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Search results - "Rhodes,"
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43 views13mm c. 188-84BC. Obv. Radiate Nymph Rhodes right, Rev. P-O to sides of Rose with bud and shoot in incuse square. BMC327 , SNG Keckman 711.1 commentsLee S
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14 views13mm c. 188-84BC. Obv. Radiate Nymph Rhodes right, Rev. P-O to sides of Rose with bud and shoot in incuse square. BMC327 , SNG Keckman 711.
Lee S
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22 views12mm c. 188-84BC. Obv. Radiate Nymph Rhodes with earring right, Rev. P-O to sides of Rose with bud and shoot in incuse square. BMC237.
Lee S
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17 views10mm c. 350-300BC. Obv. Head of nymph Rhodes with Stephane right, Rev. Rose with bud and shoot, Race torch in left field. BMC 91 , SNG Keckman 391.Lee S
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15 views12mm c. 188-84BC. Obv. Radiate Nymph Rhodes with earring right, Rev. P-O to sides of Rose with bud and shoot in incuse square. BMC327.Lee S
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12 viewspishpash
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35 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Perseus. 179-168 B.C. AR drachm (15 mm, 2.60 g, 12 h). ca. 171/0 B.C. Aristokrates, magistrate. Head of Helios facing slightly right / P-O, rose with bud to left; in left field, club; above, magistrate's name: [ΑΡΙ]ΣΤΟΚΡΑΤΗΣ. R. J. H. Ashton, ""Clubs, Thunderbolts, Torches, Stars and Caducei: more Pseudo-Rhodian Drachms from Mainland Greece and the Islands,"" NC 162 (2002), 17 (A6/P5; this coin). Toned. Very fine.
Ex Naville V (18 June 1923), 2669. British Museum Duplicate, Ex: British Museum


The Pseudo-Rhodian drachms were struck, probably by the Macedonians under Perseus but possibly by the Romans, to pay for Mercenaries from Crete and Rhodes who would have been familiar with Rhodian coinage. The coins in the name of the magistrate Aristokrates with the club symbol in the field is the largest known individual issue of pseudo-Rhodian drachms from the Third Macedonian War, and used at least twenty-nine obverse dies.
paul1888
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6023 viewsPseudo-Autonomous
Rhodes
AE 35mm (drachm)
c.31BC - 60AD
Obverse: Head of Dionysus right, radiate and with ivy leaf wreath
Reverse: Nike, right, with palm and aphlastron, on prow
Magistrate: Hypsikles
RPC I 2761
As this coin is listed in RPC I there is enough justification, for me at least, to include it in my "Diverse Roman" gallery.
mauseus
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Hemidrachm 404-390 BC. AR 10mm. 1.6grm18 viewsRhodes, Hemidrachm. 404-390 BC. 1.6Grm.
Obv. Head of Helios facing
Rev. P O Flanking rose within incuse square,
Ref. SNG Keck. 367 (Var)
Lee S
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Rhodos, Carian Islands, c. 188 - 84 B.C.104 viewsSilver hemidrachm, cf. SNG Keckman 642 ff. (various magistrates and control symbols)Dexikrates, Fine/Fair, scratches, underweight (perhaps imitative), 0.905g, 13.0mm, 135o, Rhodos (Rhodes) mint, c. 188 - 84 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Helios facing slightly right; reverse rose with bud to right, P-O in fields, magistrates name above,ΔΕΞΙΚΡΑΤΗΣ, control symbol lower left, all within a shallow square incuse;7 commentsRandygeki(h2)
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13. Phaselis: Tetradrachm in the name of Alexander the Great.22 viewsTetradrachm, 206 / 05 BC, Phaselis mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. ΙΓ and Φ at left.
16.59 gm., 30 mm.
P. #2853.

The letters ΙΓ are a date: year 13. The dated coinage of Phaselis runs from year 1 through year 33. The coinage of Phaselis came to an end in 186 BC when the Treaty of Apamea gave Rhodes control over Lycia. That makes year 13 correspond to 206 / 205 BC. See pages 346 - 49 of Price, vol. I.
Callimachus
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14. Rhodes: Tetradrachm in the name of Alexander the Great.16 viewsTetradrachm, ca 201 - 190 BC, Rhodes mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. ΔΑΜΑΤΡΙΟΣ and rosebud at left, ΡΟ under throne.
16.89 gm., 32 mm.
P. #2521; M. #1162.

In 202 - 201 BC, Philip V of Macedon was threatening the cities of Asia Minor. Pergamum and Rhodes were political and military rivals, but they were allies against this common aggressor. Each city struck coins of the Alexander type so that the fleet and army assembled in this alliance could be paid in a common currency. By 190 BC old animosities reemerged and the joint coinage ended.
Callimachus
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1997.161.16716 viewsLugdunum (Lyon), 3.04 g

Obverse: IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG; Radiate, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: MARS VICTOR; II; Mars advancing right, carrying transverse spear in right and trophy in left, over left shoulder.
Ref: RIC 37; Rhodes 167; Bastien 166 [The difference is stated by Bastien on pp. 52-4: nos. 164-173 have portraits resembling Florian, while nos. 176-182 have proper Probus portraits, no longer resembling Florian. Translation complement of Curtis Clay]
gordian_guy
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1di Claudius Gothicus26 views268-270

AE antoninianus

Radiate cuirassed bust right, IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Liberlitas stg, LIBERALITAS AVG

RIC 57

Zosimus recorded: When the troops were calmed by their commanders, Claudius was chosen emperor, having previously been designed for that dignity by general consent. Aureolus, who had for a long time kept himself out of the hands of Gallienus, presently sent agents to Claudius, to effect a peace. Surrendering himself, he was killed by the guards of the emperor, who still remembered the hatred they bore against him for his treachery.

The Scythians were by this time so elated by their former success, that they appointed a place of meeting with the Heruli, Peucae, and Gothi, near the river Tyra, which empties itself into the Pontus; where having built six thousand vessels, and put on board them three hundred and twenty thousand men, they sailed across the Pontus, and made an attempt on Tomes, a fortified town, but were repulsed from it. From thence they proceed to Marcianopolis, a city of Mysia, but failing there likewise in their attack on it, they took the opportunity of a favourable wind and sailed forward. . . . they passed through the Hellespont, and arrived at Mount Athos. Having there refitted and careened their vessels, they laid siege to Cassandria and Thessalonica, which they were near taking by means of machines which they raised against the walls. But hearing that the emperor was advancing with an army, they went into the interior, plundering all the neighbourhood of Doberus and Pelagonia. There they sustained a loss of three thousand men, who were met with by the Dalmatian cavalry, and with the rest of their force engaged the army of the emperor. Great numbers were slain in this battle on both sides, but the Romans, by a pretended flight, drew the Barbarians into an ambuscade and killed more than fifty thousand of them.

Egypt being thus reduecd by the Palmyrenians, the Barbarians, who survived the battle of Naissus between Claudius and the Scythians, defending themselves with their carriages which went before them, marched towards Macedon, but were so distressed by the want of necessaries, that many of them and of their beasts perished with hunger. They were met likewise by the Roman cavalry, who having killed many of them, drove the rest towards Mount Haemus; where being surrounded by the Roman army, they lost a vast number of men. But a quarrel ensuing between the Roman horse and foot soldiers, the emperor wishing the foot to engage the Barbarians, the Romans, after a smart engagement, were defeated with considerable loss, but the cavalry, coming up immediately, redeemed in some degree the miscarriage of the infantry. After this battle, the Barbarians proceeded on their march, and were pursued by the Romans. The pirates who cruized about Crete and Rhodes retired without doing any thing worthy of mention; and being attacked by the plague on their way home, some of them died in Thrace and some in Macedon. All that survived were either admitted into the Roman legions, or had lands assigned for them to cultivate and so become husbandmen. Nor was the plague confined to the Barbarians alone, but began to infest the Romans, many of whom died, and amongst the rest Claudius, a person adorned with every virtue. His death was a severe loss to his subjeets, and was consequently much regretted by them.
Blindado
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201343 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
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*Alex
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AE 10mm c. 350-300BC.14 viewsAE 10mm c. 350-300BC.
Obv. Head of nymph Rhodes with Stephane right
Rev. P-O to sides of rose with bud and shoot.

This is the first coin from Rhodes I have cleaned up myself...
It is not quite detailed enough for an accurate attribution, but it is now my favourite, ( and was certainly the cheapest!! )
Lee S
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AE 12; Nymph of Rhodos/ Hibiscus25 viewsCaria, Rhodes, c. 188-84 B.C. AE 12, 1.73g. SNG Keckman 702-24. Obv: Radiate head of nymph Rhodos r. Rev: Hibiscus in shallow incuse square. F+. Ex H.J.Berk1 commentsPodiceps
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AE 12; Zeus/ Hibiscus15 viewsRhodos, Caria, c. 225 B.C. Bronze AE 12, SNG Cop 797, nice F, Rhodos mint, 1.967g, 11.7mm, 0o, c. 225 BC; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse PO, rose, sun-disk behind; rare. Based on the unusual Zeus obverse, this small bronze could be connected to Ptolemy III of Egypt. A devastating earthquake struck Rhodes in 226 B.C. It knocked down the Colossus of Rhodes and destroyed the city. Polybius records that Ptolemy III promised the Rhodians '300 talents of silver, a million artabae of corn, ship-timber for 10 quinqueremes and 10 triremes, consisting of 40,000 cubits of squared pine planking, 1000 talents of bronze coinage, 180,000 pounds of tow (for ropes), 3000 pieces of sailcloth, 3000 talents (of copper?) for the repair of the Colossus, 100 master-builders with 350 workmen, and 14 talents yearly to pay their wages. Beside this, he gave 12,000 artabae of corn for their public games and sacrifices, and 20,000 artabae for victualling 10 triremes. The greater part of these goods were delivered at once, as well as one-third of the money named.' This issue shows perceived harmony with, or thanks to Ptolemaic Egypt. -- J. Ashton, Rhodian Bronze Coinage and the Earthquake of 229. Ex FORVMPodiceps
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AE 12mm, 1.3grm. Rhodes. Ca. 205-188 BC.20 viewsAE 12mm, 1.3grm. Rhodes. Ca. 205-188 BC.
Obv. Radiate head of Helios right.
Rev. P-O flanking rose with bud on either side.
Ref. SNG Keckman 611
Lee S
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AE 15mm, 3.3grm. Rhodes. Ca. 188-84 BC.12 viewsAE 15mm, 3.3grm. Rhodes. Ca. 188-84 BC.
Obv. Laureate head of Zeus right.
Rev. Rose surmounted by radiate solar disk. Uncertain control marks.
Ref. SNG Keckman 725-728
Lee S
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AE 28; Radiate head of Helios right/ R-O; Hibiscus flower with helmet and thunderbolt as buds36 viewsCaria, Rhodos, Helios / Rose, AE28. 28mm, 12.26. Ca. 88-87 B.C. Obv: radiate head of Helios right. Rev: P - O, hibiscus flower ("rose"), helmet in left, thunderbolt in right field as buds. BMC 320. SNG München 661. SNG Cop. 856. Ashton, Coinage 97 (A30/P96); SNG Keckman -. This coinage was struck during Mithradates VI's failed six-month siege of Rhodes in 88 B.C. Unable to produce enough silver for military expenditures, the Rhodians resorted to a fiduciary bronze coinage. Ex Numismatik Lanz & areich3 commentsPodiceps
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AE Chalkos of Rhodos.66 viewsHead of the nymph Rhodes with Stephane right.

Rose with bud, Race torch in left field, shoot in left.

