, Eagle standing right, palm across the shoulder, holding wreath in beak.
exergue: -/S//--, diameter: 20,0mm, weight: 8,46g, axes: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 274-275 A.D., Year 6. S, ref: Geissen-3102, Dattari-5504, Kapmann-Ganschow-107.2-p335,
Q-001
quadrans
109_Aurelianus_(270-275_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3056,_D-,_Alexdr_Vaballathus-l_,L-__Q-001_0h_21,5mm_10,28g-s.jpg
109p Vaballathus/Aurelianus (270-275 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3056, D-, -/LA//--, L/Δ//--, Vaballathus bust left, #168 views109p Vaballathus/Aurelianus (270-275 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3056, D-, -/LA//--, L/Δ//--, Vaballathus bust left, #1
avers: A K Λ ΔOM AVPHΛIANOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, LA in left down.
reverse: I A C OVABAΛΛAΘOC AΘHN V AVT C P, Laureate and diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Vaballathus right, L-Δ across the field.
exergue: -/LA//--, L/Δ//--, diameter: 21,5mm, weight: 10,28g, axes:0 h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 270-271 A.D., LA/ LΔ Year 1 for Aurelianus, and Year 4 for Vaballathus, ref: Geissen-3056, Dattari-, Kapmann-Ganschow-106.67-p334,
Q-001
quadrans
025~2.JPG
110 Domitian 87 viewsDomitian AE As. 85 AD. IIMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XI CENS PER PP, laureate bust right, wearing aegis / SALVTI AVGVSTI above and below facade of the altar-enclosure of the Ara Salutis Augusti with detailed double-paneled door & horns above, S-C across fields.

C. 419, RIC 304b? RIC 2 418
6 commentsRandygeki(h2)
112_Probus_(276-282_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3126,_D-5552,_Alexandria,_Eagle_left,_L-B,_across_the_field,_KG_112_5,_year_2_276-7AD,_Q-001,_11h,_18,5-20,3mm,_6,91g-s~0.jpg
112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3126, D-5552, L/B//--, Eagle left, head right, #1 54 views112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3126, D-5552, L/B//--, Eagle left, head right, #1
avers: A K M AVP ΠPOBOC CЄB, Laureated, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle left, head right, his beak wreath, L-B, across the field.
exergue: L/B//--, diameter: 18,5-20,3mm, weight: 6,91g, axes: 11h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 276-277 A.D., L-B Year 2., ref: Geissen-3126, Dattari-5552, Kapmann-Ganschow-112.5,
Q-001
quadrans
112_Probus_(276-282_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3136-3137,_D-5561,_Alexandria,_Eagle_left,_L-Delta,_across_the_field,_Q-001_11h_19,0mm_8,03ga-s.jpg
112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3136-3137, D-5561, L/Δ//--, Eagle left, head right, #1100 views112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3136-3137, D-5561, L/Δ//--, Eagle left, head right, #1
avers: A K M AVP ΠPOBOC CЄB, Laureated, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle left, head right, his beak wreath, L-Δ, across the field.
exergue: L/Δ//--, diameter: 19mm, weight: 8,03g, axes: 11h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 278-279 A.D., L-Δ Year 4., ref: Emmet-, Milne-, Geissen-3136-3137, Dattari-5561, Kapmann-Ganschow-112.16-p338,
Q-001
Ex Kreß, Auction 171 (1978), Lot 1117.
quadrans
112_Probus_276-282_AD),_Bi-Tetrdr_,_Emmet-,G-3145,D-5553,_KG-112_22,_Alexandria,_Eagle_r_,L-E,_Y-5,279-80,Q-001_11h_18,5-20mm_7,21-s.jpg
112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3145, D-5553, L/Є//--, Eagle left, head right, #1 93 views112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, Emmet-3984, L/Є//--, Eagle left, head right, #1
avers: A K M AVP ΠPOBOC CЄB, Laureated, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle left, head right, his beak wreath, L-Є, across the field.
exergue: L/Є//--, diameter: 18,5-20,0mm, weight: 7,21g, axes: 11h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 279-280 A.D., L-Є Year 5., ref: Emmet-3984, Milne-4610, Geissen-3145, Dattari-5553, Kapmann-Ganschow-112.22-p339,
Q-001
quadrans
112_Probus_(276-282_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3149,_D-5557,_KG-112_31,_Alexandria,_Eagle_left,_L-S,_Y-6,_Milne_4632,_280-1AD,_Q-001,_0h,_17,0-18,5mm,_6,75g-s~0.jpg
112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3149, D-5557, L/S//--, Eagle right, head right, #1 76 views112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3149, D-5557, L/S//--, Eagle right, head right, #1
avers: A K M AVP ΠPOBOC CЄB, Laureated, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle right, head right, his beak wreath, L-S, across the field.
exergue: L/S//--, diameter: 18-22mm, weight: 8,69g, axes: 11h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 280-281 A.D., L-S Year 6., ref: Emmet-3982, Milne-4682, Geissen-3149, Dattari-5557, Curtis , Kapmann-Ganschow-112.31-p339,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
112_Probus_276-282_AD),_Bi-Tetrdr_,_Emmet-,G-3154,D-5558,_KG-112_37,_Alexandria,_Eagle_r_,L-Z,_Y-7,281-2,Q-001_0h_18-22mm_8,69g-s.jpg
112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3154, D-5558, L/Z//--, Eagle right, head right, #1 103 views112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3154, D-5558, L/Z//--, Eagle right, head right, #1
avers: A K M AVP ΠPOBOC CЄB, Laureated, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle right, head right, his beak wreath, L-Z, across the field.
exergue: L/Z//--, diameter: 18-22mm, weight: 8,69g, axes: 11h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 281-282 A.D., L-Z Year 7., ref: Emmet-3154, Milne-4649, Geissen-3154, Dattari-5558, Curtis 1864, Kapmann-Ganschow-112.37-p340,
Q-001
quadrans
112_Probus_(276-282_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_Emmet-3984,_G-3155,_D-5555,_Alexandria,_Eagle_left,_L-Z,_across_the_field,_Q-001_0h_19mm_7,38g-s.jpg
112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3155, D-5555, L/Z//--, Eagle left, head right, #1108 views112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3155, D-5555, L/Z//--, Eagle left, head right, #1
avers: A K M AVP ΠPOBOC CЄB, Laureated, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle left, head right, his beak wreath, L-Z, across the field.
exergue: L/Z//--, diameter: 19mm, weight: 7,38g, axes: 11h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 281-282 A.D., L-Z Year 7., ref: Geissen-3155, Dattari-5555, Kapmann-Ganschow-112.38-p340,
Q-001
quadrans
Probus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-AVR-PROBVS-AVG_ABVNDANTIA-AVG_IIII_Bust-F-var_RIC-59-p-25_Lugdunum_5th-emision_277-78-AD_Rare_Q-001_1h_22mm_3,90g-s.jpg
112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 059.5.4./A-F9, -/-//IIII, ABVNDANTIA AVG, AE-Ant., Abundantia standing right, emptying cornucopiae, Rare!!! #186 views112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 059.5.4./A-F9, -/-//IIII, ABVNDANTIA AVG, AE-Ant., Abundantia standing right, emptying cornucopiae, Rare!!! #1
avers: IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right, holding spear across the left shoulder, (F9).
reverse: ABVNDANTIA AVG, Abundantia standing right, emptying cornucopiae, (Typ.A).
exergue: -/-//IIII, diameter: 22mm, weight: 3,90g, axis: 1h,
mint: Lugdunum, 5th. em., 4th. off., date: 277-278 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 059.5.4./A-F9, p-25, Bastien-249, HO-11, Rare!!!
Q-001
quadrans
hadrian_RIC779b.jpg
117-138 AD - HADRIAN AE sestertius - struck 134-138 AD72 viewsobv: HADRIANVS AVG COS III PP (laureate head right)
rev: - (Nemesis standing right, holding fold of dress with right hand and branch pointed downward in left), S-C across field
ref: RIC II 779b (S), C.1372 (12frcs), BMCRE 1549
mint: Rome
20.57gms, 30mm
Scarce

A nice and scarce Hadrian bronze. This coin shows the original condition with original patina, there’s no corrections or special matters for sharping, and better in hand than the picture allows.
1 commentsberserker
120_Maximianus_Herculeus_(285-286_Caesar,_286-305,_307-308___310_A_D__Augustus),_Bi-Tetradr_G-3307,D-5989-91,Alexdr_Tyche_l_L-E,_Q-001_0h_18mm_6,485g-s.jpg
120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3307, D-5989-91, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/E//--, Tyche left, #163 views120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3307, D-5989-91, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/E//--, Tyche left, #1
avers:- A K M OVA MAΞIMIANOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- L-E across the field, Tyche standing left holding rudder and cornucopia, star to left.
exerg: L/E//--, diameter: 18mm, weight:6,48 g, axes: 0h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 289-290 A.D., Year 5 L-E., ref: Geissen-3307, Dattari-5989-91, Kapmann-Ganschow-120.46-p-353,
Q-001
quadrans
120_Maximianus_Herculeus_(285-286_Caesar,_286-305,_307-308___310_A_D__Augustus),_Bi-Tetradr_G-3324,D-5967,5969,Alexdr_-Nike,L-Z,_Q-001_11h_19,5mm_8,70g-s.jpg
120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3324, D-5967,5969, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/Z//--, Nike advancing right, #167 views120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3324, D-5967,5969, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/Z//--, Nike advancing right, #1
avers:- MAΞIMIANOC CEB, Laureate head right.
revers:- Nike advancing right holding wreath and palm branch, L-Z across the field.
exe: L/Z//--, diameter: 22mm, weight: 9,07g, axis: 5h,
mint:Alexandria, date:290-291 A.D., L-Z Year 7., ref: Geissen-3324, Dattari-5967, 5969, Kapmann-Ganschow-120.64-p-354,
Q-001
quadrans
111Hadrian__RIC121.jpg
121 Hadrian Denarius Roma 119-22 AD Felicitas standing34 viewsReference.
Strack 63; RIC 121b

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder, seen from front.

Rev. PM.TR.P COS III / across fields FELIC AVG.
Felicitas standing facing, head left, holding caduceus and cornucopiae.

2.64 gr
18 mm
h
1 commentsokidoki
121c.jpg
121c Constantine I. AE follis 4.1gm24 viewsobv: IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG laur. cuir. bust r.
rev: SOLI INVIC_TO CAMITI Sol rad.std. l. raising r. hand, globe in l. chlamys across l. shoulder
ex: T-F//PTR
hill132
121_Constantius-I__Chlorus_(293-305_A_D__Caesar,_305-306_A_D__Augustus),_Bi-Tetradr_-G-3349,D-6050-6055,Alexdr_-Elpis-l_-L-B_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
121p Constantius I. Chlorus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-306 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3349, D-6050-6055, Bi-Tetradrachm, Elpis standing left, L-B across the field,62 views121p Constantius I. Chlorus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-306 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3349, D-6050-6055, Bi-Tetradrachm, Elpis standing left, L-B across the field,
avers:- ΦΛ Α ΚωCTANTIOC K, Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- Elpis standing left holding flower and hem of skirt, Δ in exergo, L-B across the field.
exerg: L/B//Δ, diameter: 21mm, weight: 9,5g, axes: 0 h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 293-294 A.D., Year 2. L-B., ref: Geissen- 3349, Dattari-6050-6055, Kapmann-Ganschow-121.14-p-358,
Q-001
quadrans
Galerius_AE-Follis_GAL-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-NOB-C_GENIO-POP-VLI-ROMANI_S-A_RIC-VI-81b_Siscia-310-311-AD__Q-001_1h_28-29mm_9,74g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 081bvar., S/A//--, AE-Follis, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, #1148 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 081bvar., S/A//--, AE-Follis, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, #1
avers:- GAL-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-NOB-C, Laureate head right.
revers:- GENIO-POP-VLI-ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera and cornucopiae. S-A across fields. No mintmark. .
exergo: S/A//--, diameter: 28-29mm, weight: 9,74g, axis: 1h,
mint: Siscia, date: 294 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-81b var (unlisted reverse break)
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
124_Carausius,_Londinium,_RIC_V-II_141,_IMP_C_CARAVSIVS_P_F_AVG,_PAX_AVG_G_G,_S-P,_MLXXI,_Q-001_6h,_22,0-24,5mm,_3,16g-s.jpg
124 Carausius, (286-287, 293 A.D.), Londinium, RIC V-II 141, AE-Antoninianus, PAX AVG G G, S/P//MLXXI, Pax standing left, #1114 views124 Carausius, (286-287, 293 A.D.), Londinium, RIC V-II 141, AE-Antoninianus, PAX AVG G G, S/P//MLXXI, Pax standing left, #1
avers:- IMP C CARAIVSIVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- PAX AVG G G, Pax standing left, holding olive-branch and transverse sceptre; S-P across fields, mintmark MLXXI.
exerg: S/P//MLXXI, diameter: 22,0-24,5mm, weight: 3,16g, axes: 6h,
mint: Londinium, date: 287-293 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 141,
Q-001
quadrans
Allectus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-ALLECTVS-P-F-AVG_PROVIDENTIA-AVG_S-P_C_RIC-V-105_p-_Camulodunum_293-96-AD_Q-001_6h_21,0-21,5mm_3,89g-s.jpg
125 Allectus, (293-296 A.D.), Camulodunum, RIC V-II 105, AE-Antoninianus, PROVIDENTIA AVG, S/P//C, Providentia, standing left,115 views125 Allectus, (293-296 A.D.), Camulodunum, RIC V-II 105, AE-Antoninianus, PROVIDENTIA AVG, S/P//C, Providentia, standing left,
avers:- IMP C ALLECTVS P F AVG, Radiate, and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia, standing left, holding globe and transverse sceptre, S-P across fields, Mintmark C.
exerg: S/P//C, diameter: 21,0-21,5mm, weight: 3,89g, axes: 6h,
mint: Camulodunum, date: 293-296 A.D., ref: RIC-V-105, p-, Sear 13837,
Q-001
quadrans
54Hadrian__RIC126.jpg
126 Hadrian Denarius Roma 119-122 AD Hilaritas standing29 viewsReference.
Strack 69; RIC 126; C. 815

IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG .
Laureate bust right

Rev. P M TR P-COS III HI | LAR / P | R across fields
Hilaritas, veiled, standing facing, drawing veil with both hands

3.04 gr
20 mm
h

Note.
Scarce reverse type with facing personification.
Ex Beastcoins
1 commentsokidoki
213Hadrian__RIC128.jpg
128 Hadrian Denarius Roma 119-22 AD Libertas standing32 viewsReference.
Strack 75; RIC 128; BMC 290; C. 907.

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN-HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder, (and across back of neck)

Rev. P M TR P COS-III LIB | PVB across fields
Libertas standing facing, head left, pileus in right hand, scepter in left.

3.30 gr
1 commentsokidoki
Lcnius1.jpg
1308b, Licinius I, 308 - 324 A.D. (Siscia)59 viewsLicinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D. Bronze follis, RIC 4, F, Siscia, 3.257g, 21.6mm, 0o, 313 - 315 A.D. Obverse: IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; Reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and scepter, eagle with wreath in beak left, E right, SIS in exergue.



De Imperatoribus Romanis : An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Licinius (308-324 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Licinius' Heritage

Valerius Licinianus Licinius, more commonly known as Licinius, may have been born ca. 265. Of peasant origin, his family was from Dacia. A close friend and comrade of arms of the Emperor Galerius, he accompanied him on his Persian expedition in 297. When campaigns by Severus and Galerius in late 306 or early 307 and in the summer of 307, respectively, failed to dislodge Maxentius who, with the luke warm support of his father Maximianus Herculius, was acclaimed princeps on 28 October 306, he was sent by the eastern emperor to Maxentius as an ambassador; the diplomatic mission, however, failed because the usurper refused to submit to the authority of his father-in-law Galerius. At the Conference of Carnuntum which was held in October or November of 308, Licinius was made an Augustus on 11 November 308; his realm included Thrace, Illyricum, and Pannonia.

Licinius' Early Reign

Although Licinius was initially appointed by Galerius to replace Severus to end the revolt of Maxentius , Licinius (perhaps wisely) made no effort to move against the usurper. In fact, his first attested victory was against the Sarmatians probably in the late spring, but no later than the end of June in 310. When the Emperor Galerius died in 311, Licinius met Maximinus Daia at the Bosporus during the early summer of that year; they concluded a treaty and divided Galerius' realm between them. It was little more than a year later that the Emperor Constantine defeated Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge on 28 October 312. After the defeat of the usurper, Constantine and Licinius met at Mediolanum (Milan) where Licinius married the former's sister Constantia; one child was born of this union: Valerius Licinianus Licinius. Licinius had another son, born of a slave woman, whose name is unknown. It appears that both emperors promulgated the so-called Edict of Milan, in which Constantine and Licinius granted Christians the freedom to practice their faith without any interference from the state.

As soon as he seems to have learned about the marital alliance between Licinius and Constantine and the death of Maxentius, who had been his ally, Daia traversed Asia Minor and, in April 313, he crossed the Bosporus and went to Byzantium, which he took from Licinius after an eleven day siege. On 30 April 313 the armies of both emperors clashed on the Campus Ergenus; in the ensuing battle Daia's forces were routed. A last ditch stand by Daia at the Cilician Gates failed; the eastern emperor subsequently died in the area of Tarsus probably in July or August 313. As soon as he arrived in Nicomedeia, Licinius promulgated the Edict of Milan. As soon as he had matters in Nicomedeia straightened out, Licinius campaigned against the Persians in the remaining part of 313 and the opening months of 314.

The First Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine

Once Licinius had defeated Maximinus Daia, the sole rulers of the Roman world were he and Constantine. It is obvious that the marriage of Licinius to Constantia was simply a union of convenience. In any case, there is evidence in the sources that both emperors were looking for an excuse to attack the other. The affair involving Bassianus (the husband of Constantius I's daughter Anastasia ), mentioned in the text of Anonymus Valesianus (5.14ff), may have sparked the falling out between the two emperors. In any case, Constantine' s forces joined battle with those of Licinius at Cibalae in Pannonia on 8 October 314. When the battle was over, Constantine prevailed; his victory, however, was Pyrrhic. Both emperors had been involved in exhausting military campaigns in the previous year and the months leading up to Cibalae and each of their realms had expanded so fast that their manpower reserves must have been stretched to the limit. Both men retreated to their own territory to lick their wounds. It may well be that the two emperors made an agreement, which has left no direct trace in the historical record, which would effectively restore the status quo.

Both emperors were variously engaged in different activities between 315 and 316. In addition to campaigning against the Germans while residing in Augusta Treverorum (Trier) in 315, Constantine dealt with aspects of the Donatist controversy; he also traveled to Rome where he celebrated his Decennalia. Licinius, possibly residing at Sirmium, was probably waging war against the Goths. Although not much else is known about Licinius' activities during this period, it is probable that he spent much of his time preparing for his impending war against Constantine; the latter,who spent the spring and summer of 316 in Augusta Treverorum, was probably doing much the same thing. In any case, by December 316, the western emperor was in Sardica with his army. Sometime between 1 December and 28 February 317, both emperors' armies joined battle on the Campus Ardiensis; as was the case in the previous engagement, Constantine' s forces were victorious. On 1 March 317, both sides agreed to a cessation of hostilities; possibly because of the intervention of his wife Constantia, Licinius was able to keep his throne, although he had to agree to the execution of his colleague Valens, who the eastern emperor had appointed as his colleague before the battle, as well as to cede some of his territory to his brother-in-law.

Licinius and the Christians

Although the historical record is not completely clear, Licinius seems to have campaigned against the Sarmatians in 318. He also appears to have been in Byzantium in the summer of 318 and later in June 323. Beyond these few facts, not much else is known about his residences until mid summer of 324. Although he and Constantine had issued the Edict of Milan in early 313, Licinius turned on the Christians in his realm seemingly in 320. The first law that Licinius issued prevented bishops from communicating with each other and from holding synods to discuss matters of interest to them. The second law prohibited men and women from attending services together and young girls from receiving instruction from their bishop or schools. When this law was issued, he also gave orders that Christians could hold services only outside of city walls. Additionally, he deprived officers in the army of their commissions if they did not sacrifice to the gods. Licinius may have been trying to incite Constantine to attack him. In any case, the growing tension between the two rulers is reflected in the consular Fasti of the period.

The Second Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine and Licinius' Death

War actually broke out in 321 when Constantine pursued some Sarmatians, who had been ravaging some territory in his realm, across the Danube. When he checked a similar invasion of the Goths, who were devastating Thrace, Licinius complained that Constantine had broken the treaty between them. Having assembled a fleet and army at Thessalonica, Constantine advanced toward Adrianople. Licinius engaged the forces of his brother-in-law near the banks of the Hebrus River on 3 July 324 where he was routed; with as many men as he could gather, he headed for his fleet which was in the Hellespont. Those of his soldiers who were not killed or put to flight, surrendered to the enemy. Licinius fled to Byzantium, where he was besieged by Constantine. Licinius' fleet, under the command of the admiral Abantus, was overcome by bad weather and by Constantine' s fleet which was under the command of his son Crispus. Hard pressed in Byzantium, Licinius abandoned the city to his rival and fled to Chalcedon in Bithynia. Leaving Martinianus, his former magister officiorum and now his co-ruler, to impede Constantine' s progress, Licinius regrouped his forces and engaged his enemy at Chrysopolis where he was again routed on 18 September 324. He fled to Nicomedeia which Constantine began to besiege. On the next day Licinius abdicated and was sent to Thessalonica, where he was kept under house arrest. Both Licinius and his associate were put to death by Constantine. Martinianus may have been put to death before the end of 324, whereas Licinius was not put to death until the spring of 325. Rumors circulated that Licinius had been put to death because he attempted another rebellion against Constantine.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
Licin1AEFolJupiAlex.jpg
1308c, Licinius I, 308-324 A.D. (Alexandria)66 viewsLicinius I, 308-324 A.D. AE Follis, 3.60g, VF, 315 A.D., Alexandria. Obverse: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG - Laureate head right; Reverse: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI AVGG - Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on a globe and scepter; exergue: ALE / (wreath) over "B" over "N." Ref: RIC VII, 10 (B = r2) Rare, page 705 - Hunterian Museum, Glasgow, Scotland.


De Imperatoribus Romanis : An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Licinius (308-324 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Licinius' Heritage

Valerius Licinianus Licinius, more commonly known as Licinius, may have been born ca. 265. Of peasant origin, his family was from Dacia. A close friend and comrade of arms of the Emperor Galerius, he accompanied him on his Persian expedition in 297. When campaigns by Severus and Galerius in late 306 or early 307 and in the summer of 307, respectively, failed to dislodge Maxentius who, with the luke warm support of his father Maximianus Herculius, was acclaimed princeps on 28 October 306, he was sent by the eastern emperor to Maxentius as an ambassador; the diplomatic mission, however, failed because the usurper refused to submit to the authority of his father-in-law Galerius. At the Conference of Carnuntum which was held in October or November of 308, Licinius was made an Augustus on 11 November 308; his realm included Thrace, Illyricum, and Pannonia.

Licinius' Early Reign

Although Licinius was initially appointed by Galerius to replace Severus to end the revolt of Maxentius , Licinius (perhaps wisely) made no effort to move against the usurper. In fact, his first attested victory was against the Sarmatians probably in the late spring, but no later than the end of June in 310. When the Emperor Galerius died in 311, Licinius met Maximinus Daia at the Bosporus during the early summer of that year; they concluded a treaty and divided Galerius' realm between them. It was little more than a year later that the Emperor Constantine defeated Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge on 28 October 312. After the defeat of the usurper, Constantine and Licinius met at Mediolanum (Milan) where Licinius married the former's sister Constantia; one child was born of this union: Valerius Licinianus Licinius. Licinius had another son, born of a slave woman, whose name is unknown. It appears that both emperors promulgated the so-called Edict of Milan, in which Constantine and Licinius granted Christians the freedom to practice their faith without any interference from the state.

As soon as he seems to have learned about the marital alliance between Licinius and Constantine and the death of Maxentius, who had been his ally, Daia traversed Asia Minor and, in April 313, he crossed the Bosporus and went to Byzantium, which he took from Licinius after an eleven day siege. On 30 April 313 the armies of both emperors clashed on the Campus Ergenus; in the ensuing battle Daia's forces were routed. A last ditch stand by Daia at the Cilician Gates failed; the eastern emperor subsequently died in the area of Tarsus probably in July or August 313. As soon as he arrived in Nicomedeia, Licinius promulgated the Edict of Milan. As soon as he had matters in Nicomedeia straightened out, Licinius campaigned against the Persians in the remaining part of 313 and the opening months of 314.

The First Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine

Once Licinius had defeated Maximinus Daia, the sole rulers of the Roman world were he and Constantine. It is obvious that the marriage of Licinius to Constantia was simply a union of convenience. In any case, there is evidence in the sources that both emperors were looking for an excuse to attack the other. The affair involving Bassianus (the husband of Constantius I's daughter Anastasia ), mentioned in the text of Anonymus Valesianus (5.14ff), may have sparked the falling out between the two emperors. In any case, Constantine' s forces joined battle with those of Licinius at Cibalae in Pannonia on 8 October 314. When the battle was over, Constantine prevailed; his victory, however, was Pyrrhic. Both emperors had been involved in exhausting military campaigns in the previous year and the months leading up to Cibalae and each of their realms had expanded so fast that their manpower reserves must have been stretched to the limit. Both men retreated to their own territory to lick their wounds. It may well be that the two emperors made an agreement, which has left no direct trace in the historical record, which would effectively restore the status quo.

Both emperors were variously engaged in different activities between 315 and 316. In addition to campaigning against the Germans while residing in Augusta Treverorum (Trier) in 315, Constantine dealt with aspects of the Donatist controversy; he also traveled to Rome where he celebrated his Decennalia. Licinius, possibly residing at Sirmium, was probably waging war against the Goths. Although not much else is known about Licinius' activities during this period, it is probable that he spent much of his time preparing for his impending war against Constantine; the latter,who spent the spring and summer of 316 in Augusta Treverorum, was probably doing much the same thing. In any case, by December 316, the western emperor was in Sardica with his army. Sometime between 1 December and 28 February 317, both emperors' armies joined battle on the Campus Ardiensis; as was the case in the previous engagement, Constantine' s forces were victorious. On 1 March 317, both sides agreed to a cessation of hostilities; possibly because of the intervention of his wife Constantia, Licinius was able to keep his throne, although he had to agree to the execution of his colleague Valens, who the eastern emperor had appointed as his colleague before the battle, as well as to cede some of his territory to his brother-in-law.

