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Search results - "Owl"
53_Good_OWLS.jpg
A 53 Parliament of Owls20 viewscicerokid
coinC_copy.jpg
Antiochos VIII & Cleopatra32 viewsAE 19, 5.78g, Antiochos VIII & Cleopatra, 123 BC, Obv: Radiate head of Antiochus right.. Rev: Owl standing right, head facing on prostrate amphora / ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ ΚΑΙ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΞΟΥ, IE in ex. , Seleukid date 190 (123 BC), aXF. S 7139, B.M.C.4.87,10, SC 2263, Hoover HGC 9, 1189 (S).Molinari
COCK_BOTH.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 146/5 BC14 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
34 mm Thompson issue 18
Thompson catalogue:Obs Gaziantep 146?:Rev NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
below control mark ME
2 magistrates : XAPΙ ΗPA
RF symbol : Cock with Palm
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
greek1.jpg
ATTICA,Athens. AR tetradrachm72 viewsThomson 31b/bmc 445/ 135-134bc
obv: Helmeted head of Athena bust R.
rev: Owl std.r.head facing on amphora. Magistrates name in field
Asklepios std.l. holding serpent. intwined scepter. Z on amphora,delta
I below. all within wreath
4 commentshill132
48+1_Even_Better.jpg
Parliament of 49 Owls16 views24 Thompson old catalogue
13 Thompson middle catalogue
8 Thompson late catalogue of which 3 are post-Sullan
3 Imitations of which 1 "old catalogue" 1, "late catalogue" & 1 "post Sullan"
1 pseudo-Athenian New Style Thompson type ii Sullan "Lucullean" issue
cicerokid
marcus_aurel_minerva_res.jpg
(0161) MARCUS AURELIUS27 viewsM. Aurelius, as Caesar
161 - 180 AD (as Augustus)
Struck 156 (as Caesar)
AE 23 X 25 mm, 11.1 g
O:[AVR]ELIVS CAES ANTON [AVG PII F], head left
R: [TR PO]T X COS II S-C, Minerva standing left holding owl and spear, shield behind her legs
Rome
(unpublished)
laney
domitian_athena_owl_denarius_B_RES.jpg
(12) DOMITIAN36 views81-96 AD
(Struck 88 AD)
AR Denarius 18mm, 3.41 gm
O: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VII, laureate head right
R: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P, Minerva standing right on galley, brandishing spear and shield; at her feet, owl standing right.
RIC II 108a; BMCRE 117; RSC 236.
laney
Janus119BCCrawford281_1.jpg
(500a) Roman Republic, 119 BC, M. Furius Philius - Furia 1880 viewsRoman Republic, 119 BC, M. Furius Philius - Furia 18. Crawford 281/1, Sydenham 529; 19mm, 3.23 grams. aVF, Rome; Obverse: laureate head of Janus, M FORVRI L F around; Reverse: Roma standing left erecting trophy, Galic arms around, PHLI in exergue. Ex Ephesus Numismatics.

Gauis Marius
As a novus homo, or new man, Marius found the rise in the Roman cursus honorum ( "course of honours"-- the sequential order of public offices held by aspiring politicians in the Roman Republic) a daunting challenge. It is certain that he used his old family client contacts and his military relations as a source of support. Among these contacts were the powerful Metelli family, and their early support was to prove to be a disaster for them. Just a few short years after his service as Quaestor, Marius was elected Tribune of the Plebes in 119 BC. In this position so soon after the political turmoil and murder of the Gracchi brothers (Gaius murdered 123 BC), Marius chose to follow the populares path, making a name for himself under similar auspices. As Tribune, he would ensure the animosity of the conservative faction of the Senate, and the Metelli, by passing popular laws forbidding the inspection of ballot boxes. In do doing, he directly opposed the powerful elite, who used ballot inspection as a way to intimidate voters in the citizen assembly elections.

Marius would go on to be elected Consul seven times and figure prominantly in the civil unrest of the early eighties as Lucius Cornelius Sulla's opponent. In 88 BC, Sulla had been elected Consul. There was now a choice before the Senate about which general to send to Asia (a potentially lucrative command): either Marius or Sulla. The Senate chose Sulla, but soon the Assembly appointed Marius. In this unsavory episode of low politics, Marius had been helped by the unscrupulous actions of Publius Sulpicius Rufus, whose debts Marius had promised to erase. Sulla refused to acknowledge the validity of the Assembly's action.

