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Search results - "Venus"
DenGCesare-1.jpg
37 viewsC. IVLIVS CAESAR - Denarius - Mint in Africa - 47-46 B.C.
Ob.: Diademed head of Venus right
Rev.: Aeneas walking left, carrying Anchises and the Palladium. Behind CAESAR
gs. 3,6 mm 18,2
Cr458/1, Sear RCV 1402 Syd 1013.

Maxentius
DenLMemmioGaleriabis.jpg
23 viewsSerrate Denarius - 106 BC
L. MEMMIVS GALERIA - Gens Memmia
Obv.: Laureate head of Saturn left; ROMA and harpa behind
Rev,; Venus in biga right, Cupid flying above with laurel wreath, L MEMMI (ME in monogram) GAL in two lines in ex.
Gs. 3,82 mm. 17,2x17,8
Cr313/1a, Sear RCV 190.

Maxentius
DenSerratoCNevioBalbo.jpg
21 viewsSerrate Denarius - 79 BC.
C. NAEVIVS BALBVS - Gens Naevia
Obv.: Diademed head of Venus right, SC behind
Rev.: Victory in triga right; C NAE BALB (AE & AL in monogram) in ex.
Gs. 3,6 mm. 18,4
Crawford 382/1, Sear RCV 309



Maxentius
DenMnCordioRufobis.jpg
26 viewsDenarius - 46 BC.
MN. CORDIVS RVFVS - Gens Cordia
Obv.: Jugate heads of the Dioscuri right; stars above; RVFVS III VIR behind
Rev.: Venus stg. left, holding scales and sceptre; on her shoulder, Cupid. MN CORDIVS right.
Gs. 3,9 mm. 16x17,2
Craw. 463/1a; Sear RCV 440

Maxentius
PLAUTILLA-1.jpg
34 viewsPLAVTILLA - Denarius - 204 AD
Obv.:PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple & palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet.
Gs. 3,8 mm. 19,3x20
Cohen 25, RIC 369
Maxentius
DenCNorbano.jpg
52 viewsDenarius - 83/82 BC. - Mint of Rome
C. NORBANVS - Gens Norbana
Obv.: Diademed head of Venus right, C.NORBANUS below, numeral control mark behind
Rev.:Fasces with axe between caduceus & ear of corn.
Gs. 3,7 mm. 18,9x19,9
Craw.357/1b, Sear RCV 277, BMRRC 2770



1 commentsMaxentius
GValeria-1.jpg
14 viewsGALERIA VALERIA - Æ Follis - 309-310 AD. - Heraclea mint
Obv.: GAL VALERIA AVG, diademed & draped bust right
Rev.: VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple upwards and raising drapery. HTA in ex.
Gs. 6,7 mm. 25,3
Cohen 2, RIC 43
Maxentius
LucillaVenusDenarius.jpg
82 viewsLucilla denarius, standing Venus, mint state2 commentsmarandnumiz
FAUSTJR-2.jpg
53 viewsFAVSTINA II (wife of M. Aurelius) - As or Dupondius - 149/152 AD - Rome mint
Obv; FAVSTINA AVG ANTONINI AVG PII FIL, draped bust right
Rev: VENVS S C, Venus standing right, drawing back cloak over right shoulder and holding apple
Gms 11,1 mm 26,2
RIC 1410c Cohen 257
1 commentsMaxentius
Sabina.jpg
80 viewsSabina Augusta Hadriani Avg pp. Diad and draped bust r.Hair coiled and piled on top of head.REV No legend Venus stg.r.viewed partially from behind,holding helmet and spear and resting on column against which rest shield.Weight 3,30gr RIC 4123 commentsspikbjorn
Faustina_Sest_RIC_1081.jpg
17.5 Faustina20 viewsFAUSTINA I
AE Sestertius
FAVSTINA AVG ANTONINI AVG PII P P, draped bust right / VENERI AVGVSTAE S-C, Venus standing right drawing up robe from right shoulder and holding apple.
RIC 1081, Cohen 282, BMC 1120, Sear 4677
RI0090
Sosius
Julia_Domna_Den_RIC_388c.jpg
24.5 Julia Domna12 viewsJULIA DOMNA
AR Denarius. (3.2g), 216 AD

IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right / VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, extending right hand and holding sceptre in left.

RIC 388c [Caracalla], RSC 212, BMC 23B; VF
Ex. Ancient Roman Coins, Fort Collins, CO
Sosius
Julia_Soemias_RIC_241.jpg
29.4 Julia Soaemias12 viewsJulia Soaemias
Mother of Elagabalus
AR Denarius, 3.05g, AD 220

IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, draped bust right / VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre, star in field

RIC 241; C 8; RCV 7719
Ex Ancient Treasures
Sosius
Julia_Soaemias_Sear_2170.jpg
29.4 Julia Soaemias10 viewsROMAN IMPERIAL
Julia Soaemias
Mother of Elagabalus
AR Denarius, 3.05g, AD 220

IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, draped bust right / VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre, star in field

RIC 241; C 8; RCV 7719
Sosius
Julia_Soaemias_RIC_243~0.jpg
29.4 Julia Soaemias52 viewsJULIA SOAEMIAS,
AR denarius, Rome (2.8g)

IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, draped bust right / VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus diademed seated left on throne, apple in right, scepter in left, child at her feet

SRCV II 7720, RIC IV 243, RSC III 14 EF
Ex Blanchard & Co. - Control # 72454
3 commentsSosius
Gal_Valeria_Siscia_RIC_210_hwflip.jpg
4.5 Galeria Valeria24 viewsGALERIA VALERIA
AE Follis, Siscia, 310-311 AD

GAL VALERIA AVG, bust right, draped and diademed on crescent, wearing necklace, with facing shoulders / VENERI-VICTRICI, Venus standing facing, SIS in ex, crescent in l. field, epsilon in r. field.

RIC VI Siscia 211; Sear 14590. Fine, chipped flan.
Sosius
Magnia_Urbica_Ant_RIC_V_347_-_sm.jpg
8.5 Magnia Urbica43 viewsMagnia Urbica. Augusta, AD 283-285. Antoninianus (21mm, 2.17 g, 12h). Ticinum mint. 5th emission, August AD 283. Diademed and draped bust right, set on crescent / Venus standing left, holding helmet and scepter; shield at side; SXXIT. RIC V 347; Pink VI/2 p. 29. Good VF, green patina with partial silvering, earthen highlights.2 commentsSosius
pl369.jpg
Plautilla, Denarius, Rome 204 C.E. Wife of Caracalla16 viewsPlautilla ar denarius, Rome RIC IV 369. Struck 204 C.E.
Obverse - PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA. Draped bust right.
Reverse - VENVS VICTRIX. Venus standing left, breast exposed, holding apple and palm and resting left elbow on shield. Cupid standing left at her feet.
19.5 mm diam., 3.0 g. Scarce
sold 2-2018
NORMAN K
normal_Sabina_den.JPG
Sabina, wife of Hadrian, died 137 AD96 views
OBVERSE: SABINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in plait behind

REVERSE: VENERI GENTRICI, Venus standing right holding an apple

Size: 17mm - 3.4 grams
Marjan E
00013x00.jpg
36 viewsROME
PB Tessera (19mm, 2.71 g, 12 h)
Imperial issue (?)
Venus Victrix standing right, resting arm on cippus and holding transverse scepter and clasping hands with Mars, standing left
Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Rostowzew 153, pl. III 2; München 16-7; Kircheriano 572, 582, 738, and 741

Rostowzew places this with the "Tesserae capitibus et nominibus imperatorum signatae" on the basis of type. In my studies, I have noticed that many of the types bearing Imperial portraiture or names are much more finely engraved, often with a centering dot and pronounced rims.
Ardatirion
00008x00~0.jpg
12 viewsROME
PB Tessera (17mm, 5.32 g, 6 h)
Venus standing left, holding mirror and adjusting hair
Bunch of grapes
Rostowzew – (but cf. 484 for a similar type with Fortuna on the obverse)
Ardatirion
00015x00~0.jpg
16 viewsROME
PB Tessera (14mm, 2.22 g, 6h)
Venus standing right, holding mirror and adjusting hair
TRC
Rostowzew 3104
Ardatirion
DSC_0251.jpg
30 viewsROME
PB Tessera (18mm, 4.06 g, 1 h)
Venus standing left, holding mirror and adjusting hair; TIVS to right
Venus standing left, holding mirror and adjusting hair; palm frond to right
Rostowzew 3091, pl. VIII, 2; München 594

Ex Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 267, lot 685 (part of)
Ardatirion
DSC_6023.jpg
18 viewsROME
PB Tessera (13mm, 2.55 g, 12 h)
Venus Pudica standing facing, head left, raising arms to cover breast
Victory advancing right, holding palm frond
Rostowzew 3132; Rostowzew & Prou 325
Ardatirion
quadrans.jpg
106 viewsROME. temp. Hadrian-Antoninus Pius. Circa AD 120-161
Æ Quadrans (16mm, 2.94 g, 7h)
Rome mint
Petasus
Winged caduceus; S C flanking
Weigel 18; RIC II 32; Cohen 36

Weigel reconsiders the anonymous quadrantes as a cohesive group. The seriesportrays a pantheon of eleven deities: Jupiter, Minerva, Roma, Neptune, Tiber, Mars, Venus, Apollo, Mercury, Bacchus/Liber, and Hercules. Types are primarily a portrait of the god, with an attribute on the reverse and are usually influenced by (but not directly copied from) earlier designs, primarily from the Republic. He updates the series to the reigns of Hadrian and Antoninus.
5 commentsArdatirion
00022x00.jpg
53 viewsROME. temp. Domitian-Antoninus Pius. Circa AD 81-160
Æ Quadrans (16mm, 3.99 g, 12 h)
Rome mint
Griffin seated left, paw on wheel
Tripod; S C flanking
Weigel 15; RIC II 28; Cohen 38

Weigel reconsiders the anonymous quadrantes as a cohesive group. The seriesportrays a pantheon of eleven deities: Jupiter, Minerva, Roma, Neptune, Tiber, Mars, Venus, Apollo, Mercury, Bacchus/Liber, and Hercules. Types are primarily a portrait of the god, with an attribute on the reverse and are usually influenced by (but not directly copied from) earlier designs, primarily from the Republic. He updates the series to the reigns of Hadrian and Antoninus.
Ardatirion
juliuscombhoriz~0.jpg
(01) JULIUS CAESAR69 viewsJULIUS CAESAR
AR Denarius 18 - 20 mm 3.41 g
minted FEB-MAR 44 BC
O: LAUR HEAD RIGHT, STAR BEHIND
R: VENUS STANDING L HOLDING VICTORY AND SCEPTER WITH SHIELD
(P Sepullius Macer)
CRAWFORD 480/5b
(ex R. Suarez)
laney
sabina_venus.jpg
(0117) SABINA (B)11 views(wife of Hadrian) 117 - 137 AD
AE SESTERTIUS 33 mm 23.25 g
O: Draped diademed bust right, with hair up and coiled in bun
R: Venus standing right, drawing out fold of drapery and holding apple, S-C. RIC 1035 (Hadrian, CH 74); RARE
laney
faustina_jr_a.jpg
(0145) FAUSTINA II34 views(wife of Marcus Aurelius, mother of Commodus)
FAUSTINA JR.
128 - 175 AD
AE 25 mm 10 70 g
O:BUST R
R:VENUS STANDING L HOLDING VICTORY AND RESTING HAND ON SHIELD
laney
lucilla.jpg
(0161) LUCILLA36 views(wife of Lucius Verus; sister of Commodus)
Ca. 149 - 182 AD
AE SESTERTIUS 30 mm 19.78 g
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANT[ONINI AVG]
DRAPED BUST R
R: VEN[VS] SC
VENUS SEATED LEFT HOLDING VICTORY AND SCEPTER
ROME
BM 1176 COHEN 83
laney
plautilla.jpg
(0203) PLAUTILLA22 views(wife of Caracalla)
d. 211 AD
AR DENARIUS 2.05 mm max., 2.87 g
O: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA
DR. BUST RIGHT
R: VENVS VICTRIX
VENUS STANDING L HOLDING APPLE AND PALM, SHIELD AT SIDE, CUPID HOLDING HELMET AT FEET
laney
julia_soaem.jpg
(0218a) JULIA SOAEMIAS24 views(mother of Elagabalus)
218 - 222 AD (Augusta)
AR Denarius 17 mm 2.07 g
Obv: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, draped bust right.
Rev: VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated left holding apple and scepter, child standing before her.
Rome
RIC 243
laney
salonina_venus_a_res.jpg
(0253) SALONINA48 views(wife of Gallienus; mother of emperors Valerian II and Saloninus) 253 - 268 AD
struck 287 AD
Billon antoninianus 20.5 mm 3.57 g
Obverse: SALONINA AVG, Diademed, draped bust right, on crescent, hair weaved in rows with long plait up the back of head, under stephane.
Reverse: VENVS AVG, Venus standing left, holding helmet and spear, one arm resting on shield.
PXV in exe
Antioch
Unlisted in Sear, Van Meter #45, RSC #113, RIC 86.
1 commentslaney
GAL_VAL.jpg
(0308) GALERIA VALERIA22 views(2nd wife of Galerius; daughter of Diocletian)
308 - 310 AD
AE FOLLIS 24 mm
O: BUST R
R:VENERI VICTRICI
VENUS STANDING LEFT HOLDING APPLE AND RAISING DRAPERY OVER SHOULDER
laney
GAL_VAL_VENUS_RES.jpg
(0308) GALERIA VALERIA19 views(2nd wife of Galerius; daughter of Diocletian)
Struck 308 - 309 AD
AE 25 mm, 4.87 g
O: GAL VAL-ERIA AVG, Diademed draped bust right
R: VENERI V-ICTRICI, Venus standing left holding apple in right hand, and lifting her veil with left hand, Δ in left field; MKV in exe
Cyzicus RIC 46
laney
C_Norbanus_83BC_CR-3571b_Syd_739_Norbana_2.JPG
000. Republic, C Norbanus. AR Denarius. 83 BC. Norbana 2.124 viewsObv. Diademed head of Venus r C NORBANUS LXXVIIII
Rev. Ear of wheat, fasces and caduceus.
Rome, 83 BC. 3.88g. Cr-357/1b, Syd 739, Norbana 2.
ex-HJB
1 commentsLordBest
Caesar_AR-Den_Diademed-Venus-Head-Right_C·CAESAR_–_IMP·COS·ITER_A·ALLIENVS_–_PRO·COS_Syd-1022_Crawf_457-1_C-13_Sicily-mint_47-BC_Q-001_axis-9h_17-18,5mm_3,53g-s.jpg
001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 457-1, Sicily, AR-denarius, A·ALLIENVS–PRO·COS, Trinacrus standing left,232 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 457-1, Sicily, AR-denarius, A·ALLIENVS–PRO·COS, Trinacrus standing left,
avers:- C·CAESAR–IMP·COS·ITER, Diademed, draped Venus Head Right,
revers:- A·ALLIENVS–PRO·COS, Trinacrus standing left, placing right foot on prow, holding trisceles in right hand and cloak in left.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18,5mm, weight: 3,59g, axes: 6h,
mint: Sicily, date: 47B.C., ref: Crawford-457/1, Sydneham-1022, Babelon-Julia-14, Alliena-1, C-1,
Q-001
"In late 47 BC Caesar was on Sicily, preparing for his assault on the Pompeian forces in north Africa. During this period a small issue of denarii was produced in his name by Aulus Allienus, then the proconsul of Sicily. The reverse shows a figure of Trinacrus, supposedly a son of Neptune, who may have been invented to account for the name Trinacria, commonly used for Sicily. The coins of Allienus must have seen considerable circulation: almost all surviving specimens are considerably worn."
3 commentsquadrans
Caesar_AR-Den_Diademed-Venus-Head-Right_CAESAR_Syd-1013_Crawf_458-1_Aeneas_C-13_Africa-mint_47-46-BC_Q-001_axis-6h_16,5mm_3,59ga-s.jpg
001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 458-1, Africa, AR-denarius, CAESAR, Aeneas advancing left, #1103 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 458-1, Africa, AR-denarius, CAESAR, Aeneas advancing left, #1
avers:- Diademed Venus Head Right,
revers:- CAESAR, Aeneas advancing left, holding palladium and carrying Anchises on his shoulder.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5-17mm, weight: 3,59g, axes: 6h,
mint: Military mint travelling with Caesar in North Africa, date: 47-46 B.C., ref: Crawford-458/1, Sydneham-1013,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Caesar_AR-Den_Diademed-Venus-Head-Right_CAESAR_Syd-1013_Crawf_458-1_Aeneas_C-13_Africa-mint_47-46-BC_Q-002_axis-6h_16,5mm_3,33ga-s.jpg
001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 458-1, Africa, AR-denarius, CAESAR, Aeneas advancing left, #290 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 458-1, Africa, AR-denarius, CAESAR, Aeneas advancing left, #2
avers:- Diademed Venus Head Right,
revers:- CAESAR, Aeneas advancing left, holding palladium and carrying Anchises on his shoulder.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5mm, weight: 3,33g, axes: 6h,
mint: Military mint travelling with Caesar in North Africa, date: 47-46 B.C., ref: Crawford-458/1, Sydneham-1013,
Q-002
quadrans
Caesar_AR-Den_Diademed-Venus-Head-Right_CAESAR_Syd-1013_Crawf_458-1_Aeneas_C-13_Africa-mint_47-46-BC_Q-003_axis-6h_17-19mm_3,23g-s.jpg
001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 458-1, Africa, AR-denarius, CAESAR, Aeneas advancing left, #3107 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 458-1, Africa, AR-denarius, CAESAR, Aeneas advancing left, #3
avers:- Diademed Venus Head Right,
revers:- CAESAR, Aeneas advancing left, holding palladium and carrying Anchises on his shoulder.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-19mm, weight: 3,23g, axes: 6h,
mint: Military mint travelling with Caesar in North Africa, date: 47-46 B.C., ref: Crawford-458/1, Sydneham-1013,
Q-003
quadrans
Caesar_AR-Den_Diademed-Venus-Head-Right_CAESAR_Syd-1014_Crawf_468-1_C-13_Spanish-mint_46-45-BC_Q-001_axis-7h_xxmm_x,xxxg-s.jpg
001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 468-1, Spanish, AR-denarius, CAESAR, Gallia and Gaulish captive seated,366 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 468-1, Spanish, AR-denarius, CAESAR, Gallia and Gaulish captive seated,
avers: No legends, Diademed head of Venus right, Cupid on her shoulder.
revers: Gallia and Gaulish captive seated beneath trophy of Gallic arms, CAESAR below.
exerg: -/-//CAESAR, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,92g, axes: 5h,
mint: Spanish, date: 46-45 B.C., ref: Crawford-468/1, Sydneham-1014,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Sulla_denaroius_new.jpeg
001 Sulla AR Denarius17 viewsL.Sulla. 84-83 BC. AR Denarius
(3.34 g).
Obv: Diademed head of Venus right; cupid with long palm branch before
Rev: Capis and lituus between two trophies.
Cr359/2; Syd 761; Cornelia 30
Forum Ancient Coins Member auctions September 2017
orfew
0062.jpg
0062 - Denarius Cordia 46 BC31 viewsObv/Conjoined heads of the Dioscuri with pilei, r., with star atop; behind, RVFVS III VIR.
Rev/MN CORDIVS, Venus (Aequitas?) standing l., holding scales & scepter.

Ag, 18.9mm, 3.52g
Moneyer: Mn. Cordius Rufus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 463/1a [dies o/r: 549/610 (1a+1b)] - RCV 440 - Syd. 976-976a - RSC Cordia 1-2c - Sear (Imp.) 63-63a -Calicó 465.
ex-Spink, auction march 2008, lot 994 (ex-Glendining, auction april 1976, lot 140)
dafnis
0098.jpg
0098 - Denarius Julia Domna 193-6 AC19 viewsObv/ IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust r.
Rev/ VENERI VICTR, Venus, seen from behind, naked to below the buttocks, holding palm and apple, resting left elbow on column.

Ag, 18.6 mm, 3.27 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC IV.1/536 - BMCRE V/49
ex-Freeman & Sear, e-auction feb 2011, lot #KALA1292 064
1 commentsdafnis
2620274.jpg
01 Julius Caesar, Captives19 viewsJulius Caesar. AR Denarius. Military mint traveling with Caesar in Spain. c. 46-45 B.C. (3.71g, 19.5mm, 6h). Obv: Diademed head of Venus right, Cupid on shoulder. Rev: Gallia seated in attitude of mourning and a Gaulish male captive, hands bound, seated beneath trophy, possibly Vercingetorix. CAESAR in Exergue. RSC 13. Craw. 468/1.

This type was minted during Caesar’s final campaign against Pompeian forces in Spain. The obverse refers to Caesar's mythical descent from the goddess Venus. The reverse refers to Caesar's victories in Gaul and the male Gaulish captive may be Vercingetorix. Not perfect, but well centered, a good state of preservation, with a clear CAESAR on the reverse.
Lucas H
Julius_Caesar_RSC_12.jpg
01 Julius Caesar, Venus39 viewsJulius Caesar. AR Denarius. Military mint traveling with Caesar in North Africa c. 47-46B.C. (3.88, 19.2mm, 6h). Obv: Diademed head of Venus right. Rev: CAESAR, Aeneas walking left, carrying Anchises and the Palladium. Craw. 458/1. RSC 12, Sear RCV 1402.

Minted to pay his legends during their African campaign against the Pomeians, this coin harkens to Caesar’s mythical origin from Venus. Aeneas, a survivor of Troy, was the son of Aphrodite’s liaison with the mortal Anchises. Aeneas lead a group of survivors, the Aeneads, ultimately to the Italian peninsula.
1 commentsLucas H
juliuscombhoriz.jpg
01. JULIUS CAESAR55 viewsAR Denarius 18 - 20 mm 3.41 g
minted FEB-MAR 44 BC
O: LAUR HEAD RIGHT, STAR BEHIND
R: VENUS STANDING L HOLDING VICTORY AND SCEPTER WITH SHIELD
(P Sepullius Macer)
CRAWFORD 480/5b
(ex R. Suarez)
2 commentslaney
0112.jpg
0112 - Denarius Julia Domna 211-17 AC12 viewsObv/ Draped bust of J.D. r.
Rev/ VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated l., extending r.h. and holding scepter in her l.

Ag, 19.2 mm, 3.15 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/26 – RIC IV.1/388c [C]
ex-VEA, auction 6, lot 75
dafnis
0116.JPG
0116 - Denarius Octavian 32-29 BC33 viewsObv/ Head of Venus r., wearing diadem.
Rev/ CAESAR DIVI F, Octavian l., in military dress, cloak flying behind, holding spear.

Ag, 20.2 mm, 3.51 g
Mint: Italy (Brundisium or Roma?)
RIC I/251 [S]
ex-Nomisma, auction e2, lot 18
dafnis
0122.jpg
0122 - Denarius Gordian III 241 AC19 viewsObv/ IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of G. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing half-l., leaning on shield, holding helmet and transverse scepter.

Ag, 19.9 mm, 3.45 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC VI/131 [R]
ex-Roma Numismatics, jul 2011 – art. #12264
dafnis
0123.jpg
0123 - Denarius Julia Domna 196-211 AC15 viewsObv/ IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of J.D. r.
Rev/ VENVS FELIX, Venus standing facing, head l., holding apple in r.h. and drawing drapery from shoulder.

Ag, 19.0 mm, 2.82 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/88 – RIC IV.1/580 [S]
ex-Roma Numismatics, jul 2011 – art. #12335
1 commentsdafnis
0127.jpg
0127 - Denarius Lucilla 166-9 AC16 viewsObv/ LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of L. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., holding Victory and leaning on shield.

Ag, 19.1 mm, 3.13 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC III/786 [C]
ex-J.B. González Redondo (denarios.org), jul 2011
dafnis
0128.jpg
0128 - Denarius Severina 270-5 AC10 viewsObv/ SEVERINA AVG, draped bust of S. r., wearing diadem.
Rev/ VENV(S) FELIX, Venus standing l., holding seated figure (Cupid?) and long scepter.

AE, 19.5 mm, 2.63 g
Mint: Roma (5th officina).
RIC V.1/6 [C]
ex-J.B. González Redondo (denarios.org), jul 2011
dafnis
0129.jpg
0129 - Antoninianus Gallienus 120-8 AC11 viewsObv/ GALLIENVS AVG, radiated and draped bust of G. r.
Rev/ VENRI VICTRICI, Venus standing l., holding helmet and spear, leaning on shield.

AE, 22.9 mm, 3.07 g
Mint: Asia.
RIC V.1/660 [C]
ex-Rusty Romans (vcoins), jul 2011
dafnis
0131.jpg
0131 - Denarius Julia Mamaea 222-35 AC12 viewsObv/ IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust of J.M. r., wearing diadem.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., holding helmet and scepter; shield at her l.

Ag, 20.2 mm, 3.10 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC IV.2/358 [C]
ex-Áureo & Calicó, auction jul 2011, lot 108
dafnis
0135.jpg
0135 - Antoninianus Salonina 267 AC18 viewsObv/ SALONINA AVG, draped bust of S. r., wearing diadem; crescent below.
Rev/ VENVS AVG, Venus standing l., holding helmet and spear, leaning on shield; PX(V) in ex.

AE, 20.2 mm, 4.12 g
Mint: Roma (5th officina).
RIC V.1/86 [C]
ex-J.B. González Redondo (denarios.org), jul 2011
dafnis
0136.jpg
0136 - Nummus Galeria Valeria 308 AC15 viewsObv/ GAL VAL-ERIA AVG, draped bust of G.V. r., wearing diadem.
Rev/ VENERI V-ICTRICI, Venus standing facing, head l., holding apple in upraised r. hand and raising drapery over l. shoulder; mint symbol Γ in filed; in ex., ANT.

AE, 24.5 mm, 7.08 g
Mint: Antioch.
RIC VI/84 [S]
ex-J.B. González Redondo (denarios.org), jul 2011
dafnis
0137.jpg
0137 - Denarius Julia Mamaea 222-35 AC16 viewsObv/ IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed and draped bust of J.M. r.
Rev/ VENERI FELICI, Venus standing r., holding Cupid and scepter.

Ag, 19.7 mm, 2.82 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC IV.2/351 [C]
ex-Numismatik Lanz, eBay jul 2011 - art. #230637829841
dafnis
0138.jpg
0138 - Denarius Julia Domna 196-211 AC11 viewsObv/ IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of J.D. r.
Rev/ VENVS GENETRICI, Venus standing l., holding patera and scepter.

Ag, 18.2 mm, 3.35 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/84 – RIC IV.1/578 [S]
ex-Numismatik Lanz, eBay jul 2011 - art. #300575544711
dafnis
0141.jpg
0141 - Denarius Julia 103 BC32 viewsObv/ Helmeted head of Mars r.; above, control mark C; behind, CAESAR.
Rev/ Venus in biga of Cupids l., holding sceptre and reins; above control mark C; below, lyre; L IVLI L F in ex.

Ag, 17.0 mm, 4.09 g
Mint: Roma.
Moneyer: L. Iulius Caesar.
RRC 320/1 [dies o/r: 92/92] - Syd. 593a - RSC Julia 4
ex-Artemide Aste, auction 9E, lot 9194
dafnis
0142.jpg
0142 - Denarius Caracalla 213-17 AC14 viewsObv/ ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head of C. r.
Rev/ VENUS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., draped, r. breast naked, holding Victory and transverse scepter, leaning l. shoulder on shield over helmet on ground.

Ag, 20.8 mm, 3.10 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/85 – RIC IV.1/311b [C]
ex-Global Aste, auction 5, lot 248
dafnis
0144.jpg
0144 - Antoninianus Julia Domna 211-17 AC17 viewsObv/ IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust of J.D. r., crescent below.
Rev/ VENVS GENETRIX, Venus draped, seated l., r.h. extended and l.h. holding scepter.

Ag, 23.0 mm, 4.58 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/23A – RIC IV.1/388a [S]
ex-J.B. González Redondo (denarios.org), jul 2011
dafnis
Caesar-Syd-1014.jpg
015. C. Julius Caesar.13 viewsDenarius, 46-45 BC, probably minted in Gaul or Spain.
Obverse: Bust of Venus, Cupid at her shoulder.
Reverse: CAESAR / Gaulish captives sitting under a trophy.
3.83 gm., 18.5 mm.
Syd. #1014; RSC #13; Sear #1404.
Callimachus
0151.jpg
0151 - Denarius Julia Domna 196-211 AC11 viewsObv/ IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of J.D. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., holding helmet on extended r.h. and palm on l.h., leaning arm on column; to the l., shield on the ground.

Ag, 20.0 mm, 3.34 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/90 – RIC IV.1/581 [C]
ex-Numismatik Lanz, eBay jul 2011 - art. #230650283511
dafnis
0157.jpg
0157 - Antoninianus Caracalla 213-17 AC25 viewsObv/ ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiated and togate bust of C. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., hlding helmet and scepter, leaning on shield; captives to the l. and r.

Ag, 24.9 mm, 5.04 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/86 – RIC IV.1/312a [S]
ex-Auctiones, auction e2, lot 102 (T.Kunsch Caracalla colln.)
dafnis
0159.jpg
0159 - Denarius Plautilla 202-5 AC17 viewsObv/ PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of P. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus naked to waist, holding apple and palm, leaning on shield; to the l., Cupid holding helmet.

Ag, 19.1 mm, 3.31 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/429 – RIC IV.1/369 [S]
ex-CNG, auction e272, lot 390
dafnis
0164.jpg
0164 - Denarius Norbana 83 BC102 viewsObv/ Diademed head of Venus r.; behind, control mark CL; below, C NORBANVS.
Rev/ Corn ear, fasces with axe and caduceus.

Ag, 19.0 mm, 3.89 g
Moneyer: C.Norbanus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 357/1b [dies o/r: 156/173 (all var.)] - Syd. 739 - RSC Norbana 2
ex-Auctiones, auction e3, lot 106 (ex-De La Tour colln., Hess-Divo, auction 314, lot 1350) (ex-Varesi, auction nov 1989, lot 175)
dafnis
0165.jpg
0165 - Denarius Titus 79 AC78 viewsObv/ T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, laureate head of T. r.
Rev/ TR POT VIII COS VII, Venus standing r., leaning on column, naked to waist, holding helmet and spear.

Ag, 18.7 mm, 3.42 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC II.1/1078 [C]
ex-Soler y Llach, auction feb 2012, lot 71 (Turrinus colln.)
1 commentsdafnis
0175.jpg
0175 - Denarius Mussidia 42 BC41 viewsObv/Head of Concordia r.; behind CONCORDIA.
Rev/Shrine of Venus Cloacina, inscribed CLOACIN; L MVSSIDIVS LON(GVS) around.

Ag, 16.2mm, 4.46g
Moneyer: L. Mussidius Longus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 494/42 [dies o/r: 87/97 (all var.)] - RSC Mussidia 6 - Syd. 1093 - Sear Imp. 188
ex-VAuctions 303, lot 388 (ex-Ivar Gault colln., CNG e-auction 271, lot 397)
3 commentsdafnis
0177.jpg
0177 - Denarius Julia Soaemias 218-22 AC18 viewsObv/ IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, togate bust of J.S. r.
Rev/ VENUS CAELESTIS, Venus togate, standing l., holding apple and long scepter; star on field r.

Ag, 20.5 mm, 3.24 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/45 - RIC IV.2/241 [C]
ex-Gitbud & Naumann, auction Pecunem 12, lot 636
dafnis
0184.jpg
0184 - Denarius Crispina 180-2 AC17 viewsObv/ CRISPINA AVGVSTA, togate bust of Crispina r.
Rev/ VENVS, Venus standing l., holding apple with r.h. and raising toga above shoulder with l.h.

Ag, 19 mm, 2.33 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC III/286a [S]
ex-Jesús Vico, auction 137, lot 413
dafnis
0199.jpg
0199 - Denarius Licinia 55 BC50 viewsObv/ Laureate bust of Venus r., togate and with stephane; behind, SC.
Rev/ Female figure standing front, leading horse and holding spear; at feet, cuirass and shield; around, P CRASSVS M F.

Ag, 4.09 g
Moneyer: P. Licinius Crassus M.f.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 430/1 - BMCRR Rome 3901 - Syd. 929 - RSC Licinia 18
ex-Bremens-Belleville, november 2014, lot 363 (ex-St.Florian monastery, Dorotheum, june 1956, lot 2764 / ex. Apostolo Zeno colln., 18th c.)
1 commentsdafnis
P1200525b-horz.jpg
02 - 02 - Julio Cesar (49 - 44 A.C.)20 viewsAR Denario 19 mm de 3,9 gr.

Anv: ANEPIGRAFA - Busto diademado de Venus a derecha.
Rev: Eneas (Aeneas) avanzando a izquierda cargando a su Padre Anquises (Anchises) sobre su hombro izq. y portando Palladium en mano der, CAESAR en campo derecho.

Acuñada durante los años 47 - 46 A.C.
Ceca: Movil legionaria durante sus campañas contra Metelo Escipión (Metellus Scipio) y Labieno (Labienus) probablemente en el Norte de África.

Referencias: Babelon Vol.2 Julia #10, Pag.11 - Sear CRI #55 - Craw. 458/1 - Syd. #1013 - BMCRR East #31 - RSC Vol.I Caesar #12 Pag.107 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #1402 Pag.268 - Cohen Vol.I #12 Pag. 9 - Albert #1400 - Catalli #658, Pag.2001
mdelvalle
Craw_458_1_Denario_Julius_Caesar.jpg
02 - 02 - Julio Cesar (49 - 44 A.C.)28 viewsAR Denario 19 mm de 3,9 gr.

Anv: ANEPIGRAFA - Busto diademado de Venus a derecha.
Rev: Eneas (Aeneas) avanzando a izquierda cargando a su Padre Anquises (Anchises) sobre su hombro izq. y portando Palladium en mano der, CAESAR en campo derecho.

Acuñada durante los años 47 - 46 A.C.
Ceca: Movil legionaria durante sus campañas contra Metelo Escipión (Metellus Scipio) y Labieno (Labienus) probablemente en el Norte de África.

Referencias: Babelon Vol.2 Julia #10, Pag.11 - Sear CRI #55 - Craw. 458/1 - Syd. #1013 - BMCRR East #31 - RSC Vol.I Caesar #12 Pag.107 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #1402 Pag.268 - Cohen Vol.I #12 Pag. 9 - Albert #1400 - Catalli #658, Pag.2001
mdelvalle
Denario_de_Julio_Cesar_TROFEO.jpg
02 - 03 - Julio Cesar (49 - 44 A.C.)61 viewsAR Denario 17 mm de 3,51 gr.

Anv: ANEPIGRAFA - Busto diademado de Venus a der. Cupido detrás de su hombro.
Rev: Dos cautivos sentados a los lados de un trofeo de armas Galo, con escudo ovalado y Carnix en cada brazo, CAESAR en exergo.

Acuñada durante los años 46 - 45 A.C.
Ceca: Movil legionaria durante sus campañas probablemente en la Galia, Italia y/o Hispania.

Referencias: Babelon Julia #11 - Sear CRI #58 - Craw. 468/1 - Syd. #1014 - BMCRR Spain #89 - RSC Vol.I Caesar #13 Pag.107 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #1404 Pag.269 - Cohen Vol.I #13 Pag.10

mdelvalle
Craw_468_1_Denario_Julius_Caesar.jpg
02 - 03 - Julio Cesar (49 - 44 A.C.)32 viewsAR Denario 17 mm de 3,51 gr.

Anv: ANEPIGRAFA - Busto diademado de Venus a der. Cupido detrás de su hombro.
Rev: Dos cautivos sentados a los lados de un trofeo de armas Galo, con escudo ovalado y Carnix en cada brazo, CAESAR en exergo.

Acuñada durante los años 46 - 45 A.C.
Ceca: Movil legionaria durante sus campañas probablemente en la Galia, Italia y/o Hispania.

Referencias: Babelon Julia #11 - Sear CRI #58 - Craw. 468/1 - Syd. #1014 - BMCRR Spain #89 - RSC Vol.I Caesar #13 Pag.107 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #1404 Pag.269 - Cohen Vol.I #13 Pag.10
mdelvalle
0202_RICII_396.jpg
0202 - Denarius Sabina 134-137 AC11 viewsObv/ SABINA AVGVSTA, togate and diademed best of S. r.
Rev/ VENERI GENETRICI, Venus standing r., raising tunica with r.h. and holding apple with l.h.

Ag, 17.1 mm, 2.97 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC II/396 (C) - BMCRE III/944
ex-Gitbud & Naumann (Pecunem), auction e30, lot 475
dafnis
0203_RICIII_786.jpg
0203 - Denarius Lucilla 166-169 AC9 viewsObv/ LVCILLA AVGVSTA, bust of L. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing r., holding Victory on r.h., leaning l.h. on engraved shield.

Ag, 18.4 mm, 3.21 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC III/786 [C] – BMCRE IV/353
ex-Savoca Coins, auction e1, lot 326
1 commentsdafnis
0208_RRC424_1.jpg
0208 - Denarius Considia 57 BC36 viewsObv/ Laureate and diademed bust of V. r., behind C CONSIDI NONIANI; before, SC.
Rev/ Tetrastyle temple on hill, surrounded by walls and gate, with ERVC above.

Ag, 18.7 mm, 3.75 g
Mint: Roma
RRC 424/1 [
3 commentsdafnis
0213_.jpg
0213 - Denarius Faustina II 147-50 AC14 viewsObv/ FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, togate bust of F. r., with high bun held by string of pearls.
Rev/ Venus togate standing l., holding apple on r.h. and l.h. leaning on rudder and dolphin.

Ag, 18.0 mm, 3.24 g
Mint: Roma
RIC III/517c [S] – BMCRE IV/1074
ex-Naville Numismatics, auction 23, lot 413 (ex-colln E.E: Clain-Stefanelli)
dafnis
0229_REPROM_RRC313_1b.jpg
0229 - Denarius Memmia 106 BC9 viewsObv/ Laureate head of Saturn l., harpa and ROMA behind; before, control mark.
Rev/ Venus on biga r., holding scepter and reins. Above, Cupid flying l. and holding wreath; below, L MEMMI GAL.

Ag, 18.9 mm, 3.93 g
Moneyer: father of L. and C. Memmii L.f. Gal.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 313/1b [dies o/r: 131/164 all var.]
ex-CNG, auction e436, lot 455 (ex-A McCabe, direct purchase to Künker am Dom, 2018)
dafnis
23.jpg
023 Julia Titi. AR Denarius 3.2gm49 viewsobv: JVLIA AVGVSTA TITI AVGVST IF drp. bust r.
rev: VENVS AVGVST Venus std. r. leaning on cippus,
holding helment and spear
"doughter of Titus, mistress of Domitian"
3 commentshill132
0231_FaustII_RIC_III_1408.jpg
0231 - As Faustina II 147-75 AC8 viewsObv/ FAVSTINA AVG ANTONINI AVG PII FIL, togate bust of F. r.
Rev/ Venus togate standing l., holding apple on r.h. and scepter on l.h.; around, VENVS; S C low on field.

AE, 25.9 mm, 10.26 g
Mint: Roma
RIC III/1408 [C] – BMCRE IV/2172 var.
ex-Numismatik Naumann, auction 74, lot 367
dafnis
__57(1)-1.jpg
03 - Caracalla AR Antoninianus - VENUS VICTRIX - Frontal bust9 viewsCaracalla AR Antoninianus.

obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding victory and sceptre, shield by her side.

5.1 gr, 28mm
rexesq
__57(1).JPG
03 - Caracalla AR Antoninianus - VENUS VICTRIX - Frontal bust26 viewsCaracalla AR Antoninianus.

obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding victory and sceptre, shield by her side.

5.1 gr, 28mm
2 commentsrexesq
Juliadomna_denar4.jpg
031 - Julia Domna (c 170-217 AD), denarius - RIC 53647 viewsObv: IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right.
Rev: VENERI VICTR, Venus standing right, naked to waist and with legs crossed, leaning on column to left, holding palm and apple.

Minted in Rome under Spetimius Severus 194 AD.