Licinius and the Christians

Although the historical record is not completely clear, Licinius seems to have campaigned against the Sarmatians in 318. He also appears to have been in Byzantium in the summer of 318 and later in June 323. Beyond these few facts, not much else is known about his residences until mid summer of 324. Although he and Constantine had issued the Edict of Milan in early 313, Licinius turned on the Christians in his realm seemingly in 320. The first law that Licinius issued prevented bishops from communicating with each other and from holding synods to discuss matters of interest to them. The second law prohibited men and women from attending services together and young girls from receiving instruction from their bishop or schools. When this law was issued, he also gave orders that Christians could hold services only outside of city walls. Additionally, he deprived officers in the army of their commissions if they did not sacrifice to the gods. Licinius may have been trying to incite Constantine to attack him. In any case, the growing tension between the two rulers is reflected in the consular Fasti of the period.

The Second Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine and Licinius' Death

War actually broke out in 321 when Constantine pursued some Sarmatians, who had been ravaging some territory in his realm, across the Danube. When he checked a similar invasion of the Goths, who were devastating Thrace, Licinius complained that Constantine had broken the treaty between them. Having assembled a fleet and army at Thessalonica, Constantine advanced toward Adrianople. Licinius engaged the forces of his brother-in-law near the banks of the Hebrus River on 3 July 324 where he was routed; with as many men as he could gather, he headed for his fleet which was in the Hellespont. Those of his soldiers who were not killed or put to flight, surrendered to the enemy. Licinius fled to Byzantium, where he was besieged by Constantine. Licinius' fleet, under the command of the admiral Abantus, was overcome by bad weather and by Constantine' s fleet which was under the command of his son Crispus. Hard pressed in Byzantium, Licinius abandoned the city to his rival and fled to Chalcedon in Bithynia. Leaving Martinianus, his former magister officiorum and now his co-ruler, to impede Constantine' s progress, Licinius regrouped his forces and engaged his enemy at Chrysopolis where he was again routed on 18 September 324. He fled to Nicomedeia which Constantine began to besiege. On the next day Licinius abdicated and was sent to Thessalonica, where he was kept under house arrest. Both Licinius and his associate were put to death by Constantine. Martinianus may have been put to death before the end of 324, whereas Licinius was not put to death until the spring of 325. Rumors circulated that Licinius had been put to death because he attempted another rebellion against Constantine.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
Licinius-I_AE-Follis_IMP-C-VAL-LICIN-LICINIVS-P-F-AVG_IOVI-CONS-ERVATORI_X-IIMu__SMNA_RIC-VII-52A_Heraclea_321-24-AD__Q-001_h_21mm_g-s.jpg
132 Licinius l. (308-324 A.D.), Heraclea, RIC VII 052A, -/X/IIμ//SΜHA, AE-Follis, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, R!!156 views132 Licinius l. (308-324 A.D.), Heraclea, RIC VII 052A, -/X/IIμ//SΜHA, AE-Follis, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, R!!
avers:- IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, (2,C3), Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- IOVI CONS ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and leaning on sceptre, eagle with wreath left, captive right. In right field: X over IIμ.
exergo: -/X/IIμ//SΜHA, diameter: 21mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Heraclea, 1st. off., date: 321-324 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-52A, p548, R!!
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Licinius-I_AE-3-Follis_IMP-LICINIVS-P-F-AVG-(2,B4)_SOLI-INV-I-CTO-COMITI_R-F_R-star-P__RIC-VII-22_p-298_Rome_314-AD_R4_Q-001_1h_21,5-20,5mm_2,86g-s.jpg
132 Licinius l. (308-324 A.D.), Rome, RIC VII 022, R/F//R*P, AE-3 Follis, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol standing left, R4 !!!70 views132 Licinius l. (308-324 A.D.), Rome, RIC VII 022, R/F//R*P, AE-3 Follis, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol standing left, R4 !!!
avers:- IMP LICINIVS P F AVG, (2, B4), Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- SOLI INV I CTO COMITI, Sol standing left with chlamys across shoulder, raising right hand and holding globe in left.
exergo: R/F//R*P, diameter: 21,5-20,5 mm, weight: 2,86g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 314 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-022, p-298, R4 !!!,
Q-001
quadrans
Licinius-I_AE-3-Follis_IMP-LICINIVS-P-F-AVG_SOLI-INVI-C-TO-COMITI_star_STdot__RIC-VII-17_p-361_Ticinum_314-15-AD_Q-001_axis-1h_18,5mm_2,82g-s.jpg
132 Licinius l. (308-324 A.D.), Ticinum, RIC VII 017, */-//ST•, AE-3 Follis, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol standing left, R2 !!!84 views132 Licinius l. (308-324 A.D.), Ticinum, RIC VII 017, */-//ST•, AE-3 Follis, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol standing left, R2 !!!
avers:- IMP LICINIVS P F AVG, 2, B1, Laureate head right.
revers:- SOLI INVI C TO COMITI, Sol standing left with chlamys across shoulder, raising right hand and holding globe in left, star in left field.
exergo: */-//ST• , diameter:18,5 mm, weight: 2,82g, axis: 1h,
mint: Ticinum, date: 314-415 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-017, p-361, R2 !!!,
Q-001
quadrans
Licinius-I_AE-3-Follis_IMP-LICIN-IVS-P-F-AVG_IOVI-CONSER-VATORI-A-VG_STR__RIC-VII-212-p-182_Treveri_318-19-AD_R3_Q-001_axis-6h_17,5-18,5mm_3,38ga-s.jpg
132 Licinius l. (308-324 A.D.), Treveri, RIC VII 212, -/-//STR, AE-3 Follis, IOVI CONSERVATORI AVG, Licinius on eagle R3 !!!69 views132 Licinius l. (308-324 A.D.), Treveri, RIC VII 212, -/-//STR, AE-3 Follis, IOVI CONSERVATORI AVG, Licinius on eagle R3 !!!
avers:- IMP LICIN IVS P F AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding mappa in right hand, scepter in left hand across left shoulder
revers:- IOVI CONSER VATORI A VG, Eagle standing, wings spread, carrying emperor, standing left, holding thunderbolt and sceptre.
exergo: -/-//STR, diameter:17,5-18,5 mm, weight: 3,38g, axis: 6h,
mint: Treveri, date: 318-199 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-212, p-182, R3 !!!,
Q-001
quadrans
Licinius-II__AE-3_LICINIAN-LICINIVS-IVN_6aB1_IOVI-CONS-E-RVATORI_P_TT_RIC-71_Ticinum_317-18-AD-R3_Q-001_0h_18,6-19,5mm_2,35g-s.jpg
133 Licinius II. (317-324 A.D.), Ticinum, RIC VII 071, P/-//TT, AE-3 Follis, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, R3!143 views133 Licinius II. (317-324 A.D.), Ticinum, RIC VII 071, P/-//TT, AE-3 Follis, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, R3!
avers:- LICINIAN LICINIVS IVN, 6a, B1, Laureate, head right.
revers:- IOVI CONS E RVATORI, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on sceptre, thunderbolt in right hand, P in left in field.
exergo: P/-//TT, diameter:18,6-19,5mm, weight: 2,35g, axis:0h,
mint:Ticinum, 3rd. off., date: 317-318A.D., ref: RIC-VII-71, p-371, R3!,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Constantinus-I__AE-Follis_CONSTANTINVS-PF-AVG_SOLI-INVI-CTO-COMITI_F-T_PLG_RIC-VI-16-p-123_Lugdunum_1st_-off__309-10-AD_R_Q-001_6h_21,5-24,5mm_3,81g-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Lugdunum, RIC VII 016, AE-2 Follis, F/T//PLG, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol radiate, head left, Rare!79 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Lugdunum, RIC VII 016, AE-2 Follis, F/T//PLG, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol radiate, head left, Rare!
avers:- CONSTANTINVS P F AVG 1a, C, Laurate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- SOLI INVIC TO COMITI, Sol radiate, head left, rising right hand, chlamys over left shoulder, and hanging behind, across the right shoulder, holding up globe left hand.
exerg: F/T//PLG, diameter: 21,5-24,5mm, weight: 3.81g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lugdunum, 1st.-off., date: 309-310-A.D., ref:RIC VII 016, p-123, Rare!
Q-001
quadrans
Constantinus-I__AE-Follis_CONSTA-N-TINVS-AVG-1-D6_VIRTV-S-AVG-G_3-turrets-6-layers_P-R_RT_3-off_RIC-VII-166-p-315_Rome_318-319-AD_R5_Q-001_5h_17,5-18mm_2,75ga-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Rome, RIC VII 166, AE-3 Follis, P/R//R-T, VIRTVS AVG G, Campgate with three turrets, R5!!! 123 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Rome, RIC VII 166, AE-3 Follis, P/R//R-T, VIRTVS AVG G, Campgate with three turrets, R5!!!
avers: CONSTA N TINVS AVG, Laureate helmeted cuirassed bust right. 1-D6,
reverse: VIRTV S AVG G, Campgate, three turrets, six layers no doors; P-R across fields, RT in ex.
exergue: P/R//R-T, diameter: 17,5-18mm, weight: 2,75g, axes: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 318-319 A.D., ref: RIC VII 166, p-315, R5!!!,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Constantinus-I__AE-3_IMP-CONSTANT-INVS-AVG-1c_VICTORIA-LAETAE-PRINC-PERP-H11l__VOT-PR_Delta-SIS_RIC-VII-55-p-432_Altar-type-x_Siscia_318-9-AD_Rx_Q-001_6h_17-19,5mm_2,97g-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VII 055v, AE-3 Follis, -/-//ΔSIS, Not in RIC this Officina-Δ !!!, VICTORIA LAETAE PRINC PERP, Rare !!!81 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VII 055v., AE-3 Follis, -/-//ΔSIS, Not in RIC this Officina-Δ !!!, VICTORIA LAETAE PRINC PERP, Rare !!
avers:- IMP CONS TANT INVS AVG, 1c, H11l., High-crested helmeted, cuirassed bust right, spear across right shoulder.
rever:- VICTORIA LAETAE PRINC PERP, Two Victories standing, facing each other, together holding shield reading VOT/PR on cippus.
exergo: -/-//ΔSIS, diameter: 17-19,5mm, weight: 2,97g, axis:6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 318-319 A.D., ref: RIC VII 55var., T-I, Not in RIC this Officina-Δ, p-432, altar typ: x,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Constantinus-I__AE-Follis_CONSTANT-INVS-AVG_VICT_LAETAE-PRINC-CAES_VOT-PR-I_B-SIS-star_RIC-VII-95-p-436-1-H12_Siscia_2th_-off__319-20-AD_R3_Q-001_axis-h_19mm_x,xxg-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VII 095, AE-3 Follis, -/-//BSIS*, VICT•LAETAE PRINC PERP, R3!!!133 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VII 095, AE-3 Follis, -/-//BSIS*, VICT•LAETAE PRINC PERP, R3!!!
avers:- IMP CONS TANTINVS AVG, 1,H12-l, High crested, helmeted,cuirassed head left, spear across right shoulder, shield on left arm.
rever:- VICT•LAETAE PRINC PERP, Two Victories standing, facing each other, together holding shield reading VOT/PR on cippus, I on altar.
exergo: -/-//BSIS*, diameter: xxmm, weight: x,xxg, axis: h,
mint: Siscia, date: 319-320 A.D., ref: RIC VII 95, p436, altar I,
Q-001
quadrans
Constantinus-I__AE-Follis_CONSTANTINVS-PF-AVG_SOLI-INVI-CTO-COMITI_ST_RIC-VI-133-p-360_Ticinum_1st_-off__313-AD__Q-001_axis-7h_20-22mm_3_60g-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VI 133, AE-2 Follis, -/-//ST, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol radiate, head facing, Scarce !263 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VII 133, AE-2 Follis, -/-//ST, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol radiate, head facing, Scarce!
avers:- CONSTANTINVS P F AVG 1a, C, Laurate, cuirassed head right.
revers:- SOLI INVI CTO COMITI, Sol radiate, head facing, chlamys over left shoulder, and hanging behind, across the right shoulder, holding up globe left hand.
exerg: -/-//ST, diameter: 20-22mm, weight: 3.60g, axis: 7h,
mint: Ticinum_1st.-off., date: 312-313-A.D., ref:RIC VI 133, p-298, Scarce !
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Constantinus-I__AE-Follis_IMP-CONSTANTINVS-PF-AVG_SOLI-INVI-CTO-COMITI_star_PT_RIC-VII-8-p-361_Ticinum_1st_-off__313-AD_R2_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VII 008, AE-2 Follis, */-//PT, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol radiate, head left, R2!!112 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VII 008, AE-2 Follis, */-//PT, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol radiate, head left, R2!!
avers:-IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG (1, B5), Laurate, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- SOLI INVIC TO COMITI, Sol radiate, head left, rising right hand, chlamys over left shoulder, and hanging behind, across the right shoulder, holding up globe left hand.
exerg: */-//PT, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Ticinum, 1st.-off., date: 313-A.D., ref:RIC VII 8, p-361, R2!!
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Constantinus-I__AE-3-Silvered_IMP-CONSTANT-INVS-AVG-1b_VICTORIA-LAETAE-PRINC-PERP-H11l__VOT-PR_P-T_RIC-VII-83-p-372-_Ticinum_318-319-AD_R2_Q-001_11h_17,5-18mm_3,41g-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VII 083, AE-3 Follis, -/-//PT, VICTORIA LAETAE PRINC PERP, Two Victories standing, R2!!,68 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VII 083, AE-3 Follis, -/-//PT, VICTORIA LAETAE PRINC PERP, Two Victories standing, R2!!,
avers:- IMP CONSTAN TINVS AVG, 1b,H11l., High-crested helmet, cuirassed bust left, holding spear across the right shoulder.
rever:- VICTORIA LAETAE PRINC PERP, Two Victories standing, facing each other, together holding shield reading VOT/PR on cippus, altar.
exergo: -/-//PT, diameter: 17,5-18mm, weight: 3,41g, axis: 11h,
mint: Ticinum, date: 318-319 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-083, p-372, , R2!!,
Q-001
quadrans
Constantinus-I_RIC-VII-Not_in-_0h_23-24mm_4,24g-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Trier, RIC VI 866a, AE-3 Follis, T/F//PTR, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol radiated standing left, Scarce!76 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Trier, RIC VI 866a, AE-3 Follis, T/F//PTR, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol radiated standing left, Scarce!
avers:- IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- SOLI INVI CTO COMITI, Sol radiated standing left, rising right hand, holding globe in left hand,chlamys across left shoulder.
exerg: T/F//PTR, diameter: 23-24mm, weight: 4,24g, axes: 0h,
mint: Treveri, date: 310-313 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-866a, p-226, Scarce!
Q-001
quadrans
136_Constantinus_I__Trier_RIC_VI_899,_AE-Red-Follis_CONSTANTINVS_AVG,_SOLI_IN_VICTO,_PTR,_p-,_310-11-AD,_Q-001,_h,_17-18,5mm,_g-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Trier, RIC VI 899, AE-3 Follis, -/-//PTR, SOLI INVICTO, Sol radiated standing left, Scarce!128 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Trier, RIC VI 899, AE-3 Follis, -/-//PTR, SOLI INVICTO, Sol radiated standing left, Scarce!
avers:- CONSTANTINVS AVG, Laureate, and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- SOLI INVI CTO, Sol radiated standing left, raising right hand, holding the globe in left hand, chlamys across left shoulder.
exerg: -/-//PTR, diameter: 17,0-18,5mm, weight: g, axes: ,
mint: Treveri, date: 310-311 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-899, p-, Scarce!
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
Constantinus-I__AE-3_CONSTANTINVS-P-F-AVG-(1dB4)_SOLI-INVICTO-COMITI_T-F_PTR_RIC-VII-41-p-168_Trier_313-5-AD_R5_Q-001_h_mm_ga-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Trier, RIC VII 042, AE-2 Follis, F/T//PTR, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol radiate, head left, R3!208 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Trier, RIC VII 042, AE-2 Follis, F/T//PTR, SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol radiate, head left, R3!
avers:- CONSTANTINVS P F AVG (1d,B5), Laurate, and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- SOLI INVIC TO COMITI, Sol radiate, head left, rising right hand, chlamys over left shoulder, and hanging behind, across the right shoulder, holding up globe left hand.
exerg: F/T//PTR, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Trier, 1st.-off., date: 313-315-A.D., ref:RIC-VII-42, p-168, R3!
Q-001
quadrans
Constantinus-I__AR-Argenteus_IMP-CONSTANTI-NVS-AVG_VICTORIA-LAETAE-PRINC-PERP-VOT_PR_PTR_RIC-not_C-not_Trier_318-319-AD__Q-001_19mm_2,73g-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Trier, RIC VII ???, AR-Argenteus, -/-//PTR, VICTORIA LAETAE PRINC PERP, Not in RIC !!!161 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Trier, RIC VII ???, AR-Argenteus, -/-//PTR, VICTORIA LAETAE PRINC PERP, Not in RIC !!!
avers:- IMP CONSTANTI NVS AVG, bust l., high-crested helmet, cuir., dr., spear across r. shoulder..
rever:- VICTORIA LAETAE PRINC PERP, two Victories stg. facing one another, together holding shield inscribed VOT/PR on altar. PTR in exergue.
"UNLISTED ISSUE. This issue is listed erroneously in RIC VII as regular follis (TRIER 208A, p. 181), but in fact it is "billon argenteus" (c. 25% of silver) and belongs to the group of TREVERI 825-826 in RIC VI. Note that only PTR mark is correct, because of only one officina working at that time at Treveri. Note also that the bust type is similar to H11 from RIC VII, but there are also a few differences: bust is usually larger, half-length, and could be described as cuirassed and draped. Coin should be listed after TREVERI 826. See: Bastien, P., "L’émission de monnaies de billon de Treves au début de 313", Quaderni Ticinesi (Numismatica e Antichità Classiche) 1982, XI, p. 271-278. See: CORRIGENDA, VOL. VII, p. 181, CORRIGENDA, VOL. VI, p. 224" by Lech Stepniewski, in "Not in RIC" , thank you Lech Stepniewski,
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/notinric/6tre-826.html
exergo: -/-//PTR, diameter: 19mm, weight: 2,73g, axis: h,
mint: Trier, date: 318-319 A.D., ref: RIC VI Trier 825-6?, RIC VI, "TREVERI [after 826], CONSTANTINE I, UNLISTED ISSUE" by Lech Stepniewski,
Q-001
quadrans
Commemorativ_AE-follis_RO-MA_P-R_RIC-VIII-104-p-256_Rome_333-34AD-R4_Q-001_axis-5h_16mm_2,43g-s.jpg
137a Commemorative, (340-348 A.D.), AE-4, Rome, RIC VIII 104, RO MA/ P-R, R4!!!,311 views137a Commemorative, (340-348 A.D.), AE-4, Rome, RIC VIII 104, RO MA/ P-R, R4!!!,
avers: - RO-MA, draped bust of Roma right, wearing visored and crested helmet,
revers: - No legend, Emperor, helmeted and in military dress, standing facing, head left, holding spear in right hand and resting left hand on shield. P-R across fields.
exe: No mintmark, diameter: 16mm, weight: 2,43g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 348 A.D., RIC-VIII-104, p-256, R4!!!,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
antpius sest-.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AE sestertius - struck 149 AD34 viewsobv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XII (laureate bust right)
rev: TEMPORVM FELICITAS, COS IIII in exergue, S C across field (crossed cornucopiae from which a grape bunch flanked by two grain ears hang, surmounted by busts of two boys, vis-á -vis)
ref: RIC III 857, Cohen 813 (8frcs), BMC 1825note
23.14gms, 30mm,
Rare

The infants are thought to represent T. Aelius Antoninus and T. Aurelius Antoninus, the twin sons of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior born in 149 AD. These were the first male offspring of the couple, offering hope for the establishment of the new dynasty, but both died in infancy.
The coin is before cleaning.
berserker
tiberius as.jpg
14-37 AD - TIBERIUS AE as - struck 22-23 AD39 viewsobv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII (bare head left)
rev: PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXIII around large S.C.
ref: RIC I 44, C.24 (5 frcs), BMC91
9.44gms, 27mm

In 6 AD Tiberius was in Carnuntum military camp. He led at least eight legions (VIII Augusta from Pannonia, XV Apollinaris and XX Valeria Victrix from Illyricum, XXI Rapax from Raetia, XIII Gemina, XIV Gemina and XVI Gallica from Germania Superior and an unknown unit) against king Maroboduus of the Marcomanni in Bohemia (Czechia). At the same time, I Germanica, V Alaudae, XVII, XVIII and XIX, - led by Caius Sentius Saturninus (governor of Germania) -, moved against Maroboduus along the Elbe. Saturninus led his forces across the country of the Chatti, and, cutting his way through the Hercynian forest, joining Tiberius on the north bank of the Danube, and both wanted to make a combined attack within a few leagues from the Marcomannic capital Boviasmum. It was the most grandiose operation that ever conducted by a Roman army, but a rebellion in Illyria obstructed its final execution.
berserker
tiberius RIC58-RR.jpg
14-37 AD - TIBERIUS AE As - struck 36-37 AD55 viewsobv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII (laureate head left)
rev: PONTIF MAX TR POT XXXVII, S-C to left and right of rudder placed vertically across banded globe, small globe at base of rudder
ref: RIC 58 (R2), Cohen 13 (2frcs), BMC 117
10.58gms, 26mm
Very rare
1 commentsberserker
CTGDafne.jpg
1403c, Constantine I (the Great), early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.49 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC VII 35, choice aEF, Constantinople mint, 3.336g, 20.0mm, 180o, 328 A.D.; Obverse: CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: CONSTANTINI-ANA DAFNE, Victory seated left on cippus, head right, palm frond in each hand, trophy and captive before, CONS in exergue, B left; scarce. Ex FORVM.

"The information about Constantine's campaign across [the Danube] is obscure and untrustworthy. The question, therefore, of what he achieved by this enterprise was, and is, subject to contradictory interpretations. On the one hand, the Panegyrists claimed that he had repeated the triumphs of Trajan. On the other, his own nephew, Julian the Apostate, spoke for many when he expressed the view that this second 'conquest' of Dacia was incomplete and extremely brief . . . monetary commemoration was accorded to the building, at about the same time [AD 328], of the river frontier fortress of Constantiniana Dafne (Spantov, near Oltenita) . . ." (Grant, Michael. The Emperor Constantine. London: Phoenix, 1998. 58-9).

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
1 commentsCleisthenes
Julian2VotXConstantinople.jpg
1409a, Julian II "the Philosopher," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.143 viewsJulian II, A.D. 360-363; RIC 167; VF; 2.7g, 20mm; Constantinople mint; Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted & cuirassed bust right, holding spear & shield; Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath; CONSPB in exergue; Attractive green patina. Ex Nemesis.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Julian the Apostate (360-363 A.D.)

Walter E. Roberts, Emory University
Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University

Introduction

The emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus reigned from 360 to 26 June 363, when he was killed fighting against the Persians. Despite his short rule, his emperorship was pivotal in the development of the history of the later Roman empire. This essay is not meant to be a comprehensive look at the various issues central to the reign of Julian and the history of the later empire. Rather, this short work is meant to be a brief history and introduction for the general reader. Julian was the last direct descendent of the Constantinian line to ascend to the purple, and it is one of history's great ironies that he was the last non-Christian emperor. As such, he has been vilified by most Christian sources, beginning with John Chrysostom and Gregory Nazianzus in the later fourth century. This tradition was picked up by the fifth century Eusebian continuators Sozomen, Socrates Scholasticus, and Theodoret and passed on to scholars down through the 20th century. Most contemporary sources, however, paint a much more balanced picture of Julian and his reign. The adoption of Christianity by emperors and society, while still a vital concern, was but one of several issues that concerned Julian.

It is fortunate that extensive writings from Julian himself exist, which help interpret his reign in the light of contemporary evidence. Still extant are some letters, several panegyrics, and a few satires. Other contemporary sources include the soldier Ammianus Marcellinus' history, correspondence between Julian and Libanius of Antioch, several panegyrics, laws from the Theodosian Code, inscriptions, and coinage. These sources show Julian's emphasis on restoration. He saw himself as the restorer of the traditional values of Roman society. Of course much of this was rhetoric, meant to defend Julian against charges that he was a usurper. At the same time this theme of restoration was central to all emperors of the fourth century. Julian thought that he was the one emperor who could regain what was viewed as the lost glory of the Roman empire. To achieve this goal he courted select groups of social elites to get across his message of restoration. This was the way that emperors functioned in the fourth century. By choosing whom to include in the sharing of power, they sought to shape society.

Early Life

Julian was born at Constantinople in 331. His father was Julius Constantius, half-brother of the emperor Constantine through Constantius Chlorus, and his mother was Basilina, Julius' second wife. Julian had two half-brothers via Julius' first marriage. One of these was Gallus, who played a major role in Julian's life. Julian appeared destined for a bright future via his father's connection to the Constantinian house. After many years of tense relations with his three half-brothers, Constantine seemed to have welcomed them into the fold of the imperial family. From 333 to 335, Constantine conferred a series of honors upon his three half-siblings, including appointing Julius Constantius as one of the consuls for 335. Julian's mother was equally distinguished. Ammianus related that she was from a noble family. This is supported by Libanius, who claimed that she was the daughter of Julius Julianus, a Praetorian Prefect under Licinius, who was such a model of administrative virtue that he was pardoned and honored by Constantine.

Despite the fact that his mother died shortly after giving birth to him, Julian experienced an idyllic early childhood. This ended when Constantius II conducted a purge of many of his relatives shortly after Constantine's death in 337, particularly targeting the families of Constantine's half-brothers. ulian and Gallus were spared, probably due to their young age. Julian was put under the care of Mardonius, a Scythian eunuch who had tutored his mother, in 339, and was raised in the Greek philosophical tradition, and probably lived in Nicomedia. Ammianus also supplied the fact that while in Nicomedia, Julian was cared for by the local bishop Eusebius, of whom the future emperor was a distant relation. Julian was educated by some of the most famous names in grammar and rhetoric in the Greek world at that time, including Nicocles and Hecebolius. In 344 Constantius II sent Julian and Gallus to Macellum in Cappadocia, where they remained for six years. In 351, Gallus was made Caesar by Constantius II and Julian was allowed to return to Nicomedia, where he studied under Aedesius, Eusebius, and Chrysanthius, all famed philosophers, and was exposed to the Neo-Platonism that would become such a prominent part of his life. But Julian was most proud of the time he spent studying under Maximus of Ephesus, a noted Neo-Platonic philospher and theurgist. It was Maximus who completed Julian's full-scale conversion to Neo-Platonism. Later, when he was Caesar, Julian told of how he put letters from this philosopher under his pillows so that he would continue to absorb wisdom while he slept, and while campaigning on the Rhine, he sent his speeches to Maximus for approval before letting others hear them. When Gallus was executed in 354 for treason by Constantius II, Julian was summoned to Italy and essentially kept under house arrest at Comum, near Milan, for seven months before Constantius' wife Eusebia convinced the emperor that Julian posed no threat. This allowed Julian to return to Greece and continue his life as a scholar where he studied under the Neo-Platonist Priscus. Julian's life of scholarly pursuit, however, ended abruptly when he was summoned to the imperial court and made Caesar by Constantius II on 6 November 355.