Sulla left Rome and traveled to "his"army waiting in Nola, the army the Senate had asked him to lead to Asia. Sulla urged his legions to defy the Assembly's orders and accept him as their rightful leader. Sulla was successful, and the legions murdered the representatives from the Assembly. Sulla then commanded six legions to march with him opon Rome and institute a civil war.

This was a momentous event, and was unforeseen by Marius, as no Roman army had ever marched upon Rome—it was forbidden by law and ancient tradition.

Sulla was to eventually rule Rome as Dictator. In his book Rubicon, historian Tom Holland argues that Sulla's actions had no lasting negative effect upon the health of the Republic, that Sulla was at heart a Republican. However, once a Roman general has defied Republican tradition, once a Roman general has used his command to combat fellow Romans, once a Roman general has set-up himself as Dictator--it follows that the decision to replicate these decsions (think: Caesar and Rubicon) is that much more easiely taken.

J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.





Cleisthenes
57638q00.jpg
*SOLD*8 viewsAugustus Copper quadrans

Attribution: RIC I 453
Date: 5 BC
Obverse: MESSALLA APRONIVS III VIR, garlanded altar with bowl-shaped top
Reverse: GALVS SISINNA A A A F F, around large S C
Size: 15.6 mm
Weight: 2.51 grams
ex- Forvm
Noah
56471q00.jpg
*SOLD*8 viewsAugustus Copper quadrans

Attrribution: RIC I 455a, Morrison BN 806
Date: 5 BC
Obverse: MESSALLA GALVS III VIR, garlanded altar with bowl-shaped top
Reverse: APRONIVS SISENNA AAAFF, around large S C
Size: 17 mm
Weight: 3.02 grams
ex-Forvm
Noah
Augustus_Quadrans_3_-_RIC_450.jpg
*SOLD*9 viewsAugustus Copper quadrans

Attribution: RIC I 450 corr.
Date: 5 BC
Obverse: GALVS MESSALLA III VIR, altar with bowl-shaped top
Reverse: SISENNA APRONIVS AAAFF, around large S C
Size: 16.3 mm
Weight: 3.16 grams
ex-Forvm
Noah
Augustus_Quadrans_3_-_RIC_454.jpg
*SOLD*36 viewsAugustus Copper quadrans

Attribution: RIC I 454
Date: 5 BC
Obverse: MESSALLA APRONIVS III VIR, altar with bowl-shaped top
Reverse: SISENNA GALVS AAAFF, around large S C
Size: 16.1 mm
Weight: 3.07 grams
ex-Forvm
Noah
09270630.jpg
0.3 Athenian Tetradrachm (archaic)91 viewsAR Tetradrachm of Athens
449 - 404 BCE
25 mm, 16.6 gm

Obv. archaic Athena r. helmeted
Rev. Owl with A (theta) E; olive and crescent in upper left corner
test cut through Owl
Zam
830.jpg
0.30 AR Athenian Tetradrachm 454-415 BCE62 viewsATTICA: Athens. Ca. 454(?)-415 BC. AR tetradrachm. Athena / Owl. Nice centering.

Silver tetradrachm, pl. XXII, 6´. Svoronos pl. 15, 30., 17.1gm, 24mm, gVF, 449-413 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right with almond shaped eye, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring,; reverse A?E right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, prong tail, to left olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square.
1 commentsEcgþeow
0001.jpg
0001 - Quadrans Nero 64 AC89 viewsObv/NERO CLAV CAE AVG GER, owl on altar.
Rev/PM TR P IMP PP, SC on field, olive branch.
Quadrans of small module, no value-mark.

AE, 12.84mm, 1.70g
Mint: Rome.
RIC I/260 [C] - Cohen 185 - RCV 1988 - BMCRE p.258
ex-Numismática Saetabis
dafnis
0047.jpg
0047 - Denarius Domitian 85 AC45 viewsObv/IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V, Domitian laureate head r.
Rev/IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P, Minerva standing r. on Columna Rostrata, holding shield and brandishing javelin, owl at feet.