[Sold]
pierre_p77
Hadrian_AR-Den_HADRIANVS-AVG-COS-III-P-P_VENERIS-FELICIS_RIC-II-280d-p-371_RSC-1449_134-138-AD_Q-001_5h_19-19,5mm_3,29g-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0280d, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENERIS FELICIS, Venus seated left,183 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), RIC II 0280d, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENERIS FELICIS, Venus seated left,
avers: HADRIANVS-AVG-COS-III-P-P, Laureate head right.
revers: VENERIS-FELICIS, Venus, mantled and diademed, seated left on throne, holding statuette of Cupid, and sceptre.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter:19-19,5mm, weight: 2,29g, axes: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 134-138 A.D., ref: RIC II 280d, p-371, RSC 1449,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
033_Sabina_(--136_A_D_),_RIC_II_396,_AR-Denar,_SABINA_AVGVSTA,_VENERI_GENETRICI,_RSC-73,_BMCRE_944,_136_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_18mm,_3,29g-s.jpg
033 Sabina (???-136 A.D.), RIC II 0396, Rome, AR-Denarius, -/-//--, VENERI GENETRICI, Venus standing right, #164 views033 Sabina (???-136 A.D.), RIC II 0396, Rome, AR-Denarius, -/-//--, VENERI GENETRICI, Venus standing right, #1
Wife of Hadrian.
avers: SABINA AVGVSTA, Her bust diademed and draped right, hair in a plait behind.
reverse: VENERI GENETRICI, Venus standing right holding an apple.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0mm, weight: 3,29g, axes: 6h,
mint: Roma, date: 128-136/7 A.D., ref: RIC II 396, RSC 73, BMCRE 944,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
34.jpg
034 Faustina Sr. AR Denarius 15 viewsobv: DIVA FAUSTINA drp. bust r.
rev: AVGVSTA Venus std. l. holding apple and resting l. hand on shield
"wife of Ant. Pius"
hill132
Faustina-fil_AR-Den_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_AVGV-S-TI-P-II-FIL_S-C_RIC-000_C-000_Q-001_16-18mm_3,11g-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0495a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus, 167 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0495a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head.
revers: AVGVS-TI-P-II-FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and shield on helmet.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 16-17mm, weight: 3,11g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 156-161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-495a (Antoninus Pius), p-93 , C-15,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA-AVG_P-II-AVG-FIL_VE-NVS_RIC-_Q-001_-h_mm_ga-s~0.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0517c (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS, Venus standing left, Scarce!, #1115 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0517c (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS, Venus standing left, Scarce!, #1
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, showing Strack's coiffure a, with band of pearls in hair.
revers: VE-NVS, Venus standing left, holding apple and rudder, dolphin coiled around rudder.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: 17mm, weight: 2,91g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-RIC 517c, p-95,(Ant.Pius), Strack 495. BMCRE 1067. Cohen 266.
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Faustina-fil_AE-Sest_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_AVGV-S-TI-P-II-FIL_S-C_RIC-000_C-000_Q-001_30mm_19,67g-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1367 (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Sestertius, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,80 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1367 (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Sestertius, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
revers: AVGVS-TI-P-II-FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and shield on helmet.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 30mm, weight: 19,67g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 156-161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1367 (Antoninus Pius), p-191 , C-16,
Q-001
quadrans
Faustina-fil_AE-Sest-vers-AE-Dup-vers-AR-Den_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_AVGV-S-TI-P-II-FIL_S-C_RIC-000_C-000_Q-001_mm_g-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1367, RIC III 495a and RIC III 1389a (all under Ant.Pius), AE-Sestertius, AR-Denarius and AE-Dupondius, Rome, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,80 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1367, RIC III 495a and RIC III 1389a (all under Ant.Pius), AE-Sestertius, AR-Denarius and AE-Dupondius, Rome, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head.
revers: AVGVS-TI-P-II-FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and shield on helmet.
Exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 30mm, 23-25mm, 16-17mm, weight: 19,67g, 10,46g, 3,11g, axis: h, h, h,
mint: Rome, date: 156-161 A.D., ref: RIC-1367, C-16; RIC-495a (all under Antoninus Pius), C-15; RIC-1389a, C-17;
Q-001
quadrans
Faustina-fil_AE-Dup_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_AVGV-S-TI-P-II-FIL_S-C_RIC-000_C-000_Q-001_23-25mm_10,46g-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1389a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,104 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1389a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head.
revers: AVGVS-TI-P-II-FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and shield on helmet.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 23-25mm, weight: 10,46g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 156-161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1389a (Antoninus Pius), p-193, C-17,
Q-001
quadrans
caracalla_AD214_AR-antoninianus_venus-victrix_bothsides~0.JPG
04 - Caracalla AR Antoninianus - 'Venus Victrix'120 viewsCaracalla AR Antoninianus.

obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding victory and sceptre, shield by her side.

5.2 grams - 26mm.

*Notes: Well struck and well centered coin on a very large flan.
Take a look at the detail on the
shield Venus is standing next to on the reverse.
4 commentsrexesq
caracalla_AD214_AR-antoninianus_venus-victrix_bust-close.JPG
04 - Caracalla AR Antoninianus - Frontal bust close40 viewsCaracalla AR Antoninianus.

obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding victory and sceptre, shield by her side.
5.2 grams.
rexesq
Lucilla_AR-Den_LVCILLA_AVGVSTA_VENVS-VIC-TRIX__RIC-III-(M_Aur)-786_C-89_Rome_166-67-AD_Q-001_axis-h_16-17mm_x,xxg-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0786 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, #188 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0786 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, #1
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
reverse: VENVS VIC TRIX, Venus standing front, head left, holding Victory and resting left hand on shield.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,0-17,0mm, weight: 2,94g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC III 786 (Marc.Aur.), p-276, RSC-89.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
040_Lucilla,_RIC_III(M_Aur)_786,_AR-Den,_LVCILLA_AVGVSTA,_VENVS_VICTRIX,__RSC-89,_Rome_166-67-AD,_Q-002,_h,_17mm,_2,84g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0786 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, #283 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0786 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, #2
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing front, head left, holding Victory and resting left hand on shield.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0mm, weight: 2,84g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC III 786 (Marc.Aur.), p-276, RSC-89.,
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
magniaurbica.jpg
040. Magnia Urbica56 viewsMagnia Urbica. AE Antoninianus. Lugdunum mint.

Obv. Draped and diademed bust right on crescent MAGNIA VRBICA AVG.

Rev. Venus Genetrix standing left holding gapple and sceptre, shield at feet VENVS GENETRIX, D in left field.

RIC V pt. 2, 337.gVF, R2.

A coin ive been looking for for a long time, Magnia Urbica has by far the finest portraits of any post-Severan empress
LordBest
47c.jpg
047c Julia Domna. AR Antoninianus36 viewsobv: IVIA PIA FELEX AVG dia. and drp. bust r. set in cresent
rev: VENVS GENETRIX Venus std. l. extending r. hand and holding sceptre
1 commentshill132
48d.jpg
048d Caracalla. AR antoninianus14 viewsobv: ANTONINIVS PIVS AVG GERM radiate drp. cuir. bust r
rev: VENVS VICTRIX Venus std. l. holding victory and spear,
leaning on shield set in helmet
hill132
RIC_IV-I_536D_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_DO_MNA_AVG,_VENERI_VICTR,_Roma,_RSC-194,_BMCRE-49,_S-6608,_194_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_15,5-19mm,_2,74g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 536D, Roma, AR-Denarius, VENERI VICTR, Venus standing right, #164 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 536D, Roma, AR-Denarius, VENERI VICTR, Venus standing right, #1
avers: IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Bust draped right.
reverse: VENERI VICTR, Venus standing right, her back turned to the viewer, draped from the waist down and leaning on a short column with her left elbow; holding a palm branch with her left arm and an apple in her extended right hand.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:15,5-19,0mm, weight: 2,74g, axis: 0h,
mint: Roma, date: 194 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 536D, RSC 194, BMCRE 49, Sear 6608,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
RIC_IV-I_633_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_DO_MNA_AVG,_VENER_VICTOR,_Emesa(Homs),_RSC-189,_BMCRE-423,_194-195_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_17,0-17,5mm,_3,15g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 633, Emesa(Homs), AR-Denarius, VENER VICTOR, Venus standing right, Scarce! #166 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 633, Emesa(Homs), AR-Denarius, VENER VICTOR, Venus standing right, Scarce! #1
avers: IVLIA DO MNA AVG, Bust draped right.
reverse: VENER VICTOR, Venus standing right, her back turned to the viewer, draped from the waist down and leaning on a short column with her left elbow; holding a palm branch with her left arm and an apple in her extended right hand.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:17,0-17,5mm, weight: 3,15g, axis: 6h,
mint: Emesa(Homs), date: 194-195 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 633, RSC 189, BMCRE 423, Scarce!
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Julia-Domna_AR-Antoninianvs_IVLIA-PIA-FELIX-AVG_VENVS-GENETRIX_Roma-RIC-IV-388A(Caracalla)_C-211_Q-001_0h_21,5-22mm_3,80g-s.jpg
050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 388A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, 65 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 388A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left,
avers:- IVLIA-PIA-FELIX-AVG, Diademed and draped bust right on crescent.
revers:- VENVS-GENETRIX, Venus seated left, extending right hand and holding sceptre in left.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 21,5-22mm, weight: 3,80g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 216 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-388A (Caracalla), p-, C-211, BMCRE 22-23A (Caracalla),
Black toned coin like a "limes" coin .
Q-001
quadrans
RIC_388A(Car)_Julia-Domna_AR-Antoninianvs_IVLIA-PIA-FELIX-AVG_VENVS-GENETRIX_Roma-RIC-IV-388A(Caracalla)_C-211_Q-001_0h_21,5-22mm_3,80ga-s.jpg
050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 388A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, 108 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 388A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left,
avers:- IVLIA-PIA-FELIX-AVG, Diademed and draped bust right on crescent.
revers:- VENVS-GENETRIX, Venus seated left, extending right hand and holding sceptre in left.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 21,5-22mm, weight: 3,80g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 216 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-388A (Caracalla), p-, C-211, BMCRE 22-23A (Caracalla),
Black toned coin like a "limes" coin .
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Domna_AR-Antoninianvs_IVLIA-PIA-FELIX-AVG_VENVS-GENETRIX_Roma-RIC-IV-389A(Caracalla)_C-211_Q-002_1h_21-22mm_4,51g.jpg
050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 389A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, Scarce!86 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 389A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, Scarce!
avers: IVLIA-PIA-FELIX-AVG, Diademed and draped bust right on crescent.
revers: VENVS-GENETRIX, Venus seated left, holding sceptre and apple, Cupid standing right before.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 21,5-22mm, weight: 3,80g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 216 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-389A (Caracalla), p-274, C-204, (Caracalla), Scarce!
Q-001
quadrans
051_Caracalla_RIC_IV-I_310,_AR-Ant,_ANTONINVS_PIVS_AVG_GERM,_VENERI_VICTRICI_,_Rome_215,_AD__Q-001,_0h,_mm,_g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 310, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, Scarce! #186 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 310, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, Scarce! #1
avers: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Radiate, and cuirassed bust right seen half from the back.
reverse: VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding Victory and sceptre, leaning on shield set on helmet.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22,8-23,0mm, weight: 5,64g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 215 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 310, RSC
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Caracalla_AR-Den_ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM_VENVS-VICTRIX_RIC-IV-I-311b-p-_C-606_Rome_216-AD_Q-001_axis-7h_20,5mm_3,28g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 311b, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,346 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 311b, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers:- ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate head right.
revers:- VENVS-VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory and spear with shield.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 20,5mm, weight: 3,28g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 216 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-311b, p-, C-606,
Q-001
quadrans
051_Caracalla_RIC_IV-I_311d,_AR-Ant,_ANTONINVS_PIVS_AVG_GERM,_VENVS_VICTRIX,_RSC_608c,_BMC_80cf,_Rome_213-17-AD_Q-001_6h_22,5-25,0mm_5,75g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 311d, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,144 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 311d, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Radiate and draped bust right, seen half from back.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter, leaning on shield set on helmet.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22,5-25,0mm, weight: 5,75g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 213-317 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-311d, RSC 608c, BMC 80cf,
Q-001
quadrans
051_Caracalla,_RIC_IV-I_311v(bust-not_in),_AR-Ant,_ANTONINVS_PIVS_AVG_GERM,_VENVS_VICTRIX,_312-17_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_22,8-23mm,_5,64g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 311v, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,164 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 311v, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Radiate, and cuirassed bust right seen half from the back.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter, leaning on shield set on helmet.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22,8-23,0mm, weight: 5,64g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 213-317 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 311v, RSC 608a-c, var.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Caracalla_AR-Ant_ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM_VENVS-VICTRIX_216_Roma-RIC-312c_Q-001_23mm_5_02g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 312c, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,86 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 312c, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers:- ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen half from back.
revers:- VENVS-VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and scepter with shield; seated captive on either side.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 23mm, weight: 5,02g, axis:- h,
mint: Rome, date: 213-217 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-312c, p-259,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Plautilla_AR-Den_PLAVTILLA-AVGVSTA_VENVS-VICTRIX_RIC-IV-I-369-p270_C-24-25_Roma_Q-001_axis-5h_17,5-18,5mm_3,35g-s.jpg
052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Rome, RIC IV-I 369 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, Scarce!, #1277 views052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Rome, RIC IV-I 369 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, Scarce!, #1
Wife of Caracalla,
avers: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-18,5mm, weight: 3,35g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 204 A.D., ref: RIC IV 369, p-270, Issue II, RSC 24-25., BMC 429, Sear 7074,
Q-001
quadrans
Plautilla_AR-Den_PLAVTILLA-AVGVSTA_VENVS-VICTRIX_RIC-IV-I-369-p270_C-24-25_Roma_Q-002_axis-6h_18-19mm_2,78g-s.jpg
052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Rome, RIC IV-I 369 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, Scarce!, #2102 views052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Rome, RIC IV-I 369 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, Scarce!, #2
Wife of Caracalla,
avers: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-19,0mm, weight: 2,78g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 204 A.D., ref: RIC IV 369, p-270, Issue II, RSC 24-25., BMC 429, Sear 7074,
Q-002
quadrans
Plautilla_AR-Den_PLAVTILLA-AVGVSTA_VENVS-VICTRIX_RIC-IV-I-369-p270_C-24-25_Roma_Q-x01_axis-6h_18-20mm_3_60gx-s.jpg
052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Rome, RIC IV-I 369 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, Scarce!, #3113 views052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Rome, RIC IV-I 369 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, Scarce!, #3
Wife of Caracalla,
avers: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-20,0mm, weight: 3,60g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 204 A.D., ref: RIC IV 369, p-270, Issue II, RSC 24-25., BMC 429, Sear 7074,
Q-003
1 commentsquadrans
RI_054b_img.jpg
054 - Lucilla Sestertius - RIC III 176327 viewsObv:– LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS S-C, Venus standing left holding apple & scepter
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– BMCRE 1167. Cohen 72. RIC III 1763

26.83g, 32.85mm, 0o
maridvnvm
57.jpg
057 Julia Soaemias. AR denarius9 viewsobv: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG drp. bust r.
rev: VENVS CAELESTIS Venus std. l. holding apple and scepter
fld: * in r.
"mother of Elagablus"
hill132
Julia-Soaemias_IVLIA-SOAEMIAS-AVG_VENVS-CAE-L-ESTIS_RIC-IV-241_C-8-Elagabal_Star-right-Q-002_h_17,5-19mm_2,86g-s.jpg
060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 241, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus standing left, #1114 views060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 241, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus standing left, #1
Mother of Elagabalus.
avers: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, Draped bust right,
reverse: VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus, diademed and standing left, holding apple and sceptre; in right field a star.
exergue: -/*//--, diameter: 17,5-19mm, weight: 2,86g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 218-222 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 241, p-48, C-8,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Soaemias_IVLIA-SOAEMIAS-AVG_VENVS-CAE-L-ESTIS_RIC-IV-241_C--Elagabal_Star-left-Q-001_6h_17-19mm_2,58g-s.jpg
060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 241, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus standing left, #1119 views060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 241, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus standing left, #1
Mother of Elagabalus.
avers: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, Draped bust right,
reverse: VENVS CAE L ESTIS, Venus, diademed and standing left, holding apple and sceptre; in left field a star.
exergue: */-//--, diameter: 17-19mm, weight: 2,58g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 218-222 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 241, p-48, C-8,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Soaemias_IVLIA-SOAEMIAS-AVG_VENVS-CA-ELESTIS_RIC-243_C-14_Q-001_1h_18-19mm_2,80g-s.jpg
060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated left, #172 views060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated left, #1
Mother of Elagabalus.
avers: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, Draped bust right.
reverse: VENVS CA ELESTIS, Venus seated left, holding patera (or apple?) and sceptre; at her feet a child reaching up to her.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 2,80g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 220 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 243, p-, C-14,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Soaemias_IVLIA-SOAEMIAS-AVG_VENVS-CAELESTIS_RIC-243_C-14_Q-002_6h_18,5-19,5mm_2,34g-s.jpg
060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated left, #2207 views060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated left, #2
Mother of Elagabalus.
avers: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, Draped bust right.
reverse: VENVS CA ELESTIS, Venus seated left, holding patera (or apple?) and sceptre; at her feet a child reaching up to her.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19,5mm, weight: 2,34g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 220 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 243, p-, C-14,
Q-002
quadrans
RI_064pc_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -17 viewsObv:- IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, Laureate head right
Rev:- VENER AVG, Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm
Eastern COS II mint (RIC - Emesa). A.D. 193 - 195
References:- BMCRE -. RSC - RIC -.

This reverse type should come with VICTOR AVG or VICT AVG. VENER VICT and variations (VICTR, VICTOR etc.) turn up on Venus types of Domna, which we so rarely seen muled with obverses of Septimius Severus but I have never seen this odd mixing.
maridvnvm
RI_064ne_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - (unlisted mule with a Julia Domna reverse)29 viewsObv:- IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right
Rev:- VEN-ER VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand; sceptre in left
Emesa mint. Struck 194-195 AD.
References:- RIC IV -; BMCRE -; RSC -.

This would appear to be a mule of a Septimius Severus obverse with a reverse of Julia Domna.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_064td_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - (unlisted mule with a Julia Domna reverse)11 viewsObv:- IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right
Rev:- VEN-ER VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand; sceptre in left
Emesa mint. Struck 194-195 AD.
References:- RIC IV -; BMCRE -; RSC -.

This would appear to be a mule of a Septimius Severus obverse with a reverse of Julia Domna.
maridvnvm
Iulia-Mamaea_AR-Den_IVLIA-MA-MAEA-AVG_VENVS-GE-N-ETRIX_RIC-355_C-72_Q-001_19-20mm_2_94g-s.jpg
064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus standing left, #170 views064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus standing left, #1
avers:-IVLIA-MA-MAEA-AVG, Diademed bust right, draped.
revers:-VENVS-GE-N-ETRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and scepter; Cupid to left.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 19-20mm, weight: 2,94g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 223 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-355, p-99, C-72,
Q-001
quadrans
Iulia-Mamaea_AR-Den_IVLIA-MA-MAEA-AVG_VENVS-G-E-N-ETRIX_RIC-355_C-72_Q-002_axis-6h_17-18mm_2,52g-s.jpg
064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus standing left, #2112 views064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus standing left, #2
avers:-IVLIA-MA-MAEA-AVG, Diademed bust right, draped.
revers:-VENVS-GE-N-ETRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and scepter; Cupid to left.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18mm, weight: 2,52g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 223 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-355, p-99, C-72,
Q-002
quadrans
Iulia-Mamaea_AR-Den_IVLIA-MA-MAEA-AVG_VENVS-G-E-NETRIX_RIC-355_C-72_Q-003_2h_19,5mm_3,05g-s.jpg
064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus standing left, #3124 views064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus standing left, #3
avers:-IVLIA-MA-MAEA-AVG, Diademed bust right, draped.
revers:-VENVS-G-E-NETRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and scepter; Cupid to left.
exerg: -/-//, diameter: 19,5mm, weight: 3,05g, axis: 2h,
mint: Rome, date: 223 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-II-355, p-99, C-72,
Q-003
quadrans
RI_065af_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna Ae As - RIC 84625 viewsAe As
Obv:– IVLIA DO-MNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VENERI VICTR, Venus, naked to waist, standing right, holding apple and palm and resting on column.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 193-196
Reference(s) – Cohen 196. RIC IV 846 (R)
Martin Griffiths
RI_065au_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna Antoninianus - RIC IV 381 [Caracalla]33 viewsObv:– IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, resting on a crescent
Rev:– VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left holding branch & scepter
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– RIC IV 381 [Caracalla]. RSC 111.
maridvnvm
RI 065ag img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - 536 var66 viewsObv:– IVLIA DO-MNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VENERI VICRT (sic), Venus naked to waist, standing right, seen from behind, leaning on column, holding apple and palm.
Minted in Rome A.D. 193 - 196
Reference:– BMCRE -. RIC IV 536 var (VICRT instead of VICTR)
maridvnvm
RI_065ao_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -25 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust facing right
Rev:– VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and palm, resting elbow on column with cuirass right, Cupid holding shield at feet
Minted in Rome
References:– RIC -. RSC -. BMCRE -.

This reverse type not mentioned in any of the major references.
maridvnvm
RI_065bd_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -26 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, raising robe with left hand
Minted in Alexandria A.D. 197
Reference:– BMCRE -. Bickford-Smith pl. 1, 10. RIC IV -. cf RIC 580 (Rome).

The most common Alexandrian type from this issue for Domna.
maridvnvm
RI_065be_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -30 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, raising robe with left hand
Minted in Alexandria.
Reference(s) – BMCRE -. RIC -, cf RIC 580 (Rome). RSC -.
maridvnvm
RI_065bl_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -28 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, raising robe with left hand
Minted in Alexandria.
Reference:– BMCRE -. Bickford-Smith pl. 1, 10. RIC IV -. cf RIC 580 (Rome).
maridvnvm
RI_065bn_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -19 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, raising robe with left hand
Minted in Alexandria A.D. 197
Reference:– BMCRE -. Bickford-Smith pl. 1, 10. RIC IV -. cf RIC 580 (Rome).

The most common Alexandrian type from this issue for Domna.
maridvnvm
RI_065bv_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -19 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, raising robe with left hand
Minted in Alexandria.
Reference(s) – BMCRE -. RIC -, cf RIC 580 (Rome). RSC -.
maridvnvm
RI_065bw_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -17 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, raising robe with left hand
Minted in Alexandria.
Reference:– BMCRE -. Bickford-Smith pl. 1, 10. RIC IV -. cf RIC 580 (Rome).
maridvnvm
RI_065a_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 388c22 viewsObv:– IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Draped bust facing right
Rev:– VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left with scepter & right hand extended
Minted in Rome, A.D. 216
References:– VM 51a, RIC 388c, RCV02 7106, RSC 212

A reasonable example of the older bust.
Martin Griffiths
RI_065b_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 389 fouree16 viewsObv:– IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Draped bust facing right
Rev:– VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left with scepter & right hand extended, cupid at feet
Minted in Rome, A.D. 217
References:– RIC 389 fouree
Martin Griffiths
RI_065bb_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 53626 viewsObv:– IVLIA DO-MNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VENER-I V-ICTR, Venus naked to waist, standing right, seen from behind, leaning on column, holding apple and palm.
Minted in Rome A.D. 193 - 196
Reference:– RIC IV 536
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_065ai_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63016 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENER VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare, A.D. 195
References:– BMCRE 422, RIC 630, RSC 188a
Martin Griffiths
RI_065l_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63019 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENER-I VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare, A.D. 195
References:– BMCRE 422, RIC 630, RSC 188a

Beautiful rainbow tone developing on the obverse.
1 commentsMartin Griffiths
RI_065bf_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63018 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENER VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in an Eastern mint - old-style, A.D. 195
References:– BMCRE 422, RIC 630, RSC 188a
maridvnvm
RI_065bt_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63030 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENE-R VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare, A.D. 195
References:– BMCRE 422, RIC 630, RSC 188a
maridvnvm
RI_065ap_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63228 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VENERI VICTR, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Emesa.
Reference:– BMCRE 424. RIC IV 632 (Rated scarce). RSC 194.
maridvnvm
RI_065bh_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63236 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENERI VICTR, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Syria.
Reference:– RIC IV 632 (Rated scarce). RSC 194
maridvnvm
RI_065br_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63237 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENERI VICTR, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 193-196
Reference:– BMCRE 424. RIC IV 632 (Rated scarce). RSC 194
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_065bo_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63324 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENER VICTOR, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Rome. A.D. 193-196
Reference:– BMCRE 423. RIC IV 633 (Rated scarce). RSC 189
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_065bp_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 64618 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing facing, head left, apple in right, scepter in left
Minted in Laodicea ad Mare. A.D. 193-196
Reference:– BMCRE 620. RIC IV 646, RSC III 197
maridvnvm
RI_065as_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC unlisted56 viewsObv:– IVLA (sic) DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VENERI VICTI (sic), Venus, nude with drapery falling below hips, standing with back turned, head right, resting left arm on low column, holding an apple in extended right hand and palm, sloping upward to left in left hand: coil of drapery falls over column
Minted in Alexandria, A.D. 194
RIC -, RSC -, BMCRE -.

2.25g. 17.65mm. 0o
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 066bc img.jpg
066 - Caracalla Antoninianus - RIC 313 var (unlisted, probably in error)68 viewsObv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Radiate, cuirassed bust right, seen half from the back
Rev:– VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory and spear, shield at side
Minted in Rome circa A.D. 215
Reference:– RIC 311 var (Unlisted in RIC with Cuirassed bust, probably in error)
A nice example of one of the earliest of the Ants. produced by Caracalla.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 066az img.jpg
066 - Caracalla denarius - RIC 311b43 viewsObv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate bust right,
Rev:– VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding Victory, shield and spear, a helmet at feet
Minted in Rome, A.D. 213 - 217
References:- VM 97/1, RIC 311b (Common), RCV02 6890, RSC 606
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 067a img.jpg
067 - Plautilla denarius - RIC 369 15 viewsObv:– PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENUS VICTRIX, Venus left holding apple and palm, resting elbow on shield; Cupid at feet
Minted in Rome, A.D. 204
References:– RIC 369 (Scarce), RCV02 7074, RSC 25
maridvnvm
07-Gordian-III-RIC-131.jpg
07. Gordian III / RIC 131.19 viewsDenarius, 240 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG / Laureate bust of Gordian.
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX / Venus standing, holding helmet and sceptre, leaning on shield.
3.12 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #131; Sear #8683.
Callimachus
072_Gordianus-III__(238-244_A_D_),_RIC_131_AG-Den__IMP-GORDIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG_VENVS-VICTRIX_RIC-IV-III-131-p-28_4th-iss_C-347_Rome_241-3-AD_Q-001_1h_20-22mm_3,28g-s.jpg
072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 131, AR-Denarius, Rome, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, Rare!, #183 views072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 131, AR-Denarius, Rome, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, Rare!, #1
avers: IMP-GORDIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG, Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed.
revers: VENVS-VICTRIX, Venus standing left with helmet & scepter, leaning on shield
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 20-22mm, weight: 3,28g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 241-243 A.D.(4th Issue), ref: RIC IV-III 131, p-28, C-347,
Q-001
quadrans
RI 075b img.jpg
075 - Julia Soaemias denarius - RIC 243 (example 1)45 viewsDenarius,
Obv:- IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, Bare head right
Rev:– VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated lt., holding an apple and a sceptre, cupid stands before her.
References– RIC 243, RSC 14
maridvnvm
RI 075a img.jpg
075 - Julia Soaemias denarius - RIC 243 (example 2)40 viewsObv:- IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, Bare head right
Rev:– VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated lt., holding an apple and a sceptre, cupid stands before her.
References– RIC 243, RSC 14
maridvnvm
RI_079i_img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea denarius - RIC 35121 viewsIVLIA MAMAEA AVG, Diademed, draped bust right
Rev:– VENERI FELICI, Venus standing front, head right, holding Cupid & scepter
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– RIC 351, RSC 60, BMC 189
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 079e img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea denarius - RIC 35841 viewsObv:– IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, Diademed & draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing front, head left, with helmet & scepter, shield at feet
References:– RIC 358, RSC 76
maridvnvm
A-20_Rep_AR-Den_C_Norbanus_C_NORBANVS-C-XXXIIII-Head-Venus-r__Corn-ear-Axe-Caduceus_Crawford-357-1_Syd-739_Rome_83-BC_Q-001_axis-7h_18mm_3,80g-s.jpg
083 B.C., C Norbanus, Rebublic AR-Denarius, Crawford-357-5, Rome, Corn ear, fasces and caduceus.90 views083 B.C., C Norbanus, Rebublic AR-Denarius, Crawford-357-5, Rome, Corn ear, fasces and caduceus.
avers:- Number behind (C-XXXIIII), C NORBANVS below, diademed head of Venus right.
revers: - Corn ear, fasces and caduceus.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,80g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 083 B.C., ref: Crawford-357-5, Syd-739, Norbana 2,
Q-001
quadrans
RI 087y img.jpg
087 - Gordian III Denarius - RIC 13140 viewsObv:– IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, Laureate, draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and sceptre, and leaning on shield
Minted in Rome. Summer A.D. 241
Reference:– RIC 131, RSC 347
Weight 2.59 gms
Dimensions 21.04mm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Caracalla-RIC-311c.jpg
087. Caracalla.17 viewsAntoninianus, 215-217 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM / Radiate bust of Caracalla.
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX / Venus standing, holding Victory and spear, leaning on a shield set on a helmet.
4.87 gm., 23.5 mm.
RIC #311c.

The reverse is unusual for an Emperor, and may refer to Caracalla's plan to solve the Parthian problem by marrying the daughter of the Parthian king (RIC Vol. IV, pt, 1, p, 88).
Callimachus
Plautilla-RIC-369.jpg
089. Plautilla.16 viewsDenarius, 202-205 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA / Bust of Plautilla.
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX / Venus standing, holding apple and palm branch, resting elbow on shield; Cupid at her feet.
3.25 gm., 19.5 mm.
RIC #369; Sear #7004.
Callimachus
Salonina-Billon-Ant_SALONINA-AVG_VENVS-VICTRIX_RIC-68_Gobl-899c_C-129_Koln_Q-001_7h_20-22,5mm_3,45g-s.jpg
091 Salonina (? - 268 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 068, Cologne, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,72 views091 Salonina (? - 268 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 068, Cologne, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers:- SALONINA-AVG, Diademed draped bust right on crescent.
revers:- VENVS-VICTRIX, Venus standing left, shield on ground behind her, holding apple in right hand and grain ear in left.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 20-22,5 mm, weight: 3,45 g, axis: 7 h,
mint: Cologne, date: A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-068, p-, Göbl-899c,
Q-001
quadrans
Salonina-Billon-Ant_SALONINA-AVG_VENVS-V(I)CTRIX_RIC-68_Gobl-899c_Cologne_Q-002_0h_21-22,5mm_3,28g-s.jpg
091 Salonina (? - 268 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 068var., Cologne, VENVS V(I)CTRIX, Venus standing left,64 views091 Salonina (? - 268 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 068var., Cologne, VENVS V(I)CTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers:- SALONINA-AVG, Diademed draped bust right on crescent.
revers:- VENVS-V(I)CTRIX, Venus standing left, holding apple and vertical sceptre, shield at feet in left. Legend error I missing (VCTRIX).
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 21-22,5 mm, weight: 3,28 g, axis: 0 h,
mint: Cologne, date: A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-068var., p-, Göbl-899cvar., C-
Q-001
quadrans
Salonina-Billon-Ant_SALONINA-AVG_VENVS-VICT_MS_RIC-_C-_Gobl-1368o,_Sear-_Mediolanum_-AD_Q-001_0h_19-22mm_2,26ga-s.jpg
091 Salonina (? - 268 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 1368o, Rome, VENVS VICT, Venus standing left,64 views091 Salonina (? - 268 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 1368o, Rome, VENVS VICT, Venus standing left,
avers:- SALONINA-AVG, Diademed draped bust right on crescent.
revers:- VENVS-VICT, Venus standing left, holding helmet left and transverse scepter. MS in exergue.
exe:-/-//MS, diameter: 19-22 mm, weight: 2,26 g, axis: 0 h,
mint: Mediolanum, date: A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-035, p-, Göbl-1368o,
Q-001
quadrans
0001JUL.jpg
1) Julius Caesar157 viewsDenarius, Rome, Moneyer P. Sepullius Macer, 44 BC, 4.03g. Cr-480/11, Syd-1072; Sear, Imperators-107b. Obv: Wreathed head of Caesar r., CAESAR before, D[IC]T PERPETVO behind. Rx: Venus standing l., looking downwards, holding Victory and scepter resting on star, P SEPVLLIVS behind, MACER downwards before. Same dies as Alfoldi, Caesar in 44 v. Chr., pl. LIII, 6-8. Banker's mark behind Caesar's eye. Good portrait. Some areas of flat striking, otherwise EF

Ex HJB - purchased on the Ides of March, 2011

Gaius Julius Caesar (Classical Latin: [ˈɡaː.i.ʊs ˈjuː.lɪ.ʊs ˈkaj.sar], July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC) was a Roman general, statesman, Consul and notable author of Latin prose. He played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire. In 60 BC, Caesar, Crassus and Pompey formed a political alliance that was to dominate Roman politics for several years. Their attempts to amass power through populist tactics were opposed by the conservative elite within the Roman Senate, among them Cato the Younger with the frequent support of Cicero. Caesar's conquest of Gaul, completed by 51 BC, extended Rome's territory to the English Channel and the Rhine. Caesar became the first Roman general to cross both when he built a bridge across the Rhine and conducted the first invasion of Britain.

These achievements granted him unmatched military power and threatened to eclipse the standing of Pompey, who had realigned himself with the Senate after the death of Crassus in 53 BC. With the Gallic Wars concluded, the Senate ordered Caesar to lay down his military command and return to Rome. Caesar refused, and marked his defiance in 49 BC by crossing the Rubicon with a legion, leaving his province and illegally entering Roman territory under arms. Civil war resulted, from which he emerged as the unrivaled leader of Rome.

After assuming control of government, Caesar began a program of social and governmental reforms, including the creation of the Julian calendar. He centralised the bureaucracy of the Republic and was eventually proclaimed "dictator in perpetuity". But the underlying political conflicts had not been resolved, and on the Ides of March (15 March) 44 BC, Caesar was assassinated by a group of senators led by Marcus Junius Brutus. A new series of civil wars broke out, and the constitutional government of the Republic was never restored. Caesar's adopted heir Octavian, later known as Augustus, rose to sole power, and the era of the Roman Empire began.

Much of Caesar's life is known from his own accounts of his military campaigns, and from other contemporary sources, mainly the letters and speeches of Cicero and the historical writings of Sallust. The later biographies of Caesar by Suetonius and Plutarch are also major sources. Caesar is deemed to be one of the greatest military commanders of history. Source: wikipedia
RM0001
13 commentsSosius
Jul_Caes_Den_3_~0.jpg
1) Julius Caesar Denarius - Aeneas28 viewsJulius Caesar
AR Denarius
47-46 BC, military mint traveling with Caesar in Africa

Diademed head of Venus right / CAESAR, Aeneas walking left, carrying Anchises and the Palladium

Cr458/1, Syd 1013, RSC 12; Sear5 #1402

VF, nicely toned
RM0030
1 commentsSosius
Caesar_den.jpg
1) Julius Caesar Denarius - RSC 1316 viewsJulius Caesar
AR Denarius.
46-45 BC, military mint traveling with Caesar in Spain

Diademed head of Venus right, Cupid on her shoulder / CAESAR below Gallia & Gaulish captive seated beneath trophy of Gallic arms.

Syd 1014, Crawford 468/1, RSC 13, sear5 #1404
RM0019
Sosius
Julius_Caesar_fouree~0.jpg
1) Julius Caesar Fouree31 viewsJULIUS CAESAR
AR Denarius fouree.

CAESAR IMP, laureate head right, lituus & simpulum behind / M METTIVS, Venus standing left with Victory & scepter, shield resting on globe; control letter to left.

Cr480/3; Syd 1056, RSC 34, Sear5 #1407
RM0029
2 commentsSosius
Cordia_2_Den_6.jpg
1) The Caesarians: Cordia 214 viewsIMPERATORIAL ROME
Mn Cordius Rufus
Moneyer under Julius Caesar
AR Denarius, 46 BC.

RVFVS III VIR, conjoined heads of the Dioscuri, right & in pilei with star atop / MN CORDIVS, Venus (Aequitas?) standing left, holding scales & sceptre.

Cordia 2, Sear5 #440
RM0024
Sosius
Cordia_3a_Den_3.jpg
1) The Caesarians: Cordia 3a16 viewsIMPERATORIAL ROME
Mn Cordius Rufus
Moneyer under Julius Caesar
AR Denarius, 46 BC.

RVFVS S.C., diademed head of Venus right / MN. CORDIVS, Cupid on dolphin right.

Cr463/3, Syd 977, Cordia 3a. Cracked and glued, spotty toning
RM0025
Sosius
ANTOSE86a.jpg
1. Aeneas travels from Troy to Italy 47 viewsAntoninus Pius. 138-161 AD. Sestertius (24.15g, Ø 33mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev.: S C [left and right in field], Aeneas wearing a short tunic and cloac, advancing right, carrying Anchises on left shoulder and holding Ascanius by right hand. Anchises (veiled and draped) carries a box in left hand, Ascanius wears a short tunic and Phrygian cap and caries a pedum in left hand. RIC 627[R2], BMCRE 1292, Cohen 761; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali) 373 (4 specimens); Foss 57b.

This sestertius was issued in preparation of the 900th anniversary of Rome which was celebrated in A.D.147.
The scene depicts Aeneas leaving Ilium, as the Romans called Troy, with Ascanius and Anchises. According to Vergil (Aeneid, Book 2), Aeneas, the son of the goddess Venus and the Trojan Anchises, fled with some remnants of the inhabitants of Troy as it fell to the Greeks, taking with him his son, Ascanius, his elderly father, Anchises, and the Palladium, the ancient sacred statue of Athena. The Trojans eventually made their way west to resettle in Italy. There they intermarried with the local inhabitants and founded the town of Lavinium, and thereby became the nucleus of the future Roman people. One of the descendants of Aeneas' son Ascanius (known now as Iulus) was Rhea Silvia, mother of Romulus and Remus, founders of Rome. The mythological depictions on this coin reinforce the importance of Ilium, not only as the seedbed of the future Roman people, but also as the mother city of the future caput mundi.
Charles S
L__Julius_L_f__Caesar_AR-Den_CAESAR_L-IVLI-L-F_Crawford-320-1_Julia-4_Sydenham-593_103_BC_Q-001_axis-7h_19mm_2,99g-s.jpg
103 B.C., L. Julius L.f. Caesar, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 320/1, Rome, Venus in biga of Cupids left,127 views103 B.C., L. Julius L.f. Caesar, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 320/1, Rome, Venus in biga of Cupids left,
avers: Helmeted head of Mars left, behind, CAESAR, above, control mark. The controlmark is retrograde Q which was heretofore unknown (by forarr).
reverse: Venus in biga of Cupids left, holding sceptre and reins, above, control mark, below, lyre, in exergue: L•IVLI•L•F•.
exergue: -/-//L•IVLI•L•F•, diameter: 19mm, weight: 2,99g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 103 B.C., ref: Crawford 320/1, Sydenham 593a., Julia 4a.,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
105.jpg
105 Magna Urbica. AE antoninianus41 viewsobv: MAGN VRBICA AVG dia. drp. bust r. on crescent
rev: VENVS VCTRIX Venus std. l. holding helment and scepter, at foot shield
ex: K(crescent with dot)AS
2 commentshill132
coin283.JPG
105c. Lucilla32 viewsAnnia Aurelia Galeria Lucilla (March 7, 150–183) was the daughter of the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius and Faustina the Younger.

In AD 164, she was betrothed by her father to his co-emperor and adoptive brother, Lucius Verus, gaining the title of Augusta. Following his death she married Pompeianus. Lucilla was implicated in several plots to overthrow Commodus (her brother and then emperor) and was banished to the island of Capreae in AD 182. Shortly afterwards she was put to death by Commodus.