SNG Keckman 391

Thanks to rover1.3 for attribution help!
3 commentsWill Hooton
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AE10mm c. 350-300BC11 views10mm c. 350-300BC. Obv. Head of nymph Rhodes with Stephane right,
Rev. Rose with bud and shoot.
BMC106, SNG Keck. 40
Lee S
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AE12mm. c. 350-300BC.13 viewsAE12mm. c. 350-300BC.
Obv. Head of nymph Rhodes with Stephane right,
Rev. Rose with bud and shoot.
Ref. SNG Keckman 384-425
Lee S
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AE12mm. c. 350-300BC.8 viewsAE12mm. c. 350-300BC.
Obv. Head of nymph Rhodes with Stephane right,
Rev. Rose with bud and shoot. Control off flan.
Ref. SNG Keckman 384-425
Lee S
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AE9.9; Head of nymph Rhodos/ R – O, Rose with bud. 5 viewsRhodos, Caria, c. 400 - 333 B.C. 9.9mm, 1.25g. Head of nymph Rhodos. R – O, Rose with bud. BMC 238, 74. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
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Ancients: CARIAN ISLANDS. Rhodes. Ca. 250-200 BC. AR didrachm (20mm, 12h)8 viewsCARIAN ISLANDS. Rhodes. Ca. 250-200 BC. AR didrachm (20mm, 12h). NGC Choice XF. Timotheus, magistrate. Radiate head of Helios facing, turned slightly right, hair parted in center and swept to either side / ΤΙΜΟΘΕΟΣ, rose with single bud on tendril to right; herm left to left, P-O flanking stem, dotted border, all in incuse circle. HGC 6, 1439. Ashton 209.1 commentsMark R1
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AR11mm c. 350-300BC.11 views11mm c. 350-300BC. Obv. Head of nymph Rhodes with Stephane right,
Rev. Rose with bud and shoot.
BMC107,
Lee S
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Asia Minor, Caria, Rhodes, Helios, rose with bud 10 viewsRhodes, 88-84 BC
Asia Minor, Caria
AR Drachm, magistrate Nikephoros
‘Plinthophoric’ coinage (‘plinthophoric’ for the square incuse around the reverse type)
Obv.: Radiate head of Helios right
Rev.: Rose with bud to right; NIKHΦOPOΣ above, hand holding grain ear to lower right, P-O
Ag, 2.11g, 14mm
Ref.: Jenkins, Rhodian, Group E, 249; HGC 6, 1461
shanxi
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Asia Minor, Caria, Rhodes, Helios, rose, winged thunderbold18 viewsRhodes, 304-166 BC
Asia Minor, Caria
AR Drachm, magistrate Stasion
Obv.: Head of Helios facing slightly right.
Rev.: ΣΤΑΣIΩΝ, P - O, Rose with bud right, winged thunderbolt in field left.
Ag, 2.75g, 14mm
Ref.: "Neue Beiträge zur antiken Münzkunde aus schweizerischen öffentlichen und privaten Sammlungen", p. 63, no. 59, RSN 30 (1945) p. 1-103. (1 specimen cited).
Ex Pecunem Gitbud&Naumann auction 19, Lot 269
shanxi
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Assam: Lakshmi Simha (1769-1780) Rupee (RB-Q27, KM#182)20 viewsObv: Assamese script with invocation to Śiva and Parvati: Śri Śri Hara/ Gauri Charanara/vinda Makaranda/ Madhukarasya
Rev: Śri Śri Svarga/ Deva Śri Laksmi/ Simha Nripasya / Śake date 1694, lion running right, below

ex-Nicholas Rhodes Collection
SpongeBob
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Assam: Lakshmi Simha (1769-1780) ¼ Rupee (RB-Q50, KM#176)22 viewsObv: Śri Śri La/ksmi Simha/ Nrpasya
Rev: Śake / 1695

ex-Nicholas Rhodes Collection
SpongeBob
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Bithynia, Nikaia, Severus Alexander, SNG von Aulock 60661 viewsSeverus Alexander 222-235
AE 25, 9.18g
obv. M AVR CEVH - ALEZANDROC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. NI - [K] - AIEΩ - N
Dionysos, draped, with ivy wreath, holding thyrsos, sitting r., head turned l. to a female figure (probably Nikaia), stg. frontal, head with chignon r., holding wreath in r. hand.
SNG von Aulock 606 (C. Rhodes)
very rare, about VF

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'.
Jochen
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Caria - Rhodes26 viewsAR Diobol
c.230-205 BC
O - Radiate head of Helios right
R - P O, two rose buds with symbol between
cf SNG Kayhan 916-7
1 commentsmauseus
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Caria Rhodes 167-88 BC5 viewsCaria Rhodes 167-88 BC

Obverse. Radiate head of Helios right

Reverse. rose with bud,palm branch on right

11mm 1.07 Grams
Macedonian Warrior
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Caria Rhodes AR Drachm circa 166-188 BC 2.65g30 viewsHead of Helios to right radiate.Rev shallow incuse square within which PO rose with budding branch, on either side,magistrates name above,symbol at right headdress of Isis left.Grant H
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Caria, Rhodes3 viewsÆ10, 0.9g, 12h; c. 394-304 BC.
Obv.: P-O either side of rose, Σ to left.
Rev.: Rose.
Reference: SNG Cop 248.
John Anthony
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Caria, Rhodes AR Plinthophoric Drachm31 viewsMagistrate Antigenes circa 190-170 BC.
Obv: Radiate head of Helios right.
Rev: ΑΝΤΙΓΕΝΗΣ, Rose with bud, prow in left field.
Jenkins 1989, 17; BMC 249; HGC 6, 1457. 2.50g, 15mm,
1 commentsancientone
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Caria, Rhodes mint, BMC Caria p. 240, 10934 viewsRhodes mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C. AE, 10mm 1.18g, BMC Caria p. 240, 109; SNG Keckman 384 - 425 var (symbol), 0.864g, 9.6mm,
O: Diademed head of Rhodos right;
R: PO, rose
1 commentscasata137ec
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Caria, Rhodes, Drachm, (similar to) SNG Copenhagen 83642 viewsRhodes, Drachm, 166-88 B.C. AR, 1.98g 14mm, (similar to) SNG Copenhagen 836
O: Radiate head Helios right
R: Rose with stalk on either side; (off flan: magistrate’s name) above; in field P-O; all within incuse square
1 commentscasata137ec
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Caria, Rhodes. AE1817 viewsObv: PODI WN. Radiate bust of Helios? right.
Rev: PODIWN, radiate bust of Serapis right
ancientone
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CARIA, RHODES. Ancient Greece.21 views3rd Cent. century BC. Æ ( 1,1 g. - 10 mm)
Vs: Head of nymph right.
Rs: Rose.
1 commentsAntonivs Protti
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Caria, Rhodes. Commodus AE16, radiate head of Helios.31 viewsCommodus, AE16 of Rhodos, Caria. 177-192 AD.
Obv: RODIWN, radiate head of Commodus r.
Rev: RODIWN, radiate head of Helios r.
BMC 422; SNG Cop 912; SNG Keckman 1, 788-790; SNG Tuebingen 3612.
ancientone
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Caria, Rhodes. Pseudo-autonomous. Ae15 (1st century AD).17 viewsObv: Radiate and draped bust of Helios right.
Rev: POΔIΩN. Nike standing left, holding wreath and palm branch.
BMC 389 var. (with acrostolium; ethnikon).
1.97 gm. 15 mm.
ancientone
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Caria,Rhodes. AR didrachm29 viewsSNG Keckman 477 / 305-275 BC
obv: head of Helios facing slightly r.
rev: rose,bud to r., to l. thunderbolt.
1 commentshill132
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Caria-Rhodes; 125-88 BC40 viewsAR-Hemidrachm
"Plinthophoric" Coinage
Obv: Radiate head of Helios, 3/4 facing right.
Rev: Rhodian rose - P, Isis crown at left; O, budding branch at right,
Magistrate above: TIMOKPAT(HΣ), all within incuse square.
Size: 13.34 mm;1.44 gm
Ref: BMC Caria,Rhodes, Vol.18,Pg.256,No.291-308 var.
Sear GCV ????
Jenkins, Rhodian Group D, 120; SNG Keckman 669 var.
3 commentsBrian L
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CARIA. Rhodos, Rhodes157 viewsISLANDS off CARIA. Rhodos, Rhodes. Circa 125-88 BC. AR Hemidrachm (14mm, 1.25 gm). Magistrate Melantas. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right / P-O, rose; MELANTAS above, grape bunch to right; all within incuse square. Jenkins, Rhodian, Group D, Series 98; cf. SNG Helsinki 668; SNG Copenhagen -. Near EF. Ex-CNG(295) B127V1272 commentsecoli73
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CARIA: Rhodes10 viewsISLANDS off CARIA, Rhodos. Rhodes. Early-mid 1st century AD. Æ Drachm (35mm, 20.73 g, 2h). Antigonos, magistrate. Radiate head of Dionysus left, wearing ivy wreath / Nike right on rose, holding wreath and palm frond. RPC I 2756; BMC 364. Near VF, earthen green patina, crack running along reverse edge.

CNG 374, lot 269. Ex Stevex6
Molinari
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Carian Islands, Rhodes16 viewsAE10
333-304 B.C.
10mm, 1.05g
GCV-5074var.

Obverse:
Rose, with bud on right.

Reverse:
Rose
P O on either side of stem.
rubadub
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Carian Islands, Rhodes17 viewsSear 5074 var., SNG Copenhagen 750-751 & 858-9, SNG Helsinki 384-392 var., SNG Keckman 384-421, SNG von Aulock 2796-2797 var., BMC Caria pg. 238-239, 74ff var., Laffaille 503 var.

AE 10, circa 350-300 B.C.

Obv: Diademed head of Rhodos right, hair rolled.

Rev: P-O in lower field, rose with bud to the right, H to the left.

In 408 B.C., the cities on the island of Rhodes united to form one territory and built the city of Rhodes, as their new capital on the northern end of the island. The Peloponnesian War had so weakened the entire Greek culture that it lay open to invasion. In 357 B.C., the island was conquered by the king Mausolus of Caria, then it fell to the Persians in 340 B.C., and in 332 B.C. became part of the empire of Alexander the Great. Following the death of Alexander, his generals vied for control of his empire. Rhodes formed strong commercial and cultural ties with the Ptolemies of Egypt, and together formed the Rhodo-Egyptian alliance that controlled trade throughout the Aegean in the 3rd century B.C. The city developed into a maritime, commercial and cultural center, and its coins circulated nearly everywhere in the Mediterranean. In 305 B.C, Antigonus directed his son, Demetrius, to besiege Rhodes in an attempt to break its alliance with Egypt. Demetrius created huge siege engines, but despite this engagement, in 304 B.C., he relented and signed a peace agreement, leaving behind a huge store of military equipment. The Rhodians sold the equipment and used the money to erect a statue of their sun god, Helios, which became known as the Colossus of Rhodes.