Julian as Caesar

Constantius II realized an essential truth of the empire that had been evident since the time of the Tetrarchy--the empire was too big to be ruled effectively by one man. Julian was pressed into service as Caesar, or subordinate emperor, because an imperial presence was needed in the west, in particular in the Gallic provinces. Julian, due to the emperor's earlier purges, was the only viable candidate of the imperial family left who could act as Caesar. Constantius enjoined Julian with the task of restoring order along the Rhine frontier. A few days after he was made Caesar, Julian was married to Constantius' sister Helena in order to cement the alliance between the two men. On 1 December 355, Julian journeyed north, and in Augusta Taurinorum he learned that Alamannic raiders had destroyed Colonia Agrippina. He then proceeded to Vienne where he spent the winter. At Vienne, he learned that Augustudunum was also under siege, but was being held by a veteran garrison. He made this his first priority, and arrived there on 24 June 356. When he had assured himself that the city was in no immediate danger, he journeyed to Augusta Treverorum via Autessioduram, and from there to Durocortorum where he rendezvoused with his army. Julian had the army stage a series of punitive strikes around the Dieuse region, and then he moved them towards the Argentoratum/Mongontiacum region when word of barbarian incursions reached him.

From there, Julian moved on to Colonia Agrippina, and negotiated a peace with the local barbarian leaders who had assaulted the city. He then wintered at Senonae. He spent the early part of the campaigning season of 357 fighting off besiegers at Senonae, and then conducting operations around Lugdunum and Tres Tabernae. Later that summer, he encountered his watershed moment as a military general. Ammianus went into great detail about Julian's victory over seven rogue Alamannic chieftains near Argentoratum, and Julian himself bragged about it in his later writing. After this battle, the soldiers acclaimed Julian Augustus, but he rejected this title. After mounting a series of follow-up raids into Alamannic territory, he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia, and on the way defeated some Frankish raiders in the Mosa region. Julian considered this campaign one of the major events of his time as Caesar.

Julian began his 358 military campaigns early, hoping to catch the barbarians by surprise. His first target was the Franks in the northern Rhine region. He then proceeded to restore some forts in the Mosa region, but his soldiers threatened to mutiny because they were on short rations and had not been paid their donative since Julian had become Caesar. After he soothed his soldiers, Julian spent the rest of the summer negotiating a peace with various Alamannic leaders in the mid and lower Rhine areas, and retired to winter quarters at Lutetia. In 359, he prepared once again to carry out a series of punitive expeditions against the Alamanni in the Rhine region who were still hostile to the Roman presence. In preparation, the Caesar repopulated seven previously destroyed cities and set them up as supply bases and staging areas. This was done with the help of the people with whom Julian had negotiated a peace the year before. Julian then had a detachment of lightly armed soldiers cross the Rhine near Mogontiacum and conduct a guerilla strike against several chieftains. As a result of these campaigns, Julian was able to negotiate a peace with all but a handful of the Alamannic leaders, and he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia.

Of course, Julian did more than act as a general during his time as Caesar. According to Ammianus, Julian was an able administrator who took steps to correct the injustices of Constantius' appointees. Ammianus related the story of how Julian prevented Florentius, the Praetorian Prefect of Gaul, from raising taxes, and also how Julian actually took over as governor for the province of Belgica Secunda. Hilary, bishop of Poitiers, supported Ammianus' basic assessment of Julian in this regard when he reported that Julian was an able representative of the emperor to the Gallic provincials. There is also epigraphic evidence to support Julian's popularity amongst the provincial elites. An inscription found near Beneventum in Apulia reads:
"To Flavius Claudius Julianus, most noble and sanctified Caesar, from the caring Tocius Maximus, vir clarissimus, for the care of the res publica from Beneventum".

Tocius Maximus, as a vir clarissimus, was at the highest point in the social spectrum and was a leader in his local community. This inscription shows that Julian was successful in establishing a positive image amongst provincial elites while he was Caesar.

Julian Augustus

In early 360, Constantius, driven by jealousy of Julian's success, stripped Julian of many troops and officers, ostensibly because the emperor needed them for his upcoming campaign against the Persians. One of the legions ordered east, the Petulantes, did not want to leave Gaul because the majority of the soldiers in the unit were from this region. As a result they mutinied and hailed Julian as Augustus at Lutetia. Julian refused this acclamation as he had done at Argentoratum earlier, but the soldiers would have none of his denial. They raised him on a shield and adorned him with a neck chain, which had formerly been the possession of the standard-bearer of the Petulantes and symbolized a royal diadem. Julian appeared reluctantly to acquiesce to their wishes, and promised a generous donative. The exact date of his acclamation is unknown, but most scholars put it in February or March. Julian himself supported Ammianus' picture of a jealous Constantius. In his Letter to the Athenians, a document constructed to answer charges that he was a usurper, Julian stated that from the start he, as Caesar, had been meant as a figurehead to the soldiers and provincials. The real power he claimed lay with the generals and officials already present in Gaul. In fact, according to Julian, the generals were charged with watching him as much as the enemy. His account of the actual acclamation closely followed what Ammianus told us, but he stressed even more his reluctance to take power. Julian claimed that he did so only after praying to Zeus for guidance.

Fearing the reaction of Constantius, Julian sent a letter to his fellow emperor justifying the events at Lutetia and trying to arrange a peaceful solution. This letter berated Constantius for forcing the troops in Gaul into an untenable situation. Ammianus stated that Julian's letter blamed Constantius' decision to transfer Gallic legions east as the reason for the soldiers' rebellion. Julian once again asserted that he was an unwilling participant who was only following the desire of the soldiers. In both of these basic accounts Ammianus and Julian are playing upon the theme of restoration. Implicit in their version of Julian's acclamation is the argument that Constantius was unfit to rule. The soldiers were the vehicle of the gods' will. The Letter to the Athenians is full of references to the fact that Julian was assuming the mantle of Augustus at the instigation of the gods. Ammianus summed up this position nicely when he related the story of how, when Julian was agonizing over whether to accept the soldiers' acclamation, he had a dream in which he was visited by the Genius (guardian spirit) of the Roman state. The Genius told Julian that it had often tried to bestow high honors upon Julian but had been rebuffed. Now, the Genius went on to say, was Julian's final chance to take the power that was rightfully his. If the Caesar refused this chance, the Genius would depart forever, and both Julian and the state would rue Julian's rejection. Julian himself wrote a letter to his friend Maximus of Ephesus in November of 361 detailing his thoughts on his proclamation. In this letter, Julian stated that the soldiers proclaimed him Augustus against his will. Julian, however, defended his accession, saying that the gods willed it and that he had treated his enemies with clemency and justice. He went on to say that he led the troops in propitiating the traditional deities, because the gods commanded him to return to the traditional rites, and would reward him if he fulfilled this duty.

During 360 an uneasy peace simmered between the two emperors. Julian spent the 360 campaigning season continuing his efforts to restore order along the Rhine, while Constantius continued operations against the Persians. Julian wintered in Vienne, and celebrated his Quinquennalia. It was at this time that his wife Helena died, and he sent her remains to Rome for a proper burial at his family villa on the Via Nomentana where the body of her sister was entombed. The uneasy peace held through the summer of 361, but Julian concentrated his military operations around harassing the Alamannic chieftain Vadomarius and his allies, who had concluded a peace treaty with Constantius some years earlier. By the end of the summer, Julian decided to put an end to the waiting and gathered his army to march east against Constantius. The empire teetered on the brink of another civil war. Constantius had spent the summer negotiating with the Persians and making preparations for possible military action against his cousin. When he was assured that the Persians would not attack, he summoned his army and sallied forth to meet Julian. As the armies drew inexorably closer to one another, the empire was saved from another bloody civil war when Constantius died unexpectedly of natural causes on 3 November near the town of Mopsucrenae in Cilicia, naming Julian -- the sources say-- as his legitimate successor.

Julian was in Dacia when he learned of his cousin's death. He made his way through Thrace and came to Constantinople on 11 December 361 where Julian honored the emperor with the funeral rites appropriate for a man of his station. Julian immediately set about putting his supporters in positions of power and trimming the imperial bureaucracy, which had become extremely overstaffed during Constantius' reign. Cooks and barbers had increased during the late emperor's reign and Julian expelled them from his court. Ammianus gave a mixed assessment of how the new emperor handled the followers of Constantius. Traditionally, emperors were supposed to show clemency to the supporters of a defeated enemy. Julian, however, gave some men over to death to appease the army. Ammianus used the case of Ursulus, Constantius' comes sacrum largitionum, to illustrate his point. Ursulus had actually tried to acquire money for the Gallic troops when Julian had first been appointed Caesar, but he had also made a disparaging remark about the ineffectiveness of the army after the battle of Amida. The soldiers remembered this, and when Julian became sole Augustus, they demanded Ursulus' head. Julian obliged, much to the disapproval of Ammianus. This seems to be a case of Julian courting the favor of the military leadership, and is indicative of a pattern in which Julian courted the goodwill of various societal elites to legitimize his position as emperor.

Another case in point is the officials who made up the imperial bureaucracy. Many of them were subjected to trial and punishment. To achieve this goal, during the last weeks of December 361 Julian assembled a military tribunal at Chalcedon, empanelling six judges to try the cases. The president of the tribunal was Salutius, just promoted to the rank of Praetorian Prefect; the five other members were Mamertinus, the orator, and four general officers: Jovinus, Agilo, Nevitta, and Arbetio. Relative to the proceedings of the tribunal, Ammianus noted that the judges, " . . . oversaw the cases more vehemently than was right or fair, with the exception of a few . . .." Ammianus' account of Julian's attempt at reform of the imperial bureaucracy is supported by legal evidence from the Theodosian Code. A series of laws sent to Mamertinus, Julian's appointee as Praetorian Prefect in Italy, Illyricum, and Africa, illustrate this point nicely. On 6 June 362, Mamertinus received a law that prohibited provincial governors from bypassing the Vicars when giving their reports to the Prefect. Traditionally, Vicars were given civil authority over a group of provinces, and were in theory meant to serve as a middle step between governors and Prefects. This law suggests that the Vicars were being left out, at least in Illyricum. Julian issued another edict to Mamertinus on 22 February 362 to stop abuse of the public post by governors. According to this law, only Mamertinus could issue post warrants, but the Vicars were given twelve blank warrants to be used as they saw fit, and each governor was given two. Continuing the trend of bureaucratic reform, Julian also imposed penalties on governors who purposefully delayed appeals in court cases they had heard. The emperor also established a new official to weigh solidi used in official government transactions to combat coin clipping.

For Julian, reigning in the abuses of imperial bureaucrats was one step in restoring the prestige of the office of emperor. Because he could not affect all elements of society personally, Julian, like other Neo-Flavian emperors, decided to concentrate on select groups of societal elites as intercessors between himself and the general populace. One of these groups was the imperial bureaucracy. Julian made it very clear that imperial officials were intercessors in a very real sense in a letter to Alypius, Vicar of Britain. In this letter, sent from Gaul sometime before 361, the emperor praises Alypius for his use of "mildness and moderation with courage and force" in his rule of the provincials. Such virtues were characteristic of the emperors, and it was good that Alypius is representing Julian in this way. Julian courted the army because it put him in power. Another group he sought to include in his rule was the traditional Senatorial aristocracy. One of his first appointments as consul was Claudius Mamertinus, a Gallic Senator and rhetorician. Mamertinus' speech in praise of Julian delivered at Constantinople in January of 362 is preserved. In this speech, Claudius presented his consular selection as inaugurating a new golden age and Julian as the restorer of the empire founded by Augustus. The image Mamertinus gave of his own consulate inaugurating a new golden age is not merely formulaic. The comparison of Julian to Augustus has very real, if implicit, relevance to Claudius' situation. Claudius emphasized the imperial period as the true age of renewal. Augustus ushered in a new era with his formation of a partnership between the emperor and the Senate based upon a series of honors and offices bestowed upon the Senate in return for their role as intercessor between emperor and populace. It was this system that Julian was restoring, and the consulate was one concrete example of this bond. To be chosen as a consul by the emperor, who himself had been divinely mandated, was a divine honor. In addition to being named consul, Mamertinus went on to hold several offices under Julian, including the Prefecture of Italy, Illyricum, and Africa. Similarly, inscriptional evidence illustrates a link between municipal elites and Julian during his time as Caesar, something which continued after he became emperor. One concrete example comes from the municipal senate of Aceruntia in Apulia, which established a monument on which Julian is styled as "Repairer of the World."

Julian seems to have given up actual Christian belief before his acclamation as emperor and was a practitioner of more traditional Greco-Roman religious beliefs, in particular, a follower of certain late antique Platonist philosophers who were especially adept at theurgy as was noted earlier. In fact Julian himself spoke of his conversion to Neo-Platonism in a letter to the Alexandrians written in 363. He stated that he had abandoned Christianity when he was twenty years old and been an adherent of the traditional Greco-Roman deities for the twelve years prior to writing this letter.

(For the complete text of this article see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/julian.htm)

Julian’s Persian Campaign

The exact goals Julian had for his ill-fated Persian campaign were never clear. The Sassanid Persians, and before them the Parthians, had been a traditional enemy from the time of the Late Republic, and indeed Constantius had been conducting a war against them before Julian's accession forced the former to forge an uneasy peace. Julian, however, had no concrete reason to reopen hostilities in the east. Socrates Scholasticus attributed Julian's motives to imitation of Alexander the Great, but perhaps the real reason lay in his need to gather the support of the army. Despite his acclamation by the Gallic legions, relations between Julian and the top military officers was uneasy at best. A war against the Persians would have brought prestige and power both to Julian and the army.

Julian set out on his fateful campaign on 5 March 363. Using his trademark strategy of striking quickly and where least expected, he moved his army through Heirapolis and from there speedily across the Euphrates and into the province of Mesopotamia, where he stopped at the town of Batnae. His plan was to eventually return through Armenia and winter in Tarsus. Once in Mesopotamia, Julian was faced with the decision of whether to travel south through the province of Babylonia or cross the Tigris into Assyria, and he eventually decided to move south through Babylonia and turn west into Assyria at a later date. By 27 March, he had the bulk of his army across the Euphrates, and had also arranged a flotilla to guard his supply line along the mighty river. He then left his generals Procopius and Sebastianus to help Arsacius, the king of Armenia and a Roman client, to guard the northern Tigris line. It was also during this time that he received the surrender of many prominent local leaders who had nominally supported the Persians. These men supplied Julian with money and troops for further military action against their former masters. Julian decided to turn south into Babylonia and proceeded along the Euphrates, coming to the fortress of Cercusium at the junction of the Abora and Euphrates Rivers around the first of April, and from there he took his army west to a region called Zaitha near the abandoned town of Dura where they visited the tomb of the emperor Gordian which was in the area. On April 7 he set out from there into the heart of Babylonia and towards Assyria.

Ammianus then stated that Julian and his army crossed into Assyria, which on the face of things appears very confusing. Julian still seems to be operating within the province of Babylonia between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. The confusion is alleviated when one realizes that,for Ammianus, the region of Assyria encompassed the provinces of Babylonia and Assyria. On their march, Julian's forces took the fortress of Anatha, received the surrender and support of several more local princes, and ravaged the countryside of Assyria between the rivers. As the army continued south, they came across the fortresses Thilutha and Achaiachala, but these places were too well defended and Julian decided to leave them alone. Further south were the cities Diacira and Ozogardana, which the Roman forces sacked and burned. Soon, Julian came to Pirisabora and a brief siege ensued, but the city fell and was also looted and destroyed. It was also at this time that the Roman army met its first systematic resistance from the Persians. As the Romans penetrated further south and west, the local inhabitants began to flood their route. Nevertheless, the Roman forces pressed on and came to Maiozamalcha, a sizable city not far from Ctesiphon. After a short siege, this city too fell to Julian. Inexorably, Julian's forces zeroed in on Ctesiphon, but as they drew closer, the Persian resistance grew fiercer, with guerilla raids whittling at Julian's men and supplies. A sizable force of the army was lost and the emperor himself was almost killed taking a fort a few miles from the target city.
Finally, the army approached Ctesiphon following a canal that linked the Tigris and Euphrates. It soon became apparent after a few preliminary skirmishes that a protracted siege would be necessary to take this important city. Many of his generals, however, thought that pursuing this course of action would be foolish. Julian reluctantly agreed, but became enraged by this failure and ordered his fleet to be burned as he decided to march through the province of Assyria. Julian had planned for his army to live off the land, but the Persians employed a scorched-earth policy. When it became apparent that his army would perish (because his supplies were beginning to dwindle) from starvation and the heat if he continued his campaign, and also in the face of superior numbers of the enemy, Julian ordered a retreat on 16 June. As the Roman army retreated, they were constantly harassed by guerilla strikes. It was during one of these raids that Julian got caught up in the fighting and took a spear to his abdomen. Mortally wounded he was carried to his tent, where, after conferring with some of his officers, he died. The date was 26 June 363.

Conclusion

Thus an ignominious end for a man came about who had hoped to restore the glory of the Roman empire during his reign as emperor. Due to his intense hatred of Christianity, the opinion of posterity has not been kind to Julian. The contemporary opinion, however, was overall positive. The evidence shows that Julian was a complex ruler with a definite agenda to use traditional social institutions in order to revive what he saw as a collapsing empire. In the final assessment, he was not so different from any of the other emperors of the fourth century. He was a man grasping desperately to hang on to a Greco-Roman conception of leadership that was undergoing a subtle yet profound change.
Copyright (C) 2002, Walter E. Roberts and Michael DiMaio, Jr. Used by permission.

In reality, Julian worked to promote culture and philosophy in any manifestation. He tried to reduce taxes and the public debts of municipalities; he augmented administrative decentralisation; he promoted a campaign of austerity to reduce public expenditure (setting himself as the example). He reformed the postal service and eliminated the powerful secret police.
by Federico Morando; JULIAN II, The Apostate, http://www.forumancientcoins.com/NumisWiki/view.asp?key=Julian%20II

Flavius Claudius Iulianus was born in 331 or maybe 332 A.D. in Constantinople. He ruled the Western Empire as Caesar from 355 to 360 and was hailed Augustus by his legions in Lutetia (Paris) in 360. Julian was a gifted administrator and military strategist. Famed as the last pagan emperor, his reinstatement of the pagan religion earned him the moniker "the Apostate." As evidenced by his brilliant writing, some of which has survived to the present day, the title "the Philosopher" may have been more appropriate. He died from wounds suffered during the Persian campaign of 363 A.D. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.




2 commentsCleisthenes
1302_P_Hadrian_RPC1410.jpg
1410 Hadrian, Cistophorus Uncertain mint in Asia Minor, Bundle of grain four ears17 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1410; Metcalf 66; (same die pair as M303 plate)

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder,

Rev. COS III (across top)
Poppy and four grain stalks in bundle

9.26 gr
28 mm
1h
1 commentsokidoki
IMG_2422.JPG
142 Aelius47 viewsOrichalcum sestertius, RIC II Hadrian 1059, SRCV II 3981, BMCRE III Hadrian 1921, Cohen II 26, aF, Rome mint, weight 25.725g, maximum diameter 31.3mm, die axis 180o, 137 A.D.; obverse L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right; reverse TR POT COS II, PANNO-NIA and S - C across fields, Pannonia standing facing, head left, holding vexillum in right hand and gathering up drapery in left; scarce; ex forvm5 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Londinium_RIC_VII_252,_142_Crispus_AE-3-Follis_CRISPVS-NOB-CAES_BEAT-TRA-NQLITAS_VOT-IS-XX_F-B_PLON_-p-113__321-2-AD_R5_Q-001_6h_19-19,5mm_2,78g-s1.jpg
142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Londinium, RIC VII 252, AE-3 Follis, F/B//PLON, BEAT TRANQLITAS, VO/TIS/XX, Globe on altar, R5!!!97 views142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Londinium, RIC VII 252, AE-3 Follis, F/B//PLON, BEAT TRANQLITAS, VO/TIS/XX, Globe on altar, R5!!!
avers: CRISPVS-NOB-CAES, Laureated and cuirassed bust left, spear across right shoulder, decorated shield with two captives on the left arm.
revers: BEAT-TRA-NQLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VOT/IS/XX, above, three stars.
exerg: F/B//PLON, diameter: 19-19,5mm, weight: 2,78g, axis: 6h,
mint: Londinium, date: 322-323 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-252, p-113, R5!!!
Q-001
quadrans
Nicomedia_RIC_VII_032,_142_Crispus_AE-3-Follis_D-N-FL-IVL-CRISPVS-NOB-CAES_PROVIDEN-TIAE-CAES-S_palm-left-field_S-dot_SMN_r2_317-20-AD_Q-001_19mm_3,80ga-s.jpg
142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VII 032, AE-3 Follis, palm/S over•//SMN, PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, Jupiter standing left, R2!!95 views142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VII 032, AE-3 Follis, palm/S over•//SMN, PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, Jupiter standing left, R2!!
avers:- D-N-FL-IVL-CRISPVS-NOB-CAES, 5b, B4, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- PROVIDEN-TIAE-CAES-S, Jupiter stg. left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on sceptre, holding Victory on globe. Palm in the left field at foot, S over • in right field.
exergo: palm/S over•//SMN, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,80g, axis: 6h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 317-320 AD., ref: RIC-VII-32, p604, R2!!
Q-001
quadrans
Treveri_RIC_VII_372,_142_Crispus_AE-3-Follis_IVL-CRISPVS-NOB-CAES_BEATA-TRANQVILLITAS_VO-TIS-XX_dotPTRdot_p197_C3_322-3-AD_Q-001_0h_19,5mm_2,51ga-s.jpg
142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Treveri, RIC VII 372, AE-3 Follis, -/-//•PTR•, BEATA TRANQVILLITAS, VO/TIS/XX, C3!97 views142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Treveri, RIC VII 372, AE-3 Follis, -/-//•PTR•, BEATA TRANQVILLITAS, VO/TIS/XX, C3!
avers:- IVL-CRISPVS-NOB-CAES, Laureated and cuirassed bust left, spear across right shoulder, decorated shield on the left arm.
revers:- BEATA-TRANQVILLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VO/TIS/XX, above, three stars.
exerg: -/-//•PTR•, diameter: 19,5mm, weight: 2,51g, axis: 0 h,
mint: Treveri, date: 322-323 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-372, p-197, C3!,
Q-001
quadrans
Treveri_RIC_VII_372,_142_Crispus_AE-3-Follis_IVL-CRISPVS-NOB-CAES_BEATA-TRANQVILLITAS_VO-TIS-XX_dotSTRdot_p197_C3_322-3-AD_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Treveri, RIC VII 372, AE-3 Follis, -/-//•STR•, BEATA TRANQVILLITAS, VO/TIS/XX, #189 views142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Treveri, RIC VII 372, AE-3 Follis, -/-//•STR•, BEATA TRANQVILLITAS, VO/TIS/XX, #1
avers:- IVL-CRISPVS-NOB-CAES, Laureated and cuirassed bust left, spear across right shoulder, decorated shield on the left arm. The sash visible on the bust.
revers:- BEATA-TRANQVILLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VO/TIS/XX, above, three stars.
exerg: -/-//•STR•, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Treveri, date: 322-323 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-372, p-197,
Q-001
quadrans
Treveri_RIC_VII_372,_142_Crispus_AE-3-Follis_IVL-CRISPVS-NOB-CAES_BEATA-TRANQVILLITAS_VO-TIS-XX_dotSTRdot_p197_C3_322-3-AD_Q-002_h_mm_g-s.jpg
142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Treveri, RIC VII 372, AE-3 Follis, -/-//•STR•, BEATA TRANQVILLITAS, VO/TIS/XX, #282 views142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Treveri, RIC VII 372, AE-3 Follis, -/-//•STR•, BEATA TRANQVILLITAS, VO/TIS/XX, #2
avers:- IVL-CRISPVS-NOB-CAES, Laureated and cuirassed bust left, spear across right shoulder, decorated shield on the left arm. The sash visible on the bust.
revers:- BEATA-TRANQVILLITAS, Globe set on altar inscribed VO/TIS/XX, above, three stars.
exerg: -/-//•STR•, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Treveri, date: 322-323 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-372, p-197,
Q-002
quadrans
Constantinus-II__AE-3-Silvered_CONSTANTINVS-IVN-NOB-CAES_CLARITAS-REIPVBLICAE_Delta-SIS_RIC-VII-37-p-428_Siscia_317-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_20-20,5mm_3,00ga-s.jpg
145 Constantinus-II. (316-337 A.D. Caesar, 337-340 A.D. Augustus), RIC VII 037, Siscia, AE-3 Follis, -/-// Δ-SIS, CLARITAS REIPVBLICAE, Sol standing left, R3!!!94 views145 Constantinus-II. (316-337 A.D. Caesar, 337-340 A.D. Augustus), RIC VII 037, Siscia, AE-3 Follis, -/-// Δ-SIS, CLARITAS REIPVBLICAE, Sol standing left, R3!!!
avers:- CONSTANTINVS-IVN-NOB-CAES-7-B4, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- CLARITAS-REIPVBLICAE, Sol standing left, rising right hand, globe in left hand, chlamys across left shoulder.
exe: -/-// Δ-SIS, diameter: 20-20,5 mm, weight: 3,00g, axis: 6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 317 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-037-p-428, R3!!!,
Q-001
quadrans
Magnentius_AE-2-21_DN-MAGNEN-TIVS-PF-AVG_SALVS-DD-NN-AVG-ET-CAES_P-R-P-dot_RIC-000_C-00_Rome_000_Q-001_h_21mm_5,13g-s.jpg
148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), Arles, RIC VIII 196, AE-21, A/ω//PAR•, SALVS D D N N AVG ET CAES, Large Chi-Rho,107 views148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), Arles, RIC VIII 196, AE-21, A/ω//PAR•, SALVS D D N N AVG ET CAES, Large Chi-Rho,
avers:- D N MAGNEN TIVS P F AVG, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- SALVS D D N N AVG ET CAES, Large Chi-Rho, A-W across the field.
exerg: A/ω//PAR•, diameter: 21mm, weight: 5,13g, axis: h,
mint: Arles , date: 350-353 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-196, C-,
Q-00
quadrans
Magnentius_AE-1-28_DN-MAGNEN-TIVS-PF-AVG_SALVS-DD-NN-AVG-ET-CAES_TRS_A-W_RIC-318_Treveri-350-353_Q-001_h_27-28mm_7,38gx-s.jpg
148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), Trier, RIC VIII 318, AE-28, Double Centenionalis, A/ω//TRS, SALVS D D N N AVG ET CAES, Large Chi-Rho,103 views148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), Trier, RIC VIII 318, AE-28, Double Centenionalis, A/ω//TRS, SALVS D D N N AVG ET CAES, Large Chi-Rho,
avers:- D N MAGNEN TIVS P F AVG, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- SALVS D D N N AVG ET CAES, Large Chi-Rho, A-ω across the field.
exerg: A/ω//TRS, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: 7,38g, axis: h,
mint: Trier, date: 350-353 AD., ref: RIC VIII 318, C-,
Q-001
quadrans
RI 155k img.jpg
155 - Licinius - RIC VI Thessalonica 06092 viewsObv:– IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on sceptre, Victory on globe in right hand; eagle with wreath to left
Minted in Thessalonica (.TS.A. in exe)
References:– RIC VI Thessalonica 60 (Common)
maridvnvm
RI 155h img.jpg
155 - Licinius - RIC VII Siscia 00847 viewsObv:– IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on sceptre, Victory on globe in right hand; eagle with wreath to left.
Minted in Siscia (A in right field, SIS in exe.) in A.D. 313
References:– RIC VII Siscia 8 (Scarce)
maridvnvm
RI_155ah_img.jpg
155 - Licinius I - Follis - RIC VII Alexandria 1010 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right
Rev:– IOVI CONSER-VATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and sceptre; eagle with wreath at foot left
Minted in Alexandria (_ | Wreath over Delta over N / ALE). A.D. 314
Reference(s) – RIC VII Alexandria 10 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI_155al_img.jpg
155 - Licinius I - Follis - RIC VII Alexandria 10 29 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right
Rev:– IOVI CONSER-VATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and sceptre; eagle with wreath at foot left
Minted in Alexandria (_ | Wreath over B over N / ALE). A.D. 314
Reference(s) – RIC VII Alexandria 10 (R2)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_155an_img.jpg
155 - Licinius I - Follis - RIC VII Alexandria 14 13 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right
Rev:– IOVI CONSER-VATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and sceptre; eagle with wreath at foot left
Minted in Alexandria (K | Wreath over A over X // ALE). A.D. 315-316
Reference(s) – RIC VII Alexandria 14 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI_155as_img.jpg
155 - Licinius I - Follis - RIC VII Cyzicus 01521 viewsFollis
Obv:- IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:- IOVI CONSERVATORI , Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on sceptre, Victory on globe in right hand; eagle with wreath to left.
Minted in Cyzicus (_ | X over II Mu // SMKG).
Reference(s):- RIC VII Cyzicus 15 (R2)