Ag, 20.9mm, 3.45g
Mint: Rome.
RIC IIa/343 [R2] - Cohen 187
ex-Forum Ancient Coins, art.#15705
1 commentsdafnis
01-Athens.jpg
01. Athens Tetradrachm.129 viewsTetradrachm, 449 - 413 BC.
Obverse: "Archaic style" head of Athena, wearing crested helmet ornamented with olive leaves and floral scroll.
Reverse: ΑΘΕ / Owl, olive twig, and crescent moon.
17.15 gm., 24 mm.
S. #2526.
2 commentsCallimachus
cng2.jpg
01.- Attica Tetradrachm (454-404 BC)21 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (22mm, 17.09 g, 8h). Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597. VF, lightly toned, minor area of porosity on obverse, graffito and slight die shift on reverse.
Purchased at Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. auction in 2015.
3 commentsOscar D
017.jpg
011 DOMITIAN14 viewsEMPEROR: Domitian
DENOMINATION: Denarius
OBVERSE: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P X, laureate head right
REVERSE: IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, holding spear and shield, owl at feet
DATE: Ad 90-91
MINT: Roma
WEIGHT: 3.29 g
RIC: II.720
Barnaba6
montaje.JPG
02.- Attica Tetradrachm (287-262 BC)10 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 287-262 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 16.80 g). Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square.
Purchased at Filatelia Numismatica Santos in 2015.
Oscar D
Domitian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-P-M-TR-P-VII_IMP-XIIII-COS-XIIII-CENS-P-P-P_Roma-RIC-_new-576-_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0576, RIC II(1962) 0108a, AR-Denarius, Rome, IMP•XIIII•COS•XIIII•CENS•P•P•P•, Minerva standing right,142 views024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0576, RIC II(1962) 0108a, AR-Denarius, Rome, IMP•XIIII•COS•XIIII•CENS•P•P•P•, Minerva standing right,
avers:- IMP•CAES•DOMIT•AVG•GERM•P•M•TR•P•VII, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- IMP•XIIII•COS•XIIII•CENS•P•P•P•, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, brandishing thunderbolt and shield; owl at her feet.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 88 A.D., ref: RIC 0576, RIC II(1962) 0108a p-166, C-236,
Q-001
5 commentsquadrans
Domitian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-P-M-TR-P-VIIII_IMP-XXI-COS-XV-CENS-P-P-P_Roma-RIC-148-new-690-_Q-001_19mm_3,25g-s.jpg
024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0690, RIC II(1962) 0148, AR-Denarius, Rome, IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right, #1222 views024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0690, RIC II(1962) 0148, AR-Denarius, Rome, IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right, #1
avers:- IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-P-M-TR-P-VIIII, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- IMP-XXI-COS-XV-CENS-P-P-P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, brandishing thunderbolt and shield; owl at her feet.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,25g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 89 A.D., ref: RIC 0690, RIC II(1962) 0148 p-171, C-262,
Q-001
quadrans
Domitian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-P-M-TR-P-X_IMP-XXI-COS-XV-CENS-P-P-P_Roma-RIC-153-new-720_Rome-90-91-AD_Q-001_axis-h_18,5mm_3,16g-s.jpg
024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0720, RIC II(1962) 0153, AR-Denarius, Rome, IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right, #1134 views024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0720, RIC II(1962) 0153, AR-Denarius, Rome, IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right, #1
avers:- IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-P-M-TR-P-X, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- IMP-XXI-COS-XV-CENS-P-P-P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, brandishing thunderbolt and shield; owl at her feet.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5mm, weight: 3,16g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 90-91 A.D., ref: RIC 0720, RIC II(1962) 0153 p-172, RSC 266, BMC 179,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Domitian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-P-M-TR-P-X_IMP-XXI-COS-XV-CENS-P-P-P_Roma-RIC-153-new-720_Rome-90-91-AD_Q-002_6h_17,5-19mm_3,37g-s.jpg