Silver Denarius Obv: LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F - Bare head right, draped. Rev: VENVS - Venus standing left, holding apple and scepter. Rome mint: AD 165-169 RIC III, 784, page 276 - Cohen 70- SEAR RCV II (2002), 5491, page 370 /3.05 g.
ecoli
T-1857_107_Severina_AE-Denar-Silvered_SEVERI-NA-AVG_VENVS-F-ELIX___RIC-6_RIC-T-1857_Rome_11-iss_3rd-off_275-AD_Q-001_7h_17,5-19,5mm_1,72g-s.jpg
107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-1857 (Estiot), RIC V-I 006, Rome, AE-Denar, VENVS FELIX, -/-//Γ, Venus standing left, #1155 views107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-1857 (Estiot), RIC V-I 006, Rome, AE-Denar, VENVS FELIX, -/-//Γ, Venus standing left, #1
avers:- SEVERI-NA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right. (E2*)
revers:- VENVS-F-ELIX, Venus standing left, holding unidentified object (perfume box, apple?) in right hand and long sceptre in left hand. (Venus 9)
exerg: -/-//Γ, diameter: 17,5-19,5mm, weight: 1,72g, axes: 7h,
mint: Rome, iss-11, off-3, date: 274-275 A.D., ref: RIC-6, T-1857 (Estiot), C-,
Q-001
quadrans
T-1857_107_Severina_AE-Denar-Silvered_SEVERI-NA-AVG_VENVS-F-ELIX___RIC-6_RIC-T-1857_Rome_11-iss_3rd-off_275-AD_Q-002_7h_18,8-19,5mm_2,44g-s.jpg
107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-1857 (Estiot), RIC V-I 006, Rome, AE-Denar, VENVS FELIX, -/-//Γ, Venus standing left, #2151 views107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-1857 (Estiot), RIC V-I 006, Rome, AE-Denar, VENVS FELIX, -/-//Γ, Venus standing left, #2
avers:- SEVERI-NA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right. (E2*)
revers:- VENVS-F-ELIX, Venus standing left, holding unidentified object (perfume box, apple?) in right hand and long sceptre in left hand. (Venus 9)
exerg: -/-//Γ, diameter: 18,8-19,5mm, weight:2,44g, axes: 7h,
mint: Rome, iss-11, off-3, date: 274-275 A.D., ref: RIC-6, T-1857 (Estiot), C-,
Q-002
quadrans
T-1857_107_Severina_AE-Denar-Silvered_SEVERI-NA-AVG_VENVS-F-ELIX___RIC-6_RIC-T-1857_Rome_11-iss_3rd-off_275-AD_Q-003_0h_18-19mm_1,78ga-s.jpg
107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-1857 (Estiot), RIC V-I 006, Rome, AE-Denar, VENVS FELIX, -/-//Γ, Venus standing left, #3136 views107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-1857 (Estiot), RIC V-I 006, Rome, AE-Denar, VENVS FELIX, -/-//Γ, Venus standing left, #3
avers:- SEVERINA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right. (E2*)
revers:- VENVS-FELIX, Venus standing left, holding unidentified object (perfume box, apple?) in right hand and long sceptre in left hand. (Venus 9)
exerg: -/-//Γ, diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 1,78g, axes:0h,
mint: Rome, iss-11, off-3, date: 274-275 A.D., ref: RIC-6, T-1857 (Estiot), C-,
Q-003
quadrans
Severina_AE-Denar-Silvered_SEVERINA-AVG_VENVS-FELIX___RIC-6_RIC-T-1857_C-_Rome_3rd-off_275-AD__Q-007_0_18,5mm_1,78g-s.jpg
107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-1857 (Estiot), RIC V-I 006, Rome, AE-Denar, VENVS FELIX, -/-//Γ, Venus standing left, #4106 views107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-1857 (Estiot), RIC V-I 006, Rome, AE-Denar, VENVS FELIX, -/-//Γ, Venus standing left, #4
avers:- SEVERINA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right. (E2*)
revers:- VENVS-FELIX, Venus standing left, holding unidentified object (perfume box, apple?) in right hand and long sceptre in left hand. (Venus 9)
exerg: -/-//Γ, diameter: 18,5mm, weight: g, axes: 0
mint: Rome, iss-11, off-3, date: 274-275 A.D., ref: RIC-6, T-1857 (Estiot), C-,
Q-004
quadrans
T-1861_107_Severina_AE-Denar-Silvered_SEVERI-NA-AVG_VENVS-F-ELIX_E_RIC-6_RIC-T-1861_Rome_11-iss_5-off_275-AD_Q-001_6h_18,6-19,6mm_1,77g-s.jpg
107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-1861 (Estiot), RIC V-I 006, Rome, AE-Denar, VENVS FELIX, -/-//E, Venus standing left, #1150 views107 Severina (270-275 A.D.), T-1861 (Estiot), RIC V-I 006, Rome, AE-Denar, VENVS FELIX, -/-//E, Venus standing left, #1
avers:- SEVERI-NA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right. (E2*)
revers:- VENVS-F-ELIX, Venus standing left, holding unidentified object (perfume box, apple?) in right hand and long sceptre in left hand. (Venus 9)
exerg: -/-//E, diameter: 18,6-19,6mm, weight: 1,77g, axes:6h,
mint: Rome, iss-11, off-5, date: 274-275 A.D., ref: RIC-6, T-1861 (Estiot), C-,
Q-001
quadrans
RI 108b img.jpg
108 - Salonina Antoninianus RIC 00725 viewsObv:– SALONINA AVG, Diademed draped bust right on crescent
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left, holding sceptre, at foot captive
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 257-258
Reference:– Cohen 115. RIC 7
maridvnvm
114.jpg
114 Galeria Valeria. AE follis 6.0gm41 viewsobv: GAL VAL_ERIA AVG dia. drp.bust r.
re: VENERI V_ICTRICI Venus std. l. holding apple l., raising drapery over l. shoulder
ex: -(crescent)/-B//ANT
1 commentshill132
RIC_V-II_342_Magnia-Urbica_AE-Ant_MAGN-VRBICA-AVG_VENVS-VICTRIX_KASzigma_RIC-VII-II-343-p-184_C-17_Rome_284-AD_Scarce_Q-001_6h_20-22mm_4,17g-s.jpg
116 Magnia Urbica (??? A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 343A, Rome, -/-//KAς, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,128 views116 Magnia Urbica (??? A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 343A, Rome, -/-//KAς, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers: MAGN-VRBICA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right, on crescent.
revers: VENVS-VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and scepter, shield to left.
exergo: -/-//KAς, diameter: 20-22mm, weight: 4,17g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, 5th. em., date: 284 (Nov.)A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-343A-p-184, C-17,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
RIC_V-II_347A_Magnia-Urbica,_AE-Ant,_MAGNIA_VRBICA_AVG,_VENVS_VICTRIX,_SXXIT,_Sear_12423,_C-15,_5th_em,_Ticinum,_283-AD,_S,_Q-001,_6h,_21,6-22,7mm,_3,46gx-s.jpg
116 Magnia Urbica (??? A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 347A, Ticinum, -/-//SXXIT, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,126 views116 Magnia Urbica (??? A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 347A, Ticinum, -/-//SXXIT, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers: MAGNIA VRBICA AVG, Diademed bust right on crescent wearing Stephane and richly embroidered robe
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and slanted scepter, shield below her left elbow.
exergue: -/-//SXXIT, diameter: 21,6-22,7mm, weight: 3,46g, axis: 6h,
mint: Ticinum, 5th. em., date: 283 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 347A, C-15, Sear 12423,
Q-001
quadrans
sabina den-.jpg
117-138 AD - SABINA AR denarius - struck 117-135 AD66 viewsobv: SABINA AVGVSTA
rev: VENERI GENETRICI (Venus standing right holding an apple)
ref: RIC396, C.73
2.76gms
berserker
Galeria-Valeria_AE-26_-RIC-VI-63_Heraclea-3rd-off__Q-001_h_mm_gx-s.jpg
123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Heracleia, RIC VI 063, -/Crescent//HTΓ, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left,132 views123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Heracleia, RIC VI 063, -/Crescent//HTΓ, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left,
Galeria-Valeria, daughter of Diocletian and wife of Galerius,.
avers:- GAL-VAL-ERIA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right.
revers:- VENERI-V-ICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding apple and raising skirt, Crescent right field.
exergo: -/Crescent//HTΓ, diameter: 26mm, weight: 6,08g, axis: h,
mint: Heracleia, date: 311 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-63, 3rd-off., C-,
Q-001
quadrans
Galeria-Valeria_AE-26_GAL-VALERIA-AVG_VENERI-V-ICTRICI_star-A__SM_SD__Serdica-315-RIC-41_Q-001_26mm_6_08g-s.jpg
123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Serdica, RIC VI 041, */A//•SM•SD•, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, 404 views123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Serdica, RIC VI 041, */A//•SM•SD•, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left,
Galeria-Valeria, daughter of Diocletian and wife of Galerius,.
avers:- GAL-VALERIA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right.
revers:- VENERI-V-ICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding apple and raising skirt, * left, A right.
exergo: */A//•SM•SD•, diameter: 26mm, weight: 6,08g, axis: h,
mint: Serdica, date: 307-308 A.D., ref: RIC-41-1st-off., C-,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Galeria-Valeria_AE-26_GAL-VALERIA-AVG_VENERI-V-ICTRICI_star-A__SM_SD__Serdica-307-308-RIC-41-1st-off__Q-002_6h_26,5mm_5,37g-s.jpg
123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Serdica, RIC VI 041, */A//•SM•SD•, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, #2109 views123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Serdica, RIC VI 041, */A//•SM•SD•, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, #2
Galeria-Valeria, daughter of Diocletian and wife of Galerius,.
avers:- GAL-VALERIA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right.
revers:- VENERI-V-ICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding apple and raising skirt, * left, A right.
exergo: */A//•SM•SD•, diameter: 26,5mm, weight: 5,37g, axis: 6h,
mint: Serdica, date: 307-308 A.D., ref: RIC-41-1st-off., C-,
Q-001
quadrans
Galeria-Valeria_AE-26_GAL-VA-LERIA-AVG_VENERI-VICTRICI_crescent-Gamma_SIS_Siscia-310-311_RIC-211-3rd-off_C-_Q-002_axis-h_mm_g-s.jpg
123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 211, Crescent/Γ// SIS, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left,141 views123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 211, Crescent/Γ// SIS, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left,
Galeria-Valeria, daughter of Diocletian and wife of Galerius, AE-26 Follis
avers:- GAL-VALERIA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right.
revers:- VENERI-V-ICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding apple and raising skirt, crescent left, Γ right.
exergo: Crescent/Γ// SIS, diameter: 23-25mm, weight: 7,13g, axis: 11h,
mint: Siscia, date: 307-310 A.D., ref: RIC-211var-3rd.off, C-,
Q-002
quadrans
Galeria-Valeria_AE-26_GAL-VA-LERIA-AVG_VENERI-VICTRICI_crescent-A_SIS_Siscia-310-311_RIC-211-3rd-off_C-_Q-003_5h_24,5-25,5mm_7,09g-s.jpg
123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 211, Crescent/A//SIS, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, #383 views123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 211, Crescent/A//SIS, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, #3
Galeria-Valeria, daughter of Diocletian and wife of Galerius, AE-26 Follis
avers:- GAL-VALERIA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right.
revers:- VENERI-V-ICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding apple and raising skirt, crescent left, E right.
exergo: Crescent/A// SIS, diameter: 24,5-25,5mm, weight: 7,09g, axis: 5h,
mint: Siscia, date: 309-310 A.D., ref: RIC-211var-.off, C-,
Q-003
quadrans
Galeria-Valeria_AE-26_GAL-VALERIA-AVG_VENER-I-VICTRICI_Crescent-Epsilon_SIS_Siscia-309-310-RIC-VI-211_p-480_5th-off__Q-001_0h_24-26mm_6,61g-s.jpg
123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 211, Crescent/E//SIS, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left,151 views123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 211, Crescent/E//SIS, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left,
Galeria-Valeria, daughter of Diocletian and wife of Galerius, AE-26 Follis
avers:- GAL-VALERIA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right.
revers:- VENERI-V-ICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding apple and raising skirt, crescent left, E right.
exergo: Crescent/E// SIS, diameter: 24-26mm, weight: 6,61g, axis: 0h,
mint: Siscia, date: 309-310 A.D., ref: RIC-211var-5th.off, C-,
Q-002
quadrans
Galeria-Valeria_AE-26_GAL-VA-LERIA-AVG_VENERI-VICTRICI_crescent-Gamma_SIS_Siscia-309-310_RIC-211_C--_Q-001_26mm_4,98g-s.jpg
123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 211var Not in RIC, Crescent/Γ// SIS, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left,148 views123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 211var Not in RIC, Crescent/Γ// SIS, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left,
Galeria-Valeria, daughter of Diocletian and wife of Galerius, AE-26 Follis
avers: GAL VAL ERIA AVG, Diademed, decorated draped bust right. The robe around the neck of interesting shapes (some of Victoria ??) can be seen.
reverse: VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding the apple and raising skirt, crescent left, Γ right.
exergue: Crescent/Γ// SIS, diameter: 26mm, weight: 4,98g, axis: 1h,
mint: Siscia, date: 307-310 A.D., ref: RIC-211var-3rd.off, C-, this bust Not in RIC !!!
Q-001
quadrans
Galeria-Valeria_AE-26_GAL-VA-LERIA-AVG_VENERI-VICTRICI_crescent-Gamma_SIS_Siscia-309-310_RIC-211_C--_Q-001_26mm_4,98g-figures.jpg
123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 211var Not in RIC, Crescent/Γ// SIS, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, The decoration on the dress the part of the neck.138 views123 Galeria-Valeria (?-315 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VI 211var Not in RIC, Crescent/Γ// SIS, AE-Follis, VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, The decoration on the dress the part of the neck.
avers: GAL VALERIA AVG, Diademed, draped bust right. The robe around the neck of interesting shapes (some of Victoria or Erotes/Cupid ??) can be seen.
reverse: VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding the apple and raising skirt, crescent left, Gamma right.
"I would concur that they are Erotes/Cupids. Which, of course, would fit with the reverse type, Erotes being associated with Venus." by Adrianus. Thank you Adrianus.
exergue: -/-//SIS, diameter: 26mm, weight: 4,98g, axis: 1h,
mint: Siscia, date: 307-310 A.D., ref: RIC-211, C-,
Q-001
quadrans
RI_126d_img~0.jpg
126 - Severina, denarius - RIC 00621 viewsObv:– SEVERINA AVG, Diademed and draped bust right on crescent
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding Cupid and scepter
Minted in Rome (_ | G / VSV). Emission 10. end A.D. 274
Reference:– La Venera 1103-1104. Estiot 187. RIC 6

Weight 2.72g. 18.97mm.
maridvnvm
14-Gordian-III-RIC-116.jpg
13. Gordian III / RIC 116.24 viewsDenarius, 240 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG / Laureate bust of Gordian.
Reverse: VIRTVTI AVGVSTI / Hercules standing, resting right hand on hip and left hand club set on rock; lion-skin beside club.
3.58 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #116; Sear #8684.

The chronology of the denarii coinage of Gordian III has been poorly understood because Roman Imperial Coinage (RIC) has it mixed up in its listings. For example, it will tell you that 5 denarii (Diana, Pietas, Salus, Securitas, and Venus) were issued in the summer of 241 to commemorate the marriage of Gordian and Tranquillina. Recent thinking tells another entirely different story. The following summary is based on a posting by Curtis Clay, November 25, 2011, on the Forum Ancient Coins Classical Numismatics Discussion Board.
Although antoniniani were issued for a while under Caracalla and Elagabalus, the denarius was the standard silver denomination throughout the reigns of Severus Alexander, Maximinus Thrax, and into the first part of the joint reign of Balbinus & Pupienus. (This, by the way, is when the PIETAS AVGG denarius of Gordian as Caesar was issued.) Sometime during the short reign of Balbinus & Pupienus, the antoninianus supplanted the denarius as the standard silver denomination. When Gordian III became emperor (July 238), his administration continued to follow the then current practice of issuing only antoniniani.

Early in 240, Gordian apparently decided to revert back to the traditional coinage of the Empire and began to issue only denarii. The denarii issued at this time were the following:

P M TR P III COS P P / Horseman
DIANA LVCIFERA
PIETAS AVGVSTI
SALVS AVGVSTI
SECVRITAS PVBLICA
VENVS VICTRIX

No antoniniani exist with these reverse types.

The next issue of denarii was issued in the summer of 240 after Gordian became COS II, and consists of these types:

P M TR P III COS II P P / Emperor standing
P M TR P III COS II P P / Apollo seated
AETERNITATI AVG
IOVIS STATOR
LAETITIA AVG N
VIRTVTI AVGVSTI

Within a short time, however, it was decided to go back to having the antoninianus as the standard silver denomination. Antoniniani were issued again, at first with the same reverse types as the second issue of denarii. That is why these reverse types exist on denarii and antoniniani even though they were not issued at the same time.

So the period the mint issued denarii rather than antoniniani as the standard silver denomination lasted from about March through August, 240. This was the last time denarii were issued for general circulation. The antoninianus lasted until Diocletian’s coinage reform of 295, after which Roman coinage was so vastly different that there was no question of returning to the denarius.

The 13 denarii of Gordian III are presented in this album in this order:
Gordian III as Caesar denarius - 1 coin.
First issue of denarii - 6 coins.
Second issue of denarii - 6 coins.
Callimachus
RI 138b img.jpg
138 - Magnia Urbica - RIC 337 - (D | _)37 viewsAE Antoninianus.
Obv:– MAGNIA VRBICA AVG, Draped bust right on crescent, hair brushed in straight lines, plait carried up the back to top of head and running under stephane
Rev:– VENVS GENETRIX, Venus standing facing, head left, apple upward in right hand, vertical scepter in left
Minted in Lugdunum (D in left field).
RIC V pt. 2, 337. Bastien 617

Some areas flatly struck but still a quite pleasing example.
maridvnvm
RI 138a img.jpg
138 - Magnia Urbica - RIC 337 var - (A | _)43 viewsAE Antoninianus.
Obv:– MAGNIA VRBICA AVG, Draped bust right on crescent, hair brushed in straight lines, plait carried up the back to top of head and running under stephane
Rev:– VENVS GENETRIX, Venus standing facing, head left, apple upward in right hand, vertical scepter in left
Minted in Lugdunum (A in left field).
RIC V pt. 2, 337 var (not listed from this officina). Bastien -, Bastien Supplement -, Bastien Supplement II 613α (2 examples cited)
23mm, 3.16g
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_138c_img.jpg
138 - Magnia Urbica, Antoninianus - RIC V Pt 2 343 - (Rome)58 viewsObv:– MAGN VRBICA AVG, Draped bust right on crescent, hair brushed in straight lines, plait carried up the back to top of head and running under stephane
Rev:– VENVS V-I_CTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and scepter, shield at her feet
Minted in Rome (//KAS). A.D. 283-285
Reference:– RIC V Pt 2 343. Cohen 17.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
0021-040np_noir.jpg
1400 - Julius Caesar, Denarius250 viewsDenarius minted in North Africa c.47-46 BC
No legend, Diademed head of Venus right
CAESAR, Aeneas left, bearing Anchises on his shoulder
3.91 gr
Ref : HCRI # 55, RCV #1402, Cohen #12
5 commentsPotator II
faustinaII sest-RIC1387(AntPius).jpg
145-161 AD - FAUSTINA Junior molded sestertius - struck 145-161 AD 39 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVG P II AVG (draped bust right)
rev: VENVS / S.C. (Venus holding an apple & cornucopiae)
ref: not in RIC, similar to RIC III 1387 (Ant.Pius)
30.86gms, 33mm

The molded roman AE coins usually called 'Limes falsa' coins, because they were produced on the fringes of the Empire. 'Limes falsa' are immitations of bronze denominations like As, Dupondius or Sestertius.
This sestertius was used in Pannonia Inferior (here was found).
berserker
Denarius N.BALBUS.jpg
15-01 - C. NAEVIUS BALBUS (79 A.C.)52 viewsAR Denarius Aserrado 18 mm 3.4 gr
Anv: Cabeza con diadema de Venus viendo a derecha - "S C".
Rev: Victoria en triga cabalgando a derecha, "CXXXX" número de control sobre los caballos. "C·NAE·BALB·" (AB y AL en ligadura) en Exergo.
Una de las dos ocasiones en que se acuña una triga (Carruaje de guerra griego tirado por tres caballos) en las monedas romanas.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #309 Pag.130 - Craw RRC #382/1b - Syd CRR #769b -BMCRR #2926-76 - RSC Vol.1 Naevia 6 Pag.68
mdelvalle
Craw_382_1b_Denario_C__Naevius_Balbus_1.jpg
15-01 - C. NAEVIUS BALBUS (79 A.C.)15 viewsAR Denarius Aserrado 18 mm 3.4 gr

Anv: Cabeza con diadema de Venus viendo a derecha - "S C".
Rev: Victoria en triga cabalgando a derecha, "CXXXX" número de control sobre los caballos. "C·NAE·BALB·" (AB y AL en ligadura) en Exergo.
Una de las dos ocasiones en que se acuña una triga (Carruaje de guerra griego tirado por tres caballos) en las monedas romanas.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #309 Pag.130 - Craw RRC #382/1b - Syd CRR #769b -BMCRR #2926-76 - RSC Vol.1 Naevia 6 Pag.68
mdelvalle
Craw_382_1b_Denario_C__Naevius_Balbus_2.jpg
15-01 - C. NAEVIUS BALBUS (79 A.C.)15 viewsAR Denarius Aserrado 19 mm 3.8 gr
Anv: Cabeza con diadema de Venus viendo a derecha - "S C".
Rev: Victoria en triga cabalgando a derecha, "L" número de control sobre los caballos. "C·NAE·BALB·" (AB y AL en ligadura) en Exergo.
Una de las dos ocasiones en que se acuña una triga (Carruaje de guerra griego tirado por tres caballos) en las monedas romanas.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #309 Pag.130 - Craw RRC #382/1b - Syd CRR #769b -BMCRR #2926-76 - RSC Vol.1 Naevia 6 Pag.68
mdelvalle
faustinaII dup.jpg
161-176 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AE dupondius or as - struck 161-176 AD43 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA (diademed bust right)
rev: VE-NVS (Venus standing facing, head right, drawing back cloak with right hand over right shoulder and holding apple in extended left hand), S-C across field
ref: reverse RIC III 1770 (Marcus Aurelius)
11.38gms, 26mm
Rare - not in RIC

A nice hybrid Dupondius or orichalcum As with Faustina Junior obverse and Lucilla reverse. Thanks to Rupert for identify.
berserker
rjb_2017_07_s20a.jpg
161a8 viewsFaustina II (“Junior”)
Sestertius
Rome mint
Obv: FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL
Draped bust left
Rev: VENVS SC
Venus standing left holding apple and sceptre
BMC 2185 note, citing Hess, Lucerne, 15 Feb. 1934, lot 698 (same obv. die, different rev. die).
Strack 1322, citing Hess Lucerne 211, 9 May 1932, lot 1014, which is the same coin as the one in their 1934 sale cited by BMC.
1 commentsmauseus
crispina fourre denar.jpg
177-183 AD - CRISPINA fouree denarius - struck 180-183 AD36 viewsobv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: VENVS (Venus standing left, holding an apple)
ref: RIC III 286a (Commodus), C.35 (3frcs)
Scarce
berserker
LouisXVIII1822VenusdeMilo.JPG
1822. Louis XVIII. Discovery and presentatoin of Venus de Milo.140 viewsObv. Head of Louis XVIII to right LVDOVICVS XVIII FRANC ET NAV REX
Rev. Venus de Milo standing in front of Egyptian antiquities COLLECTIS EX AEGYPTO GREACIAQ MONVMENTIS / SVMTV REGIO BONARVM ARTVIM VTILITATI MDCCCXXII
AE50.

This medal commemorates the discovery and presentation of the statue Venus de Milo.
LordBest
jdomna_RIC632.jpg
193-196(?) AD - JULIA DOMNA AR denarius49 viewsobv: IVLIA DOMNA AVG (draped bust right, hair coiled and waved)
rev: VENERI VICTR (Venus half naked standing to r., holding an apple and a palm and leaning on a column)
ref: RIC IVi 632, C.194 (5frcs)
mint: Emesa and Laodicea (or probably Rome)
3.5gms, 18mm
Scarce

Julia Domna was the wife of Septimius Severus and mother of Caracalla and Geta. She was a great support for Severus in serving her family and the empire. A staunch opponent to Severus' praetorian prefect Plautianus, she attempted to turn his influence from the emperor. Her attempts to mitigate in the hatred between her two sons did not succeed. However, she seems to have prevented them from splitting the empire between them, fearing an all-out civil war. Perhaps this was one of the turning points of Roman history. If the empire had been divided at this time, future history may have become wholly different. Her greatest tragedy was probably the death of Geta in her arms from the murderers instigated by Caracalla. Nevertheless she continued serving the empire and Caracalla until, he too, was murdered. After bearing Caracalla's ashes to Rome, she starved herself to death.
2 commentsberserker
rjb_dom_04_09.jpg
193c29 viewsJulia Domna
AR denarius
Obv "IVLIA DOMNA AVG"
Draped bust right
Rev "VENERI VICTR"
Venus standing right from the back, leaning on a column and holding a branch and apple
Emisa mint
RIC 632
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_carac3_01_09.jpg
19824 viewsCaracalla 198-217 AD
AR antoninianus
Obv "ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "VENVS VICTRIX"
Venus standing left holding victoriola and resting on shield
Rome mint
RIC 311
2 commentsmauseus
CarIV312dLimes.jpg
198-217 AD - Caracalla - RIC IV 312d - Limes Denarius - Venus Reverse44 viewsEmperor: Caracalla (r. 198-217 AD)
Date: 213-217 AD
Condition: Fair
Denomination: Limes Denarius

Obverse: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Emperor Antoninus Pius (Caracalla) Germanicus
Head right; laureate

Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX
Victorious Venus
Venus standing left, holding helmet and sceptre and leaning on shield, captives seated right and left.

Limes Denarius of: RIC IV Caracalla 312d; VM 97/3 (Rome mint)
2.46g; 19.5mm; 0°
Pep
JuliusCaesarDenVenus.jpg
1aa Julius Caesar166 views60 BC (formation of the First Triumvirate)-44 BC (assassination)

Denarius
44 BC

Caesar's head, right, eight-pointed star behind. CAESAR IMP.
Venus standing left, holding victory and scepter. P SEPVLLIVS MACER.

RSC 41

Plutarch said of the first triumvirate: There is a law among the Romans, that whoever desires the honour of a triumph must stay without the city and expect his answer. And another, that those who stand for the consulship shall appear personally upon the place. Caesar was come home at the very time of choosing consuls, and being in a difficulty between these two opposite laws, sent to the senate to desire that, since he was obliged to be absent, he might sue for the consulship by his friends. Cato, being backed by the law, at first opposed his request; afterwards perceiving that Caesar had prevailed with a great part of the senate to comply with it, he made it his business to gain time, and went on wasting the whole day in speaking. Upon which Caesar thought fit to let the triumph fall, and pursued the consulship. Entering the town and coming forward immediately, he had recourse to a piece of state policy by which everybody was deceived but Cato. This was the reconciling of Crassus and Pompey, the two men who then were most powerful in Rome. There had been a quarrel between them, which he now succeeded in making up, and by this means strengthened himself by the united power of both, and so under the cover of an action which carried all the appearance of a piece of kindness and good-nature, caused what was in effect a revolution in the government. For it was not the quarrel between Pompey and Caesar, as most men imagine, which was the origin of the civil wars, but their union, their conspiring together at first to subvert the aristocracy, and so quarrelling afterwards between themselves.

Of Caesar's military leadership, Plutarch wrote: He was so much master of the good-will and hearty service of his soldiers that those who in other expeditions were but ordinary men displayed a courage past defeating or withstanding when they went upon any danger where Caesar's glory was concerned. . . . This love of honour and passion for distinction were inspired into them and cherished in them by Caesar himself, who, by his unsparing distribution of money and honours, showed them that he did not heap up wealth from the wars for his own luxury, or the gratifying his private pleasures, but that all he received was but a public fund laid by the reward and encouragement of valour, and that he looked upon all he gave to deserving soldiers as so much increase to his own riches. Added to this also, there was no danger to which he did not willingly expose himself, no labour from which he pleaded an exemption. His contempt of danger was not so much wondered at by his soldiers because they knew how much he coveted honour. But his enduring so much hardship, which he did to all appearance beyond his natural strength, very much astonished them. For he was a spare man, had a soft and white skin, was distempered in the head and subject to an epilepsy, which, it is said, first seized him at Corduba. But he did not make the weakness of his constitution a pretext for his ease, but rather used war as the best physic against his indispositions; whilst, by indefatigable journeys, coarse diet, frequent lodging in the field, and continual laborious exercise, he struggled with his diseases and fortified his body against all attacks. He slept generally in his chariots or litters, employing even his rest in pursuit of action. In the day he was thus carried to the forts, garrisons, and camps, one servant sitting with him, who used to write down what he dictated as he went, and a soldier attending behind him with his sword drawn.
2 commentsBlindado
PCrassusDenAmazon.jpg
1ab Marcus Licinius Crassus172 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Pompey in 60 BC, killed at Carrhae in Parthia in 53 BC.

Denarius, minted by son, P Licinius Crassus, ca 54 BC.
Bust of Venus, right, SC behind
Amazon with horse, P CRASSVS MF.

These coins were probably minted to pay Crassus' army for the invasion of Parthia. The reverse figure is sometimes described as a warrior or Gaulish horseman, but this example clearly accords with those who identify the figure as a woman! Member of the first triumvirate, 59-53 BC.

Seaby, Licinia 18

Plutarch wrote of Crassus: People were wont to say that the many virtues of Crassus were darkened by the one vice of avarice, and indeed he seemed to have no other but that; for it being the most predominant, obscured others to which he was inclined. The arguments in proof of his avarice were the vastness of his estate, and the manner of raising it; for whereas at first he was not worth above three hundred talents, yet, though in the course of his political life he dedicated the tenth of all he had to Hercules, and feasted the people, and gave to every citizen corn enough to serve him three months, upon casting up his accounts, before he went upon his Parthian expedition, he found his possessions to amount to seven thousand one hundred talents; most of which, if we may scandal him with a truth, he got by fire and rapine, making his advantages of the public calamities. . . . Crassus, however, was very eager to be hospitable to strangers; he kept open house, and to his friends he would lend money without interest, but called it in precisely at the time; so that his kindness was often thought worse than the paying the interest would have been. His entertainments were, for the most part, plain and citizen-like, the company general and popular; good taste and kindness made them pleasanter than sumptuosity would have done. As for learning he chiefly cared for rhetoric, and what would be serviceable with large numbers; he became one of the best speakers at Rome, and by his pains and industry outdid the best natural orators. . . . Besides, the people were pleased with his courteous and unpretending salutations and greetings, for he never met any citizen however humble and low, but he returned him his salute by name. He was looked upon as a man well-read in history, and pretty well versed in Aristotle's philosophy. . . . Crassus was killed by a Parthian, called Pomaxathres; others say by a different man, and that Pomaxathres only cut off his head and right hand after he had fallen. But this is conjecture rather than certain knowledge, for those that were by had not leisure to observe particulars. . . .
2 commentsBlindado
PCrassusDenAmazon~0.jpg
1ab Marcus Licinius Crassus17 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Pompey in 60 BC, killed at Carrhae in Parthia in 53 BC.

Denarius, minted by son, P Licinius Crassus, ca 54 BC.
Bust of Venus, right, SC behind
Amazon with horse, P CRASSVS MF.

Seaby, Licinia 18

These coins were probably minted to pay Crassus' army for the invasion of Parthia, which led to its destruction. My synthesis of reviewing 90 examples of this issue revealed a female warrior wearing a soft felt Scythian cap with ear flaps; a fabric garment with a decorated skirt to the knees; probably trousers; an ornate war belt; a baldric; a cape, animal skin, or shoulder cord on attached to the left shoulder; and decorated calf-high boots. She matches the historically confirmed garb of the real amazons—Scythian horsewomen—and of course holds her steed. The horse’s tack is consistent with archeological discoveries of tack in use by Scythians and Romans.

Adrienne Mayor writes that amazon imagery on Greek vases suddenly appeared in 575-550 BC, initially depicting them in Greek-style armor. By the end of the century, as the Greeks learned more through direct and indirect contact with Scythians, they began to appear wearing archeologically confirmed Scythian-Sarmatian-Thracian patterned attire. (Adrienne Mayor, The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2014, 199-200). To this, artists added their own creative ideas regarding colors, fabric patterns, and decorations. “They dressed the warrior women in body-hugging ‘unitards’ or tunics, short chitons or belted dresses, sometimes over leggings or trousers. . . . In paintings and sculpture, pointed or soft Scythian caps with earflaps or ties (kidaris) soon replaced the Greek helmets, and the women wear a variety of belts, baldrics (diagonal straps), corselets, shoulder cords or bands, and crisscrossing leather straps attached to belt loops like those worn by the archer huntress Artemis. . . . Amazon footgear included soft leather moccasin-like shoes, calf-high boots (endromides), or taller laced boots (embades) with scallops or flaps and lined with felt or fur.” (Mayor, 202)

The artists apparently had detailed knowledge of gear used by real Scythian horsewomen to equip their imagined Amazons. “Archeological discoveries of well-preserved sets of clothing confirm that real horsewomen of ancient Scythian lands dressed much as did those described in Greek texts and illustrated in Scythian and Greek artwork.” (Mayor, 203)
1 commentsBlindado
PCrassusDenAmazon2.jpg
1ab_2 Marcus Licinius Crassus34 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Pompey in 60 BC, killed at Carrhae in Parthia in 53 BC.

Denarius, minted by son, P Licinius Crassus, ca 54 BC.
Bust of Venus, right, SC behind
Amazon with horse, P CRASSVS MF.

Seaby, Licinia 18

These coins were probably minted to pay Crassus' army for the invasion of Parthia. My synthesis of reviewing 90 examples of this issue revealed a female warrior wearing a soft felt Scythian cap with ear flaps (visible in this example); a fabric garment with a decorated skirt to the knees; probably trousers; an ornate war belt; a baldric; a cape, animal skin, or shoulder cord on attached to the left shoulder; and decorated calf-high boots. She matches the historically confirmed garb of the real amazons—Scythian horsewomen—and of course holds her steed. The horse’s tack is consistent with archeological discoveries of tack in use by Scythians and Romans.

Adrienne Mayor writes that amazon imagery on Greek vases suddenly appeared in 575-550 BC, initially depicting them in Greek-style armor. By the end of the century, as the Greeks learned more through direct and indirect contact with Scythians, they began to appear wearing archeologically confirmed Scythian-Sarmatian-Thracian patterned attire. (Adrienne Mayor, The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2014, 199-200). To this, artists added their own creative ideas regarding colors, fabric patterns, and decorations. “They dressed the warrior women in body-hugging ‘unitards’ or tunics, short chitons or belted dresses, sometimes over leggings or trousers. . . . In paintings and sculpture, pointed or soft Scythian caps with earflaps or ties (kidaris) soon replaced the Greek helmets, and the women wear a variety of belts, baldrics (diagonal straps), corselets, shoulder cords or bands, and crisscrossing leather straps attached to belt loops like those worn by the archer huntress Artemis. . . . Amazon footgear included soft leather moccasin-like shoes, calf-high boots (endromides), or taller laced boots (embades) with scallops or flaps and lined with felt or fur.” (Mayor, 202)
The artists apparently had detailed knowledge of gear used by real Scythian horsewomen to equip their imagined Amazons. “Archeological discoveries of well-preserved sets of clothing confirm that real horsewomen of ancient Scythian lands dressed much as did those described in Greek texts and illustrated in Scythian and Greek artwork.” (Mayor, 203)

Plutarch wrote of Crassus: People were wont to say that the many virtues of Crassus were darkened by the one vice of avarice, and indeed he seemed to have no other but that; for it being the most predominant, obscured others to which he was inclined. The arguments in proof of his avarice were the vastness of his estate, and the manner of raising it; for whereas at first he was not worth above three hundred talents, yet, though in the course of his political life he dedicated the tenth of all he had to Hercules, and feasted the people, and gave to every citizen corn enough to serve him three months, upon casting up his accounts, before he went upon his Parthian expedition, he found his possessions to amount to seven thousand one hundred talents; most of which, if we may scandal him with a truth, he got by fire and rapine, making his advantages of the public calamities. . . . Crassus, however, was very eager to be hospitable to strangers; he kept open house, and to his friends he would lend money without interest, but called it in precisely at the time; so that his kindness was often thought worse than the paying the interest would have been. His entertainments were, for the most part, plain and citizen-like, the company general and popular; good taste and kindness made them pleasanter than sumptuosity would have done. As for learning he chiefly cared for rhetoric, and what would be serviceable with large numbers; he became one of the best speakers at Rome, and by his pains and industry outdid the best natural orators. . . . Besides, the people were pleased with his courteous and unpretending salutations and greetings, for he never met any citizen however humble and low, but he returned him his salute by name. He was looked upon as a man well-read in history, and pretty well versed in Aristotle's philosophy. . . . Crassus was killed by a Parthian, called Pomaxathres; others say by a different man, and that Pomaxathres only cut off his head and right hand after he had fallen. But this is conjecture rather than certain knowledge, for those that were by had not leisure to observe particulars. . . .
1 commentsBlindado
PCrassusDenAmazon2~1.jpg
1ab_2 Marcus Licinius Crassus35 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Pompey in 60 BC, killed at Carrhae in Parthia in 53 BC.

Denarius, minted by son, P Licinius Crassus, ca 54 BC.
Bust of Venus, right, SC behind
Amazon with horse, P CRASSVS MF.

Seaby, Licinia 18

These coins were probably minted to pay Crassus' army for the invasion of Parthia, which led to its destruction. My synthesis of reviewing 90 examples of this issue revealed a female warrior wearing a soft felt Scythian cap with ear flaps (visible in this example); a fabric garment with a decorated skirt to the knees; probably trousers; an ornate war belt; a baldric; a cape, animal skin, or shoulder cord on attached to the left shoulder; and decorated calf-high boots. She matches the historically confirmed garb of the real amazons—Scythian horsewomen—and of course holds her steed. The horse’s tack is consistent with archeological discoveries of tack in use by Scythians and Romans.

Adrienne Mayor writes that amazon imagery on Greek vases suddenly appeared in 575-550 BC, initially depicting them in Greek-style armor. By the end of the century, as the Greeks learned more through direct and indirect contact with Scythians, they began to appear wearing archeologically confirmed Scythian-Sarmatian-Thracian patterned attire. (Adrienne Mayor, The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2014, 199-200). To this, artists added their own creative ideas regarding colors, fabric patterns, and decorations. “They dressed the warrior women in body-hugging ‘unitards’ or tunics, short chitons or belted dresses, sometimes over leggings or trousers. . . . In paintings and sculpture, pointed or soft Scythian caps with earflaps or ties (kidaris) soon replaced the Greek helmets, and the women wear a variety of belts, baldrics (diagonal straps), corselets, shoulder cords or bands, and crisscrossing leather straps attached to belt loops like those worn by the archer huntress Artemis. . . . Amazon footgear included soft leather moccasin-like shoes, calf-high boots (endromides), or taller laced boots (embades) with scallops or flaps and lined with felt or fur.” (Mayor, 202)

The artists apparently had detailed knowledge of gear used by real Scythian horsewomen to equip their imagined Amazons. “Archeological discoveries of well-preserved sets of clothing confirm that real horsewomen of ancient Scythian lands dressed much as did those described in Greek texts and illustrated in Scythian and Greek artwork.” (Mayor, 203)
2 commentsBlindado
Cleopatra80DrachEagle.jpg
1ad Cleopatra VII55 views51-29 BC

Alexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871

Plutarch wrote: [Cleopatra] was to meet Antony in the time of life when women's beauty is most splendid, and their intellects are in full maturity. . . . She received several letters, both from Antony and from his friends, to summon her, but she took no account of these orders; and at last, as if in mockery of them, she came sailing up the river Cydnus, in a barge with gilded stern and outspread sails of purple, while oars of silver beat time to the music of flutes and fifes and harps. She herself lay all along under a canopy of cloth of gold, dressed as Venus in a picture, and beautiful young boys, like painted Cupids, stood on each side to fan her. Her maids were dressed like sea nymphs and graces, some steering at the rudder, some working at the ropes. The perfumes diffused themselves from the vessel to the shore, which was covered with multitudes, part following the galley up the river on either bank, part running out of the city to see the sight. The market-place was quite emptied, and Antony at last was left alone sitting upon the tribunal; while the word went through all the multitude, that Venus was come to feast with Bacchus, for the common good of Asia. On her arrival, Antony sent to invite her to supper. She thought it fitter he should come to her; so, willing to show his good-humour and courtesy, he complied, and went. . . . For her actual beauty, it is said, was not in itself so remarkable that none could be compared with her, or that no one could see her without being struck by it, but the contact of her presence, if you lived with her, was irresistible; the attraction of her person, joining with the charm of her conversation, and the character that attended all she said or did, was something bewitching. It was a pleasure merely to hear the sound of her voice, with which, like an instrument of many strings, she could pass from one language to another; so that there were few of the barbarian nations that she answered by an interpreter. . . .
Blindado
LucillaSestVenus.jpg
1bm Lucilla164 viewsWife of Lucius Verus, executed 182 AD

Sestertius
Draped bust, right, LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Venus standing facing left holding apple, drawing out robe, VENUS

RIC 1767

Daughter of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior, she married Lucius Verus in 164.

According to Herodian: For the present, however, the memory of his father and his respect for his advisers held Commodus in check. But then a disastrous stroke of ill fortune completely altered his previously mild, moderate disposition. It happened this way. The oldest of the emperor's sisters was Lucilla. She had formerly been married to Lucius Verus Caesar. . . . But after Lucius died, Lucilla, who retained all the privileges of her imperial position, was married by her father to Pompeianus.

Commodus, too, allowed his sister to retain the imperial honors; she continued to occupy the imperial seat at the theaters, and the sacred fire was carried before her. But when Commodus married Crispina, custom demanded that the front seat at the theater be assigned to the empress. Lucilla found this difficult to endure, and felt that any honor paid to the empress was an insult to her; but since she was well aware that her husband Pompeianus was devoted to Commodus, she told him nothing about her plans to seize control of the empire. Instead, she tested the sentiments of a wealthy young nobleman, Quadratus, with whom she was rumored to be sleeping in secret. Complaining constantly about this matter of imperial precedence, she soon persuaded the young man to set in motion a plot which brought destruction upon himself and the entire senate.