In Greek mythology, Rhodos was the goddess of the island of Rhodes and wife of Helios. She was the daughter of Aphrodite and Poseidon.
Stkp
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Carian Islands, Rhodes27 viewsRhodes 88-85 BC. AR Drachm (3.36 gm) Plinthophoric standard. Radiate head of Apollo Helios r. / P-O flanking rose in bloom, caduceus to l. ΚΑΛΛΙΞΕΙΝΟΟΣ (magistrate Kaleizenos). EF.  
HGC 6 #1461; Jenkins 1989 Group E #244; SNG Cop 819; SNG Helsinki 684.
1 commentsChristian T
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Carian Islands, Rhodes9 viewsRhodes. 170-150 BC. AR Hemidrachm (1.21 gm) Plinthophoric standard. Radiate head of Apollo Helios, 3/4 to r. / Rose upright in bloom, P-O flanking, club and T to l., APTEMΩN magistrate Artemon below. VF.
HGC 6 #1462 (S); Jenkins 1989 Group B #44 cf #37-55; SNG Cop 842; SNG Helsinki 654-6.
Christian T
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Carian Islands, Rhodes11 viewsRhodes 205-190 BC. AR Drachm (2.71 gm) Reduced Rhodian standard. Radiate head of Apollo Helios, 3/4 to r. / Rose with one large upright bud in bloom, bow case l., P-O. Magistrate ΓΟΡΓΟΣ (Gorgos) above. EF.
CNG coin store. BMC 164ff; HGC 6 #1453; SNG Helsinki 582ff; SNG Cop 783. Ashton 2001 288.
Christian T
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Carian Islands, Rhodes9 viewsRhodes 250-230 BC. AR Didrachm (6.67 gm) Rhodian stdd.  Radiate head of Apollo Helios, 3/4 to r. / Rose upright in bloom, P-O flanking stem, bud to r., Phrygian helmet to l., and EΡAΣIKΛHΣ (magistrate Herasikles) above VF. 
HGC 6 #1439; Ashton, RN 1988 Colossus pl. 17 #54, 2001 Series 4 #207; SNG Helsinki 536; BMC Caria pg. 235, 47; SNG Cop 738; SNG von Aulock 2806
Christian T
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CARIAN ISLANDS, RHODES, 125-88 BC76 viewsHemidrachm, 13mm, 1.32g

O. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right
R. Rose with bud to left; ANTAIOΣ above, P-O flanking rose, grape bunch to lower right; all within incuse square.

Jenkins group D, 86; HGC 6, 1463; SNG Keckman 664 var. (control), Karl 604 var. (obv. type); SNG von Aulock 8194 var. (same); SNG Copenhagen -; BMC 292 var. (same); SNG München -.

Plinthophoric issue. Antaios, magistrate. Rare symbol for this issue.

Ex Sayles and Lavender
Ex Triton XII
4 commentsAZRobbo
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CARIAN ISLANDS, RHODES, 230-205 BC78 viewsDidrachm, 20mm, 6.75g

O. Radiate hd of Helios 3/4 facing r.
R. Rose with bud to right, MNAΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ; above, P-O flanking stem; to left, Athena Nikephoros standing left.

Karl 475, BMC 143, Ashton 208, SNG von Aulock 2807, SNG Copenhagen 765

Ex Washington Numismatic Gallery
3 commentsAZRobbo
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Carian Islands, Rhodes, Hemidrachm 304 - 167 B.C.31 viewsObv, Head of Helios three quarter face to the right, hair loose. Rev, Rose, with bud on right. P - O in lower field.
B.M.C. 18. 247, 189-91
1 commentsPhiloromaos
LarryW2303.jpg
Carian Islands, Rhodos c. 88-43 BC168 viewsSilver trihemidrachm, 19mm, 4.15g, Nice EF
Radiate head Helios 3/4 right / Rose as viewed from above, magistrate ΛEΩN, wreath, all within circle of dots.
Ashton, NC 1997, 273 (A90/P265) (this coin)
Sear 5069v; BMC Caria, pg 260, #335v; SNG Cop 869v; SNG Von Aulock 2838v
2 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
CARION_ISLANDS_RHODES.jpg
CARION ISLANDS, RHODES AR Hemidrachm Sear 5065v, Rose30 viewsOBV: Radiate head of Helios 3/4 facing
REV: Rose with magistrates name above, caduceous left all within uncuse square
1.6g; 12mm

Minted at Rhodes, 167-88 BC
1 commentsLegatus
Constantine_I_Nicomedia_RIC_12.jpg
Constantine I - [Nicomedia RIC VII 12]66 viewsSilvered follis, 3.24g, 20mm, 0 degree, Nicomedia mint, 307-337 A.D.

Obv. - IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right

Rev. - IOVI CONS-ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, nude except for chlamys, holding Victory on globe in right and leaning on sceptre in left, eagle with wreath in beak at feet left, Z to right, SMN in ex.

Great centering, full legends, and purchased for the marvelous reverse

80%+ silvering
___________

Purchased from Rhodes Ancient Coins
4 commentsrenegade3220
E4938452-0C19-4D06-94DB-868030A4353B.jpeg
Crusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John . Anonymous (1319-1360) Billon denier. 24 viewsCrusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John . Anonymous (1319-1360) Billon denier.
+•CIVIS•RODI Genoese style gateway , pellet right.
+MAGR•hOSPITAL Cross
CCS 9. Schlumberger Pl.X , 3
Vladislav D
4C3DB92E-9665-44F9-A678-9050175861B2.jpeg
Crusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John . Anonymous (Circa 1400s ) Billon denier. 26 viewsCrusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John . Anonymous (Circa 1400s ) Billon denier.
14 mm. / 0.4 g.
+CONVENTO RODI (or variant ) castle
+OSPITALIS IERVSLEM ( or variant ) Cross
Schlumberger Pl.XII , 1-5.
Vladislav D
3DC276B3-1496-4669-861A-138F3CC7A07D.jpeg
Crusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John . Anonymous (Circa 1400s ) Billon denier.29 viewsCrusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John . Anonymous (Circa 1400s ) Billon denier.
+CONVENTO RODI (or variant ) castle
+OSPITALIS IERVSLEM ( or variant ) Cross
Schlumberger Pl.XII , 1-5.
Vladislav D
AF1B49CA-A2DA-4A4B-B2AD-25F11C78DF1E.jpeg
Crusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John . Emery d'Amboise (1503-1512) AR denier.23 viewsCrusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John . Emery d'Amboise (1503-1512) AR denier.
0.6 g.
EMERIC....AMBO... Arms of the House of Amboise
ECCE•AG....DEIECC..V.. St. John the Baptist standing facing ,holding the symbolic lamb with his right hand and a long cross in left .
Schlumberger Pl.XI - 10
Extremely Rare .
Vladislav D
6457683D-2D3D-4A0C-999C-616F0BA7B281.jpeg
Crusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John . Emery d'Amboise (1503-1512) AR denier.24 viewsCrusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John . Emery d'Amboise (1503-1512) AR denier.
0.5 g.
E.....DAMBOISE•MA Arms of the House of Amboise
E.....DEI.....V St. John the Baptist standing facing ,holding the symbolic lamb with his right hand and a long cross in left .
Schlumberger Pl.XI - 10
Extremely Rare .
Vladislav D
908EB040-EB73-4507-BEA7-539E4A1FEF0F.jpeg
Crusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John . Pierre d'Amboise (1476-1503) AR denier. 17 viewsCrusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John . Pierre d'Amboise (1476-1503) AR denier.
Cross
St. John the Baptist standing facing
Schlumberger Pl. X - 24
Vladislav D
3BBCEBE6-7FC3-4CE6-B954-8E116B0E148D.jpeg
Crusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John. Philibert of Naillac (1396-1421). Gigliato.22 viewsCrusader. Rhodes. Order of St. John. Philibert of Naillac (1396-1421). Gigliato.
Obv: •+• FR·FILIBERTUS·DE·NEILACO·mRI·OS Grand Master kneeling left before cross potent on three steps. M beneath cross . Coat-of-arms behind.
Rev: •+• OSPITAL·S·IOAnES·IhRLm Cross fleurée; each bar ending in shield with arms of the Order of St. John.
Metcalf, Crusades 1219. CCS 27
Vladislav D
ROGER_DE_PINS,_(1355-1365_AD)__St_John,_Order,_Rhodes,_Gigliato,_Metc__1194_var__Q-001,_11h,_27mm,_3,8g-s.jpg
Crusaders, Antioch, Roger de Pins, (1355-1365 A.D.), Metcalf, Crusades, 1194 var., AR-Gigliato, St.John, Order, Rhodes, ✠ OSPITAL•S•IOHIS•IRLNI•QT'•RODI•, Cross Fleury with the arms, #163 viewsCrusaders, Antioch, Roger de Pins, (1355-1365 A.D.), Metcalf, Crusades, 1194 var., AR-Gigliato, St.John, Order, Rhodes, ✠ OSPITAL•S•IOHIS•IRLNI•QT'•RODI•, Cross Fleury with the arms, #1
avers: ✠ F•ROGIERIUS•D•PINIBUS•DI•GRA•M•, The Grand Master kneeling before the cross, no symbols.
reverse: ✠ OSPITAL•S•IOHIS•IRLNI•QT'•RODI•, Cross Fleury with the arms of the order at the ends.
diameter: 27,0mm, weight: 3,8g, axis: 11h,
mint: St.John, Order, Rhodes, mint mark:-,
date:1355-1365 A.D., ref: Metcalf, Crusades, 1194 var., Schlumb. IX, 20 var., Beckenb. 1001 var.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Nero_den.jpg
Denarius, AVGVSTVS GERMANICVS giant statue of Nero, RIC 19417 viewsNero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D. Silver denarius, Rome 64-65 A.D. RIC I 47; BMCRE I 60, RSC II 45, Sear RCV I: 1941, Fair, Rome mint, 2.404g, 17.7mm, 180o, 64 - 68 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR, laureate head right; reverse AVGVSTVS GERMANICVS, Nero radiate and togate, standing facing, branch in right, Victory on globe in left; rare. The giant radiate statue of Nero was modeled on the Colossus of Rhodes. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Rhodian_Dependency_AR_Hemidrachm_-_Rose_+_L.jpg
Dependency of Island of Rhodes off Caria AR Hemidrachm 13mm 1.58g ca 3rd century BC.87 viewsO: Hd Helios facing 3/4 r.
R: Rose with bud to r., grape bunch + L to l., uncertain magistrate above.
Unlisted in Sear, SNG Cop or online references. _4001
Antonivs Protti
EB0068b_scaled.JPG
EB0068 Helios / Rose7 viewsRhodes, CARIA, AR Didrachm, c.250-229 BC.
Obverse: Helios Radiate Head Three Quarter Face.
Reverse: MNAΣIMAXOΣ above, P O below, Rose on its stem, with a button on the right; in the field, left, Athena Niképhore standing left.
References: Pz. 2704, Delpierre 2764, SNG Cop.765, BMC 143.
Diameter: 21mm, Weight: 6.495g.
Ex: Ariagno Collection.
EB
EB0069b_scaled.JPG
EB0069 Helios / Rose5 viewsRhodes, CARIA, AR drachm, ca. 205-188 BC.
Obverse: Helios facing (not radiate).
Reverse: Rose, double-strike, illegible.
References: Cf. SNG Hel 588.
Diameter: 14mm, Weight: 2.286g.
EB
EB0070b_scaled.JPG
EB0070 Helios / Rose6 viewsRhodes-Peraia, Caria. AR drachm, 175-170 BC.
Obverse: Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right.
Reverse: Z-Ω EΡMIAΣ, rose with bud on the right.
References: SNG Keckman 793; Price, Larissa 1968 Hoard, 247.
Diameter: 14mm, Weight: 2.685g.
EB
EB0270b_scaled.JPG
EB0270 Helios / Rose2 viewsCaria, Rhodes, AE 12.
Obverse: Radiate head of Helios right.
Reverse: ΡO&-O Rose.
References: -.
Diameter: 12mm, Weight: 1.446g.
EB
Gela,_Sicily,_c__430_-_425_B_C_.jpg
Gela, Sicily, c. 430 - 425 B.C.60 viewsSilver litra, Jenkins Gela, group VI, 401 - 453; SNG Cop 275; BMC Sicily p. 71, 52; HGC 2 374 (R1), aF, dark toning, scratches, corrosion, flan cracks, Gela mint, weight 0.563g, maximum diameter 13.3mm, die axis 45o, c. 430 - 425 B.C.; obverse bearded cavalryman charging left on horseback, helmeted, armed with shield and couched spear; reverse CEΛAΣ, forepart of a man-faced bull (river god) swimming right; from a Northern Florida collector.