3.42 gms. 20.16 mm. 0 degrees
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_157h_img.jpg
157 - Licinius II - AE3 - RIC VII Arles 160 10 viewsAE3
Obv:– VAL LICINIVS NOB CAES, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, chlamys spread across both shoulders
Minted in Arles (//T Star in Crescent A.)
Reference:– RIC VII Arles 160 (R3)
maridvnvm
RI_157i_img.jpg
157 - Licinius II - AE3 - RIC VII Arles 16017 viewsAE3
Obv:– VAL LICINIVS NOB CAES, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, chlamys spread across both shoulders
Minted in Arles (//T Star in Crescent A.)
Reference:– RIC VII Arles 160 (R3)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_160en_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - Follis - RIC VII Arles 15016 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:- SOLI INVI-CTO COMITI, Sol standing right, head left, holding globe in left hand and raising right, chlamys spread across both shoulders
Minted in Arles (C | S / PARL).
Reference:– RIC VII Arles 150 (Rated S)
maridvnvm
RI_160ep_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - Follis - RIC VII London 14919 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:- SOLI INV-I-CTO COMITI, Sol standing left, holding globe in left hand and raising right, chlamys spread across both shoulders
Minted in London (Crescent | * / PLN).
Reference:– RIC VII London 149 (Rated R4)
maridvnvm
RI_160fo_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - Follis - RIC VII Siscia 1520 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate cuirassed bust right
Rev:- IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and sceptre, eagle with wreath at foot left
Minted in Siscis (_ | D / dot SIS dot). A.D. 315-316
Reference(s) – RIC VII Siscia 15
maridvnvm
RI_160em_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - Follis - RIC VII Ticinum 314 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:- SOLI INVI-C-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left hand and raising right, chlamys spread across both shoulders
Minted in Ticinum (// TT).
Reference:– RIC VII Ticinum 3 (Rated R2)
maridvnvm
RI_160eh_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - Follis - RIC VII Trier 12813 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate cuirassed bust right
Rev:- SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left hand and raising right, chlamys spread across both shoulders
Minted in Trier (T | F / BTR).
Reference:– RIC VII Trier 128 (Rated R4)
maridvnvm
RI_160ei_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - Follis - RIC VII Trier 13211 viewsObv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, Laureate cuirassed bust right
Rev:- SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left hand and raising right, chlamys spread across both shoulders
Minted in Trier (T | F / BTR).
Reference:– RIC VII Trier 132
maridvnvm
RI_160ej_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - Follis - RIC VII Trier 13511 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate cuirassed bust right
Rev:- SOLI INVIC-TO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left hand and raising right, chlamys spread across both shoulders
Minted in Trier (T | F / BTR).
Reference:– RIC VII Trier 135
maridvnvm
RI 160bj img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great - RIC VII Thessalonica 424 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS P F INV AVG, Laureate bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on scepter, Victory on globe in right hand, eagle with wreath at feet to the left
Minted in Thessalonica (//•TS•A•), November A.D. 316 – March A.D. 317
Reference:– RIC Thessalonica 4 (R3)
maridvnvm
RI_160gi_img.jpg
160 - Constantine the Great -AE3 - RIC VII Rome 33 19 viewsAE3
Obv:– IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SOLI IN -VI-CTO COMITI, Sol standing left holding globe in left and raising right, chlamys across left shoulder
Minted in Rome (S | F //RP).
Reference:– RIC VII Rome 33 (C3).

Large flan. Residual golden toned silvering in the fields.

3.49 gms. 21.79 mm generally but 23.55 mm at the sprue
maridvnvm
RI 161j img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Arles 37437 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Arles. Wreath in left field, PCONST in exe.
Reference:– RIC Arles 374 (R2).
maridvnvm
RI 161h img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Constantinople 7930 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Constantinople. CONSIA. in exe.
Reference:– RIC Constantinople 79
maridvnvm
RI 161l img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 24130 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum (PLG in exe). A.D. 330
Reference:– RIC VII Lugdunum 241 (R1). Bastien 202 (36 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 161i img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 24621 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum. dot PLG in exe.
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 246 (R2).
maridvnvm
RI 161d img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 25634 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum. dot in Crescent PLG in exe. A.D. 330 - 333
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 256 (R1). Bastien Vol. XIII 222.
maridvnvm
RI_161al_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 25620 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum. dot in Crescent PLG in exe. A.D. 330 - 333
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 256 (R1). Bastien Vol. XIII 222.
maridvnvm
RI_161am_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 256 16 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum (dot in Crescent PLG). A.D. 330 - 333
Reference(s) – Bastien XIII 222 (44). RIC VII Lugdunum 256 (R1)
maridvnvm
RI 161k img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Lugdunum 26622 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum. *SLG in exe. A.D. 334-335
Reference:– RIC Lugdunum 266 (R3). Bastien Vol. XIII 260 (11 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 161b img.JPG
161 - Commemorative - RIC Thessalonica 18846 viewsObv:– CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev:– –, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Thessalonica. SMTSE in exe. A.D. 330 - 333
Reference:– RIC Thessalonica 188
maridvnvm
RI_161an_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC Trier 53011 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Trier (TRS•).
Reference:– RIC VII Trier 530
maridvnvm
RI_161at_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Alexandria 64 16 viewsAE3
Obv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Alexandria (//SMALB).
Reference:– RIC VII Alexandria 64 (R1)
maridvnvm
RI_161au_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Arles 351 15 viewsAE3
Obv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Arles (//SCONST*).
Reference:– RIC VII Arles 351 (R4)
maridvnvm
RI_161ad_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Arles 352 (R4)21 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Arles (* | _ /PCONST).
Reference:– RIC VII Arles 352 (R4)
maridvnvm
RI_161t_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Arles 369 (R2)18 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Arles (Triple palm branch angled left | _ /PCONST).
Reference:– RIC VII Arles 369 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI_161u_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Arles 369 (R3)17 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Arles (Triple palm branch angled left | _ /SCONST).
Reference:– RIC VII Arles 369 (R3)
maridvnvm
RI_161aa_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Cyzicus 92 (R4)25 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Cyzicus (SMKE).
Reference:– RIC VII Cyzicus 92 (R4)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_161ac_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Lugdunum 241 (R3)15 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum (//SLG). A.D. 330
Reference:– Bastien 205 (11 examples cited). RIC VII Lugdunum 241 (R3)
maridvnvm
RI_161x_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Lugdunum 246 (R2)32 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum (•PLC). A.D. 332
Reference:– Bastien XIII 233 (59 examples cited). RIC VII Lugdunum 246 (R2)
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_161ax_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Lugdunum 246 (R2)22 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum (•PLC). A.D. 332
Reference:– Bastien XIII 233 (59 examples cited). RIC VII Lugdunum 246 (R2)
maridvnvm
RI_161z_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Lugdunum 266 (R3)16 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Lugdunum (*SLG). A.D. 334-335
Reference:– Bastien 260 (11 examples cited). RIC VII Lugdunum 266 (R3)
maridvnvm
RI_161v_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Rome 355 (S)18 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Rome (//R Wreath E).
Reference:– RIC VII Rome 355 (S)
maridvnvm
RI_161y_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Trier 53026 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Trier (TRP•).
Reference:– RIC VII Trier 530
maridvnvm
RI_161w_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Trier 54827 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Trier (//TRS*).
Reference:– RIC VII Trier 548
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_161ab_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Trier 54818 viewsObv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Trier (TRP*).
Reference:– RIC VII Trier 548
maridvnvm
RI_161aw_img.jpg
161 - Commemorative - RIC VII Trier 54814 viewsAE3
Obv: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted and laureate Constantinopolis bust left
Rev: None, Victory standing left on prow of a galley, holding transverse spear across her body and shield
Minted in Trier (TRP*).
Reference:– RIC VII Trier 548 (C3)

2.75 gms. 17.92 mm. 0 degrees.
maridvnvm
faustinaII dup.jpg
161-176 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AE dupondius or as - struck 161-176 AD43 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA (diademed bust right)
rev: VE-NVS (Venus standing facing, head right, drawing back cloak with right hand over right shoulder and holding apple in extended left hand), S-C across field
ref: reverse RIC III 1770 (Marcus Aurelius)
11.38gms, 26mm
Rare - not in RIC

A nice hybrid Dupondius or orichalcum As with Faustina Junior obverse and Lucilla reverse. Thanks to Rupert for identify.
berserker
faustina2 RIC745(M.Aurelius).jpg
161-176 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AR denarius - struck 176-180 AD27 viewsobv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA (draped bust right)
rev: CONSECRATIO (throne with scepter across it, peacock below & standing right)
ref: RIC III 745 (M.Aurelius), RSC 73 (3frcs) , BMC 723
2.10gms, 18mm
Scarcer type
berserker
maurel_RIC1179.jpg
161-180 AD - MARCUS AURELIUS AE dupondius - struck 177 AD43 viewsobv: M.ANTONINVS.AVG.GERM.SARM.TRP.XXXI (radiate head right)
rev: IMP.VIII.COS.III.PP (trophy of base of wich are seated Marcomann (German) woman on right, and Markomann (German) with hands bound behind him on left), S-C in field, DE GERM in ex.
ref: RIC III 1179 (S), C.157 (6frcs)
mint: Rome
13.00gms, 25mm
Scarce

This dupondius celebrates Roman victory a series of wars on the empire’s northern frontier known as the Bellum Germanicum et Sarmaticum. The reverse of this coin speaks of these campaigns with the inscription DE GERM(ANIS) encompassing a military trophy flanked by two captives. The bound men would have come from the barbarian nations that occupied lands across the Danube, for in recent years the Romans had won wars against the Marcomanns, the Quadi, the Jazyges and the Sarmatians.
Many other types celebrated Roman victories in this theatre, and they became the centrepiece of coin propaganda of the era. Considering these wars were not only a source of great financial strain, but they annually cost the lives of many young men, it was essential for Marcus Aurelius to demonstrate success in the form of attractive coin types showing bound barbarians and trophies.
berserker
391_P_Hadrian.jpg
1647 MYSIA, Miletopolis Hadrian AE 16 Caduceus22 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1647; SNG von Aulock 1313; IMHOOF KM S29,3(2)

Magistrate Iouliοs Quintοs Bassοs (epimeletes)

Obv. ΑΥ Κ ΤΡ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС
Laureate head right, with drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. ΜΙΛΗΤΟ-ΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ ,K-O across fields EPMEILHTOPOLEITWN
winged Kerykeion (Caduceus)

1.98 gr
15.5 mm
6h
okidoki
1366_P_Hadrian_RPC1650.jpg
1650 MYSIA, Miletopolis Hadrian, Winged caduceus1 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1650;

Magistrate Ti. Fla. (?) Asiaticus (first archon and epimeletes)

Obv. ΑΥΤΟ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟ
Laureate, bust right, baldric strap around neck and across chest, loop on shoulder, seen from front.

Rev. ΜΕΙΛΗΤΟΠΟΛΕΙΤΩΝ [ ], ΑΤΙ (in field, r.)
Winged caduceus

2.84 gr
mm
h
okidoki
464_P_Hadrian_RPC1653.jpg
1653 MYSIA, Miletopolis Hadrian, Athena bust12 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1653; SNG France 1312; BMC 10 var. (pag. 92);SNG Cop. - (vgl. 251), SNG v.Aul. -

Obv. ΑΥΤΟ ΤΡΑΙΑ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟ
Laureate, bust right, baldric (sword) strap around neck and across chest, loop on shoulder, seen from front.

Rev. ΜΕΙΛΗΤΟΠΟΛΕΙΤΩΝ
helmeted and cuirassed bust of Athena, right.

5.81 gr
20 mm
6h

Note.
assarion: an assarion, a farthing (one tenth of a drachma).
okidoki
RI_169am_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE2 - RIC VIII Trier 221 21 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Laureate and rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand
Rev:- FEL•TEMP•REPAR-ATIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, diagonally across soldier (Hut 3)
Minted in Trier; (// TRP )
Reference:– RIC VIII Trier 221 (S).
maridvnvm
RI_169br_img.jpg
169 - Constans II - AE2 - Barbarous imitative of Trier25 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Laureate and rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand
Rev:- FII ITEPM IYTIIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, diagonally across soldier
Barbarous imitative of Trier; (// TRI )

4.84 gms. 21.56 mm. 180 degrees
maridvnvm
17-Constantine-II-Lon-RIC-118.jpg
17. Constantine II.16 viewsFollis, 317, London mint.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN N C / Laureate bust of Constantine II.
Reverse: SOLI INVICTO COMITI / Sol standing, chlamys across left shoulder, raising right hand, holding globe in left hand. S P in field.
Mint mark: PLN
3.26 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #118; PBCC # 73; Sear #17142.
Callimachus
Leo-I_AE-11_DN-LEO_b-E-Verina_RIC-X-714_LRBC-2275_Q-001_axis-6h_11mm_1,13ga-s.jpg
171 Leo I. (457-474 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC X 714, b/E//--, AE-4, Verina, #1207 views171 Leo I. (457-474 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC X 714, b/E//--, AE-4, Verina, #1
avers:- D N L EO, Bust draped and cuirassed, pearl diademed.
revers:- Empress (Verina) standing faceing, holding cross on globe and transverse sceptre, b-E across the field.
exe: b/E//--, diameter: 11 mm, weight: 1,13g, axis: 6h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: RIC X 714, p-295, LRBC-2275,
Q-001
quadrans
Leo-I__AE-4_DN-LEO-1c_B-in-left-field_E-in-right-field_-D6_xx_RIC-xx-_C-x_xx_3xxAD__Q-001_11mm_1,01ga-s.jpg
171 Leo I. (457-474 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC X 714, b/E//--, AE-4, Verina, #2178 views171 Leo I. (457-474 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC X 714, b/E//--, AE-4, Verina, #2
avers:- D N L EO, Bust draped and cuirassed, pearl diademed.
revers:- Empress (Verina) standing faceing, holding cross on globe and transverse sceptre, b-E, across the field.
exe: b/E//--, diameter: 11 mm, weight: 1,01g, axis: h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: RIC-X-714, p-295, LRBC-2275,
Q-002
quadrans
1243_P_Hadrian_RPC1734.jpg
1734 MYSIA, Pergamun Hadrian 118 AD Telesphoros standing3 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1734; BMC 270, SNG France 2091-2

Magistrate Cl. Cephaliôn (to b, strategos)

Obv. ΑΥ ΚΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟ
Laureate, bust right, drapery on left shoulder, baldric strap around back of neck and across chest.

Rev. ΠΕΡΓΑ СΤΡ ΚΛ ΚΕΦΑΛΙΩ, ΤΟ Β (in field, r.)
Telesphorus wearing mantle with hood standing facing

1.75 gr
16 mm
12h
okidoki
1162_P_Hadrian_RPC1734.jpg
1734 MYSIA, Pergamun Hadrian 118 AD Telesphoros standing9 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1734; BMC 270, SNG France 2091-2

Magistrate Cl. Cephaliôn (to b, strategos)

Obv. ΑΥ ΚΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟ
Laureate, bust right, drapery on left shoulder, baldric strap around back of neck and across chest.

Rev. ΠΕΡΓΑ СΤΡ ΚΛ ΚΕΦΑΛΙΩ, ΤΟ Β (in field, r.)
Telesphorus wearing mantle with hood standing facing

2.77 gr
16 mm
12h
okidoki
312Hadrian_RIC52.jpg
176 Hadrian Denarius Roma 118 AD Pietas standing31 viewsReference.
Strack 49; RIC III, 176; C. 1476

Bust A4

Obv. MP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate bare bust with drapery

Rev. P M TR P COS DES III
Pietas, veiled, standing right, both hands raised
VOT | PVB across fields

3.4 gr
20 mm
12h
okidoki
commodus RIC468b.jpg
177-192 AD - COMMODUS AE sestertius - struck 186 AD70 viewsobv: M COMMODVS ANT P - FELIX AVG BRIT (laureate head right)
rev: P M TR P XI - IMP [VII] - COS V P P (Commodus standing left on platform, raising hand and holding scepter, facing four soldiers to left), S C across fields, FID EXERCIT in ex.
ref: RIC III 468b, Cohen 136 (20frcs)
23.63gms, 30mm
Very rare
ex Numismatic LANZ

Historical background: Under Commodus reign Sextus Tigidius Perennis was the Pretorian Prefect who exercised the chief responsibilities of government in the Roman Empire. In 185 Perennis was implicated in a plot to overthrow the emperor by his political rival Marcus Aurelius Cleander, and Commodus gave them permission to execute him as well as his wife and sons. After this Commodus received the title of FELIX. This coin shows when the emperor proclaimed the executions to soldiers, and the FIDES EXERCITUS means the aggreement between the emperor and the legions.
berserker
1794_Chichester___Portsmouth_Halfpenny.JPG
1794 AE Halfpenny Token. Chichester and Portsmouth, Sussex.29 viewsObverse: IOHN HOWARD F•R•S PHILANTHROPIST•. Bust of John Howard facing left.
Reverse: CHICHESTER AND PORTSMOUTH • / HALFPENNY; Arms of the town of Portsmouth; the sun and moon over a triple-towered castle, with the arms of Chichester above the gateway below the central tower, 1794 in exergue.
Edge: PAYABLE AT SHARPS PORTSMOUTH AND CHALDECOTTS CHICHESTER.
Diameter 29mm | Die Axis 12
Dalton & Hamer: 19

This token was probably manufactured by Peter Kempson in Birmingham and the dies were engraved by Thomas Wyon. The issuers of this token were John Chaldecott, a silversmith and cutler in Chichester and Thomas Sharp, a mercer in Portsmouth. Chaldecott was also a partner in the Chichester Old Bank and the Portsmouth, Portsea and Hampshire Bank. The two men were probably relations or close friends and they issued joint tokens in both Portsmouth and Chichester in the 18th century.

This token was struck in the name of John Howard who was born in Lower Clapton, London the son of a wealthy upholsterer. After the death of his father in 1742, he received a sizeable inheritance. Since he was wealthy and had no true vocation, in 1748 Howard left England and began to travel. However, while in Hanover he was captured by French privateers and imprisoned. It was this experience that made him consider the conditions in which prisoners were held.
In 1758 Howard returned to England and settled in Cardington, Bedfordshire. As a landowner he was philanthropic and enlightened, ensuring that his estate housing was of good standard and that the poor houses under his management were well run.
In 1773 he became High Sheriff of Bedfordshire. On his appointment he began a tour of English prisons which led to two Acts of Parliament in 1774, making gaolers salaried officers and setting standards of cleanliness.
In April 1777, Howard's sister died leaving him £15,000 and her house. He used this inheritance and the revenue from the sale of her house to further his work on prisons. In 1778 he was examined by the House of Commons, who were this time inquiring into prison ships, or “hulks”. Two days after giving evidence, he was again travelling Europe, beginning in the Dutch Republic.
His final journey took him into Eastern Europe and Russia. Whilst at Kherson, in what is now Ukraine, Howard contracted typhus on a prison visit and died. He was buried on the shores of the Black Sea in a walled field at Dophinovka (Stepanovka), Ukraine. Despite requesting a quiet funeral without pomp and ceremony, the event was elaborate and attended by the Prince of Moldovia.
Howard became the first civilian to be honoured with a statue in St Paul's Cathedral, London. A statue was also erected in Bedford, and another one in Kherson. John Howard's bust can still be seen as a feature in the architecture of a number of Victorian prisons across the UK.
*Alex
1794_Whale_Fishery_Halfpenny.JPG
1794 AE Halfpenny Token. London Middlesex.24 viewsObverse: HALFPENNY•. Bust of Neptune, with trident across his right shoulder, facing right.
Reverse: PAYABLE AT I:FOWLER’s LONDON•. Whale fishing scene consisting of four men in a small boat harpooning a whale; below, WHALE FISHERY / 1794 in two lines.
Edge: Plain.
Diameter 29mm | Die Axis 12
Dalton & Hamer: 306

The dies for this token were engraved by Thomas Wyon and it was manufactured by Thomas Mynd in Birmingham.
The token was issued by J. Fowler who was an oil merchant and tin-plate worker with a business at 78, Long Acre, at the West End of London.
*Alex
1795_Glasgow_Halfpenny_Token.JPG
1795 AE Halfpenny, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.29 viewsObverse: LET GLASGOW FLOURISH. The arms of Glasgow; Shield containing tree with a bird and a bell in it's branches and a fish across it's trunk.
Reverse: RULE BRITANNIA. Britannia facing left, seated on globe, her right hand holding spear, her left arm holding laurel-branch and resting on shield at her side; in exergue, 1795.
Edge: Engrailed.
Striking flaw visible next to the “H” in FLOURISH
Diameter: 28mm | Weight: 7.3gms.
Dalton & Hamer: 6a

Manufactured by Matthew Boulton at his SOHO mint in Birmingham, the diesinker was probably Thomas Wyon.
Reputedly issued by Gilbert Shearer & Co. who were, according to Jones's Directory dated 1789, woollen drapers with a shop at No.19 Trongate, Glasgow.
*Alex
1795_John_Howard_Halfpenny.JPG
1795 AE Halfpenny, Portsmouth, Hampshire.71 viewsObverse: IOHN HOWARD F.R.S. PHILANTHROPIST •. Bust of John Howard facing left.
Reverse: RULE BRITANNIA. Britannia facing left, seated on globe, her right hand holding spear, her left arm holding laurel-branch and resting on shield at her side; in exergue, 1795.
Edge: “CURRENT EVERY WHERE ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦”
Diameter: 29mm
Dalton & Hamer: 57b

The dies for this token were likely engraved by Thomas Wyon and it was probably manufactured by Peter Kempson at his mint in Birmingham.
The Fitzwilliam Museum regards Liverpool as an alternative possibility for the place of issue.
These 18th century tokens are often generically referred to as “Conder” tokens, the name originating from James Conder, a linen draper from Tavern Street in Ipswich. Conder was an ardent collector of tokens and the author of the standard work on the subject until it was superseded by that of Atkins in 1892.

John Howard was born in Lower Clapton, London the son of a wealthy upholsterer. After the death of his father in 1742, he received a sizeable inheritance. Since he was wealthy and had no true vocation, in 1748 Howard left England and began to travel. However, while in Hanover he was captured by French privateers and imprisoned. It was this experience that made him consider the conditions in which prisoners were held.
In 1758 Howard returned to England and settled in Cardington, Bedfordshire. As a landowner he was philanthropic and enlightened, ensuring that his estate housing was of good standard and that the poor houses under his management were well run.
In 1773 he became High Sheriff of Bedfordshire. On his appointment he began a tour of English prisons which led to two Acts of Parliament in 1774, making gaolers salaried officers and setting standards of cleanliness.
In April 1777, Howard's sister died leaving him £15,000 and her house. He used this inheritance and the revenue from the sale of her house to further his work on prisons. In 1778 he was examined by the House of Commons, who were this time inquiring into prison ships, or “hulks”. Two days after giving evidence, he was again travelling Europe, beginning in the Dutch Republic.
His final journey took him into Eastern Europe and Russia. Whilst at Kherson, in what is now Ukraine, Howard contracted typhus on a prison visit and died. He was buried on the shores of the Black Sea in a walled field at Dophinovka (Stepanovka), Ukraine. Despite requesting a quiet funeral without pomp and ceremony, the event was elaborate and attended by the Prince of Moldovia.
Howard became the first civilian to be honoured with a statue in St Paul's Cathedral, London. A statue was also erected in Bedford, and another one in Kherson. John Howard's bust can still be seen as a feature in the architecture of a number of Victorian prisons across the UK.
*Alex
Charles_IIII_1795_Mexico_Spanish_Colonial_8_Reales.jpg
1795- MoFM Mexico Spanish Colonial 8 Reales of Charles IIII - [KM-109 -- Charles IIII]63 viewsChopmarked, 0.7797 ounce silver 8 Reales (also known as the pillar dollar), 26.65g, 39.62mm, 0 degree, Mexico City, Mexico Mint [Mo -- small 'o' set over a large 'M'], 179[5]

Obv. - • CAROLUS IIII • DEI • GR[ATIA] •, laureate bust of Charles IIII right

Rev. - • HISPAN • ET IND • REX • Mo • 8R • F • M •, coat of arms of Spain

This coin was sold as a 1794 chopmarked 8 Reale. Upon inspection in hand under high magnification and different lighting conditions, as well as inspection of large, quality pictures on the computer allowing for color/contrast/levels manipulation, and I have determined this coin to actually be from 1795. The '5', although extremely worn is visible under the correct conditions and comparisons of the worn number morphology to other 179x coins lends credence to this finding.