Quadratus, in selecting confederates among the prominent senators, prevailed upon Quintianus, a bold and reckless young senator, to conceal a dagger beneath his robe and, watching for a suitable time and place, to stab Commodus; as for the rest, he assured Quintianus that he would set matters straight by bribes.

But the assassin, standing in the entrance to the amphitheater (it was dark there and he hoped to escape detection), drew his dagger and shouted at Commodus that he had been sent by the Senate to kill him. Quintianus wasted time making his little speech and waving his dagger; as a result, he was seized by the emperor's bodyguards before he could strike, and died for his stupidity in revealing the plot prematurely.

This was the initial reason for the young emperor's hatred of the Senate. He took Quintianus' words to heart and, ever mindful of what his attacker had said, now considered the entire Senate his collective enemy.

This incident also gave Perennis sufficient excuse for taking action, for he was always advising the emperor to eliminate and destroy the prominent men. By confiscating their property, Perennis easily made himself the richest man of his time. After the attempt at assassination had been thoroughly investigated by the prefect, Commodus without mercy put to death his sister, all those actually involved in the plot, and any who were under the slightest suspicion as well.
3 commentsBlindado
JuliaDomDenVenus.jpg
1bt Julia Domna14 viewsDenarius

Draped bust, right, IVLIA AVGVSTA
Venus with bare bottom, VENERI VICTR

RIC 536

According to the Historia Augusta, "Next [Septimius Severus] was appointed legate of Lugdunensis. When he wished to marry a second time, after losing his wife, he investigated the horoscopes of potential brides, being very skilled in astrology himself, and since he had heard that there was a certain woman in Syria whose horoscope forecast that she would marry a king, he sought her hand. It was of courseJulia, and he gained her as his bride through the mediation offriends. She at once made him a father! . . . [A]s concerns his family he was less careful, retaining his wife Julia who was notorious for her adulteries and was also guilty of conspiracy."
Blindado
JuliaSoaemDenVenusCal.jpg
1cc Julia Soaemias11 viewsDenarius

Draped bust, right, IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG

Venus std, VENVS CAELESTIS

The mother of Elegabalus, she died at the same time as her son.

RIC 243
Blindado
MagniaUrbicaAntVenus.jpg
1dr2 Magnia Urbica3 viewsWife of Carinus

AE Antoninianus

Diademed & draped bust right, resting on crescent, right, MAGNIA VRBICA AVG
Venus standing left, leaning against shield, & holding helmet in right hand, scepter in left VENVS VICTRIX

RIC 347
Blindado
GalValFollis.jpg
1dw Galeria Valeria15 viewsDaughter of Diocletian and wife of Galerius.

Follis, Cyzicus

Diademed & draped bust, right, GAL VALERIA AVG
Venus standing left, holding up apple in right hand & raising drapery over shoulder with left, D left, MKV in ex, VENERI VITRICI

RIC 46
Blindado
Titi_denario_VENVS_AVGVST.jpg
20-01 - JULIA TITI (79 - 81 D.C.)28 viewsHija de Tito
AR Denario 20 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA TITI AVGVSTI F" - Busto vestido y con diadema viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS AVGVST" - Venus semi-desnuda, viendo a derecha, apoyada en Cippus (columna corta), portando Yelmo en mano der. y jabalina en izq.

Acuñada 79 - 80 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.II (Titus) #56 Pag.122 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2612 Pag.480 - BMCRE Titus #141 - Cohen Vol.1 #276 Pag.388 - DVM #3 Pag.108 - CBN Titus #106 - RSC Vol. II #14 Pag.60
mdelvalle
RIC_56_Denario_Julia_Titi.jpg
20-01 - JULIA TITI (79 - 81 D.C.)13 viewsHija de Tito
AR Denario 20 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA TITI AVGVSTI F" - Busto vestido y con diadema viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS AVGVST" - Venus semi-desnuda, viendo a derecha, apoyada en Cippus (columna corta), portando Yelmo en mano der. y jabalina en izq.

Acuñada 79 - 80 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.II (Titus) #56 Pag.122 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2612 Pag.480 - BMCRE Titus #141 - Cohen Vol.1 #276 Pag.388 - DVM #3 Pag.108 - CBN Titus #106 - RSC Vol. II #14 Pag.60
mdelvalle
coins123.JPG
202a. Plautilla60 viewsVenus

The Roman goddess of love and beauty, but originally a vegetation goddess and patroness of gardens and vineyards. Later, under Greek influence, she was equated with Aphrodite and assumed many of her aspects. Her cult originated from Ardea and Lavinium in Latium. The oldest temple known of Venus dates back to 293 BCE, and was inaugurated on August 18. Later, on this date the Vinalia Rustica was observed. A second festival, that of the Veneralia, was celebrated on April 1 in honor of Venus Verticordia, who later became the protector against vice. Her temple was built in 114 BCE. After the Roman defeat near Lake Trasum in 215 BCE, a temple was built on the Capitol for Venus Erycina. This temple was officially opened on April 23, and a festival, the Vinalia Priora, was instituted to celebrate the occasion.

Venus is the daughter of Jupiter, and some of her lovers include Mars and Vulcan, modeled on the affairs of Aphrodite. Venus' importance rose, and that of her cult, through the influence of several Roman political leaders. The dictator Sulla made her his patroness, and both Julius Caesar and the emperor Augustus named her the ancestor of their (Julian) family: the 'gens Julia' was Aeneas, son of Venus and the mortal Anchises. Ceasar introduced the cult of Venus Genetrix, the goddess of motherhood and marriage, and built a temple for her in 46 BCE. She was also honored in the temple of Mars Ultor. The last great temple of Venus was built by the emperor Hadrianus near the Colusseum in 135 CE.

Roman statues and portraits of Venus are usually identical to the Greek representations of Aphrodite.

AR Denarius. PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple & palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet. RSC 25.
ecoli
coin232.JPG
204c. Julia Soaemias29 viewsJulia Soaemias Bassiana (180-March 11, 222) was the daughter of Julia Maesa, a powerful Roman woman of Syrian origin, and Julius Avitus. She was niece of emperor Septimius Severus and sister of Julia Avita Mamaea.

She was married to Sextus Varius Marcellus, a Syrian Roman of an Equestrian family (meaning not a member of the Roman senate). As members of the imperial Roman family, they lived in Rome, where their numerous children were born. In 217, her cousin emperor Caracalla was killed and Macrinus ascended to the imperial throne. Julia's family was allowed to returned to Syria with the whole of their financial assets. They would not allow the usurper to stand unopposed. Together with her mother, Julia plotted to substitute Macrinus with her son Varius Avitus Bassianus (Heliogabalus). To legitimise this plot, Julia and her mother spread the rumour that the 13-year-old boy was Caracalla's illegitimate son. In 218 Macrinus was killed and Heliogabalus became emperor. Julia then became the de facto ruler of Rome, since the teenager was concerned mainly with religious matters. Their rule was not popular and soon discontent arose. Julia Soaemias and Heliogabalus were killed by the Praetorian Guard in 222. Julia was later declared public enemy and her name erased from all records.

Julia Soaemias Denarius. 220 AD. IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, draped bust right / VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated left, holding scepter, extending her hand to Cupid standing before her. RSC 14.
ecoli
rjb_2016_07_07.jpg
2197 viewsJulia Paula
Denarius
Obv:IVLIA PAVLA AVG
Draped bust right
Rev: VENVS GENETRIX
Venus enthroned left holding apple and sceptre
Rome mint
RIC 222
mauseus
J-Soaemias-RIC-241.jpg
22. J. Soaemias.14 viewsDenarius, 220 - 222 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG / Bust of Julia Soaemias.
Reverse: VENVS CAELESTIS / Venus standing, holding apple and sceptre.
3.14 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #241; Sear #7719.

The coinage of Julia Soaemias is much smaller than that of her mother. Coins of the "eastern style" do not exist for her, so it is likely that her coinage started after the eastern mint(s) was closed. Her coinage, then, was entirely minted at Rome, and spans the years 220 - 222.
Callimachus
jsoemias den-.jpg
220 AD - JULIA SOAEMIAS denarius 20 viewsobv: IVLIA SOAMIAS AVG (draped bust right)
rev: VENVS CAELESTIS (Venus seated left, holding scepter, extending her hand to Cupid standing before her)
ref: RIC243(Elagabalus), C.14
mint: Rome, 2.32g
She was the mother of Elagabalus, killed together his son by Praetorian Guard in 222 AD
berserker
22068.jpg
22068 Julia Domna/Venus9 viewsJulia Domna/Venus
Obv: IVLIA AVGVSTA
draped bust right
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing facing holding helmet and palm, leaning on column, shield at foot
Mint: Rome 18.1mm 2.9g

RIC IV Septimius Severus 581 (denarius)
Blayne W
rjb_j_mam1_10_07.jpg
222b26 viewsJulia Mamaea
AR denarius
Obv "IVLIA MAMAEA AVG"
Diademed draped bust right
Rev "VENERI FELICI"
Venus standing right
Rome mint
RIC 351
mauseus
mamaea sest.jpg
224 AD (?)- JULIA MAMAEA sestertius 31 viewsobv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA (diademed and draped bust right)
rev: VENVS FELIX (Venus seated left, holding statuette and scepter), S-C in ex.
ref: RIC 701, Cohen 69, BMC 197
21.35gms, 30mm
berserker
J-Paula-RIC-222.jpg
23. J. Paula.21 viewsDenarius, 219 - 220 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IVLIA PAVLA AVG / Bust of Julia Paula.
Reverse: VENVS GENETRIX / Venus seated, holding globe and sceptre.
2.06 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #222; Sear #7658.
1 commentsCallimachus
1195Hadrian_anonymous_RIC24.jpg
24 Anonymous issues. Time of Hadrian to Antoninus Pius. Rome Quadrans 117-161 AD25 viewsReference.
RIC 24

Obv.
Diademed and draped bust of Venus right

Rev. S-C
Dove standing right.

4.05 gr
15 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
rjb_severina2_10_07.jpg
270b18 viewsSeverina,
AE denarius
Rome mint
Obv "SEVERINA AVG"
Diademed and draped bust right
Rev "VENVS FELIX"
Venus standing left holding sceptre and small figure
-/-//Δ
RIC 6; Gőbl 141
mauseus
1168Hadrian_RIC28.jpg
28 Anonymous issues. Time of Hadrian to Antoninus Pius. Rome Quadrans 117-161 AD11 viewsReference.
RIC 28; C. 38

Obv.
Griffin seated left

Rev. S-C
Tripod.

2.43 gr
15 mm
6h

Note.
The series of Imperial-era anonymous quadrantes portrays eleven deities: Jupiter, Minerva, Roma, Neptune, Tiber, Mars, Venus, Apollo, Mercury, Bacchus/Liber, and Hercules, as well as the Four Seasons. They invariably depict either a portrait on the obverse and an attribute of the deity on the reverse, or otherwise an attribute on either side. These designs appear to be influenced, but not directly copied from, earlier designs of the Republican period.
okidoki
39Hadrian__RIC280~0.jpg
280 Hadrian Denarius Roma 134-38 AD Venus36 viewsReference.
RIC 280a var Globe; C 1449 (no globe); Strack 276(no globe)

Obv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
laureate head right

Rev. VENERIS FELICIS
Venus, mantled and diademed, seated left on throne, holding statuette of Cupid, and sceptre,globe in exergue

3.04 gr
19 mm
12h
okidoki
345-magnia urbica-.jpg
283-285 AD - MAGNIA URBICA antoninianus 57 viewsobv: M[AGN.VRB]ICA.AVG (diademed & draped bust right)
rev: [VEN]VS.VICTRIX (Venus standing left, leaning against shield, & holding helmet in right hand, scepter in left)
ref: RIC343 v. RIC347, C.17 v.C.15
mint: Rome or Ticinum, struck 284-285 AD
1.98gms, 21mm
Scarce
She was the wife of Carinus. The coin broken, added shape.
1 commentsberserker
rjb_gval2_04_07.jpg
305a38 viewsGaleria Valeria
AE Follis
Obv: GAL VALERIA AVG
Diademed, draped bust facing with necklace, head right
Rev: VENERI VICTRICI
Venus standing left, holding apple and vertical sceptre
*/delta/.SM.TS.
Thessalonica Mint
RIC (VI) Thessalonica 36
2 commentsmauseus
rjb_gval1_04_07.jpg
305a16 viewsGaleria Valeria
AE Follis
Obv: GAL VALERIA AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Rev: VENERI VICTRICI
Venus standing left, holding apple and vertical sceptre
Δ/-//MKV
Cyzicus Mint
RIC (VI) Cyzicus 46
mauseus
coin248.JPG
309a. Salonina22 viewsSalonina Antoninianus / Venus

Attribution: Van Meter 49
Date: 260-268 AD
Obverse: SALONINIA AVG, bust r.
Reverse: VENVS VICT, Venus l. holding helmet and scepter
Size: 20x17mm
Weight: 2.5 grams
Description: A decent ant of the wife of Gallienus
ecoli
323-1_-_Ivlia.jpg
323/1. Julia - denarius (101 BC)8 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 101 BC)
O/ Helmeted head of Roma right; corn-ear behind.
R/ Victory in biga right, holding reins in both hands; L IVLI below.
3.84g; 19mm
Crawford 323/1 (47 obverse dies/59 reverse dies)

* Lucius Julius:

Although our moneyer belonged to the very famous gens Julia, his life is completely unknown. The Julii had been among the important patrician gentes of the early Republic, but fell in obscurity in the fourth century. In the second century, a new branch emerged, the Julii Caesares, but Crawford notes that our moneyer cannot be a Caesar because he did not use this cognomen and his coins lack a reference to Venus (cf. RRC 258 and 320).

The corn ear on the obverse refers to grain distributions, which often featured on Republican coins (RRC 242, 243, 245, 260, 261, 306, 330).
Joss
Denario_Lucilla_RIC_786.jpg
36-02 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)87 viewsAR Denario 19 x 17 mm 2.7 gr.

Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucila (7 de marzo de 150 - 182) fue la hija mayor del emperador romano Marco Aurelio y Faustina la Menor y hermana de Cómodo. En el año 164 d. C., el emperador Marco Aurelio casó a su hija Annia Lucilla, con su socio en el poder y hermano de adopción Lucio Aurelio Vero. Después de la muerte del emperador Lucio Vero en 169, Lucila se volvió a casar, esta vez con Claudius Pompeianus y se entregó al desenfreno y depravación, viviendo incluso una incestuosa relación con su hermano Cómodo. El emperador Cómodo sufrió numerosos complots y después de descubrir algunos de ellos, empezó un periodo de terror en el que numerosas personalidades influyentes fueron acusadas y condenadas a muerte. Incluso sus más allegados, como su esposa Crispina y su hermana Lucila fueron acusadas de traición, deportadas a Caprea (isla de Capri) y más tarde asesinadas. Lucila había realmente conspirado junto con un grupo de senadores, pero durante el año 182 fue descubierta y murió en Capri, por orden de emperador. Los senadores líderes también fueron ejecutados. [Fuente WIKIPEDIA]

Anv: "LVCILLA AVGVSTA"- Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS VICTRIX" - Venus estante a izquierda portando Victoriola en la mano derecha extendida y apoyando la izquierda en un escudo.

Acuñada 166 - 169 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #786 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5492 – BMCRE IV #353 - Cohen Vol.III #89 Pag.222 - DVM #15 Pag.158 – RSC II #89 - MIR.18/45 -4
mdelvalle
RIC_786_Denario_Lucila.jpg
36-02 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)12 viewsAR Denario 19 x 17 mm 2.7 gr.

Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucila (7 de marzo de 150 - 182) fue la hija mayor del emperador romano Marco Aurelio y Faustina la Menor y hermana de Cómodo. En el año 164 d. C., el emperador Marco Aurelio casó a su hija Annia Lucilla, con su socio en el poder y hermano de adopción Lucio Aurelio Vero. Después de la muerte del emperador Lucio Vero en 169, Lucila se volvió a casar, esta vez con Claudius Pompeianus y se entregó al desenfreno y depravación, viviendo incluso una incestuosa relación con su hermano Cómodo. El emperador Cómodo sufrió numerosos complots y después de descubrir algunos de ellos, empezó un periodo de terror en el que numerosas personalidades influyentes fueron acusadas y condenadas a muerte. Incluso sus más allegados, como su esposa Crispina y su hermana Lucila fueron acusadas de traición, deportadas a Caprea (isla de Capri) y más tarde asesinadas. Lucila había realmente conspirado junto con un grupo de senadores, pero durante el año 182 fue descubierta y murió en Capri, por orden de emperador. Los senadores líderes también fueron ejecutados. [Fuente WIKIPEDIA]

Anv: "LVCILLA AVGVSTA"- Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS VICTRIX" - Venus estante a izquierda portando Victoriola en la mano derecha extendida y apoyando la izquierda en un escudo.

Acuñada 166 - 169 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #786 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5492 – BMCRE IV #353 Pag.432 (Plate 59 #10) - Cohen Vol.III #89 Pag.222 - DVM #15 Pag.158 – RSC II #89 Pag.234 - MIR.18/45 -4
mdelvalle
AS o Dupondio LUCILA RIC 1764.jpg
36-12 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)45 viewsAE AS 25 x 22 mm 10.9 gr.
Hija de Marco Aurelio y Faustina hija, esposa de Lucio Vero.

Anv: "LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AV[G F]" - Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS - S C" - Venus de pié a izquierda portando una manzana en la mano derecha y largo cetro vertical en la izquierda.

Acuñada 164 - 166 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #1764 Pag.354 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5524 Pag.373 - BMCRE #1189 - Cohen Vol.III #73 Pag.220 - DVM #32 var Pag.158 - MIR Vol.18 #16
mdelvalle
RIC_1764_Sestercio_Lucila.jpg
36-12 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)8 viewsAE AS 25 x 22 mm 10.9 gr.
Hija de Marco Aurelio y Faustina hija, esposa de Lucio Vero.

Anv: "LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AV[G F]" - Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS - S C" - Venus de pié a izquierda portando una manzana en la mano derecha y largo cetro vertical en la izquierda.

Acuñada 164 - 166 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #1764 Pag.354 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5524 Pag.373 - BMCRE IV #1189 Pag.574 (Plates 77 #8 y 9) - Cohen Vol.III #73 Pag.220 - DVM #32 var Pag.158 - MIR Vol.18 #16
mdelvalle
SCPanoramaBlack.jpg
382/1b C Naevius Balbus43 viewsC. Naevius Balbus. AR Denarius Serrate. Rome mint. 79 BC. Rev: Diademed head of Venus right, SC behind. Rev: Victory driving galloping triga right, CLXXVII above; C·NAE·BALB in
exergue.
Syd 769b; Naevia 6; Crawford 382/1b

By die comparison, controlnumber 127.

1 commentsPaddy
coin223.JPG
406a. Galeria Valeria24 viewsGaleria Valeria was Diocletian's daughter and, to cement the alliance between Diocletian and Galerius, Valeria was married to Galerius. It appears that this was not a very happy marriage. Galeria Valeria was sympathetic towards Christians during this time of severe persecution and it is possible that she was actually a Christian herself. The imperial couple were not blessed with any children during their eighteen year marriage. After Galerius died in A. D. 311, Galeria Valeria and her mother went to live at the court of Maximinus Daia, the caesar who became emperor of the East upon the death of Galerius.

Maximinus proposed marriage to Valeria soon afterward. He was probably more interested in her wealth and the prestige he would gain by marrying the widow of one emperor and the daughter of another than he was in Valeria as a person. She refused his hand, and immediately Maximinus reacted with hatred and fury. Diocletian, by now an old man living in a seaside villa on the Dalmatian coast, begged Maximinus to allow the two women to come home to him. Maximinus refused and had Valeria and her mother banished to live in a village in Syria.

During the civil war that erupted between Maximinus and Licinius, Valeria and Prisca disguised themselves and escaped, trying to reach the safety of Diocletian's villa. In the meantime, Diocletian had died, leaving the women without a haven of safety to which to run. For fifteen months the two royal fugitives traveled from one city to another, always living in fear of being discovered and in search of a little peace.

Finally, they were recognized by someone in the Greek city of Salonika. They were hastily taken to a square in the city and beheaded before a crowd of citizens who had once revered them as empresses. The bodies of Valeria and her mother were afterwards thrown into the sea.

Galeria Valeria Follis. AD 308-311. GAL VAL-ERIA AVG, Diademed & draped bust right / VENERI V-ICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding apple & scepter, * to left, G to right, (dot)SM(dot)TS(dot) in ex.
ecoli
Longus.jpg
42 BC L. Mussidius Longus129 viewsCONCORDIA
Veiled and diad. head of Concordia right star below chin

L. MVSSIDIVS LONGVS
Shrine of Venus Cloacina consisting of circular platform, inscribed CLOACIN, surmounted by two statues of the goddess

Rome
42 BC

3.42g
Sear 494, RRC 494/42

ex-Canadian Coin

In Roman mythology, Cloacina (Latin, cloaca: "sewer" or "drain") was the goddess who presided over the Cloaca Maxima the main sewer drain in Rome. The Cloaca Maxima is traditionally said to have beeen started by one of Rome's Etruscan kings, Tarquinius Priscus. Despite her Etruscan origins, she later became identified with Venus.

Titus Tatius, who reigned with Romulus, erected a statue to Cloacina as the spirit of the "Great Drain". As well as controlling sewers, she was also a protector of sexual intercourse in marriage. The Romans believed that a good sewage system was important for the success of Rome, as a good sewer system was necessary for the physical health of Roman citizens. Additionally, Romans worshipped Cloacina as the goddess of purity. Cloacina was worshipped as an aspect of Venus at the small Shrine of Venus Cloacina, located in front of the Basilica Aemilia in the Roman Forum and directly above the Cloaca Maxima. The depiction on the reverse of this coin is that shrine.

The image of Concordia could be interpreted to convey the thought of Unity between the triumvirs to defeat Brutus and Cassius. Venus Cloacina on the reverse conveys the thought of purification for the treacherous murder of the dictator Julius Caesar by men who claimed to be his friends.
4 commentsJay GT4
rjb_2014_11_04.jpg
42442 viewsC. Considius Nonianus; c.56 BC
AR denarius
Obv: "C. CONSIDI. NONIANI SC"
Laureate and diademed bust of Venus Erycina right
Rev: "ERVC"
Temple on summit of mountain, surrounded with rampart and central gateway
Crawford 424/1.
3 commentsmauseus
Caesar~4.jpg
44 BC Julius Caesar Lifetime Portrait denarius432 viewsCAESAR DICT PERPETVO
laureate head of Julius Caesar right

L BVCA
Venus seated right holding Victory on extended right hand, transverse scepter in left

Struck Feb - Mar 14th, 44 BC.

3.58g

RCV 1410, RSC 24.

Venus seated' only appears on this one type of Caesar's 'lifetime' issues, on the remainder she is standing.

Lucius Aemilius Buca was a distant relative of the dictator Sulla. This coin was struck within a month of Caesar's murder.

Ex-Incitatus, Ex-CNG Electronic Auction 223, lot 393
6 commentsJay GT4
Caesar~0.jpg
46-45 BC Gauis Julius Caesar90 viewsDiademed head of Venus right, small cupid at shoulder behind


CAESAR
trophy of Gallic arms between two seated male and female captives

Spain 46-45 BC

3.71g
Sear 1404

ex-Calgary coins

Minted for the Spanish campaign against the Pompey brothers, the obverse of this series is occupied by the head of Venus, ancestress of the Julia gens along with a small Cupid identifying her as Venus Genetrix. Caesar had recently dedicated a temple in the forum to her. The reverse revives the theme of victory in Gaul probably to remind his veteran legions of the glory and success in years past. These veterans who were overdue for discharge were now being called on to face the Pompeian threat for the third time in two and a half years.


SOLD Forum Auction May 2016
2 commentsJay GT4
roman_republic,_Mn__Cordius_Rufus.jpg
463/1b Mn. Cordius Rufus35 viewsMn. Cordius Rufus. 46 B.C. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. SRCV I 440, Sydenham 976c. 19.2mm, 3.85 g., Obverse: RVFVS III-VIR, Conjoined heads of the Dioscuri r., wearing pilei surmounted by stars. Reverse: MN-CORDIVS (MN in monogram) on right, Venus Verticordia standing left, scales in right, transverse scepter in left, cupid on her left shoulder. Ex Forvm.1 commentsLucas H
Caesar_Black_.jpg
468/1 Julius Caesar31 viewsJulius Caesar. AR Denarius. 46-45 BC. (3.6 g, 19 mm) Military mint travelling with Caesar in Spain. Obv: Diademed head of Venus right, Cupid behind. Rev: CAESAR, trophy of Gallic arms with captives flanking.
Syd 1014; RSC 13; Crawford 468/1

Ex: Gitbud & Naumann
Paddy
caesar.jpg
47/46 BC Julius Caesar83 viewsDiademed head of Venus right, wearing necklace, hair collected into a knot, falling in two locks

CAESAR
Aeneas, naked, advancing left, head facing, holding palladium in extended right hand and bearing his father, Anchises, wearing long tunic and hood, on his left shoulder.


Military mint moving with Caesar in North Africa.

47-46 BC

3.5g

Crawford 458/1; CRI 55; Sydenham 1013; RSC 12.

Ex-Munzhandlung Polak

The reverse depicts Aeneas’ flight from Troy, with his elderly father Anchises on his shoulder. Virgil's epic poam The Aeneid tells the story of Aeneas. When Troy was sacked by the Greeks, Aeneas, after being commanded by the gods to flee, gathered a group of Trojan's and then travelled to Italy and became progenitors of the Roman people.

Probably struck in Africa during Caesar’s campaign against the remaining Pompeian's. The obverse depicts Venus, from whom Caesar claimed descent via Iulus, son of the Trojan prince Aeneas, who was the son of Anchises and Venus.
1 commentsJay GT4
rjb_2019_02_04.jpg
49417 viewsL Musidius Longus c.42 BC
AR denarius
Obv "CONCORDIA"
Veiled head of Concordia right
Rev "L MVSSIDIVS LONGVS"
Shrine of Venus Cloacina inscribed CLOACIN
Rome mint
Crawford 494/42a
3 commentsmauseus
coin514.JPG
501. Constantine I Heraclea VOTA35 viewsHeraclea

Heraclea (Greek ‘Ηράκλεια), an ancient city of Lucania, situated near the modern Policoro, 3 m. from the coast of the Gulf of Taranto, between the rivers Aciris (Agri) and Sinis (Sinni) about 13 m. S.S.W. of Metapontum. It was a Greek colony founded by the Tarentines and Thurians in 432 BC, the former being predominant. It was chosen as the meeting-place of the general assembly of the Italiot Greeks, which Alexander of Epirus, after his alienation from Tarentum, tried to transfer to Thurii. Here Pyrrhus, king of Epirus, defeated the consul Laevinus in 280 BC, after he had crossed the river Sinis (see Battle of Heraclea). In 278 BC, or possibly in 282 BC, probably in order to detach it from Tarentum, the Romans made a special treaty with Heraclea, on such favourable terms that in 89 B.C. the Roman citizenship given to the inhabitants by the Lex Plautia Papiria was only accepted after considerable hesitation. We hear that Heraclea surrendered under compulsion to Hannibal in 212 BC and that in the Social War the public records were destroyed by fire. Cicero in his defence of the poet Archias, an adopted citizen of Heraclea, speaks of it as a flourishing town. As a consequence of its having accepted Roman citizenship, it became a municipium; part of a copy of the Lex Iulia Municipalis of 46 BC (engraved on the back of two bronze tablets, on the front of which is a Greek inscription of the 3rd century BC defining the boundaries of lands belonging to various temples), which was found between Heraclea and Metapontum, is of the highest importance for our knowledge of that law. It was still a place of some importance under the empire; a branch road from Venusia joined the coast road here. The circumstances of its destruction and abandonment was unknown; the site is now marked by a few heaps of ruins. Its medieval representative was Anglona, once a bishopric, but now itself a heap of ruins, among which are those of an 11th-century church.

Constantine I (AD 307-337)
AE3 - Vot XXX, .SMHB (Eyes to God)
AE-3 (AD 327-329)
OB: Plain-diademed head, right, looking upwards
CONSTANTINVS AVG.
REV: Wreath with VOT. /
XXX inscribed within
D. N. CONSTANTINI MAX. AVG.
. SMHB in exergue
Heraclea mint
RIC, Vol. VII, #92
Rated “Scarce” in RIC
ecoli
RIC_243_Denario_Julia_Soemia_1.jpg
55-01 - JULIA SOEMIA (218 - 222 D.C) 13 viewsMadre de Heliogábalo, sobrina de Setimio Severo y hermana de Julia Mamea.

AR Denario 19.4 mm 3.13 gr.

Anv: "IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG" - Busto vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS CAELESTIS" – Venus sentada en trono a izq., portando manzana en mano derecha y cetro largo en izquierda. a sus pies un niño.

Ceca: Roma
Acuñada: 220 D.C.

Referencias: RIC Vol.IVb #243 (C) Pag.48 - DVM #6 Pag.210 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #7720 Pag.630 – BMCRE V #55/6 – M.Thirion “Le Monnayage d’Elagabal (218-222)” #384 - Cohen Vol.IV #14 - RSC Vol. III #14
mdelvalle
RIC_243_Denario_Julia_Soemia_2.jpg
55-02 - JULIA SOEMIA (218 - 222 D.C)13 viewsMadre de Heliogábalo, sobrina de Setimio Severo y hermana de Julia Mamea.

AR Denario 19.4 mm 2.15 gr.
Antigua falsificación ?

Anv: "IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG" - Busto vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS CAELESTIS" – Venus sentada en trono a izq., portando manzana en mano derecha y cetro largo en izquierda. a sus pies un niño.

Ceca: Roma
Acuñada: 220 D.C.

Referencias: RIC Vol.IVb #243 (C) Pag.48 - DVM #6 Pag.210 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #7720 Pag.630 – BMCRE V #55/6 – M.Thirion “Le Monnayage d’Elagabal (218-222)” #384 - Cohen Vol.IV #14 - RSC Vol. III #14
mdelvalle
Sulla_pompey.jpg
56 BC Faustus Cornelius Sulla 80 viewsLaur. diad. and draped bust of Venus right, sceptre over shoulder SC behind

Three trophies between jub and lituus, monogram FAVSTVS in ex.

RRC 426/3
Sear 386

SOLD!

The three trophies were engraved on the signet ring of Pompey the Great symbolizing his victories on three continents. Faustus was the son of Lucius Cornelius Sulla and son-in-law of Pompey the Great.
1 commentsTitus Pullo
25-Gaeria-Valeria-Ser-41.jpg
59 Galeria Valeria: Serdica follis.16 viewsFollis, 307 - 308 AD, Serdica mint.
Obverse: FAL VALERIA AVG / Bust of Galeria Valeria.
Reverse: VENERI VICTRICI / Venus standing, holding up apple, raising drapery over left shoulder, * in left field, Δ in right field.
Mint mark: . SM . SD .
7.07 gm., 26.5 mm.
RIC #41; PBCC #852; Sear #14591.

She was the daughter of Diocletian and Prisca. Her father married her off to his colleague Galerius.
This coin is from the last group of coins issued from the Serdica mint before it was closed in 308.
Callimachus
11347q00.jpg
661. Julia Domna denarius66 viewsRome Mint, 210 Ad
20 mm, VF
IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, floormat on head
VENVS VICTRIX, half naked Venus, holding helmet and palm, leaning on column, shield at feet
Zam
J-Mamaea-RIC-694.jpg
71. J. Mamaea sestertius.19 viewsSestertius, ca 224 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA / Diademed bust of Julia Mamaea.
Reverse: VENERI FELICI / Venus standing, holding sceptre and Cupid. SC in field on either side.
22.83 gm., 34 mm.
RIC #694; S. # 8232.
Callimachus
1212Hadrian_RIC783.jpg
783 Hadrian Sestertius Roma 134-38 AD Decastyle Temple25 viewsReference.
RIC II 783; Strack 696; c. 1422; BMC 1554

Obv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P
Laureate head right

Rev. [SPQR] S-C
Decastyle temple set on base; temple is flanked by two columns, each decorated with a statue on top columns surmounted by statues and set on pedestals on either side

22.71 gr
31 mm
12h

Note.
The great temple of Venus and Rome, was actually two temples that were built back-to-back. Dedigned by Hadrian, the temple of Venus faced the Flavian ampitheatre and that of Rome overlooked the Forum. Construction began in 121 AD, but was not completed until 141 AD under Antoninus Pius. The temple was destroyed by fire in 307 AD, and later rebuilt by Maxentius. Its remains can still be seen in Rome today.
3 commentsokidoki
Antoniniano Salonina RIC 86.jpg
83-05 - SALONINA (254 - 268 D.C.)49 viewsBillon Antoniniano 21 x 19 mm 2.6 gr.
Esposa de Galieno y madre de Valeriano II y Salonino

Anv: "SALONINA AVG" - Busto diademado y vestido, viendo a derecha y descansando sobre una media luna.
Rev: "VENVS AVG" - Venus de pié a izquierda, portando un casco en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y lanza transversal en izquierda. "PXV" en exergo.

Acuñada 15ava. Emisión 267 D.C.
Ceca: Antiochia (Off.8va.) - Hoy Antaklyah Siria

Referencias:
Göbl #1671 I1 - RIC Vol.V Parte I #86 Pag.200 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #10654 - Cohen Vol.V #113 Pag.508 - DVM #45 Pag.252 - RSC Vol.IV #113 Pag.115
mdelvalle
Göbl_1671l_Antoniniano_Salonina.jpg
83-08 - SALONINA (254 - 268 D.C.)15 viewsVellón Antoniniano 21 x 19 mm 2.6 gr.
Esposa de Galieno y madre de Valeriano II y Salonino

Anv: "SALONINA AVG" - Busto diademado y vestido, viendo a derecha y descansando sobre una media luna.
Rev: "VENVS AVG" - Venus de pié a izquierda, portando un casco en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y lanza transversal en izquierda. "PXV" en exergo.

Acuñada 15ava. Emisión 267 D.C.
Ceca: Antiochia (Off.8va.) - Hoy Antaklyah Siria

Referencias: Göbl #1671 I1 - RIC Vol.V Parte I #86 Pag.200 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #10654 Pag.328 - Cohen Vol.V #113 Pag.508 - DVM #45 Pag.252 - RSC Vol.IV #113 Pag.115 - Hunter #33
mdelvalle
Mag-Urbica-RIC-247.jpg
96. Magna Urbica.12 viewsAntoninianus, 283 - 285 AD, Ticinum mint.
Obverse: MAGNIA VRBICA AVG / Diademed bust of Magnia Urbica.
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX / Venus standing, holding helmet and sceptre, shield at right. SXXIT in exergue.
3.76 gm., 22 mm.
RIC #347; Sear #12423.
Callimachus
RIC_6_Denario_Severina.jpg
97-02 - SEVERINA (Augusta 274 - 275 D.C.)9 viewsEsposa de Aureliano, lo acompañaba en sus campañas.

AE Denario o Medio Antoniniano 19 mm 1.70 gr.

Anv: "SEVERI - NA AVG" - Busto con diadema, vestido, viendo a derecha (L5).
Rev: "VEN - V - S - FELIX" – Venus de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando una figura (Cupido?) en manoderecha extendida y un largo cetro vertical en la izquierda. "Γ" en exergo.

Acuñada: 11ava. Emisión, Inicio a Setiembre 275 D.C.
Ceca: Roma Italia (Off. 3ra.)

Referencias: RIC Va #6 P.316, RIC2 Temp.#1857, Sear RCTV '88 #3287, Sear RCTV III #11710 P.440, Cohen VI #14 P.211 (3f), DVM #6 P.258, Göbl#141 t3, CBN #266, Hunter #1, La Venera 1504/6
mdelvalle
AE_denario_Severina_RIC_6_G.jpg
97-12 - SEVERINA (Augusta 274 - 275 D.C.)34 viewsEsposa de Aureliano, lo acompañaba en sus campañas.

AE Denario o Medio Antoniniano 19 mm 1.70 gr.

Anv: "SEVERI - NA AVG" - Busto con diadema, vestido, viendo a derecha (L5).
Rev: "VEN - V - S - FELIX" – Venus de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando una figura (Cupido?) en manoderecha extendida y un largo cetro vertical en la izquierda. "Γ" en exergo.

Acuñada: 11ava. Emisión, Inicio Setiembre 275 D.C.
Ceca: Roma Italia (Off. 3ra.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #6 Pag.316 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3287- Cohen Vol.VI #14 Pag.211 (3f) - DVM #6 Pag.258 - Göbl#141-t3 – La Venera II 1/1504 (3 Ejemplares)
mdelvalle
Follis Galeria Valeria RIC Nicomedia 57.jpg
A114-10 - GALERIA VALERIA (308 - 311 D.C.)36 viewsAE Follis 24 x 25 mm 6.6 gr.
Hija de Diocleciano y esposa de Galerio.

Anv: "GAL VALERIA AVG" - Busto con diadema, túnica y collar, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENERI VICTRICI CMH(Ligadas)" - Venus de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando una manzana en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y levantando su velo con mano izquierda. "SMNA" en exergo.

Acuñada 308 - 310 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Nicomedia) #57 Pag.562 - Cohen Vol.VII #13 Pag.130 - DVM #3 var Pag.282 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7303.c. var. Pag.77
mdelvalle
R669_Faustina_fac.jpg
AE Dupondius or As, RIC 3, p.194, 1410 (b) - Faustina II, Venus11 viewsFaustina II
Dupondius or As, AD 145-161
Obv.: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, Draped bust left.
Rev.: VENVS / S - C, Venus standing right, drawing back cloak over shoulder and holding apple.
Ref.: RIC 1410 (b) [S]
AE, 8.72g, 28 mm.
Ex Numismatik Naumann, Auction 74, Lot 368
shanxi
Anonymous 11 D.jpg
Anonymous quadrans25 viewsAnonymous Quadrans. AE about 81-161 AD
Obv.: Draped and diademed bust of Venus r., hair tied up in the back of the head.
Rev. : S-C Dove standing r.
RIC 24.
Tanit
Quadran.jpg
Anonymous quadrans22 viewsAnonymous Quadrans. AE about 81-161 AD
Obv.: Draped and diademed bust of Venus r., hair tied up in the back of the head.
Rev. : S-C Dove standing r.
RIC 24.
Tanit
Anonymous-quadrans-group-7-.gif
Anonymous quadrantes group 07 Venus dove left30 viewsQuadrans
2.48 g, 14.6 mm, 6 h.
Obv. Head of Venus right.
Rev. Dove left. SC in field.
RIC 25.
cckk
ymous-quadrans-group-7-Venu.gif
Anonymous quadrantes group 07 Venus dove right exergue19 viewsQuadrans
2.63 g, 14.9 mm, 6 h.
Obv. No legend. Head of Venus right.
Rev. Dove standing right. SC in exergue.
RIC 24.
cckk
Roma.jpg
Antoninus Pius 25 views
Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Sestertius (32mm, 25.3g, 10h). Rome mint. Struck circa AD 141-143. Laureate head right / Decastyle temple, with statues on roof and in pediment. RIC II 622. Good Fine.

The great temple of Venus and Roma was actually composed of two temples back to back. The temple of Venus faced the Flavian ampitheatre and that of Rome overlooked the Forum - both were designed by Hadrian himself. Construction began in 121 AD and and remained unfinished on the emperor’s death in 138 AD. Work was at last completed in 141 AD under Antoninus Pius, the event commemorated on this coin. The temple would be destroyed by fire in 307 and later rebuilt by Maxentius, the remains of which can still be seen in Rome today.
Ancient Aussie
AntoSee1.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 615a, Sestertius of AD 140-144 (Aeneas) 114 viewsÆ Sestertius (26.15g, Ø33mm, 11h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-44.
Obv/ ANTONINVS · AVGVSTVS PIVS, laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right, aegis on left shoulder.
Rev/ P P TR P COS III (in field) [S C (in ex.)], Aeneas wearing a short tunic and cloak, advancing right, looking back, carrying Anchises on his shoulder and holding Ascanius by the hand. Anchises (veiled and draped) carries a box in left hand, Ascanius wears a short tunic and Phrygian cap and caries a pedum (shepherd's crook) in left hand.
RIC 615a (R2), BMCRE 1264, Cohen 655 (80 Fr.), Strack 904 (3 specimens found); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 309 (same obv. and rev. dies, 3 specimens found).
ex Numphil (Paris, june 2014 auction)

This type is part of a series figuring scenes from ancient Roman legends. The scene depicts Aeneas leaving Troy with his son Ascanius and his father Anchises. According to the legend, Aeneas, son of Venus and the Trojan Anchises, fled by boat with some inhabitants of Troy as it fell to the Greeks, taking the Palladium - the ancient sacred statue of Athena - and eventually made their way west to resettle in Italy. They intermarried with the local inhabitants and founded the town of Lavinium, and became the nucleus of the future Roman people. One of the descendants of Aeneas'son Ascianus was Rhea Silvia, the mother of the twins Romulus and Remus.

