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Search results - "Pella"
Pella.jpg
37 viewsMacedonia, Pella AE21. 158-149 BC. Bust of Pan / Athena Alkidemos advancing right. Ref.Sear 1445

( I was given this coin as a bonus by an experienced collector / dealer, to attempt electrolysis on, he had been attempting to clean it with conventional methods for 1½ years, however it remained a nugget... I know some members will object, but 10 minuets in the bath of evil, and the crust just flaked off revealing a pretty and detailed coin!!! How I wish it was always so easy!!)
Lee S
Pella_bull.jpg
16 viewsMacedonia under Roman rule. Gaius Publius Quaestor. 148-146BC. AE19mm. Obv. Athena in crested helmet. Rev. Grazing cow right. GAIOY TAMIOU. SNG ´Cop. 1323Lee S
_Macedon_c.jpg
Macedon9 viewsCoins of the ancient Greek cities and Kings of Macedon, and some celtic imitations thereof. Includes the Hellenistic kings of Macedon and Roman successors. Principal mints: Akanthos, Amphipolis and Pella. 1 commentsAnaximander
07-Alex-Pella-P250.jpg
07. "Pella": Tetradrachm in the name of Alexander the Great.30 viewsTetradrachm, ca 315 - 310 BC, "Pella" mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. Boeotian shield at left, Σ. between the rungs of the throne.
17.24 gm., 26 mm.
P. #250; PROa #135.

Alexander appointed Antipater regent in Macedon during his absence. After Alexander's death in 323 BC, Antipater continued ruling as regent until his own death in 319 BC. Thereafter his son Kassander ruled until 297 BC, eventually taking the title of King in 305 BC. He was notorious for his cruelty, and in 311 BC he killed Alexander's widow and her young son. The silver coinage of Kassander's reign was all issued in the name of Alexander.
Callimachus
072p_Gordianus-III__(238-244_A_D_),_Macedonia,_Pella,_AE-26,_Varbanov_3748,_Mouchmov_6489,_Q-001,_7h,_26mm,_11,9g-s.jpg
072p Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), Macedonia, Pella, Varbanov 3748, AE-26, COL IVL A VAG PELLA, Pella enthroned left, 111 views072p Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), Macedonia, Pella, Varbanov 3748, AE-26, COL IVL A VAG PELLA, Pella enthroned left,
avers: IMP C M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers: COL IVL A VAG PELLA, Pella enthroned left, right hand raised to her shoulder.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 26,0mm, weight: 11,9,60g, axis: 7h,
mint: Macedonia, Pella, date: 238-244 A.D., ref: Varbanov 3748, Mouchmov 6489,
Q-001
quadrans
Aemilia10.jpg
0ac Conquest of Macedonia13 viewsPaullus Aemilius Lepidus, moneyer
109-100 BC

Denarius

Veiled head of Concord, right, PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA
TER above trophy, L. Aemelius Lepidus on right, Perseus and his two sons as prisoners on left, PAVLLVS in ex.

Seaby, Aemelia 10

L. Aemelius Paullus defeated the Macedonians in 168 BC and brought Perseus and his sons to Rome to adorn his triumph.

Three days after the battle Perseus arrived at Amphipolis, and from that city he sent heralds with a caduceus to Paulus. In the meanwhile Hippias, Midon, and Pantauchus, the principal men among the king's friends who had fled from the field of battle to Beroea, went and made their surrender to the Roman consul. In the case of others also, their fears prompted them, one after another, to do the same. The consul sent his son Q. Fabius, together with L. Lentulus and Q. Metellus, with despatches to Rome announcing his victory. He gave the spoils taken from the enemy's army lying on the field of battle to the foot soldiers and the plunder from the surrounding country to the cavalry on condition that they were not absent from the camp more than two nights. The camp at Pydna was shifted to a site nearer the sea. First of all Beroea, then Thessalonica and Pella, and almost the whole of Macedonia, city by city, surrendered within two days.

Livy, History of Rome, 44.45
Blindado
11-Alex-Pella-P527.jpg
11. "Pella": Tetradrachm in the name of Alexander the Great.34 viewsTetradrachm, ca 280 - 275 BC, "Pella" mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. Monogram under throne, Triton at left.
16.95 gm., 29 mm.
P. #527.

Following the overthrow of Demetrios Poliorketes by Lysimachos in 288 BC, there was a period of about a dozen years where no ruler was able to establish himself for any length of time in Macedonia. In 277 BC, Antigonos Gonatas achieved a victory over Gallic invaders in Thrace, and that enabled him to claim his father's throne. He ruled until 239 BC and the Macedonian kingdom prospered during his reign.
This coin was issued about the time Antigonos became king and established his own coinage. The decade 280 - 270 BC was a troubled one for the area due to the Gallic invasions (279 - 276 BC), and coins in the name of Alexander the Great from this decade are not common.
Callimachus
Richard_II_halfpenny.JPG
1377 - 1399, Richard II, AR Halfpenny struck at London, England6 viewsObverse: + RICARD : REX : ANGL. Crowned facing bust of Richard II within circle of pellets. Cross pattée in legend.
Reverse: CIVITAS LONDON. Long cross pattée dividing legend around inner circle of pellets into quarters, trefoil in each quarter of circle.
Type II, intermediate style, lombardic n's in 'LONDON'
Diameter: 13mm | Weight: 0.55gms | Die Axis: 1
SPINK: 1699 | North: 1331b

Richard II was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. Edward III's heir, Edward the Black Prince, was Richard's father but he died in 1376, leaving Richard as heir apparent. When Edward III died the following year, the 10-year-old Richard succeeded to the throne.
During Richard's first years as king the government was in the hands of a series of regency councils which were under the control of Richard's uncles John of Gaunt and Thomas of Woodstock. England then faced various problems, most notably the Hundred Years' War. Another major challenge of the reign was the Peasants' Revolt in 1381, a crisis which the young king played a central part in suppressing.
Richard sought to restrain the power of the aristocracy and this caused so much discontent that, in 1387, a group of aristocrats known as the Lords Appellant took control of the government. But by 1389 Richard had regained control and for the next eight years governed in apparent harmony with his former opponents. However, in 1397, Richard took his revenge on the Appellants, many of whom were executed or exiled. In 1399, after John of Gaunt died, the king disinherited Gaunt's son, Henry of Bolingbroke, who he had previously exiled. Henry invaded England in June 1399 with a small force that quickly grew in numbers. Meeting little resistance, Bolingbroke deposed Richard and had himself crowned as King Henry IV.
Henry had agreed to let Richard live after his abdication but this all changed when Henry discovered that Lord Despenser, the earls of Huntingdon, Kent and Salisbury, and possibly also the Earl of Rutland, who had all been demoted from the ranks they had been given by Richard, were conspiring to murder him and restore Richard to the throne. Although averted, the plot highlighted the danger of allowing Richard to live and he is reported to have been starved to death in captivity in Pontefract Castle on or around 14 February 1400.
Richard's body was then taken south from Pontefract and displayed in the old St Paul's Cathedral, London until the 6th of March after which it was taken for burial in King's Langley Priory, Hertfordshire. Sometime later, by the order of King Henry V, Richard's body was moved from the Priory to Westminster Abbey.
1 comments*Alex
MacrinDenProvid.jpg
1bx Macrinus38 views217-218

Denarius

Laureate draped bust, right, IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG
Providentia stg, PROVIDENTIA DEORVM

RIC 80

According to the Historia Augusta, which concedes that almost nothing was known about Macrinus: Though of humble origin and shameless in spirit as well as in countenance, and though hated by all, both civilians and soldiers, he nevertheless proclaimed himself now Severus and now Antoninus. Then he set out at once for the Parthian war and thus gave no opportunity either for the soldiers to form an opinion of him, or for the gossip by which he was beset to gain its full strength. The senators, however, out of hatred for Antoninus Bassianus, received him as emperor gladly. . . . Now to his son, previously called Diadumenianus, he gave the name Antoninus (after he had himself assumed the appellation Felix) in order to avert the suspicion of having slain Antoninus. This same name was afterwards taken by Varius Elagabalus also, who claimed to be the son of Bassianus, a most filthy creature and the son of a harlot. . . .

And so, having been acclaimed emperor, Macrinus assumed the imperial power and set out against the Parthians with a great array, eager to blot out the lowliness of his family and the infamy of his early life by a magnificent victory. But after fighting a battle with the Parthians he was killed in a revolt of the legions, which had deserted to Varius Elagabalus. He reigned, however, for more than a year.

Macrinus, then, was arrogant and bloodthirsty and desirous of ruling in military fashion. He found fault even with the discipline of former times and lauded Severus alone above all others. For he even crucified soldiers and always used the punishments meted out to slaves, and when he had to deal with a mutiny among the troops, he usually decimated the soldiers but sometimes he only centimated them. This last was an expression of his own, for he used to say that he was merciful in putting to death only one in a hundred. . . .

This is one of my favorite pieces because I bought it completely covered with crud and set about cleaning it. Boy was I surprised!
Blindado
ConstansAE3GlorEx.jpg
1ei Constans21 views337-350

AE3

RIC 93

Rosette diademed, draped & cuirassed bust, right, CONSTANS P F AVG
Two soldiers standing to either side of one standard with chi-rho on banner, GLORIA EXERCITVS, [A]SIS-crescent in ex.

Constans received Italy, Africa, and the Balkans when the empire was divided. He took charge of the remainder of the West after Constantine II imprudently attacked him in 340. Zosimus recorded, "Constans, having thus removed his brother, exercised every species of cruelty toward his subjects, exceeding the most intolerable tyranny. He purchased some well favoured Barbarians, and had others with him as hostages, to whom he gave liberty to harrass his subjects as they pleased, in order to gratify his vicious disposition. In this manner he reduced all the nations that were subject to him to extreme misery. This gave uneasiness to the court guards, who perceiving that he was much addicted to hunting placed themselves under the conduct of Marcellinus prefect of the treasury, and Magnentius who commanded the Joviani and Herculiani (two legions so termed), and formed a plot against him in the following manner. Marcellinus reported that he meant to keep the birth-day of his sons, and invited many of the superior officers to a feast. Amongst the rest Magnentius rose from table and left the room; he presently returned, and as it were in a drama stood before them clothed in an imperial robe. Upon this all the guests saluted him with the title of king, and the inhabitants of Augustodunum, where it was done, concurred in the same sentiment. This transaction being rumoured abroad, the country people flocked into the city; while at the same time a party of Illyrian cavalry who came to supply the Celtic legions, joined themselves with those that were concerned in the enterprize. When the officers of the army were met together, and heard the leaders of the conspiracy proclaim their new emperor, they scarcely knew the meaning of it; they all, however, joined in the acclamation, and saluted Magnentius with the appellation of Augustus. When this became known to Constans, he endeavoured to escape to a small town called Helena, which lies near the Pyrenean mountains. He was taken by Gaison, who was sent with some other select persons for that purpose, and being destitute of all aid, was killed. "
Blindado
22-Celtic-Alex-tet.jpg
22. Celtic Alexander Tetradrachm (?)42 viewsTetradrachm, ca 2'nd century BC, Danube region.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. Tripod at left.
17.25 gm., 28 mm.

In researching this coin, I found five coins which are from the same pair of dies as this one. These are the only examples of this type (tripod on reverse) that I've been able to find.

1. Palladium sale #10 (Nov. 1995), attributed to the mint at Pella and catalogued as Muller #146.

2. Palladium sale #11 (April 1996), described as "unlisted in Price, and apparently unknown before a recent hoard find. Variant of Price 633."

3. CNG sale #54, lot 99, described as a Celtic imitation of Alexander's coinage from the Danube region, ca 2'nd century BC. c.f. Goble, OTA, 566. This is the coin pictured above.

4. CNG sale #72, lot 13, described as "Celtic, Lower Danube, uncertain tribe, early 3'rd century BC . . . . Unpublished in the standard references . . . . By virtue of its style, fabric, and weight, this Alexander imitation is certainly an early issue, probably struck during the first decades of the third century BC."

5. Harlan J Berk 156th Buy or Bid Sale (Oct. 2007), lot 75, described as "Possibly unpublished . . . Somewhat unusual style on the obverse."

Five coins from the same pair or dies, five different attributions. I will agree, though, with the last statement of coin #4 above, that this appears to be an early issue. This coin is on a thick flan resembling coins minted during Alexander's lifetime and immediately thereafter and is made from good silver. There is something a bit barbaric about the style of this coin, although there are genuine Alexander coins listed and pictured in Martin J. Price's book which are more barbaric than this one. An interesting coin.
1 commentsCallimachus
1179_P_Hadrian_RPC2360.jpg
2360 PHRYGIA, Hydrela Hadrian, Mên riding 14 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2360; = R. Pace, ‘Una moneta inedita di Hydrela’, Panorama Numismatico 112/97, pp. 18-9.

Magistrate Apellas Athènagorou

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΟΛΥΜΠΙΟС
Laureate head of Hadrian, right

Rev. ΑΠΕΛΛΑС ΑΘΗΝΑΓΟΡΟΥ ΑΝΕΘΗΚΕ ΥΔΡΗΛΕΙΤΩΝ
Mên riding r., holding trident over l. shoulder.

10.52 gr
25 mm
6h

Note.
plate coin R. Pace, ‘Una moneta inedita di Hydrela’, Panorama Numismatico 112/97, pp. 18-9.
okidoki
753_P_Hadrian_RPC607.JPG
607 MACEDONIA Pella, AE 26 Pan seated left17 viewsReference
RPC III, 607; Varbanov III 3714; BMC 33; AMNG 30

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRA HADRIANVS AVG COS P P
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., with drapery on l. shoulder (countermarked head right)

Rev. COL IVL AVG PELL
Pan, naked, seated l. on rock, his r. hand raised to head, left arm resting on syrinx.

9.83 gr
26 mm
12h
okidoki
753_P_Hadrian_RPC607~0.JPG
607 MACEDONIA Pella, AE 26 Pan seated left9 viewsReference
RPC III, 607; Varbanov III 3714; BMC 33; AMNG 30

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRA HADRIANVS AVG COS P P
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., with drapery on l. shoulder (countermarked head right)

Rev. COL IVL AVG PELL
Pan, naked, seated l. on rock, his r. hand raised to head, left arm resting on syrinx.

9.83 gr
26 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
AE16_de_Philippe_II_de_Macédoine_359-336_av__J-C!.jpg
AE16 de Philippe II de Macédoine 359-336 av. J-C!36 views2575
AE16 de Philippe II de Macédoine 359-336 av. J-C! Frappe Pella
6.26 gr, patine foncée, beau relief, Etat: TTB++
Droit : tête à diadème de Apollo à droite;
Rev.: Chevalier gallopant à gauche, FILIPPOU au dessus, monograme pointe de flèche au dessous.

Antonio Protti
AE17_de_Philippe_II_de_Macédoine_359-336_av_JC!.jpg
AE17 de Philippe II de Macédoine 359-336 av.JC!29 views3036 AE17 de Philippe II de Macédoine 359-336 av.JC!
Frappe Pella 6.11 gr, patine foncée, beau relief, Etat: proche SUP
Droit : tête à diadème de Apollo à droite;
Rev.: Chevalier gallopant à droite, FILIPPOU au dessus, monograme pointe de flèche au dessous.