EX FORVM . With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

Gela, named after the river Gela, was founded around 688 BC by colonists from Rhodos (Rhodes) and Crete, 45 years after the founding of Syracuse. In 424 B.C., the Congress of Gela established a platform of "Sicily for the Sicilians" and formed a league that pushed back the Athenian attempt to conquer the island.
2 commentsSam
Bild2612neu.jpg
Greece, Rhodes163 viewssteps to the Acropolis of Lindos on RhodesFranz-Josef M
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Greece, Rhodes164 viewsView on the acropolis of LindosFranz-Josef M
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Greece, Rhodes145 viewsship carved in the rock on the acropolis of LindosFranz-Josef M
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Greece, Rhodes Acropolis of Lindos165 viewsIn the background you can see the steep steps of medieval time.Franz-Josef M
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Greece, Rhodes grave of Kleobulos152 viewsHellenistic grave - it was named after one of the seven wise man, Kleobulos who lived in Lindos.Franz-Josef M
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Greece, Rhodes grave of Kleobulos 133 viewsThe grave was used as a chapel in the medievalFranz-Josef M
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Greece, Rhodes Lindos 142 viewsLindos Acropolis and villageFranz-Josef M
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Greece, Rhodes Lindos150 viewsRestored Stoa on the acropolis of LindosFranz-Josef M
Bild2602neu.jpg
Greece, Rhodes Lindos inscription 141 viewsFranz-Josef M
BILD1285neu.jpg
Greece, Rhodes plan of Lindos159 views1 semicircular exedra
2 relief of a ship
3 medieval stairway
4 medieval headquarter building
5 Byzantine church
6 hellenistic vaults
7 roman temple
8 late hellenistic stairway
9 hellenistic stoa
10 propylaion stairway
11 propylaion
12 temple of athena lindos
13 portico of Psithyros
Franz-Josef M
cariarhodes.jpg
GREEK56 viewsAR didrachm. Rhodes ( Islands of Caria) c. 250-229 BC. 6,75 grs. 12 h. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose in profile, bud to right. MNAΣIMAXOΣ ( magistrate ) above. P-O flanking stem. To left, Athena Nikephoros standing left.
SNG von Aulock 2807. SNG Copenhagen 765.
3 commentsbenito
Rhodes_AR_Didrachm_1_CNG.jpg
GREEK, Caria, ISLANDS off CARIA, Rhodes349 viewsCirca 250-229 BC. AR Didrachm (6.61 g, 12h). Mnasimachos, magistrate. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to right; MNAΣIMAXOΣ above; to left, Athena Nikephoros standing left. Ashton 208; SNG Keckman 537-9; SNG Copenhagen 765
4 commentscarthago
175_BC_HELIOS_ROSE_IN_SQUARE~0.jpg
Greek, Caria, Islands off Caria, Rhodes, Hemidrachm76 views3/4 Head of Helios/Rose in incuse Square with grapes. C. 175-150 BC, 1.42 gr.
SNG Fin.647V
jcm-houston
rhodes~1.jpg
GREEK, Caria, ISLANDS off CARIA, Rhodos. Circa 125-88 BC. AR Hemidrachm 114 viewsRhodes. (13mm, 1.46 g). Gorgias, magistrate. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to left; sun to right; GORGIAS above; all within incuse square. Jenkins, Rhodian, Group D, 147; SNG Keckman -; SNG Copenhagen -. Near EF, hairline flan crack.

ex CNG 184, Lot: 56.
1 commentsDino
01011AB~0.jpg
GREEK, Caria, ISLANDS off CARIA, Rhodos. Circa 125-88 BC. AR Hemidrachm 189 views CARIAN ISLANDS, RHODES, 125-88 BC
Hemidrachm, 13mm, 1.32g

O. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right
R. Rose with bud to left; ANTAIOΣ above, P-O flanking rose, grape bunch to lower right; all within incuse square.

Jenkins group D, 86; HGC 6, 1463; SNG Keckman 664 var. (control), Karl 604 var. (obv. type); SNG von Aulock 8194 var. (same); SNG Copenhagen -; BMC 292 var. (same); SNG München -.

Plinthophoric issue. Antaios, magistrate. Rare symbol for this issue.

ex Sayles and Lavender
ex Triton XII
4 commentsrobertpe
rodos.jpg
GREEK, Rhodes (Rodos), AR drachm335 views6 commentsOptimus
Rhodos Drachm Radiate.jpg
GREEK, Rhodes (Rodos), AR drachm106 views2 commentsOptimus
Rhodos drachm facing 2.jpg
GREEK, Rhodes (Rodos), AR drachm105 views1 commentsOptimus
175_BC_HELIOS_ROSE_IN_SQUARE.jpg
GREEK, Rhodes, 175-150 BC Hemidrachm35 viewsObv: HELIOS
Rev: ROSE IN SQUARE
jcm-houston
helios-moeda1.jpg
GREEK, Rhodes, 350-340 BC16 viewsAR Drachm Island of Rhodos 350-340 BC

Weight: 2.7gr
Ø: 13mm

Obv: Head of Hélios 3/4 face to left, hair loose.

Rev: Ros with bud on right above GORGOS to left a bow in case R-O in lower field.

EF/EF

Sear 5052 - Jenkins 209.
Jorge C
bpGS1G4Rhodes.jpg
GREEK, Rhodes, AR Didrachm53 viewsDidrachm, 6.56 gm, 16.9 mm, 400-335 BC, SNG Kayhan 913.
Obv: Anepigraphic with head of Helios at a three quarter face with hair loose and flowing suggesting the rays of the sun.
Rev: (POΔION) off flan at top.
Rose with Star in left field and Δ below. Rosebud in right field.
Comment: Both the o and r of this coin are in very high relief. My scanner does not give this little beauty the justice it deserves.
Massanutten
Rhodessta1.JPG
GREEK, Rhodes, AR Drachm58 viewsSilver drachm minted in the city of Rhodes, under magistrate Stasion.

Circa 205 - 190 B.C.

The obverse with a beautiful facing head portrait of the famous patron deity of the City, Helios. He is shown with wind blown hair and facing slightly right.

The reverse with a blossoming rose, thunder bolt in left field, tendrils in right.

The legend above bearing the magistrates name and reading:

ΣTAΣIΩN

"Of Stasion"

The island nation of Rhodes, just off the Turkish mainland was a highly successful commercial centre in antiquity. The Island also boasted one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, the Colossus of Rhodes. The Colossus was a monstrous statue, standing over 98 feet tall, that stood at the entrance to the city's harbour and depicted the island's patron god, Helios.

The widely traded coinage of Rhodes also proudly displayed the image of their god on the obverse. While the reverse employs a visual pun on the City name, as the Greek word for Rose is Rhodon.

Diameter: 15 mm.

Weight: 2.60 g
1 commentssuperflex
rodasf.JPG
Greek, Rhodes, Hemidrachm26 viewsCaria, Islands off. Rhodes. Circa 408-394 BC. AR Hemidrachm (1.87 gm). Facing head of Helios / P O, rose in incuse square.

RARE!
anthivs
greek91.jpg
Islands of Caria, Rhodes AR Didrachm88 views(250-229 BC). Agesidamos, magistrate.
Obv.: Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right.
Rev.: AΓΗΣΙΔΑΜΟΣ / Ρ - Ο. Rose with bud right. Control: Artemis advancing left, holding torch.
Ashton 206.
4 commentsMinos
greek56.jpg
Islands of Caria, Rhodes AR Hemidrachm50 views(125-88 BC). Melantas, magistrate.
Obv.: Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right.
Rev.: Rose with bud to left; grain ear to right.
Jenkins, Rhodian Group D, 184; SNG Copenhagen -.
4 commentsMinos
greek25.jpg
Islands of Caria, Rhodes Ar Tetradrachm109 views(229-205 BC). Tharsytas, magistrate.
Obv.: Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right.
Rev.: Rose with bud to right; to left, eagle standing right on torch.
Ashton 215. SNG Keckman 550.
5 commentsMinos
rhodes_didrachm_k.jpg
ISLANDS off CARIA, Rhodes5 viewsAR Didrachm, 21mm, 6.6 g, 12h; c. 305-275 BC
Obv.: Head of Helios facing slightly right.
Rev.: POΔION; Rose with bud to right; E and grape bunch to left.
Reference: Ashton 157; SNG Keckman 451-3; HGC 6, 1435
16-386-355
John Anthony
Caria_Rhodes_AR_Drachm.jpg
Islands off CARIA, Rhodes (Rhodos) AR Drachm Circa 205-190 BC3 viewsAinetor, magistrate.
Obverse: Head of Helios facing slightly right.
Reverse: Rose with bud to right
AINHTWR above, butterfly to left
Ashton: 282; HGC 6, 1453; SNG Keckman 587 Scarce.
15mm, 2.18g
jaseifert
Caria,_Rhodes.jpg
Islands off CARIA, Rhodes (Rhodos) AR Drachm. 8 viewsCirca 205-190 BC.
Ainetor, magistrate.
Obverse: Head of Helios facing slightly right.
Reverse: Rose with bud to right; AINHTWR above, butterfly to left.
Ashton: 282; HGC 6, 1453; SNG Keckman 587 Scarce. Size: 15mm, 2.18g.
JBGood
rhodes_k~0.jpg
ISLANDS off CARIA, Rhodes.3 viewsÆ19, 3.7g, 6h; c. AD 100-150.
Obv.: Radiate and draped bust of Helios right; star below chin.
Rev.: POΔIΩN; Draped bust of Serapis right, wearing kalathos.
Reference: SNG Keckman 783–4; RPC III 2190 / 17-299-40
John Anthony
Ashton-288.jpg
Islands off Caria, Rhodes: Anonymous (ca. 205-190 BCE) AR Drachm, Gorgos, Magistrate (Ashton 288; SNG Keckman 582-4)23 viewsObv: Head of Helios facing
Rev: P-O, rose with bud to right; above, magistrate's name: ΓOPΓOY; in left field, bow in gorytos
Quant.Geek
Rhodes1~0.jpg
Islands off Caria, Rhodos, Rhodes39 viewsAR Didrachm (18mm, 6.55g)
c. 305-275 BCE

O: Head of Helios facing slightly right

R: ΡOΔION, Rose with bud to right; grape bunch to left, E-Y flanking stem

BMC 34
Salaethus
Rhodes.JPG
ISLANDS off CARIA, Rhodos. Circa 125-88 BC. AR Hemidrachm351 viewsRhodes. (13mm, 1.46 g). Gorgias, magistrate. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right / Rose with bud to left; sun to right; GORGIAS above; all within incuse square. Jenkins, Rhodian, Group D, 147; SNG Keckman -; SNG Copenhagen -. Near EF, hairline flan crack.

ex CNG 184, Lot: 56.
11 commentsCGPCGP
rhodes.jpg
ISLANDS off CARIA. Rhodes AR Didrachm48 viewsCirca 229-205 BC. AR Didrachm (6.68gm, 20mm, 11h). Tharsytas, magistrate. Ashton 215; SNG Keckman 550; SNG Copenhagen 756. Obverse: Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right. Reverse: Rose with bud to right; ΘAPΣYTAΣ above; to left, eagle standing right on fulmen. Lovely strike on a nice full flan. High relief elegant dies. Choice EF. Toned.