Numismatic note: This issue has been struck from a single obverse die with the unique obverse legend "ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS PIVS" found nowhere else in the coinage of Antoninus Pius. This obverse die was used exclusively with two reverse dies with slightly different legends: the one in the photo above, and a similar one with the legend "P P TR POT COS III". The use of the aegis on the bust is not exclusive for this issue, but very rare for Antoninus Pius.
2 commentsCharles S
APiusSestRIC621.JPG
Antoninus Pius, RIC 621, Sestertius of AD 140-144 (Roma)162 viewsÆ Sestertius (28.4g, Ø 33-34mm, 12h) Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PI-VS P P TR P COS III, laurate head right
Rev.: ROMA AETERNA (around), S C (in ex.), Roma seated left on throne, holding palladium and spear; shield at side.
RIC 621; BMCRE 1276; C. 694; Strack 846; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 330 (7 spec.); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 24b; Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 1276
ex CNG Auction #29, lot 62687, May 2001

Issued to celebrate the completion in AD141 of the temple of Venus and Rome, designed and begun by Hadrian. This could also belong to the series of ancient Roman legends issued in this same period, as the Palladium held by Roma is the statue of Pallas Athena, stolen from Troy and brought to Italy by Aeneas. It was regarded by the Romans as guardian of their city.
2 commentsCharles S
AntoSe53-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 622, Sestertius of AD 141-144 (Temple of Venus and Roma)80 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.5g, Ø 33mm, 12h), Rome mint, struck AD 141-143.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laurate and draped bust of Antoninus Pius facing right
Rev.: ROMAE AETERNAE (around) S C (in field below) Decastyle temple with statues on roof and pediment.
RIC 622 (S); BMCRE 1279-82; Cohen 700 (Fr.12); Strack 848; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 333 var. (bust not draped); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:24a; Sear (Roman Coins & Their Values II) 4212.
ex Mike R. Vosper (UK, 2000)

Coin issued on the occasion of the completion of the temple of Venus and Rome, begun by Hadrian in AD 121. The temple was be destroyed by fire in 307 and later rebuilt by Maxentius. Remains of the temple can still be seen today.
Charles S
AntoSef0-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 622c, Sestertius of AD 140-144 (Temple of Venus & Roma)33 viewsÆ Sestertius (29,1g, Ø 33mm, 10h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head left.
Rev.: ROMAE AETERNAE (around) S C (ex.), decastyle temple on podium of four steps with statues on roof and in pediment.
RIC 622(c) (scarce); BMCRE 1345v. (hd. r.); Cohen 702 (12 fr.); Strack 848 (2 spec. for left-headed var.); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 335 (1 spec. w/o illustration); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4212v. (hd. r.)
Ex Guy BRAUN collection (France, 2015).
very rare left headed variety

The temple of Roma, designed by Hadrian in 121 and completed by Antoninus Pius in 141, facing the forum, was built back to back with the temple of Venus, which faced the Flavian Amphitheater. The building containing the two temples was referred to as the Temple of Venus and Roma ("Templum Veneris et Romae"). The remains are still visible and show that both temples consisted of ten colums. The coins suggest many decorative details.
Charles S
antose63~0.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 623, Sestertius of AD 141-144 (Temple of Venus and Roma)45 viewsÆ sestertius (25.11, 6h) Rome mint. Struck AD 141-144.
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
ROMAE AETERNAE (around) S C (in field below) ornamented dekastyle temple with the statue of Roma inside; tympanum adorned with high relief statues; quadriga (suggested) at top and statues at each side.
RIC 623 (scarce); Cohen 703 (12 Fr.); BMCRE 1279; Strack 849; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali III) 336 (4 spec.); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:24a
ex CNG EAuction 52 (2002)

The temple of Roma was designed by Hadrian (himself) in AD 121 and completed by Antoninus Pius in 141. It stood facing the forum, and was built back to back with the temple of Venus, which faced the Flavian Amphitheater. The two temples in one building were referred to as the Temple of Venus and Roma ("Templum Veneris et Romae"). Hadrian had to have the colossal statue of Nero removed in order to make room for the temples, which were built on the site of the vestibule of Nero's golden house. (He had Nero's statue placed near the entrance to the Ampitheater, and this provided the nickname, "Colloseum".) Their ruins prove both temples consisted of ten colums, and the coins suggest many decorative details.
Charles S
AntoSe63-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 623, Sestertius of AD 141-144 (Temple of Venus and Roma)35 viewsÆ sestertius (25.11g, 31.5mm 6h) Rome mint. Struck AD 141-144.
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
ROMAE AETERNAE (around) S C (ex.) ornamented dekastyle temple with the statue of Roma inside; tympanum adorned with high relief statues; quadriga (suggested) at top and statues at each side.
RIC 623 (scarce); Cohen 703 (12 Fr.); BMCRE 1279; Strack 849; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 336 (4 spec.); Sear(Roman Coins and their Values II) 4212 var. (rev. no figure of Roma); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:24a
ex CNG EAuction 52 (2002)

The temple of Roma was designed by Hadrian (himself) in AD 121 and completed by Antoninus Pius in 141. It stood facing the forum, and was built back to back with the temple of Venus, which faced the Flavian Amphitheater. The building with the two temples was referred to as the Temple of Venus and Roma ("Templum Veneris et Romae"). Hadrian had to have the colossal statue of Nero (Colossus) removed in order to make room for the temples, which were built on the site of the vestibule of Nero's golden house. (He had the Colossus placed near the entrance to the amphitheater, and this provided the nickname, "Colosseum".) The ruins show that both temples consisted of ten colums, and the coins suggest many decorative details.
1 commentsCharles S
AntoSe75~0.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 651(a), Sestertius of AD 141-144 (Temple of Venus and Roma)46 viewsÆ sestertius (23.78g, 12h). Rome mint struck AD 141-144.
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
VENERI FELICI (around) S C (in ex.) decastyle temple
RIC 651(a); Cohen 1075var. (dr. bust); BMC 1322; Strack 864; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:23
ex Jean Elsen et ses Fils (Bruxelles) auction 97; ex coll. A. Senden: l'architecture des monnaies Romaines
F, dark green patina, corroded

Issued on the occasion of the completion of the temple of Venus and Roma in AD 141. This was the largest temple in Rome dedicated to Venus Felix (Happy Venus) and Roma Aeterna (Eternal Rome). Actually it consists of two temples back under one roof. It was designed by Hadrian himself (who, by the way, executed his architect for critisising the project) and dedicated by him in AD 135, and completed by Antoninus Pius.
Charles S
ANTOSEf5-1.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 651(b), Sestertius of AD 141-143 (Temple of Venus & Roma)43 viewsÆ Sestertius (25,45g, Ø 30mm, 7h). Rome mint. Struck AD 141-143.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate draped bust right.
Rev.: VENERI FELICI around, S C in ex., Decastyle temple with statues on roof and pediment; pellet between columns in the centre.
RIC 651(b); Cohen 1075 (4 fr.); Strack 864); Banti 504 (Paris spec.); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:23
Ex Roma Numismatics E-Sale 17 (April 2015).
2 commentsCharles S
antosed2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 652, Sestertius of AD 141-143 (Temple of Venus and Roma)31 viewsÆ sestertius (24.06g, 33, 12h). Rome mint struck AD 141-143.
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
VENERI FELICI (around) S C (in ex.) decastyle temple on podium of four steps; figure (of Venus) in the center in space between columns seated front; in pediment three standing figures in the center flanked by reclining figures; on roof, seated figure in the center flanked by two smaller kneeling figures; on angles, Victories standing front, holding wreaths in both hands.
RIC 652 (rare); Cohen 1074 (12 fr.); BMCRE 1324 var. (but no figure in space between columns); Strack 865 (3 specimens); Sear (Roman Coins & Their Values II) 4257; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:23;
ex Nomisma

This commemorates the completion in AD 141 of the celebrated double-temple of Venus and Roma designed by Hadrian and begun two decades before. The two sanctuaries were placed back to back and the complex formed the largest temple in Rome. A parallel issue depicts the other element of the structure, the temple of Roma.
1 commentsCharles S
AntoSed2-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 652, Sestertius of AD 141-143 (Temple of Venus and Roma)25 viewsÆ sestertius (24.06g, 33, 12h). Rome mint struck AD 141-143.
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
VENERI FELICI (around) S C (in ex.) decastyle temple on podium of four steps; statue of seated figure (Venus) in center space between columns; in pediment three standing figures in the center flanked by reclining figures; on roof, seated figure in the center flanked by two smaller kneeling figures; on angles, Victories standing front, holding wreaths in both hands.
RIC 652 (rare); Cohen 1074 (12 fr.); BMCRE 1324 var. (no statue between columns); Strack III 865 (listed in 3 collections: Berlin, Paris, Vienna; plate X 864: same obv. & rev. dies); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 507 (3 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins & Their Values II) 4257; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:23
ex Nomisma auction 46 (2012)

This commemorates the completion in AD 141 of the celebrated double-temple of Venus and Roma designed by Hadrian and begun two decades before. The two sanctuaries were placed back to back and the complex formed the largest temple in Rome. A parallel issue depicts the other element of the structure, the temple of Roma.
Charles S
AntoDu11-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 664, Dupondius of AD 141-144 (Temple of Venus and Roma)68 viewsÆ Dupondius (13.2g, Ø25mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 141-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, radiate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: ROMAE AETERNAE (around), S C (in ex.), decastyle temple with statues in pediment and on the roof.
RIC 664 (S); BMC 1345; Cohen 701; Strack 848

ex Artcoins Roma

In AD 141, Antoninus Pius completed the temple of Venus and Roma which had been designed by Hadrian (in person) twenty years earlier. A series of coins was issued to celebrate this event. The temple consisted actually of two temples built back to back to form a single building. The ruins, which can still be seen today, prove that both temples consisted of ten colums. The coins suggest many decorative details.
Charles S
gordianIII_SNGlev774~0.jpg
Aphrodite512 viewsAphrodite is the greek goddess of beauty and love. She is much older and more primordial than Venus. Venus was a more local goddess and came to Rome not before the 4th century. Aphrodite is melted together of indoeuropean-hellenistic, aegaean-anatolean and semitic-oriental elements. The origin of her name is unknown, perhaps it is related to the sem.*asthart. Her relation to Cyprus is referring to that origin. Possibly the name of the month April comes from etruscan *aprodita. So there could be an etruscan intermediation. She seems to be a conglomerate of old fertility goddesses. Her attributes dolphin and shell points to marine, dove, sparrow and and swane to caelestic and apple, rose and pomegranat to herbal sexual spheres. With Homer Aphrodíte replaces the dark weird deities as a light goddess of charm and gracefulness. She was called 'philommeides', the smiling, and she was the mistress of the Graces.
On the rev. of this coin we see Aphrodite as a later depiction as goddess of grace and seduction. She holds a mirror as the symbol of vanity. Her companions are two Erotes with torches to ignite love.
2 commentsJochen
Julia_Domna_Denarius~0.JPG
AR Denarius of Julia Domna/ Venus Felix 193-201 AD 57 views2.70 gr. 18 mm. Sear Roman Coins and their Values [1988 edition] s1851
Julia Domna Denarius. IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left holding apple and drawing out fold of drapery. RIC 580, RSC 198. _3145
Antonivs Protti
As_Venus_FELIX_seated.jpg
As VENVS FELIX seated 33 viewsmix_val
As_Venus_FELIX_seated_dup.jpg
As VENVS FELIX seated dup32 viewsmix_val
As_venus_helmet,_shield_and_sceptre,_10_039g,_12h.jpg
As VENVS VICTRIX AVG44 viewsWeight 10.039g; Die axis, 12h3 commentsmix_val
AsVenus_Victrix_red.jpg
As VENVS VICTRIX AVGVSTA15 viewsObverse: IVLIA MAMAEA_AVGVSTA
Bust right, drape, wearing stephane
Reverse: VENVS VICT(R)IX, S and C, left and right, in midfield.
Venus draped, standing front, head turned left, holding helmet in right and a vertical sceptre in left; at foot, left, a shield.
BMC 723, RIC 707
Weight, 10.57 g; die axis, 6h

mix_val
R658_Domitia_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Ionia, Ephesus, Domitia, Venus20 viewsDomitia
Ionia, Ephesus
Cistophorus (AD 82-96).
Obv.: DOMITIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
Rev.: VENVS AVG, Venus standing right, back facing, leaning upon column to left, holding helmet and sceptre.
Ag, 10.39g, 26mm
Ref.: RIC² 847 (Domitian); RPC II 870.
2 commentsshanxi
Auguste denier 2.jpg
Augustus - denarius34 viewsNo legend ; head of Venus right, wearing stephanè.
CAESAR DIVI F. ; Augustus in military dress standing left, holding transverse spear and raising right hand.
1 commentsGinolerhino
1107_barbar.jpg
Barbarous Hadrian Denarius Venus standing 10 viewsObv. HADIIIVNVZ AVC COZ III P P (sic!)
Laureate head of Hadrian to right, with slight drapery on his left shoulder.

Rev. VENDSO[.] IETVS (sic!)
Venus standing front, head to left, holding apple in her right hand and scepter with her left, and a star behind

3.14 gr
17 mm
12h
okidoki
BCC_G18_Roman_Gem_.jpg
BCC g1836 viewsRoman Gem Stone
Intaglio 1st-3rd cent.CE
Caesarea Maritima
Female figure, possibly Demeter / Hygeia,
standing left, holding sacrificial bowl and
sceptre? or snake.
Translucent Red Carnelian
10.5x7.8x2.5mm. 0.29gm.
cf. Amorai-Stark, Hershkovitz, “Gemstones,
Finger Rings, and Seal Boxes from Caesarea
Maritima, The Hendler Collection”, #52 and
#54. c. Shay Hendler, Tel Aviv 2016.

Also possible, but perhaps less likely: Venus
standing. cf. Anit Hamburger, "Gems from
Caesarea Maritima", Atiqot English Series,
Vol. VIII, 1968, #45.
v-drome
galeria_valeria.jpg
BCC Lr1317 viewsLate Roman BCC Lr13
Galeria Valeria 305-311CE
AE Follis - Thessalonica
OBV:GAL VALE-[RIA] AVG
Diademed and draped bust right, wearing necklace.
REV:VENERI V-ITRICI
Venus standing left, holding apple and raising drapery
from shoulder, star to left, A to right, dot SM dot TS in ex.
23x25mm. 5.81gm. Axis:0
RIC 36, A
The coins of Galeria all have very interesting variations in hairstyle, jewelry, and
dress. According to Stevenson, this empress met an unfortunate end, as did
so many of the rulers from this period.
v-drome
BCC_Lt15.jpg
BCC Lt1542 viewsLead Tessera
Obv: Female figure
possibly Venus
to left, facing altar or tree?
Rev: Blank
7.0x8.5mm. 1.06gm.
v-drome
BCC_Lt18.jpg
BCC Lt1860 viewsLead Tessera
Caesarea Maritima
Obv: Uncertain figure,
standing to front, head tuned left.
In right hand, staff, in left, shield?
at feet, unknown?
Rev: Female figure, possibly Venus
standing to front, head turned to left.
10mm. 0.42gm. Axis:0
1 commentsv-drome
BCC_LT66_Venus_Aphrodite__tessera.jpg
BCC LT6621 viewsLead Tessera
Caesarea Maritima
Roman 1st-3rd Century CE
Obv: Standing figure, crudely
rendered. Perhaps Venus/
Aphrodite drying hair?
Rev: Blank?
9.75 x 8 x 1.5mm.
Weight: 0.62gm.
cf. Hamburger #61 and 62
cf. BCC LT18
v-drome
serapis_tessera_BCC_Lt9.jpg
BCC Lt956 viewsLead Tessera
Caesarea Maritima
Obv: Mummiform Zeus Heliopolites standing facing, holding
whip and grain ears; at feet, foreparts of bulls on either side.
Rev: Standing figure,head turned to the left, perhaps
Venus/Aphrodite, who also was honored with a temple
at Heliopolis (Baalbek).
9mm. 0.38gm. Axis:0
1 commentsv-drome
faustina_venus.jpg
BCC RI32 (was BCC 43)30 viewsRoman Imperial
AR Denarius
Faustina II 146-176 CE
wife of Marcus Aurelius
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Draped bust right
Rev: VENVS Venus standing left holding apple
in right hand, scepter in left.
17mm. 3.14 gm. axis:0
possible ref: RIC III 728
v-drome
RSC25 Plautilla~0.JPG
bE6. RSC 25. Venus Victrix.46 viewsAR Denarius. Rome mint.

Obv. Draped bust right PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA

Rev. Venus standing semi-clothed golding apple and leaning on shield, cupid at feet VENVS VICTRIX.

RIC369, RSC 25. EF, lustrous.
LordBest
Bramsen 0280.JPG
Bramsen 0280. La Venus de Medicis, 1803.153 viewsObv. Head of Napoleon.
Exergue, JEUFFROY FECIT 1803. DENON DIR. G.D. MUSÉE C. D. ARTS
Rev. the antique statue of the Venus de Medicis.
Legend, AUX ARTS LA VICTOIRE. L'AN IV DU CONSULAT DE BONAPARTE.

Depicts the Venus de Medici in the Louvre, and the occasion of Napoleons visit to the museum. The legend "Aux arts la victoire" is a reference to Napoleon's philosophy of "To the victors belong the spoils" . 1803.
LordBest
Bronze_quadrans,_81-161_AD;_obv_diademed_and_draped_bust_of_Venus,_rev_dove_standing_right,_S-C_flanking_across_field.jpg
Bronze quadrans, 81-161 AD, obv diademed and draped bust of Venus, rev dov stand right, S-C flanking across field20 viewsMy first auction win! I'm very much all about deity, and am definitely planning to collect for the Greek and Roman deities if I can. Some near and dear to my heart, from preliminary scanning, I think will be hard to find (Hephaestus/Vulcan, I'm looking at you beautiful), but I'm happily determined. As to this particular coin, I cannot be happier to be starting out with Venus as my first coin, and first forum coin to boot!EvaJupiterSkies
C__Naevius_Balba_Republic~0.JPG
C Naevius Balba Republic26 viewsC. Naevius Balba, one of only 2 Republican Trigas, 79 BC, Rome, 19mm, 3.78g, Crawford 382/1a, RSC Naevia 6, axis 4o
OBV: Head of Venus right, wearing diadem, S•C behind, L before.
REV: Victory in triga right, holding reins in both hands, C NAE BALB in exergue.
EX: CNG
Romanorvm
C_Naevius_Balbus.jpg
C Naevius Balbus14 viewsAR Denarius serratus
Rome mint, 79 B.C.
1.91g, 19mm
RCVI- 309, RSCv.1- Naevia 6-6b

Obverse:
SC
Diademed head of Venus right.

Reverse:
C NAE BALB
(AL in monogram)
Victory in triga right.

Will J
Naevia_1a_img.jpg
C Naevius Balbus, 79 BC., AR Serrate Denarius32 viewsObv:- Diademed head of Venus right, SC behind
Rev:- Victory in triga right; numeral CLVI above, C NAE BALB in ex.
Minted in Rome. 79 B.C.
Crawford 382/1b; Syd 769b. Naevia 6.

Uneven toning on obverse with a dark toned reverse.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
C_Norbanus_2.jpg
C NORBANUS ROMAN REPUBLIC; GENS NORBANA AR Denarius19 viewsOBVERSE: C• NORBANVS, head of Venus right, wearing stephane, earring, and necklace; XVIIII behind
REVERSE: Prow-stem, fasces, caduceus and grain ear.
Rome 83 BC
3.8g, 18mm
Crawford 357/1a. Sydenham 740. Norbana 1
Legatus
ervc.jpg
C. CONSIDIUS NONIANUS57 viewsAR denarius. 56 BC. 3.92 g, 5h. Laureate bust of Venus Erycina right, wearing stephane. C.CONSIDI NONIANI behind.SC before. / Temple on summit of mountain,sorrounded with ramparts, ERVC above gateway in centre. Craw 424/1. RSC Considia 1. Smyth V/12.
CNG 776324.
benito
195.jpg
C. CONSIDIUS NONIANUS 44 viewsAR denarius. 56 BC. 3.92 g, 5h. Laureate bust of Venus Erycina right, wearing stephane. C.CONSIDI NONIANI behind.SC before. / Temple on summit of mountain,sorrounded with ramparts, ERVC above gateway in centre. Craw 424/1. RSC Considia 1. Smyth V/12.
CNG 776324.
1 commentsbenito
C_Considius_Nonianus.jpg
C. Considius Nonianus - AR denarius7 viewsRome
²c. 60 BC
¹56 BC
laureate draped bust of Venus Erycina right, wearing stephane
C·CONSIDI·NONIANI__S·C
tetrastyle temple of Venus Erycina on the top of mount Eryx, Porta Collina (place of Sulla's great victory)*
ERVC
¹Crawford 424/1, Sydenham 888, RSC I Considia 1b
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,6g
ex Lucernae

scarce

*The temple of Venus Erycina on the top of mountain in the west of Sicily should had been founded by Aeneas and historian Polybios described it as the greatest and most splendid of all sacred places of Sicily. Venus Erycina was patroness of sex and protector of prostitutes.

Chosen designe of coin indicates moneyer's loyalty to Pompey who competed for Venus' favour with Caesar. Pompey claimed he inherited Venus' favour from Sulla who worshipped this goddes. According Harlan temple is only structure in the background whereas in the foreground there is Colline Gate, place of Sulla's famous victory. Roman temple of Venus Erycina stood at Quirinal near Colline Gate.
Johny SYSEL
Egnatia_RRC_391-3~1.jpg
C. Egnatius Cn. f. Cn. n. Maxumus33 viewsC. Egnatius Cn. f. Cn. n. Maxumus. Denarius 75 BC. 4 grs.
Obs. : MAXSMVS Laureate and diademed bust of Libertas r.; behind, pileus .
Rev. : G – CNN Roma and Venus standing facing and both holding staff, the former with her l. foot on wolf’s head and the latter has Cupid alighting on her shoulder; on either side, rudders on prow. In exergue, C·EGNATIVS· CN· F.
Babelon Egnatia 3. Sydenham 787. Crawford 391/3
2 commentslabienus
Naevius_def.jpg
C. Naevius Balbus4 viewsC. Naevius Balbus, denarius.
18,5 x 19,1 mm.
4,06 g.
Obv. Diademed head of Venus right, SC behind.
Rev. Victory in triga right, above, CLXXXXVII; C NAE BALB in exergue,

Babelon (Naevia) 6. Crawford 382/1b. Sydenham 769b.
Marsman
1301_382_Naevius.JPG
C. Naevius Balbus - AR serrate denarius11 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
¹²79 BC
diademed head of Venus right
S·C
Victory right in triga holding reins
XXXIII
C·N(AE)·B(AL)B
¹Crawford 382/1b, SRCV I 309, RSC I Naevia 6, Sydenham 769b, BMCRR Rome 2937 var. (XXXIIII)
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Naumann
ex Forum Ancient Coins
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
Balbus_Denarius.jpg
C. Naevius Balbus 79b.c. Denarius26 viewsDiademed head of Venus right, S.C. behind. Reverse. Victory in triga right, number above, C.V NAE. BALB in exergue
Philoromaos
naev_Balbus_denarius.jpg
C. Naevius Balbus Denarius54 viewsAR Serrate Denarius: 18mm, 3.85 grams, Die axis: 6h
Moneyer: C. Naevius Balbus, circa 79 BCE


Obverse: Diademed head of Venus to right, H below chin, SC behind neck.

Reverse: Victory in triga to right, C.NAE BALB monogram in exergue.

Mint: Rome

Notes:
- The purpose of the serrated edge on 1st century BCE denarii is not agreed upon. One hypothesis in that it was an attempt to thwart clipping; another to prove that the coin did not contain a copper core.
- The ancestor of C. Naeveius Balbus, also of the same name, wrote the earliest known Latin epic poem. It was a versed history of the first Punic War, 264 to 241 BCE.
- 79 BCE was the year Sulla resigned his dictatorship and returned to his country estate. He died a year later.

Ex Classical Numismatics Group (CNG), 2005
3 commentsPharsalos
179.jpg
C. Naevius Balbus Denarius Serratus - Victory Riding in Triga (Crawf. 382/1b)38 viewsAR Denarius Serratus
Rome, 79 BC
4.06g

Obv: Diademed head of Venus (R) wearing earrings and necklace, behind S.C - "Senatus Consulto"

Rev: Victory in prancing triga (R); above, TXV and in exergue, C·NAE·BALB

Virtually as struck and Fleur de Coin.

Sydenham 769b. RBW 1410. Crawford 382/1b.

ex. Elvira Clain Stefanelli (1914-2001) collection, curator of the National Numismatics Collection at the Smithsonian

Minted under Sulla's rule, the coin honours Venus, who Sulla is known to have worshipped. Behind her portrait is the abbreviation S∙C - “Senatus Consulto”, a rarity on silver coinage, indicating it was minted by special permission of the Senate.
The incredibly struck reverse shows the winged goddess Victory holding the reins to a rarely depicted "triga", or three-horse chariot, prancing delightfully across the coin. Note the exquisite and playful rendering of the horses, even showing the details of their harnesses.
Some believe the triga may allude to Sulla’s three major victories in Greece, Numidia and most notably in Asia Minor against Mithradates VI. Below can be seen the wonderfully ligatured name of the moneyer, C(aius) NAE(vius) BALB(us). This may be the same Balbus mentioned in Plutarch's dramatic description of the Battle of Colline Gate (29) "Balbus, sent forward by Sulla, rode at full speed with 700 horsemen. He paused just long enough to let the sweat of the horses dry off, then quickly bridled them again & attacked.."
1 commentsKained but Able
0109.jpg
C. Naevius Balbus, Denarius 13 viewsC. Naevius Balbus, Denarius

RRC 382/1b
79 bc

Av: Diademed head of Venus r.; behind, S C
Rv: Victory in triga r., holding reins; above, control numeral; in ex. C NAE BALB

Ex Bertolami Fine arts, Auction 24, Numismatics, London, 23.06.2016, #469
Norbert
norbanus.jpg
C. NORBANUS15 viewsAR denarius. 83 BC. 3.77 gm. Diademed head of Venus right; CXXXXV behind, C. NORBANVS below / Grain-ear, fasces, and caduceus. Crawford 357/1b. RSC Norbana 2. benito
00norbanus.jpg
C. NORBANUS 21 viewsAR denarius. 83 BC. 3.77 gm. Diademed head of Venus right; CXXXXV behind, C. NORBANVS below / Grain-ear, fasces, and caduceus. Crawford 357/1b. RSC Norbana 2.
benito
00751.jpg
C. Norbanus (RSC I Norbana 2, Coin #751)1 viewsRSC I Norbana 2, AR Denarius, Rome, 83 BC
OBV: CXXV C.NORBANVS; Diademed haed of Venus right wearing single drop earring and pearl necklace.
REV: Fasces between ear of wheat and caduceus.
SIZE: 20.6mm, 3.86g
MaynardGee
C_Norbanus~0.jpg
C. Norbanus - AR denarius9 views²Sicily or Bruttium
¹Rome
²84 BC
¹83 BC
diademed head of Venus right, wearing single drop earring and pearl necklace
CLIII
C·NORBANVS
grain ear, fasces and caduceus
¹Crawford 357/1b, RSC I Norbana 2, Sydenham 739, BMCRR I Rome 2810, SRCV I 278
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Aurea

Moneyer's family came from Volscian town Norba.
Reverse commemorates activity of elder C. Norbanus, moneyer's father, during the Social War, when he raised troops, organized a fleet, and provisioned the town of Rhegium. He, as a consul, led popular forces and was defeated by Sulla in 83 BC.
Johny SYSEL
C__Norbanus.png
C. Norbanus - Norbana-220 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC C. Norbanus. AR Denarius (18.6mm, 3.86 grams), Struck Circa. 83 BC Obverse: Diademed head of Venus right, wearing single drop earring and pearl necklace, CLXXV behind, C • NORBANVS below. Reverse: Grain ear to left, fasces in center, and caduceus to right. Crawford 357/1b; Sydenham 739; SECV 278; Norbana-21 commentsBud Stewart
Norbanus Denarius.jpg
C. Norbanus Denarius125 viewsRome 83 bc.

obv: Diademed head of Venus r., C NORBANVS below, LXXVIIII behind.

rev: Ear of wheat, fasces and caduceus

3.88g
Crawford 357/1b; Syd- 739; Norbana 2

ex. HJB
{sold}
2 commentswolfgang336
393_RR.jpg
C. Norbanus, 83 BC. Denarius11 viewsReference.
Albert 1243; Crawford 357/1b; Sydenham 739

Obv. C.NORBANVS / LXXII
Diademed head of Venus to right, wearing earring and pearl necklace.

Rev.
Ear of wheat, fasces bound with an axe, and caduceus.

17x18 mm
3.54 gr
okidoki
0089.jpg
C. Norbanus, Denarius26 viewsC. Norbanus. AR Denarius

RRC 357/1a
83 bc

Av: Head of Venus r. wearing diadem; behind X. Below C.NORBANVS
Rv: Prow-stem, fasces with axe, caduceus and ear of corn.


Ex ArtemideAste, Antiquities 4, 19/20.03.2016, #95
2 commentsNorbert
AncientRomanEmpire-AR-denarius-JuliusCaesar-046800.jpg
Caesar93 viewsRoman Imperatorial
Gaius Julius Caesar
(Reign as Dictator and/or Consul of the Roman Republic 49-44 BC)
(b. 100 BC, d. 44 BC)


Obverse: DICT.IN PERPETVO CAESAR, Wreathed and veiled head of Caesar facing right

Reverse: C MARIDIANVS, Venus holding Victory, resting elbow on shield set on globe, facing left



Silver Denarius
Minted in Rome February-March, 44 BC



Translations:

Imperatorial=The Imperatorial period extends from the outbreak of civil war between Julius Caesar and Pompey in January 49 B.C. and ends early 27 B.C. when Caesar's adopted heir Octavian was given the title "Augustus" by the Senate, effectively making him the sole ruler of the entire Roman territory. 

DICT.IN PERPETVO CAESAR=Dictator for Life Julius Caesar

C MARIDIANVS=Moneyer Caius Cossutius Maridianus

References:
Crawford 480/15
RSC 42

1 commentsSphinx357
Caesar_Lf.jpg
Caesar: Grandfather of Mark Antony 131 viewsCAESAR
Head of young Mars left wearing a crested helmet

Rev.
L IVLI L F
Venus Genetrix in Biga left drawn by two cupids, before them a lyre

Rome 103 BC

Sear 198

ex-Harlan J. Berk

Lucius Julius Caesar was Mark Antony's grandfather and Gaius Julius Caesar's cousin. He was moneyer in 103 BC and tried in vain to obtain the quaestorship. However he was praetor in 94 and then became the proconsul of Macedonia. Finally he gained the Consulship in 90 BC the same year his younger brother Gaius was aedile.

In 90 BC Lucius Julius Caesar as consul defeated the Samnites and proposed the Lex Julia which offered citizenship to all communities in Italy that were not in revolt. In the following year 89, the Lex Plautia Papiria extended citizenship to those who gave up the fight by a certain date. Lucius Julius Caesar was now made censor along with Publius Licinius Crassus (father of the triumvir). But it was a time of unrest.

In 87 Marius returned to Rome with Cinna and captured the city. Lucius and Gaius were killed during the fighting and according to Livy their heads were exposed on the speakers platform.
1 commentsTitus Pullo
Caligula_Three_Siste.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius 14 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Laureate head left
AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA - AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA, the three sisters of Caligula standing, in the guises of Securitas, Concordia, and Fortuna, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue
Exergue: SC


Mint: Rome (37-38AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 27.88g / 35.6mm / 180
Rarity: Rare
References:
RIC I 33
BMCRE p. 152, 36
BnF II 47
Cohen I 4
SRCV I 1800
Provenances:
Forvm Ancient Coins
Acquisition/Sale: Forvm Ancient Coins Internet

The Gary R. Wilson Collection

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From Numismatica Ars Classica:
Many aspects of Caligula's reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula's sisters.
Caligula's incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of scepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior, as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla, Caligula's favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess, providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace worsened after Drusilla's death and Caligula's affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula's lover. After Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of 'three sisters' sestertii, the production of which Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having plotted against his life.

From Wikisource:
It is easy to understand why the peace and harmony which had been reestablished for a moment in the troubled imperial family by the advent of Caligula should have been of brief duration. His grandmother and his sisters were Romans, educated in Roman ideals, and this exotic madness of his could inspire in them only an irresistible horror. This brought confusion into the imperial family, and after having suffered the persecutions of Sejanus and his party, the unhappy daughters of Germanicus found themselves in the toils of the exacting caprices of their brother. In fact, in 38, Caligula had already broken with his grandmother, whom the year before he had had proclaimed Augusta; and between the years 38 and 39, catastrophes followed one another in the family with frightful rapidity. His sister Drusilla, whom, as Suetonius tells us, he already treated as a lawful wife, died suddenly of some unknown malady while still very young. It is not improbable that her health may have been ruined by the horror of the wild adventure, which was neither human nor Roman, into which her brother sought to drag her by marriage. Caligula suddenly declared her a goddess, to whom all the cities must pay honors. He had a temple built for her, and appointed a body of twenty priests, ten men and ten women, to celebrate her worship; he decreed that her birthday should be a holiday, and he wished the statue of Venus in the Forum to be carved in her likeness.

But in proportion as Caligula became more and more fervid in this adoration of his dead sister, the disagreement between himself and his other two sisters became more embittered. Julia Livilla was exiled in 38; Agrippina, the wife of Domitius Enobarbus°, in 39, and about this same time the venerable Antonia died. It was noised about that Caligula had forced her to commit suicide, and that Agrippina and Livilla had taken part in a conspiracy against the life of the emperor. How much truth there may be in these reports it is difficult to say, but the reason for all these catastrophes may be affirmed with certainty. Life in the imperial palace was no longer possible, especially for women, with this madman who was transforming Rome into Alexandria and who wished to marry a sister. Even Tiberius, the son of Drusus and co-heir to the empire with Caligula, was at about this time defeated in some obscure suit and disappeared.

Many aspects of Caligula’s reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to
have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged
seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula’s
sisters.
Caligula’s incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and
Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including
Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of
the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of skepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and
dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior,
as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example
offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla,
Caligula’s favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died
tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess,
providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace
worsened after Drusilla’s death and Caligula’s affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus
Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula’s lover. At least after Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to
include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved
into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their
suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of ‘three sisters’ sestertii, the production of which
Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having
plotted against his life.
Gary W2
Caligula_Three_Siste~0.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius61 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Laureate head left
AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA - AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA, the three sisters of Caligula standing, in the guises of Securitas, Concordia, and Fortuna, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue
Exergue: SC


Mint: Rome (37-38AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 27.88g / 35.6mm / 180
Rarity: Rare
References:
RIC I 33
BMCRE p. 152, 36
BnF II 47
Cohen I 4
SRCV I 1800
Provenances:
Forvm Ancient Coins
Acquisition/Sale: Forvm Ancient Coins Internet

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From Numismatica Ars Classica:
Many aspects of Caligula's reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula's sisters.
Caligula's incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of scepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior, as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla, Caligula's favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess, providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace worsened after Drusilla's death and Caligula's affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula's lover. After Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of 'three sisters' sestertii, the production of which Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having plotted against his life.

From Wikisource:
It is easy to understand why the peace and harmony which had been reestablished for a moment in the troubled imperial family by the advent of Caligula should have been of brief duration. His grandmother and his sisters were Romans, educated in Roman ideals, and this exotic madness of his could inspire in them only an irresistible horror. This brought confusion into the imperial family, and after having suffered the persecutions of Sejanus and his party, the unhappy daughters of Germanicus found themselves in the toils of the exacting caprices of their brother. In fact, in 38, Caligula had already broken with his grandmother, whom the year before he had had proclaimed Augusta; and between the years 38 and 39, catastrophes followed one another in the family with frightful rapidity. His sister Drusilla, whom, as Suetonius tells us, he already treated as a lawful wife, died suddenly of some unknown malady while still very young. It is not improbable that her health may have been ruined by the horror of the wild adventure, which was neither human nor Roman, into which her brother sought to drag her by marriage. Caligula suddenly declared her a goddess, to whom all the cities must pay honors. He had a temple built for her, and appointed a body of twenty priests, ten men and ten women, to celebrate her worship; he decreed that her birthday should be a holiday, and he wished the statue of Venus in the Forum to be carved in her likeness.

But in proportion as Caligula became more and more fervid in this adoration of his dead sister, the disagreement between himself and his other two sisters became more embittered. Julia Livilla was exiled in 38; Agrippina, the wife of Domitius Enobarbus°, in 39, and about this same time the venerable Antonia died. It was noised about that Caligula had forced her to commit suicide, and that Agrippina and Livilla had taken part in a conspiracy against the life of the emperor. How much truth there may be in these reports it is difficult to say, but the reason for all these catastrophes may be affirmed with certainty. Life in the imperial palace was no longer possible, especially for women, with this madman who was transforming Rome into Alexandria and who wished to marry a sister. Even Tiberius, the son of Drusus and co-heir to the empire with Caligula, was at about this time defeated in some obscure suit and disappeared.

Many aspects of Caligula’s reign have captured the imagination of historians, but the sexual relationships he is said to
have pursued with his sisters is perhaps most shocking of all. It is on par with the exploits of Elagabalus or the alleged
seduction of young Nero by his deranged mother Agrippina Jr., who, by no mere coincidence, was one of Caligula’s
sisters.
Caligula’s incestuous relationships with his sisters are alleged by the relatively contemporary historians Suetonius and
Josephus. Much later, in the fourth and fifth centuries, these original claims were echoed by various writers, including
Eutropius, Aurelius Victor, St. Jerome, Orosius and the anonymous compiler of the Epitome de caesaribus. The truth of
the claims, of course, is impossible to confirm, and there is a healthy dose of skepticism among modern scholars.
Whatever personal or sexual affection Caligula may have felt toward his sisters, this coinage is purely political and
dynastic in flavour. His sisters are each named and are shown in the guise of personifications: the eldest, Agrippina Junior,
as Securitas, the middle-sister, Drusilla, as Concordia, and the youngest, Julia Livilla, as Fortuna.
This remarkable type was produced on two occasions, his initial coinage of 37-38, and again in 39-40. The example
offered here belongs to the first coinage, which was issued when all three of the imperial women were alive. Drusilla,
Caligula’s favourite sister (and the one with whom he is said to have had an enduring incestuous relationship), died
tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the initial issue were struck.
By the time the last issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess,
providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace
worsened after Drusilla’s death and Caligula’s affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
The circumstances reported by the ancient sources are nothing short of bizarre: Drusilla had been married to Marcus
Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula’s lover. At least after Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to
include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved
into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their
suspected complicity.
All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of ‘three sisters’ sestertii, the production of which
Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having
plotted against his life.

Per RIC-Rare
3 commentsGary W2
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-zg2aP0ewwCVrhb-Caligula_damnatio.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Bronze AS13 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Bare head left
Vesta SC - Vesta, veiled and draped, seated left, on throne with ornamented back and legs, holding patera in right hand and long transverse sceptre in left
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (37-38 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 10.40g / 28mm / 6h
Rarity: Common
References:
RIC I 38
BMCRE 46
BN 54
Cohen 27
Acquisition/Sale: indalocolecciones eBay

The Gary R. Wilson Collection

DAMNATIO MEMORIAE: This coin seems to have suffered a 'Damnatio Memoriae'. It looks as if the portrait has had cut marks applied to the jaw and neck areas. Interestingly, the ancient writers said that on his assassination, the first strike to Caligula was to his jaw or neck/shoulder areas. Damnatio memoriae is a modern Latin phrase meaning "condemnation of memory", i.e., that a person is to be excluded from official accounts.


ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From The Dictionary of Roman Coins:
Caligula, the grand nephew and murderer of Tiberius, most worthy to succeed that emperor, because of an equally infamous, though not so able a tyrant, reigned from A.D. 37 to A.D. 41.

His real appellation was Caius Caesar, but about the time of Augustus' death, he, still a child, being with the army of the lower Rhine, the soldiers, with whom he was a great favorite, were accustomed in the joking parlance of the camp, to give him the nickname of Caligula (from Caligae) because he constantly appeared in the usual military leggings.

Hence Ausonius, in his poem, referring to this cruel wretch, says --

Post hunc castrensis caligae cognomine
Caesar Successit, saevo saevior ingenio.

As emperor, however, he was always called Caius, and he considered himself insulted by the name of Caligula.

He was the youngest son of Germanicus, the nephew of Tiberius and Agrippina; born in 12 A.D. on the day before the calends of September, at Antium, as Suetonius has proved at great length (in Caligula, ch. 8). In 17 A.D., he went into Syria with his father, at whose death, within two years, he returned to Rome with his mother. After she was banished, he was transferred to his great grand-mother Julia and when she diet to his grand-mother Antonia.