Antonio Protti
AE16_de_Philippe_II_de_Macédoine_359-336_av__J-C!d.jpg
AE17 de Philippe II de Macédoine 359-336 av.JC! (Probably Baebaric Immitation)42 views3696
AE17 de Philippe II de Macédoine 359-336 av.JC! Frappe Pella
4.83 gr, patine brune/ brune-verte (olive) foncée, beau relief, Etat: SUP
Droit : tête à diadème de Apollo à droite;
Rev.: Chevalier gallopant à droite, FILIPPOU au dessus, monograme pointe de flèche au dessous.
Antonio Protti
AE18_de_Philippe_II_de_Macédoine,_Pella_359-336_av__JC!_Pella,_Macédoine.jpg
AE18 de Philippe II de Macédoine 359-336 av. J-C!38 views3209
AE18 de Philippe II de Macédoine 359-336 av. J-C!
18 mm- 6.37 gr, belle patine foncée, relief, Etat: TTB++ Frappe Pella, Macédoine
Droit : Tête laurée de Apollo à droite;
Rev.: L'impéreur gallopant sur cheval à droite- FILIPPOU au dessus, monograme HP et trident au dessous.
Prix estimé: 50 Euro
Antonio Protti
1451_Alexander_III_Babylon.jpg
Alexander III - AR tetradrachm12 viewsunder Stamenes or Archon
Babylon
324-323 BC
head of young Herakles right wearing lion's skin
Zeus seated left, leaning on scepter, holding eagle; kerykeion in left field
AΛEΞANΔPOY
(HΦΛ) / M
Price 3627
ex Künker

After Mazaeus died in 328 B.C., Alexander appointed Stamenes as satrap of Babylon. Little is known about him, other than he probably died of natural causes around 323 B.C. when Archon of Pella replaced him. Perdiccas suspected Archon of colluding in the theft of Alexander's corpse and, in 321 B.C., sent Dokimos to replace him. Archon was defeated and died from battle wounds."
Johny SYSEL
679_Alexander_III_Pella3.jpg
Alexander III - AR tetradrachm6 viewsstruck by Kassander in the name of Alexander III

Pella
317-314 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter
boeotian shield left; snake under the throne
AΛEΞANΔPOY
Price 249; SNG Copenhagen 728. Muller 754
17,19g

ex CNG
ex Aurea auction 49
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
Alexander_III_Tetradrachm.jpg
Alexander III Tetradrachm Pella Mint40 viewsOBV: Head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion's skin headdress.
REV: ALEXANDROU
Zeus seated left, holding eagle in right hand and sceptre in left
hand; Phrygian helmet in left field with crossed palm branches
above, monogram under throne, and exergue.
Price 629; Müller 233. ANACS # 4684706
ca. 275-270 B.C.
Pella Mint
2 commentsgoldenancients
03_Alexander.jpg
Alexander III the Great (336 - 321 B.C.)8 viewsAE 18, 336 – 323 B.C., Pella?, 18.2mm, 7.69g, 90°, Sear 6741.
Obv: Head of Heracles right wearing lion skin.
Rev: AΛEΞANΔPOY Thunderbolt, club, bow and case.
Marti Vltori
Alexandre le Grand Tetrad..jpg
Alexander The Great Silver Tetradrachm42 viewsPella Mint, 285/275 B.C., 29 mm
Obv: Head of Herakles
Rev: Zeus with eagle, monograms K M
Ref: Price Cat. # 563 of The British Museum
1 commentsJean Paul D
Alexander_III_Herakles-Weapons.jpg
Alexander the Great * Macedonia, 337 to 323 BC. Bronze drachm152 views
Obv: Alexander III guised as Herakles in lion skin headdress, right-facing, enclosed within ornamental dotted circle.
Rev: (Top to bottom) * Lighting bolt, knotted Olive-branch club right-facing, AΛEXANΔΡ[OY], Unstrung bow in ornamented traveling/storage case, Monogram Δ.

Exergue: (N/A) Monogram Δ present in undefined exergual space.

Mint: (Pella?)
Struck: 337-323 BC.

Size: 18.50 mm.
Weight: 6.38 gms.
Die axis: 360°

Condition: XF. Exceptionally lovely coin, more-so in hand. Superb high relief and all details distinct and present.
Beautiful tone, rather dark-golden in the higher relief’s contrast delightfully against a yet-darker gold background in the lower areas of the flan. The flat area around the portrait and within the dotted circle is a strong, accentuating black-olive (not well-communicated by the present image).
Exquisite example of the type.

Refs:*
Not found in Sear GCATV.
Sear 6739, is an Æ 20. Partially descriptive.
4 commentsTiathena
AlexSmall.jpg
Alexander the Great Bronze18 viewsA lifetime issue Alexander the Great bronze coin.

Obverse: the head of a young man, probably Apollo, inside a dotted border.

Reverse: a horse rearing up, with the name ALEXANDROY written above, and the letter Phi, a mintmark, written below

Minted in Macedonia, 336-323 BC, probably at the royal mint at the capital city of Pella.

Attribution: Price 361
chuy1530
Alexander the Great half unit, 334 BC.JPG
Alexander the Great half unit, 334 BC38 viewsAlexander the Great
Kingdom of Macedon
AE - half unit, 15mm
Pella or Amphipolis, 334 BC
Macedonian shield; around, five double crescents with five pellets between each; in center, eagle
B-A on either side of crested Macedonian helmet
SNG Cop 1120
Ardatirion
platedTet.jpg
Alexander the Great, plated tetradrachm, imitating one of Pella mint72 views28mm, 10.97g
obv: head of Herakles wearing lion skin right
rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ; Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter, Macedonian helm to left, monogram below throne
seems to match most closely Price 625 but the monogram seems to have only two cross bars instead of three
ex Gitbud & Naumann
CLICK picture for a larger, sharper version
areich
Amyntas_III_Diobol.jpg
Amyntas III Diobol -- 393-369 BC15 views1.161 g, 10.5 mm, 0°
Pella Mint
Silver Diobol; Grainy, Edge Chips
Minted During the Reign of Amyntas III
SNG ANS 94; SNG Alpha Bank 200; AMNG III 3

Obverse: Head of Herakles Wearing Nemean Skin Headdress Right.
Reverse: AMYNTA, Within Linear Square, Eagle Stands Left, Head Looking Back Right

Amyntas III, son of Arrhidaeus and father of Philip II, was king of Macedon in 393 BC, and again from 392 to 370 BC. In 393, he was driven out by the Illyrians, but in the following year, with the aid of the Thessalians, he recovered his kingdom. He is historically considered the founder of the unified Macedonian state. Through his youngest son, Philip II, he was paternal grandfather to Alexander the Great.
___________________________________
FORVM purchase; how could I resist a nice coin of Alexander the Great's grandfather?
Hydro
Macedon_AmyntasIII_SNG-ANS_94_gf.jpg
Amyntas III. 393-369 BC. 6 viewsMacedon, Amyntas III. 393-369 BC. AR Hemidrachm (1.58 gm) of Aigai or Pella, light Thraco-Mac. stdd. Head of Herakles clan in lion skin headdress r. / Eagle stdg l., head r., all in linear square. ΑΜΥΝ-ΤΑ. aVF. Pegasi V Lot 96. SNG ANS 8 #94; AMNG III/2 #3 (plate XXX #1); BMC Macedonia pp. 171172 #5-8; HGC 3.1 #830; SNG Alpha Bank 200-201; SNG Cop 2 #513-514; SNG Munchen 46-47; SNG Ashmolean 3 #2441-2442; Westermark Regal plate LXX #33. Anaximander
Amyntas_III.jpg
Amyntas III. 393-370/69 B.C.15 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Amyntas III. 393-370/69 B.C. Ae 16mm, 3.73g. Aigai or Pella mint. Obv:Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress. Rev: AMYNT, eagle standing right, attacking serpent. SNG ANS 100-9; SNG Alpha Bank
214-30; AMNG 7.
ddwau
Antigonas_Gonatus_Pan_2b.jpg
Antigonos Gonatas * War-helmed Athena * Pan, 277-239 BC. Æ20157 views
Antigonos Gonatas * Athena * Pan, Bronze Drachm

Obv: Head of Athena right wearing crested Corinthian helmet.
Rev: Pan standing right erecting a trophy; B-A, to left and right of Pan respectively. Φ in lower-left field, ligate monogram between Pan's legs.

Exergue: (Blank)

Mint: Pella (?)
Struck: 277-239 BC.

Size: 18.15 mm.
Weight: 6.64 grams
Die axis: 005°

Condition: Nicely centered strike with good images on both sides. Lovely dark-olive patina (near-black). Showing signs of wear, long usage and the passage of time. Still a lovely coin and very pleasing to the eye.

Refs:*
Price 71
SNG Copenhagen 1205(ff)

1 commentsTiathena
gonatas_k.jpg
Antigonos II Gonatas, c. 270-240 BC11 viewsÆ22, 7.1g, 6h; Uncertain mint in Macedon (Pella or Amphipolis?)
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: B - A. Pan erecting trophy; monogram below.
Reference: SNG Cop 1209; SNG Alpha Bank 1010 ff.
John Anthony
PiusItalia.jpg
Antoninus Pius Italia119 viewsANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III
Laureate head right

ITALIA
Italia, towered, seated l. on globe, holding cornucopiae and sceptre.

3.12g
Rome 140-143
RIC 73c. BMC 214

Ex-Pella Coins and Antiquities
4 commentsJay GT4
Macedon_Archelaos_SNG-ANS_65-69_gf.jpg
Archelaos. 413-399 BC. 15 viewsMacedon, Archelaos. 413-399 BC. AR Pentadrachm (10.64 gm) Aigai or Pella, Reduced Light Thraco-Mac. stdd. Head of Apollo (or Ares) wearing tainia, r. / Horse standing r., foreleg raised, trailing bridle. ΑΡΧΕ-ΛΑΟ. VF. SNG ANS 8 #65-69. HGC 3.1 #795; ACNAC: Davis 75, Dewing 1093; Kraay ACGC plate 28 #505; Price 51; SNG Alpha Bank 146-148; SNG Berry 75; SNG Cop 2 #503; Westermark Grp II Series 2 (O90/R112). cf. Sotheby's 6417 #205. 1 commentsAnaximander
Bactria,_Diodotos_II,_AE_22_.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Diodotos II, ca. 240-230 BC, Æ Double Unit 13 viewsLaureate head of Zeus right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔIOΔITOY Artemis right holding transverse torch; star to right.

HGC 12, 27; SNG ANS 9, 96; Mitchiner 82; Holt Ι2; Kritt Ι2; Sear GCV 7504 var. (hound at Artemis feet). Ai Khanoum mint.

(22 mm, 9.6 g, 6h).
Sayles & Lavender.

Artemis depicted on the reverse of this coin was the twin sister of Apollo and goddess of the Moon. A huntress with legendary skills in archery, she brought fertility to the land and special protection to women in childbirth. The historian Frank Holt wrote ‘A better patron goddess for a city such as Ai Khanoum could not have been found. It may only be coincidence, but the choice of Artemis as one female type for this city has a faint echo down through the ages. The ancient Greek name of the polis has vanished from history, but its current appellation derives from Turko-Uzbek and means “Lady Moon”. Local legends offer several explanations and identify various important women as the eponymous hero of the site. For example, local village women still bring votive offerings to a “Lady Moon”, protector of mothers and infants. Another “Lady Moon” was associated with irrigation canals and yet another with control over the rivers that flowed by the walls of the city. Such “modern” folktales reverberate with ancient echoes of Artemis/Anahita, goddess of the moon, mistress of the fertilizing waters, and guardian of women in childbirth.’
n.igma
Macedon_Bottiaia_SNG-Ashmolean_3289_gf.jpg
Bottiaia. c. 187-168 BC. AR 2½ obol 2 viewsMacedon, Bottiaia. c. 187-168 BC. AR 2½ obol (1.77 gm) of Pella. Macedonian shield with tetraskelis, a whorl ornament, at center composed of five crescents. / Stern of galley l. inscribed BOTTEATΩΝ; ΘE below.  VF.  Bottiaia issuance group 4 under the Antigonid kings Philip V & Perseus. Ponterio 126 #773. SNG Ashmolean 3289; HGC 3.1 #358; Liampi Schild M47; AMNG III/1 #123; BMC p. 64 #3. cf. SNG Cop 7 #136 (no monogram); ACNAC Dewing 1219 (same). Anaximander
IMG_9987.JPG
Demetrios I Poliorketes8 viewsKINGS of MACEDON. Demetrios I Poliorketes. 306-283 BC. Æ . Pella mint. Macedonian shield with monogram of Demetrios in central boss / Macedonian helmet. Newell 132; SNG Alpha Bank 969. ecoli
Macedon_DemPoliorketes_Newell_DP90_gf.jpg
Demetrios I Poliorketes. 306-285 BC. AR Tetradrachm of Pella3 viewsMacedon, Demetrios I Poliorketes. 306-285 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.78 gm) of Pella. Diademed and horned bust r. / Poseiden Pelagaios stdg l., r. foot on rock, holding trident. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ. Monograms EYP to l., HP to r.  aVF.   Newell DP Series VI #90 (obv. die LXXXI, plate VIII #10); HGC 3.1 #1014a; SNG Cop 2 #1179. Anaximander
Macedon_DemPoliorketes_Newell_DP68_gf.jpg
Demetrios I Poliorketes. 306-285 BC. AR Tetradrachm Pella 12 viewsMacedon, Demetrios I Poliorketes. 306-285 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.40 gm) of Pella 294-292 BC. Winged Nike stdg l. on prow of galley, blowing trumpet & holding stylis. / Poseidon Pelagaios advancing l. w/ trident. ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ. Ɪᵔ monogram to l.; dolphin above to r.  EF.  Lustrous. Newell DP 68 (obv. die LVII, plate VI #18); ACNAC Dewing #1196; HGC 3.1 #1012e. cf. SNG Cop 2 #1178 (no star or dolphin); SNG Munich 1042 (no dolphin, same obv. die); Sotheby's 6147 #236. 2 commentsAnaximander
Macedonian_Kingdom_1c_img.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Macedonian Kingdom, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, Newell p. 97, 9176 viewsObv:– Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity
Rev:– BASILEOS DEMETRIOY, Poseidon standing left, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander), monogram left
Minted in Pella, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C.
Reference:– Newell p. 97, 91 and pl. VIII, 12, SNG Cop 1179 var.
17.0192g, 29.3mm, 45o

Ex-Harlan Berk. Ex-Forvm, where it was described as gVF, superb portrait, tight flan.
4 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1c_img~0.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Macedonian Kingdom, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, Newell p. 97, 9164 viewsObv:– Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity
Rev:– BASILEOS DEMETRIOY, Poseidon standing left, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander), monogram left
Minted in Pella, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C.
Reference:– Newell p. 97, 91 and pl. VIII, 12, SNG Cop 1179 var.
17.0192g, 29.3mm, 45o

Ex-Harlan Berk. Ex-Forvm, where it was described as gVF, superb portrait, tight flan.

Updated image of an old coin from my collection.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Macedonian_Kingdom_1c_img~1.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes, Macedonian Kingdom, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C., Silver tetradrachm, Newell p. 97, 9156 viewsObv:– Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity
Rev:– BASILEOS DEMETRIOY, Poseidon standing left, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander), monogram left
Minted in Pella, c. 289 - fall 288 B.C.
Reference:– Newell p. 97, 91 and pl. VIII, 12, SNG Cop 1179 var.
17.0192g, 29.3mm, 45o

Ex-Harlan Berk. Ex-Forvm, where it was described as gVF, superb portrait, tight flan.