024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0720, RIC II(1962) 0153, AR-Denarius, Rome, IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right, #2105 views024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0720, RIC II(1962) 0153, AR-Denarius, Rome, IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right, #2
avers:- IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-P-M-TR-P-X, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- IMP-XXI-COS-XV-CENS-P-P-P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, brandishing thunderbolt and shield; owl at her feet.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-19mm, weight: 3,37g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 90-91 A.D., ref: RIC 0720, RIC II(1962) 0153 p-172, RSC 266, BMC 179,
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
RICc_0720_RIC-II_0153,_024_Domitian_(69-81ADCaes__81-96ADAug_),_AR-Den,_IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-P-M-TR-P-X,_IMP-XXI-COS-XV-CENS-PPP,_Roma,_90-91-AD_Q-003_6h_18mm_3,09g-s.jpg
024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0720, RIC II(1962) 0153, AR-Denarius, Rome, IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right, #3171 views024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0720, RIC II(1962) 0153, AR-Denarius, Rome, IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right, #3
avers:- IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P X, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, brandishing thunderbolt and shield; owl at her feet.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 17,8-18,8mm, weight: 3,09g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 90-91 A.D., ref: RIC 0720, RIC II(1962) 0153 p-172, RSC 266, BMC 179,
Q-003
6 commentsquadrans
Domitian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-P-M-TR-P-XI_IMP-XXI-COS-XV-CENS-P-P-P_Roma-RIC--new-_Rome-90-91-AD_Q-002_7h_18mm_3,00g-s.jpg
024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0725, RIC II(1962) 0157, AR-Denarius, Rome, IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right#1138 views024c Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0725, RIC II(1962) 0157, AR-Denarius, Rome, IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right#1
avers:- IMP-CAES-DOMIT-AVG-GERM-P-M-TR-P-XI, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- IMP-XXI-COS-XV-CENS-P-P-P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, brandishing thunderbolt and shield; owl at her feet.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,00g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 91-92 A.D., ref: RIC 0725, RIC II(1962) 0157 p- , RSC-270, BMCRE-183,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Anonymous-AE-QuadransHelmeted-Cuirassed-Minerva_right_Owl-left_S-C_RIC-II-8-p-216_Q-001_h_mm_ga-s.jpg
024d Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC II(1962) 008, Anonymus AE-Quadrans, Rome, Owl standing half left, S/C//--, #175 views024d Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC II(1962) 008, Anonymus AE-Quadrans, Rome, Owl standing half left, S/C//--, #1
Anonymous AE Quadrans. Time of Domitian to Antoninus Pius.
avers: Draped, cuirassed bust of Minerva right, wearing Corinthian helmet.
revers: Owl standing hal left.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: mm, weight: , axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 84-85 A.D., ref: RIC II(1962) 008, p-216,
Q-001
quadrans
V920sm.jpg
03 Domitian as Caesar RIC 92098 viewsAR Denarius, 2.96g
Rome mint, 76-77AD (Vespasian)
RIC 920 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1947. RSC 45b.
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Minerva stg. r. on prow, with spear and shield; to r., owl
Ex Private Collection.