In 31 A.D., after the violent deaths of his brothers Nero and Drusus, and also of Sejanus, whose plots he alone had escaped he was he was the apparent successor to the empire and invested with the Pontificate.

In 33 A.D., on the same day he assumed the toga he laid aside his beard, he was nominated questor and Tiberius invited him to Capraea. He moved in with Tiberius, feigning ignorance or indifference, regarding the murder of his relations, as though it did not concern him. He so obsequiously obeyed Tiberius the it was a common expression, that "there never was a better servant, or a worse master." (Sueton, ch. 10)

In 37 A.D., Tiberius was attacked with a severe illness from which he was recovering when Caligula, at the instigation of Maero, the praetorian prefect, put and end to his life by smothering him.

Caligula entered Rome after Tiberius' death and compelled the Senate to join him, by a Senatus Consultum, in depriving Tiberius, son Drusus junior and the elder Tiberius' heir in his last will, of his right to the empire.

The funeral ceremonies of were performed with due pomp by Caligula.

On the eighth month of his reign he was attacked with severe sickness. On his recovery, he adopted his brother Tiberius, gave him the title of Princeps Juventutis, and afterwards put him to death.

In the calends of July he entered upon the office of Consul Suffectus, as colleague to his uncle Claudius, and after two months resigned it.

In 38 A.D. he conceded to Soaemus, the kingdom of Arabians of Ituraea; to Cotys, Armenia Minor; to Polemon, the son of Polemon, his father's dominions.

Dion wrote, "In a short time he assumed so much the air of a king, that all those honors, which Augustus had accepted only when duly arrived at the sovereignty, and even then with hesitation as they were decreed from time to time, and many of which Tiberius altogether declined, were by Caligula grasped in one day, with the exception only of Pater Patriae, which, however was not long deferred."

In 39 A.D., in the calends of January, he entered his second Consulate and resigned the office in thirty days. (Sueton ch. 17)

Having exhausted the treasury by his profuse expenditure on public spectacles and other extravagances, he endeavoured to repair the deficiency by the slaughter of wealthy citizens; and then proceeded to Gaul, their to practice the like system of murder and spoliation.

The name of Germanicus does not appear on coins of this year, nor ever subsequently.

In 40 A.D., Caligula, without a colleague, entered his third consulate, at Lugdunum (Lyon), in Gaul; and resigned it on the ides of January. (Sueton. ch. 17)

Having invited over from Africa, Ptolemy, the son of Juba, he put him to death on the pretence of the young prince's ostentatious bearing. (Dion, B. lix. 25)

Proceeding to the ocean, as if about to invade Britain, he ordered his soldiers to gather shell-fish, and returned as a conqueror, laden with the spoils of the sea. (Sueton. ch. 46)

L. Vitellius, prefect of Syria, the same year, gave such a lesson to Artabanus, the Persian, who was threatening an invasion of Armenia that the later abandoned his design, and paid his adoration to the statues of Augustus and of Caligula. (Dion, I. e.)

In 41 A.D., he began hid fourth consulate, on the 7th of the ides of January. Shortly afterwards (viz. on the 9th of the calends of February), he was assassinated by the conspirators Cassius Chaerea and Cornelius Sabinus.

Caligula's accession to the empire was hailed with joy by the Roman people; but their satisfaction was based on no solid foundations, being the result rather of their deep-rooted attachment to his father Germanicus. He seeming, indeed, responded to the fond wishes of the nation, by many acts of piety, justice, and moderation. But it too soon became apparent that these virtues were not of natural growth but owed their exhibition to the policy of Tiberius, who wished through their influences to consolidate his own power in the empire. For there was not act of cruelty, folly, meanness or infamy, which this monster and madman did not delight in perpetrating. He caused his horse, whom he called Incitatus, to be introduced at dinner time, setting before him gilded corn, and drinking his health in golden cups; and he would have created him consul, had he lived long enough. He imitated all the gods and goddesses, in the adoration which he caused to be paid to him, becoming by turns Jupiter, Bacchus, Hercules, Juno, Diana, and Venus. He constructed a bridge of vessels joined together from Puteoli to Baiae, and crossing over with his troops invaded puteoli and then recrossed it in a kind of triumph, delighting in hearing himself called Alexander the Great. By his absurd and extravagant undertakings of this kind, before the year was fully expired, he had squandered the enormous sums of money left by Tiberius. (Vicies ae septics millies IIS. -- See Sestertium).

He both claimed and receive divine worship, and was the greatest blasphemer that ever lived; yet he quailed in the conviction of a deity, and crept under his bed whenever he heard thunder. With savage inhumanity he attended executions in person, and made parents behold the merciless torments inflicted on their children. He contracted and dissolved marriages with equal caprice and dishonesty. Besides his incestuous union with Drusilla, he seized and repudiated three wives, and was at last permanently attached to Caesonia a mother of children by another man, and without your or beauty, but of depravity corresponding with his own.

Other instances of his incredible cruelty and lust may be found in Suetonius, Philo, and Dion. Such infatuations are evident tokens not only of a brutal nature, but also of a distempered intellect. Nor is it possible to entertain other than supreme contempt for the base servility of the Romans, who could offer solemn adoration to a wretch openly guilty of the most detestable and unnatural crimes; and whose adage was oderint, dum metuant (Let them hate so long as they fear).

The gold and silver coins of Caligula are of considerable rarity. Sestertii are also rare. Ases are more common, yet still expensive due to popularity of collecting the infamous emperor and because they generally exhibit good workmanship. When Caligula was destroyed, the dastardly senators, who had so recently sacrificed to him, ordered all his statues to be demolished, his acts abrogated, his money melted down and his inscriptions defaced, in order that his memory might be extinguished forever. Yet this sentence has not prevented a considerable number of his coins from reaching us, though consequently, except for ases, they are of considerable rarity when in good preservation. The coins of Caligula, minted at Rome, do not exhibit Imperator as a surname. This title is used on colonial coins. The only imperial coin of Caligula bearing IMP is a denarius.

On his coins, Caligula resembles his grandfather, but is less noble and has a malignant expression. He was at great pains to cherish this horrid index of his cruel disposition.

Gary W2
Gary W2
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-2WcIZv40JXVImci-Caligula_69.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Bronze As11 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Bare head left
VESTA SC - Vesta Seated Left, Holding Patera & Sceptre
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (37-38AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 11.61g / 29mm / 180
Rarity: Common
References:
RIC I 38
Acquisition/Sale: timeman21 Ebay

The Gary R. Wilson Collection

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From The Dictionary of Roman Coins:
Caligula, the grand nephew and murderer of Tiberius, most worthy to succeed that emperor, because of an equally infamous, though not so able a tyrant, reigned from A.D. 37 to A.D. 41.

His real appellation was Caius Caesar, but about the time of Augustus' death, he, still a child, being with the army of the lower Rhine, the soldiers, with whom he was a great favorite, were accustomed in the joking parlance of the camp, to give him the nickname of Caligula (from Caligae) because he constantly appeared in the usual military leggings.

Hence Ausonius, in his poem, referring to this cruel wretch, says --

Post hunc castrensis caligae cognomine
Caesar Successit, saevo saevior ingenio.

As emperor, however, he was always called Caius, and he considered himself insulted by the name of Caligula.

He was the youngest son of Germanicus, the nephew of Tiberius and Agrippina; born in 12 A.D. on the day before the calends of September, at Antium, as Suetonius has proved at great length (in Caligula, ch. 8). In 17 A.D., he went into Syria with his father, at whose death, within two years, he returned to Rome with his mother. After she was banished, he was transferred to his great grand-mother Julia and when she diet to his grand-mother Antonia.

In 31 A.D., after the violent deaths of his brothers Nero and Drusus, and also of Sejanus, whose plots he alone had escaped he was he was the apparent successor to the empire and invested with the Pontificate.

In 33 A.D., on the same day he assumed the toga he laid aside his beard, he was nominated questor and Tiberius invited him to Capraea. He moved in with Tiberius, feigning ignorance or indifference, regarding the murder of his relations, as though it did not concern him. He so obsequiously obeyed Tiberius the it was a common expression, that "there never was a better servant, or a worse master." (Sueton, ch. 10)

In 37 A.D., Tiberius was attacked with a severe illness from which he was recovering when Caligula, at the instigation of Maero, the praetorian prefect, put and end to his life by smothering him.

Caligula entered Rome after Tiberius' death and compelled the Senate to join him, by a Senatus Consultum, in depriving Tiberius, son Drusus junior and the elder Tiberius' heir in his last will, of his right to the empire.

The funeral ceremonies of were performed with due pomp by Caligula.

On the eighth month of his reign he was attacked with severe sickness. On his recovery, he adopted his brother Tiberius, gave him the title of Princeps Juventutis, and afterwards put him to death.

In the calends of July he entered upon the office of Consul Suffectus, as colleague to his uncle Claudius, and after two months resigned it.

In 38 A.D. he conceded to Soaemus, the kingdom of Arabians of Ituraea; to Cotys, Armenia Minor; to Polemon, the son of Polemon, his father's dominions.

Dion wrote, "In a short time he assumed so much the air of a king, that all those honors, which Augustus had accepted only when duly arrived at the sovereignty, and even then with hesitation as they were decreed from time to time, and many of which Tiberius altogether declined, were by Caligula grasped in one day, with the exception only of Pater Patriae, which, however was not long deferred."

In 39 A.D., in the calends of January, he entered his second Consulate and resigned the office in thirty days. (Sueton ch. 17)

Having exhausted the treasury by his profuse expenditure on public spectacles and other extravagances, he endeavoured to repair the deficiency by the slaughter of wealthy citizens; and then proceeded to Gaul, their to practice the like system of murder and spoliation.

The name of Germanicus does not appear on coins of this year, nor ever subsequently.

In 40 A.D., Caligula, without a colleague, entered his third consulate, at Lugdunum (Lyon), in Gaul; and resigned it on the ides of January. (Sueton. ch. 17)

Having invited over from Africa, Ptolemy, the son of Juba, he put him to death on the pretence of the young prince's ostentatious bearing. (Dion, B. lix. 25)

Proceeding to the ocean, as if about to invade Britain, he ordered his soldiers to gather shell-fish, and returned as a conqueror, laden with the spoils of the sea. (Sueton. ch. 46)

L. Vitellius, prefect of Syria, the same year, gave such a lesson to Artabanus, the Persian, who was threatening an invasion of Armenia that the later abandoned his design, and paid his adoration to the statues of Augustus and of Caligula. (Dion, I. e.)

In 41 A.D., he began hid fourth consulate, on the 7th of the ides of January. Shortly afterwards (viz. on the 9th of the calends of February), he was assassinated by the conspirators Cassius Chaerea and Cornelius Sabinus.

Caligula's accession to the empire was hailed with joy by the Roman people; but their satisfaction was based on no solid foundations, being the result rather of their deep-rooted attachment to his father Germanicus. He seeming, indeed, responded to the fond wishes of the nation, by many acts of piety, justice, and moderation. But it too soon became apparent that these virtues were not of natural growth but owed their exhibition to the policy of Tiberius, who wished through their influences to consolidate his own power in the empire. For there was not act of cruelty, folly, meanness or infamy, which this monster and madman did not delight in perpetrating. He caused his horse, whom he called Incitatus, to be introduced at dinner time, setting before him gilded corn, and drinking his health in golden cups; and he would have created him consul, had he lived long enough. He imitated all the gods and goddesses, in the adoration which he caused to be paid to him, becoming by turns Jupiter, Bacchus, Hercules, Juno, Diana, and Venus. He constructed a bridge of vessels joined together from Puteoli to Baiae, and crossing over with his troops invaded puteoli and then recrossed it in a kind of triumph, delighting in hearing himself called Alexander the Great. By his absurd and extravagant undertakings of this kind, before the year was fully expired, he had squandered the enormous sums of money left by Tiberius. (Vicies ae septics millies IIS. -- See Sestertium).

He both claimed and receive divine worship, and was the greatest blasphemer that ever lived; yet he quailed in the conviction of a deity, and crept under his bed whenever he heard thunder. With savage inhumanity he attended executions in person, and made parents behold the merciless torments inflicted on their children. He contracted and dissolved marriages with equal caprice and dishonesty. Besides his incestuous union with Drusilla, he seized and repudiated three wives, and was at last permanently attached to Caesonia a mother of children by another man, and without your or beauty, but of depravity corresponding with his own.

Other instances of his incredible cruelty and lust may be found in Suetonius, Philo, and Dion. Such infatuations are evident tokens not only of a brutal nature, but also of a distempered intellect. Nor is it possible to entertain other than supreme contempt for the base servility of the Romans, who could offer solemn adoration to a wretch openly guilty of the most detestable and unnatural crimes; and whose adage was oderint, dum metuant (Let them hate so long as they fear).

The gold and silver coins of Caligula are of considerable rarity. Sestertii are also rare. Ases are more common, yet still expensive due to popularity of collecting the infamous emperor and because they generally exhibit good workmanship. When Caligula was destroyed, the dastardly senators, who had so recently sacrificed to him, ordered all his statues to be demolished, his acts abrogated, his money melted down and his inscriptions defaced, in order that his memory might be extinguished forever. Yet this sentence has not prevented a considerable number of his coins from reaching us, though consequently, except for ases, they are of considerable rarity when in good preservation. The coins of Caligula, minted at Rome, do not exhibit Imperator as a surname. This title is used on colonial coins. The only imperial coin of Caligula bearing IMP is a denarius.

On his coins, Caligula resembles his grandfather, but is less noble and has a malignant expression. He was at great pains to cherish this horrid index of his cruel disposition.
Gary W2
316_Caracalla_antoninianus.jpg
Caracalla - AR antoninianus5 viewsRome
213-217 AD
radiate and draped bust right, from behind
ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Venus standing left, holding Victory and sceptre, leaning on shield set on helmet
VENVS VICTRIX
RIC IV 311d
5,71 g
Johny SYSEL
395_Caracalla_Venus.jpg
Caracalla - AR denarius6 viewsRome
216 AD
laureate head right
ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Venus standing left, holding Victory and sceptre, leaning on shield set on helmet
VENVS VICTRIX
SRCV II 6890, RIC IV 311b, RSC III 606, BMCRE V 82 ff.
1,99g
Johny SYSEL
Caracalla.jpg
Caracalla - VENVS VICTRIX26 viewsDenarius, 2.72 g, 20 mm, 6 h, 213-217 AD

Obverse: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Laureate head right

Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing facing left, holding Victory on globe in right hand, holding sceptre in left hand and leaning on shield

Rome mint

RIC IVi 311b
1 commentsdrjbca
criciv311cORweb.jpg
Caracalla Antoninianus, RIC IV 311c53 viewsRome mint, Caracalla Antoninianus, 213-217 A.D. AR, 23mm 5.12g, RIC IV 311c, RSC 608a
O: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right, seen from front
R: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory & scepter, leaning on shield set on helmet
5 commentscasata137ec
caracalla_AR-Antoninianus_venus-victrix_helmet_two-captives_00.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus - Venus holding helmet, two captives.38 viewsobv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from behind.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding helmet & scepter, shield set on right of two captives seated to either side.
RIC 312c
5.5 grams.
rexesq
caracalla_AR-antoninianus_venus-victrix_helmet_two-captives_obv_01.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus - Venus holding helmet, two captives. obv 0133 viewsAD 212 - 217
obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from behind.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding helmet & scepter, shield set on right of two captives seated to either side.

5.5 grams.
2 commentsrexesq
12.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus - Venus holding helmet, two captives. obv 0228 viewsAD 212 - 217
obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from behind.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding helmet & scepter, shield set on right of two captives seated to either side.

5.5 grams
--------------------------
*Great portrait
1 commentsrexesq
caracalla_AR-antoninianus_venus-victrix_helmet_two-captives_obv_04.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus - Venus holding helmet, two captives. obv 0417 viewsobv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from behind.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding helmet & scepter, shield set on right of two captives seated to either side.

5.5 grams
rexesq
caracalla_antoninianus.JPG
CARACALLA AR ANTONINIANUS 213 - 217 AD 40 viewsOne of the first Roman coins of this type (antoninianus)
Obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM , radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX , Venus standing left, holding Victory & spear, leaning on shield set on helmet
weight 5,01 grams, diameter 24,05 mm, silver, fineness per thousand 500 ‰
Reference: RIC 311c, RSC 608

1 commentsAntonivs Protti
caracalla_AD214_AR-ant_AD213_AR-denarius-in-flip_obv_01.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus.21 viewsleft: Caracalla (212 - 217 AD) AR Antoninianus - 'Bust right, seen from the front' - 'VENUS VICTRIX' reverse with Venus standing holding Victory in one hand and a sceptre in the other, a shield by her side.
---------------------------------------
right: Caracalla 'PROFECTIO AUG' reverse - AR Denarius for size comparison.
----------------------------------
*The Denarius is inside a coin flip in these photos.*
rexesq
caracalla_AD214_AR-ant_AD213_AR-denarius-in-flip_obv_03.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus.28 viewsleft: Caracalla (212 - 217 AD) AR Antoninianus - 'Bust right, seen from the front' - 'VENUS VICTRIX' reverse with Venus standing holding Victory in one hand and a sceptre in the other, a shield by her side.
---------------------------------------
right: Caracalla 'PROFECTIO AUG' reverse - AR Denarius for size comparison.
----------------------------------
*The Denarius is inside a coin flip in these photos.*
rexesq
tyre-phoenicia_tet_AR-ant_AR-denarius_caracalla_01.JPG
Caracalla AR Tet, Tyre - AR Antoninianus, Rome mint, and AR Denarius, Rome Mint15 viewsbottom left:
---------------------------------------
Roman Empire, Tyre, Phoenicia. Emperor Caracalla
Silver Tetradrachm, Tyre Mint - 213 - 217 A.D.
Weight 13.379 Grams, Diameter 26.4 mm
obv: Laureate bust of Emperor right, cuirassed and seen from the front.
rev: Eagle standing on club facing, wings spread, tail and head left, wreath in beak, murex shell between legs
13.379 Grams
-----------------------------------
bottom right:
-----------------------------------

Roman Empire, Emperor Caracalla (AD 212-217)
Silver Antoninianus (double denarius) 'Venus Victrix'
obv: ANTONINUS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing left, holding Victory & scepter, leaning on shield set on helmet.
5.2 Grams
------------------------------
top middle:
------------------------------
Caracalla Denarius. 213 AD.
OBV: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT - laureate head right.
REV: PROFECTIO AVG - Caracalla standing right, holding a transverse spear,
two standards behind him.
------------------------------
rexesq
tyre-phoenicia_tetradrachm_caracalla_13_79grams_murex-shell_AR-Ant_venus-victrix_obv_01.jpg
Caracalla AR Tetradrachm, Tyre - Caracalla AR Antoninianus, Rome Mint15 viewsleft:
---------------------------------------
Roman Empire, Tyre, Phoenicia. Emperor Caracalla
Silver Tetradrachm, Tyre Mint - 213 - 217 A.D.
Weight 13.379 Grams, Diameter 26.4 mm
obv: Laureate bust of Emperor right, cuirassed and seen from the front.
rev: Eagle standing on club facing, wings spread, tail and head left, wreath in beak, murex shell between legs
13.379 Grams
-----------------------------------
right:
-----------------------------------

Roman Empire, Emperor Caracalla (AD 212-217)
Silver Antoninianus (double denarius) 'Venus Victrix'
obv: ANTONINUS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing left, holding Victory & scepter, leaning on shield set on helmet.
5.2 Grams
--------------------------
rexesq
Caracalla_AR_Denarius_Venus.jpg
Caracalla Denarius "Venus"55 viewsAR Denarius
Obverse: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
laureate head right
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing left, Victory in right,
transverse scepter in left, resting left arm on shield set on helmet
SRCV II 6890, RIC IV 311b, RSC III 606, BMCRE V 82 ff.
Choice gVF, full-circles strike, Rome mint
Weight 2.746g, maximum diameter 19.2mm, 216 A.D.
ex. FORVM
4 commentsDanny Jones
caracalla_sold.JPG
Caracalla Denarius Venus16 viewsCaracalla Denarius. 216 AD. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right
VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding Victory & sceptre, resting elbow on shield set on helmet. RSC 606.
Britanikus
caracalla.jpg
Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.149 viewsSilver denarius, RIC 311b, RSC 606, BMC 82, choice VF, 2.689g, 19.7mm, 180o, Rome mint, 216 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right; reverse VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, Victory in right, transverse scepter in right resting on shield set on helmet; ex Jean Elsen;b70
caracalla_311(c)var.jpg
Caracalla, RIC IV, 311(c) var.69 viewsCaracalla, AD 198-217
AR - Antoninianus, 5.33g, 24.04mm, 315°
Rome, 2.half AD 215
obv. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS GERM
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. VENVS VI - CTRIX
Venus, in long garment, r. breast bare, stg. facing, head l., holding Victoriola in
outstretched r. hand and transverse scepter in l. hand; leaning with l. ellbow on
oval shield set on helmet.
RIC IV/1, 311(c) var. (holds spear, not sceptre); C.608; BMC 78 (Dorchester Hoard 1937)
Scarce, EF

This is one of the earliest Antoniniani! There was a previous one with the legend VENERI VICTRICI which soon was changed to the nominative form (Curtis Clay).
1 commentsJochen
trajse29.jpg
CAST COPY OF: Trajan, RIC 577, Sestertius of AD 107 (Octastyle temple flanked by porticoes)82 viewsCast copy of
Æ Sestertius (26.4g, Ø33mm, 7h). Rome mint. Struck AD 107.
Obv/ IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P laureate bust of Trajan facing right.
Rev/ S·P·Q·R· OPTIMO PRINCIPI [around] S C [in ex.], Octastyle temple with porticoes on either side with steps between them leading to the central temple; A seated cult figure in centre of the temple; tympanon with seated figure in the centre flanked by reclining figures; on the roof top a central figure flanked by winged Victories on the corners.
RIC 577 [R]; Cohen 549 (20 Fr.); BMC 863; Strack 393; Foss 102:44
(Netherlands, 2001)

In the absence of any specific reverse legend, it is difficult to know for sure which temple is depicted on this coin. According to Clive Foss (1990) it is the temple of Venus Genetrix of the Forum of Julius Caesar. Since the statue in the centre of the building appears to be that of Jupiter, most assume that it is the temple of Jupiter Victor. In that case, this issue could celebrate the restoration of that temple by Trajan which event was celebrated in conjunction with the tenth anniversary of his reign. Later this temple was rededicated to Divus Traianus, and later still by Elegabalus to Sol-Elagabal. Strack however carefully studied all evidence and examined the best preserved specimens of this and related issues and concludes that the best guess is that the central figure represents the Genius Augusti and that the temple is dedicated to Divus Nerva.
3 commentsCharles S
maxsumus~0.jpg
Cn. Egnatius Cn. f. Cn. n. Maxsumus 39 viewsAR denarius. 75 BC. 3,95 grs. Diademed and draped bust of Libertas right; pileus and MAXSVMVS behind / Roma, holding staff and sword, foot on wolf's head, and Venus, holding staff, standing facing; Cupid alighting on the shoulder of Venus; rudder standing on prow on either side, K to left, CN. N to right.
C EGNATIVS CN F below.
Crawford 391/3. RSC Egnatia 3.
Jose A. Herrero 14. Lot 188.
benito
maxsumus.jpg
Cn. Egnatius Cn. f. Cn. n. Maxsumus18 viewsAR denarius. 75 BC. 3,95 grs. Diademed and draped bust of Libertas right; pileus and MAXSVMVS behind / Roma, holding staff and sword, foot on wolf's head, and Venus, holding staff, standing facing; Cupid alighting on the shoulder of Venus; rudder standing on prow on either side, K to left, CN. N to right.
C EGNATIVS CN F below.
Crawford 391/3. RSC Egnatia 3.
benito
Coin_2.jpg
Coin 1111 viewsThe legend is: " PATENT OCT 16 60, DEC 10 80, VENUS".

15 mm
Daniel F
salonine_venus_victrix.jpg
Cologne, salonina19 viewsicos
PC200070_comp_sm.jpg
Comparison of two ases of the same type: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL 19 viewsLeft: Ӕ, 22.5-24+mm, 9.56g, die axis 11h
Right: Ӕ, 23-24mm, 9.15g, die axis 11h

FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half

Seems RIC 1389a, Faustina Minor issue by Antoninus Pius, minted in Rome, possible minting dates 145-146 or 156-161.

For more details about Faustina Minor see http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-151025
Yurii P
CONSIDIA6R1D+R.jpg
CONSIDIA 638 viewsC. Considius Paetus (c. BC 46)
D/ PAETI behind hd. Venus r., diad. and laur.
R/ Victory in quad. l., C.CONSIDI in ex.
Syd. 992, Craw. 465/3, BMC 4087
This is an example like the current wandering in the ground they could damage a fourrè denarius that in the alloy had granules of copper not amalgamated from a perfect fusion.
Rugser
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Cordius Rufus. Roman Republic. 46 B.C. Silver Denarius AR17mm.9 viewsCordius Rufus. Roman Republic. 46 B.C.
Obv: no legend - Conjoined heads of the Dioscuri, right wearing pilei (caps); in field above, two stars.
Rev: MN CORDIVS -Venus standing left with Cupid on left shoulder, holding transverse scepter and scales.
Lee S
rjb_repub4_05_09.jpg
Corduba27 viewsSpain, Corduba
Cn. Julius
Mid-2nd century BC
Æ quadrans
CN IVLI L F Q
Draped bust of Venus right
Winged Eros standing left, holding torch and cornucopiae; three pellets in left field
SNG Copenhagen 462-3
mauseus
FAB1558.JPG
Corduba semis (1)88 viewsObserve: (C)N. IVLI. L. (F.Q.) Venus head to the right, behind 3 pellets.
Reverse: CORD(VBA). Eros lookinng to the left, holding a cornucopia and a torch?. 3 pellets below
Weight: 5,6 gr. Size: 20 mm.
FAB: 1558.
1 commentsCorduba
FAB1558A.JPG
Corduba Semis (2)62 viewsObserve: C.N. IVLI. L. F.Q. Venus head to the right, behind 3 pellets.
Reverse: CORDVBA. Eros lookinng to the left, holding a cornucopia and a torch?. 3 pellets below.
Weight: 7,5 gr. Size: 19 mm.
FAB: 1558.
Corduba
FAB1558B.JPG
Corduba semis (3)80 viewsObserve: C.N. IVLI.(L. F.Q.) Venus head to the right, behind 3 pellets.
Reverse: CORDVBA. Eros lookinng to the left, holding a cornucopia and a torch?. 3 pellets below
Weight: 8,0 gr. Size: 21 mm.
FAB: 1558.
Corduba
FAB1558incuso.JPG
Corduba semis incuse55 viewsObserve: (C)N. IVLI. L. (F.Q.) Venus head to the right, behind 3 pellets.
Reverse: Incuse.
Weight: 6,8 gr. Size: 20 mm.
FAB: 1558.
Corduba
corduba~0.jpg
Corduba, Spain, quarter unit, Venus / Eros3 viewsCorduba, Spain, Mid 1st Century B.C. Bronze quarter unit, SNG BMC Spain 1636 ff., SNG Cop 462, 3.704g, 17.8mm, 315o, obverse CN IVLI L F Q, head of Venus right, three pellets behind; reverse CORDVBA, winged Eros standing slightly left, torch in right, cornucopia in left, three pellets left. Ex FORVMPodiceps
corduba.jpg
Corduba; Venus/ Eros13 viewsCorduba, Spain, Mid 1st Century B.C. Bronze quarter unit, SNG BMC Spain 1636 ff., SNG Cop 462, F, 5.241g, 19.3mm, 45o, obverse CN IVLI L F Q, head of Venus right, three pellets behind; reverse CORDVBA, winged Eros standing slightly left, torch in right, cornucopia in left, three pellets left; green patina with earthen fill highlighting. Ex FORVMPodiceps
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Cr 85/7 AE Uncia Anonymous "H" Series7 views South East Italy, c. 211-210 BCE
o: Helmeted head of Roma right; behind, pellet
r: ROMA. Prow right; before, H; below, pellet.
4.01 gm 17.50 mm
The key "H" symbol on the reverse is not easy to see in this somewhat washed out photo, but it is there. The H series is somewhat rare.
McCabe attributes the H series to Venusia in Apulia. (The Roman Bronze Coinage struck in Apulia and South East Italy in the Second Punic War, in Proceedings XV International Numismatic Congress (2015)) There are multiple slightly varying styles within the H series.
PMah
AsForumMemmi.jpg
Cr 313/2 AE As Memmius 7 viewso: laureate bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above
r: Prow right, head of Venus decorating acrostolium; Cupid stdg l before prow and placing wreath on head of Venus, L MEMMI (ME ligate) above, ROMA below
Bronze as, Crawford 313/2, Sydenham 575 (very rare), BMCRR I Rome 1357, Russo RBW 1160, SRCV I 733, gF, well centered, light corrosion, edge cracks, weight 24.804g, maximum diameter 31.0mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 106 B.C.; obverse laureate bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse Prow right, head of Venus decorating acrostolium (prow-stem), Cupid standing left before prow and placing wreath on head of Venus, L MEMMI (ME ligate) above, ROMA below; from the Andrew McCabe Collection; very rare
Purchased from Forum Ancient Coins
PMah
618NN378.jpg
Cr 313/4 Æ Quadrans L. Memmius Galeria5 viewsc. 106 b.c.e., 18 mm, 4.16 gms.
o: Head of Hercules r., wearing lion’s skin; behind, three pelelts
r: Three pellets above /L·MEMMI above Prow r., with head of Venus decorating acrostolium; before, Cupid placing wreath on its top and below, ROMA.
Memmia 5. Sydenham 575b.
One has to squint, a bit, at the interersting reverse to see Venus and Cupid on the reverse, but Cupid is facing left and stretching very hard towards the acrostolium, wings fluttering behind. The "eye" and the "X" oar-box are clear, as are the stylized waves.
ex RBW Collection (not NAC sales)
PMah
814ag180.jpg
Cr 320/1 fouree AR Denarius Fouree L. Julius L.f. Caesar13 viewsc. 103 BCE fourrée denarius (16.8 mm, 3.01 g, 5 h)
o: CAESAR upwards behind helmeted head of Mars, left; above, control symbol Q OR p
r: Venus driving a chariot left, drawn by two flying erotés; lyre in field beneath; L·IVLI·L·F in ex.
cf. Julia 4
An extremely convincing fouree, with break-through wear on the highest points on the reverse. Crawford says that the type repeats the control mark, which is variable in execution on authentic pieces, on both sides, which I do not clearly see on this otherwise crisp coin; perhaps this was a "tell" to contemporaries.
PMah
memmius_den_2.jpg
Cr 349/1 - L. and C. Memmius L.f. Galeria (87 BC)10 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC
L. and C. Memmius L.f. Galeria (87 BC). 2 AR denarii (3.75 gm). Rome Mint

Laureate head of Saturn left; behind, harpa; to left, .P (retrograde); to right, EX. S. C / Venus driving biga r., holding scepter, Cupid flying l. above.

Crawford 349/1, Sydenham 712. Memmia 8. Toned. VF
Ex Heritage
RR0021
RR0022
Sosius
355.jpg
Cr 350B/3d AE Quadrans Anonymous 10 viewsc. 100 - 80 B.C. Bronze quadrans (Rome mint, 86 B.C.E.?)(2.082g, 16.1mm, die axis 90o) ;
O: head of Hercules right clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind
R: prow of galley right, ROMA (MA ligate) above, three pellets right(?), head of Venus decorating top of acrostolium(?)
cf. Crawford 350B/3d (possibly unofficial copy)
ex RBW Collection
PMah
498No338.jpg
Cr 382/1a AR Denarius C. Naevius Balbus14 views79 BCE Denarius Serratus (18 mm, 3.65 g, 6 h), Rome.
o: S C Diademed head of Venus right; before, E
r: C.NAE.BALB Victory driving galloping triga right, holding reins
Crawford 382/1a. Sydenham 769
Much nicer in hand; toned.
PMah
813RMA631.jpg
Cr 391/1b AR Denarius C. Egnatius Cn. F. Cn. N. Maxsumus5 views AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 75 BC. 3.60gm, 19mm, 8h.
o: Diademed and draped bust of Venus, right, with Cupid perched on shoulder; IIII below
r: Libertas in biga left, crowned by flying Victory; behind, pileus; C•EGNATIVS•CN•F CN•N in exergue
This moneyer is postulated by Crawford to be among the populares and referenced by Cicero, Ad Atticum, although I have not yet matched the cite; if so, he presumably gained in importance without leaving a clear record among the top magistracies. The type has one die per control number among a total of 8, this one being IIII, and so is scarcer.
This coin is not a beauty, but is reasonably well-centered for the type and retains serrations.
PMah
433G429Cordia.png
Cr 463/3 AR Denarius Mn. Cordius Rufus10 views46 BCE
o: Head of Venus right, RVFVS SC behind
r: Cupid on dolphin right; below, MN [ligate] CORDIVS
Crawford 463/3; Cordia 3
3.70g. (2h)

Although this coin is a nice specimen, and the type is very popular, I find it hard to get excited about this issue.
Cordius was presumably a Caesarian minting between the battles of Pharsalus and Munda. The times were rather grim, both for the huge armies and the populace on which they were billeted. Cordius does not seem to be a significant personage.

The coin seems remarkably light-hearted and that seemingly drives its popularity in modern collecting -- "hey, it's a kid on a dolphin, what's not to like?"

It may reflect payment to troops crossing to (or leaving) Africa under the benevolent gaze of Caesar's ancestor Venus and her son Cupid (whose father is Mars). Given that the first part of the Caesarian army was scattered by storms, perhaps these coins were intended to reassure the follow-up troops that they would not end up scattered to the winds and eaten by lions, tigers and bears. Venus also looks vaguely like some of the later coin portraits of Caesar (or Eleanor Roosevelt).
PMah
Republik_06.jpg
Cr. 468/1, Julius Caesar, Venus, captives25 viewsJulius Caesar
AR Denarius, 46/45 BC
Military mint travelling with Caesar in Spain
Obv.: Diademed head of Venus right, Cupid behind shoulder
Rev.: Trophy with oval shields between female and male seated captives, CAESAR in exergue
Ag, 3.90g, 18mm
Ref.: BMC 89, Crawf. 468/1, Syd. 1014
Ex Helios Numismatik
1 commentsshanxi
crispina~0.jpg
CRISPINA26 viewsAR denarius. 180-182 AD. 3,33 grs. Draped bust right. CRISPINA AVGVSTA / Venus standing left, holding apple and gathering drapery at her shoulder. VENVS.
RIC III 286a (Commodus); MIR 18, 19-4a; RSC 35
benito
crispina.jpg
CRISPINA32 viewsAR denarius. 180-182 AD. 3,33 grs. Draped bust right. CRISPINA AVGVSTA / Venus standing left, holding apple and gathering drapery at her shoulder. VENVS.
RIC III 286a (Commodus); MIR 18, 19-4a; RSC 35
benito
C1338LG.jpg
Crispina (178 - 182 A.D.)134 viewsAR Denarius
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair weaved in rows and tucked in round coil at back.
R: VENVS, Venus standing facing, head left, apple in right hand, gathering up drapery on her left shoulder with left hand.
Rome
18mm
2.97g
RIC III, 286a (Commodus) RSC 035
7 commentsMat
16132LG.jpg
Crispina (178 - 182 A.D.)100 viewsAR Denarius
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in round coil at back.
R: VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left, holding Victory and sceptre.
Rome
19mm
2.55g
RIC 288
1 commentsMat
crispina-sestertius.jpg
Crispina AE Sestertius, 178-191 AD16 viewsRoman Imperial, Crispina AE Sestertius, (178-191 AD), 24.4g, 31mm

Obverse: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.

Reverse: VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left holding Victory & sceptre.

Reference: RIC 673, Cohen 40, BMC 424

Ex: John Anthony
Gil-galad
crriciii288.jpg
Crispina, RIC III 288 (Commodus)11 viewsRome mint, Crispina Denarius, 178-182 A.D. AR, 18mm 2.59g, RIC III 288 (Commodus), RSC 39a
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
R: VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left, holding Victory and sceptre
casata137ec
crispina092108a.jpg
Crispina, Venus65 viewsCRISPINA-AVGVSTA
draped bust right

VE-NVS
Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple and lifting drapery from shoulder

Ar denarius;3.06g;17-19mm
RIC 286a;Cohen 35
4 commentsarizonarobin
Crispina_RIC_C286a.JPG
Crispina, wife of Commodus39 viewsObv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Crispina facing right.

Rev: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding an apple in her right hand; gathering up folds of her gown with her left.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, c. 180 - 182 AD

3.4 grams, 19.14 mm, 180°

RIC III Commodus 286a, RSC 35, S6002, VM 8
1 commentsSPQR Coins
ad1.jpg
Crispina. Augusta, AD 178-182. Æ Dupondius or As18 viewsRome mint. Struck under Commodus.
Obv: Draped bust right.
Rev: Venus seated left, holding Victory and scepter.
ancientone
26720246.jpg
Crouching Venus154 viewsThe British museumJohny SYSEL
Crawford_480_4.jpg
crw 480/4 . Julius Caesar. 44 B.C. AR denarius 64 viewsJulius Caesar. Rome mint, moneyer L. Aemilius Buca, lifetime issue c. mid Jan - Feb 44 B.C. ; AR denarius ( fragment ) .
14 mm, 1.26 g.
Obverse: Wreathed head of Julius Caesar right, CAESAR IMP before, P M divided by large crescent with horns up behind .
Reverse: Venus standing left, Victory in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, L AEMILIVS before, BVCA behind .
Crawford 480/4; HCRI 102; Sydenham 1060; RSC 22
Ex Moneta Numismatic Services
3 commentsVladislav D
caracalla_AR_antoninianii_quarter_01.JPG
D - Caracalla AR Antoninianii31 viewsTwo different bust type Caracalla Silver Antoninianii - both have different ' VENUS VICTRIX ' reverses - next to a U.S.A. State Quarter for size comparison.
-----
Lower Left: Caracalla AR Antoninianus, Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from the front.
5.2 grams. - *This coin is in a plastic flip in these shots.
------------------------------------
Top Right: Caracalla AR Antoninianus, Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind.
5.5 grams.
rexesq
Faustina_II_66~0.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.093, 495a - Faustina II, Venus, Victory11 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and resting left hand on shield, set on helmet.
Ag, 17mm, 3.52g
Ref.: RIC 495a, CRE 224 [C]
shanxi
Faustina_II_49.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.093, 495b - Faustina II, Venus, Victory 36 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust left
Rev.: AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and resting left hand on shield, set on helmet.
Ag, 3.60g, ca. 16mm
Ref.: RIC 495b, RSC 15a, CRE 225 [R3]
Ex Mike R. Vosper Coins
shanxi
Faustina_II_64~1.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.095, 517a - Faustina II, Venus 37 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome, AD 147-150
Obv.: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, Draped bust of Faustina II to right with band of pearls, her hair bound with pearls
Rev.: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple in her right hand and rudder set on dolphin, which coils around it
Ag, 3.52g
Ref.: RIC 517a, CRE 233 [C]
Ex Künker
1 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_8.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.095, 517a var. - Faustina II, Venus63 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome, AD 147-150
Obv.: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, Draped bust of Faustina II to right with band of pearls, her hair bound with pearls
Rev.: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple in her right hand and rudder, no (or very small) dolphin
Ag, 3.71g, 17.50mm
Ref.: RIC 517a var., CRE 233var.
Ex Dionysos Numsimatik
shanxi
Faustina_II_33.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.095, 517a var. - Faustina II, Venus 32 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome, AD 147-150
Obv.: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, Draped bust of Faustina II to right with band of pearls, her hair bound with pearls
Rev.: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple in her right hand and rudder
Ag, 3.58g, 17x18.9mm
Ref.: RIC 517a (Hairstyle Variation), CRE-233 [C]
shanxi
Faustina_R619_fac~0.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.271, 722 - Faustina II, Venus, VENERI AVGVSTAE6 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome mint
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: VENERI AVGVSTAE, Venus seated left, holding Victory and spear.
Ag, 3.49g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC III 722 [R], CRE 237 [R2] var.
Ex Kölner Münzkabinett
shanxi
Faustina_II_R643_fac.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.272, 728 - Faustina II, Venus10 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre.
Ag, 18mm, 3.06g
Ref.: RIC III 728, CRE 231 [C]
Ex Roma Numismatics, E-LIVE Auction 2, Lot 692
shanxi
R648_Faustina_II_fac~0.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.272, 731 - Faustina II, Venus12 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left, holding victory and sceptre
Ag, 18.3mm, 2.99g
Ref.: RIC III 731 [C], CRE 238 [S]
shanxi
Faustina_II_67~0.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.272, 734 - Faustina II, Venus18 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denarius
Augusta AD 146 - winter 175/176
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, waved hair knotted behind, band of bearls
Rev.: VENVS GENETRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory and leaning on figured shield with Dioscuri
Ag, 3.24g. 18m
Ref.: RIC III 734 var., RSC 280a

for the same type, but bust without band of pearls click here


1 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_15~0.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.272, 734 - Faustina II, Venus27 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denarius
Augusta AD 146 - winter 175/176
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, waved hair knotted behind
Rev.: VENVS GENETRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory and leaning on figured shield with Dioscuri, helmet below shield
Ag, 3.39g. 18.8mm
Ref.: RIC III 734, RSC 280a, CRE 227 [S]


for the same type, but bust with band of pearls click here


3 commentsshanxi
Denarius_Venus_Gentrix_standing_with_child.jpg
Denarius VENVS GENTRIX standing with child15 viewsmix_val
Denarius_Venus_victrix_dup.jpg
Denarius VENVS VICTRIX53 viewsmix_val
Denarius_Venus_victrix_shield_helmet_sceptre.jpg
Denarius VENVS VICTRIX shield helmet sceptre50 views1 commentsmix_val
faustina_II_venus.jpg
Denarius; AVGVS(TI PII FI)L, Venus with Victory, RIC III 495a4 viewsFaustina Junior – Denarius (under Antoninus Pius). Rome mint, 157-161 CE. 15x16mm, 2.39g. 
Obverse: Draped bust right. 
FAVSTINA (AVG)VSTA 
Reverse: Venus standing left, resting left hand on a shield set on a helmet, holding up Victory in her right hand. 
AVGVS(TI PII FI)L. Sear RCV (2002) 4700; RIC III 495a. Ex MoremothPodiceps
domna_venvs_felix.jpg
Denarius; VENVS FELIX, RIC 58014 viewsJulia Domna Denarius. 2,69g, 19mm. IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left holding apple and drawing out fold of drapery. RIC 580, RSC 198.Podiceps
Faustina_II_2.JPG
Denarius; VENVS, RIC 517a12 viewsFaustina Junior – Denarius
Obv: FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right
Rev: VENVS, Venus standing left with apple and dolphin-entwined rudder.
RIC 517a, RSC 266, BMC 1075
kaitsuburi
FSr30.jpg
DIVA AVG FAVSTINA33 viewsAR 17mm after 141AD
Obv - DIVA AVG FAVSTINA - draped bust right
Rev - AETERNITAS - Aeternitas or Venus veiled,standing facing, head right, pulling veil from face with right hand and holding sceptre in left
Reference - RIC III (Antoninus Pius) 1103A
Mint - Rome
aragon6
D847.jpg
Domitia RIC 847110 viewsAR Cistophorus
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD (Domitian)
Obv: DOMITIA AVGVSTA; Bust of Domitia, draped r., hair massed in front and in long plait behind
Rev: VENVS AVG; Venus stg. r., leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 847 (R). BMC 256. RSC 19. RPC 870 (8 spec.). BNC 226.
Ex CNG E424, 11 July 2018, lot 471.