Updated image using new photography setup.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Demetrios_Poliorketes.jpg
Demetrius Poliorketes - AE 1512 viewsMacedon (Pella???)
306-283 BC
macedonian shield with (ΔHP)
macedonian helmet
BA _ ΣI
SGCV II 6774, SNG Cop 1224, AMNG 1, Newell 129 ff
4,26g 16-15mm
Johny SYSEL
DiadF.jpg
Diadumenian133 viewsDiadumenian, as Caesar. 218 AD. AR Denarius 3.04 g. 2nd emission, July AD 217-March 218

O: M OPEL ANT DIADVMENIAN CAES, bare-headed and draped bust right
R: PRINC IVVENTVTIS, Diadumenian standing half-left, head right, holding standard and sceptre; two standards behind.
RIC IV 102 (Macrinus); BMCRE 87 (Macrinus); RSC 3.

Marcus Opellius Diadumenianus was born in 208. According to Aelius Lampridius, quoted below, the boy was so named because he was born with a diadem formed by a rolled caul.

“Now let us proceed to the omens predicting his imperial power — which are marvellous enough in the case of others, but in his case beyond the usual wont. 4 On the day of his birth, his father, who then chanced to be steward of the greater treasury, was inspecting the purple robes, and those which he approved as being brighter in hue he ordered to be carried into a certain chamber, in which two hours later Diadumenianus was born. 2 Furthermore, whereas it usually happens that children at birth are provided by nature with a caul, which the midwives seize and sell to credulous lawyers (for it is said that this bring luck to those who plead), 3 this child, instead of a caul, had a narrow band like a diadem, so strong that it could not be broken, for the fibres were entwined in the manner of a bow-string. 4 The child, they say, was accordingly called Diadematus, but when he grew older, he was called Diadumenianus from the name of his mother's father, though the name differed little from his former appellation Diadematus.”

His father Macrinus was hailed as Augustus in 217. Diadumenian, in turn, received the titles of Caesar and Prince of the Youth. He was also given the name Antoninus after the assassinated emperor Caracalla.

These titles are seen on this example as ANT and PRINC IVVENTVTIS.

When the armies of Elagabalus revolted at Emesa on May 16, 218, Macrinus traveled to the praetorian fortress at Apamaea to shore up (buy) support and to raise Diadumenian to the rank of Augustus. Still, Macrinus’ armies were defeated outside Antioch in less than a month.

10 year old Diadumenian was captured while fleeing to Zeugma and executed shortly thereafter. He reigned as Caesar for 13 months and as Augustus for less than one.

Although the Senate never confirmed Diadumenian’s title as Augustus, there is extremely rare silver (one or two pieces?) with Diadumenian as emperor. It is believed that a large issue was struck, only to be immediately recalled and melted down when the news of Macrinus’ defeat reached Rome.
5 commentsNemonater
DiadumenianStandards.jpg
DIADUMENIAN68 viewsDIADUMENIAN (Caesar, 217-218). Denarius. 2.53 g. 20mm, Rome mint.
O: M OPEL DIADVMENIAN CAES, Bareheaded, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: PRINC IVVENTVTIS, Diadumenian standing left, holding baton; two signa to right.
-RIC 107.

1st emission of Macrinus, AD 217, only three examples in the Reka Devnia hoard.

Diadumenian's three main types as Caesar exactly correspond to Macrinus' three issues, which for their part can be approximately dated on the basis of the titles they bear and their volumes of issue as revealed by the Reka Devnia hoard. So Diadumenian's dates derive from those estimated for Macrinus.

Marcus Opellius Diadumenianus was born in 208. According to Aelius Lampridius, quoted below, the boy was so named because he was born with a diadem formed by a rolled caul.

“Now let us proceed to the omens predicting his imperial power — which are marvellous enough in the case of others, but in his case beyond the usual wont. 4 On the day of his birth, his father, who then chanced to be steward of the greater treasury, was inspecting the purple robes, and those which he approved as being brighter in hue he ordered to be carried into a certain chamber, in which two hours later Diadumenianus was born. 2 Furthermore, whereas it usually happens that children at birth are provided by nature with a caul, which the midwives seize and sell to credulous lawyers (for it is said that this bring luck to those who plead), 3 this child, instead of a caul, had a narrow band like a diadem, so strong that it could not be broken, for the fibres were entwined in the manner of a bow-string. 4 The child, they say, was accordingly called Diadematus, but when he grew older, he was called Diadumenianus from the name of his mother's father, though the name differed little from his former appellation Diadematus.”

His father Macrinus was hailed as Augustus on April 8, 217. Dio Cassius tells us that Diadumenian was named Caesar and Prince of the Youth by the Senate in May 217 as soon as news of Macrinus' accession reached Rome. A little later, Dio continues, news arrived that Diadumenian had independently been proclaimed Caesar by the soldiers at Zeugma, as he was on his way from Antioch to join Macrinus in Mesopotamia, and that he had also assumed Caracalla's name Antoninus. Hence this first short issue of coins in Rome is with the titles Caesar and Prince of the Youth, but still without Antoninus.

When the armies of Elagabalus revolted at Emesa on May 16, 218, Macrinus traveled to the praetorian fortress at Apamaea to shore up (buy) support and to raise Diadumenian to the rank of Augustus. Still, Macrinus’ armies were defeated outside Antioch in less than a month.

10 year old Diadumenian was captured while fleeing to Zeugma and executed shortly thereafter. He reigned as Caesar for 13 months and as Augustus for less than one.

Although the Senate never confirmed Diadumenian’s title as Augustus, there is extremely rare silver (one or two pieces?) with Diadumenian as emperor. It is believed that a large issue was struck, only to be immediately recalled and melted down when the news of Macrinus’ defeat reached Rome.
5 commentsNemonater
EB0688_scaled.JPG
EB0688 Otacilia Severa11 viewsOtacilia Severa (Augusta, 244-249), Pella, Macedon, AE 23.
Obverse: M·OTAC·S-EVERAE A, Diademed and draped bust right.
Reverse: COL IVL A-VS PЄLLA, City goddess seated left, drawing drapery from shoulder.
References: Varbanov 3764 and Moushmov 6494 are the same type but with OTACIL instead of OTAC.
Diameter: 23.5mm, Weight: 9.489g.
EB
Gordian_III_Pan_on_Rock_Pella.JPG
Gordian III Pan on Rock Pella Macedonia22 viewsGordian III, Pella Macedonia, 238 - 244 AD, 25mm, 9.09g, BMC macedonia pg. 95, 44, SNG Cop 287, Varbanov 3754
OBV: IMP C M ANT GORDIANVS, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
REV: COL IVL A_VG PELLA, Pan seated on rock left, holding branch
Romanorvm
Mxi5d8CSB6t4e6HEWT9csDW27yGAm3.jpg
Gotarzes II52 views(14.16 gm; 28 mm). Minted at Seleucia on the Tigris in month Apellaios, year 358 SE (AD. 46). Diademed bust left / Gotarzes seated right, receiving wreath from Tyche standing left, holding cornucopia; (year) above. Sellwood 65.8var.; Shore 361; Sunrise 416.

Upon the death of their father Artabanos III, Vardanes I (the principal heir) and Gotarzes II contested for the kingship. Vardanes was eventually successful, but was murdered shortly thereafter. Like his father, Gotarzes’ subsequent rule was primarily consumed with internal strife. Also like his father, his primary rivals were supported by Rome as well as some of the Iranian nobility. He was ultimately successful, but his rule accomplished little, as the constant strife continued the overall slow decline of the Parthian kingdom.
2 commentsThatParthianGuy
i-HgFrKTt-XL.jpg
Greek - Kassander Bronze AE 1847 viewsGreek Bronze AE 18, Pella or Amphipolis mint, 305 - 297 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse "BASILEWS KASSANDROU", horseman riding right, right arm raised, diagonal thunderbolt below horse, "A" right4 commentsNeal A
ATGbronze3.JPG
GREEK, MACEDONIAN KINGDOM, Alexander III the Great Bronze82 viewsAlexander the Great
Pella minted 325-310 B.C.
OBV: Head of Herakles right, wearing a lion's skin headdress
REV: B (thunderbolt) A between a club and bowcase.
18 mm
3 commentsbaseball_7
Alexander_III______~0.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander III the great, Tetradrachm175 viewsstruck by Kassandros in the name of Alexander III

Pella
317-314 BC
head of young Heracles in lionskin right
Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, holding eagle and scepter
boeotian shield left; snake under the throne
AΛEΞANΔPOY
Price 249; SNG Copenhagen 728. Muller 754
17,19g

ex CNG
ex Aurea auction 49
3 commentsJohny SYSEL
FotorCreated~21.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian kingdom, Lysimachos, AR Tetradrachm circa 305-281 BC 29mm 17.15g 9h65 viewsPella mint struck 286/5-282/1 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right with horn of Ammon. Rev Athena Nikephoros seated left,left arm resting on shield with lions head in center,spear in background with point facing down,to inner left monogram in circle above arm,monogram below.Nike crowning Kings name with wreath left.
ex CNG esale 366 lot 407,ex Bowers & Ruddy 6-9-80 lot 99,ex A.Hess Nachf {157} 18 March 1918,ex Joseph Hamburger {7} 17 June 1908 lot 414, ex Hirsch {14} 1905 lot 270.
Grant H
68354p00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C., Gold stater18 viewsSH68354. Gold stater, Le Rider p. 146 & pl. 58. 157 (D42/R112), SNG ANS 172 ff., SNG Cop 529, SNG Alpha Bank -, EF, perfect centering, weight 8.602 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, posthumous, 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY (in exergue), charioteer driving biga right, kentron in right, reins in left, kantharos below; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 215, lot 758Joe Sermarini
gx10-s.jpg
Greek, Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V (221-179 B.C.), SNG Cop 1250, AE-21, Pella mint, Two goats kneeling right,212 viewsPhilip V., Macedonia, Kings, (221-179 B.C.), SNG Cop 1250, AE-21, Pella mint, Two goats kneeling right,
avers:- Head of young Herakles right, clad in lion's skin.
revers:-Two goats kneeling right side by side, BA above, Φ below.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 21 mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Philippos V., Pella mint, date: 221-179 B.C., ref: SNG Cop 1250,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
pel_eh~0.jpg
Greek, Mysia220 viewsMale head r. / Eagle on Omphalos (?)
EL - EZ = Zeleia, Troad *) / Mysia
AE 10, 0.9 g
Not listed in many referencies consulted
Compare: Weber 2275 Pl. 88 (Pella)

*) read by Mark Fox, thanks

Pekka K
bpGS1P2Macedon.jpg
GREEK, Pella, Macedonia, AR Triobol54 viewsTriobol, 1.7 gm, 12.3 mm, 187-179 BC, Sear (GC) 1438
Obv: Anepigraphic with Macedonian shield containing wheel like ornament at center composed of five crescents.
Rev: Ship's prow enscribed ΒΟΤΤΕΑΤΩΝ
Comment: Issued in the name of the Bottiaians, the original inhabitants of the region where Pella was located. Struck just prior to the Roman occupation.
ex-Berk
Massanutten
Pella_Bronze_Pan_Hoerner_Nebris_Pedum_Ziegen_Kranz_s.jpg
GRIECHISCHE BRONZEMÜNZEN Pella ?, Bronze15 viewsVs: Kopf des Pan mit kurzen Hörnern mit Nebris und Pedum n. r.
Rv. B, darüber Strich, zwei Zeigen n. rechts. Alles im Kranz
5,78 gr 20 mm
Erhaltung: Randfehler, sonst sehr schön
BMC 46 _e20
Antonivs Protti
Hadrian_Pan_Leaning_on_Syrinx.JPG
Hadrian Pan Leaning on Syrinx39 viewsHadrian AE25, 8.03g, Pella Macedonia,
OBV: Unknown legend, Laureate bust right
REV: COL IVL AV [Pella], Pan Leaning on Syrinx
Similar reverse legend as Varbanov (Engl.) 3715 (AE20) but unlisted in this size.

Unknown and Unpublished
1 commentsRomanorvm
1382_Kassandros.jpg
Kassander as regent - AE6 viewsPella or Amphipolis
317-305 BC
young head of Herakles right wearing lion's skin
lion reclining right, torch right
KAΣΣAN / ΔPOY
N
SNG München 991; SNG Alpha Bank 883-7; SNG Copenhagen 1140
3,8g
ex Naumann
Johny SYSEL
Macedon_Kassander_SNGCop_1139_gf.jpg
Kassander. As regent, 316-305 BC. AE15 of Pella3 viewsMacedon, Kassander. As regent, 316-305 BC. AE15 (3.37 gm) of Pella. Head of young Herakles r. clad in lion skin headdress. / Lion reclining r., KΑΣΣAN-ΔPOY. HP monogram to r.  VF.  SNG Cop 2 #1139; AMNG III/2 p.176 #1/#2 obv/rev. (plate XXXII #6); HGC 3.1 #995; SNG Alpha Bank 876. General and self-styled successor to Alexander III, he was only one of the less successful claimants, with a reputation for cruelty.  He had Philip III and his mother slain.Anaximander
Kassander_AR_Stater.jpg
Kingdom of Macedonia AR Tetradrachm124 viewsKassander as Regent. Pella Mint. Circa 317-315 B.C. AR Tetradrachm in the name and types of Philip II, 14.31g. Le Rider-531 (D281/R436), SNG ANS-450 (same dies). Obverse laureate head of Zeus right. Reverse ΦIΛIΠ-ΠOY nude youth, holding palm frond and reins, on horseback right; coiled serpent below, Boeotian shield below foreleg. EF, lightly toned, some die wear on obverse, die break and die shift on reverse. Attractive style.

Ex CNG.
1 commentsJason T
336_-_323_BC_ALEXANDER_III_AE_QUARTER-OBOL~0.JPG
Kingdom of Macedonia, Alexander the Great. AE Quarter-Obol (2 Chalkoi). Lifetime issue struck 336 – 323 BC at Amphipolis, Macedonia.8 viewsObverse: No legend. Head of Herakles, wearing lion skin headdress, facing right.
Reverse: AΛEΞANĐPOY. Eagle facing right, it's head turned to left, standing on a thunderbolt; mint-mark, A in right field before the eagle's breast.
Diameter: 15mm | Weight: 3.9gms | Die Axis: 6
Sear: 6743 | Weber: 2142 | Liampi: 6-8 | Price: 0159
RARE

This coin is a Type 3 (eagle type) bronze Quarter-Obol (two chalkoi). Alexander's Eagle bronzes are part of his Eagle coinage that also includes various silver denominations, including a stater, drachm, hemidrachm, diobol, and obol. Alexander's Eagle coins are much rarer than his issues of Herakles and Zeus imperial silver coins and his Herakles and weapons bronze coins.
Le Rider and Troxell stress the existence of only two principal mints in Macedonia during Alexander the Great's lifetime, those were probably Pella and Amphipolis.
*Alex
56899q00_(2).jpg
Kingdom of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm183 viewsCirca 297-281 B.C. AR Tetradrachm, Thompson 59, Müller 88 (Sestus mint), 17.146g, maximum diameter 31.2mm, die axis 0o, Mysia, Lampsacus mint. Obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon. Reverse Athena seated left on prow, Nike crowning name in extended right, transverse spear resting against right side, resting left arm on shield behind, KA monogram inner left, herm outer left. gVF. Nice style, beautiful portrait of Alexander.

Ex Otakirak Collection. Ex Stack's, Bowers and Ponterio NYINC Auction 2012, lot 194. Ex FORVM.