The first appearance of Minerva on a denarius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian. His devotion to the goddess came early in life, so it comes as no surprise he wished to honour her on the coins minted in his name. This denarius is a clear indication Domitian had some say in what reverse types were struck for him under Vespasian. The Minerva on prow is an early prototype of one of the four standard Minerva types (M2) Domitian would later extensively strike on his own denarii as Augustus. An extremely rare type for him as Caesar.

A pleasing coin with a Vespasian-like portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton
Marc-Aurelius_AR-Den_AVRELIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-II-FIL_TR-POT-VIIII-COS-II_RIC-463B-A-Pius_RSC-676_Rome-156-57-AD_Q-001_5h_18,5-19mm_3,27g-s.jpg
037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0463a. (Ant. Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, TR POT VIIII COS II, Minerva standing left,173 views037a Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0463a. (Ant. Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, TR POT VIIII COS II, Minerva standing left,
avers: AVRELIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-II-FIL, Bare head right.
revers: TR-POT-VIIII-COS-II, Minerva standing left, holding owl, left hand rests on shield, and spear rests against left arm.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19mm, weight: 3,27g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 154-155 A.D., ref: RIC-III-463a. (Ant. Pius), p-86, C-676, RSC-676, BMCRE 837,
Q-001
quadrans
037_Marcus-Aurelius_AE-26_M-AVR-ANTONINVS-AVG-Laur-cuirass-r__C-L-I-COR-Minerva-l_-holding-Nike-altar-spear-r_owl_st_facing_Corinth-160-180-AD_Q-001_h_26mm_12,81g-s~0.jpg
037p Marcus Aurelius (161-180 A.D.), Corinth, Achaea, AE-26, Minerva/Athena standing left,65 views037p Marcus Aurelius (161-180 A.D.), Corinth, Achaea, AE-26, Minerva/Athena standing left,
avers:- M-AVR-ANTONINVS-AVG, Laureate-headed bust of Marcus Aurelius wearing cuirass, right.
revers:- C-L-I-COR, Minerva/Athena standing, left, holding Victoria/Nike over altar and spear; to right, owl standing, facing.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 26mm, weight: 12,81g, axis: 4h,
mint: Corinth, Achaea, date: 161-180 AD., ref: BCD Corinth 688, Lanz 105 (26/11/2001), coll. BCD, http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/5160/
Q-001
quadrans
GI_038a_img.jpg
039 - Nerva Ar Drachm - SNG Cop. 4424 viewsObv:–AVTOKPAT NEPOYAC KAICAP CEBACT, Laureate bust right; L-Y across field
Rev:– YPATOY TRITOY, Two lyres (chelyes), owl above
Minted in Lycia, Lycian League. A.D. 97
Reference:– SNG Cop. 44; SNG von Aulock 4266; BMC Lycia p. 39, 6
 
Some surface lamination issues.
maridvnvm
40a.jpg
040a Commodus. AR Denarius19 viewsobv: M COMMODVS ATON AVG PIVS laur. head r.
rev: TRP VIIII IMP_VI COS III PPMinerva adv. r. brandishing javelin and shield
at feet owl or var. spinx
hill132
Commodus_AR-Den_M-COMMODVS-ANTON-AVG-PIVS_TR-P-VIII-IMP-VI-COS-IIII-P-P_RIC-III-72-p-373_C-424_Rome_183-4-AD_Q-001_axis-0h_17mm_3,42g-s.jpg
041b Commodus (166-180 A.D. as Caesar, 180-192 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0072, Rome, AR-denarius, TR P VIIII IMP VI COS IIII P P, Minerva advancing right,288 views041b Commodus (166-180 A.D. as Caesar, 180-192 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0072, Rome, AR-denarius, TR P VIIII IMP VI COS IIII P P, Minerva advancing right,
avers:- M-COMMODVS-ANTON-AVG-PIVS, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-VIIII-IMP-VI-COS-IIII-P-P, Minerva advancing right, aiming spear and holding shield; owl to lower right.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17 mm, weight: 3,42 g, axis: 0 h ,
mint: Rome, date: 183-184 A.D., ref: RIC-III-072, p-373, C-424,
Q-001
quadrans
RI_051u_img.jpg
051 - Marcus Aurelius Sestertius - RIC III Pius 132129 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv:– AVRELIVS CAE-SAR AVG PII FIL, Bare-headed, draped bust right
Rev:– TR POT VIIII COS II S-C, Minerva standing left, holding owl and spear, shield at her side
Minted in Rome mint. A.D. 154-155
Reference:– Cohen 678. RIC III Pius 1321
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_051o_img.jpg
051 - Marcus Aurelius Sestertius - RIC III Pius 132547 viewsObv:– AVRELIVS CAES ANTON AVG PII F, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– TR POT X COS II, S C, Minerva standing left holding owl and spear; shield at left side
Minted in Rome mint. A.D. 155-156
Reference:– BMCRE 2007. Cohen 687. RIC III Pius 1325.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
IMG_3676.jpg
08 Constantius II68 viewsConstantius II
AE 2
24.75 mm 5.14g
D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, helmeted soldier standing left, spearing fallen horseman who is wearing a bowl-shaped helmet, clutching the horse's neck. Star in left field. Mintmark SMHA.
Heraclea
RIC VIII 67