Ex Pars Coins

The facing head of the sun god Helios on later coins of Rhodes represent the famous statue in antiquity known as the Colossus of Rhodes. It was built in the 3rd century B.C. and took 12 years to complete. It stood at almost 100 feet tall and was one of the tallest statues in the world until it was toppled down by an earthquake around 226 B.C. The statue was erected to commemorate the defeat or withdrawal of the diadoch Demetrios Poliorketes after failing to take the besieged city. The reverse shows the iconic rose which served as a pun to the name of the city, in this case, the Greek word “rhodon” for rose. It is interesting to note that some of the facing head designs on the coins have a peculiar orientation. When looking closely to the head on this particular coin, the viewer seems to be looking at the face from below. It is tempting to assume that when this coin was minted, the Colossus was still standing and hadn’t yet been toppled down by the earthquake. This could be the actual likeness of the face of the statue while it was still standing. If the presumption is correct, we could date this coin to around 229-226 B.C.
1 commentsJason T
IMG_2233.JPG
ISLANDS off CARIA: Rhodos4 viewsISLANDS off CARIA, Rhodos. Rhodes. Circa 350-300 BC. Æ 11mm. Obv: Diademed head of Rhodos right. Rev: Rose with bud to right. SNG Keckman 384-421; SNG Copenhagen 858-9.Molinari
Helios_Rose.JPG
Macedonian Kingdom, Reign of Perseus 199 views171-170 BC
AR Drachm (15mm, 2.81g)
Uncertain mint in Thessaly
Hermios magistrate.
O: Head of Helios facing 3/4 right, hair loose.
R: Rose with bud on right; I-Ω to either side of stem, EPMIAΣ (magistrate) above.
Price, Larissa p. 241; SNG Keckman 795; Sear 5092
ex Jack H. Beymer

Originating from the Sitichoro, Thessaly hoard of 1968, the long held attribution for this pseudo-Rhodian series was 'Rhodian Peraia' or 'Islands off Karia', etc, and probably used to pay mercenaries. This was the attribution I bought the coin with, and it served for nearly twenty years.
However a 1988 article by Richard Ashton claims these coins were actually issued by Perseus of Macedon during the Third Macedonian War to pay his Cretan mercenaries in a coin which was familiar to them, that is, the classic 'Helios/Rose' coinage of Rhodes. This is the attribution I use today.
Selene Psoma further suggests an even more specific location based on style and weight standard, pinpointing this issue in Thasian Peraia, so it will be interesting to see what further study may reveal.
6 commentsEnodia
marcus-antonius-denarius.jpg
Marcus Antonius AR denarius-3,93 grams- 18 mm-itinerary mint- 42 b.C. 211 viewsobverse: M.ANTONI IMP, bust of Marcus Antonius right
reverse: III VIR RPC, radiate & draped bust of Sol facing on a disk within distyle temple

Crawford 496/1- Cohen 12 (5fr.)- Sear 1467

This coin was minted during Antony's military campaign against Brutus and Cassius in Greece.

The tyrannicide Cassius gained some notoriety for robbing the temple of Helios in the city of Rhodes; he was said to have left untouched only the chariot of the sun. This type of Antonius reproaches Cassius for that robbery and constitutes a promise to avenge the god of the sun (see F. X. Ryan, SNR 84, 2005, 84–86).
4 commentsL.e.
kallatis_pseudoautonom_Ruzicka296b.jpg
Moesia inferior, Kallatis, pseudo-autonomous, Ruzicka 296b23 viewsAE 19, 3.36g
obv. KTIC - TC
Bearded head of Herakles l.
rev. Hermes, clothed and wearing hat, std. frontal, head l., with crossed legs on ram,
leaping l., holding winged staff in l. arm and purse in extended r. hand.
in ex. KALLATI / ANWN
Ref.: Ruzicka, Inedita aus Moesia inferior, 296b (same dies); not in AMNG
very rare, VF, nearly black patina

Thanks to C.Rhodes for attribution!
Jochen
nikopolis_gordianIII_HrJ8_36_38_5var(rev).jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 36. Gordian III, HrHJ (2018) 8.36.38.02 (plate coin)22 viewsGordian III, AD 238-244
AE 27, 11.99g, 26.94mm, 15°
struck under governor Sabinius Modestus
obv. AVT K M ANTWNIOC - GORDIANOC .
Bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, radiate, r.
rev. VP CAB MODECTOV N - IKOPODEITWN(sic!) P[ROC] (OV and WN ligate)
in r. field one below the other I / C / T
in ex. [RON]
Tyche, in long garment and mantle, with kalathos, stg. l., holding cornucopiae in l. arm and rudder set on globe in r. hand
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 2082 var. (different legend distribution on rev. and globe not mentioned)
b) not in Varbanov (engl.)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.36.38.2 (plate coin)
F+

Interesting legend error on rev.! gordian_guy (C. Rhodes) has 2 die pairs with the same error.
Jochen
rhodes_pan.jpg
Mylasa, Caria, c. 170 - 130 B.C.86 views Silver Pseudo-Rhodian (drachm*), Ashton NC 1992, 255, SNG Kayhan 846, weight 2.2 g, maximum diameter 15.86 mm, Mylasa mint, c. 170 - 130 B.C.; Obv. facing head of Helios with eagle superimposed on r. cheek, hair loose; Rev. rose with bud/stem to right,(left bud off flan**) monogram left, ΠΕ & A to right. Same obv. die as Ashton 255 & Kayhan 846. Some surface roughness on top of both sides.

*Ashton, Kayhan, & Sear all describe this denom. as "drachm", though considerably underweight according to the Rhodian standard. Apparently these immitatives use the lower weight.

**Kayhan 846 plate shows stems and buds going both left and right. (but only describes the bud to the left), Ashton's plate also shows on both sides, and describes as such when in combination with letters /monograms. My example, is an Obv. die match, though the Rev. is not an exact die match, but is very close (probably same hand), and shows the right stem and bud clearly, but the left is off flan. Ashton identifies 107 Obv. dies in this series, and none of the rest are even close to the style of #255. This Obv. is shown with one other Rev. type(different letters).

Note; Ashton concludes the top two letters (on these later type with 4-5 letters/monograms) are abbrieviations for the month they were struck by the particular magistrate. (1st two letters in the Macedonian calender months used in Mylasa at the time) In my coin ΠΕ are for ΠΕΡΙΘΙOΣ or Peritios, the 10th month. He also concludes the monogram and lower letter abbrieviate the magistrate's name. Also, though he knows of no metrological analysis, the the quality of the silver seems to be somewhat debased compared to the Rhodian and early Pseudo-Rhodian issues.(most of the CH 4 hoard were of this later type, and were covered in a thick black patina{that were harshly cleaned}, the few earlier series and the one Rhodian type didn't have this patina and seemed to be of higher quality silver)

Historical background; courtsey Forvm Ancient Coins

Mylasa (Milas, Turkey today) was often mentioned by ancient writers. The first mention is from early 7th century B.C., when Arselis, a Carian leader from Mylasa, helped Gyges in his fight for the Lydian throne. Under Persia, Mylasa was the chief city of Caria. Mylasa joined the Delian League c. 455 B.C., but Persian rule was restored by 400. Mylasa was the hometown and first capital of the Hecatomnid dynasty, nominally Persian satraps, but practically kings of Caria and the surrounding region, 377 - 352 B.C. In the Hellenistic era, the city was contested by Alexander's successors, but prospered. Mylasa was severely damaged in the Roman Civil War in 40 B.C., but again regained prosperity under Roman rule.



Ex. Aegean Nunismatics
2 commentsSteve E
Side.jpg
Pamphylia, Side (Circa 145-125BC)32 viewsAR Tetradrachm

29 mm, 15.94 g

Kleuch-, magistrate.

Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right.

Reverse: ΚΛΕ - ΥΧ, Nike advancing left, holding wreath; pomegranate to left.

SNG BN 697.

In 333 BC, Alexander the Great occupied Side and introduced the population to Hellenistic culture, which became the dominant tradition until the 1st century BC. Ptolemy later overtook the city when he declared himself king of Egypt in 305 BC. Side stayed under Ptolemaic control until it was captured by the Seleucid Empire in the 2nd century BC. In 190 B.C., however, a fleet from Rhodes, supported by Rome and Pergamum, defeated the Seleucid fleet, which was under the command of the fugitive Carthaginian general, Hannibal (who was unskilled in naval warfare, but to his credit still almost won the battle). The Seleucid defeat solidified by the Treaty of Apamea (188 BC), left Side in an uncertain state of autonomy during which it minted its own money. This lasted until 36 BC when the city came under the rule of the Roman client King of Galatia, Amyntas.
2 commentsNathan P
rhodes.jpg
Plinthophoric Drachm,188-170 BC, AR 15.5mm. 3grm24 viewsDrachm,188-170 BC,
Obv. Radiate head of Helios right
Rev. P-O, rose, bud to right in incuse square. ANTIGENES (magistrate), Prow (Symbol left field).
Ref. SNG Keckman 1. 632/633, SNG Cop. 812
1 commentsLee S
PtolemyI26mms.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm as Satrap41 viewsPtolemy I Soter. Silver Tetradrachm (15.68 g, 26mm), as Satrap, 323-305 BC. Alexandria, in the name of Alexander III. Overstruck on earlier Alexander tetradrachm, 306-305 BC.
O: Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant's skin headdress, aegis around neck with tiny Δ in scales.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY in left field, Athena Alkidemos advancing right, wielding javelin and holding forth shield;in right field, monogram, Corinthian helmet right above ΔI and eagle standing right on thunderbolt.
Overstruck, undertype beading visible on obverse just above elephant's ear; on the reverse, portrait of Alexander above eagles head into Athena's shield.

The earlier 17g tetradrachms were withdrawn from circulation in 306/305 BC and reissued after weight adjustment. They were trimmed to remove 1.5g of silver, heated and restruck. This must have been faster than melting them down into bullion and restriking. Some of these issues, such as this one, show the clear evidence of the edges being trimmed, although many do not.

Ptolemy was feeling the financial burden of repelling Antigonus’ invasion and supporting Rhodes through a thirteen-month siege. The government needed extra currency and Egypt produced little or no silver. The recall of the heavy issues meant 8 tetradrachms were restruck into 9 “Crisis Issues” but with no change in the appearance of the dies.
3 commentsNemonater
Ptolemy_30mms.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm as Satrap55 viewsPtolemy I Soter. Silver Tetradrachm (15.65 g, 30mm), as Satrap, 323-305 BC. Alexandria, in the name of Alexander III
O: Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant's skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY in left field, Athena Alkidemos advancing right, wielding javelin and holding forth shield;in right field, monogram, Corinthian helmet above and eagle standing right on thunderbolt.
Overstruck, traces of undertype visible.

The earlier 17g tetradrachms were withdrawn from circulation in 306/305 BC and reissued after weight adjustment. They were trimmed to remove 1.5g of silver, heated and restruck. This must have been faster than melting them down into bullion and restriking. Some issues show clear evidence of the edges being trimmed, although many, such as this one, do not.

Ptolemy was feeling the financial burden of repelling Antigonus’ invasion and supporting Rhodes through a thirteen-month siege. The government needed extra currency and Egypt produced little or no silver. The recall of the heavy issues meant 8 tetradrachms were restruck into 9 “Crisis Issues” but with no change in the appearance of the dies.
4 commentsNemonater
Egypt_Bronze_Zeus_Eagle.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater AE41 64.05g 221-204 BC. Struck 212 BC76 viewsPtolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy IV Philopater AE41 64.05g 221-204 BC. Struck 212 BC.
O: Head Zeus with Horn of Ammon r, centering dimple evident.
R: Eagle with closed wings stg. l., Filleted Cornucopia in l. field, BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU around, LI symbol between legs.
Svoronos 1126, SNG Cop 200v(DI between legs).
32500 sold

Ptolemy IV Philopater reigned 221–205 BCE, son of Ptolemy III and Berenice II of Egypt was the fourth Pharaoh of Ptolemaic Egypt. Under the reign of Ptolemy IV, the decline of the Ptolemaic kingdom began.
His reign was inaugurated by the murder of his mother, and he was always under the dominion of favourites, male and female, who indulged his vices and conducted the government as they pleased. Self-interest led his ministers to make serious preparations to meet the attacks of Antiochus III the Great on Coele-Syria including Judea, and the great Egyptian victory of Raphia (217), where Ptolemy himself was present, secured the northern borders of the kingdom for the remainder of his reign.