A brief issue of cistophori were struck for Domitia as Augusta under Domitian in 82. Venus leaning on column was the sole reverse type chosen for her rare cistophori. The style and six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the home mint. K. Butcher and M. Ponting's metal analysis reveal they were struck from a different stock of metal than contemporary Rome mint denarii, possibly from recycled older denarii. At 80% silver fineness these early cistophori were likely struck before Domitian's major coinage reform of 82 when the denarius was raised to nearly 100% fineness.

Domitia Longina was the daughter of the famed Roman general Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo who was commanded to commit suicide by Nero for alleged treason. Domitian courted and married Domitia soon after Vespasian's accession, despite her already being the wife of Aelius Lamia. It was a good match - distancing the Flavians from the reign of Nero and uniting them to a beloved general's family. Soon after Domitian become emperor, Suetonius tells us he briefly divorced Domitia because of an adulterous affair she had with the actor Paris. Dio claims Domitian actually considered executing her but was persuaded from doing so by the praetorian prefect Ursus. He soon reunited with her after a brief separation alleging the people demanded it. Where this coin fits into that time frame is hard to tell. We don't know exactly when the divorce occurred or how long it lasted. However, it is likely this coin was struck after their reconciliation and can be seen as symbolically strengthening Domitia's position at court.

Struck in fine early style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton
Domitian_RIC_II_847.jpg
Domitian RIC II 084748 viewsDomitia. AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. Rome Mint for Asia. 82 A.D. (10.66g, 26.6m, 6h). Obv: DOMITIA AVGVSTA, bust of Domitia, draped, right, hair massed in front and long plait behind, [pellet under bust.] Rev: VENVS AVG, Venus stg. r. leaning on column, with helmet and spear. RIC II 847.

My first example of an Empress during the era of the 12 Caesars. Cistophoric tetradrachms were valued at 3 denarii, and during the Flavian era, were likely minted in Rome for distribution in the East. Worn, and slightly off center, I still enjoy the denomination.
3 commentsLucas H
EB0354_scaled.JPG
EB0354 Venus / C NAE BALB, Victory in triga17 viewsC. Naevius Balbus, AR Serrate Denarius, 79 BC.
Obv: Diademed head of Venus right, SC behind.
Rev: Victory in triga right; control mark (I-XXVIII) above, C NAE BALB in ex.
References: Crawford 382/1; RSC Naevia 6; Syd. 769.
Diameter: 18mm, Weight: 3.659 grams.
EB
EB0357_scaled.JPG
EB0357 Dioscuri / Venus holding scales & sceptre14 viewsMn Cordius Rufus, AR Denarius, 46 BC.
Obv: RVFVS III VIR, Conjoined heads of the Dioscuri right, wearing laureate pilei surmounted by stars.
Rev: MN CORDIVS, Venus Verticordia standing left, holding scales and scepter; Cupid on her shoulder.
References: Cr463/1; Syd 976.
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 3.845 grams.
EB
EB0431_scaled.JPG
EB0431 Sabina / Venus12 viewsSabina, AE Sestertius, 136-137 AD
Obv: SABINA AVGVSTA [HADRIANI AVG P P], draped bust right, hair in plait.
Rev: [VENERI GE]NERETICI S-C, Venus standing right, drawing out fold of drapery & holding apple.
References: RIC 1035; Cohen 74; BMC 1883
Diameter: 31.5mm, Weight: 21.37 grams.
1 commentsEB
EB0453_scaled.JPG
EB0453 Faustina II / Venus11 viewsFaustina II, AR Denarius, 145-161 AD.
Obv: FVSTINA AVGVSTA, Bust of Faustina the Younger, bare-headed, with hair waived and coiled on back of head, draped, right.
Rev: AVGVSTI PII FIL: Venus, draped. standing left, holding Victory on right hand and resting left on round shield set on helmet on ground.
References: RIC III 495A.
Diameter: 18mm, Weight: 3.19 grams.
EB
EB0459_scaled.JPG
EB0459 Faustina II / Venus and Mars12 viewsFaustina II, AE Dupondius or As, 161-176 AD.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Rev: VENERI VICTRICI S-C, Venus standing right, grasping right arm of Mars standing facing, head left, holding shield.
References: RIC 1680, Cohen 241, BMC 999.
Diameter: 27mm, Weight: 11.911 grams.
Note: Sold.
EB
EB0465_scaled.JPG
EB0465 Lucillia / Venus14 viewsLucillia AE As, 164-169 AD.
Obv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
Rev: VENVS S-C, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand and sceptre in left hand.
References: RIC III 1766; Cohen 75.
Diameter: 26.5mm, Weight: 10.336 grams.
Ex: B.A.Seaby Ltd.
EB
EB0467_scaled.JPG
EB0467 Lucillia / Venus10 viewsLucillia (wife of Lucius Verus), AR Denarius, 165-169 AD.
Obv: LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right.
Rev: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple & scepter.
References: RIC III 784, RSC 70, BMC 322.
Diameter: 19.5mm, Weight: 2.86 grams.
EB
EB0483_scaled.JPG
EB0483 Julia Domna / VENVS GENETRIX9 viewsJulia Domna, AR Antoninianus, 216 AD.
Obv: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, diademed and draped bust right on a crescent.
Rev: VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, extending right hand and holding sceptre in left.
References: RIC IV 388A; RSC 211; Sear 7098.
Diameter: 23.5mm, Weight: 4.926 grams.
EB
EB0499_scaled.JPG
EB0499 Julia Paula / Venus6 viewsJulia Paula (wife of Elagabalus), AR Denarius, 219-220 AD.
Obv: IVLIA PAVLA AVG, draped bust right.
Rev: VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, holding apple and sceptre.
References: RIC IV 222, RSC 21, BMC 323.
Diameter: 18.5mm, Weight: 2.603 grams.
EB
EB0500_scaled.JPG
EB0500 Julia Soaemias / Venus10 viewsJulia Soaemias, AR Denarius, 218-222 AD.
Obv: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, draped bust right.
Rev: [VENVS C]AELESTIS, Venus seated left, holding scepter, extending her hand to Cupid standing before her.
References: RIC IV 243, RSC 14, BMC 55.
Diameter: 18mm, Weight: 2.455 grams.
EB
EB0752_scaled.JPG
EB0752 Galeria Valeria / Venus12 viewsGaleria Valeria (wife of Galerius), AE Follis, Heraclea 308-311 AD.
Obverse: GAL VAL-ERIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right.
Reverse: VENERI V-ICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding apple and raising drapery, star in left field. Mintmark HTΔ(A?).
References: Cf. RIC VI Heraclea 50 (mintmark HTA).
Diameter: 27mm, Weight: 7.204g.
EB
JLSOSE01.jpg
Elagabalus, RIC 402, for Julia Soaemias, Sestertius of AD 220-221 10 viewsÆ Sestertius (26.90g, Ø30mm, 12h), Rome mint, Struck AD 220-221
Obv.: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, diademed and draped bust of Julia Soaemias facing right.
Rev.: VENVS CAELESTIS (around) S C (in field), Venus caelestis standing left, holding apple and long sceptre; star in field.
RIC 402 (R); Cohen 11
ex CNG 85 (2010) lot 964

Venus Caelestis is a Roman adaptation of a Syrian goddess brought by princesses from the east to Rome. The only coins with this reverse type are of the Severan empresses.
Charles S
AntoninusPius_Zodiac_VenusTaurus.jpg
Emmett 1450 - Antoninus Pius drachm alexandria, Zodiac Aphrodite (Venus) in Taurus51 viewsEGYPT, Alexandria. Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Drachm (33mm, 23.27 g, 12h). Dated RY 8 (AD 144/5). Laureate head right / Star and diademed bust of Venus left above bull (Taurus) butting left; L H (date) in exergue. Köln 1492-3; Dattari (Savio) 2960; K&G 35.2801 commentsmattpat
faustina88~0.jpg
FAUSINA II32 viewsAR denarius. c. 147-150 AD. 3,16 grs. Draped bust right. FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL / Venus standing left, holding apple and dolphin-entwined rudder. VENVS.
RIC (Ant. Pius) 517a. RSC 266.
Artemide XLI, lot 229.
benito
faustina_filia_495.jpg
Faustina Filia RIC III, 495a71 viewsFaustina Filia, died 175, wife of Marcus Aurelius, daughter of Antoninus Pius
AR - Denar, 3.28g, 16.6mm
Rome 157 - 161
obv. FAVST[I]NA - AVGUSTA
draped bust, bare head r.
rev. AVGVS - TI - [P]II FIL
Venus standing l., holding r. Victoriola, resting l. on shield set on helmet
RIC III, Antoninus Pius 495(a); C.15; BMCR. 1099
EF, uncirculated
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

Venus with the attributes of Venus Victrix.
Jochen
faustina_filia_730.jpg
Faustina Filia RIC III, 73028 viewsFaustina Filia, AD 146-175/6, wife of Marcus Aurelius
AR - denarius, 3.29g, 18.8mm
Rome
obv. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Bust, draped, r.; hair in three broqad waves, in neck bound with three pearl-
strips as knot
rev. VE - NVS
Venus, in long garment, stg. l., holding long sceptre in l. hand and dove in
outstretched r. hand.
RIC III, (Marcus Aurelius) 730; C.255
Sacrce, good VF
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

The dove was in ancient times a symbol of conubial truth.
1 commentsJochen
Faust2Ric723.JPG
Faustina II31 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Bust draped, right
VENVS
Venus standing, head left, holding apple and scepter
RIC 723, BMC 162, RSC 249
Rome, 18 mm, 3.26 g.
whitetd49
Faustina_II.jpg
Faustina II (c. 130-176 AD) - AE As - Rome70 viewsRoman empress, wife of the emperor Marcus Aurelius

Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA - Draped bust right
Rev: AVGVS-TI PII FIL / S.C. - Venus standing left, holding Victory and leaning on shield, set on helmet

Minted in Rome (145-146 AD)
References: RIC III Antoninus Pius, 1389a (C)
Weight: 10.29 g
Dimensions: 25 mm
1 commentskrazy
00211.jpg
Faustina II (RIC 1388b, Coin #211)11 viewsRIC 1388b (C), AE Sestertius, Rome, 145-146 AD.
Obv: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL Draped bust right.
Rev: VENVS Venus standing left holding an apple and a rudder with a dolphin coiled around. SC in fields.
Size: 32.3mm 25.14gm
MaynardGee
Faustina_II_728_(Aurel).jpg
Faustina II - AR denarius16 viewsRome
161-175 AD
draped bust right
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Venus standing left holding apple and scepter
VE_NVS
RIC 728
3g 18-17 mm
Johny SYSEL
faustina_II-RIC_1387.png
Faustina II -RIC 138712 viewsSestertius
Roma 147-150 AD.
FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL
VENUS -SC
35 mm.
xokleng
Faustina_I__AE_As_.JPG
Faustina II AE as.29 viewsFaustina II AE As. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet. Cohen 17. RIC 1389a. sear5 #4721 Antonivs Protti
Faustina_II_Venus_RIC_1686.jpg
Faustina II Venus RIC 168620 viewsFaustina II, Sestertius, Rome, 161 - 175 AD, 31mm, 24.2g, RIC 1686, Cohen 275
OBV: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
REV: VENVS FELIX S - C, Venus seated left, Holding Victory and sceptre. S -C across field.
Romanorvm
Faustina_II_Venus_RIC_517c.JPG
Faustina II Venus RIC 517c25 viewsFaustina II, Denarius, Rome, 148 AD, RIC III: 517c (Antoninus Pius), RSC II 266
OBV: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right with head bare, hair waived and coiled on back of head
REV: VENVS, Venus standing left holding apple in right and rudder in left, dolphin coiled around rudder

SCARCE
Romanorvm
U3141F1XGMOQIPG.jpg
Faustina II, AE Sestertius.33 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA; draped bust right

VENVS VICTRIX / SC; Venus standing left, holding Victoriola, resting left hand on shield

RIC 1688, Cohen 283, BMC 960

Patina that green in life too!
1 commentsGaiusCaligula
Faustina-fil_AR-Den_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_AVGV-S-TI-P-II-FIL_RIC-495a_C-15_Q-001_16-18mm_3,11g-s.jpg
Faustina II, Filia (128-175 AD.). AR denarius, AVGVSTI P II FIL,178 viewsFaustina (II) Filia AR denarius
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
revers: AVGVS-TI-P-II-FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and shield on helmet.
date: 156-161 AD.
mint: Rome
diameter: 16-17mm
weight:3,11g
ref: RIC-495a (Antoninus Pius) , C-15
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
FAUSTJR-33.jpg
Faustina II, Junior, daughter of Antoninus Pius, wife of Marcus Aurelius. Augusta, 147-175/6 CE.205 viewsAR denarius (17.8 mm, 3.27 gm).
Issued under Antoninus Pius, Rome mint, 157-161 CE.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Bare headed and draped bust, r.
Rev: AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing l., holding Victory and leaning left hand on shield set upon a helmet.
RIC 495a; Sear 4700; BMC 1099; Cohen 15.
EmpressCollector
Capture~5.PNG
Faustina II. (147-175 AD). AE Sestertius ,Rome, c. 149-156 AD.27 viewsObv. FAVSTINAE AVG P II AVG FIL, draped bust right.
Rev. VENVS AVG / S - C, Venus standing left, holding apple and rudder with dolphin coiled around.
RIC III, p. 193, 1388b.
31 mm, 20.16g
1 commentsCanaan
FaustinaII2.jpg
Faustina Jr Denarius21 viewsFaustina Jr AR Denarius
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, dr. bust right
Rev: VENVS GENETRIX, Venus stg. l., holding Victory and a shield adorned with images of the Dioscuri

RIC 735, C. 280
Tanit
e~3.jpg
Faustina Jr Æ Dupondius or As. Venus/Mars17 viewsFaustina Jr AE As. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / VENERI VICTRICI S-C, Venus standing right, grasping right arm of Mars standing facing, head left, holding shield. Cohen 241. ancientone
Favjse17-2.jpg
Faustina Jr, RIC (A. Pius) 1367, sestertius of AD 16115 viewsÆ Sestertius (26g, Ø 31mm). Rome mint. Struck AD 156-161 (under Antoninus Pius).
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, bust right draped.
Rev.: A[VGVSTI] PII FIL around, S C across field, Venus-Genetrix standing left, holding Victory and leaning on shield set on helmet.
RIC (A. Pius) 1367; BMCRE 2195; Cohen 16; Strack 1333; Banti 11 (2 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4709
Ex Pannonii (Slovenia, 2009).
Charles S
Favjse14-2.jpg
Faustina Jr, RIC (A. Pius) 1388(b), Sestertius of AD 148-15233 viewsÆ Sestertius (23.5g, Ø 33mm, 5h). Rome mint. Struck AD 148-152 (under Antoninus Pius).
Obv.: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, Draped bust right; hair waved and coiled on the back of the head.
Rev.: VENVS around, S C across field, Venus standing left, holding apple and rudder around which is entwined dolphin.
RIC (Antoninus Pius) 1388(b); BMCRE 2147; Cohen 268; Strack 1306; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali, III-2) 135; Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4720.
Ex Roma Numismatics Ltd., 2008; ex Künker, 2006.
2 commentsCharles S
FavjSe21c.jpg
Faustina Jr, RIC (A. Pius) RIC 1386, Sestertius of AD 16127 viewsÆ Sestertius (22,98g, Ø 31mm, 5h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161.
Obv.: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust of Faustina Jr right, hair waved and coiled back adorned with pearls and band of pearls round head.
Rev.: VENERI GENITRICI (around) S C (in field), Venus, draped, standing left holding apple and baby.
RIC (Antoninus Pius) 1386(a); BMCRE IV 2146 (note); Cohen 237; Strack 1306; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali III-2) 128 (4 spec.).

ex Varesi auction 65, lot 208 (2014); Ex Ghiglione 27, lot 117.
2 commentsCharles S
FavjSe01-2.jpg
Faustina Jr, RIC (A. Pius) RIC 1388(b), Sestertius of AD 148-15214 viewsÆ Sestertius (23.4g, Ø 31mm, 11h). Rome mint. Struck AD 148-152 (under Antoninus Pius).
Obv.: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, Draped bust right; hair with locks on forehead and coiled on the back of the head.
Rev.: VENVS around, S C across field, Venus standing left, holding apple and rudder around which is entwined dolphin.
RIC (Antoninus Pius) 1388(b); BMCRE 2147; Cohen 268; Strack 1306; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali, III-2) 137; Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4720.
Ex D.Ruskin (Oxford, 1994); from an old British collection.
Charles S
FAVJAS05.jpg
Faustina Jr, RIC (A. Pius) RIC 1410, As of AD 152-154 (Venus) 88 viewsÆ As (5.99g, Ø25mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 152-154.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVG (PII AVG FIL), draped bust of Faustina Minor facing right, one string of pearls in hair.
Rev.: VENVS (around) S C (in field), Venus standing right holding apple and drawing cloak over her right shoulder.
RIC 1410; BMC 2169; Cohen 257
ex iNumis, Paris
Charles S
djdsd.jpg
Faustina Jr. (146 - 175 A.D.)98 viewsAR Denarius
O: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in bun at back of head.
R:  AVGVSTI PII. FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and resting left hand on shield set on helmet.
Rome
18mm
3.3g
RIC (A. Pius) 93, 495a. Cohen 15.
6 commentsMat
fausyoung11.jpg
Faustina Jr. (146 - 175 A.D.)57 viewsAR Denarius
O: FAUSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right with head bare, hair waived and coiled on back of head,
R:VENVS, Venus standing left holding apple in right and rudder in left, dolphin coiled around rudder.
Rome
18mm
3.4g
RIC III Pius 517c, RSC II 266
6 commentsMat
Faustina_Junior_venus.jpg
Faustina Junior VENVS28 viewsFaustina Junior, Augusta 146 - winter 175/176 A.D, wife of Marcus Aurelius

Obverse:
Draped bust right
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA

FAVSTINA: Faustina
AVGVSTA: Empress

Reverse:
VENVS

VENVS: Venus
Venus standing left, holding apple & sceptre.

Domination: Denarius (silver), size 15 mm

Mint: Rom,
John S
collage5~5.jpg
Faustina Junior, Venus159 viewsFAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL
draped bust right

VENVS
Venus standing left, holding apple and rudder placed on dove.

RIC 517a, Sear5 #4708, RSC 266
AR Denarius;18mm;3.42g / Date: 149 - 156 A.D. Rome

(a bit different and nice hair style for Faustina Junior)
3 commentsarizonarobin
faustinajr030801.jpg
Faustina Junior, Venus69 viewsAr denarius; 3.13g; 16-17mm

FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA
draped bust left

AVGVSTI PII FIL
Venus standing left holding victory and resting
hand on shield set on helmet

RIC 495b, BMC 1105, RSC 15a
wildwinds example (this coin)
arizonarobin
2013-01-024.jpg
Faustina Junior, Venus69 viewsAr Denarius

FAVSTINAE AVG P II AVG FIL
draped bust right

VENVS
Venus standing left, holding rudder and apple

RIC 517c
5 commentsRobin Ayers
1Faustina_unita.jpg
FAUSTINA minore, denario (147-161 d.C.)27 viewsFaustina minore, moglie di Marco Aurelio. Zecca di Roma
AR, gr. 3,1; mm 16, 180°, MB+
D/ FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, busto drappeggiato a dx
R/ AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus stante a sx, tiene Vittoria, con la mano poggiata su uno stemma posto su un elmo
RIC 495a, RSC 15, BMC 1099
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (10 giugno 2007, numero catalogo 53); ex collezione Daniele Bocci, Foligno PG Italia (fino al 2007).
paolo
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Faustina Sr, RIC (A. Pius) 1081, Sestertius of AD 139 (life time issue)21 viewsÆ Sestertius (25,78g, Ø 33mm, 6h). mint. Struck AD 139 (under Antoninus Pius).
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVG ANTONINI AVG PII P P, draped bust right with hair waived & coiled on top head.
Rev.: VENERI AVGVSTAE around, S | C, Venus, semi-nude, standing right, holding cloak over shoulders with r. hand and holding apple l.
RIC (A.Pius) 1081; Strack 1224; BMCRE 1120; Cohen 282 (8 fr.); Banti 107 (23 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values) 4677
Ex cgb.fr, june 2015
Charles S
gord2~3.jpg
FAUSTUS CORNELIUS SULLA41 viewsAR denarius. 56 BC. 3.87 gr. Laureate and diademed head of Venus right,sceptre, SC behind. / Three military trophies ,capis left, lituus right. FAVSTVS (in monogram) in exergue. Toned. Craw 426/3. RSC Cornelia 63.

2 commentsbenito
00sulla1.jpg
FAUSTUS CORNELIUS SULLA36 viewsAR denarius. 56 BC. 3.87 gr. Laureate and diademed head of Venus right,sceptre, SC behind. / Three military trophies ,capis left, lituus right. FAVSTVS (in monogram) in exergue. Toned. Craw 426/3. RSC Cornelia 63.
benito
faustus06.jpg
Faustus Cornelius Sulla AR Denarius - 3 trophies48 viewsAR denarius.
Struck 56 BC.
Grade: F
OBV: Laureate and diademed bust of Venus right; scepter on shoulder, SC behind.
Rx; 3 military trophies between capis & lituus; FAVSTVS, monogrammed, in exergue.
RCV 384 19mm, 3.2g.
Recycled photo
cliff_marsland
Lg3_quart_sm.jpg
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL / Ӕ As or Dupontius (156-161 A.D.)20 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half

Ӕ, 22.5-24+mm, 9.56g, die axis 11h

There may be a countermark across the front part of the face on obverse, but due to its location it is difficult to be sure and identify it.

AVGVSTI PII FIL(ia) = daughter of August Antoninus Pius, points out to the ruling of Fausta's father Antoninus Pius rather than her husband Marcus Aurelius. Reverse: Unlike Greek Aphrodite, in addition to her other aspects Roman Venus was also a goddess of victory, this embodied in her representation as Venus Victrix (Victorious) or Victris (of Victory), like in this case: she offers a little winged representation of victory, resting on defensive military attributes (as a female goddess, she represented passive, defensive aspects of war, active ones being the domain of male Mars). SC = [Ex] Senatus Consulto (Senatus is genitive, Consulto is ablative of Consultum) = by decree of the Senate, i. e. the authority of the Senate approved minting of this coin (necessary to justify issue of copper alloy coins for which the intrinsic value was not obvious).

Of two Ӕ coins with the same legends and Venus with shield, RIC 1367 and 1389a, the first is a sestertius and its typical dimensions are characteristic of the type: 30+ mm and 20+g. This one is definitely smaller. Material seems reddish, so this one is more likely an as. Minted in Rome. Some sources give issue dates as 156-161 (the end of Faustina's father's reign), others as 145-146 (her marriage).

Annia Galeria Faustina Minor (Minor is Latin for the Younger), Faustina Minor or Faustina the Younger (born probably 21 September c. 130 CE, died in winter of 175 or spring of 176 CE) was a daughter of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius and Roman Empress Faustina the Elder. She was a Roman Empress and wife to her maternal cousin Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius. She was held in high esteem by soldiers and her own husband and was given divine honours after her death. Faustina, named after her mother, was her parents' fourth and youngest child and their second daughter; she was also their only child to survive to adulthood. She was born and raised in Rome. Her great uncle, the emperor Hadrian, had arranged with her father for Faustina to marry Lucius Verus. On 25 February 138, she and Verus were betrothed. Verus’ father was Hadrian’s first adopted son and his intended heir; however, when Verus’ father died, Hadrian chose Faustina’s father to be his second adopted son, and eventually, successor. Faustina’s father ended the engagement between his daughter and Verus and arranged for Faustina's betrothal to her maternal cousin, Marcus Aurelius; Aurelius was also adopted by her father.

In April or May 145, Faustina and Marcus Aurelius were married, as had been planned since 138. Since Aurelius was, by adoption, Antoninus Pius' son, under Roman law he was marrying his sister; Antoninus would have had to formally release one or the other from his paternal authority (his patria potestas) for the ceremony to take place. Little is specifically known of the ceremony, but it is said to have been "noteworthy". Coins were issued with the heads of the couple, and Antoninus, as Pontifex Maximus, would have officiated. Marcus makes no apparent reference to the marriage in his surviving letters, and only sparing references to Faustina. Faustina was given the title of Augusta on 1 December 147 after the birth of her first child, Galeria Faustina (or Domitia? sources differ which of them was born in 147 and was the first child).

When Antoninus died on 7 March 161, Marcus and Lucius Verus ascended to the throne and became co-rulers. Faustina then became empress. Unfortunately, not much has survived from the Roman sources regarding Faustina's life, but what is available does not give a good report. Cassius Dio and the Augustan History accuse Faustina of ordering deaths by poison and execution; she has also been accused of instigating the revolt of Avidius Cassius against her husband. The Augustan History mentions adultery with sailors, gladiators, and men of rank; however, Faustina and Aurelius seem to have been very close and mutually devoted.

Faustina accompanied her husband on various military campaigns and enjoyed the love and reverence of Roman soldiers. Aurelius gave her the title of Mater Castrorum or ‘Mother of the Camp’. She attempted to make her home out of an army camp. Between 170–175, she was in the north, and in 175, she accompanied Aurelius to the east.

That same year, 175, Aurelius's general Avidius Cassius was proclaimed Roman emperor after the erroneous news of Marcus's death; the sources indicate Cassius was encouraged by Marcus's wife Faustina, who was concerned about her husband's failing health, believing him to be on the verge of death, and felt the need for Cassius to act as a protector in this event, since her son Commodus, aged 13, was still young. She also wanted someone who would act as a counterweight to the claims of Tiberius Claudius Pompeianus, who was in a strong position to take the office of Princeps in the event of Marcus’s death. The evidence, including Marcus's own Meditations, supports the idea that Marcus was indeed quite ill, but by the time Marcus recovered, Cassius was already fully acclaimed by the Egyptian legions of II Traiana Fortis and XXII Deiotariana. "After a dream of empire lasting three months and six days", Cassius was murdered by a centurion; his head was sent to Marcus Aurelius, who refused to see it and ordered it buried. Egypt recognized Marcus as emperor again by 28 July 175.

Faustina died in the winter of 175, after a somewhat suspicious accident, at the military camp in Halala (a city in the Taurus Mountains in Cappadocia). Aurelius grieved much for his wife and buried her in the Mausoleum of Hadrian in Rome. She was deified: her statue was placed in the Temple of Venus in Rome and a temple was dedicated to her in her honor. Halala’s name was changed to Faustinopolis and Aurelius opened charity schools for orphan girls called Puellae Faustinianae or 'Girls of Faustina'. The Baths of Faustina in Miletus are named after her.

In their thirty years of marriage, Faustina bore Marcus Aurelius thirteen children, of whom 6 reached adulthood and were significant in history. The best known are emperor Commodus and the closest to him sister Lucilla (both depicted in a very historically inaccurate movie "Gladiator" and, together with their parents, in a much more accurate 1st season "Reign of Blood" of the TV series "Roman Empire").
Yurii P
Lg004N_quad_sm.jpg
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL / Ӕ As or Dupontius (156-161 A.D.)11 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half.

Ӕ, 23-24mm, 9.15g, die axis 11h

Another of this type:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-151025
See more info there.

Their comparison:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-151893
Yurii P
FUENGIROLA_-_Parque_Yacimiento_Romano_1.JPG
Fuengirola- Roman Complex28 viewsThe complex was discovered in 1970 when the town of Fuengirola was making a new railroad, and is dated back to the I and V century.

The excavation area consist of 2 areas, Industrial and Termal zone.

The Industrial zone consist of 2 large living rooms, and 8 columns in a pair of 2 series with 4 columns. Within the Industrial area and to the north there are 4 central pillar ovens and a 5th smaller one. All these represents the access corridor (praefurnium) and combustion chamber. The ovens are made basically from Amphoras and common ceramics.

The Termal zone consist of several units corresponding to heated rooms, and several other rooms which not yet have been determined. The Termal is ruled by a large square in which there have been circular swimming pool with a diameter of 4,70 m, deep 1,50 m, and with 4 small steps. There has also been a porched room witk mosaics and 2 ovens ((Praefurnium) to heat op the thermaes.

Yacimiento romano, descubierto en 1970 mientras se realizaban las obras de una nueva línea de ferrocarril.
En este paraje, después de diversas excavaciones, se han hallado valiosos restos arqueológicos, entre los que cabe mencionar una escultura realizada en mármol, conocida popularmente como la venus de Fuengirola, una pequeña factoría para salar el pescado y un edificio termal de pequeñas dimensiones

El yacimiento se ubica en la margen derecha del arroyo Pajares (en la confluencia con la variante de Fuengirola), entre la vía del tren Fuengirola-Málaga y el Barrio de los Pacos. El complejo arqueológico se encuentra dividido, artificialmente, por la referida carretera en dos grandes áreas, norte y sur.

El terreno excavado, situado en el área sur del yacimiento, presenta dos espacios constructivos: zona industrial y zona termal.
La zona industrial se compone de dos grandes habitaciones, desarrollándose, en la más meridional, un conjunto de ocho piletas en dos series de cuatro; más al sur una extensa nave cuya planta permanece aún incompleta. Las estructuras existentes presentan diversas huellas de reparaciones y reutilizaciones. Dentro del complejo industrial, y al noreste de las habitaciones reseñadas, se ubican cuatro hornos de pilar central y un quinto de pequeñas dimensiones. Todos ellos presentan corredor de acceso (praefurnium) y cámara de combustión. El material producido en dichos hornos se compone, básicamente, de Ánforas y de cerámica común.

En la zona termal, situada en el extremo noreste del área sur del yacimiento, presenta varias dependencias, correspondientes a habitaciones calefactadas, y otras estancias, aún no definidas, que se desarrollan hacia el norte y oeste. De todo el conjunto cabría resaltar la sala de planta cuadrada en la que se inscribe una piscina circular de 4,70 metros de diámetro y 1,50 metros de profundidad, con cuatro pequeñas exedras-accesos. Así mismo habría que indicar la presencia de una sala porticada decorada con mosaicos y de dos hornos (Praefurnium) para la calefacción de las termas. La cronología del yacimiento se estima entre los siglos I y V de nuestra era.

John S
FUENGIROLA_-_Parque_Yacimiento_Romano_2.JPG
Fuengirola- Roman Complex33 viewsThe complex was discovered in 1970 when the town of Fuengirola was making a new railroad, and is dated back to the I and V century.

The excavation area consist of 2 areas, Industrial and Termal zone.

The Industrial zone consist of 2 large living rooms, and 8 columns in a pair of 2 series with 4 columns. Within the Industrial area and to the north there are 4 central pillar ovens and a 5th smaller one. All these represents the access corridor (praefurnium) and combustion chamber. The ovens are made basically from Amphoras and common ceramics.

The Termal zone consist of several units corresponding to heated rooms, and several other rooms which not yet have been determined. The Termal is ruled by a large square in which there have been circular swimming pool with a diameter of 4,70 m, deep 1,50 m, and with 4 small steps. There has also been a porched room witk mosaics and 2 ovens ((Praefurnium) to heat op the thermaes.

Yacimiento romano, descubierto en 1970 mientras se realizaban las obras de una nueva línea de ferrocarril.
En este paraje, después de diversas excavaciones, se han hallado valiosos restos arqueológicos, entre los que cabe mencionar una escultura realizada en mármol, conocida popularmente como la venus de Fuengirola, una pequeña factoría para salar el pescado y un edificio termal de pequeñas dimensiones

El yacimiento se ubica en la margen derecha del arroyo Pajares (en la confluencia con la variante de Fuengirola), entre la vía del tren Fuengirola-Málaga y el Barrio de los Pacos. El complejo arqueológico se encuentra dividido, artificialmente, por la referida carretera en dos grandes áreas, norte y sur.

El terreno excavado, situado en el área sur del yacimiento, presenta dos espacios constructivos: zona industrial y zona termal.
La zona industrial se compone de dos grandes habitaciones, desarrollándose, en la más meridional, un conjunto de ocho piletas en dos series de cuatro; más al sur una extensa nave cuya planta permanece aún incompleta. Las estructuras existentes presentan diversas huellas de reparaciones y reutilizaciones. Dentro del complejo industrial, y al noreste de las habitaciones reseñadas, se ubican cuatro hornos de pilar central y un quinto de pequeñas dimensiones. Todos ellos presentan corredor de acceso (praefurnium) y cámara de combustión. El material producido en dichos hornos se compone, básicamente, de Ánforas y de cerámica común.

En la zona termal, situada en el extremo noreste del área sur del yacimiento, presenta varias dependencias, correspondientes a habitaciones calefactadas, y otras estancias, aún no definidas, que se desarrollan hacia el norte y oeste. De todo el conjunto cabría resaltar la sala de planta cuadrada en la que se inscribe una piscina circular de 4,70 metros de diámetro y 1,50 metros de profundidad, con cuatro pequeñas exedras-accesos. Así mismo habría que indicar la presencia de una sala porticada decorada con mosaicos y de dos hornos (Praefurnium) para la calefacción de las termas. La cronología del yacimiento se estima entre los siglos I y V de nuestra era.

John S
FUENGIROLA_-_Parque_Yacimiento_Romano_3.JPG
Fuengirola- Roman Complex29 viewsThe complex was discovered in 1970 when the town of Fuengirola was making a new railroad, and is dated back to the I and V century.

The excavation area consist of 2 areas, Industrial and Termal zone.

The Industrial zone consist of 2 large living rooms, and 8 columns in a pair of 2 series with 4 columns. Within the Industrial area and to the north there are 4 central pillar ovens and a 5th smaller one. All these represents the access corridor (praefurnium) and combustion chamber. The ovens are made basically from Amphoras and common ceramics.

The Termal zone consist of several units corresponding to heated rooms, and several other rooms which not yet have been determined. The Termal is ruled by a large square in which there have been circular swimming pool with a diameter of 4,70 m, deep 1,50 m, and with 4 small steps. There has also been a porched room witk mosaics and 2 ovens ((Praefurnium) to heat op the thermaes.

Yacimiento romano, descubierto en 1970 mientras se realizaban las obras de una nueva línea de ferrocarril.
En este paraje, después de diversas excavaciones, se han hallado valiosos restos arqueológicos, entre los que cabe mencionar una escultura realizada en mármol, conocida popularmente como la venus de Fuengirola, una pequeña factoría para salar el pescado y un edificio termal de pequeñas dimensiones

El yacimiento se ubica en la margen derecha del arroyo Pajares (en la confluencia con la variante de Fuengirola), entre la vía del tren Fuengirola-Málaga y el Barrio de los Pacos. El complejo arqueológico se encuentra dividido, artificialmente, por la referida carretera en dos grandes áreas, norte y sur.

El terreno excavado, situado en el área sur del yacimiento, presenta dos espacios constructivos: zona industrial y zona termal.
La zona industrial se compone de dos grandes habitaciones, desarrollándose, en la más meridional, un conjunto de ocho piletas en dos series de cuatro; más al sur una extensa nave cuya planta permanece aún incompleta. Las estructuras existentes presentan diversas huellas de reparaciones y reutilizaciones. Dentro del complejo industrial, y al noreste de las habitaciones reseñadas, se ubican cuatro hornos de pilar central y un quinto de pequeñas dimensiones. Todos ellos presentan corredor de acceso (praefurnium) y cámara de combustión. El material producido en dichos hornos se compone, básicamente, de Ánforas y de cerámica común.

En la zona termal, situada en el extremo noreste del área sur del yacimiento, presenta varias dependencias, correspondientes a habitaciones calefactadas, y otras estancias, aún no definidas, que se desarrollan hacia el norte y oeste. De todo el conjunto cabría resaltar la sala de planta cuadrada en la que se inscribe una piscina circular de 4,70 metros de diámetro y 1,50 metros de profundidad, con cuatro pequeñas exedras-accesos. Así mismo habría que indicar la presencia de una sala porticada decorada con mosaicos y de dos hornos (Praefurnium) para la calefacción de las termas. La cronología del yacimiento se estima entre los siglos I y V de nuestra era.
John S
FUENGIROLA_-_Parque_Yacimiento_Romano_4.JPG
Fuengirola- Roman Complex33 viewsThe complex was discovered in 1970 when the town of Fuengirola was making a new railroad, and is dated back to the I and V century.

The excavation area consist of 2 areas, Industrial and Termal zone.

The Industrial zone consist of 2 large living rooms, and 8 columns in a pair of 2 series with 4 columns. Within the Industrial area and to the north there are 4 central pillar ovens and a 5th smaller one. All these represents the access corridor (praefurnium) and combustion chamber. The ovens are made basically from Amphoras and common ceramics.

The Termal zone consist of several units corresponding to heated rooms, and several other rooms which not yet have been determined. The Termal is ruled by a large square in which there have been circular swimming pool with a diameter of 4,70 m, deep 1,50 m, and with 4 small steps. There has also been a porched room witk mosaics and 2 ovens ((Praefurnium) to heat op the thermaes.

Yacimiento romano, descubierto en 1970 mientras se realizaban las obras de una nueva línea de ferrocarril.
En este paraje, después de diversas excavaciones, se han hallado valiosos restos arqueológicos, entre los que cabe mencionar una escultura realizada en mármol, conocida popularmente como la venus de Fuengirola, una pequeña factoría para salar el pescado y un edificio termal de pequeñas dimensiones

El yacimiento se ubica en la margen derecha del arroyo Pajares (en la confluencia con la variante de Fuengirola), entre la vía del tren Fuengirola-Málaga y el Barrio de los Pacos. El complejo arqueológico se encuentra dividido, artificialmente, por la referida carretera en dos grandes áreas, norte y sur.

El terreno excavado, situado en el área sur del yacimiento, presenta dos espacios constructivos: zona industrial y zona termal.
La zona industrial se compone de dos grandes habitaciones, desarrollándose, en la más meridional, un conjunto de ocho piletas en dos series de cuatro; más al sur una extensa nave cuya planta permanece aún incompleta. Las estructuras existentes presentan diversas huellas de reparaciones y reutilizaciones. Dentro del complejo industrial, y al noreste de las habitaciones reseñadas, se ubican cuatro hornos de pilar central y un quinto de pequeñas dimensiones. Todos ellos presentan corredor de acceso (praefurnium) y cámara de combustión. El material producido en dichos hornos se compone, básicamente, de Ánforas y de cerámica común.