ex Steve
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
athensfraction.jpg
1. Attica, Athens. 460-455 BC. (Most Likely an Eastern imitation)90 viewsAR Obol.
obv: Helmeted head of Athena right
rev: Owl standing right, head facing, AQE to right, leaf to left.
CGPCGP
tyre.jpg
1/12 Shekel, Hippocamp/ Owl42 viewsPhoenicia, Tyre, c. 332-275 BC, 1/12 Shekel, 0.66g. SG-5916, BM-43. Obv: Hippocamp l. Rx: Owl stg. l., crook and flail under wing. Ex John Twente Animal Collection, purchased from Amphora, 1/26/79. VF; area of weak strike. Ex Twente & H.J.BerkPodiceps
image2_(1).JPG
11 Constantius II55 viewsConstantius II
26 mm
DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
laureate, rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right, holding globe; A behind bust
RE-PARATIO
bowl-shaped helmet with bobble directly on top, kneeling on one knee, hand up
R Epsilon / * over A left
Rome 174
Scarce
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
1205_-_1216_John_AR_Penny_Dublin.JPG
1199-1216, John, AR Penny, Struck 1207 – 1211 at Dublin, Ireland5 viewsObverse: IOHANNES REX around triangle enclosing a crowned and draped facing bust of King John holding, in his right hand, a sceptre tipped with a cross pommée which extends through the side of the triangle into the legend. Quatrefoil to right of bust.
Reverse: ROBERD ON DIVE around triangle containing sun over crescent moon and a star in each angle. Cross pattée at apex of each point of the triangle and above legend on each of the three sides. Moneyer, Roberd.
Third issue “REX” coinage, struck to the same weight and fineness as the English standard.
This was the only coinage struck by King John in his own name.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 1.2gms | Die Axis: 4
SPINK: 6228

John was King of England from 1199 until his death in 1216. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the first Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.
John, the youngest of the five sons of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, was not expected to inherit significant lands which resulted in him being given the nickname John Lackland. However, after the failed rebellion of his elder brothers between 1173 and 1174, John became Henry's favourite child. He was appointed Lord of Ireland in 1177 and given lands in England and on the continent. John's elder brothers William, Henry and Geoffrey died young and when Richard I became king in 1189, John was the potential heir to the throne. John unsuccessfully attempted a rebellion against Richard's administration whilst his brother was participating in the Third Crusade but despite this, after Richard died in 1199, John was proclaimed King of England.
King John contracted dysentery at Lynn in 1216 but, just before his death, he managed to dictate a brief will. This will still survives and as part of it John requested: "I will that my body be buried in the church of St. Mary and St. Wulfstan of Worcester".
Some of King John's favourite hunting grounds were in Worcester, at Kinver and Feckenham, and he had a special affection for Saint Wulfstan, one of the two great Anglo-Saxon saints whose shrines and tombs were also at Worcester. Both Saint Wulfstan and Saint Oswald can be seen in miniature beside the head of the effigy of King John on his tomb.
Medieval effigies usually show the subject in the prime of life, however the effigy on King John's tomb is unique in that not only is it a life-like image of him, it is also the oldest royal effigy in England.
King John's tomb has been opened twice, once in 1529 and again in 1797. At the first opening it was said that John's head was covered with a monk's cowl, however it is now thought that this was probably his coronation cap. When the tomb was opened for the second time the antiquarians responsible discovered that a robe of crimson damask had originally covered the king's body but, by 1797, most of the embroidery had deteriorated. They also found the remains of a sword which lay down the left side of the body along with parts of its scabbard.
2 comments*Alex
antoninuspius RIC201.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AR denarius - struck 150-151 AD44 viewsobv: IMP CAES T AEL HADR ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P (laureate head right)
rev: TR POT XIIII COS IIII / PIETAS (Pietas standing right, holding hind by the neck & plate of fruits over altar to right)
ref: RIC 201 (S), RSC 616 (5frcs)
3.25gms, 18mm,
Rare