Lysimachos, a Macedonian of great physical strength and fortitude, rose to prominence as a σωματοφύλαξ, or “bodyguard” for Alexander the Great. When Alexander’s territories were parceled out during the settlement at Babylon in 323 BC, Lysimachos was given control of Thrace, the Chersonese, and the intervening Black Sea coast. Unfortunately, much of this territory was no longer under Macedonian control, but was claimed by various Thracian tribes. Although Lysimachos was involved to some extent in the early wars of the Diadochs, most of his early years as satrap were preoccupied with subduing the Thracian tribes, an endeavor that was largely unsuccessful. By the time he assumed the royal title in 306/5 BC, his kingdom consisted of little more than the southern portions of Thrace. While this territory included a few already active mints, such as Ainos and Byzantion, Lysimachos was forced to depend on his ally Kassander, the king of Macedon, for coinage, as the sources of bullion were under the control of his enemies. This situation changed in 302 BC, when Lysimachos raised an army at the urging of Kassander and invaded Asia Minor, territory which Antigonos I Monophthalmos controlled, and whose son, Demetrios I Poliorketes, was threatening Kassander’s southern flank in Thessaly. Lysimachos quickly captured much of the Hellespont, and he penetrated as far as Lydia. This territory was rich with both silver bullion and mint cities, including Alexandria Troas, Ephesos, Lampsakos, Magnesia, and Sardis. Lysimachos used these mints to begin striking coinage on his behalf, while at the same time, he apparently sent bullion back to Thrace, where Lysimacheia and Sestos also began to produce coinage for him. These mints initially struck coins of Alexander type for Lysimachos, but later changed to the new Lysimachos type in 297 BC. After Lysimachos and Seleukos I defeated the Antigonids at Ipsos in 301 BC, most of western Asia Minor passed to Lysimachos. He now held some of the most prosperous cities in the Aegean, and soon most of the well-established mints were striking coinage in his name. Many of these same mints were required to pay large sums of tribute in order to fund further campaigns of expansion. One such object of expansion was Macedon, the ultimate goal of all the Diodochs. Since the death of Kassander in 298 BC, it had fallen into chaos and was eventually captured by Demetrios, who was, in turn, driven out by the joint invasion of Lysimachos and Pyrrhos in 288 BC. Initially, Macedon was split between the two, with Lysimachos taking the eastern half and its mint of Amphipolis. By 285 BC, when Lysimachos also obtained the western half from Pyrrhos, Pella also began producing coinage for Lysimachos. His successes, however, were short-lived. Beginning in 284 BC with the murder of his step-sons, Lysimachos became involved in a treacherous game of political and dynastic intrigue. As a result, revolt broke out among the Asian cities under his control, and Seleukos I launched an invasion against him. At the battle of Korupedion in 281 BC, Lysimachos was killed, and his kingdom was subsumed into the Seleukid empire. Ptolemy Keraunos, however, siezed Lysimachos’ European territories after he murdered Seleukos I later that year. Edward T. Newell’s study of Lysimachos’ lifetime issues arranged them according to the territorial expansion of his kingdom. Unfortunately, Newell died before completing his study, and consequently many issues are missing from Margaret Thompson’s survey of his unfinished work. The many ‘unpublished’ coins that have appeared over the past two decades reveal how little is known about Lysimachos’ coinage. Although most catalogs list these unpublished coins as posthumous issues, this is unlikely, as most of his mint cities were taken over by other kingdoms following Lysimachos’ death. The cities that continued to issue his coins as a regular type, such as Byzantion, were mostly ones that regularly conducted trade with cities to the north of Thrace, whose economies were likely dominated by Lysimachos type coinage during his lifetime. A few cities, such as Tenedos, struck brief, sporadic issues of Lysimachos type coins long after his death, but these issues were likely struck for some specific purpose that required this type, and are not part of any regular series. At the beginning of his reign, Lysimachos continued to use Alexander’s coinage types, later modifying them by replacing Alexander’s name with his own. In 297 BC, Lysimachos introduced a new type: the obverse was a portrait of Alexander; the reverse was Athena, Lysimachos’ patron goddess. G.K Jenkins noted the power of the Alexander portrait in his commentary on the Gulbenkian Collection: “The idealized portrait of Alexander introduced on the coinage of Lysimachos in 297 BC is characterized by the horn of Ammon which appears above the ear. The allusion is to Alexander’s famous visit to the oracle of Ammon at the Siwa Oasis in 331, when the god is supposed to have greeted Alexander as ‘My son’.... The best of the Alexander heads on Lysimachos’ coinage...have a power and brilliance of effect that is irresistible. It [is speculated] that these Alexander heads may have derived from an original gem carved by Pyrgoteles, an engraver prominent among the artists of Alexander’s court....” Regardless of the inspiration for the new design, part of the remarkable attraction of this coinage is its artistic variety: each engraver created his own fresh and distinctive portrayal of the world’s greatest conqueror. (Commentary courtesy of CNG).
6 commentsJason T
SHIELD_2RES.jpg
KINGS OF MACEDON--DEMETRIOS I POLIORKETES16 views306-283 BC
AE 16 mm 4.04 g
O: Macedonian shield with Demetrios' monogram at center
R: BA-SI , Crested Macedonian helmet
Pella mint
laney
pol_shield_b.jpg
KINGS OF MACEDON--DEMETRIOS POLIORKRETES29 views306-283 BC
AE 15 mm 3.91 g
O: Macedonian shield with Demetrios' monogram at center
R: BA-SI ,Crested Macedonian helmet
Pella
laney
perseus_eagle_2.jpg
KINGS OF MACEDON--PERSEUS11 views179 - 168 BC
AE 18 mm, 5.70 g
O: Head of hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head, harpa across shoulder
R:Eagle standing half-left on thunderbolt, head right, wings open, B - A flanking above wings, Π−E flanking across lower field, star in exergue
Pella or Amphipolis mint; SNG München 1274 ff., SNG Cop 1275
laney
pella_goats_a.jpg
KINGS OF MACEDON--PHILIP V AND PERSEUS32 viewsCa. 187 BC- 168 BC
AE 16 mm 5.40 g
O: Draped bust of Pan right; at shoulder, logobolon
R: Two goats recumbent right; above, monogram/PEL; all within wreath
PELLA, MACEDON
laney
Cassander.jpg
Kings of Macedon. Alexander III ‘The Great’ (Circa 325-315 BC)22 viewsAR Tetradrachm

26 mm, 16.77 g

Late lifetime or posthumous issue struck under Antipater or Polyperchon. Pella Mint. Circa 325-315 BC

Obv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress.

Rev: Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, thunderbolt in left field, ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ to right.

Price 232
Nathan P
Price_3014.jpg
KINGS of MACEDON. Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. AR Drachm. Tarsos mint.10 views18mm, 4.24 g, 4h

Struck under Menes or Philotas, circa 327-323 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; plow in left field, Γ below throne, pellet below right arm. Price 3014; Newell, Tarsos 23. Good VF, lightly toned. Very rare, three in Pella, none in CoinArchives.
Leo
Le_Rider_320.jpg
KINGS OF MACEDON. Philip II, 359-336 BC. Stater23 viewsGold, 19 mm, 8.56 g, 11 h
Pella, struck under Philip II or Alexander III, circa 340-328.
Laureate head of Apollo to right. Rev. ΦΙΛΙΠΠOY Charioteer driving biga to right, holding reins in his left hand and goad in his right; below horses, trident right.
Le Rider 320 (D145/R244). Several nicks and small scrapes , otherwise, good very fine. From a Viennese collection, formed in the 1990s.
1 commentsLeo
Capture_00002~2.JPG
Kings of Macedonia35 viewsPhilip V - Persius
187-168 B.C.
AR Tetrobol
2.27 gm, 14 mm
Obv.: Macedonian shield; MA-KE above and below club in center
Rev.: Macedonian helmet with cheek pieces; two monograms to left, monogram and trident head to right
Pella or Amphipolis mint; Zoilos, magistrate.
Struck circa 184-179 B.C.
BMC Macedonia p. 9, 11;
SNG Ashmolean 3280
2 commentsJaimelai
Tyre_Alexander_-_Price_3250.jpg
Kings of Macedonia, Alexander III The Great, 336-323 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Tyre 330/29 BC32 viewsHead of young Herakles right in lion skin headdress, paws tied at neck.
ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, Phoenician letters ayn and kaph (a contraction of the name of ‘Ozmilk) in left field, regnal year 20 below.

Price 3250 (Ake); Newell Ake Series IV, 12 (plate VI, 11 same obverse die XIII).
The first dated Alexander from the mint at Tyre struck 330/329 BC.

(25 mm, 17.10 g, 9h).
Harlan J. Berk 191, 2 July 2014, 46 (incorrectly attributed to Pella).

This is the first dated Alexander from the mint at Tyre. The year 20 date relates to the reign of ‘Ozmilk which has conclusively been determined to be the year 330/29 based on the extensive study of the precursor dated coinage of Tyre by Elayi and Elayi (2009).
The crude, rough hammered fabric and often crudely engraved reverse dies point to a hurried issue. The coinage may have been struck to fund the reconstruction of Tyre following the siege of the city in the first half of 332 BC. Unusual is the attempt to convey fleshy lines on the neck of Herakles; a less than successful artistic endeavor that was not repeated on subsequent dies.
1 commentsn.igma
MACEDON_ALEX_III_HALF_UNIT_334BC.jpg
MACEDON - Alexander III24 viewsMACEDON - Alexander III "The Great" - 336-323 B.C.E. - AE half-unit. Alexander III AE Anonymous Half-Unit. Struck in Pella or Amphipolis 334 B.C. Macedonian shield; around, five double crescents with five pellets between each; in centre, thunderbolt / B - A on either side of Crested Macedonian helmet. 15mm. SNG Cop 1120.dpaul7
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Macedon, Pella26 views158-149 BC
Pella

O: Head of Pan right
R: Armed figure of Athena Alkidamos fighting right; Monograms left and right
20mm; 8.03g
Lindgren 1098

Cop. SNG 1206
arizonarobin
DSC02508.JPG
Macedon, Pella. AE 18. Bronze. 187-31BC37 viewsLaur. hd. of Poseidon r.
Rev. P E L Cow standing r., monograms below and to right. nice green patina.
Moushmov 6442.1. SNG Cop 259.
CGPCGP
4150451.jpg
MACEDON, Uncertain. Tiberius3 viewsMACEDON, Uncertain. Tiberius. AD 14-37. Æ (19mm, 5.74 g, 12h). Pella or Dium mint; C. Baebius and L. Rusticelius Basterna, duoviri. Female head right, hair knotted behind neck / C BAEBIVS • P • F/L RVSTICELIVS/BASTERNA/II VIR QVINQ in four lines. RPC I 1538.4 (this coin). VF, green patina. Rare.ecoli
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MACEDON. Pella. Ae (Circa 187-168 BC).18 viewsObv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: Nike? driving biga right, corn ear below horse, star above.
SNG ANS 571.
Weight: 8.6 g.
Diameter: 20 mm.
ancientone
Macedon__Philip_II_AR_Tetradrachm.jpg
Macedon. Philip II AR Tetradrachm129 viewsKingdom of Macedon. Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 323-317 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Youth on horseback right, holding reins and long palm branch; coiled serpent below, Boeotian shield to right, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ around. 14.38g, 25mm. Mint State. 3 commentsLeo
PELLA_AE18_No1.jpg
MACEDONIA - Pella18 viewsMACEDONIA - Pella, AE 18mm. Circa 187-31 BC. Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena Parthenos right Rev.: PEL-LHS, bull grazing right. References: SNGCop 266ff. Moushmov 6453.dpaul7
1246_Macedonia_Perseus.jpg
Macedonia - AE9 viewsPella or Amphipolis
179-168 BC
head of Perseus (hero) right wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head; harpa right
eagle facing, head right; B_A / (ΠEP) / A (ΓH)
SNG Alpha Bank 1135-42 var.
Johny SYSEL
Macedon_nymph_prow.jpg
Macedonia - AR Tetrobol7 viewsPella or Amphipolis
c. 185-168 BC
head of Maenad right wreathed with vine leaves and grapes, wearing necklace and earrings
stern of galley right, star above
MAKE / ΔONΩN
M?
SGCV I 1384, SNG Cop 1292
Johny SYSEL
PELLA_AE18_No2.jpg
MACEDONIA - Pella14 viewsMACEDONIA - Pella, AE 18mm. Circa 187-31 BC. Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena Parthenos right Rev.: PEL-LHS, bull grazing right. References: SNGCop 266ff. Moushmov 6453.dpaul7
Macedon_x_Pella.jpg
Macedonia / Pella - AE 235 viewsoverstrike

Pella
c. 168-31 BC
helmeted head of Roma or hero Perseus right
inscription in oak wreath
ΠΕΛΛΗΣ
(ΠΩEA)? / (ΠAP)
SNG ANS 581; SNG Copenhagen 261
7,46g

host coin:

Macedonia
187-168 BC
diademed head of Poseidon right
inscription above and below club, all in oak wreath
MAKE / ΔONΩN
? / (HP)?
Laffaille323 var. BMC.52 Cop.1296
Johny SYSEL
Capture~1.PNG
Macedonia Pella8 viewsMacedonia Pella, 158-149 B.C.

Obverse.Helmeted head of Athena Parthenos right

Reverse.?E?-?HS, bull grazing right.

18mm (8.34 grams)
Macedonian Warrior
Capture~3.PNG
Macedonia Pella13 viewsMacedonia Pella 196-168 B.C.

Obverse.Head of Zeus right, wearing oak-wreath.

Reverse. ???O? above and below winged thunderbolt; BOT monogram beneath
Macedonian Warrior
279_P_Macedonia_BMC_47.jpg
MACEDONIA Pella? AE 23 Herakles Horse8 viewsReference.
BMC Macedonia 47 (p.13)

Obv.
Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin.

Rev. MA-KE ΔONΩN
Naked youth on horse right, placing wreath on horse head to right,in front monogram.