The reverse is just as interesting and challenging. Although the mintmark is almost completely worn off, the assayer of FM ensures that the coin is of Mexico City, Mexico mintmark.

The coat of arms of Spain, a crown crown flanked by columns and a middle shield includes the national motto PLVS VLTRA spread across the two columns. PLVS VLTRA (PLUS ULTRA) translates to "further beyond." It is adopted from the personal motto of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor (and King of Spain as Charles I) and is a Latin translation from Plus Oultre, his original motto in Old French.

A great website for helping to attribute these coins and a breakdown of the legend components can be found here: http://coinquest.com/cgi-bin/cq/coins?main_coin=2334

Reading on different chopmarks can be found here: http://www.1messydesk.com/chopmarks/chopmarks.html

Although this coin is quite worn in certain areas, it has a lovely tone and great character. The numerous different chopmarks just add to the appeal. This coins was bought as a conversation piece as I have always found them interesting, albeit with knowing next to nothing concerning them. However, after doing some research, I have come to appreciate it much more and may follow suite with further additions. In any case, I plan on further reading into the subject area.
___________

Purchased from Regal Coin Exchange in Savannah, GA
1 commentsrenegade3220
1797_PERTH_HALFPENNY.JPG
1797 AE Halfpenny Token. Perth, Scotland.24 viewsObverse: PRO REGE LEGE ET GREGE (For King, Law and Flock). Coat of Arms of the City of Perth consisting of double-headed eagle with shield, displaying lamb holding saltire flag.
Reverse: PERTH • HALFPENNY • • • •. A hank of yarn above a package of dressed flax; 17 - 97 across field.
Edge: Incuse legend “PAYABLE AT THE HOUSE OF PAT. K MAXWELL X X".
Diameter: 29mm.
Dalton & Hamer: 9
SCARCE

This token was issued by Patrick Maxwell, a grocer and spirit dealer on the High Street in Perth. In later years this business became known as Maxwell & Son. The hank of yarn and bale of flax refers to the linen trade in the town which was its main industry at the time of this token’s issue.
This token was engraved and manufactured by Joseph Kendrick at his works in Birmingham, England.
*Alex
17g-Constantine-Lon-156.jpg
17g. Constantine: London.18 viewsAE3, 318 - 320, Londinium mint.
Obverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG / Helmeted bust of Constantine facing left, spear across his left shoulder.
Reverse: VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP / Two Victories resting shield on altar. Shield is inscribed VOT P R.
Mint mark: PLN
2.95 gm., 17.5 mm.
RIC #156; PBCC #78; Sear unlisted.
Callimachus
17q-Constantine-II-Lon-118.jpg
17q. Constantine II: London.18 viewsFollis, 317, London mint.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN N C / Laureate bust of Constantine II.
Reverse: SOLI INVICTO COMITI / Sol standing, chlamys across left shoulder, raising right hand, holding globe in left hand. S and P in fields.
Mint mark: PLN
3.26 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #118; PBCC # 73; Sear #17142.
Callimachus
17s-Constantine-II-Her-020.jpg
17s. Constantine II: Heraclea.23 viewsAE3, 317, Heraclea mint.
Obverse: D N FL CL CONSTANTINVS NOB C / Laureate bust of Constantine II, facing left, hilding globe, sceptre, and mappa.
Reverse: PROVIDENTIAE CAESS / Campgate with three turrets.
Mint mark: MHTE
3.03 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #20; PBCC #951; Sear #17140.

This coin has many small flecks of silver across it surfaces which are apparently all that is left of the original silvering. The very small bust is characteristic of the mints at Heraclea, Cyzicus, and Nicomedia where it was used from time to time with the junior caesars.
Callimachus
17u-Constantine-II-Tre-180.jpg
17u. Constantine II: Treveri.19 viewsAE3, 317 - 320, Treveri mint.
Obverse: FL CL CONSTANTINVS IVN N C / Bust of Constantine II.
Reverse: CLARITAS REIPVBLICAE / Sol standing, chlamys across left shoulder, raising right hand, holding globe in left hand. F in left field; T in right field.
Mint mark: BTR
2.79 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #180/181; PBCC #186; Sear #17109.
Callimachus
PCrassusDenAmazon~0.jpg
1ab Marcus Licinius Crassus17 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Pompey in 60 BC, killed at Carrhae in Parthia in 53 BC.

Denarius, minted by son, P Licinius Crassus, ca 54 BC.
Bust of Venus, right, SC behind
Amazon with horse, P CRASSVS MF.

Seaby, Licinia 18

These coins were probably minted to pay Crassus' army for the invasion of Parthia, which led to its destruction. My synthesis of reviewing 90 examples of this issue revealed a female warrior wearing a soft felt Scythian cap with ear flaps; a fabric garment with a decorated skirt to the knees; probably trousers; an ornate war belt; a baldric; a cape, animal skin, or shoulder cord on attached to the left shoulder; and decorated calf-high boots. She matches the historically confirmed garb of the real amazons—Scythian horsewomen—and of course holds her steed. The horse’s tack is consistent with archeological discoveries of tack in use by Scythians and Romans.

Adrienne Mayor writes that amazon imagery on Greek vases suddenly appeared in 575-550 BC, initially depicting them in Greek-style armor. By the end of the century, as the Greeks learned more through direct and indirect contact with Scythians, they began to appear wearing archeologically confirmed Scythian-Sarmatian-Thracian patterned attire. (Adrienne Mayor, The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2014, 199-200). To this, artists added their own creative ideas regarding colors, fabric patterns, and decorations. “They dressed the warrior women in body-hugging ‘unitards’ or tunics, short chitons or belted dresses, sometimes over leggings or trousers. . . . In paintings and sculpture, pointed or soft Scythian caps with earflaps or ties (kidaris) soon replaced the Greek helmets, and the women wear a variety of belts, baldrics (diagonal straps), corselets, shoulder cords or bands, and crisscrossing leather straps attached to belt loops like those worn by the archer huntress Artemis. . . . Amazon footgear included soft leather moccasin-like shoes, calf-high boots (endromides), or taller laced boots (embades) with scallops or flaps and lined with felt or fur.” (Mayor, 202)

The artists apparently had detailed knowledge of gear used by real Scythian horsewomen to equip their imagined Amazons. “Archeological discoveries of well-preserved sets of clothing confirm that real horsewomen of ancient Scythian lands dressed much as did those described in Greek texts and illustrated in Scythian and Greek artwork.” (Mayor, 203)
1 commentsBlindado
PCrassusDenAmazon2.jpg
1ab_2 Marcus Licinius Crassus34 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Pompey in 60 BC, killed at Carrhae in Parthia in 53 BC.

Denarius, minted by son, P Licinius Crassus, ca 54 BC.
Bust of Venus, right, SC behind
Amazon with horse, P CRASSVS MF.

Seaby, Licinia 18

These coins were probably minted to pay Crassus' army for the invasion of Parthia. My synthesis of reviewing 90 examples of this issue revealed a female warrior wearing a soft felt Scythian cap with ear flaps (visible in this example); a fabric garment with a decorated skirt to the knees; probably trousers; an ornate war belt; a baldric; a cape, animal skin, or shoulder cord on attached to the left shoulder; and decorated calf-high boots. She matches the historically confirmed garb of the real amazons—Scythian horsewomen—and of course holds her steed. The horse’s tack is consistent with archeological discoveries of tack in use by Scythians and Romans.

Adrienne Mayor writes that amazon imagery on Greek vases suddenly appeared in 575-550 BC, initially depicting them in Greek-style armor. By the end of the century, as the Greeks learned more through direct and indirect contact with Scythians, they began to appear wearing archeologically confirmed Scythian-Sarmatian-Thracian patterned attire. (Adrienne Mayor, The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2014, 199-200). To this, artists added their own creative ideas regarding colors, fabric patterns, and decorations. “They dressed the warrior women in body-hugging ‘unitards’ or tunics, short chitons or belted dresses, sometimes over leggings or trousers. . . . In paintings and sculpture, pointed or soft Scythian caps with earflaps or ties (kidaris) soon replaced the Greek helmets, and the women wear a variety of belts, baldrics (diagonal straps), corselets, shoulder cords or bands, and crisscrossing leather straps attached to belt loops like those worn by the archer huntress Artemis. . . . Amazon footgear included soft leather moccasin-like shoes, calf-high boots (endromides), or taller laced boots (embades) with scallops or flaps and lined with felt or fur.” (Mayor, 202)
The artists apparently had detailed knowledge of gear used by real Scythian horsewomen to equip their imagined Amazons. “Archeological discoveries of well-preserved sets of clothing confirm that real horsewomen of ancient Scythian lands dressed much as did those described in Greek texts and illustrated in Scythian and Greek artwork.” (Mayor, 203)

Plutarch wrote of Crassus: People were wont to say that the many virtues of Crassus were darkened by the one vice of avarice, and indeed he seemed to have no other but that; for it being the most predominant, obscured others to which he was inclined. The arguments in proof of his avarice were the vastness of his estate, and the manner of raising it; for whereas at first he was not worth above three hundred talents, yet, though in the course of his political life he dedicated the tenth of all he had to Hercules, and feasted the people, and gave to every citizen corn enough to serve him three months, upon casting up his accounts, before he went upon his Parthian expedition, he found his possessions to amount to seven thousand one hundred talents; most of which, if we may scandal him with a truth, he got by fire and rapine, making his advantages of the public calamities. . . . Crassus, however, was very eager to be hospitable to strangers; he kept open house, and to his friends he would lend money without interest, but called it in precisely at the time; so that his kindness was often thought worse than the paying the interest would have been. His entertainments were, for the most part, plain and citizen-like, the company general and popular; good taste and kindness made them pleasanter than sumptuosity would have done. As for learning he chiefly cared for rhetoric, and what would be serviceable with large numbers; he became one of the best speakers at Rome, and by his pains and industry outdid the best natural orators. . . . Besides, the people were pleased with his courteous and unpretending salutations and greetings, for he never met any citizen however humble and low, but he returned him his salute by name. He was looked upon as a man well-read in history, and pretty well versed in Aristotle's philosophy. . . . Crassus was killed by a Parthian, called Pomaxathres; others say by a different man, and that Pomaxathres only cut off his head and right hand after he had fallen. But this is conjecture rather than certain knowledge, for those that were by had not leisure to observe particulars. . . .
1 commentsBlindado
PCrassusDenAmazon2~1.jpg
1ab_2 Marcus Licinius Crassus35 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Pompey in 60 BC, killed at Carrhae in Parthia in 53 BC.

Denarius, minted by son, P Licinius Crassus, ca 54 BC.
Bust of Venus, right, SC behind
Amazon with horse, P CRASSVS MF.

Seaby, Licinia 18

These coins were probably minted to pay Crassus' army for the invasion of Parthia, which led to its destruction. My synthesis of reviewing 90 examples of this issue revealed a female warrior wearing a soft felt Scythian cap with ear flaps (visible in this example); a fabric garment with a decorated skirt to the knees; probably trousers; an ornate war belt; a baldric; a cape, animal skin, or shoulder cord on attached to the left shoulder; and decorated calf-high boots. She matches the historically confirmed garb of the real amazons—Scythian horsewomen—and of course holds her steed. The horse’s tack is consistent with archeological discoveries of tack in use by Scythians and Romans.

Adrienne Mayor writes that amazon imagery on Greek vases suddenly appeared in 575-550 BC, initially depicting them in Greek-style armor. By the end of the century, as the Greeks learned more through direct and indirect contact with Scythians, they began to appear wearing archeologically confirmed Scythian-Sarmatian-Thracian patterned attire. (Adrienne Mayor, The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2014, 199-200). To this, artists added their own creative ideas regarding colors, fabric patterns, and decorations. “They dressed the warrior women in body-hugging ‘unitards’ or tunics, short chitons or belted dresses, sometimes over leggings or trousers. . . . In paintings and sculpture, pointed or soft Scythian caps with earflaps or ties (kidaris) soon replaced the Greek helmets, and the women wear a variety of belts, baldrics (diagonal straps), corselets, shoulder cords or bands, and crisscrossing leather straps attached to belt loops like those worn by the archer huntress Artemis. . . . Amazon footgear included soft leather moccasin-like shoes, calf-high boots (endromides), or taller laced boots (embades) with scallops or flaps and lined with felt or fur.” (Mayor, 202)

The artists apparently had detailed knowledge of gear used by real Scythian horsewomen to equip their imagined Amazons. “Archeological discoveries of well-preserved sets of clothing confirm that real horsewomen of ancient Scythian lands dressed much as did those described in Greek texts and illustrated in Scythian and Greek artwork.” (Mayor, 203)
2 commentsBlindado
CaligulaAE27Caesonia.jpg
1ao2 Caesonia (?)19 viewsAE 27 of Carthago Nova, Spain

Laureate head of Caligula, right, C CAESAR AVG GERMANIS
Draped bust of Caesonia (as Salus) right, DN ATEL FLAC CN POM FLAC II VIR Q V I N C, SAL AVG across field

Generally held to portray the fourth wife of Caligula.

Sear 624

Caesonia, Milonia, (d41AD) was the fourth and last wife of Caligula. Her younger half-brother was the Consul Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo. Her niece, Domitia Longina, married Domitian. In 41, Caligula was assassinated and Caesonia and her daughter Julia Drusilla murdered.

Suetonius states: As for Caesonia, who was neither young nor beautiful, had three daughters by another man, and was wildly promiscuous and extravagant, he not only loved her more passionately for it, but also more faithfully, taking her out riding, and showing her to the soldiers, dressed in a cloak with helmet and shield: while he exhibited her to his friends stark naked. He did not honour her with the title of wife until she had given him a child, announcing his paternity and the marriage on the very same day. This child, whom he named Julia Drusilla, he carried round all the temples of the goddesses, before finally entrusting her to Minerva’s lap, calling on that goddess to nurture and educate his daughter. Nothing persuaded him more clearly that she was his own issue than her violent temper, which was so savage the infant would tear at the faces and eyes of her little playmates. . . .

And as [Caligula] kissed the neck of wife or sweetheart, he never failed to say: ‘This lovely thing will be slit whenever I say.’ Now and then he even threatened his dear Caesonia with torture, if that was the only way of discovering why he was so enamoured of her. . . . Some think that Caesonia his wife administered a love potion that had instead the effect of driving him mad.
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AgrippinaObol.jpg
1aq Agrippina junior31 viewsMarried Claudius 49 AD

Diobol of Alexandria

Draped bust right, wreathed with corn, hair bound in plait behind, AGRIPPEINA CЄBACTH
Draped bust of Euthenia right, wreathed with corn, holding ears of corn, ЄYQH-NIA across fields, L-IB below

Milne 124

Agrippina the Younger, Julia Agrippina, or Agrippinilla (Little Agrippina) after 50 AD known as Julia Augusta Agrippina (c16 AD –59) was sister of Caligula, niece and fourth wife of Claudius and the mother of Nero. In 28, Tiberius arranged for Agrippina to marry her paternal second cousin Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus. Their only son was named Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, after Domitius’s recently deceased father. This child would become the Emperor Nero. In 39, Agrippina and her sister Livilla, with their maternal cousin, Drusilla’s widower, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, were involved in a failed plot to murder Caligula, and make Lepidus emperor. Lepidus was executed. Agrippina and Livilla were exiled by their brother to the Pontine Islands.

Suetonius says, "But it was Agrippina the Younger, his brother Germanicus’s daughter, who ensnared him, assisted by a niece’s privilege of exchanging kisses and endearments. At the next Senate meeting, he primed a group of Senators to propose that he ought to marry Agrippina, as it was in the public interest, and that such marriages between uncle and niece should from then on be regarded as lawful, and no longer incestuous. He married her (AD 49) with barely a day’s delay, but only one freedman and one leading centurion married their respective nieces, to follow suit. Claudius himself, with Agrippina, attended the centurion’s wedding."

The Euthenia reverse reminds one of "euthanasia." which is what some suspect she did to Claudius to elevate her son Nero to the purple.
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TraianDecSestDacia.jpg
1cq Trajan Decius24 views249-251

Sestertius

Laureate, cuirassed bust, right, MP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG
Dacia standing left holding draco standard, or staff surmounted by a donkey's head, DACIA SC

RIC 101b

The Byzantine historian Zosimus recorded in his New History: [Philip], thinking that he had by these means established himself in the possession of the empire, he made an expedition against the Carpi, who had plundered all the country about the Ister. . . . As there were at that time many disturbances in the empire, the eastern provinces, which were uneasy, partly, owing to the exactions of exorbitant tributes, and partly to their dislike of Priscus, their governor, who was a man of an intolerably evil disposition, wished for innovation, and set up Papianus for emperor, while the inhabitants of Moesia and Pannonia were more inclined to Marinus.

Philip, being disturbed by these events, desired the senate cither to assist him against such imminent dangers, or, if they were displeased with his government, to suffer him to lay it down and dismiss him quietly. No person making a reply to this, Decius, a person of illustrious birth and rank, and moreover gifted, with every virtue, observed, that he was unwise in being so much concerned at those events, for they would vanish of themselves, and could not possibly long subsist. And though the event corresponded with the conjecture of Decius, which long experience in the world had enabled him to make, Papianus and Marinus being taken off, yet Philip was still in fear, knowing how obnoxious the officers in that country were to the army. He therefore desired Decius to assume the command of the legions in Moesia and Pannonia. As he refused this under the plea that it was inconvenient both for Philip and himself, Philip made use of the rhetoric of necessity, as the Thessalians term it, and compelled him to go to Pannonia to punish the accomplices of Marinus. The army in that country, finding that Decius punished all that had offended, thought it most politic to avoid the present danger and to set up a sovereign who would better consult the good of the state, and who, being more expert both in civil and military affairs, might without difficulty conquer Philip.

For this purpose they clothed Decius in purple, and notwithstanding all his apprehensions of future mischances, compelled him to assume the supreme authority. Philip therefore, on hearing that Decius was thus made emperor, collected all his forces to overpower him. The supporters of Decius, though they knew that the enemy had greatly the advantage in numbers, still retained their confidence, trusting to the general skill and prudence of Decius in affairs. And when the two armies engaged, although the one was superior in number, yet the other so excelled it in discipline and conduct, that a great number of Philip's partisans were slain and he himself amongst them, together with his son, on whom he had conferred the title of Caesar. Decius thus acquired the empire.

The Scythians, taking advantage of the disorder which every where prevailed through the negligence of Philip, crossed the Tanais, and pillaged the countries in the vicinity of Thrace. But Decius, marching against them, was not only victorious in every battle, but recovered the spoils they had taken, and endeavoured to cut off their retreat to their own country, intending to destroy them all, to prevent their ever again, making a similar incursion. For this purpose he posted Gallus on the bank of the Tanais with a competent force, and led in person the remainder of his army against the enemy. This expedition exceeded to his utmost wish; but Gallus, who was disposed to innovation, sent agents to the Barbarians, requesting their concurrence in a conspiracy against Decius. To this they gave a willing assent, and Gallus retained his post on the bank of the Tanais, but the Barbarians divided themselves into three battalions, the first of which posted itself behind a marsh. Decius having destroyed a considerable number of the first battalion, the second advanced, which he likewise defeated, and discovered part of the third, which lay near the marsh. Gallus sent intelligence to him, that he might march against them across the fen. Proceeding therefore incautiously in an unknown place, he and his army became entangled in the mire, and under that disadvantage were so assailed by the missiles of the Barbarians, that not one of them escaped with life. Thus ended the life of the excellent emperor Decius.

Eutropius wrote: DECIUS, a native of Lower Pannonia, born at Budalia, assumed the government. . . . When he and his son had reigned two years, they were both killed in the country of the Barbarians, and enrolled among the gods.
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ClaudiusIIAntLiberalit.jpg
1di Claudius Gothicus26 views268-270

AE antoninianus

Radiate cuirassed bust right, IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Liberlitas stg, LIBERALITAS AVG

RIC 57

Zosimus recorded: When the troops were calmed by their commanders, Claudius was chosen emperor, having previously been designed for that dignity by general consent. Aureolus, who had for a long time kept himself out of the hands of Gallienus, presently sent agents to Claudius, to effect a peace. Surrendering himself, he was killed by the guards of the emperor, who still remembered the hatred they bore against him for his treachery.

The Scythians were by this time so elated by their former success, that they appointed a place of meeting with the Heruli, Peucae, and Gothi, near the river Tyra, which empties itself into the Pontus; where having built six thousand vessels, and put on board them three hundred and twenty thousand men, they sailed across the Pontus, and made an attempt on Tomes, a fortified town, but were repulsed from it. From thence they proceed to Marcianopolis, a city of Mysia, but failing there likewise in their attack on it, they took the opportunity of a favourable wind and sailed forward. . . . they passed through the Hellespont, and arrived at Mount Athos. Having there refitted and careened their vessels, they laid siege to Cassandria and Thessalonica, which they were near taking by means of machines which they raised against the walls. But hearing that the emperor was advancing with an army, they went into the interior, plundering all the neighbourhood of Doberus and Pelagonia. There they sustained a loss of three thousand men, who were met with by the Dalmatian cavalry, and with the rest of their force engaged the army of the emperor. Great numbers were slain in this battle on both sides, but the Romans, by a pretended flight, drew the Barbarians into an ambuscade and killed more than fifty thousand of them.

Egypt being thus reduecd by the Palmyrenians, the Barbarians, who survived the battle of Naissus between Claudius and the Scythians, defending themselves with their carriages which went before them, marched towards Macedon, but were so distressed by the want of necessaries, that many of them and of their beasts perished with hunger. They were met likewise by the Roman cavalry, who having killed many of them, drove the rest towards Mount Haemus; where being surrounded by the Roman army, they lost a vast number of men. But a quarrel ensuing between the Roman horse and foot soldiers, the emperor wishing the foot to engage the Barbarians, the Romans, after a smart engagement, were defeated with considerable loss, but the cavalry, coming up immediately, redeemed in some degree the miscarriage of the infantry. After this battle, the Barbarians proceeded on their march, and were pursued by the Romans. The pirates who cruized about Crete and Rhodes retired without doing any thing worthy of mention; and being attacked by the plague on their way home, some of them died in Thrace and some in Macedon. All that survived were either admitted into the Roman legions, or had lands assigned for them to cultivate and so become husbandmen. Nor was the plague confined to the Barbarians alone, but began to infest the Romans, many of whom died, and amongst the rest Claudius, a person adorned with every virtue. His death was a severe loss to his subjeets, and was consequently much regretted by them.
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AllectusPaxAnt.jpg
1ds3 Allectus14 views293-296

AE antoninianus

Radiate & cuirassed bust right, IMP C ALLECTVS P F AVG
PAX AVG, Pax standing left, holding palm-branch in right hand, vertical sceptre in left, S-P across fields, ML in ex

RIC 28 S-P

The usurper in Britain who killed and replaced Carausius, according to Eutropius.
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ConstantinusFollisSol.jpg
1ec_2 Constantine the Great18 views307-337

Follis

Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG
Sol standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, raising right hand and holding globe in left hand, captive to left. Mintmark RQ.

RIC VII 52

According to Zonaras: Constans, in the eleventh year of his reign since he had been proclaimed Caesar, having ruled gently and mildly, came to the end of his life while residing in Britain, having, because of his goodness, bequeathed grief for himself among those he ruled, first having appointed successor the elder of his own sons, namely Constantine the Great, whom he begat by his first wife. He also had by his second wife, Herculius’ daughter Theodora, other sons, Constantinus, Hannibalianus, and Constantius. Constantine the Great was preferred over them, since they were judged by their father to be unsuited for sovereignty. . . . Constantine, when he was still a lad, was actually given by his father as a hostage to Gallerius, in order that, serving as a hostage, at the same time he be trained in the exercise of the soldierly art.

Eutropius summarizes: CONSTANTINE, being a man of great energy, bent upon effecting whatever he had settled in his mind, and aspiring to the sovereignty of the whole world, proceeded to make war on Licinius, although he had formed a connexion with him by marriage,5 for his sister Constantia was married to Licinius. And first of all be overthrew him, by a sudden attack, at Cibalae in Pannonia, where he was making vast preparations for war; and after becoming master of Dardania, Maesia, and Macedonia, took possession also of several other provinces.

There were then various contests between them, and peace made and broken. At last Licinius, defeated in a battle at Nicomedia by sea and land, surrendered himself, and, in violation of an oath taken by Constantine, was put to death, after being divested of the purple, at Thessalonica.

At this time the Roman empire fell under the sway of one emperor and three Caesars, a state of things which had never existed before; the sons of Constantine ruling over Gaul, the east, and Italy. But the pride of prosperity caused Constantine greatly to depart from his former agreeable mildness of temper. Falling first upon his own relatives, he put to death his son, an excellent man; his sister's son, a youth of amiable disposition; soon afterwards his wife, and subsequently many of his friends.

He was a man, who, in the beginning of his reign, might have been compared to the best princes; in the latter part of it, only to those of a middling character. Innumerable good qualities of mind and body were apparent in him; he was exceedingly ambitious of military glory, and had great success in his wars; a success, however, not more than proportioned to his exertions. After he had terminated the Civil war, he also overthrew the Goths on various occasions, granting them at last peace, and leaving on the minds of the barbarians a strong remembrance of his kindness. He was attached to the arts of peace and to liberal studies, and was ambitious of honourable popularity, which he, indeed, sought by every kind of liberality and obligingness. Though he was slow, from suspicion, to serve some of his friends,6 yet he was exceedingly generous towards others, neglecting no opportunity to add to their riches and honours.

He enacted many laws, some good and equitable, but most of them superfluous, and some severe. He was the first that endeavoured to raise the city named after him to such a height as to make it a rival to Rome. As he was preparing for war against the Parthians, who were then disturbing Mesopotamia, he died in the Villa Publica, at Nicomedia, in the thirty-first year of his reign, and the sixty-sixth of his age.