En la zona termal, situada en el extremo noreste del área sur del yacimiento, presenta varias dependencias, correspondientes a habitaciones calefactadas, y otras estancias, aún no definidas, que se desarrollan hacia el norte y oeste. De todo el conjunto cabría resaltar la sala de planta cuadrada en la que se inscribe una piscina circular de 4,70 metros de diámetro y 1,50 metros de profundidad, con cuatro pequeñas exedras-accesos. Así mismo habría que indicar la presencia de una sala porticada decorada con mosaicos y de dos hornos (Praefurnium) para la calefacción de las termas. La cronología del yacimiento se estima entre los siglos I y V de nuestra era.

John S
iulius_caesar_Cr480_13.jpg
G. Iulius Caesar, Crawford 480/1358 viewsGaius Iulius Caesar, 13.6.100-15.3.41 BC, gens Iulia
AR - Denar, 3.83g, 19.7mm, 90°
Rome, Feb.-Mar. 44 BC
moneyer P. Sepullius Macer
obv. Head of Caesar, wreathed and veiled, r.
before CAESAR, behind DICT PERPETVO
rev. r. P SERPVLLVS, l. MACER (both from top to bottom)
Venus Victrix with bare l. breast, stg. l., holding small Victory in xxtended r. hand and resting with raised l. hand on lpng sceptre on which is leaning the shield set on ground
ref. Crawford 480/13; Sydenham 1074; RSC Julius Caesar 39; BMCRR I Rome 4173; SRCV I 1414; Vagi 56; Sear CRI 107d
VF, portrait!, toned, scratches, somewhat excentric
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

From highest historical importance: The 1st portrait of Iulius Caesar and the coin that killed Caesar!

Please, take a look at http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=109646.0
5 commentsJochen
Julius_Caesar.jpg
Gaius Julius Caesar205 viewsFebruary-March 44 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.90 g, 5h). Rome mint. P. Sepullius Macer, moneyer. Laureate and veiled head right / Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter; shield at base of scepter. Crawford 480/13; CRI 107d; Sydenham 1074; RSC 39. From the Jörg Müller Collection.

Alföldi arranges Crawford 480 series coins in (44 BC) month order as follows:

RRC 480/1, Buca - January
RRC 480/2, DICT QVART - early February
RRC 480/3/4/5, CAESAR IMP - late February
RRC 480/6/7/8/9/10/11/12/13/14, DICT PERPETVO - early to mid March
RRC 480/17/18, CAESAR IMPER - late March
RRC 480/19/20, PARENS PATRIAE - April
RRC 480/15/16, MARIDIANVS - April
RRC 480/21/22, CLEMENTIAE CAESARIS and Mark Antony - April

"Iconography, historical meaning:

The rev. can be understand easily: The Iulians ascribed their gens back to Aeneas who was the son of Venus (Aphrodite) and Anchises.Venus was the tutelary goddess of the gens Iulia and hence of Caesar. 46 BC Caesar has consecrated together with his new built forum also the temple of Venus Genetrix, the ancestress of his gens. On this denarius with Victory, spear and shield it is rather Venus Victrix.

The portrait on obv. is imposing by its realistic depiction. It was for the first time that a living ruler was pictured on a Roman coin. This too raised suspicion that Caesar - even if he wasn't acclaimed king - would behave as such.

Caesar's portrait attracts attention by the wreath he is wearing. It protrudes notable wide beyond his forehead. Furthermore it is padded and very ragged. This characteristic received too little attention until now. There is every indication that it is not a usual wreath but a corona graminea, a Grass or Blockade crown. This crown was dedicated by the army to that commander who has freed them from an encirclement and saved them from certain death. The crown was composed from flowers and tuft of grass which was plucked at the location of their liberation. This crown was regarded as the highest of all crowns! Pliny (nat. 22, 6) has known only of 8 persons with this honour:
1. Lucius Siccius Dentatus, tribunus plebis 454 BC
2. Publius Decius Mus, 343 BC, 1st Samnite War, dedicated even by 2 armies!
3. Marcus Calpurnius Flamma, 258 BC, at Carmina on Sicily
4. Quintus Fabius Maximus, after the departure of the Carthaginians from Italy, 203 BC
(dedicated by the Senate and the people of Rome, possibly posthumous)
5. Scipio Aemilianus Africanus
6. Gnaeus Petreius Atinas, centurio during the war against the Cimbri
7. Lucius Cornelius Sulla, during the Allied War at Nola 89 BC
8. Quintus Sertorius, 97 BC aa military tribune in Spain under Titu Ddius.
To Caesar and Augustus the crown was dedicated by the Senate!

The veil Caesar is wearing as Pontifex Maximus for lifetime.

DICTATOR PERPETVVS

During Republican times a dictator was designated when the state was in an emergency situation. His position was always temporally limited, yes, sometimes designated only for a single task. In the beginning Caesar too was dictator limited to 1 year and had to be designated again for the next year. Already 46 BC Caesar has been nominated dictator for 10 years but the title had to be renewed each year. So we know of coins with DICT, DICT ITER (= again, for the second time), IC TER (for the third time) and DICT QVART.

Since the proclamation as king has failed the title dictator disappeared from the denarii and were replaced by IMP. But soon behind Caesar's head appeares a star, a crescent, or Victory's spear stands on a star. These celestial signs - and that was understod by all - stand for divinity and should raise Caesar high above all Romans. Incompatible with the idea of a republican constituted Rome.

The point of culmination in this series is the legend DICT PERPETVO of this coin. Now the title of dictator was no more temporally limited but was valid like his office as Pontifex Maximus for all his life and it no more was necessary to confirm the title each year. That actually was a spectacular violation of the Roman constitution! The fact that he appeared at the Lupercalia on February 15. 44 BC in the ancient robe of kings strengthened the suspicion that he was looking for the kingship. In fact he has publicly
refused the royal crown that was offered to him by Marcus Antonius, but his authority to exert power was equal a king even without bearing the title of king. That was the most hateful title of the Roman Republic.

Now he has passed a line that his republican enimies couldn't tolerate any more if they still wanted to be taken seriously. So this coin actually led to his murder by the conspirators. So "The coin that kills Caesar" is by no means an exaggeration.

The planned Parthian War:

Caesar has planned a war against the Parthians. In March 44 BC he wanted to start for a campaign to the east. His assassination inhibited this intention. In science disputed are the goals which Caesar has had in mind with his war. They are reaching from a boundary adjustment, as Mommsen suggested, to world domination like Alexander the Great, as Plutarch is writing: According to him Caesar after the submission of the Parthians would go across Hyrcania at the Caspian Sea, then round the Black Sea via the Caucasus, invade the land of the Scyths, attack Germania and would finally return to Italy through the land of the Celts. In this way he would have conquered the world known to the Ancients and his limits were only the shores of the surrounding Okeanos.

Probably Sueton who was sitting directly at the sources was more realistic. And we know of the campaigns of Marcus Antonius and Augustus who surely have known Caesar's plans and have used them for their own purposes. It's clear that Caesar doesn't want to repeat the errors of Crassus who perished at Carrhae, and has tried to avoid he Parthian cavalry units. Therefore a route through Lesser Armenia is most probable. And there was hope that the Mesopotamian cities would raise against the Parthians. Caesar had gathered an army of 16(!) legions, a huge power that alone by its mere bigness would ensure the victory. Caesar was no gambler, rather a cautious and prudential commander.The famous "veni, vidi, vici" doesn't exist longer. What he actually had in mind we don't know. It's speculative. But there is every indication that it was a reorganisation of the east. And that rather by establishing client-kingdoms than creating new Roman provinces.

Probably the conspirators were afraid of Caesar's Parthian War, because a victory, which was possible or even probable, would have strengthen Caesar's position and has made him practically invulnerable." - Jochen
4 commentsNemonater
caesar_aeneas_reverse.jpg
GAIUS JULIUS CAESAR, 100 - 44 BC134 viewsGaius Julius Caesar, 100 - 44 BC. Denarius, Africa, 47 - 46 BC.
Obverse- Head of Venus right.
Reverse- CAESAR/ Aeneas carrying Anchises and Palladium out of Troy.
Cr. 458/1; A. 1400.
3.77 g, 18 mm
2 commentsb70
00349-GaleriaValeria.JPG
Galeria Valeria24 viewsGaleria Valeria Follis
26 mm 7.15 gm
O: GAL VALERIA AVG
Diademed bust right, wearing embroidered robes.
R: VENERI VICTRICI
Venus standing facing, head left, holding up apple in right hand and raising drapery over shoulder with left.
2 commentsKoffy
galeriavaleria3.jpg
GALERIA VALERIA16 viewsAE follis. Cyzicus 308-309 AD. 8,20 grs. Diademed and draped bust right. GAL VALERIA AVG / Venus standing facing, head left, right hand holding apple, left raising drapery over left shoulder. Delta and star in field, MKV in exergue.
RIC VI 46. Cohen 2.
benito
galeriavaleria3~0.jpg
GALERIA VALERIA18 viewsAE follis. Cyzicus 308-309 AD. 8,20 grs. Diademed and draped bust right. GAL VALERIA AVG / Venus standing facing, head left, right hand holding apple, left raising drapery over left shoulder. VENERI VICTRICI. Delta and star in field, MKV in exergue.
RIC VI 46. Cohen 2.
benito
galval.jpg
Galeria Valeria (293 - 311 A.D.)67 viewsÆ Follis
O: GAL VAL-ERIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right.
R: VENERI V-ICTRICI, Venus standing facing, head left, holding up apple and raising drapery; K-Γ/P, ALE in exergue.
Alexandria Mint
23mm
6.85g
RIC VI 110
5 commentsMat
00445b~0.jpg
Galeria Valeria (RIC 110, Coin #445)137 views
RIC 110, AE Follis, Alexandria, 308 - 310 AD.
Obv: GAL VALERIA AVG Draped & diademed bust right.
Rev: VENERI VICTRICI (ALE) Venus standing left, holding apple
and lifting robe. K - Gamma over P in fields.
Size: 24.4mm 6.82gm

1 commentsMaynardGee
00525.jpg
Galeria Valeria (RIC 56 var, Coin #525)28 views
Galeria Valeria, RIC 56 var (officina), AE Follis, Heraclea, 310 - 311 AD
Obv: GAL VALERIA AVG Diademed and draped bust right.
Rev: VENERI VICTRICI (HTЄ) Venus standing facing, head left, holding up
apple with right hand, raising drapery with left hand. Crescent in right field.
Size: 24.0mm, 5.52g

Note: RIC does not show an Є officina for any of Galeria Valeria's coins minted in Heraclea.

1 commentsMaynardGee
Galeria Valeria.jpg
Galeria Valeria - AE Follis 26 viewsGaleria Valeria, wife of Galerius. AE Follis, 26mm., mint of Anthioch.

Obv.: Her diademed and draped bust to right.

Rev.: VENERI VICTRICI. Venus standing left, holding apple.
Marjan E
GALVALTOGETHER.jpg
Galeria Valeria AD 305-311, AE follis of Thessalonica. RIC VI#3624 views
Galeria Valeria AD 305-311, AE follis of Thessalonica. 27.63mm/ 5.79 grams

Obverse > GAL VALE-RIA AVG, Diademed bust facing, head right, hair weaved in rows and curled around side of head at base of neck, wearing embroidered robes with two necklaces.

Reverse > VENERI V-ICTRICI,Venus standing facing, head left, apple in uplifted right hand, raising drapery over left shoulder with left hand. Star in left field,Gamma in right field.

Mintmark > dot SM dot TS dot. RIC VI #36 Thessalonica ; Officina 3, AD December 308- May 310.


1 commentsPaul R3
lg_galeria_valeria.jpg
Galeria Valeria AE Follis32 viewsGaleria Valeria (Augusta)
AE Follis 6.55g / 25mm / -
GAL VALERIA AVG - Diademed & draped bust right
VENERI VICTRICI - Venus standing left, holding apple & scepter, * to left, E to right
Exergue: SM dot TS
Mint: Thessalonica (308-311 AD)
Ref: RIC 36
Scotvs Capitis
roman56.jpg
Galeria Valeria AE Follis 39 views311 AD. Alexandria mint.
Obv.: GAL VALERIA AVG - Diademed and draped bust of Galeria Valeria.
Rev.: VENERI VICTRICI - Venus holding apple and raising drapery over shoulder. [crescent]/K in l. field, Γ/P in r..
RIC 128A
Minos
galval.jpg
Galeria Valeria AE Follis VENERI VICTRICI26 viewsGaleria Valeria Æ Follis. GAL VALERIA AVG, diademed & draped bust right / VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing facing, head left, holding up apple & raising drapery over shoulderancientone
galeria-valeria-heraclea.jpg
Galeria Valeria AE Follis Heraclea Venus16 viewsRoman Imperial, Galeria Valeria AE Follis, Struck 309-310 AD.

Obverse: GAL VALERIA AVG, Diademed & draped bust right.

Reverse: VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple upwards and raising drapery, HTB in ex. "Women of the Victor"

Reference: RIC Heraclea 43-B, Sear 14593.

Ex: Ancient Imports+photo
Gil-galad
Galeria_Valeria_2.jpg
GALERIA VALERIA AE Follis RIC 36B, Venus15 viewsOBV: GAL VALERIA AVG, diademed & draped bust right
REV: VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple upwards and raising drapery, star left, B right; dot SM dot TS dot in ex
6.14g, 24mm

Minted at Thessalonica, 308-11 AD
Legatus
Galeria_Valeria.jpg
GALERIA VALERIA AE Follis RIC 43, Venus18 viewsOBV: GAL VALERIA AVG, diademed & draped bust right
REV: VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple upwards and raising drapery, star left, HTA in ex.
4.8g, 29mm

Minted at Heraclea, 309-10 AD
Legatus
GalVal_b.jpg
Galeria Valeria follis43 viewswife of Galerius
VENERI VICTRICI
Tibsi
galeria valeria-.jpg
GALERIA VALERIA follis AD308-30910 viewsobv:GAL.VALERIA.AVG (diademed & draped bust right)
rev:VENERI.VICTRICI / Δ / MKV (Venus standing left, holding up apple in right hand & raising drapery over shoulder with left)
ref:RIC VI-Cyzicus46
mint:Cyzicus, 5.63g, 24mm
Diocletian's daughter and Galerius's wife. They married in June 293, and Valeria followed her husband to East provinces. When Galerius died (312 AD) she was banished by Maximinus II (Daza). After hidden for years she (and her mother) was captured and brutally executed at Thessalonica in 315 AD.
berserker
galeria_valeria_thessalonica_36.jpg
Galeria Valeria RIC VI, Thessalonica 3634 viewsGaleria Valeria, daughter of Diocletian, 2nd wife of Galerius. killed AD 315 by Licinius I
AE - AE 3, 6.39g
Thessalonica 2nd officina, AD 308-310
obv. GAL VALE - RIA AVG
bust, draped and diademed, r.
rev. VENERI V - ICTRICI
Venus Victrix, draped, stg. l., holding up apple with r. hand, and raising hem of
her skirt over l. shoulder
star in l. field, B in r. field
in ex.: dot SM dot TS dot
RIC VI, Thessalonica 36
VF

I think this is one of the last depictions of Venus on Roman coins!
1 commentsJochen
Galeria_Valeria_Venus.JPG
Galeria Valeria Venus18 viewsBronze Galeria Valeria - West of Galarius - Follis Coin circa 305-311 A.D. Venus reverse. 25mm Sear-3730
Galeria Valeria Follis, .
RIC VI Thessalonica 33, rated common.
OBV: GAL VALE-RIA AVG, diademed & draped bust right, wearing necklace
REV: VENERI V-ICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding apple & scepter, * to left, A to rght
Mintmark: .SM.TS.
Romanorvm
GalValeria.JPG
Galeria Valeria, AE Follis62 viewsGAL VALERIA AVG
VENERI VICTRICI, HAdelta
RIC IV 43
Heraclea, 309-310 AD
This type records the last appearance of Venus on Imperial Coinage.
whitetd49
gv58.jpg
Galeria Valeria, AE follis 309-310 C.E., Second wife of Galerius 9 viewsObverse: GAL VAL ERIA AVG, diademed AND DRAPED BUST RIGHT.
Reverse: VENERI V ICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand and drapery over shoulder with left hand. D * in field
Mintmark MKV RIC VI 58 Cyzicus, 27.3 mm., 5.6 g.
NORMAN K
Galeria_Valeria_RIC_VI_Thessalonica_36.jpg
Galeria Valeria, AE Follis, RIC VI Thessalonica 3683 viewsGaleria Valeria
Augusta, 308-311 A.D.

Coin: AE Follis

Obverse: GAL VALE-RIA AVG, laureate, draped bust facing right, wearing a Necklace. Seen from the front.
Reverse: VENERI V-ICTRICI, Venus, standing, facing left, holding an Apple with her right hand and lifting her Stola with her left. ✳ - Γ across the fields.

Weight: 4.89 g, Diameter: 26.2 x 26.4 x 1.3 mm, Die axis: 0°, Mintmark: ●SM●TS● (Thessalonica), struck between 308-310 A.D. Reference: RIC VI Thessalonica 36
Masis
galval2.jpg
Galeria Valeria, Alexandria89 viewsGaleria Valeria. Augusta, AD 293(?)-311. Æ Follis (24mm, 7.21 g). Alexandria mint. Struck AD 308-310. Diademed and draped bust right / Venus standing facing, head left, holding up apple and raising drapery over shoulder; K-G/P//ALE. RIC VI 110. Good VF, dark brown patina, some green encrustation on the obverse.

The style of this portrait is my favorite of Galeria Valeria.
Ex-CNG
wildwinds example (this coin)
4 commentsarizonarobin
galeria_k.jpg
Galeria Valeria, Augusta, AD 293(?)-311 3 viewsÆ Follis, 25mm, 6.4g, 12h; Siscia mint, 1st officina. Struck circa AD 309-310.
Obv.: GAL VALERIA AVG; Diademed bust right, wearing embroidered robes.
Rev.: VENERI V-ICTRICI; Venus standing facing, head left, lifting dress and holding apple; (crescent) / A // SIS.
Reference: RIC VI 204, p. 479
John Anthony
ARI-Ga__Valeria-3.jpg
Galeria Valeria, BI Nummus, Alexandria6 viewsAD 293(?) - 311
6.91 grams
Obv.: GALVAL - ERIA AVG, Draped bust right, wearing stephane.
Rev.: VICTRIC - VICTRICI Pin left field Delta over R in Right field, Venus standing left, examining apple Mintmark ALE in ex
RIC VI 74
Purchased from Heritage Auctions
NGC AU: Strike 5/5: Surface 4/5
Richard M10
galeriavaleria.jpg
Galeria Valeria, daughter of Diocletian, wife of co-Emporer Galeria, Cyzicus mint, Turkey 308-309 AD133 viewsBust: Right facing, diademed, no crescent.
Obverse: GALVALERIAAVG
Reverse: VENERIVICTRICI
Type: Venus standing left, holding apple and raising skirt.

Mint = MKV = Cyzicus. Turkey.

Mark = triangle
308 -309 AD. (according to Aorta)

She doesn't come across as a great beauty in other busts, but I think she's rather beautiful in this version. She has a sad expression in her eyes, as if she can see what's coming for her...
Banjaxed
GALVALER-1.jpg
Galeria Valeria, daughter of Diocletian, wife of Galerius. Augusta, 293(?)-311 CE.175 viewsÆ Follis (26 mm, 6.64 gm). Nicomedia mint, 308-310 CE.
Obv: GAL VAL-ERIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right.
Rev: VENERI VI-CTRICI CMH, Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple and drapery; in exergue, SMNA.
RIC VI 57; Sear 3730 var.
EmpressCollector
0591-301.jpg
Galeria Valeria, Follis - 007549 viewsHeraclea mint, 1st officina
GAL VALERIA AVG, draped and diademed bust right
VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, HTA at exergue
6.98 gr
Galeria Valeria, follis, Ref : Cohen # 2, TTB, R!
Potator II
Galeria_Valeria_RIC_211.JPG
Galeria Valeria, RIC 2119 viewsGAL VALERIA AVG
VENERI VICTRICI
AE2, 24mm, 4.95g
Draped bust wearing necklace, shoulders facing on crescent
Venus standing, facing, head left, holding apple and raising drapery over shoulder, A in right field

Poorly preserved example
SIS in ex
novacystis
galeria_valeria_alex_81.jpg
Galeria Valeria, RIC VI, Alexandria 8111 viewsGaleria Valeria, AD 315 murdered by Licinius II
AE - Follis (AE 3), 5.98g, 22mm, 0°
Alexandria, 5th officina, late 308
obv. GAL VAL - ERIA AVG
Bust, draped, diademed, r.
rev. VENERI - V - ICTRICI
Venus Victric, inlonggarment and mantle, stg. frontal, head l., holding in raise l. hand garment over
shoulder and in r. hand apple
in l. and r. field E / X - K
in ex. ALE
ref. RIC VI, Alexandria 81; C. 2
F-about VF
Pedigree:
ex coll. Drexler, Würzburg, Christmas 1958
Jochen
galval867.jpg
Galeria Valeria, Venus67 viewsGAL VALE-RIA AVG

VENERI V-ICT RICI

:dot: SM :dot: TS :dot:
:star: /left field, B in right ( I think just worn down)

Thessalonica
2 commentsarizonarobin
femaleOR.jpg
Galleria Valeria, RIC VI 35 Thessalonica14 viewsThessalonica, Galleria Valeria, 308-310 A.D. AE, 24mm 4.89g, RIC VI 35 Thessalonica
O: GAL VAL-ERIA AVG, bust draped and diademed (no necklace)
R: VENERI V-ICTRICI , Venus standing l., holding apple and raising drapery from shoulder, Star in left field, Δ in right
Ex: SMTS
casata137ec
Gallienus_Venus~0.jpg
Gallienus - BI antoninianus4 viewsViminacium / Antioch
254-255 AD
radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind
IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG
Venus half left leaning on shield, holding helmet and scepter
VENVS VICTRIX
RIC V 298
Johny SYSEL
245_Gallienus_Venus.jpg
Gallienus - BI antoninianus7 viewsRome
264?-268 AD
radiate head right
GALLIENVS AVG
Venus standing left, holding helmet and spear, shield to left
VENVS V_ICTRIX
Cunetio hoard 1104, Normanby hoard 151 (S)
2,23 g 18-16 mm

Reverse of Salonina - scarce
Johny SYSEL
0440-230np_noir.jpg
Gallienus, Antoninianus65 viewsAntioch mint, AD 265
GALLIENVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right seen from front
VENRI (sic) VICTRICI, Venus standing left, holding helmet shield and spear
3,30 gr
Ref : RCV #10370 var, Cohen #1021 var, Göbl #1653g
1 commentsPotator II
RIC_Gordian_III_SRCV_8683_venus.jpg
Gordian III (Marcus Antoninus Gordianus) (Caesar 238 A.D.; Augustus 238-244 A.D.)4 viewsSRCV 8683, RIC IV 131, Van Meter 76

AR Denarius, 2.67 g., 21.55 mm max., 180°

Rome mint, struck Summer 241 A.D. (special marriage issue)

Obv: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind.

Rev: VENVS VICTRIX (= victorious Venus), Venus standing slightly left, head left, draped, helmet in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, left arm resting on a large oval shield grounded behind.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter BV1.
Stkp
Gordian_III_RIC_131_den.JPG
Gordian III, 238 - 244 AD33 viewsObv: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian III facing right.

Rev: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding a helmet in her right hand and a scepter in her left, and leaning on a shield.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 241 - 242 AD

2.75 grams, 19.9 mm, 180°

RIC IViii 131, RSC 347, S8683, VM 76

Ex: FORVM
1 commentsSPQR Coins
Gordvenus.JPG
Gordian III, 238-244 AD86 viewsIMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG
VENVS VICTRIX
RIC 131
Rome, 240 AD
2 commentswhitetd49
0300-217.jpg
Gordian III, Denarius52 viewsRome mint, AD 241
IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate and draped bust right
VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet in right hand, scepter in left hand and leaning on shield
2.88 gr
Ref : RIC IV part III # 131, RSC # 347, RCV # 8683
Potator II
Gordian III Venus Victrix2.jpg
Gordian III- Venus Victrix108 viewsobv: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG - Laureate, draped, and cuirassed right
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing left, holding globe and sceptre, leaning on shield.

Minted at Rome 240ce. (mistakenly attributed to 241)
20mm, 2.6g
RIC 131 (Rare); Cohen 347
wolfgang336
IulDomna-Antoninian-Venusgenetrix-RIC[Cara]388a.jpg
I/a - IULIA DOMNA -b-001 Antoninian RIC IV [Carac] /I/388a16 viewsAv) IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG
Diademed and draped bust right on a crescent

Rv) VENVS GENETRIX
Venus seated left, extending right hand & holding sceptre in left

Weight:4,5g, Ø: 22mm; Reference.: RIC IV[Carac]/I/388a; ROME mint,
struck under Caracalla
sulcipius
Caracalla-Denar-VENUSVICTRIX-RIC311b.jpg
II-CARACALLA -a- 015 Denar RIC IV/I/311b27 viewsAv) ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Laureated head right

Rv) VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing left, holding Victoriola and sceptre , she isleaning on a shield, which is placed on a helmet

Weight:3,4g; Ø: 17mm; Reference: RIC IV/I/311b; ROME mint; struck: 213-217 A.D.
2 commentssulcipius
IMG_1282.JPG
Italy, Rome, Capitoline Museums, Capitoline Venus188 viewsCapitoline museumsJohny SYSEL
IMG_1210.JPG
Italy, Rome, Capitoline Museums, Esquiline Venus210 viewsCapitoline museumsJohny SYSEL
IMG_1406.JPG
Italy, Rome, Temple of Venus and Roma172 viewsThis is largest roman temple and it was designed by emperor Hadrian himself. Temple was finished by Antoninus Pius and repaired by Maxentius after fire. In 850 after earthquake pope Leo IV built Santa Maria Nova over ruins. In 1612 after renovation church was renamed to Santa Francesca Romana.Johny SYSEL
IMG_3146wp.jpg
Italy, Rome, Temple of Venus Genetrix144 viewschurch of Santi Luca e Martina; curia; arch of Septimius Severus
... I think so many different types of building in the one picture you can find only in Rome.
Johny SYSEL
Italy- Forum Romanum- Part of the Forum of Caesar 0.jpg
Italy- Forum Romanum- Part of the Forum of Caesar 060 viewsThe Forum of Caesar, in addition to being one of the most evident monuments of self-representation of political power, was constructed as an extension to the Roman Forum. Caesar himself behaved like a greco-oriental sovereign, escorted by a procession of elephants and, against every republican norm, once received the Senate sitting in the center of the temple. The dictator also had placed in front the temple a statue of himself riding Bucefalo, the celebrated horse of Alexander the Great and symbol of absolute power. The Temple of Venus Genetrix, intentionally placed at the end of the piazza was the unifying and conclusive element to the architectural complex. This strict centralized vision corresponded to the ideological function, following the propaganda of the Hellenistic sanctuaries.
The choice of the Forum site is also significant: the future dictator didn't want to be far from the central power, represented in the Curia, seat of the Senate. In fact, not long before Caesar's death, the Senate agreed to reconstruct the Curia on the site.
John Schou
Italy- Forum Romanum- Part of the Forum of Caesar 1.jpg
Italy- Forum Romanum- Part of the Forum of Caesar 152 viewsThe Forum of Caesar, in addition to being one of the most evident monuments of self-representation of political power, was constructed as an extension to the Roman Forum. Caesar himself behaved like a greco-oriental sovereign, escorted by a procession of elephants and, against every republican norm, once received the Senate sitting in the center of the temple. The dictator also had placed in front the temple a statue of himself riding Bucefalo, the celebrated horse of Alexander the Great and symbol of absolute power. The Temple of Venus Genetrix, intentionally placed at the end of the piazza was the unifying and conclusive element to the architectural complex. This strict centralized vision corresponded to the ideological function, following the propaganda of the Hellenistic sanctuaries.
The choice of the Forum site is also significant: the future dictator didn't want to be far from the central power, represented in the Curia, seat of the Senate. In fact, not long before Caesar's death, the Senate agreed to reconstruct the Curia on the site.
John Schou
Italy- Forum Romanum- Part of the Forum of Caesar and a statue of Ceasar.jpg
Italy- Forum Romanum- Part of the Forum of Caesar and a statue of Ceasar83 viewsThe Forum of Caesar, in addition to being one of the most evident monuments of self-representation of political power, was constructed as an extension to the Roman Forum. Caesar himself behaved like a greco-oriental sovereign, escorted by a procession of elephants and, against every republican norm, once received the Senate sitting in the center of the temple. The dictator also had placed in front the temple a statue of himself riding Bucefalo, the celebrated horse of Alexander the Great and symbol of absolute power. The Temple of Venus Genetrix, intentionally placed at the end of the piazza was the unifying and conclusive element to the architectural complex. This strict centralized vision corresponded to the ideological function, following the propaganda of the Hellenistic sanctuaries.
The choice of the Forum site is also significant: the future dictator didn't want to be far from the central power, represented in the Curia, seat of the Senate. In fact, not long before Caesar's death, the Senate agreed to reconstruct the Curia on the site.
John Schou
Italy- Pompeii- The Temple of Venus and figure of Venus.jpg
Italy- Pompeii- The Temple of Venus and figure of Venus61 viewsThe temple of Venus

Venus is the patron goddess of Pompeii and her sanctuary, from where one can enjoy a view of the Gulf of Naples, dominates the plain below. The earthquake of 62 A.D. destroyed the edifice and its reconstruction was still in process when the eruption occurred. The area was surrounded by arcades. Still existing in the middle of the temple is its podium (29,15 x 15,5 m.).
John Schou
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and the temple of Venus and Roma.jpg
Italy- Rome- Forum Romanum and the temple of Venus and Roma42 viewsThe Temple of Venus and Roma (Templum Veneris et Romae in Latin) was the largest temple in Ancient Rome. It was located at the far east side of the Forum Romanum, near the Colosseum. It was dedicated to the goddesses Venus Felix (Venus the Happy) and Roma Aeterna (Eternal Rome). The designer was emperor Hadrian. Construction works on the temple started in 121 AD and though it was inaugurated by Hadrian in 135 AD, the building was finished in 141 AD under Antonius Pius.

The building measured 110 meters in length and 53 meters in width. It was placed on a stage measuring 145 meters in length and 100 meters in width. The temple itself consisted of 2 main chambers (cellae), where the cult statue of the god was, in this case the statues of Venus, the goddess of love, and Roma, the goddess of Rome, both of them seated on a throne. The cellae were placed symmetrically back-to-back. Roma's cella was faced west, looking out over the Forum Romanum, Venus' cella was faced east, looking out over the Colosseum. Each cella had its own line of 4 columns at the entrance. At the west and east sides of the temple (the short sides), 10 white columns were placed and at the south and north sides of the temple (the long sides) 18 white columns were placed. All of these columns measured 1.8 meters in width, making the temple very imposing to see.

Within Venus' cella, there was another altar where newly wed couples could make sacrifices. Right next to this altar stood gigantic, silver statues of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina.

In order to build the temple, which is placed on the remains of Nero's Domus Aurea, the statue of Nero, the Colossus, had to be moved. They placed it near the amphitheatre, which became known as the Colosseum shortly afterwards.

Hadrian's most brilliant architect, Apollodorus, wasn't impressed by his emperor's architectural skills. He made a scornful remark on the size of the statues within the cellae. He said that they'd surely hurt their heads if they tried to stand up from their thrones. He was banned and executed not long after this.

A serious fire in 307 AD caused major damage to the temple. It was restored by emperor Maxentius. Unfortunately, a gigantic earthquake at the beginning of the 9th century destroyed the temple once again. Around 850 though, Pope Leo IV ordered the building of a new church, the Santa Maria Nova, on the ruins of the temple. After a major rebuilding in 1612 this church was renamed the Santa Francesca Romana. This church has incorporated Roma's cella as the belltower.

Over the years, most of the columns around the temple have disappeared. Nowadays, only a few are still standing where they used to be, others that have gone missing have been replaced by buxus trees.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_Venus_and_Roma"
John Schou
20.jpg
Iulia Soemia, denario ( 222 d.C. circa)40 viewsIulia Soemia (madre di Eliogabalo, morta nel 222), denario
AR, 2,8 gr, 19 mm, BB
D/ IVLIA SOAEMAIS AVG, Soemia drappeggiata a dx
R/ VENVS CAELESTIS,Venus seduta con bambino ai piedi.
Sear 2171, C. 14
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (14 giugno 2007, numero catalogo 116); ex Artemide aste (San Marino, numero catalogo 2299, fino al 2007).
paolo
P1180744.jpg
IVLIA AVGVSTA - Denarius - VENERI VICTR13 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
Rome 194 n.Chr.(?)
Av.: IVLIA AVGVSTA - Bust draped r.
Rev.: VENERI VICTR - Venus, naked to waist, standing r., holding apple and palm, resting l. elbow on column
1,83 Gramm, 6 h die axis
RIC - (579 - Aureus)

Poor but rare!

In my opinion Rome style and not "Emesa"!
Perhaps unofficial? (weight!)

Doug Smith: "After most of this page had been posted, a coin became available that casts a question on the separation and dating of the 'Emesa' mint issues. This coin could be barbaric or unofficial (and therefore of no significance) but the style of the obverse portrait and the reverse Venus seems very similar to the Emesa coins (particularly the late version Venus from the back shown above). The obverse legend is IVLIA AVGVSTA which should date to 196 AD or after the closing of the 'Emesa' mint under traditional scholarship. Perhaps the closing date of this mint should be pushed back allowing this coin to be the last product of this series. However the use of the earlier legend VENERI VICTR adds weight to the theory that the coin is not official. My Questions page includes a coin of Caracalla as Caesar paired with an earlier looking 'Emesa' reverse. Is there a connection? Students whose opinions I value fail to see this as Eastern and may be right but I am still tending to consider this an official 'Emesa' product of great interest. Certainly more study is needed before this series will be understood. "
nummis durensis
Juila_Soaemias_RIC_243~0.JPG
Juila Soaemias, RIC 24316 viewsIVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG
VENVS CAELESTIS
AR denarius, 20mm, 2.38g
Draped bust right
Venus seated left, holding scepter, extending hand to Cupid
novacystis
JulDomVenG.JPG
Julia Domna93 viewsIVLIA PIA FELIX AVG
VENVS GENETRIX
RIC 388c, C 212, BMC 23B
Rome, 216 AD
1 commentswhitetd49
JulDomVenVic.JPG
Julia Domna71 viewsIVLIA AVGVSTA
VENVS VICTRIX
RIC 581, BMC 90, C 215
Rome, 210 AD
whitetd49
JulDomVenVict.JPG
Julia Domna22 viewsIVLIA DO/MNA AVG
Bust draped, right
VENERI VICTR
Venus Victrix draped below waist, standing right, seen from behind, leaning on column, holding apple and palm
RIC 536, C 194, BMC 49
Rome, 194 AD, 2.40 g.
whitetd49
JulDomVenFelix.JPG
Julia Domna39 viewsIVLIA AVGVSTA
Bust draped, right
VENVS FELIX
Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple and drawing drapery from shoulder
RIC 580, BMC 85, RSC 198
Rome, 195-211 AD, 2.63 g.
ex. Forum Ancient Coins
whitetd49
00155-JuliaDomna.JPG
Julia Domna 68 viewsJulia Domna Denarius
20 mm 3.09 gm
O: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG
Draped bust of Julia right.
R: VENVS GENETTRIX
Venus seated left, holding apple and scepter, before her, Cupid standing right, hand on her knee.
3 commentsKoffy
Julia_Domna_RIC__536.jpg
Julia Domna63 viewsDenarius (3.06g - 18mm)
obv. IVLIA DOMNA AVG
Bareheaded bust right, draped.
rev. VENERI VICTR
Venus standing right, naked to waist, leaning on column to left, holding palm and apple
Rome mint AD 194
RIC IVi 536D
1 commentsHG
Julia_Domna_RIC_388a.jpg
Julia Domna30 viewsAntoninianus ( 5.20g - 20mm)
obv. IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG
Diademed and draped bust right, set on crescent.
rev. VENVS GENETRIX.
Venus seated left with sceptre
RIC 388a
HG
DOMNA-4.jpg
Julia Domna RIC IV 64616 viewsObv: IVLIA AVGVSTA
draped bust right, small loop at neck
Rev: VENVS FELIX
Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre
19mm 3.4gm
OWL365
ju44~0.jpg
JULIA DOMNA (193 - 217 A.D.)45 viewsAR Denarius
O: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
R: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, naked to waist, standing left, holding helmet and palm, resting elbow on column, shield at feet.
Rome
17.5mm
2.8g
RIC 581 BMCRE p. 168, 90 RSC 215
1 commentsMat
domant1.jpg
Julia Domna (193 - 217 A.D.)30 viewsAR Antoninianus
O: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Diademed and draped bust right, resting on crescent.
R: VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left holding hand out, and scepter.
Rome
4.5g
23mm
RIC 388a, RSC 206a
1 commentsMat
jd4421.jpg
Julia Domna (193 - 217 A.D.)68 viewsAR Denarius
O: IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R: VENUS FELIX (Venus the Fortunate), Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple in right hand and drawing drapery from shoulder.
Rome Mint, 196 - 211 A.D.
3.4g
18mm
RIC IV 580, BMCRE V 85, RSC III 198
5 commentsMat
Julia_Domna_RIC388c.jpg
Julia Domna - Denarius - RIC 388c10 viewsObv: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right
Rev: VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, extending right hand and holding sceptre in left
Mint: Rome
Date: 216 AD
Ref: RIC IV 388c (Caracalla), RSC 212, BMC 23B
vs1969
veneri_vicos_fac.jpg
Julia Domna - Denarius - VENERI VI COS16 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
193 A.D.
Rome
Av.: IVLIA DO - MNA AVG / draped bust right
Rev.: VENERI - VI COS / Venus, naked to waist, standing right, holding apple and palm, resting elbow on column (drapery fabric hanging next to column and palm)
2,97 Gr., 6 h die axis
RIC -, Coh. -

An interesting reverse error...
nummis durensis
veneri_victr_I_fac.jpg
Julia Domna - Denarius - VENERI VICTR (I)25 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
193 A.D.
Rome
Av.: IVLIA DO - MNA AVG / draped bust right
Rev.: VENERI - VICTR / Venus, naked to waist, standing right, holding apple and palm, resting elbow on column (drapery fabric hanging next to column)
3,06 Gr., 6 h die axis
RIC 536, Coh. 193

I love this sexy ... back ;-)
nummis durensis
veneri_victr_II_fac.jpg
Julia Domna - Denarius - VENERI VICTR (II)13 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
193 A.D.
Rome
Av.: IVLIA DO - MNA AVG / draped bust right
Rev.: VENERI - VICTR / Venus, naked to waist, standing right, holding apple and palm, resting elbow on column (drapery fabric hanging next to palm)
3,52 Gr., 6 h die axis
RIC 536, Coh. 193
nummis durensis
venvs_genetrix_fac.jpg
Julia Domna - Denarius - VENVS GENETRIX19 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
216 A.D.
Rome
Av.: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG / draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS GENETRIX / Venus seated left, extending right hand and holding scepter in her left
2,31 Gr., 6 h die axis
RIC 388(c), Coh. 212
1 commentsnummis durensis
venvs_victrix_fac.jpg
Julia Domna - Denarius - VENVS VICTRIX 18 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
206 - 211 A.D.
Rome
Av.: IVLIA - AVGVSTA / draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS - VICTRIX / Venus, naked to waist, standing left, holding helmet and palm, resting elbow on column, shield at feet
2,03 Gr., 6 h die axis
RIC 581, Coh. 215
nummis durensis
581_variante.jpg
Julia Domna - denarius - VENVS VICTRIX ("Variant")31 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
196 - 210 A.D.
Rome
Av.: IVLIA - AVGVSTA / draped bust right - Type "Arcus Argentariorum"
Rev.: VENVS - VICTRIX / Venus, naked to waist, standing left, holding helmet and palm, resting elbow on column with cuirass right, Cupid holding shield at feet
3,59 Gr., 6 h die axis
RIC - (see 581 Var.), Coh. -

Also the hairstyle is different from RIC 581.
nummis durensis
Iulia_Domna_RIC.jpg
Julia Domna - Sestertius - RIC 8429 viewsObv: IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right, hair waved and coiled at back
Rev: VENERI VICT S-C, Venus leaning on column, nude to below waist, seen from behind standing right, holding palm branch & globe
Size: 25 mm
Weight: 23,6 g
Ref: RIC IV 842 (Septimius Severus), Cohen 195, BMC 488
Rarity: R
vs1969
P1090179.jpg
Julia Domna - VENEBI VICTR25 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
194 A.D.
Emesa(?)
Av.: IVLIA DO - MNA AVG / draped bust right
Rev.: VENEB(sic!)I - VICTR / Venus, naked to waist, standing right, holding apple and palm, resting elbow on column
2,27 Gr., 6 h die axis
RIC 632 Var., Coh. 194 Var.
See SEV-460 (Bonae Spei) - Barry P. Murphy Collection - for same obverse die
1 commentsnummis durensis