7.8 gr.
23 mm.
okidoki
11233.jpg
Macedonia under Roman rule, Aesillas, Quästor, Tetradrachm.90 viewsMacedonia under Roman rule, Pella (or a different Bottiaean mint), Aesillas, Quästor, 70 BC.,
Tetradrachm (28-29 mm / 16,49 g),
Obv.: M[AKEΔONΩN] , under head of Alexander the Great with horn of ram / Ammon, hair falling down neck, Θ behind.
Rev.: AESILLAS / Q , club between money-chest and Quaestaor’s chair, all within laurel wreath.
Bauslaugh Group VI (O12A / R ?) ; SNG Lockett 1543 ; SNG Fitzwilliam 2345 ; BMC 81 .
obverse die match: CNG, Mail Bid Sale 61, Lot number: 498

my ancient coin database
Arminius
MacedoniaAutonomous2.jpg
Macedonia, Bottiaia, Pella. Autonomous AE20. 196-168 BC.67 viewsObv: Head of Zeus right.
Rev: MA-KE DON-WN above & below winged thunderbolt, line over B and star below.
Autonomous issue minted during time of Philip V & Perseus, at Pella, 196-168 BC.
BMC 50.
1 commentsancientone
Philip_V_,_Macedonia,_Kings,_(221-179_B_C_),_SNG_Cop_1250,_AE-21_Q-001_h_21mm_ga-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 032 Philip V., (221-179 B.C.), SNG Cop 1250, AE-21, Pella mint, Two goats kneeling right, #1146 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 032 Philip V., (221-179 B.C.), SNG Cop 1250, AE-21, Pella mint, Two goats kneeling right, #1
avers: Head of young Herakles right, clad in lion's skin.
reverse: Two goats kneeling right side by side, BA above, Φ below.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21 mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Philip V., Pella mint, date: 221-179 B.C., ref: SNG Cop 1250,
Q-001
quadrans
Philip_V_,_Macedonia,_Kings,_(221-179_B_C_),_SNG_Cop_1250,_AE-21_Q-002_h_21mm_ga-s.jpg
Macedonia, Kings, 032 Philip V., (221-179 B.C.), SNG Cop 1250, AE-21, Pella mint, Two goats kneeling right, #2141 viewsMacedonia, Kings, 032 Philip V., (221-179 B.C.), SNG Cop 1250, AE-21, Pella mint, Two goats kneeling right, #2
avers: Head of young Herakles right, clad in lion's skin.
reverse: Two goats kneeling right side by side, BA above, Φ below.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21 mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Macedonia, Kings, Philip V., Pella mint, date: 221-179 B.C., ref: SNG Cop 1250,
Q-002
quadrans
pella_ox_2.jpg
MACEDONIA, PELLA35 views187 BC - 31 BC
AE 19 mm 8.39 g
O: HEAD OF ATHENA RIGHT
R: OX GRAZING RIGHT, PEL ABOVE, LHS BELOW
ANS 606 or sim.
laney
Macedonian_Kingdom_15.PNG
Macedonia, Pella4 viewsMacedonia, Pella 187-31 BC.

Obverse.Veiled facing head of Demeter

Reverse. cow grazing right feeding on ear of grain; monograms above ?EN,Under cow a C

17mm
Macedonian Warrior
EDF76594-15F3-4607-A08D-29905DD10594.jpeg
Macedonia, Pella or Dion; Tiberius9 viewsTiberius (14-37), Bronze, Macedonia: Pella or Dion, c. AD 14-37; AE; TI CAESAR - AVG F AVGVSTVS, head of Tiberius r., Rv. C BAEBIO P F / L RVSTICELIO / BASTERNA IIVIR QVINQ D D. RPC 1536.ecoli
Pella-Macedonia__AE-_Q-001_h_mm_ga-s.jpg
Macedonia, Pella, (168-158 B.C.), AE-19, SNG Cop 266, ΠΕΛΛ-ΗΣ, Bull grazing right, #1 65 viewsMacedonia, Pella, (168-158 B.C.), AE-19, SNG Cop 266, ΠΕΛΛE/N/-ΗΣ, Bull grazing right, #1
Avers:- Helmeted head of Athena right,
Revers: - ΠΕΛΛE above and N/ -ΗΣ below, bull grazing right.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 19-21mm, weight: 6,16g, axes: 0h,
mint: Macedonia, Pella, date: 168-158 B.C., ref: SNG Cop 266, Moushmov 6453; BMC 76.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Pella-Macedonia__AE-_Q-002_h_mm_g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Pella, (168-158 B.C.), AE-19, SNG Cop 266, ΠΕΛΛ-ΗΣ, Bull grazing right, #269 viewsMacedonia, Pella, (168-158 B.C.), AE-19, SNG Cop 266, ΠΕΛΛ-ΗΣ, Bull grazing right, #2
Avers:- Helmeted head of Athena right,
Revers: - ΠΕΛΛ above and -ΗΣ below, bull grazing right.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 19 mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Macedonia, Pella, date: 168-158 B.C., ref: SNG Cop 266, Moushmov 6453; BMC 76.,
Q-002
quadrans
Macedonia,_Pella,_(187-31_B_C_),_AE-16,_SNG_Cop_266,_Helmeted_head_of_Athena_r_,__#928;E_#923;__#923;H_#931;,_Bull_grazing_r_,_Mushm_6453,_Q-001,_0h,_15,5-17,5mm,_6,25g-s.jpg
Macedonia, Pella, (187-31 B.C.), AE-16, SNG Cop 266, ΠΕΛ/ΛΗΣ, Bull grazing right, #162 viewsMacedonia, Pella, (187-31 B.C.), AE-16, SNG Cop 266, ΠΕΛ/ΛΗΣ, Bull grazing right, #1
Avers: Helmeted head of Athena Parthenos right.
Reverse: ΠΕΛ above and ΛΗΣ below, bull grazing right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 15,5-17,5mm, weight: 6,25g, axes: 0h,
mint: Macedonia, Pella, date: 187-31 B.C., ref: SNG Cop 266, Moushmov 6453; BMC 76.,
Q-001
quadrans
072p_Gordianus-III__(238-244_A_D_),_Macedonia,_Pella,_AE-26,_Varbanov_3748,_Mouchmov_6489,_Q-001,_7h,_26mm,_11,9g-s~0.jpg
Macedonia, Pella, 072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), Varbanov 3748, Pella, AE-26, COL IVL A VAG PELLA, Pella enthroned left, 94 viewsMacedonia, Pella, 072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), Varbanov 3748, Pella, AE-26, COL IVL A VAG PELLA, Pella enthroned left,
avers: IMP C M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: COL IVL A VAG PELLA, Pella enthroned left, right hand raised to her shoulder.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 26,0mm, weight: 11,9,60g, axis: 7h,
mint: Macedonia, Pella, date: 238-244 A.D., ref: Varbanov 3748, Mouchmov 6489,
Q-001
quadrans
1001AB.jpg
MACEDONIA, PELLA, 275-270 BC81 viewsTetradrachm, 28mm, 17.08g

In The Name of Alexander the Great
O. Hd of young Herakles r.
R. Zeus enthroned left

Price 621

Ex Washington Numismatic Gallery
4 commentsAZRobbo
Gordianus_III_8.jpg
Macedonia, Pella, Gordianus III31 viewsGordianus III
Macedonia, Pella
AE 24
Obv.: IMP C M ANT * GORDIANVS, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust r.
Rev.: COL IVL A - VG – PELLA, Pan seated left on rock, right arm over head and holding pedum in left; syrinx (pan flute) in left field.
AE, 24.4 mm, 9.52 g
Ref.: SNG Copenhagen 286, Varbanov 3758
Ex Gitbud&Naumann
2 commentsshanxi
Gordianus_III_17.jpg
Macedonia, Pella, Gordianus III, Pan7 viewsGordianus III
Macedonia, Pella
Æ 23
Obv.: IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev.: COL IVL AVG PELLA, Pan, naked, seated left on rock, right hand over his head, left arm resting on a syrinx
Æ, 23mm, 6.29g
Ref.: Varbanov 3755 var.; Sear GIC 3640 var.; BMC 43 var.
shanxi
GRK_Macedonia_Pella.JPG
Macedonia, Pella.15 viewsSear --; SNG ANS 579 - 580 var. (monograms); SNG Cop 259 - 260 var. (same)

AE 18 mm, 187-31 B.C. B.C.

Obv: Bearded head of Poseidon facing right.

Rev: Bull walking right, ΠΕΛ-ΛHΣ above and below, monograms beneath and to right of bull.
Stkp
PellaMamaea.JPG
Macedonia, Pella. Julia Mamaea AE26. Pan seated in grotto.35 viewsObv: IVLIA MA [MAEA AVG], Julia Mamaea draped bust r.
Rev: [.....]PELLA, Pan seated in grotto, r. arm over head.
11.1g.
ancientone
GRK_Macedonia_Pella_Sear_1446.JPG
Macedonia. Pella.10 viewsSear 1446, cf. SNG Cop 266 ff. (various monograms); SNG ANS 598-617 (various monograms), BMC Macedonia p. 91,
Moushmov 6453 (different monogram)

AE unit, 6.63 g., 18.80 mm. max., 0°

Struck under Roman rule, ca. 187-31 B.C. (per Forum Ancient Coin listings) or 187-168/7 BC. (per CNG Coin listings) or 158-149 B.C. and later (per Sear).

Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena facing right.

Rev.: Cow grazing right, [Π]EΛ / ΛHΣ above and below, K below belly.

In 187 B.C. (a frequently-used start date for this coinage) the Roman-Seleucid War ended with the signing of the Treaty of Apamea. As a result, the Roman Republic gained hegemony over Greece. In 168 B.C. (one of the end dates used for this coinage) the Third Macedonian War ended at the Battle of Pydna, following which King Perseus was taken captive by the Romans and the kingdom was divided into four client states. In 149 B.C. (a date used in Sear), Andriscos the last king of Macedonia, ascended to the throne, only to be overthrown in the Fourth Macedonian War in 148 B.C., when Macedonia formally became a Roman Province.
Stkp
Macedonia_AR_Stater_(obverse).jpg
Macedonia. Alexander III AR Tetradrachm (obverse)44 viewsCirca 325-315 B.C. 17.23g. Pella Mint. Obverse. Bust of Alexander III as Herakles right, wearing lion skin headress. Price-211. Ex Berk. Mint State. Jason T
PellaAE.JPG
MACEDONIA: Pella12 viewsMacedon, Pella, under Gaius Publius, AE 20, 6.76g, ca. 168-167 B.C. Obv: Deity facing right in helm. Rev: Cow grazing, ΤΑΜΡΟΥ. Dark green patina, aVF. SNG 1169, Morkholm 600.Molinari
GRK_Macedonia_Alexander_II_Sear_6742.JPG
Macedonian Kingdom18 viewsSear 6742, Price 288-376

AE 17, under or in the name of Alexander III, the Great (336-323 B.C.) at either Pella or Amphipolis, after 328 B.C.

Obv: Head of Hercules facing right, wearing Nemian lion’s skin headdress.

Rev: Quiver and bow above B[A] (for ΒΑΣΣΙΛΕ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ), club [and symbol] below.
Stkp
GRK_Macedonia_Phillip_II.JPG
Macedonian Kingdom26 viewscf. Sear 6699, cf. SNG ANS 966 (but without visible H monogram behind head)

AE 17, struck under or in the name of Philip II (359-336 B.C.) at either Pella or Amphipolis, ca. 359-310 or 294 B.C.

Obv: Head of Apollo facing left, hair bound with taenia.

Rev: Naked youth on horse prancing right, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ above horse, vertical thunderbolt below.
Stkp
GRK_Macedonia_Antigonas_Gonatas_Sear_6786.JPG
Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos II Gonatas (277/6-239 B.C.)34 viewsSear 6786, SNG Alpha Bank 1020, SNG Munich 1092-1094.

AE 19, 6.5 gr., struck circa 271/0-239 B.C. at either Pella or Amphipolis mint.

Obv: Helmeted head of Athena facing right wearing crested Corinthian helmet.

Rev: Pan advancing right, erecting trophy, B-A in upper fields, Macedonian helmet in lower left field, lagobolon [hunter's stick for striking hares] in lower right field, ANTI monogram between legs.

See Portolos Collection No. 1176 (same reverse) and Alpha Bank Collection Nos. 8114-8115 for good depictions of a lagobolon in the reverse lower right field.
Stkp
grk1.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Perseus, (179 - 168 B.C.)134 viewsÆ21
Pella or Amphipolis mint
O: Head of hero Perseus right, wearing winged helmet peaked with griffin head, harpa right.
R: eEagle standing half-left on thunderbolt, wings open, head right, B - A above wings flanking head, ΓΗ monogram and ΕΡ monogram in ex
6.9g
21mm
SNG Cop 1277, SNG München 1208, SNG Evelpidis 1465
1 commentsMat
PhilipIIMacedonLifetimeTet.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C., Lifetime Issue131 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Le Rider 233 (D130/R188); SNG ANS 385 ff., VF, Pella, 14.163g, 25.4mm, 225o, 342 - 336 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse "FILIPPOU", naked youth on horse pacing right on horseback holding palm, thunderbolt below; ex CNG 214, 82; very high relief sculptural portrait, nice style, lifetime issue. Ex FORVM.

Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom, but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great. He personally selected the design of his coins.

Philip II of Macedon (382 BC–336 BC; in Greek Φίλιππος = φίλος (friend) + ίππος (horse), transliterated Philippos) was the King of Macedon from 359 BC until his assassination. He was the father of Alexander the Great, Phillip III Arrhidaeus, and possibly Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty.

Born in Pella, Philip was the youngest son of King Amyntas III and Eurydice. In his youth, (ca. 368 BC–365 BC) Philip was a hostage in Thebes, which was the leading city of Greece during the Theban hegemony. While a captive there, Philip received a military and diplomatic education from Epaminondas, was involved in a pederastic relationship with Pelopidas and lived with Pammenes, who was an enthusiastic advocate of the Sacred Band of Thebes. In 364 BC, Philip returned to Macedonia. The deaths of Philip's elder brothers, King Alexander II and Perdiccas III, allowed him to take the throne in 359 BC. Originally appointed regent for his infant nephew Amyntas IV, who was the son of Perdiccas III, Philip managed to take the kingdom for himself that same year.

Philip's military skills and expansionist vision of Macedonian greatness brought him early success. The hill tribes were broken by a single battle in 358 BC, and Philip established his authority inland as far as Lake Ohrid. He used the Social War as an opportunity for expansion. In 357 BC, he took the Athenian colony of Amphipolis, which commanded the gold mines of Mount Pangaion. That same year Philip married the Epirote princess Olympias, who was the daughter of the king of the Molossians. In 356 BC, Philip conquered the town of Crenides and changed its name to Philippi. Philip also attacked Abdera and Maronea, on the Thracian sea-board. Also in 356 Alexander was born and his race horse won in the Olympics in He took Methone in 354 BC, a town which had belonged to Athens. During the siege of Methone, Philip lost an eye.

Not until his armies were opposed by Athens at Thermopylae in 352 BC did Philip face any serious resistance. Philip did not attempt to advance into central Greece because the Athenians had occupied Thermopylae. Also in 352 BC, the Macedonian army won a complete victory over the Phocians at the Battle of Crocus Field. This battle made Philip tagus of Thessaly, and he claimed as his own Magnesia, with the important harbour of Pagasae.
Hostilities with Athens did not yet take place, but Athens was threatened by the Macedonian party which Philip's gold created in Euboea. From 352 to 346 BC, Philip did not again come south. He was active in completing the subjugation of the Balkan hill-country to the west and north, and in reducing the Greek cities of the coast as far as the Hebrus (Maritza). For the chief of these coastal cities, Olynthus, Philip continued to profess friendship until its neighboring cities were in his hands.

In 349 BC, Philip started the siege of Olynthus. Olynthus at first allied itself with Philip, but later shifted its allegiance to Athens. The Athenians did nothing to help Olynthus. Philip finally took Olynthus in 348 BC and razed the city to the ground. In 346 BC, he intervened effectively in the war between Thebes and the Phocians, but his wars with Athens continued intermittently.

Macedonia and the regions adjoining it having now been securely consolidated, Philip celebrated his Olympic games at Dium. In 347 BC, Philip advanced to the conquest of the eastern districts about the Hebrus, and compelled the submission of the Thracian prince Cersobleptes. Meanwhile, Athens had made overtures for peace, and when Philip, in 346 BC, again moved south, peace was sworn in Thessaly. With key Greek city-states in submission, Philip turned to Sparta; he sent them a message, "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city." Their reply was "If." Philip and Alexander would both leave them alone. Later, the Macedonian arms were carried across Epirus to the Adriatic Sea. In 342 BC, Philip led a great military expedition north against the Scythians, conquering the Thracian fortified settlement Eumolpia to give it his name, Philippoupolis (modern Plovdiv).