Zosimus described Constantine's conversion to Christianity: For he put to death his son Crispus, stiled (as I mentioned) Caesar, on suspicion of debauching his mother-in-law Fausta, without any regard to the ties of nature. And when his own mother Helena expressed much sorrow for this atrocity, lamenting the young man's death with great bitterness, Constantine under pretence of comforting her, applied a remedy worse than the disease. For causing a bath to be heated to an extraordinary degree, he shut up Fausta in it, and a short time after took her out dead. Of which his conscience accusing him, as also of violating his oath, he went to the priests to be purified from his crimes. But they told him, that there was no kind of lustration that was sufficient to clear him of such enormities. A Spaniard, named Aegyptius, very familiar with the court-ladies, being at Rome, happened to fall into converse with Constantine, and assured him, that the Christian doctrine would teach him how to cleanse himself from all his offences, and that they who received it were immediately absolved from all their sins. Constantine had no sooner heard this than he easily believed what was told him, and forsaking the rites of his country, received those which Aegyptius offered him ; and for the first instance of his impiety, suspected the truth of divination.
Blindado
HelenaAE4Pax.jpg
1ee Helena10 viewsAE4

Draped bust with pearl necklace, right, FL IVL HELENAE AVG

Pax standing left, holding olive branch & transverse sceptre; mintmark CONS Epsilon, PAX PVBLICA [dot?]

Mother of Constantine. She is responsible for the supposed discovery of parts of the True Cross and various holy sites across the Mediterranean littoral.

RIC 33
Blindado
ConstantineIIAE3BeataTr.jpg
1eh Constantine II12 views337-340

AE3, London

Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust left, seen from the back, CONSTANTINVS IVN N C
Altar inscribed VOT-IS-XX, F-B across fields, three stars above, BEAT TRANQVILLITAS. Mintmark PLON.

Constantine II received Britain, Gaul, and Spain of the empire after Constantine's death. He quarreled with his brother Constans over territory, invaded Italy, and died in an ambush.

RIC 255
Blindado
PhillipISestertMILSECVLARUM.jpg
1f 1,000 Years of Rome13 viewsPhilip I
244-249

Sestertius

IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right
MILITARIVM SAECVLVM, Cippus inscribed COS/III; S C across fields

Struck in 248 too commemorate the 1,000th anniversary of the founding of Rome

RIC 157A
Blindado
2014-051-2_ProbusVirtusProbiAvgMars-Forum.jpg
2014.051.247 viewsSiscia, 3.66 g

Obverse: IMP C M AVR PROBVS P AVG; Probus radiate with helmet left, seen from the back, holding spear, decorated shield slung over back; strap across right shoulder; shield decorated with Emperor on horseback charging left, holding spear appearing to impale bound captive seated left.
Reverse: VIRTVS PROBI AVG XXIS in exergue; Mars striding left holding spear in right, and trophy over left shoulder.
Ref: cf RIC 816 [bust type not listed in RIC]; This bust type not listed in Alfoldi under Type 96, for this Officina
gordian_guy
2014-051-4_ProbusRomaeAternaeRomaTemple-Forum.jpg
2014.051.428 viewsSiscia; 3.90 g

Obverse: IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG; Probus, radiated, helmet, cuirassed bust right; spear in right hand over right shoulder; shield decorated with Medusa head (Gorgon) on left shoulder, strap across chest;
Reverse: ROMAE AETERNAE; XXIS in exergue; Roma seated left in hexa-style temple; holding in extended right hand Victory standing left; scepter in left; shield beneath seat; wreath in pediment.
Ref: RIC 737; Alfoldi Type 61, no 27
gordian_guy
2014-080-5_ProbusTicinumConservatAvgSol-Forum.jpg
2014.080.534 viewsTicinum, 3.76 g

Obverse: VIRTVS PROBI AVG; Radiate, wearing helmet, cuirassed bust left, seen from back; in right hand pointing left a spear; shield decorated with floret, slung across left shoulder.
Reverse: CONSERVAT AVG; TXXT in exergue; Sol, radiate and nude but for chlamys draped over shoulder and left arm, standing facing, head left; right hand raised, holding globe in extended left hand.
Ref: RIC 351;
2 commentsgordian_guy
145187.jpg
201c. Pescennius Niger127 viewsGaius Pescennius Niger was governor of Syria in the year 193 when he learned of the emperor Pertinax's murder. Niger's subsequent attempt to claim the empire for himself ended in failure in Syria after roughly one year. His life before becoming governor of Syria is not well known. He was born in Italy to an equestrian family. He seems to have been older than his eventual rival Septimius Severus, so his birth should perhaps be placed ca. AD 135-40. Niger may have held an important position in the administration of Egypt. He won renown, along with Clodius Albinus, for participation in a military campaign in Dacia early in Commodus' reign. Although Niger could have been adlected into the senate before the Dacian campaign, he was by now pursuing a senatorial career and must have been held in high esteem by Commodus. Niger was made a suffect consul, probably in the late 180s, and he was sent as governor to the important province of Syria in 191.

Niger was a well-known and well-liked figure to the Roman populace. After Pertinax became emperor at the beginning of 193, many in Rome may have hoped that the elderly Pertinax would adopt Niger as his Caesar and heir, but Pertinax was murdered without having made succession plans. When Didius Julianus arrived at the senate house on 29 March 193, his first full day as emperor, a riot broke out among the Roman crowd. The rioters took over the Circus Maximus, from which they shouted for Niger to seize the throne. The rioters dispersed the following day, but a report of their demonstration may well have arrived in the Syrian capital, Antioch, with the news that Pertinax had been murdered and replaced by Julianus.

Spurred into action by the news, Niger had himself proclaimed emperor in Antioch. The governors of the other eastern provinces quickly joined his cause. Niger's most important ally was the respected proconsul of Asia, Asellius Aemilianus, and support began to spread across the Propontis into Europe. Byzantium welcomed Niger, who now was preparing further advances. Niger took the additional cognomen Justus, "the Just." Justice was promoted as the theme of his intended reign, and personifications of Justice appeared on his coins.

Other provincial governors, however, also set their sights on replacing Julianus. Albinus in Britain and Septimius Severus in Upper Pannonia (western Hungary) had each aspired to the purple, and Severus was marching an army on Rome. Severus was still 50 miles from the city when the last of Julianus' dwindling authority disappeared. Julianus was killed in Rome 1 June 193.

Niger sent messengers to Rome to announce his acclamation, but those messengers were intercepted by Severus. A deal was struck between Severus and Albinus that kept Albinus in Britain with the title of Caesar. The larger armies of the western provinces were now united in their support for Severus. Niger's support was confined to the east. Severus had Niger's children captured and held as hostages, and a legion was sent to confront Niger's army in Thrace.

The first conflict between the rival armies took place near Perinthus. Although Niger's forces may have inflicted greater casualties on the Severan troops, Niger was unable to secure his advance; he returned to Byzantium. By the autumn of 193, Severus had left Rome and arrived in the region, though his armies there continued to be commanded by supporters. Niger was offered the chance of a safe exile by Severus, but Niger refused.

Severan troops crossed into Asia at the Hellespont and near Cyzicus engaged forces supporting Niger under the command of Aemilianus. Niger's troops were defeated. Aemilianus attempted to flee but was captured and killed. Not long after, in late December 193 or early January 194, Niger was defeated in a battle near Nicaea and fled south to Antioch. Eastern provincial governors now switched their loyalty to Severus, and Niger faced revolts even in Syria. By late spring 194, the Severan armies were in Cilicia preparing to enter Syria. Niger and his army met the Severan troops near Issus. The battle was a decisive defeat for Niger, who fled back to Antioch. The Syrian capital that only one year earlier had cheered as Niger was proclaimed emperor now waited in fear for the approach of its new master. Niger prepared to flee once more, but outside Antioch he was captured and killed.

Despite his popularity with the Roman mob, Pescennius Niger lacked both the strong loyalty of other senatorial commanders and the number of soldiers that his rival Severus enjoyed. Niger was ultimately unable to make himself the true avenger of Pertinax, and his roughly one-year control of the eastern provinces never qualified him to be reckoned a legitimate emperor.

BITHYNIA, Caesarea. Pescennius Niger. AD 193-194. Æ 22mm (6.35 g). Laureate head right / KAICAREIAC GERMANIKHC, coiled serpent left. RG p. 282, 9, pl. XLIV, 8 (same dies); SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock -. Near VF, brown patina, rough surfaces. Very rare. Ex-CNG
2 commentsecoli
RIC_0086.jpg
203. MACRINUS191 viewsMACRINUS. 217-218 AD.

Caracalla's mother, Julia Domna, had toyed with the idea of raising a rebellion against Macrinus shortly after her son's murder, but the empress was uncertain of success and already suffering from breast cancer. She chose to starve herself to death instead.

The grandchildren of her sister, Julia Maesa, would become the focus of the successful uprising that began on 15 May 218. Her 14-year-old grandson Avitus (known to history as Elagabalus) was proclaimed emperor by one the legions camped near the family's hometown of Emesa. Other troops quickly joined the rebellion, but Macrinus marshalled loyal soldiers to crush the revolt. Macrinus also promoted his son to the rank of emperor.

The forces met in a village outside Antioch on 8 June 218. Despite the inexperience of the leaders of the rebel army, Macrinus was defeated. He sent his son, Diadumenianus, with an ambassador to the Parthian king, while Macrinus himself prepared to flee to Rome. Macrinus traveled across Asia Minor disguised as a courier and nearly made it to Europe, but he was captured in Chalcedon. Macrinus was transported to Cappadocia, where he was executed. Diadumenianus had also been captured (at Zeugma) and was similarly put to death.

Contemporaries tended to portray Macrinus as a fear-driven parvenu who was able to make himself emperor but was incapable of the leadership required by the job. An able administrator, Macrinus lacked the aristocratic connections and personal bravado that might have won him legitimacy. His short reign represented a brief interlude of Parthian success during what would prove the final decade of the Parthian empire.

AR Denarius (18mm 3.55 gm). IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust with short beard right / SALVS PVBLICA, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising up from altar, holding sceptre in left. RIC IV 86; Good VF; Ex-CNG
2 commentsecoli73
coin176.JPG
205. Severus Alexander; Alexandria, Egypt;31 viewsEGYPT, Alexandria. Severus Alexander. AD 222-235. BI Tetradrachm (23mm, 11.66 g, 12h). Dated RY 12 (AD 232/3). Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Nike seated left on cuirass, holding palm and wreath; palm to left, LI B (date) across field. Cf. Köln 2480 ; Dattari 4326; cf. Milne 3110 ; Emmett 3120.12. VF. Well struck.ecoli
349Hadrian_RIC214.jpg
214 Hadrian Denarius Roma 132-34 AD Justitia37 viewsReference.
RIC 214var; C. 884 var.

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS.
Bare Head right, aegis on left shoulder and across back of neck.

Rev. IVSTITIA AVG in Ex. COS III P P
Justitia, draped, seated left on throne, holding patera in extended right hand and vertical sceptre in left.

3.11 gr
19 mm
2 commentsokidoki
rjb_diad1_04_06.jpg
21836 viewsDiadumenian 218 AD
AE 28 mm
Nikopolis in Moesia Inferior
Apollo standing left
AMNG 1810 (for obv.), AMNG 1688 var. (for rev., Macrinus)
[Thanks to Jochen for the ref, I came across his die duplicate example in the gallery here

mauseus
22010.jpg
22010 Hadrian/ Standards18 viewsHadrian/3 Standards Quadrans. 125-128 AD.
Obv: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS,
laureate head right
Rev: COS III around three standards, Middle standard has legionary Eagle
S-C across fields
Mint:Rome 17.1mm 3.1g
RIC II 977; Cohen 450; Sear (1988) 1147.
1 commentsBlayne W
22013.jpg
22013 Constantine I /Campgate10 viewsConstantine I/Campgate
AE Follis of Antioch. AD 331 and 333-334.

Obv:CONSTAN-TINVS AVG,
laureate head right.
Rev:PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG,
Campgate with nine layers, two turrets,
star above, no doors. officina letters
Delta-Epsilon across fields.
SMANT in Exergue
Mint:Antioch
RIC VII Antioch 63.
Blayne W
22016.jpg
22016 Licinius I/Jupiter11 viewsLicinius I/Jupitor
Obv: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG,
radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI
Jupiter standing left, naked but for chlamys across left sh., holding Victory on globe & sceptre. Eagle with wreath in beak at foot left, bound
captive on ground to right.
X over II Mu in right field
SMANTB in Exergue
Mint:Antioch 17.5mm 3.7g
RIC VII Antioch 35; Sear 15225.
Blayne W
22019.jpg
22019 Licinius I/Jupiter11 viewsLicinius I/Jupiter
Obv:IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG,
radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:IOVI CONS-ERVATORI,
Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and leaning on sceptre, eagle with wreath left, captive right.
X over II Mu in Right field
SMHB In Exergue
Mint: Heraclea 18.8mm 2.4g
RIC VII Heraclea 52.
Blayne W
858_P_Hadrian_RPC2202.jpg
2202 CARIA, Mylasa Hadrian, Trident11 viewsReference
RPC III 2202; Akarca 58-9.

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΟΡΑ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟΝ СΕΒΑСΤΟΝ
Laureate, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front (with visible thunderbolt on his cuirass leather strap)

Rev. ΜΥΛΑϹΕΩΝ
Ornamented trident

4.34 gr
17 mm
6h

Note.
Ex Dr. P. Vogl collection
okidoki
22023.jpg
22023 Licinius/Jupiter GammaI11 viewsLicinius/Jupiter
Obv: IMP LIC LICINIVS PF AVG,
laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN,
Jupiter standing left, chlamys across
left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and sceptre, eagle with
wreath at foot left.
GammaI in right field.
ANT in Exergue
Mint:Antioch 22.9mm 2.9g
RIC VII Antioch 17; Sear 15253.
Rated R5

Blayne W
22025a.jpg
22025 Licinius II/Jupiter7 viewsLicinius II/Jupiter
Obv:VAL LICINIVS NOB CAES,
laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:IOVI CO-NSERVATORI,
Jupiter running right, chlamys flying out behind, throwing thunderbolt.
R-S across fields.
TARL in Exergue
Mint:Arles 18.7mm 2.8g
RIC VII Arles 128
Blayne W
22036.jpg
22036 Licinius II IOVI23 viewsLicinius II / IOVI CONS-ERVATORI
Obv: DN VAL LICIN LICINIVS NOB C
helmeted, cuirassed, spear across right shoulder, shield on left arm facing left
REV: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI
Jupiter standing left, Chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe in right eagle-tipped scepter in left, eagle with wreath left, captive right
Right field: X over II Mu
SMH gamma in Exergue
Mint Heraclea 19.2 mm 3.3 g
RIC VII Heraclea 54; Sear 15407

Blayne W
22037.jpg
22037 Licinius I/ IOVI CONS-ERVATORI16 viewsLicinius I/ IOVI CONS-ERVATORI
Obv: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG
Licinius bust laureate head only
Rev: IOVI CONSER-VATORI AVGG
Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding victory on Globe in right and scepter in left
Right field: wreath over Z over III
ANT in Exergue
Mint:Antioch 18.9mm 3.6 g
RIC VII Antioch 8; Sear 15244
Rated R4
Blayne W
22048.jpg
22048 Licinius I/Jupiter18 viewsLicinius I/Jupiter
Obv: IMP LIC LICINIVS PF AVG,
laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN,
Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and sceptre, eagle with wreath at foot left.
I in right field.
ANT in Exergue
Mint: Antioch 19.0mm 4.0 g
RIC VII Antioch 17; Sear 15253. R3
2 commentsBlayne W
22075.jpg
22075 Licinius/Jupiter14 viewsLicinius I/Jupiter
Obv: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG
Bust of Licinius, radiate, draped, cuirassed, right
Rev: IOVI CON-SERVATORI:
Jupiter, nude, chlamys draped across left shoulder, standing left, holding Victory on globe in right hand and leaning on sceptre with eagle with left hand; to left, eagle with wreath; to right, captive
X over IIMU in Right Field.
Mint:Alexandria 19.1mm 3.5g
RIC VII Alexandria 28
Blayne W
22107.jpg
22107 Victorinus/Pax from the Petherington Hoard11 viewsVictorinus/Pax
Obv: IMP C VICTORINVS P F AVG,
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: PAX AVG
Pax standing left, holding branch and sceptre;
V-star across fields.
Mint:Cologne 19.8mm 2.7g
RIC 118; Elmer 682; AGK (corr.) 14b. Sear 11175.
From the South Petherington Hoard in uncleaned condition
Ex Frascatius
Blayne W
22112.jpg
22112 Claudius/Minerva16 viewsClaudius/Minerva
Obv: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP,
bare head left.
Rev: S-C across fields,
Minerva standing right, brandishing spear and holding shield on left arm.
Mint: Rome 26.6mm 10.21g
RIC I 100; BMCRE 149; Cohen 84.
Ex Frascatius
1 commentsBlayne W
461_Hadrian_RIC230.JPG
230 Hadrian Denarius Roma 134-38 AD Modius12 viewsReference.
RIC 230; C.172

Obv. HADRIANVS-AVG COS III P P
Bare bust right, drapery over shoulder and across chest

Rev. ANNO_NA AVG
Modius with grain-ears and poppy.

3.17 gr
18 mm
okidoki
171Hadrian__RIC238.jpg
238 Hadrian Denarius Roma 134-38 AD Felicitas standing23 viewsReference.
RIC 238b; Strack 234

Obv: HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P.
Bare-headed bust right, slight drapery, and across back of neck (rarely seen)

Rev: FELICITAS P R.
Felicitas standing left with branch and cornucopia.

3.20 gr
18 mm.
okidoki
341_P_Hadrian_BMC24.jpg
2471 PHRYGIA, Trajanopolis. Hadrian AE 15 Athena standing38 viewsReference.
RPC 3, 2471; BMC 24 (pag. 428); SNG ANS 4038

http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/2471/

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟC KAICAP
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder,and across back of neck, seen from front

Rev. ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟ ΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ
Athena standing right, holding spear and shield

1.92 gr
15 mm
12 h
1 commentsokidoki
Sear_1569.jpg
26. Constantine V and Leo IV9 viewsConstantine V and Leo IV.
751-775 AD.
AE Follis. Syracuse mint.

O: K-LEWN to right and left of Constantine V, bearded on left, and Leo IV, beardless on right, standing facing (usually three-quarter length), each wearing crown and chlamys and holding akakia in arm across their chests; cross between their heads

R: LEON-DECP downwards to left and right, Leo III, bearded, half-length, standing facing, wearing crown and chlamys and holding cross potent.

SB 1569, DOC 19.

Thanks to FORVM member joma-tk for helping to ID.
Sosius
871_P_Hadrian_RPC2695.jpg
2695 PAMPHYLIA, Perga Hadrian AE 20 Artemis standing left22 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2695; SNG France 397-8

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΑΙСΑΡ
Laureate, bust right, with drapery on l. shoulder and across back of neck, seen from front

Rev. ΑΡΤΕΜΙΔΟС ΠΕΡΓΑΙΑС
Artemis, with quiver and bow in raised hands, running l., head r.; above, crescent

4.81 gr
20 mm
6h

Note.
Reverse legend is counter clockwise.
1 commentsokidoki
7_P_Hadrian_.jpg
2775 PISIDIA, Baris Hadrian AE 18 117-138 AD Horseman 30 viewsReference.
RPC 3, 2775; SNG Copenhagen 107-8; SNG von Aulock 5009

Obv. AVT KAI TPA AΔPIANOC
Laureate, bust right, baldric (sword) strap around neck and across chest, loop on shoulder, seen from front

Rev. BAPHNΩN
Horseman galloping right., spearing serpent.

3.43 gr
17 mm
6h
okidoki
390_P_Hadrian.jpg
2955 CAPPADOCIA, Tyana. Hadrian 135-36 AD Tyche seated on throne37 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2955; SNG von Aulock 6538-9; Lindgren I 1735; cf SNG Cop 316.

Issue Year 20

Obv. AVTO KAIC TPAIA AΔPIANOC CЄBACTOC.
Laureate head right.

Rev. TVANЄΩN TΩN T T IЄP ACV AVT. ЄT K (date) across field
Tyche seated left on throne decorated with sphinx, holding grain ears and bunch of grapes; below, river god swimming left, head facing, holding club

11.04 gr
25 mm
12h

Note.
ex Lindgren 1735
1 commentsokidoki
21_P_Hadrian__SNG_von_Aulock_6538-9.jpg
2955 CAPPADOCIA, Tyana. Hadrian 135-36 AD Tyche seated on throne25 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2955; SNG von Aulock 6538-9; Lindgren I 1735; cf SNG Cop 316.

Issue Year 20

Obv. AVTO KAIC TPAIA AΔPIANOC CЄBACTOC.
Laureate head right.

Rev. TVANЄΩN TΩN T T IЄP ACV AVT. ЄT K (date) across field
Tyche seated left on throne decorated with sphinx, holding grain ears and bunch of grapes; below, river god swimming left, head facing, holding club

10.2 gr
25 mm
12h
okidoki
1035_P_Hadrian_RPC2955.jpg
2955 CAPPADOCIA, Tyana. Hadrian 135-36 AD Tyche seated on throne18 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2955/25; cf SNG von Aulock 6538-9; Lindgren I 1735; cf SNG Cop 316. (crescent)

Issue Year 20

Obv. AVTO KAIC TPAIA AΔPIANOC CЄBACTOC.
Laureate head right.

Rev. TVANЄΩN TΩN T T IЄP ACV AVT. ЄT K (date) across field
Tyche seated left on throne decorated with sphinx, holding grain ears and bunch of grapes and below crescent; below, river god swimming left, head facing, holding club

11.15 gr
26 mm
12h
okidoki
937_P_Hadrian_RPC2955.JPG
2955 CAPPADOCIA, Tyana. Hadrian Æ 135-36 AD Tyche seated on throne15 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2955; SNG von Aulock 6538-9; Lindgren I 1735; cf SNG Cop 316.

Issue Year 20

Obv. AVTO KAIC TPAI AΔPIANOC CЄBACTOC.
Laureate head right.

Rev. TVANЄΩN TΩN T T IЄP ACV AVT. ЄT K (date) across field
Tyche seated left on throne decorated with sphinx, holding grain ears and bunch of grapes; below, river god swimming left, head facing, holding club

11.26 gr
25 mm
12h
okidoki
294_P_Hadrian_Strack7.jpg
2966 Hadrian Denarius Antioch 117-30 AD Fortuna standing27 viewsReference.
RIC III, 2966; Strack *7 Strack Taf. XX, 9-10; RIC II, --; BMCRE --; C. 1179. BMC 1023.

Bust B1

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front

Rev. PM TR POT E[S COS III]
Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia

2.02 gr
18 mm
6h
okidoki
1259_P_Hadrian_eastern_--.jpg
2973 Hadrian Denarius Antioch 124-27 AD Aequitas-Moneta standing11 viewsReference.
RIC III, 2973; Strack *-- ; RIC II, --; BMCRE --; C. --; BMC --

Bust B1

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front

Rev. PM TR POTES III COS III
Aequitas-Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia

3.40 gr
17 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
3+_lb__Grassy_Mtn__Petrified_Wood_-_Hoodoo_Creek_Elm.JPG
3+ lb. Grassy Mtn. Petrified Wood - Hoodoo Creek Elm 19 views7 3/4" high and measures about 4 3/4" wide across the mirror polished face. Weight is 3.06 lbs. elm tree, Grassy Mountain site in Eastern Oregon, Hoodoo Creek, a short distance from the Grassy Mtn. peak. 1 commentsAntonivs Protti
image~22.jpg
302c. Gordian I24 viewsEGYPT, Alexandria. Gordian I. AD 238. Potin Tetradrachm (23mm, 11.50 g, 12h). Dated RY 1 (AD 238). Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Eagle standing left, head right, wreath in beak; L A (date) across field. Köln 2598; Dattari (Savio) 4665; K&G 68.1; Emmett 3342.1. Fine, dark brown patina, rough surfaces. Rare.

From a Hungarian Collection formed primarily in the 1930’s.
ecoli
coin241.JPG
305b. Herennius Etruscus24 viewsQuintus Herennius Etruscus Messius Decius (c. 227 - July 1, 251), was Roman emperor in 251, in a joint rule with his father Trajan Decius. Emperor Hostilian was his younger brother.

Herennius was born in Pannonia, during one of his father's military postings. His mother was Herennia Cupressenia Etruscilla, a Roman lady of an important senatorial family. Herennius was very close to his father and accompanied him in 248, as a military tribune, when Decius was appointed by Philip the Arab to deal with the revolt of Pacatianus in the Danube frontier. Decius was successful on defeating this usurper and felt confident to begin a rebellion of his own in the following year. Acclaimed emperor by his own troops, Decius marched into Italy and defeated Philip near modern Verona. In Rome, Herennius was declared heir to the throne and received the title of princeps iuventutis (prince of youth).

From the beginning of Herennius' accession, Gothic tribes raided across the Danube frontier and the provinces of Moesia and Dacia. At the beginning of 251, Decius elevated Herennius to the title of Augustus making him his co-emperor. Moreover, Herennius was chosen to be one of the year's consuls. The father and son, now joint rulers, then embarked in an expedition against king Cniva of the Goths to punish the invaders for the raids. Hostilian remained in Rome and the empress Herennia Etruscilla was named regent. Cniva and his men were returning to their lands with the booty, when the Roman army encountered them. Showing a very sophisticated military tactic, Cniva divided his army in smaller, more manageable groups and started to push back the Romans into a marshy swamp. On July 1, both armies engaged in the battle of Abrittus. Herennius died in battle, struck by an enemy arrow. Decius survived the initial confrontation, only to be slain with the rest of the army before the end of the day. Herennius and Decius were the first two emperors to be killed by a foreign army in battle.

With the news of the death of the emperors, the army proclaimed Trebonianus Gallus emperor, but in Rome they were succeeded by Hostilian, who would die shortly afterwards in an outbreak of plague.

Herennius Etruscus AR Antoninianus. Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C, radiate draped bust right / CONCORDIA AVGG, clasped hands. RIC 138, RSC 4
1 commentsecoli
ConVIIRome27.jpg
307-337 AD - Constantine I - RIC VII Rome 027 - SOLI INVICTO COMITI40 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: 314-315 AD
Condition: EF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG
Imperator Constantine Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; laureate, draped, and cuirassed

Reverse: SOLI INV-I-CTO COMITI
Dedicated to the Emperor's companion, the unconquered Sol (Sun god).
Sol radiate standing left, right hand raised, globe in left hand, chlamys across left shoulder. R/X | F in field.