The arming of Egyptians in this campaign had a disturbing effect upon the native population of Egypt, leading to the secession of Upper Egypt under pharaohs Harmachis (also known as Hugronaphor) and Ankmachis (also known as Chaonnophris), thus creating a kingdom that occupied much of the country and lasted nearly twenty years.

Philopator was devoted to orgiastic forms of religion and literary dilettantism. He built a temple to Homer and composed a tragedy, to which his favourite Agathocles added a commentary. He married (about 220 BC) his sister Arsinoë III, but continued to be ruled by his mistress Agathoclea, sister of Agathocles. In late c. 210 BC, Agathoclea may have given birth to a son from her affair with Ptolemy IV, who may had died shortly after his birth.

Ptolemy is said to have built a giant ship known as the tessarakonteres ("forty"), a huge type of galley. The forty of its name may refer to its number of banks of oars. The only recorded instance of this type of vessel, in fact, is this showpiece galley built for Ptolemy IV, described by Callixenus of Rhodes, writing in the 3rd century BCE, and by Athenaeus in the 2nd century AD. Plutarch also mentions that Ptolemy Philopater owned this immense vessel in his Life of Demetrios. The current theory is that Ptolemy's ship was an oversize catamaran galley, measuring 128 m 420 ft.

Ptolemy IV is a major protagonist of the apocryphal 3 Maccabees, which describes purported events following the Battle of Raphia, in both Jerusalem and Alexandria.
3 commentsAntonivs Protti
g_105.JPG
Rhodes29 viewsCaria Rhodes 394-304 BC
Didrachm

Obverse:Head of Helios facing, slightly right
Reverse:PODIWN;Rose with buds at sides

18.58mm 6.34gm
maik
Rhodes_Helios_right.jpg
Rhodes41 viewsIslands of Caria
170-150 BC
AR Drachm
17mm, 2.92g
3 commentsSamson L2
Rhodes_20140128_obv.jpg
Rhodes14 viewsSilver
15 mm
2.55g
Drachm
Rhodes
Radiate head of Helios right
ΑΝΑΞΙΔΟΤΟΣ P O
Rose with bud, snake on omphalos in left field
190-170 BC
Jenkins 1989, 15; BMC 247; HGC 6, 1457
pishpash
Antoninus_Pius_Rhodos.jpg
Rhodes6 viewsObv.: ANTΩNINOC KAICAP
laureate head of Pius right
Rev.: ΡOΔI-ΩN
radiate head of Helios right

18mm, 4.32g
BMC 419; SNG von Aulock 2861; SNG Keckman 785-787; SNG Copenhagen 910
klausklage
RHODES_AE11.jpg
RHODES - Carian Islands42 viewsRHODES - Carian Islands, c. 350-300 BC. AE 11mm. Obv.: Diademed head of Rhodos right, in earring & necklace. Rev.: P-O, rose with bud to the right; uncertain symbol left. Reference: Sear 5071dpaul7
Rhodes~0.jpg
Rhodes AE37 views(To be added)CGPCGP
Rhodes.jpg
Rhodes AE38, 1st Century AD24 viewsRhodes AE38, 1st Century AD. Head of Dionysus Facing Left / Nike Holding Wreath, aVF, scarce.mjabrial
B-rhodes_01.jpg
Rhodes AR Didrachm39 viewsObv: Facing head of Apollo, looking slightly to r., hair floating loose at sides of face.
Rev: RODION - Rose with stem and bud; in field, star and Delta.
Year: Circa 305-265 BC
Cat #: SNG Kayhan 913 (drachm); BMC 26 var. (different symbol)
oa
rhodes_02.jpg
Rhodes AR Didrachm33 viewsObv: Head of Helios facing slightly right.
Rev: Rose with bud to right; thunderbolt and Δ left.
Date: Circa 305 - 275 BC
Weight: 6.60g
Ref: SNG Keckman 477
1 commentsoa
IMG_1160.JPG
Rhodes Hemidrachm C. 170-150 BC. AR 14mm. 1.3grm.36 viewsRhodes Hemidrachm C. 170-150 BC. AR 14mm. 1.3grm.
Obv. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right.
Rev. Rose with bud to right; sun to left, "Thrasymenes" above; all within incuse square.
Ref. Jenkins, Rhodian, Group B, 38; SNG Keckman 643-4
1 commentsLee S
AAELb_small.png
Rhodes Æ1016 viewsRhodes

c.350 B.C. - 300 B.C.

10mm., 1.15g.

Diademed head of Rhodos right

Rose with bud to the right

References:

AAEL
RL
IMG_0302.JPG
Rhodes, AE17mm. early 2nd century B.C.23 viewsRhodes, AE17mm. early 2nd century B.C.
Obv. Radiate and draped bust of Helios right, star below chin.
Rev. Turreted and draped bust of Sarapis right.
Ref. BMC. 408.
Ex. Forvm ancient coins
Lee S
Rhodes_1a_img.jpg
Rhodes, Ar Drachm46 viewsObv:– Head of Helios facing slightly right
Rev:– Rose with bud to right; bow and bowcase left, GOPGOS above
Minted in Rhodes, Islands off Caria 205-190 B.C. Gorgos, magistrate.
Reference:– SNG Helsinki 582 ??
maridvnvm
__12lllll.jpg
RHODES, CARIA26 viewsCirca 300-250 BC. Æ (1,18 g. - 10 mm)
Vs: Head of Nymph right.
Rs: Rose. _2785
Antonivs Protti
Rhodes,_Caria,_AR_Hemidrachm_,_Three-quarter_facing_head_of_Helios,_Rose,_Magistrate_Artemon,_SNG_Kecckman_654-656,_ca_150-125_BC,_Q-001,_0h,_13,5-14,8mm,_1,09g-s.jpg
Rhodes, Caria, ( 150-125 B.C.), SNG Kecckman 654-656, AR-Hemidrachm, AΡTEMΩN, Rose with bud right, Magistrate Artemon, #187 viewsRhodes, Caria, ( 150-125 B.C.), SNG Kecckman 654-656, AR-Hemidrachm, AΡTEMΩN, Rose with bud right, Magistrate Artemon, #1
avers: No legend, Three-quarter facing radiate head of Helios, head turned slightly right.
reverse: AΡTEMΩN (Magistrate Artemon), Rose with bud right in the incuse square, club (?) to left.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 13,5-14,8mm, weight: 1,09g, axes: 0h,
mint: Rhodes, Islands off Caria, Magistrate Artemon, date: 150-125 B.C.,
ref: SNG Keckman 654-656., SNG Copenhagen 842,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Rhodos-ssQ-001-s.jpg
Rhodes, Caria, ( 340-316 B.C.), SNG Keckman 436-440, AR-Didrachm, PΟΔΙΟΝ, Flower, E+Grapes to left, Rare!,287 viewsRhodes, Caria, ( 340-316 B.C.), SNG Keckman 436-440, AR-Didrachm, PΟΔΙΟΝ, Flower, E+Grapes to left, Rare!,
avers: No legend, Head of Helios facing slightly to right.
revers: PΟΔΙΟΝ, Rose with bud right, ΡOΔION above, bunch of grapes in field left, E below.
exerg: E/-//--, diameter: 17-22mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Rhodes, Islands off Caria, E+Grapes, date: 340-316 B.C., ref: Ashton Colossus series 1a, pl.XV 21, SNG Keckman I, 436-440, Sammlung Karl 408-411.,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
Rhodes,_Caria,_AE-11,_Rad_Head_of_Helios_r_,Rose,_Q-001,_0h,_10-11,5mm,_1,89g-s.jpg
Rhodes, Caria, ( cc. 350-300 B.C.), AE-11, BMC 326 (?), Rose Flower,110 viewsRhodes, Caria, ( cc. 350-300 B.C.), AE-11, BMC 326 (?), Rose Flower,
avers: No legend, Radiate Head of Helios right.
revers: No legend, Large Rose Flower.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 10,0-11,5mm, weight: 1,89g, axes: 0h,
mint: Rhodes, Islands off Caria, date: cc. 350-300 B.C., ref: BMC 326 (?),
Q-001
quadrans
00177Q00.JPG
Rhodes, Caria. (Circa 305-275 BC)34 viewsAR Didrachm

18 mm, 6.41 g

Obverse: Helios head in three-quarter view on the right.

Reverse: POΔΙΟΝ (RODION) above and Ε-Υ to left and right of rose with bud to right; in left field, bunch of grapes.

SNG Keckman 452; R. Ashton in: Money and Its Uses in the Ancient Greek World (Oxford 2001), p. 104, 158; H. Troxell, The Norman Davis Collection, ANS 1969, #228.

This coin was minted either during or in the years following one of the most notable sieges of antiquity, when, in the midst of the Successor Wars, Demetrius Poliorcetes, son of Antigonus I, besieged Rhodes in an attempt to make it abandon its neutrality and close relationship with Ptolemy I.

The citizens of Rhodes were successful in resisting Demetrius; after one year he abandoned the siege and signed a peace agreement (304 BC) which Demetrius presented as a victory because Rhodes agreed to remain neutral in his war with Ptolemy (Egypt).

Several years later the Helepolis (Demetrius' famed siege tower), which had been abandoned, had its metal plating melted down and - along with the money from selling the remains of the siege engines and equipment left behind by Demetrius - was used to erect a statue of their sun god, Helios, now known as the Colossus of Rhodes, to commemorate their heroic resistance.
1 commentsNathan P
IMG_8205.JPG
Rhodes, Diobol, 275-250 BC. AR 10.8mm. 0.7grm15 viewsRhodes, Diobol, 275-250 BC.
Obv. Radiate head of Helios right.
Rev. P-O flanking two rosebuds between buds unidentified symbol. Border of dots.
Ref. SNG Keckman 511-529.
Lee S
rhodes1silver.jpg
Rhodes, Hemidrachm, 230-205 BC. AR 12mm25 viewsRhodes, Hemidrachm, 230-205 BC.
Obv. Head of Helios , turned slightly to the right.
Rev. ΑΚΕΣΙΣ / P - O . Rose with bud, Oil lamp in left field.
Ref. SNG Keckman 572-575 ( Obverse die match ) , SNG Kayhan 915 ( Rev. Die match )

( My first Silver Coin from the wonderful island of Rodos. Thanks to Rover1.3 for the accurate original attribution! )
Lee S
DSCF1769.JPG
Rhodes, Hemidrachm, 230-205 BC. AR 12mm21 viewsRhodes, Hemidrachm, 230-205 BC.
Obv. Head of Helios , turned slightly to the right.
Rev. Rose, P-O around stalk, bud right, uncertain magistrates name above, trident left.
Ref. SNG Keckman 572-575 ( Obverse die match )
( this is my second Hemidrachm matching this Obverse die!! It was obviously very popular! )
Lee S
P1019889.JPG
Rhodes, Hemidrachm, 408 -C. 390 BC. AR 11.8mm. 1.773g.20 viewsRhodes, Hemidrachm, 408 -C. 390 BC.

Obv. head of Helios facing slightly right.
Rev. RODION (above), rose, drooping bud right, all within incuse square.