In 340 BC, Philip started the siege of Perinthus. Philip began another siege in 339 BC of the city of Byzantium. After unsuccessful sieges of both cities, Philip's influence all over Greece was compromised. However, Philip successfully reasserted his authority in the Aegean by defeating an alliance of Thebans and Athenians at the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC. He erected a memorial of a marble lion to the Sacred Band of Thebes for their bravery that still stands today. Philip created and led the League of Corinth in 337 BC. Members of the League agreed never to wage war against each other, unless it was to suppress revolution. Philip was elected as leader (hegemon) of the army of invasion against the Persian Empire. In 336 BC, when the invasion of Persia was in its very early stage, Philip was assassinated, and was succeeded on the throne of Macedon by his son Alexander the Great.

Philip’s Assassination

The murder happened in October of 336 BC, at Aegae, the ancient capital of the kingdom of Macedon. The court had gathered there for the celebration of the marriage between Alexander of Epirus and Philip's daughter. While the king was entering unprotected into the town's theatre (highlighting his approachability to the Greek diplomats present), he was killed by Pausanias of Orestis, one of Philip's seven bodyguards. The assassin immediately tried to escape and reach his associates who were waiting for him with horses at the entrance of Aegae. He was pursued by three of Philip's bodyguards and died by their hands.
The reasons for Pausanias' assassination of Phillip are difficult to fully expound, since there was controversy already among ancient historians. The only contemporary account in our possession is that of Aristotle, who states rather tersely that Philip was killed because Pausanias had been offended by the followers of Attalus, the king's father-in-law.

Whatever else that may be written about Philip II it must be recognized that he was responsible for making Macedon the ascendant Greek power. He reorganized the Macedonian army. It was this army that Alexander the Great inherited. Phillip II trained some of Alexander’s best generals: Antigonus Cyclops, Antipater, Nearchus, Parmenion, and Perdiccas.

According to the Greek historian Theopompus of Chios, Europe had never seen a man like king Philip of Macedonia, and he called his history of the mid-fourth century BCE the Philippic History. Theopompus had a point. Not even his better known son Alexander has done so much to change the course of Greek history. Philip reorganized his kingdom, gave it access to the sea, expanded its power so that it could defeat the Achaemenid Empire, and subdued the Greek city-states, which never regained their independence again. To achieve this, he modernized the Macedonian economy, improved the army, and concluded several marital alliances. The result was a superpower with one weakness: it was as strong as its king. When Philip's son Alexander died, the institutions were too weak, and Macedonia never recovered.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_II_of_Macedon
http://www.livius.org/phi-php/philip/philip_ii.htm
Ed. by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
LarryW2341.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359-336 BC29 viewsAV stater, 18mm, 8.57g, gVF
Struck 323-315 BC at Pella
Laureate head of Apollo right, hair short / Galloping biga driven right by charioteer holding goad; beneath, bee and Λ; ΦIΛIΠΠOY in exg
Sear 6663v; SNG ANS 8, 196; Le Rider 598a (D251/R434)
Private sale
2 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
phillip_pan3.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Phillip II, 359 - 336 B.C. Pella mint?115 viewsAE unit; SNG ANS 8-939. Weight 6.37 gr., max diameter 17.2 mm; Pella mint? (per Dr. Thomas Gibson) Obv. Apollo facing right, wearing taenia; Rev. Φ Ι Λ Ι Π Π O Υ above; boy riding horse prancing left; with N below. Thin black patina. Extra fine style!

Ex. Timeline Originals

This coin is posted as an example of the type on Wildwinds.
6 commentsSteve E
phillip_pan5.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Phillip II, 359 - 336 B.C. Pella mint?83 viewsAE unit; SNG ANS 8-923, Weight 6.71 gr., max diameter 17.8 mm; Pella mint? (per Dr. Thomas Gibson) Obv. Apollo facing right, wearing taenia; Rev. Φ Ι Λ Ι Π Π O Υ above; boy riding horse prancing right, HP monogram below. Beautiful turquoise patina!

Ex. Forvm Ancient Coins
3 commentsSteve E
phil_green_pan.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Phillip II, 359 - 336 B.C. Pella mint?91 viewsAE unit; SNG ANS 8-912 (A on obv. not visible or described on pictured coin), Hersh 64 (online) same dies as lot 115. Weight 6.4 gr., max diameter 19.25 mm; Pella mint? (per Dr. Thomas Gibson) Obv. Apollo facing right, wearing taenia, A left; Rev. Φ Ι Λ Ι Π Π O Υ above; boy riding horse prancing right, Δ below. Beautiful rich green patina! (with some unfortunate loss along one edge), some earthen encrustation2 commentsSteve E
GRK_Macedonian_Kingdom_Amyntas_Sear_1512.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Amyntas III (389-383 & 381-369 B.C.)12 viewsSear 1512, Westermark, Remarks Type 1; AMNG 7; SNG ANS 100-109; SNG Alpha Bank 214-230, BMC 17 ff.

AE tetrachalkon, 3.57 g., 16.15 mm. max., 270°

Struck ca. 381-369 B.C. at the Aigai or Pella mint.

Obv.: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.

Rev.: Eagle standing right, devouring serpent, AMYNTA above.

Amyntas was the father of Philip II and grandfather of Alexander the Great. He is considered to be the founder of the unified Macedonian state.
Stkp
GRK_Macedonian_Kingdom_SGCV__6774_Demetrios.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Demetrios I Poliorketes (306-283 B.C.)5 viewsSGCV 6774, SNG Cop 1224, Newell 129 ff., Alpha Bank 962 ff.

AE unit, Pella mint; 4.31 g., 16.20 mm. max, 270°.

Obv.: Macedonian shield with monogram of Demetrios in central boss.

Rev.: Macedonian crested helmet; BA-ΣI below, control mark to right.
Stkp
GRK_Macedonian_Kingdom,_Kassander_Sear_6755.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Kassander (319-297 B.C.)14 viewsSear 6755, SNG Alpha Bank 897 (no monogram to outer left) or 895-896 var. (AE monogram to outer left)

AE unit; struck 305-298 B.C. at the Pella or Amphipolis mint, 6.33 g., 18.24 mm. max, 180°

Obv.: Laureate head of Apollo right.

Rev.: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right of tripod lebes (cauldron in a three legged stand used for religious ritual) with lion's paw feet, palm frond on frame above, ΚΑΣΣΑΝΔΡΟΥ to left; possible uncertain monogram (if so, off flan) to outer left, kerykeion/caduceus to outer right.

The son of Antipater, who was the Regent of Macedon appointed by Alexander III, the Great, Kassander seized power upon his father's death in 319 B.C. He was notorious for his cruelty and in 311 B.C. he executed Alexander's widow, Roxana, and her son Alexander IV, who was to be king when he came of age. In 305 B.C., he declared himself king of Macedonia.
Stkp
SNG_ANS-47.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom: Amyntas III (393-370/69 BCE) Æ Unit, Aigai or Pella (Westermark, Remarks, type 2; SNG ANS 47-8; SNG Alpha Bank 231-5)11 viewsObv: Bearded head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Rev: AMYN-T-A; Forepart of boar right; club above
Quant.Geek
SNG_ANS-598.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom: Anonymous (ca. 187-31 BCE) Æ Unit, Pella (SNG ANS 598-609)16 viewsObv: Helmeted head of Athena right
Rev: ΠEΛ-ΛHΣ; Bull grazing right; below, monogram

Quant.Geek
Price-564.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom: Antigonos II Gonatas (276-239 BCE) AR Tetradrachm, Pella (Price 564)16 viewsObv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress
Rev: AΛEΞANΔPOY; Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, torch below throne
Quant.Geek
SNG_Alpha_Bank-876.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom: Kassander (316-297 BCE) Æ Unit, Pella or Amphipolis (SNG Alpha Bank 876)15 viewsObv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress
Rev: ΚΑΣΣΑΝ-ΔΡΟΥ; Lion reclining right; in right field, HP monogram
Quant.Geek
SNG_Alpha_Bank-917.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom: Kassander (316-297 BCE) Æ Unit, Pella or Amphipolis (SNG Alpha Bank 917)17 viewsObv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress
Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΚΑΣΣΑΝ-ΔΡΟΥ; Youth on horseback right, extending arm in salute; above, T; before, star; below, monogram

Quant.Geek
HGC_3-1096.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom: Perseus (179-168 BCE) Æ Unit, Pella or Amphipolis (. AMNG III/2, 9; HGC 3, 1096; SNG München 1210)13 viewsObv: Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin
Rev: Horseman riding right; ΠEP monogram to right, ZΩ monogram and ΔI monogram below

Quant.Geek
HGC_3-110.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom: Perseus (179-168 BCE) Æ Unit, Pella or Amphipolis (AMNG III/2, 12; HGC 3, 110)12 viewsObv: Macedonian shield, boss decorated with whorl
Rev: Harpa right; ΠEP monogram and star below
Dim: 16mm, 2.21 g
Quant.Geek
SNG_Alpha_Bank-1116.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom: Philip V (221-179 BCE) AR Hemidrachm, Pella or Amphipolis (Mamroth, Bronzemünzen 25a; SNG Alpha Bank 1116)10 viewsObv: Head of Heracles right, with thick beard and mustache, wearing lion skin headdress, paws tied before neck
Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ; horizontal harpa; ΔI monogram above, all within oak wreath
Dim: 22mm, 5.97 gm, 8h
Quant.Geek
Moushmov_6490_238-244_Gordianus_III.jpg
Macedonia_Pella_Gordianus_III_Moushmov 64906 viewsGordianus III.
AE, Macedonia, Edessa
Struck: 238-244 / 23-25 mm / 9,19 g

Av: IMP C M ANT GORDIANVS AVG
Radiate, cuirassed and draped bust right seen from behind

Rv: COL IVL A-VG - PELLA
Pan seated left on rock, right arm over head and holding crook in left, leaning on syrinx

Reference: Moushmov 6490
Andicz
Varbanov_3754_238-244_Gordianus_III.jpg
Macedonia_Pella_Gordianus_III_Varbanov 37547 viewsGordianus III.
AE, Macedonia, Edessa
Struck: 238-244 / 24-24,5 mm / 7,63 g

Av: IMP C M ANT GORDIANVS AVG
Laureate, cuirassed and draped bust right seen from behind

Rv: COL IVL A-VG - PELLA
Pan seated left on rock, right arm over head and holding crook in left, leaning on syrinx

Reference: Varbanov 3754
Andicz
Maximinus_I_Pella_City_Goddess~0.JPG
Maximinus I Pella City Goddess56 viewsMaximinus I, Pella Macedonia, 235 - 238 AD, 8.02g, 23mm, Varbanov III (Engl.) 3742, Moushmov 6484 plate XLV - 8,
OBV: IMP CC IVL VER MAXIMINVS, Laureate, draped cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
REV: COL IVL A-VG PELLA, City goddess seated left

Meaning of legend: IMP Caesar Caius VERus MAXIMINVS (IMP C C IVL VER MAXIMINUS)
Meaning of legend: Colony IVLia AVGusta PELLA (COL IVL AVG PELLA)

RARE
1 commentsRomanorvm
669_Pella.jpg
Pella - AE 228 views187-31 BC
head of Pan right, pedum (shepherd's crook) at his shoulder
Athena Alkidemos holding spear and shield advancing right
ΠΕΛ / ΛΗΣ
(ΠΩPA) / (?)
BMC #5; Sear #1445; Moushmov #6449; SNG ANS 577
8,07g
Johny SYSEL
Pella_2.jpg
Pella - AE 1621 views187-168/167 BC
laureated head of Apollo right
lyre
ΠΕΛΛΗΣ
Moushmov Number 6447, (SNG ANS 587)
5,74g 16-15 mm
Johny SYSEL
35_Pella.jpg
Pella - AE 175 views187-168/167 BC
laureated head of Apollo right
lyre
ΠΕΛΛΗΣ / (?) AKΦ
BMC 11; SNG ANS 587
3,61g 18-16 mm
Johny SYSEL
Pella,_Athena___cow,_AE20.JPG
Pella cow30 viewsMacedonia, Pella, c. 187 - 31 B.C. 20mm, 6.7g. Obverse: helmeted head of Athena right. Reverse: reverse PELLHS, cow grazing right, monograms. Moushmov 6453. ex areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
pjimage_(6)_(1).jpg
Pella Macedonia Athena Bull Grazing9 viewsJustin L
pella.jpg
Pella, Æ 18, Herakles/ ΠΕΛ, Ox, (Λ)ΗΣ in exergue21 viewsMacedonia, Pella, Æ 18. 5.5g. Obv. Head of Herakles right. Rev. ΠΕΛ, Ox standing right, monogram below and before, (Λ)ΗΣ in exergue.Podiceps
pella_apollo_kithara.jpg
Pella, Æ, Apollo/ Kithara9 viewsMacedonia, Pella, 187-168/7 B.C. AE. 5,3g, 15,5mm. Obv: Head of Apollo, right. Rev: Kithara; monograms to right. Touratsoglou, Macedonia 11; SNG ANS 587. Podiceps
Pella~0.JPG
Pella, Macedon30 views187-131 BC
AE 18 (18mm, 6.24g)
O: Veiled head of Demeter facing.
R: Cow grazing right, monograms above and below; ΠEΛΛΗΣ in ex.
SNG ANS 572; SNG Cop 257; BMC Macedonia 92, 29
ex Gitbud & Naumann
Enodia
Pella.JPG
Pella, Macedon10 views187-131 BC
AE 18 (18mm, 6.24g)
O: Veiled head of Demeter facing.
R: Cow grazing right, monograms above and below; ΠEΛΛΗΣ in ex.
SNG ANS 572; SNG Cop 257; BMC Macedonia 92, 29
ex Gitbud & Naumann
Enodia
4225_4226.jpg
Pella, Macedon, AE20, ΠΕΛ-ΛΗΣ9 viewsAE20
Greek Provincial
Pella, Macedon
Issued: 187 - 131BC
20.0mm 9.57gr
O: NO LEGEND; Helmeted head of Athena Parthenos, right.
R: ΠΕΛ-ΛΗΣ; Bull grazing, right.
Moushmov 6453; SNG Cop 266ff, Ref. Sear, GCV V-I, p. 147, 1443.
paydav 271776980884
2/22/15 4/30/17
Nicholas Z
438813.JPG
Pella, Macedonia23 views158-149 B.C.
Bronze AE21
8.42 gm, 21 mm
Obv.: Helmeted and draped bust of Athena right
Rev.: Nike driving biga right; star above, grain ear below; ΠΕΛΛHΣ in ex.
Moushmov 6435; Sear 1444; BMC Macedonia p. 89, 1-2

another view
Jaimelai
438803.JPG
Pella, Macedonia29 views158-149 B.C.
Bronze AE21
8.42 gm, 21 mm
Obv.: Helmeted and draped bust of Athena right
Rev.: Nike driving biga right; star above, grain ear below; ΠΕΛΛHΣ in ex.
Moushmov 6435; Sear 1444; BMC Macedonia p. 89, 1-2
Jaimelai
horsessssssssss_023.JPG
PELLA. Æ-22, 2nd century BC. VF.23 viewsPELLA. �-22, 2nd century BC. (7.65 g, 22 mm).
Head of Athena / Nike driving biga right.
Beautiful green patina.
SNG Cop. 256.
Antonio Protti
210.jpg
pella001a4 viewsElagabalus
Pella, Macedonia