Exergue: RP (Rome mint, first officina)
RIC VII Rome 27; VM 63
2.77g; 20.0mm; 180°
Pep
ConVIIRome27_2.jpg
307-337 AD - Constantine I - RIC VII Rome 027 - SOLI INVICTO COMITI - 2nd Example31 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: 314-315 AD
Condition: Fine/aVF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG
Imperator Constantine Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; laureate, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: SOLI INV-I-CTO COMITI
To the Emperor's companion, the unconquered Sol.
Sol radiate standing left, raising right hand, globe in left hand, chlamys across left shoulder.
R/X | F in field
Exergue: RT (Rome mint, third officina)

RIC VII Rome 27; VM 63
2.87g; 19.2mm; 330°
Pep
ConVIISis5.jpg
307-337 AD - Constantine I - RIC VII Siscia 005 - IOVI CONSERVATORI31 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: 313-315 AD
Condition: Very Fine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG
Imperator Constantine Emperor Wise and Dutiful Emperor
Bust right; laureate

Reverse: IOVI CON-SERVATORI
To Jupiter, the Protector.
Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on scepter, Victory on globe in right hand; eagle with wreath to left.
Exergue: SIS; "Δ" in right field (Siscia mint, fourth officina)

RIC VII Siscia 5
2.92g; 21.2mm; 180°
Pep
ConVIISis7.jpg
307-337 AD - Constantine I - RIC VII Siscia 007 - IOVI CONSERVATORI28 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: 313-315 AD
Condition: Very Fine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG
Imperator Constantine Emperor
Bust right; laureate

Reverse: IOVI CON-SERVATORI
To Jupiter, the Protector.
Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on sceptre, Victory on globe in right hand; eagle with wreath to left.
"B" in right field
Exergue: SIS (Siscia mint, second officina)

RIC VII Siscia 7
2.57g; 21.1mm; 165°
Pep
ConVIIThes4.jpg
307-337 AD - Constantine I - RIC VII Thessalonica 004 - IOVI CONSERVATORI29 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: November 316 - March 317 AD
Condition: Very Fine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS P F INV AVG
Imperator Constantine Dutiful Wise and Unconquerable Emperor
Bust right; laureate

Reverse: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI
To Jupiter, the Protector.
Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on scepter, Victory on globe in right hand; eagle with wreath to left.
Exergue: ·TS·A· (Thessalonica mint, first officina)

RIC VII Thessalonica 4
3.49g; 21.2mm; 0°
Pep
costantine-Ric8-2.jpg
307-337 AD Constantine I - Jupiter - Officina=Delta152 viewsIMPCONSTAN-TINVSAVG - Laureate, curaissed bust left, scepter over left shoulder
IOVICONS-ERVATORIAVGG - Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding scepter, Victory on globe. SMK in exe, wreath left field, (Delta) right field.

Cyzicus mint, Ric 8 (r1)
Silvered AE3, 2.5 gms. 180 degrees.
jimwho523
ConstantineI-Ric8.jpg
307-337 AD Constantine I - Jupiter - Officina=S131 viewsIMPCONSTAN-TINVSAVG - Laureate, curaissed bust left, scepter over left shoulder
IOVICONS-ERVATORIAVGG - Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding scepter, Victory on globe. SMK in exe, wreath left field, S right field.

Cyzicus mint, Ric 8 (r1)
Silvered AE3, 2.5 gms. 180 degrees.
Small corrosion 8:o'clock on obverse, otherwise exceptional!!!
jimwho523
LicVIIHera6.jpg
308-324 AD - Licinius I - RIC VII Heraclea 006 - IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG35 viewsEmperor: Licinius I (r. 308-324 AD)
Date: 313-314 AD
Condition: Fine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG
Imperator Caesar Valerius Licinianus Licinius Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Head right; laureate

Reverse: IOVI CONSER-VATORI AVGG
To Jupiter, Protector of the Emperors.
Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on sceptre, holding Victory on globe in right hand, eagle to left on ground holding wreath. "A" in right field.
Exergue: SMHT (Heraclea mint, first officina)

RIC VII Heraclea 6
3.59g; 22.4mm; 0°
Pep
LicVIIHera6_2.jpg
308-324 AD - Licinius I - RIC VII Heraclea 006 - IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG - 2nd Example27 viewsEmperor: Licinius I (r. 308-324 AD)
Date: 313-314 AD
Condition: aFine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG
Imperator Caesar Valerius Licinianus Licinius Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Head right; laureate

Reverse: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI AVGG
To Jupiter, Protector of the Emperors.
Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on sceptre, holding Victory on globe in right hand, eagle to left on ground holding wreath.
"Δ" in right field
Exergue: SMHT (Heraclea mint, fourth officina)

RIC VII Heraclea 6; VM 25
2.22g; 20.7mm; 165°
Pep
874_P_Hadrian_RPC3122A.jpg
3122A CAPPADOCIA, Caesaraea Hadrian Drachm 128-138 AD Mount Argaeus 3 stars23 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3122A; BMC 125; Sydenham 271; Metcalf Conspectus 108a

Obv. AΔPIANOC CЄBACTOC
Laureate, bust right, drapery on left shoulder and across back of neck.

Rev. YΠATOC Γ ΠATHP ΠATP
Mount Argaeus; above, three stars.

2.81 gr
17 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki
licinius-ric11.JPG
313 - 315 AD - Licinius I68 viewsIMP LICINIVS PF AVG - Laureate Head Right
IOVI CON-SERVATORI - Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on sceptre. Victory on globe in righthand, eagle with wreath to left at feet. SIS in exe, B in right field

RIC VII, Siscia Mint, # 11, Officina B = R4
jimwho523
coin508.JPG
314. Claudius II37 viewsMarcus Aurelius Claudius Gothicus (May 10, 213/214 - January, 270), more often referred to as Claudius II, ruled the Roman Empire for less than two years (268 - 270), but during that brief time, he was so successful and beloved by the people of Rome that he attained divine status.

His origin is uncertain. Claudius was either from Syrmia (Sirmium; in Pannonia Inferior) or from Dardania (in Moesia Superior). Claudius was the commander of the Roman army that defeated decisively the Goths at the battle of Naissus, in September 268; in the same month, he attained the throne, amid charges, never proven, that he murdered his predecessor Gallienus. However, he soon proved to be less than bloodthirsty, as he asked the Roman Senate to spare the lives of Gallienus' family and supporters. He was less magnanimous toward Rome's enemies, however, and it was to this that he owed his popularity.

Claudius, like Maximinus Thrax before him, was of barbarian birth. After an interlude of failed aristocratic Roman emperors since Maximinus's death, Claudius was the first in a series of tough soldier-emperors who would eventually restore the Empire from the Crisis of the third century.

At the time of his accession, the Roman Empire was in serious danger from several incursions, both within and outside its borders. The most pressing of these was an invasion of Illyricum and Pannonia by the Goths. Not long after being named emperor (or just prior to Gallienus' death, depending on the source), he won his greatest victory, and one of the greatest in the history of Roman arms.

At the Battle of Naissus, Claudius and his legions routed a huge Gothic army. Together with his cavalry commander, the future Emperor Aurelian, the Romans took thousands of prisoners, destroyed the Gothic cavalry as a force and stormed their chariot laager (a circular alignment of battle-wagons long favored by the Goths). The victory earned Claudius his surname of "Gothicus" (conqueror of the Goths), and that is how he is known to this day. More importantly, the Goths were soon driven back across the Danube River, and a century passed before they again posed a serious threat to the empire.

While this was going on, the Germanic tribe known as the Alamanni had crossed the Alps and attacked the empire. Claudius responded quickly and swiftly, routing the Alamanni at the Battle of Lake Benacus in the late fall of 268, a few months after the battle of Naissus. He then turned on the "Gallic Empire", ruled by a pretender for the past 15 years and encompassing Britain, Gaul and Spain. He won several victories and soon regained control of Spain and the Rhone river valley of Gaul. This set the stage for the ultimate destruction of the Gallic Empire under Aurelian.

However, Claudius did not live long enough to fulfill his goal of reuniting all the lost territories of the empire. Late in 269 he was preparing to go to war against the Vandals, who were raiding in Pannonia. However, he fell victim to an epidemic of plague and died early in January of 270. Before his death, he is thought to have named Aurelian as his successor, although Claudius' brother Quintillus briefly seized power.

The Senate immediately deified Claudius as "Divus Claudius Gothicus", making him one of the few Roman emperors of the period to be so honored.

Historia Augusta reports Claudius and Quintillus having another brother named Crispus and through him a niece. Said niece Claudia reportedly married Eutropius and was mother to Constantius Chlorus. Historians however suspect this account to be a genealogical fabrication by Constantine the Great.

Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus. Cyzicus mint. IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped bust right / FORTUNA REDUX, Fortuna standing left with rudder & cornucopiae. RIC 234, Cohen 88.
ecoli
caligula_RIC36-R.jpg
37-41 AD - CALIGULA AE sestertius - struck 37-38 AD79 viewsobv: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS P M TR POT (Pietas, veiled, seated left and holding patera, left elbow resting on small statue of Spes), PIETAS in exergue
rev: DIVO-AVG (Gaius sacrificing before garlanded hexastyle temple; one attendant leading bull to altar, the other holding a patera), S-C across field
ref: RIC I 36 (R), BMCRE 41, Cohen 9 (15frcs)
27.38gms, 33mm
Very rare

This issue commemorates Gaius Caligula's dedication of the Temple of the Divus Augustus and the young emperor's sense of pietas. The PIETAS beneath the figure of the emperor drives home the point that he is fulfilling his duty by dedicating the temple to his great-grandfather. Construction of the Temple of the Divus Augustus began under Tiberius and, perhaps, under the direction of Livia herself, in the general area behind the Basilica Julia (though the actual site remains unknown), and was subsequently dedicated by Caligula.
2 commentsberserker
6Hadrian_RIC688~0.jpg
3763 Hadrian Semis, Roma 125-128 AD Lyre.15 viewsReference.
RIC 688; BMC 1359; Strack 625; van Heesch 148-9/6; CRS 31; McAlee 547; RPC III 3763

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right seen from the back

Rev. COS III,
Lyre; S-C across fields.

4.22 gr
19 mm
6h
okidoki
405_P_Hadrian.jpg
3912 Phoenicia, Acco-Ptolemaïs. Hadrian. Æ 21 Hadrian, as founder plowing44 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3912; Kadman 103; cf. Rosenberger 48 (head right); cf. Rouvier 1000 (same).; Hendin 819

Obv. IMP TRA HADRIA[NO CAESAR]
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from front.

Rev. DIVOS CLAV above, C-O-L/PT-OL in two lines across field. (COL PTOL=Colonia Ptolemais)
Claudius, as founder plowing right with yoked bull and cow; in background, four standards.

11.02 gr
21 mm
12 h

Agora Auctions.
From the Kenneth Miller Collection of Ake-Ptolemaïs and Related Biblical Coins.
2 commentsokidoki
athens-counter.jpeg
4 countermarks on Athens Tetradrachm185 views449-413 B.C. Attica Old style Tetradrachm

Obverse: Head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, hair in parallel curves. 4 countermarks across cheek.

Reverse: AOE Right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square. Test cut and counter punch, and countermark.

1 commentsDk0311USMC
40-Harold-II.jpg
40. Harold II.76 viewsPenny, 1066; London mint.
Obverse: +HAROLD REX ANG / Crowned bust of Harold, sceptre in front.
Reverse: +SǷETMAN ON LVN / Across field and between two lines: PAX
Moneyer: Swetman.
1.20 gm., 19 mm.
North #836; Seaby #1186.
1 commentsCallimachus
coin264.JPG
403. Carausius37 viewsMarcus Aurelius Mausaeus Carausius (d. 293) was a Roman usurper in Britain and northern Gaul (286–293, Carausian Revolt).

Carausius was a man of humble origin, a Menapian from Belgic Gaul who distinguished himself during Maximian's campaign against the Bagaudae rebels in Gaul in 286. As a result, he was appointed to command the Classis Britannica, a fleet based in the English Channel, with the responsibility of eliminating Frankish and Saxon pirates who had been raiding the coast. However, he was suspected of keeping captured treasure for himself, and even of allowing the pirates to carry out raids and enrich themselves before taking action against them, and Maximian ordered his execution. In late 286 or early 287 Carausius learned of this sentence and responded by declaring himself Emperor of Britain and northern Gaul.

He could count on the alliegance of the three legions based in Britain, as well as one in northern Gaul. How he was able to win support from the army when his command had been sea-based is uncertain. The emperor briefly assumed the title Britannicus Maximus in 285, and the British towns of Wroxeter and Caistor by Norwich towns show signs of destruction around this time, so it is possible Carausius won the army's support during military action in Britain shortly before his rebellion. Alternatively, if the accusations of larceny are true, he could perhaps afford to buy their loyalty. He also appears to have appealed to native British dissatisfaction with Roman rule: he issued coins with legends such as Restitutor Britanniae (Restorer of Britain) and Genius Britanniae (Spirit of Britain).

Maximian, busy with wars on the Rhine, was unable to challenge him immediately, but in the Autumn of 288 he began massing troops and ships for an invasion. In 289 an invasion of Britain intended to dislodge him failed badly due to storms, although a naval defeat is also possible. An uneasy peace continued until 293, during which Rome prepared for a second effort to retake the province, while Carausius began to entertain visions of legitimacy and official recognition. He minted his own coins and brought their value in to line with Roman issues as well as acknowledging and honouring Maximian and then Diocletian. Coinage is the main source of information about the rogue emperor; his issues were initially crude but soon became more elaborate and were issued from mints in Londinium, Rotomagnus and a third site, possibly Colonia Claudia Victricensis. A milestone from Carlisle with his name on it suggests that the whole of Roman Britain was in Carausius' grasp.

It has been speculated (namely, by the historian Sheppard Frere) that the rebellion of Carausius endangered Diocletian's vision of a strong, centralized government based on his tetrarchy. In any case, by early 293 Constantius Chlorus had gained control of northern Gaul, including the rebel's stronghold and port of Bononia, on which Carausius was heavily dependent. Constantius built a mole across the harbour mouth to ensure it did not receive maritime aid.

Constantius also regained the allegiance of the rebellious Gallic legion and defeated the Franks of the Rhine mouth who seem to have been working in league with Carausius. Weakened by these setbacks, Carausius was assassinated, possibly at York, by his treasurer, Allectus.

aVF/aVF Carausius Antoninianus / Pax / Green Patina and Nice Style

Attribution: RIC 895
Date: 287-293 AD
Obverse: IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right
Reverse: PAX AVG, Pax standing left, holding branch and transverse sceptre.
Size: 20.91 mm
Weight: 3 grams
ecoli
coin553.JPG
501. Constantine I Cyzicus Iovi Conservatori Cyzicus24 viewsRoman Empire. Constantine I (The Great). A.D. 307-337. AE 3.
Cyzicus A.D. 317-320. Obv. IMP. CONSTANTINVS AVG.
Head l., laureate and draped, holding globe, sceptre and mappa.
Rv. IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG. Jupiter standing l., chlamys across
l. shoulder, holding sceptre, Victory on globe; to l., wreath; to
r., A; in exergue, SMK.
1 commentsecoli
98170.jpg
502. CONSTANTINE II156 viewsFlavius Claudius Constantinus, known in English as Constantine II, (316 - 340) was Roman Emperor (337 - 340). The eldest son of Constantine I and Fausta, he was born at Arles, and was raised as a Christian.

On March 1, 317, Constantine was made Caesar, and at the age of seven, in 323, took part in his father's campaign against the Sarmatians.

At the age of ten became commander of Gaul, after the death of his half-brother Crispus. An inscription dating to 330 records the title of Alamannicus, so it is probable that his generals won a victory over Alamanni. His military career continued when Constantine I elected his son field commander during the 332 campaign against the Goths.

Following the death of his father in 337, Constantine II became Emperor jointly with his brothers Constantius II and Constans. His section of the Empire was Gaul, Britannia and Hispania.

At first, he was the guardian of his younger brother Constans, whose portion was Italia, Africa and Illyricum. As Constans came of age, Constantine would not relinquish the guardianship and in 340 he marched against Constans in Italy, but was defeated at Aquileia and died in battle. Constans came to control his deceased brother's realm.

CONSTANTINE II, as Caesar. 317-337 AD. Æ Reduced Follis (18mm, 2.74 gm). Siscia mint. Struck 321-324 AD. Laureate head right / VOT / X in two lines across field; all within wreath; SIS sunburst. RIC VII 182. Ex-CNG
ecoli73
622Hadrian_RIC535b.JPG
535b Hadrian Sestertius, Roma 117 AD Concordia77 viewsReference.
RIC cf535b; BMC cf1104; Strack cf502; Banti 145 ( 1 example)

Obv. IMP CAES DIVI TRAIAN AVG F TRAIAN HADRIAN OPT AVG GER,
Laureate, heroically nude bust right, baldric (sword) strap around neck and across chest, loop on shoulder, seen from front

Rev DAC PARTHICO P M TR P COS P P, CONCORDIA and S C in field
Concordia seated left on throne, cornucopia at side, holding patera and resting elbow on statuette of Spes standing left set on low basis.

24.78 gr
35 mm
6h


When he became emperor following the death of Trajan in 117 AD, questions immediately arose regarding the validity of Hadrian's succesion. Although it is clear from Hadrian's early career and marriage to Sabina (Trajan's grand-niece) that the emperor brought his young kinsman within the imperial court, Trajan, unlike Nerva before, made no move to adopt Hadrian formally, instead possibly preferring others. This fact prompted Hadrian, in the early days of his reign to emphasize his legitimacy to the succession. Hadrian declared Trajan divus and ordered his ashes installed in the Column of his newly complete Forum. Trajan's name and titles were incorporated into the new imperial nomenclature, a privilege reserved solely for legitimate heirs. At the same time, coins were struck to associate the new reign with the previous administration and declare a peaceful transferral of power. The legend DAC PARTHICO (in the dedicatory dative), clearly refers to Trajan, while the Concordia reverse type (to date, uncommon with the addition of Spes), emphasized by the inclusion of CONCORDIA in the exergue, demonstrated Hadrian's potential willingness for the time to continue Trajan's policies, thereby insuring continued political harmony, something which disintegrated as Hadrian's reign progressed.
1 commentsokidoki
769Hadrian_RIC538b.jpg
538 Hadrian Dupondius 117 AD Concordia131 viewsReference.
RIC 538b; C. 260; BMC 1107; Strack 502

Obv. IMP CAES DIVI TRAIAN AVG F TRAIAN HADRIAN OPT AVG GER
Radiate, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front

Rev. DAC PARTHICO P M TR P COS P P S C
Concordia enthroned facing left, holding patera in right hand, left elbow resting on small statue of Spes on small column, cornucopiae below throne.

12.31gr
28 mm
12h
.
Note.
CNG Sale 11/09.
From the Estate Collection of Dr. Richard Doty
10 commentsokidoki
nero quadrans.jpg
54-68 AD - NERO AE quadrans - struck 64 AD25 viewsobv: NERO CLAV C AVG GER (Column with helmet atop and shield to side)
rev: P M TR P IMP PP (branch), S C across fields.
ref: RIC I 317 (obverse type 7, reverse type 6), C.179 (2frcs)
mint: Rome
2.52gms, 14mm
berserker
520Hadrian_RIC541a.jpg
541 Hadrian Sestertius Roma 117 AD Fortuna106 viewsReference.
RIC 541a; BMCRE 1110; Cohen 751; Banti 409

Obv. IMP CAES DIVI TRA PARTH F DIVI NER NEP TRAIANO HADRIANO AVG
Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest.

Rev. PONT MAX TR POT COS FORT RED/S C in two lines in exergue
Fortuna, draped, seated left on low seat, holding rudder on ground in right hand and cornucopiae in left.

28.43 gr
34 mm
3 commentsokidoki
521Hadrian_RIC543.jpg
543 Hadrian Sestertius Roma 117 AD Fortuna58 viewsReference.
Strack 509; Cohen 753; RIC 543 var. (CAESAR) ; Banti 416 var. ( Baldric strap)

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate, nude bust right, aegis on left shoulder and across back of neck, baldric (sword) strap around neck and across chest, loop on shoulder, seen from front.

Rev. PONT MAX TR POT COS DES II S C FORT RED
Fortuna, draped, seated left on low seat, holding rudder in right hand and cornucopiae in left.

27.37 gr.
32 mm.
okidoki
417_P_Hadrian_Emmett828.jpg
5434 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Tetradrachm 123-24 AD Canopic jar of Isis18 viewsReference.
Emmett 828.8; Dattari 1310; Köln 851; Milne 1051: RPC III, 5434

Issue L H = year 8

Obv. AVT KAIC TPAINA∆PIANOC CEB
Laureate head right, aegis at shoulder.

Rev. L-H date across field
Canopic jar of Isis wearing headdress

12.79 gr

Note.
Isis
Goddess of health, marriage, and wisdom
okidoki
1157Hadrian_RIC557.jpg
557 Hadrian Dupondius Roma 118 AD Fortuna10 viewsReference.
RIC 557 var. (no balteus);Spink 3663; C. 757

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG.
Radiate bust right, heroically nude bust right, baldric (sword) strap around neck and across chest, loop on shoulder, seen from front

Rev. PONT MAX TR POT COS II / S - C / FORT RED.
Fortuna seated left on throne, holding cornucopia and rudder.

12.39 gr
26 mm
6h
okidoki
55Hadrian__RIC561a.jpg
561 Hadrian Sestertius, Roma 119-22 AD Jupiter51 viewsReference.
RIC 561a

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate, bust right, baldric (sword) strap around neck and across chest, loop on shoulder, seen from front.

Rev. PONT MAX TR POT COS III / S C (in excerque)
Jupiter seated left, holding Victory and sceptre

27.3 gr
35 mm
okidoki
217_P_Hadrian__Emmett_1176_10_R2.jpg
5633 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Dichalkon 125-26 AD Bundle of three grain-ears.25 viewsReference.
Emmett 1176.10; BMC 591; RPC III, 5633; Köln -; Dattari -; Milne -; Kampmann & Ganschow

Issue L ΔΕ = year 10

Obv. -
Laureate head of Hadrian right I before

Rev. across field, date L-ΔE
Bundle of three grain-ears.

1.49 gr
12 mm
12h
okidoki
256_P_Hadrian__Emmett_852_14.jpg
5737 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Tetradrachm 129-30 AD Helios41 viewsReference.
Emmett 852.14; Köln 1002; Dattari 1384; Milne 1280; Curtis 429; RPC III, 5737

Issue L IΔ = year 14

Obv. AVT KAI TPAI AΔPIA CEB
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.

Rev. L-IΔ date across field.
Radiate and draped bust right of Helios; wearing a paludamentum

13.28 gr
25 mm
6h
3 commentsokidoki
346_P_Hadrian_Emmett888.jpg
5770 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Tetradrachm 130-31 AD Sabina33 viewsReference.
Emmett 888.15 (R5); Köln 1030 var. (placement of date); Dattari (Savio) 1260; K&G 32.507; RPC III, 5770

Issue L IE = year 15

Obv. AVT KAI TPAI AΔPIA CEB
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.

Rev. CABEINA CEBACTH L I-E (date) across field.
Sabina seated left, holding two grain ears and scepter.

12.33 gr
23 mm
12h
Rare Depiction of Sabina Enthroned
2 commentsokidoki
433_P_Hadrian_Emmett1082.jpg
5784 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Hemidrachm 130-31 AD Hadrian standing18 viewsReference.
Emmett 1082.15; Köln 1033; Dattari (Savio) 1581; K&G 32.512; RPC III, 5784

Issue L IE = year 15

Obv. AVT KAI TPAI A∆PIA CEB
Laureate , draped, and cuirassed bust right seen from behind.

Rev. L I E (date) across upper field.
Hadrian, veiled and togate, standing left, holding patera over lighted altar in right hand, scepter in left.

15.72 gr
31 mm
12h
okidoki
1350_P_Hadrian_RPC5784_21.jpg
5784 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Hemidrachm 130-31 AD Hadrian standing5 viewsReference.
Emmett 1082.15; Köln 1033; Dattari-Savio Pl. 73, 1581; K&G 32.512; RPC III, 5784/21

Issue L IE = year 15

Obv. AVT KAI TPAI A∆PIA CEB
Laureate , draped, and cuirassed bust right seen from behind.

Rev. L I E (date) across upper field.
Hadrian, veiled and togate, standing left, holding patera over lighted altar in right hand, scepter in left.

14.48 gr
30.4 mm
12h
okidoki
65_P_Hadrian_Emmett_1038.jpg
5813 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Diobol 131-32 AD Isis as mother31 viewsReference.
Emmett 1138.16 Köln 1046; K&G 32.530; RPC III, 5813

Issue L IϚ = year 16

Obv. AVT KAI TPAI AΔPIA CEB
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Rev. L Iς (date) across field.
Isis enthroned right, nursing Harpocrates, holding a lotus bud

10.47 gr
24 mm
12h
okidoki
634_P_Hadrian_Emmett933_18.jpg
5881 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Drachm 133-34 AD Canopi facing31 viewsReference.
Emmett 933.18; RPC III, 5881; Dattari 1662

Issue L IH = year 18

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СƐΒ
Laureate draped and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r., seen from rear

Rev. L I H across fields
Two Canopi jars

24.28 gr
32 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
154Hadrian__RIC604.jpg
604 Hadrian Dupondius Roma 119-21 AD Salus standing32 viewsReference.
RIC 604a; C. 1358

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG P M TR P COS III
radiate bust of Hadrian right, slight drapery on far shoulder, seen from front.

Rev. SALVS PVBLICA, S C across field
Salus standing left, with foot on globe, holding patera and rudder.

9.93 gr
25 mm
6 h

Ex Charles Darrah Collection of Flavian and Antonine Bronzes
okidoki
coin566.JPG
604a. Leo I and Verina326 viewsAelia Verina (died 484) was the wife of Byzantine emperor Leo I, and the mother-in-law of Zeno, who was married to her daughter Ariadne.

Her origins are unknown. She originally supported Zeno while the young emperor Leo II was still alive, but after Leo II's death in 474 she turned against her son-in-law. She conspired against him with her lover Patricius, her brother Basiliscus, the Isaurian general Illus, and general Theodoric Strabo, forcing Zeno to flee Constantinople in 475. Basiliscus then briefly became the rival emperor, until 476 when Verina reconciled with Zeno.

Verina then conspired against Illus, who discovered the plot, and with Zeno's consent had her imprisoned. This led to another conspiracy led by Verina's son Marcian (a grandson of the emperor Marcian), but Marcian was defeated and exiled.

In 483 Zeno asked Illus to release Verina, but by now Illus was opposed to Zeno's Monophysite sympathies. Illus allied with Verina and declared a general named Leontius emperor, but Zeno defeated them as well. Illus and Verina fled to Isauria, where Verina died in 484.

Bronze AE4, RIC 713-718, obverse D N LE-O (or similar), Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Empress Verina standing facing holding cross on globe and transverse scepter, b - E across fields, From uncleaned pile

ecoli
153Hadrian__RIC610.jpg
610 Hadrian Sestertius, Roma 121-22 AD Ceres standing55 viewsReference.
Strack 573; RIC 610c; C 1075

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, seen from front

Rev. P M TR P COS III, S C across field.
Ceres standing, facing, head left, holding grain ears and torch.