Ref. Ashton Rhodes 18, SNG Keckman I 363, SNG Cop 724, SNG Kayhan 905.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins.
Lee S
rhodian.jpg
Rhodes, Hemidrachm, C. 170 - 150 B.C. AR13.4mm, 1.28grm.41 viewsRhodes, Hemidrachm, C. 170 - 150 B.C.
Obv. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right.
Rev. "Thrasymenes" , rose with bud to lower right, thunderbolt lower left, P-O flanking across fields, all within incuse square.
Ref. Jenkins Rhodian, Group B, 54; BMC Caria p. 258, 306.
Ex. Forvm Ancient Coins.
1 commentsLee S
DSCN4884.JPG
Rhodes, Hemidrachm, C.. 404-390 BC. AR 12mm, 16 viewsRhodes, Hemidrachm, C.. 404-390 BC. 1.48Grm.
Obv. Head of Helios facing
Rev. P O Flanking rose within incuse square,
Ref. SNG Keck. 367
Lee S
pjimage_(18).jpg
Rhodes, Island off Caria9 viewsAE10, 350-300 BC
Obverse: Diademed head of Rhodos right, wearing earring and necklace.
Reverse: Rose with bud to the right, P-O in field, possible remnants of uncertain symbol left near flan edge crack.
References: SNG Helsinki 384-392 var; SNG Copenhagen 750-751 var; BMC Caria p238-239, 74ff var; SNG von Aulock 2796-2797 var
Justin L
057~1.JPG
Rhodes, Islands off Caria21 views350 - 300 B.C.
Bronze AE 10
1.24 gm, 10.5 mm
Obv.: Diademed head of Rhodos right, wearing earring and necklace
Rev.: P-O at sides of rose with bud to the right
Rhodos mint
SNG Cop 750; Sear 5071var; BMC Caria p. 240, 106; SNG Keckman 384 - 425
Jaimelai
rhodes.jpg
RHODES, ISLANDS OFF CARIA15 viewsc. 350 - 300 BC.
AE 10 mm, 1.19 g
O: Head of nymph Rhodos right, hair rolled.
R: Rose with bud on right, P - O flanking stem; control mark on left
BMC Caria, 74-117, SGCV II, 5071-73 (var), SNG Keckman 384 - 425, Sammlung Karl 654 - 658.
laney
IMG_1137.JPG
Rhodes. 43 BC-96 AD. AE.22 mm. 5.2grm.16 viewsRhodes. 43 BC-96 AD. AE.22 mm.
Obv. Radiate, draped bust of Helios right
Rev. RODIWN, Nike advancing left on prow, holding wreath and palm.
Ref. BMC 389.
Lee S
DSCF2271.JPG
Rhodes. AE18.6mm . 88-43 BC. 4.341 g.18 viewsObv. Radiate head of Helios right.
Rev. Full blown five petaled rose. uncertain magistrates name. border of dots.
Ref. SNG Keckman 747-756. BMC Caria p. 263 357 - 361
Ex. Forvm ancient coins, Ex. Ancient Imports
Lee S
DSCF2006.JPG
Rhodes. AE28mm . C.120-84 BC. 17.86 g39 viewsObv. Radiate head of Helios right
Rev. P - O flanking Rose, helmet left, palm branch right.
Ref.SNG Copenhagen 851-7 (different symbols); cf. SNG von Aulock 2834 (same), SNG Keckman 731-737 ( same )

It is believed this coinage was struck during Mithradates VI's failed six-month siege of Rhodes in 88 BC. Unable to produce enough silver for military expenditures, the Rhodians resorted to a fiduciary bronze coinage. (See R. Ashton, “Rhodian Bronze Coinage and the Siege of Mithradates VI” in NumChron 2001.)
1 commentsLee S
Rhodesia & Nyasaland.jpg
Rhodesia & Nyasaland49 viewsKm3 - 3 pence - 1956Daniel F
58956q00.jpg
Rhodos, Carian Islands, c. 304 - 275 B.C.68 viewsSH58956. Silver didrachm, Ashton Rhodes 160, SNG Keckman 461, SNG Cop 730, gF, Rhodos mint, weight 5.954g, maximum diameter 20.1mm, die axis 0o, c. 304 - 275 B.C.; obverse head of Helios facing slightly right; reverse RODION, rose with bud right, jug and EY left1 commentsNick T
_SevAlHekate.JPG
Severus Alexander / Hekate113 viewsThyatira, Lydia
223-235 AD
AE25 (7.36g)
O: Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right;
R: Hekate Selene, head facing left, wearing a short chiton and holding two torches, full moon around shoulders (billowing veil?); ΘV - ATEI - P - HNΩN.
SNG Fitzwilliam 1374
ex Ancient Imports

When at thy coming my father has given thee the deadly teeth from the dragon's jaws for sowing, then watch for the time when the night is parted in twain, then bathe in the stream of the tireless river, and alone, apart from others, clad in dusky raiment, dig a rounded pit; and therein slay a ewe, and sacrifice it whole, heaping high the pyre on the very edge of the pit. And propitiate only-begotten Hekate, daughter of Perses, pouring from a goblet the hive-stored labour of bees. And then, when thou hast heedfully sought the grace of the goddess, retreat from the pyre; and let neither the sound of feet drive thee to turn back, nor the baying of hounds, lest haply thou shouldst maim all the rites and thyself fail to return duly to thy comrades.
~ Apollonius of Rhodes (Argonautica 3,1028-1051)
2 commentsEnodia
Side.jpg
Side, Pamphylia AR Tetradrachm68 viewsCirca 155-36 B.C. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 400, SNGvA 4797, Side mint, weight 16.287g, maximum diameter 31.5mm, die axis 0o, obverse head of Athena right in a crested Corinthian helmet; reverse Nike advancing left, extending wreath in right, pomegranate left, KLE-YX (magistrate's name KLEUCHARES?) below; nice centering. EF.

Ex FORVM.

In 190 B.C. a fleet from Rhodes, supported by Rome and Pergamum, defeated the Seleucid fleet under the command of the fugitive Carthaginian general Hannibal. The Seleucid defeat freed Side from the overlord-ship of the Seleucid Empire. The Treaty of Apamea (188 B.C.) left Side in a state of uncertain freedom. It was during this period of autonomy that Side struck these tetradrachms. It would last until 36 B.C. when the city came under the rule of the Roman client King of Galatia, Amyntas.
1 commentsJason T
Tabae_Artemon.jpg
Tabae - AR drachm13 viewsArtemon son of Papius
1st century BC
head of Zeus right
Artemis standing right, quiver on shoulder, holding torch and arrow
APTEMΩΝ ΠΑΠΙΟΥ__AP TABHNΩΝ
BMC Greek (Caria, Cos, Rhodes) 19.p162; cf. SNG Copenhagen 531
Gitbud and Naumann
Johny SYSEL
Tripura_RB-185.jpg
Tripura: Rajadhara Manikya (1586-1599) AR Tanka, citing Queen Satyavati (RB-185; KM#97)23 viewsObv: lion facing left, standard (type o) above, date below, all within circle and outer border of circles with pellets
Rev: in four lines: Śri Śri Yuta Raja/dhara Manikya De/va Śri Satyava/ti Maha Devyau within square with ornaments outside

ex-Nicholas Rhodes Collection
SpongeBob
ptolemy1soterLG.jpg
[301a] Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I Soter, 305 - 283 B.C.187 viewsPTOLEMY I SOTER AR silver tetradrachm. Alexandria, 290-289 BC. Eagle standing on thunderbolt.

PTOLEMY I SOTER AR silver tetradrachm. 27mm, 13.9g. Struck at Alexandria, 290-289 BC. VF. Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right; Reverse; PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, P and PTY monogram to left. Svoronos 259, SNG Cop 72. Banker's mark and some graffito in the reverse fields. Ex Incitatus.

Ptolemy I Soter (Greek: Πτολεμαῖος Σωτήρ, Ptolemaios Soter, i.e. Ptolemy the Savior, 367 BC—283 BC) was a Macedonian general who became the ruler of Egypt (323 BC—283 BC) and founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty. In 305 BC he took the title of king.
He was the son of Arsinoe of Macedonia - either by her husband Lagus, a Macedonian nobleman, or by her lover, Philip II of Macedon (which would make him the half-brother of Alexander the Great if true). Ptolemy was one of Alexander the Great's most trusted generals, and among the seven "body-guards" attached to his person. He was a few years older than Alexander, and his intimate friend since childhood. He may even have been in the group of noble teenagers tutored by Aristotle. He was with Alexander from his first campaigns, and played a principal part in the later campaigns in Afghanistan and India. At the Susa marriage festival in 324, Alexander had him marry the Persian princess Atacama. Ptolemy also had a consort queen in Thaïs, the famous Athenian hetaera and one of Alexander's companions in his conquest of the ancient world. Thaïs became his queen in Egypt, and even after he divorced her, she reportedly remained his friend, and kept the title of queen while in Memphis.

When Alexander died in 323, Ptolemy is said to have instigated the resettlement of the empire made at Babylon. Through the Partition of Babylon, he was now appointed satrap of Egypt, under the nominal kings Philip Arrhidaeus and the infant Alexander IV; the former satrap, the Greek Cleomenes, stayed on as his deputy. Ptolemy quickly moved, without authorization, to subjugate Cyrenaica.

By custom, kings in Macedonia asserted their right to the throne by burying their predecessor. Probably because he wanted to pre-empt Perdiccas, the imperial regent, from staking his claim in this way, Ptolemy took great pains in getting his hands on the body of Alexander the Great, placing it temporarily in Memphis (a major element for The First War of The Diodochi) . Ptolemy then openly joined the coalition against Perdiccas. Perdiccas appears to have suspected Ptolemy of aiming for the throne himself, and maybe decided that Ptolemy was his most dangerous rival. Ptolemy executed Cleomenes for spying on behalf of Perdiccas — this removed the chief check on his authority, and allowed Ptolemy to obtain the huge sum that Cleomenes had accumulated.
In 321, Perdiccas invaded Egypt. Ptolemy decided to defend the Nile, and Perdiccas's attempt to force it ended in fiasco, with the loss of 2000 men. This was a fatal blow to Perdiccas' reputation, and he was murdered in his tent by two of his subordinates. Ptolemy immediately crossed the Nile, to provide supplies to what had the day before been an enemy army. Ptolemy was offered the regency in place of Perdiccas; but he declined. Ptolemy was consistent in his policy of securing a power base, while never succumbing to the temptation of risking all to succeed Alexander.

In the long wars that followed between the different Diadochi, Ptolemy's first goal was to hold Egypt securely, and his second was to secure control in the outlying areas: Cyrenaica and Cyprus, as well as Syria, including the province of Judea. His first occupation of Syria was in 318, and he established at the same time a protectorate over the petty kings of Cyprus. When Antigonus One-Eye, master of Asia in 315, showed dangerous ambitions, Ptolemy joined the coalition against him, and on the outbreak of war, evacuated Syria. In Cyprus, he fought the partisans of Antigonus, and re-conquered the island (313). A revolt in Cyrene was crushed the same year.