Obv: IMP C M AVR ANTONINVS, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: [COL IVL] AVS PЄLLA, Pan, naked, seated left on rock, right hand raised to head.
25 mm, 10.30 gms

Varbanov 3732; Moushmov 6476
Charles M
269.jpg
pella001a_24 viewsElagabalus
Pella, Macedonia

Obv: [IMP C M] AVR ANTON[INVS], laureate draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: COL VI AVS PЄLLA, Pan, naked, seated left on rock, right hand raised to head.
25 mm, 9.00 gms

Varbanov 3732; Moushmov 6476
Charles M
1531c.jpg
pella002a12 viewsElagabalus
Pella, Macedonia

Obv: IMP C M AVR ANTONINVS, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: COL IVL AVS PЄLLA, City goddess seated left, wearing mural crown, right hand raised to head.
23 mm, 8.85 gms

Varbanov 3731, Moushmov 6475
Charles M
Macedon_Perseus_McClean3675_gf.jpg
Perseus. 178-168 BC. AR Tetradrachm 6 viewsMacedon, Perseus. 178-168 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.80 gm) of Pella or Amphipolis 179-172 BC. Diademed head of Perseus right. / ΒΑΣΙ-ΛΕΩΣ ΠΕΡ-ΣΕΩΣ, eagle stdg r. on thunderbolt; AY monogram above, HP to r., AN between legs; all within laurel wreath; plow below wreath. gVF.  Triton V #1313. Ex Robert Schonwalter Coll. Mamroth ZfN 38 (1928) #15 (plate II #2); AMNG III/2 p.196 #3; McClean 3675 (same dies); HGC 3.1 #1094 (same obv die); Jameson 1013 (same obv die); Rhousopoulos 1203; SNG Cop -; SNG Delepierre 1066 (same dies); Weber 2220 (same obv die). Anaximander
Philippou.JPG
Philip gold Stater44 viewsPhilippe II de Macédoine, Pella, 340-328 BC Statère en or 8.59g
D:/ Tête laurée d’Apollon à dr. avec baies dans la couronne
R:/ ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Bige galopant à droite, conduit par un aurige, tenant les rênes et le kentron ; au-dessous du bige, un canthare vu de face
Le Rider 133-226
Brennos
image~5.jpg
Philip ii 45 viewsAv quarter stater 359-336 bc, ca. 345-328 bc, mint pella, father of Alexander the Great, (obv) Herakles wearing lion skin facing right, (rev) bow above a club, le rider pl. 83,rare... I know it kind of hurts to see such a coin put into jewelry, but wow what a ring, I couldn't pass it up!1 commentsCaesarincarnate
Phillip_II_Apollo~0.jpg
Philip II of Macedon -1st- 359-336 BC AE1887 views
Macedonia, Philip II, AE 18 * (copper or bronze)

Obv.: Head of Apollo* right, hair bound with tainia.
Rev.: Equestrian; Nude youth on horseback prancing right. ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ above (mostly worn), independent spearhead symbol (nearly completely worn) beneath horse, between horse's legs.

Mint: Pella (?)
Struck: 359-336 BC.
Size: 18 mm.
Weight: 6.5 grams

Patina: Luscious jade-green, semi-glossy

Similar to D. Sear GCATV; 6696v, Vol. 2, pg. 620
Similar to SNG ANS 880-882 (?)

* Olympian
Tiathena
Phill_Apollo_Horse_c~0.jpg
Philip II of Macedon -2nd- 359-336BC Æ 1884 views
Macedonia, Philip II, Æ 18 * (copper or bronze)

Obv.: Head of Apollo* right, hair bound with tainia.
Rev.: Equestrian; Nude youth on horseback running forward, front legs extended, rear legs firmly planted, right facing. ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ above (mostly worn), Monogram E beneath horse, between horse's legs.

Mint: Pella (probable)
Struck: 359-336 BC.
Size: 18 mm.
Weight: 5.79 grams

Patina: Light green, flat.

Similar to D. Sear, Greek coins and their values, Vol. II, 6696; pg. 620
SNG Cop. 594

* Olympian
Tiathena
Phillip_II_Apollo-Horse~0.jpg
Philip II of Macedon -3rd- 359-336BC Æ 1885 views
Macedonia, Philip II, Æ 18 * (copper or bronze)

Obv.: Diademed head of Apollo* right
Rev.: Equestrian; Nude youth holding long palm(?), on prancing horse, right facing. ΦΙΛΙΠΠ[ΟΥ] above, symbol or monogram formed with Lambda L and pellet centered within, beneath horse, between horse's legs.

Mint: Pella (probable)
Struck: 359-336 BC.
Size: 18 mm.
Weight: ca. 5.9 grams

Patina: Beautiful multi-color, subtle-blending of dark olive, copper, near-jade green and some lighter tones toward silver, gray, brown. Lovely eloquent gloss over-all.

Similar to SNGCop 583 (?)

* Olympian
1 commentsTiathena
Philip_II.jpg
Philip II SNGCop 61350 viewsPhilip II
Obv: Head of Apollo right, wearing a tainia
Rev: ΦIΛIΠΠOY, youth on horseback prancing left, trident head below
Size: 5.32 gram. 16x18 mm
Mint: Macedonian Kingdom, Pella Mint
Ids: SNGCop 613
1 commentsickster
Philip_II_tetra_small.JPG
Philip II.75 viewsKingdom of Macedon. Philip II AR Tetradrachm. Pella, circa 336-328 BC. Struck under Alexander III. Laureate head of Zeus right / Nude youth on horseback right, holding palm in right hand and reins in left; ΦIΛIΠΠOY around, wreath below. Le Rider 387. 14.31g.Auer
Macedon_PhilipII_SNG-ANS_224_gf.jpg
Philip II. 359-336 BC. AV 1/4 Stater 2 viewsMacedon, Philip II. 359-336 BC. AV 1/4 Stater (2.12 gm) of Pella, 340/336-328 BC. Head of Herakles r., wearing lion skin headdress. / Bow & Club of Herakles, ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ. Trident below. VF. SNG ANS 8 #224 = SNG Berry 103 (same rev. die); Le Rider group II 76 (D51/R36); ACNAC Dewing 1106; HGC 3.1 #851; NAIM-BAN 61 (same dies); SNG Alpha Bank 256; SNG Munich 81; SNG Turbingen 1063 (same rev. die). Cf. Triton XVIII #453 (same dies). Anaximander
Phillip_V_Poseidon-Athena.jpg
Philip V of Macedonia * Poseidon & Athena Alkidemos (221-179 BC)65 views
Philip V, Æ22 * Poseidon* & Athena* Alkidemos

Obverse: (Kemp) Laureate head of Poseidon, facing right.
Reverse: Athena Alkidemos striding/advancing left with shield, hurling a thunderbolt. Monograms in left and right fields.

Mint: Pella (?)

Bronze *
Size: 22 mm.
Weight: 8.72 grams
Die axis: 0 degs.

Patina: Lovely deep-sea green, towards dark-olive.

This coin appears to be unlisted in standard references; however, it is listed in
SNG Greece 2 - The Alpha Bank Collection #1071 ( I P ) in the right field ( I G{amma} in present instance).
It is also listed in Mamroth ZFN 42 ( a specialized work on Philip V in German).
Mamroth 42

* Olympian

Tiathena
Macedon_PhilipV_SNG-ANS_1234_gf.jpg
Philip V. 221-179 BC. AE19 5 viewsMacedon, Philip V. 221-179 BC. AE19 (6.58 gm) of Amphipolis or Pella, 220-216 BC. Head of Herakles r., clad in lion skin headdress. / Horseman prancing r., raising arm. BA below, monogram ΦI to l.  VF.  SNG Cop. 2 #1234; HGC 3.1 #1073; Mamroth Bronzemunzen ZfN 42 (1935) #1 (plate VI #1); Touratsoglou Macedonia 1. Anaximander
Macedon_PhilipV_Mamroth_ZfN40_23_gf.jpg
Philip V. 221-179 BC. AR Didrachm of Pella4 viewsMacedon, Philip V. 221-179 BC. AR Didrachm (7.99 gm) of Pella, 200/197-179. Laureate head of Philip V r. / War club, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ within laurel wreath, trident to l. Monograms ꞮΩ (Zoilos, magistrate) above, ΔΙ & ΣΙ below. VF.  Ponterio 119 #442. Babelon de Luynes 1704; HGC 3.1 #1059; Kampmann p.36 #9; Mamroth ZfN 40 #23 (plate V #7); McClean 3269; SNG Ashmolean 3269; SNG Cop - ; SNG Saroglos 938. Anaximander
Macedon_PhilipV_Mamroth_ZfN40_2_gf.jpg
Philip V. 221-179 BC. AR Tetradrachm 5 viewsMacedon, Philip V. 221-179 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.83 gm) of Pella or Amphipolis 200/197-206/5 BC. Macedonian shield with head of Perseus wearing winged Phrygian helmet, harpa over shoulder. / War club, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ within oak wreath, harpa to l. Monograms ΑΡ above, ΑΩ & ΔΗ below. gVF.   Pegasi XVIII #82 = CNG 72 #502 = Coin Galleries (9 Nov 1988) #56. Robert A. Weimer Coll. Rare sub-issue with the harpa symbol on rev. Boston MFA 717; HGC 3.1 #1058; Mamroth ZfN 40 #2 (plate V #3); cf Munzen & Medaillen 46 (2018) #99 (same rev. die); AMNG -; SNG Alpha Bank -. Anaximander
plated_tet.jpg
plated Alexander tetradrachm57 viewsPella mint
28mm, 14.84g
obv: head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress
rev: Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre; crested helmet left, monogram under throne and in exergue
imitating Price 629; Müller 233
areich
1.jpg
Price 21474 viewsAlexander III the great
Tetradrachm
PELLA 325-315 BC

Obverse:Head of Alexander the great as Herakles wearing lion's skin
Reverse:Zeus Aetophoros on throne ;Θ under throne

29.80mm 16.98g
1 commentsmaik
Pyrrhos~0.jpg
Pyrrhos; Macedonian shield with monogram/ Helmet, BA- EI, AE 1831 viewsKings of Epeiros & Macedon, Pyrrhos. B.C. 288-277. AE 18mm, 3.7g. Struck in Pella. Macedonian shield, with monogram of Pyrrhos at centre / Helmet, beneath which BA - EI divided by monogram; all within oak-wreath. Forrer/ Weber 2181, Sear GCV II: 6779. Podiceps
Titusele.jpg
RIC 0115 Titus Denarius88 viewsTitus Denarius
IMP TITVS CAES VESPSIAN AVG P M
Laureate head right

TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P
Elephant, wearing armor, walking left

3.00g

Rome 80 AD.
RIC 115 (C2); Cohen 303; BMC 44


Ex-Pella Coins and Antiquities

Thick black toning on this denarius makes it tough to photograph. Much nicer in hand.

Commemorates the completion and dedication of the Colosseum and the opening of games in 80 AD, after ten years of construction.
2 commentsJay GT4
190208018bz.jpg
Roman Empire, Maximus, Sestertius180 viewsObv. MAXIMVS CAES GERM, draped bust right.
Rev. PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS S C, emperor standing left, holding baton and spear, at the right two standards.
Mint: Rome, 236-238 AD.

32mm 21.38g

RIC 13; Cohen 14; BMC 213

Ex Münzenhandlung Manfred Olding, Lagerliste
Ex Reusing /Schürer Collection
Ex Münzenhandlung A. Riechman 1930 (65 Reichsmark)

Princeps Juventutis was a name of dignity even in the most flourishing days of the republic. It was an honorary appellation given to him who took the lead of the greater and lesser boys appointed to perform a part in the game of Troy (ad ludum Troja). The prince of the youth was, in the earlier times, the chief of the Equestrian Order. Under the empire, and from the very commencement of that monarchical form of government, this title, although simply honorary, appears to have been given, as an apanage, to such young princes of the imperial family as were destined to reign, and was sometimes conferred on them at a very early age. (Numiswiki, FAC)
6 commentskc
Roman_diploma.jpg
Roman Military Diploma Fragment198 viewsBronze Roman Military Diploma Fragment

Latin text on both sides

42mm x 17mm x 2mm.

3.83g
Dark green patina.

Found in the former Yugoslavia.

1-3 Century AD.

Possible inscription thanks to Curtis Clay:

Line 3: ASV, prob. from NOMINA SVBSCRIPTA, "whose names are written below".

Line 4: maybe EMD, coming from CIVITATEM DEDIT, "he grants citizenship".

Line 5: ABVI, from HABVISSENT, "(to the wives that they presently) have".

Line 6: ELIBE, from CAELIBES, "unmarried".

Line 7: MTA from DVMTAXAT, "just or merely (one wife per soldier)"

Lines 8-11: Should be the month date and the current consuls, which if they could be restored would establish the date of the diploma!

This fragment was submitted to Istvan for analysis. His rendering below:
Obverse:
]NIS [
]ION[ or ]HON[
]PTA SV[
]EM DE[
]HABVIS[
]ELIBES[
]MTAX[
] D [
]TIANO [
] IO [ or ]NO [ or ]HO [
] ­_S _ [


Reverse:
[the imperial names amd titles are in the previous (provbably three) lines
[IIS QV]I MILITA[VERVNT EQVITES ET PEDITES]
[IN A]LIS DECEM ET [COHORTIBVS ... QVAE]
[APELLANTVR ...]
those cavalrymen and infantrymen who served in ten alae and ... cohortes, which are called...


5 commentsJay GT4
Apamea_AE_lg.jpg
Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, Æ 21 - Apamea on the Axios 28 viewsElephant standing right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣEΛEYKOY Bridled horned horse's head left, anchor beneath.

SC 35; HGC 9, 79; CSE 415; WSM 1128; SNG Spaer 50-52; SNG Copenhagen 40; Sear GCV 6850.
Apamea on the Axios Mint 300-281 BC.

(21 mm, 7.86 g, 12h).

Seleukos I established Apamea on the Axios (a tributary of the upper Orontes River) in Syria around 300 BC. Named in honour of his Baktrian wife, Apama, it was developed on the site of the former Macedonian military colony of Pella. It became the primary Seleukid military depot and arsenal. In Apamea, Seleukos maintained his 500 war elephants and more than 30,000 horses to serve the needs of his cavalry, as well as an arsenal of weaponry and facilities for the manufacture of arms. For the next five generations, Seleukid military campaigns were mounted from Apamea.

The coin type is rare, with all known find locations being located in Syria, but with no control, or design linkages to any other emission from the Seleukid Syrian mints of the time. Newell placed this coin as the sole issue of Apamea during the reign of Seleukos I. This attribution was based on the absence of any linkage to any other Syrian mints and the iconography of the coin, which he felt reflected the military role and significance of Apamea. In the obverse he saw the war elephants, which were the pride of Seleukos’ army, while in the reverse he saw a reference to the powerful Seleukid cavalry, both of which were based at Apamea.

The iconography of the coin bears a striking similarity to the tetradrachm issues of Pergamon in Seleukos name in 281 BC, following the defeat of Lysimachos in the Battle of Korupedion. This short-lived emission is unique. Newell believed that it was possibly inspired by the Apamea bronze coinage, suggesting that the latter may have been struck at the time Seleukos was assembling his forces at Apamea for the decisive encounter with Lysimachos. Some of these coins may then have accompanied his soldiers into Asia Minor, eventually to find their way with his soldiers to Pergamon, where the type served as the model for the brief silver emission celebrating Seleukos’ victory at Korupedion.
2 commentsn.igma
4190206.jpg
Seleukos I11 viewsSeleukos I Nikator. 312-281 BC. AR Tetradrachm (25.3mm, 17.05 g, 9h). In the name and types of Alexander III of Macedon. Babylon I mint. Struck circa 311-300 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; monogram in wreath in left field, MI and pellet below throne. SC 82.5b var. (no pellet); Price 3747 var. (same); HGC 9, 10f; Berlin 18207741; CNG 402, lot 271; CNG 399, lot 220. VF, lightly toned, a few edge deposits. Very rare variety with pellet below MI, only one in Pella (Berlin), six in CoinArchives (only two noting the pellet below MI).