26,13 gr
34 mm
6 h

From the Charles Darrah Collection of Flavian and Antonine Bronzes.
2 commentsokidoki
459_P_Hadrian.jpg
6256 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Obol 137-38 AD Harpocrates20 viewsReference.
Emmett 1161.22; Köln 1245-; Dattari 1738; RPC III, 6256

Issue L KB = year 22

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СƐΒ
Laureate bust of Hadrian right, slight drapery

Rev. L -[K]-B (date) across fields
Bust of Harpocrates right, slight drapery, wearing taenia and hem-hem crown; pomegranate before.

5.20 gr
18 mm
12 h
okidoki
6Hadrian_RIC688.jpg
688 Hadrian Semis, Roma 125-128 AD Lyre.22 viewsReference.
RIC 688; BMC 1359; Strack 625; van Heesch 148-9/6; CRS 31; McAlee 547; RPC III 3763

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right seen from the back

Rev. COS III,
Lyre; S-C across fields.

4.22 gr
19 mm
6h
okidoki
TiberiusTributePennyRICI30RSCII16aSRCV1763.jpg
703a, Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Tribute Penny of Matthew 22:20-2148 viewsSilver denarius, RIC I 30, RSC II 16a, SRCV 1763, gVF, Lugdunum mint, 3.837g, 18.7mm, 90o, 16 - 37 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM, Pax/Livia seated right holding scepter and branch, legs on chair ornamented, feet on footstool; toned. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Tiberius (A.D. 14-37)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

Introduction
The reign of Tiberius (b. 42 B.C., d. A.D. 37, emperor A.D. 14-37) is a particularly important one for the Principate, since it was the first occasion when the powers designed for Augustus alone were exercised by somebody else. In contrast to the approachable and tactful Augustus, Tiberius emerges from the sources as an enigmatic and darkly complex figure, intelligent and cunning, but given to bouts of severe depression and dark moods that had a great impact on his political career as well as his personal relationships.

. . . .

Early life (42-12 B.C.)
Tiberius Claudius Nero was born on 16 November 42 B.C. to Ti. Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla. Both parents were scions of the gens Claudia which had supplied leaders to the Roman Republic for many generations. . . [I]n 39 B.C., his mother Livia divorced Ti. Claudius Nero and married Octavian, thereby making the infant Tiberius the stepson of the future ruler of the Roman world. Forever afterward, Tiberius was to have his name coupled with this man, and always to his detriment.

. . . .

Accession and Early Reign (A.D. 14 - 23)
The accession of Tiberius proved intensely awkward. After Augustus had been buried and deified, and his will read and honored, the Senate convened on 18 September to inaugurate the new reign and officially "confirm" Tiberius as emperor. Such a transfer of power had never happened before, and nobody, including Tiberius, appears to have known what to do. Tacitus's account is the fullest. . . Rather than tactful, he came across to the senators as obdurate and obstructive. He declared that he was too old for the responsibilities of the Principate, said he did not want the job, and asked if he could just take one part of the government for himself. The Senate was confused, not knowing how to read his behavior. Finally, one senator asked pointedly, "Sire, for how long will you allow the State to be without a head?" Tiberius relented and accepted the powers voted to him, although he refused the title "Augustus."

. . . .

Tiberius allowed a trusted advisor to get too close and gain a tremendous influence over him. That advisor was the Praetorian Prefect, L. Aelius Sejanus, who would derail Tiberius's plans for the succession and drive the emperor farther into isolation, depression, and paranoia.

Sejanus (A.D. 23-31)
Sejanus hailed from Volsinii in Etruria. He and his father shared the Praetorian Prefecture until A.D. 15 when the father, L. Seius Strabo, was promoted to be Prefect of Egypt, the pinnacle of an equestrian career under the Principate. Sejanus, now sole Prefect of the Guard, enjoyed powerful connections to senatorial houses and had been a companion to Gaius Caesar on his mission to the East, 1 B.C. - A.D. 4. Through a combination of energetic efficiency, fawning sycophancy, and outward displays of loyalty, he gained the position of Tiberius's closest friend and advisor.

. . . .

[I]n a shocking and unexpected turn of events, [a] letter sent by Tiberius from Capri initially praised Sejanus extensively, and then suddenly denounced him as a traitor and demanded his arrest. Chaos ensued. Senators long allied with Sejanus headed for the exits, the others were confused -- was this a test of their loyalty? What did the emperor want them to do? -- but the Praetorian Guard, the very troops formerly under Sejanus's command but recently and secretly transferred to the command of Q. Sutorius Macro, arrested Sejanus, conveyed him to prison, and shortly afterwards executed him summarily. A witch-hunt followed. . . All around the city, grim scenes were played out, and as late as A.D. 33 a general massacre of all those still in custody took place.

Tiberius himself later claimed that he turned on Sejanus because he had been alerted to Sejanus's plot against Germanicus's family. This explanation has been rejected by most ancient and modern authorities, since Sejanus's demise did nothing to alleviate that family's troubles.

. . . .

The Last Years (A.D. 31-37)
The Sejanus affair appears to have greatly depressed Tiberius. A close friend and confidant had betrayed him; whom could he trust anymore? His withdrawal from public life seemed more complete in the last years. Letters kept him in touch with Rome, but it was the machinery of the Augustan administration that kept the empire running smoothly. Tiberius, if we believe our sources, spent much of his time indulging his perversities on Capri.

. . . .

Tiberius died quietly in a villa at Misenum on 16 March A.D. 37. He was 78 years old. There are some hints in the sources of the hand of Caligula in the deed, but such innuendo can be expected at the death of an emperor, especially when his successor proved so depraved. The level of unpopularity Tiberius had achieved by the time of his death with both the upper and lower classes is revealed by these facts: the Senate refused to vote him divine honors, and mobs filled the streets yelling "To the Tiber with Tiberius!" (in reference to a method of disposal reserved for the corpses of criminals).

Tiberius and the Empire
Three main aspects of Tiberius's impact on the empire deserve special attention: his relative military inertia; his modesty in dealing with offers of divine honors and his fair treatment of provincials; and his use of the Law of Treason (maiestas).

. . . .

Conclusion
. . . Tiberius's reign sporadically descended into tyranny of the worst sort. In the right climate of paranoia and suspicion, widespread denunciation led to the deaths of dozens of Senators and equestrians, as well as numerous members of the imperial house. In this sense, the reign of Tiberius decisively ended the Augustan illusion of "the Republic Restored" and shone some light into the future of the Principate, revealing that which was both promising and terrifying.

[For the entire article please refer to http://www.roman-emperors.org/tiberius.htm]

Copyright © 1997, Garrett G. Fagan. Used by permission.

"Some of the things he did are hard to believe. He had little boys trained as minnows to chase him when he went swimming and to get between his legs and nibble him. He also had babies not weaned from their mother breast suck at his chest and groin . . . "
(Suetonius. The Twelve Caesars. Trans. Robert Graves. London: Penguin Books, 1979. XLIV).

Jesus, referring to a "penny" asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible(Joseph Sermarini).


Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
TiberiusHierapolis.jpg
703b, Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia107 viewsBronze AE 16, RPC I 2966 (1 specimen), F, Phrygia, Hierapolis, 3.300g, 15.6mm, 0o; Obverse: TIBEPIOC KAISAR, laureate head right; Reverse: IERAPOLEITWN ZOSIMOS [...], Apollo Archegetes (Lairbenos) standing left, playing lyre; reverse countermarked with star of six rays, in oval punch, 2.5 x 3.5 mm, Howgego 445 (3 pcs, 1 of which from this magistrate); dark patina; very rare. Ex FORVM.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

TIBERIUS (A.D. 14-37)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

The reign of Tiberius Claudius Nero (b. 42 B.C., d. A.D. 37, emperor A.D. 14-37) is a particularly important one for the Principate, since it was the first occasion when the powers designed for Augustus alone were exercised by somebody else. In contrast to the approachable and tactful Augustus, Tiberius emerges from the sources as an enigmatic and darkly complex figure, intelligent and cunning, but given to bouts of severe depression and dark moods that had a great impact on his political career as well as his personal relationships. His reign abounds in contradictions. Despite his keen intelligence, he allowed himself to come under the influence of unscrupulous men who, as much as any actions of his own, ensured that Tiberius's posthumous reputation would be unfavorable; despite his vast military experience, he oversaw the conquest of no new region for the empire; and despite his administrative abilities he showed such reluctance in running the state as to retire entirely from Rome and live out his last years in isolation on the island of Capri. His reign represents, as it were, the adolescence of the Principate as an institution. Like any adolescence, it proved a difficult time.

. . . .

It is all but inevitable that any historical assessment of Tiberius will quickly devolve into a historiographical assessment of Tacitus. So masterful is Tacitus's portrayal of his subject, and so influential has it been ever since, that in all modern treatments of Tiberius, in attempting to get at the man, must address the issue of Tacitus's historiographical methods, his sources, and his rhetoric. The subject is too vast to address here, but some points are salient. Tacitus's methods, especially his use of innuendo and inference to convey notions that are essentially editorial glosses, makes taking his portrayal of Tiberius at face value inadvisable. Further, his belief in the immutable character of people -- that one's character is innate at birth and cannot be changed, although it can be disguised -- prevents him from investigating the possibility that Tiberius evolved and developed over his lifetime and during his reign. Instead, Tacitus's portrayal is one of peeling back layers of dissimulation to reach the "real" Tiberius lurking underneath.

Overall, Tiberius's reign can be said to show the boons and banes of rule by one man, especially a man as dark, awkward, and isolated as Tiberius. For the people of the provinces, it was a peaceful and well-ordered time. Governors behaved themselves, and there were no destructive or expensive wars. In the domestic sphere, however, the concentration of power in one person made all the greater the threat of misbehavior by ambitious satellites like Sejanus or foolish friends like Piso. Furthermore, if the emperor wished to remain aloof from the mechanics of power, he could do so. Administrators, who depended on him for their directions, could operate without his immediate supervision, but their dealings with a man like Sejanus could lead to disaster if that man fell from grace. As a result, although he was not a tyrant himself, Tiberius's reign sporadically descended into tyranny of the worst sort. In the right climate of paranoia and suspicion, widespread denunciation led to the deaths of dozens of Senators and equestrians, as well as numerous members of the imperial house. In this sense, the reign of Tiberius decisively ended the Augustan illusion of "the Republic Restored" and shone some light into the future of the Principate, revealing that which was both promising and terrifying.

[For the complete article please refer to http://www.roman-emperors.org/tiberius.htm]

By Garrett G. Fagan, Pennsylvania State University.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.


Hierapolis in History

Usually said to be founded by Eumenes II, king of Pergamum (197-159 BC), Hierapolis may actually have been established closer to the 4th century BC by the Seleucid kings.

The name of the city may derive from Hiera, the wife of Telephus (son of Hercules and grandson of Zeus), the mythical founder of Pergamum. Or it may have been called the "sacred city" because of the temples located at the site. (The name Pamukkale is sometimes used just to refer to the white terraces, but the modern name of the whole area is also Pamukkale.)

With Colossae and Laodicea, Hierapolis became part of the tri-city area of the Lycus River valley. Hierapolis was located across the river from the other two cities and was noted for its textiles, especially wool. The city was also famous for its purple dye, made from the juice of the madder root.

The hot springs at Hierapolis (which still attract visitors today) were believed to have healing properties, and people came to the city to bathe in the rich mineral waters in order to cure various ailments.

Hierapolis was dedicated to Apollo Lairbenos, who was said to have founded the city. The Temple of Apollo that survives in ruins today dates from the 3rd century AD, but its foundations date from the Hellenistic period.

Also worshipped at Hierapolis was Pluto, god of the underworld, probably in relation to the hot gases released by the earth (see the Plutonium, below). The chief religious festival of ancient Hierapolis was the Letoia, in honor of the the goddess Leto, a Greek form of the Mother Goddess. The goddess was honoured with orgiastic rites.

Hierapolis was ceded to Rome in 133 BC along with the rest of the Pergamene kingdom, and became part of the Roman province of Asia. The city was destroyed by an earthquake in 60 AD but rebuilt, and it reached its peak in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD.

Famous natives of Hierapolis include the Stoic philosopher Epictetus (c.55-c.135 AD) and the philosopher and rhetorician Antipater. Emperor Septimus hired Antipater to tutor his sons Caracalla and Geta, who became emperors themselves.

Hierapolis had a significant Jewish population in ancient times, as evidence by numerous inscriptions on tombs and elsewhere in the city. Some of the Jews are named as members of the various craft guilds of the city. This was probably the basis for the Christian conversion of some residents of Hierapolis, recorded in Colossians 4:13.

In the 5th century, several churches as well as a large martyrium dedicated to St. Philip (see "In the Bible," below) were built in Hierapolis. The city fell into decline in the 6th century, and the site became partially submerged under water and deposits of travertine. It was finally abandoned in 1334 after an earthquake. Excavations began to uncover Hierapolis in the 19th century.

Hierapolis in the Bible

Hierapolis is mentioned only once in the Bible, when St. Paul praises Epaphras, a Christian from Colossae, in his letter to the Colossians. Paul writes that Epaphras "has worked hard for you and for those in Laodicea and in Hierapolis" (Colossians 4:12-13). Epaphras was probably the founder of the Christian community at Hierapolis.

Ancient tradition also associates Hierapolis with a biblical figure, reporting that Philip died in Hierapolis around 80 AD. However, it is not clear which Philip is menat. It could be Philip the Apostle, one of the original 12 disciples, who is said to have been martyred by upside-down crucifixion (Acts of Philip) or by being hung upside down by his ankles from a tree.

Or Philip could be Philip the Evangelist, a later disciple who helped with administrative matters and had four virgin-prophetess daughters (Acts 6:1-7; 21:8-9). Early traditions say this Philip was buried in Hierapolis along with his virgin daughters, but confusingly call him "Philip the Apostle"! In any case, it seems a prominent person mentioned in Acts did die in Hierapolis.
http://www.sacred-destinations.com/turkey/hierapolis-pamukkale.htm

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
CaligulaSmyrnaRPC2473.jpg
704a, Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D.101 viewsCaligula, 37 - 41 AD, Ionia, Smyrna. AE 17mm. Klose, Smyrna 27a. RPC 2473. 2.89 gm. Fine. Menophanes, Aviola, Procos, 37-38 AD. Obverse: AION, laureate head right; Reverse: Nike holding wreath right. Ex Tom Vossen.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

GAIUS (CALIGULA) (A.D. 37-41)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

Gaius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (Caligula) was born on 31 August, A.D. 12, probably at the Julio-Claudian resort of Antium (modern Anzio), the third of six children born to Augustus's adopted grandson, Germanicus, and Augustus's granddaughter, Agrippina. Caligula was the Roman Emperor between A.D. 37-41). Unfortunately, his is the most poorly documented reign of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. The literary sources for these four years are meager, frequently anecdotal, and universally hostile.[[1]] As a result, not only are many of the events of the reign unclear, but Gaius himself appears more as a caricature than a real person, a crazed megalomaniac given to capricious cruelty. Although some headway can be made in disentangling truth from embellishment, the true character of the youthful emperor will forever elude us.

As a baby he accompanied his parents on military campaigns in the north and was shown to the troops wearing a miniature soldier's outfit, including the hob-nailed sandal called caliga, whence the nickname by which posterity remembers him. His childhood was not a happy one, spent amid an atmosphere of paranoia, suspicion, and murder. Instability within the Julio-Claudian house, generated by uncertainty over the succession, led to a series of personal tragedies.

When Tiberius died on 16 March A.D. 37, Gaius was in a perfect position to assume power, despite the obstacle of Tiberius's will, which named him and his cousin Tiberius Gemellus joint heirs. (Gemellus's life was shortened considerably by this bequest, since Gaius ordered him killed within a matter of months.) Backed by the Praetorian Prefect Q. Sutorius Macro, Gaius asserted his dominance. He had Tiberius's will declared null and void on grounds of insanity, accepted the powers of the Principate as conferred by the Senate, and entered Rome on 28 March amid scenes of wild rejoicing. His first acts were generous in spirit: he paid Tiberius's bequests and gave a cash bonus to the Praetorian Guard, the first recorded donativum to troops in imperial history.

The ancient sources are practically unanimous as to the cause of Gaius's downfall: he was insane. The writers differ as to how this condition came about, but all agree that after his good start Gaius began to behave in an openly autocratic manner, even a crazed one. The sources describe his incestuous relations with his sisters, laughable military campaigns in the north, the building of a pontoon bridge across the Bay at Baiae, and the plan to make his horse a consul. Their unanimous hostility renders their testimony suspect, especially since Gaius's reported behavior fits remarkably well with that of the ancient tyrant, a literary type enshrined in Greco-Roman tradition centuries before his reign. Further, the only eye-witness account of Gaius's behavior, Philo's Embassy to Gaius, offers little evidence of outright insanity, despite the antagonism of the author, whom Gaius treated with the utmost disrespect.

The conspiracy that ended Gaius's life was hatched among the officers of the Praetorian Guard, apparently for purely personal reasons. It appears also to have had the support of some senators and an imperial freedman. As with conspiracies in general, there are suspicions that the plot was more broad-based than the sources intimate, and it may even have enjoyed the support of the next emperor Claudius, but these propositions are not provable on available evidence. On 24 January A.D. 41 the praetorian tribune Cassius Chaerea and other guardsmen caught Gaius alone in a secluded palace corridor and cut him down. He was 28 years old and had ruled three years and ten months.

Whatever damage Tiberius's later years had done to the carefully crafted political edifice created by Augustus, Gaius multiplied it a hundredfold. When he came to power in A.D. 37 Gaius had no administrative experience beyond his honorary quaestorship, and had spent an unhappy early life far from the public eye. He appears, once in power, to have realized the boundless scope of his authority and acted accordingly. For the elite, this situation proved intolerable and ensured the blackening of Caligula's name in the historical record they would dictate. The sensational and hostile nature of that record, however, should in no way trivialize Gaius's importance. His reign highlighted an inherent weakness in the Augustan Principate, now openly revealed for what it was -- a raw monarchy in which only the self-discipline of the incumbent acted as a restraint on his behavior. That the only means of retiring the wayward princes was murder marked another important revelation: Roman emperors could not relinquish their powers without simultaneously relinquishing their lives.

Copyright © 1997, Garrett G. Fagan.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Ancient Smyrna

The 5,000 year-old city of Izmir is one of the oldest cities of the Mediterranean basin. The original city was established in the third millennium BC (at present day Bayraklı), at which time it shared with Troy the most advanced culture in Anatolia.


Greek settlement is attested by the presence of pottery dating from about 1000 BC. In the first millennium BC Izmir, then known as Smyrna, ranked as one of the most important cities of the Ionian Federation. During this period, it is believed that the epic poet Homer resided here.

Lydian conquest of the city around 600 BC brought this golden age to an end. Smyrna was little more than a village throughout the Lydian and subsequent sixth century BC Persian rule. In the fourth century BC a new city was built on the slopes of Mt. Pagos (Kadifekale) during the reign of Alexander the Great. Smyrna's Roman period, beginning in the first century BC, was its second great era.

In the first century AD, Smyrna became one of the earliest centers of Christianity and it was one of the Seven Churches of Revelation. Both Revelation and the Martyrdom of Polycarp indicate the existence of a Jewish community in Smyrna as early as the 1st and 2nd centuries AD. The letter to the church at Smyrna in Revelation indicates that the Christians were spiritually "rich" and apparently in conflict with the Jews (2:9).

The origins of the Christian community there, which was established in the 1st century, are unknown. Ignatius of Antioch stopped at Smyrna on his way to martyrdom in Rome in 107 AD, and he sent a letter back to the Christians there from later in his journey. Smyrna's bishop, Polycarp, was burned at the stake in Smyrna's stadium around 156 AD.

Byzantine rule came in the fourth century and lasted until the Seljuk conquest in 11th century. In 1415, under Sultan Mehmed Çelebi, Smyrna became part of the Ottoman Empire.

The city earned its fame as one of the most important port cities of the world during the 17th to 19th centuries. The majority of its population were Greek but merchants of various origins (especially Greek, French, Italian, Dutch, Armenian, Sephardi and Jewish) transformed the city into a cosmopolitan portal of trade. During this period, the city was famous for its own brand of music (Smyrneika) as well as its wide range of products it exported to Europe (Smyrna/Sultana raisins, dried figs, carpets, etc.).

Today, Izmir is Turkey's third largest city and is nicknamed "the pearl of Aegean." It is widely regarded as the most Westernized city of Turkey in terms of values, ideology, gender roles, and lifestyle.
© 2005-08 Sacred Destinations. All rights reserved.
http://www.sacred-destinations.com/turkey/izmir-history.htm

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
CLAUD34LG.jpg
705a, Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D.62 viewsClaudius. 42-43 AD. AE As.
Claudius. 42-43 AD. AE As (29 mm, 10.87 g). Obverse: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head right; Reverse: CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI / S - C, Constantiae in military dress standing left, holding spear; RIC I, 111; aVF. Ex Imperial Coins.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

CLAUDIUS (41-54 A.D.)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

Ti. Claudius Nero Germanicus (b. 10 BC, d. 54 A.D.; emperor, 41-54 A.D.) was the third emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. His reign represents a turning point in the history of the Principate for a number of reasons, not the least for the manner of his accession and the implications it carried for the nature of the office. During his reign he promoted administrators who did not belong to the senatorial or equestrian classes, and was later vilified by authors who did. He followed Caesar in carrying Roman arms across the English Channel into Britain but, unlike his predecessor, he initiated the full-scale annexation of Britain as a province, which remains today the most closely studied corner of the Roman Empire. His relationships with his wives and children provide detailed insights into the perennial difficulties of the succession problem faced by all Roman Emperors. His final settlement in this regard was not lucky: he adopted his fourth wife's son, L. Domitius Ahenobarbus, who was to reign catastrophically as Nero and bring the dynasty to an end. Claudius's reign, therefore, was a mixture of successes and failures that leads into the last phase of the Julio-Claudian line.

Robert Graves' fictional characterization of Claudius as an essentially benign man with a keen intelligence has tended to dominate the wider public's view of this emperor. Close study of the sources, however, reveals a somewhat different kind of man. In addition to his scholarly and cautious nature, he had a cruel streak, as suggested by his addiction to gladiatorial games and his fondness for watching his defeated opponents executed. He conducted closed-door (in camera ) trials of leading citizens that frequently resulted in their ruin or deaths -- an unprecedented and tyrannical pattern of behavior. He had his wife Messalina executed, and he personally presided over a kangaroo court in the Praetorian Camp in which many of her hangers-on lost their lives. He abandoned his own son Britannicus to his fate and favored the advancement of Nero as his successor. While he cannot be blamed for the disastrous way Nero's rule turned out, he must take some responsibility for putting that most unsuitable youth on the throne. At the same time, his reign was marked by some notable successes: the invasion of Britain, stability and good government in the provinces, and successful management of client kingdoms. Claudius, then, is a more enigmatic figure than the other Julio-Claudian emperors: at once careful, intelligent, aware and respectful of tradition, but given to bouts of rage and cruelty, willing to sacrifice precedent to expediency, and utterly ruthless in his treatment of those who crossed him. Augustus's suspicion that there was more to the timid Claudius than met the eye was more than fully borne out by the events of his unexpected reign.

The possibility has to be entertained that Claudius was a far more active participant in his own elevation than traditional accounts let on. There is just reason to suspect that he may even have been involved in planning the murder of Gaius (Caligula). Merely minutes before the assassination of Gaius, Claudius had departed for lunch; this appears altogether too fortuitous. This possibility, however, must remain pure speculation, since the ancient evidence offers nothing explicit in the way of support. On the other hand, we can hardly expect them to, given the later pattern of events. The whole issue of Claudius's possible involvement in the death of Gaius and his own subsequent acclamation by the Praetorian Guard must, therefore, remain moot . . . yet intriguing

Copyright 1998, Garrett G. Fagan.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
Nero AE Sestertius.jpg
706a, Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.73 views6, Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D. AE setertius, Date: 66 AD; RIC I 516, 36.71 mm; 25.5 grams; aVF. Obverse: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG PONT MAX TR POT PP, Laureate bust right; Reverse: S C, ROMA, Roma seated left, exceptional portrait and full obverse legends. Ex Ancient Imports.

NERO (54-68 A.D.)

It is difficult for the modern student of history to realize just how popular Nero actually was, at least at the beginning of his reign. Rome looked upon her new Emperor with hope. He was the student of Seneca, and he had a sensitive nature. He loved art, music, literature, and theatre. He was also devoted to horses and horse racing—a devotion shared by many of his subjects. The plebs loved their new Emperor. As Professor of Classics Judith P. Hallett (University of Maryland, College Park) says, “It is not clear to me that Nero ever changed or that Nero ever grew-up, and that was both his strength and his weakness. Nero was an extraordinarily popular Emperor: he was like Elvis” (The Roman Empire in the First Century, III. Dir. Margaret Koval and Lyn Goldfarb. 2001. DVD. PBS/Warner Bros. 2003).

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University

Introduction and Sources
The five Julio-Claudian emperors are very different one from the other. Augustus dominates in prestige and achievement from the enormous impact he had upon the Roman state and his long service to Rome, during which he attained unrivaled auctoritas. Tiberius was clearly the only possible successor when Augustus died in AD 14, but, upon his death twenty-three years later, the next three were a peculiar mix of viciousness, arrogance, and inexperience. Gaius, better known as Caligula, is generally styled a monster, whose brief tenure did Rome no service. His successor Claudius, his uncle, was a capable man who served Rome well, but was condemned for being subject to his wives and freedmen. The last of the dynasty, Nero, reigned more than three times as long as Gaius, and the damage for which he was responsible to the state was correspondingly greater. An emperor who is well described by statements such as these, "But above all he was carried away by a craze for popularity and he was jealous of all who in any way stirred the feeling of the mob." and "What an artist the world is losing!" and who is above all remembered for crimes against his mother and the Christians was indeed a sad falling-off from the levels of Augustus and Tiberius. Few will argue that Nero does not rank as one of the worst emperors of all.

The prime sources for Nero's life and reign are Tacitus' Annales 12-16, Suetonius' Life of Nero, and Dio Cassius' Roman History 61-63, written in the early third century. Additional valuable material comes from inscriptions, coinage, papyri, and archaeology.


Early Life
He was born on December 15, 37, at Antium, the son of Cnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbusand Agrippina. Domitius was a member of an ancient noble family, consul in 32; Agrippina was the daughter of the popular Germanicus, who had died in 19, and Agrippina, daughter of Agrippa, Augustus' closest associate, and Julia, the emperor's daughter, and thus in direct descent from the first princeps. When the child was born, his uncle Gaius had only recently become emperor. The relationship between mother and uncle was difficult, and Agrippina suffered occasional humiliation. But the family survived the short reign of the "crazy" emperor, and when he was assassinated, it chanced that Agrippina's uncle, Claudius, was the chosen of the praetorian guard, although there may have been a conspiracy to accomplish this.

Ahenobarbus had died in 40, so the son was now the resp