In 312, Ptolemy and Seleucus, the fugitive satrap of Babylonia, both invaded Syria, and defeated Demetrius Poliorcetes ("sieger of cities"), the son of Antigonus, in the Battle of Gaza. Again he occupied Syria, and again—after only a few months, when Demetrius had won a battle over his general, and Antigonus entered Syria in force—he evacuated it. In 311, a peace was concluded between the combatants. Soon after this, the surviving 13-year-old king, Alexander IV, was murdered in Macedonia, leaving the satrap of Egypt absolutely his own master. The peace did not last long, and in 309 Ptolemy personally commanded a fleet that detached the coastal towns of Lycia and Caria from Antigonus, then crossed into Greece, where he took possession of Corinth, Sicyon and Megara (308 BC). In 306, a great fleet under Demetrius attacked Cyprus, and Ptolemy's brother Menelaus was defeated and captured in another decisive Battle of Salamis. Ptolemy's complete loss of Cyprus followed.
The satraps Antigonus and Demetrius now each assumed the title of king; Ptolemy, as well as Cassander, Lysimachus and Seleucus I Nicator, responded by doing the same. In the winter of 306 BC, Antigonus tried to follow up his victory in Cyprus by invading Egypt; but Ptolemy was strongest there, and successfully held the frontier against him. Ptolemy led no further overseas expeditions against Antigonus. However, he did send great assistance to Rhodes when it was besieged by Demetrius (305/304),. Once rescued, the Rhodians instituted a festival to worship Ptolemy as Soter ("saviour").

It is widely accepted by modern scholars that as a result of lifting the siege of Rhodes, Ptolemy I had the name Soter ("saviour") bestowed upon him by the grateful people but this account is found only in the writings of Pausanius who has proven to be inaccurate on other points related to the Ptolomies. Rhodian inscriptions related to the cult of king Ptolemy do not mention it until the first century BC and Diodorus' writings, which are favourable to Ptolemy, do not either. The first mention of the title Soter is by Ptolemy II in 256 BC when he issued coins calling himself “King Ptolemy, son of Ptolemy Soter”. Prior to this date coins had read “King Ptolemy son of Ptolemy”. It is speculated that he used the title Soter as propaganda after a series of defeats prior to its first use.

When the coalition against Antigonus was renewed in 302, Ptolemy joined it, and invaded Syria a third time, while Antigonus was engaged with Lysimachus in Asia Minor. On hearing a report that Antigonus had won a decisive victory there, he once again evacuated Syria. But when the news came that Antigonus had been defeated and slain by Lysimachus and Seleucus at the Battle of Ipsus in 301, he occupied Syria a fourth time.

The other members of the coalition had assigned all Syria to Seleucus, after what they regarded as Ptolemy's desertion, and for the next hundred years, the question of the ownership of southern Syria (ie, Judea) produced recurring warfare between the Seleucid and Ptolemaic dynasties. Henceforth, Ptolemy seems to have mingled as little as possible in the rivalries between Asia Minor and Greece; he lost what he held in Greece, but reconquered Cyprus in 295/294. Cyrene, after a series of rebellions, was finally subjugated about 300 and placed under his stepson Magas.

In 285, Ptolemy abdicated in favour of one of his younger sons by Berenice - Ptolemy II Philadelphus, who had been co-regent for three years. His eldest (legitimate) son, Ptolemy Ceraunus, whose mother, Eurydice, the daughter of Antipater, had been repudiated, fled to the court of Lysimachus. Ptolemy I Soter died in 283 at the age of 84. Shrewd and cautious, he had a compact and well-ordered realm to show at the end of forty years of war. His reputation for bonhomie and liberality attached the floating soldier-class of Macedonians and Greeks to his service, and was not insignificant; nor did he wholly neglect conciliation of the natives. Ptolemy also founded the cult of Serapis, an Egyptian god who was "recreated" in such a fashion that he was acceptable to the Greeks and Macedonians. Ptolemy initiated the building of the lighthouse off the coast of Alexandria on the island of Pharos. This was to become one of the seven wonders of the ancient world.

He was a ready patron of letters, founding the Great Library of Alexandria. He himself wrote a history of Alexander's campaigns that has not survived. This used to be considered an objective work, distinguished by its straightforward honesty and sobriety. However, Ptolemy may have exaggerated his own role, and had propagandist aims in writing his History. Although now lost, it was a principal source for the surviving account by Arrian of Nicomedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ptolemy_I_Soter

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
2 commentsCleisthenes
Ptolemy_I_Soter.jpg
[301b] Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I Soter, 305 - 283 B.C.108 viewsBronze AE 30, cf. Svoronos 271, et al., VF/F, Alexandria mint, weight 12.946g, maximum diameter 30.3mm, die axis 0o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse [PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS], eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, unidentifiable monogram(s) in left field; nice style Zeus. Ex FORVM.

Ptolemy I Soter (Greek: Πτολεμαῖος Σωτήρ, Ptolemaios Soter, i.e. Ptolemy the Savior, 367 BC—283 BC) was a Macedonian general who became the ruler of Egypt (323 BC—283 BC) and founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty. In 305 BC he took the title of king.
He was the son of Arsinoe of Macedonia - either by her husband Lagus, a Macedonian nobleman, or by her lover, Philip II of Macedon (which would make him the half-brother of Alexander the Great if true). Ptolemy was one of Alexander the Great's most trusted generals, and among the seven "body-guards" attached to his person. He was a few years older than Alexander, and his intimate friend since childhood. He may even have been in the group of noble teenagers tutored by Aristotle. He was with Alexander from his first campaigns, and played a principal part in the later campaigns in Afghanistan and India. At the Susa marriage festival in 324, Alexander had him marry the Persian princess Atacama. Ptolemy also had a consort queen in Thaïs, the famous Athenian hetaera and one of Alexander's companions in his conquest of the ancient world. Thaïs became his queen in Egypt, and even after he divorced her, she reportedly remained his friend, and kept the title of queen while in Memphis.

When Alexander died in 323, Ptolemy is said to have instigated the resettlement of the empire made at Babylon. Through the Partition of Babylon, he was now appointed satrap of Egypt, under the nominal kings Philip Arrhidaeus and the infant Alexander IV; the former satrap, the Greek Cleomenes, stayed on as his deputy. Ptolemy quickly moved, without authorization, to subjugate Cyrenaica.

By custom, kings in Macedonia asserted their right to the throne by burying their predecessor. Probably because he wanted to pre-empt Perdiccas, the imperial regent, from staking his claim in this way, Ptolemy took great pains in getting his hands on the body of Alexander the Great, placing it temporarily in Memphis (a major element for The First War of The Diodochi) . Ptolemy then openly joined the coalition against Perdiccas. Perdiccas appears to have suspected Ptolemy of aiming for the throne himself, and maybe decided that Ptolemy was his most dangerous rival. Ptolemy executed Cleomenes for spying on behalf of Perdiccas — this removed the chief check on his authority, and allowed Ptolemy to obtain the huge sum that Cleomenes had accumulated.
In 321, Perdiccas invaded Egypt. Ptolemy decided to defend the Nile, and Perdiccas's attempt to force it ended in fiasco, with the loss of 2000 men. This was a fatal blow to Perdiccas' reputation, and he was murdered in his tent by two of his subordinates. Ptolemy immediately crossed the Nile, to provide supplies to what had the day before been an enemy army. Ptolemy was offered the regency in place of Perdiccas; but he declined. Ptolemy was consistent in his policy of securing a power base, while never succumbing to the temptation of risking all to succeed Alexander.

In the long wars that followed between the different Diadochi, Ptolemy's first goal was to hold Egypt securely, and his second was to secure control in the outlying areas: Cyrenaica and Cyprus, as well as Syria, including the province of Judea. His first occupation of Syria was in 318, and he established at the same time a protectorate over the petty kings of Cyprus. When Antigonus One-Eye, master of Asia in 315, showed dangerous ambitions, Ptolemy joined the coalition against him, and on the outbreak of war, evacuated Syria. In Cyprus, he fought the partisans of Antigonus, and re-conquered the island (313). A revolt in Cyrene was crushed the same year.

In 312, Ptolemy and Seleucus, the fugitive satrap of Babylonia, both invaded Syria, and defeated Demetrius Poliorcetes ("sieger of cities"), the son of Antigonus, in the Battle of Gaza. Again he occupied Syria, and again—after only a few months, when Demetrius had won a battle over his general, and Antigonus entered Syria in force—he evacuated it. In 311, a peace was concluded between the combatants. Soon after this, the surviving 13-year-old king, Alexander IV, was murdered in Macedonia, leaving the satrap of Egypt absolutely his own master. The peace did not last long, and in 309 Ptolemy personally commanded a fleet that detached the coastal towns of Lycia and Caria from Antigonus, then crossed into Greece, where he took possession of Corinth, Sicyon and Megara (308 BC). In 306, a great fleet under Demetrius attacked Cyprus, and Ptolemy's brother Menelaus was defeated and captured in another decisive Battle of Salamis. Ptolemy's complete loss of Cyprus followed.
The satraps Antigonus and Demetrius now each assumed the title of king; Ptolemy, as well as Cassander, Lysimachus and Seleucus I Nicator, responded by doing the same. In the winter of 306 BC, Antigonus tried to follow up his victory in Cyprus by invading Egypt; but Ptolemy was strongest there, and successfully held the frontier against him. Ptolemy led no further overseas expeditions against Antigonus. However, he did send great assistance to Rhodes when it was besieged by Demetrius (305/304),. Once rescued, the Rhodians instituted a festival to worship Ptolemy as Soter ("saviour").

It is widely accepted by modern scholars that as a result of lifting the siege of Rhodes, Ptolemy I had the name Soter ("saviour") bestowed upon him by the grateful people but this account is found only in the writings of Pausanius who has proven to be inaccurate on other points related to the Ptolomies. Rhodian inscriptions related to the cult of king Ptolemy do not mention it until the first century BC and Diodorus' writings, which are favourable to Ptolemy, do not either. The first mention of the title Soter is by Ptolemy II in 256 BC when he issued coins calling himself “King Ptolemy, son of Ptolemy Soter”. Prior to this date coins had read “King Ptolemy son of Ptolemy”. It is speculated that he used the title Soter as propaganda after a series of defeats prior to its first use.

When the coalition against Antigonus was renewed in 302, Ptolemy joined it, and invaded Syria a third time, while Antigonus was engaged with Lysimachus in Asia Minor. On hearing a report that Antigonus had won a decisive victory there, he once again evacuated Syria. But when the news came that Antigonus had been defeated and slain by Lysimachus and Seleucus at the Battle of Ipsus in 301, he occupied Syria a fourth time.

The other members of the coalition had assigned all Syria to Seleucus, after what they regarded as Ptolemy's desertion, and for the next hundred years, the question of the ownership of southern Syria (ie, Judea) produced recurring warfare between the Seleucid and Ptolemaic dynasties. Henceforth, Ptolemy seems to have mingled as little as possible in the rivalries between Asia Minor and Greece; he lost what he held in Greece, but reconquered Cyprus in 295/294. Cyrene, after a series of rebellions, was finally subjugated about 300 and placed under his stepson Magas.

In 285, Ptolemy abdicated in favour of one of his younger sons by Berenice - Ptolemy II Philadelphus, who had been co-regent for three years. His eldest (legitimate) son, Ptolemy Ceraunus, whose mother, Eurydice, the daughter of Antipater, had been repudiated, fled to the court of Lysimachus. Ptolemy I Soter died in 283 at the age of 84. Shrewd and cautious, he had a compact and well-ordered realm to show at the end of forty years of war. His reputation for bonhomie and liberality attached the floating soldier-class of Macedonians and Greeks to his service, and was not insignificant; nor did he wholly neglect conciliation of the natives. Ptolemy also founded the cult of Serapis, an Egyptian god who was "recreated" in such a fashion that he was acceptable to the Greeks and Macedonians. Ptolemy initiated the building of the lighthouse off the coast of Alexandria on the island of Pharos. This was to become one of the seven wonders of the ancient world.

He was a ready patron of letters, founding the Great Library of Alexandria. He himself wrote a history of Alexander's campaigns that has not survived. This used to be considered an objective work, distinguished by its straightforward honesty and sobriety. However, Ptolemy may have exaggerated his own role, and had propagandist aims in writing his History. Although now lost, it was a principal source for the surviving account by Arrian of Nicomedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ptolemy_I_Soter

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
   
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