From the Colin E. Pitchfork Collection.

Ex CNG 419 lot 206
arash p
Lysimachus_Athena-Lion.jpg
Thrace, Lysimachus. 323 - 287 BC. Bronze drachm134 views
AE Drachm

Obv: Head of Athena*, facing right.
Rev: Pouncing lion, BASILEOS above, spearhead and LYSIMACHOY below.

Size: 19 mm.
Weight: 5.50 grams

Mint: Pella (?)
Struck: 323-287 BC.

SNG C 1149


* Olympian
1 commentsTiathena
lysimachus3.png
THRACIAN KINGDOM - Lysimachus (305-281 BC)30 viewsAR tetradrachm (27mm, 17.16 gm, 11h). Pella or Amphipolis, 286/5-282/1 BC. Head of the deified Alexander the Great right, wearing horn of Ammon / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛYΣΙΜΑΧΟY, Athena enthroned left, supporting Nike on extended right hand and resting left elbow on shield propped against throne, HP monogram in inner left field, second monogram in exergue. Thompson 248. Müller 353. Well struck from dies of excellent style in sound metal and beautifully toned. NGC Choice XF 5/5 - 4/5.

From the Mayflower Collection. Ex NFA MBS 10 (June 1986), lot 165.
RobertBohn
tiberius_pella.jpg
Tiberius Provincial, Pella or Dion12 viewsObverse: TI CAESAR AVG F AVGVSTVS. Bust of Tiberius.
Reverse: C BAEBIVS P F L RVSTICELIVS BASTERNA IIVIR QVINQ D D. Legend in five lines.
Mint: Pella or Dion, Macedonia. 14-23 A.D.

Weight: 8,707 g. Diameter: 22 mm. Axis: 180º.

Reference: RPC 1537.
Provenance: Solidus Numismatik (through Ebay); bought on March 2014.
Manuel
Tiberius_RPC_1537.JPG
Tiberius RPC 153728 viewsTiberius, Pella, Macedonia, 11.68g, 24mm, RPC 1537, Moushmov 6462A
OBV: TI CAESAR AVG F AVGVSTVS, bare head of Tiberius right
REV: C BAEBIVS P F L RVSTICELIVS BASTERNA IIVIR QVINQ D D, legend in five lines

A rare coin, somewhat of a throwback to the moneyers, and unusual for having a Senator's name on the reverse.
Romanorvm
Kassander.jpg
Zeus on Kassander AR Tetradrachm135 viewsCirca 317-315 B.C. AR Tetradrachm in the name and types of Philip II, 14.31g. Pella Mint. Le Rider-531 (D281/R436), SNG ANS-450 (same dies). Obverse laureate head of Zeus right. Reverse ΦIΛIΠ-ΠOY nude youth, holding palm frond and reins, on horseback right; coiled serpent below, Boeotian shield below foreleg. EF, lightly toned, some die wear on obverse, die break and die shift on reverse. Attractive style.

Ex CNG
1 commentsJason T
Phil2AE21.jpeg
[103b] Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C.54 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C. Bronze AE 21, Heavy or Double Unit, SNG ANS 833, aVF, 8.40g, 21.2mm, 0o, lifetime issue. Obverse: head Apollo right, wearing tania; Reverse: FILIPPOU, young male rider right, right hand raised, E right.
Ex FORVM.

Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom, but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great. He personally selected the design of his coins.

Struck in commemoration of Philip's Olympic victory. This is one of his earliest issues in bronze.

Philip II of Macedon (382 BC–336 BC; in Greek Φίλιππος = φίλος (friend) + ίππος (horse), transliterated Philippos) was the King of Macedon from 359 BC until his assassination. He was the father of Alexander the Great, Phillip III Arrhidaeus, and possibly Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty.

Born in Pella, Philip was the youngest son of King Amyntas III and Eurydice. In his youth, (ca. 368 BC–365 BC) Philip was a hostage in Thebes, which was the leading city of Greece during the Theban hegemony. While a captive there, Philip received a military and diplomatic education from Epaminondas, was involved in a pederastic relationship with Pelopidas and lived with Pammenes, who was an enthusiastic advocate of the Sacred Band of Thebes. In 364 BC, Philip returned to Macedonia. The deaths of Philip's elder brothers, King Alexander II and Perdiccas III, allowed him to take the throne in 359 BC. Originally appointed regent for his infant nephew Amyntas IV, who was the son of Perdiccas III, Philip managed to take the kingdom for himself that same year.

Philip's military skills and expansionist vision of Macedonian greatness brought him early success. The hill tribes were broken by a single battle in 358 BC, and Philip established his authority inland as far as Lake Ohrid. He used the Social War as an opportunity for expansion. In 357 BC, he took the Athenian colony of Amphipolis, which commanded the gold mines of Mount Pangaion. That same year Philip married the Epirote princess Olympias, who was the daughter of the king of the Molossians. In 356 BC, Philip conquered the town of Crenides and changed its name to Philippi. Philip also attacked Abdera and Maronea, on the Thracian sea-board. Also in 356 Alexander was born and his race horse won in the Olympics in He took Methone in 354 BC, a town which had belonged to Athens. During the siege of Methone, Philip lost an eye.

Not until his armies were opposed by Athens at Thermopylae in 352 BC did Philip face any serious resistance. Philip did not attempt to advance into central Greece because the Athenians had occupied Thermopylae. Also in 352 BC, the Macedonian army won a complete victory over the Phocians at the Battle of Crocus Field. This battle made Philip tagus of Thessaly, and he claimed as his own Magnesia, with the important harbour of Pagasae.
Hostilities with Athens did not yet take place, but Athens was threatened by the Macedonian party which Philip's gold created in Euboea. From 352 to 346 BC, Philip did not again come south. He was active in completing the subjugation of the Balkan hill-country to the west and north, and in reducing the Greek cities of the coast as far as the Hebrus (Maritza). For the chief of these coastal cities, Olynthus, Philip continued to profess friendship until its neighboring cities were in his hands.

In 349 BC, Philip started the siege of Olynthus. Olynthus at first allied itself with Philip, but later shifted its allegiance to Athens. The Athenians did nothing to help Olynthus. Philip finally took Olynthus in 348 BC and razed the city to the ground. In 346 BC, he intervened effectively in the war between Thebes and the Phocians, but his wars with Athens continued intermittently.

Macedonia and the regions adjoining it having now been securely consolidated, Philip celebrated his Olympic games at Dium. In 347 BC, Philip advanced to the conquest of the eastern districts about the Hebrus, and compelled the submission of the Thracian prince Cersobleptes. Meanwhile, Athens had made overtures for peace, and when Philip, in 346 BC, again moved south, peace was sworn in Thessaly. With key Greek city-states in submission, Philip turned to Sparta; he sent them a message, "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city." Their reply was "If." Philip and Alexander would both leave them alone. Later, the Macedonian arms were carried across Epirus to the Adriatic Sea. In 342 BC, Philip led a great military expedition north against the Scythians, conquering the Thracian fortified settlement Eumolpia to give it his name, Philippoupolis (modern Plovdiv).

In 340 BC, Philip started the siege of Perinthus. Philip began another siege in 339 BC of the city of Byzantium. After unsuccessful sieges of both cities, Philip's influence all over Greece was compromised. However, Philip successfully reasserted his authority in the Aegean by defeating an alliance of Thebans and Athenians at the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC. He erected a memorial of a marble lion to the Sacred Band of Thebes for their bravery that still stands today. Philip created and led the League of Corinth in 337 BC. Members of the League agreed never to wage war against each other, unless it was to suppress revolution. Philip was elected as leader (hegemon) of the army of invasion against the Persian Empire. In 336 BC, when the invasion of Persia was in its very early stage, Philip was assassinated, and was succeeded on the throne of Macedon by his son Alexander the Great.

Philip’s Assassination

The murder happened in October of 336 BC, at Aegae, the ancient capital of the kingdom of Macedon. The court had gathered there for the celebration of the marriage between Alexander of Epirus and Philip's daughter. While the king was entering unprotected into the town's theatre (highlighting his approachability to the Greek diplomats present), he was killed by Pausanias of Orestis, one of Philip's seven bodyguards. The assassin immediately tried to escape and reach his associates who were waiting for him with horses at the entrance of Aegae. He was pursued by three of Philip's bodyguards and died by their hands.
The reasons for Pausanias' assassination of Phillip are difficult to fully expound, since there was controversy already among ancient historians. The only contemporary account in our possession is that of Aristotle, who states rather tersely that Philip was killed because Pausanias had been offended by the followers of Attalus, the king's father-in-law.

Whatever else that may be written about Philip II it must be recognized that he was responsible for making Macedon the ascendant Greek power. He reorganized the Macedonian army. It was this army that Alexander the Great inherited. Phillip II trained some of his Alexander’s best generals: Antigonus Cyclops, Antipater, Nearchus, Parmenion, and Perdiccas.

While Alexander was a bold and charismatic leader, he owes much of his success to his father.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_II_of_Macedon
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


Cleisthenes
Phillip2Ae.jpg
[103c] Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C.43 viewsBronze AE Unit, SNG ANS 896, SNG Cop 589, F, 5.554g, 16.8mm, 0o, Macedonian mint, c. 359 - 336 B.C.; lifetime issue. Obverse: head Apollo right wearing tania; Reverse: FILIPPOU, young male riding horse prancing to right, AI below. Ex FORVM.


Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom, but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great. He personally selected the design of his coins.

Philip II of Macedon (382 BC–336 BC; in Greek Φίλιππος = φίλος (friend) + ίππος (horse), transliterated Philippos) was the King of Macedon from 359 BC until his assassination. He was the father of Alexander the Great, Phillip III Arrhidaeus, and possibly Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty.

Born in Pella, Philip was the youngest son of King Amyntas III and Eurydice. In his youth, (ca. 368 BC–365 BC) Philip was a hostage in Thebes, which was the leading city of Greece during the Theban hegemony. While a captive there, Philip received a military and diplomatic education from Epaminondas, was involved in a pederastic relationship with Pelopidas and lived with Pammenes, who was an enthusiastic advocate of the Sacred Band of Thebes. In 364 BC, Philip returned to Macedonia. The deaths of Philip's elder brothers, King Alexander II and Perdiccas III, allowed him to take the throne in 359 BC. Originally appointed regent for his infant nephew Amyntas IV, who was the son of Perdiccas III, Philip managed to take the kingdom for himself that same year.

Philip's military skills and expansionist vision of Macedonian greatness brought him early success. The hill tribes were broken by a single battle in 358 BC, and Philip established his authority inland as far as Lake Ohrid. He used the Social War as an opportunity for expansion. In 357 BC, he took the Athenian colony of Amphipolis, which commanded the gold mines of Mount Pangaion. That same year Philip married the Epirote princess Olympias, who was the daughter of the king of the Molossians. In 356 BC, Philip conquered the town of Crenides and changed its name to Philippi. Philip also attacked Abdera and Maronea, on the Thracian sea-board. Also in 356 Alexander was born and his race horse won in the Olympics in He took Methone in 354 BC, a town which had belonged to Athens. During the siege of Methone, Philip lost an eye.

Not until his armies were opposed by Athens at Thermopylae in 352 BC did Philip face any serious resistance. Philip did not attempt to advance into central Greece because the Athenians had occupied Thermopylae. Also in 352 BC, the Macedonian army won a complete victory over the Phocians at the Battle of Crocus Field. This battle made Philip tagus of Thessaly, and he claimed as his own Magnesia, with the important harbour of Pagasae.
Hostilities with Athens did not yet take place, but Athens was threatened by the Macedonian party which Philip's gold created in Euboea. From 352 to 346 BC, Philip did not again come south. He was active in completing the subjugation of the Balkan hill-country to the west and north, and in reducing the Greek cities of the coast as far as the Hebrus (Maritza). For the chief of these coastal cities, Olynthus, Philip continued to profess friendship until its neighboring cities were in his hands.

In 349 BC, Philip started the siege of Olynthus. Olynthus at first allied itself with Philip, but later shifted its allegiance to Athens. The Athenians did nothing to help Olynthus. Philip finally took Olynthus in 348 BC and razed the city to the ground. In 346 BC, he intervened effectively in the war between Thebes and the Phocians, but his wars with Athens continued intermittently.

Macedonia and the regions adjoining it having now been securely consolidated, Philip celebrated his Olympic games at Dium. In 347 BC, Philip advanced to the conquest of the eastern districts about the Hebrus, and compelled the submission of the Thracian prince Cersobleptes. Meanwhile, Athens had made overtures for peace, and when Philip, in 346 BC, again moved south, peace was sworn in Thessaly. With key Greek city-states in submission, Philip turned to Sparta; he sent them a message, "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city." Their reply was "If." Philip and Alexander would both leave them alone. Later, the Macedonian arms were carried across Epirus to the Adriatic Sea. In 342 BC, Philip led a great military expedition north against the Scythians, conquering the Thracian fortified settlement Eumolpia to give it his name, Philippoupolis (modern Plovdiv).

In 340 BC, Philip started the siege of Perinthus. Philip began another siege in 339 BC of the city of Byzantium. After unsuccessful sieges of both cities, Philip's influence all over Greece was compromised. However, Philip successfully reasserted his authority in the Aegean by defeating an alliance of Thebans and Athenians at the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC. He erected a memorial of a marble lion to the Sacred Band of Thebes for their bravery that still stands today. Philip created and led the League of Corinth in 337 BC. Members of the League agreed never to wage war against each other, unless it was to suppress revolution. Philip was elected as leader (hegemon) of the army of invasion against the Persian Empire. In 336 BC, when the invasion of Persia was in its very early stage, Philip was assassinated, and was succeeded on the throne of Macedon by his son Alexander the Great.

Philip’s Assassination

The murder happened in October of 336 BC, at Aegae, the ancient capital of the kingdom of Macedon. The court had gathered there for the celebration of the marriage between Alexander of Epirus and Philip's daughter. While the king was entering unprotected into the town's theatre (highlighting his approachability to the Greek diplomats present), he was killed by Pausanias of Orestis, one of Philip's seven bodyguards. The assassin immediately tried to escape and reach his associates who were waiting for him with horses at the entrance of Aegae. He was pursued by three of Philip's bodyguards and died by their hands.
The reasons for Pausanias' assassination of Phillip are difficult to fully expound, since there was controversy already among ancient historians. The only contemporary account in our possession is that of Aristotle, who states rather tersely that Philip was killed because Pausanias had been offended by the followers of Attalus, the king's father-in-law.

Whatever else that may be written about Philip II it must be recognized that he was responsible for making Macedon the ascendant Greek power. He reorganized the Macedonian army. It was this army that Alexander the Great inherited. Phillip II trained some of his Alexander’s best generals: Antigonus Cyclops, Antipater, Nearchus, Parmenion, and Perdiccas.

While Alexander was a bold and charismatic leader, he owes much of his success to his father.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_II_of_Macedon
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
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