Unusual and rare reverse. Piety meant the right and proper observance of religious ritual, a duty which fell to every citizen, and to the emperor as much or more than to anyone else. In this coin Pietas is holding a bowl of fruits above an altar with one hand, while the other trails a hind for the sacrifice. The bowl of fruits as an offering is also seen in coins showing Fides.
berserker
maurel sest-minerva.jpg
139-161 AD - AURELIUS Caesar AE sestertius - struck 154 AD41 viewsobv: AVRELIVS CAESAR ANTONINI AVG P II FIL (bare & draped bust right)
rev:TR POT VIII COS II (Minerva standing right holding spear & owl), S-C in field
ref:RIC III 1312 (Ant.Pius), C.666
26.88gms, 32mm,
berserker
M.Aurelius RIC450a.jpg
139-161 AD - AURELIUS Caesar AR denarius - struck 149-150 AD43 viewsobv: AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG P II FIL (bare head right)
rev: TR POT IIII COS II (Minerva, helmeted, standing left, holding spear & lefting left hand on shield, & holding owl in right hand)
ref: similar to RIC III 450a(Ant.Pius), C.634 (but without owl!)
3.40gms, 18mm,
Rare, not in RIC
berserker
0023-065.jpg
1608 - Lepidus and Octavian, Denarius148 viewsDenarius minted in Italy, 42 BC
LEPIDVS PONT MAX III V R P C, bare head of Lepidus right (NT and MA in monograms)
C CAESAR IMPIII VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right (MP in monogram)
3.78 gr
Ref : HCRI # 140, RCV # 1523, Cohen # 2

The following from forum catalog :
"Lepidus was a faithful follower of Julius Caesar, and he served as Praetor and Consul. When Caesar was assassinated, Lepidus was in charge of the cavalry and commanded a legion. This position secured him a place in the Second Triumvirate along Marc Antony and Octavian. His cut was Africa. When Octavian attacked Sextus Pompey's Sicily, Lepidus' ships and troops supported him. In an uninspired move, Lepidus thought he could force Octavian to leave him the island. The two armies separated and isolated skirmishes occurred, but soon the soldiers sick of yet another civil war, acknowledging Octavian's superiority deserted Lepidus en-masse. Lepidus left the island as a simple civilian, retaining only his priesthood, but he was the only defeated Imperator not to suffer a violent death."
2 commentsPotator II
1660_woodcut_colosseum_37.jpg
1660 Roman Woodcut Prints87 viewsDate: ca. AD 1660, Anonymous
Size: 16 x 10.7 cm

This is an leaf from a book on Rome from circa AD 1660. It has hand colored images of various Roman architecture (including the Colosseum). It has rough edges and some minor age toning, but overall the pictures are intact, brightly colored, and beautifully preserved. This book was published during the reign of Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor. In the seventeenth century, the city of Rome became the consummate statement of Catholic majesty and triumph expressed in all the arts. Baroque architects, artists, and urban planners so magnified and invigorated the classical and ecclesiastical traditions of the city that it became for centuries after the acknowledged capital of the European art world, not only a focus for tourists and artists but also a watershed of inspiration throughout the Western world.
3 commentsNoah
1791_Leeds_Halfpenny.JPG
1791 AE Halfpenny Token. Leeds, Yorkshire.32 viewsObverse: ARTIS NOSTRÆ CONDITOR •. Standing figure of Bishop Blaize (patron saint of woolcombers) holding a wool comb in his raised right hand and a book and crosier in his left; at his feet, to right, a lamb facing right with it's head turned to left.
Reverse: LEEDS HALFPENNY 1791. Coat of arms of the City of Leeds consisting of a shield containing three stars and a hanging fleece, crested by an owl. The date, 17 - 91, bisected by the base of the shield.
Edge: “PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE OF RICHARD PALEY •XX•".
Diameter: 29mm | Axis: 6
Dalton & Hamer: 45 | Conder: 20 (Yorkshire)

This token was issued by Richard Paley, a freeholder, maltster, soap-boiler and chandler with a business in a locality known as the “Calls” in Leeds. The token was manufactured by Matthew Bolton at his SOHO Mint in Birmingham, the dies were engraved by Henry Brownbill.

Bishop Blaise, also known as Saint Blasius, was a well-known martyr from Armenia, who as the price of his faith, back in the 4th century, had been put to death by being raked with red-hot rakes. Later he was adopted as the Patron Saint of Woolcombers and, appropriately, his effigy is usually shown holding a rake. On this token, however, Bishop Blaise is shown holding the traditional bishop's crosier.
*Alex
1794_Whale_Fishery_Halfpenny.JPG
1794 AE Halfpenny Token. London Middlesex.24 viewsObverse: HALFPENNY•. Bust of Neptune, with trident across his right shoulder, facing right.
Reverse: PAYABLE AT I:FOWLER’s LONDON•. Whale fishing scene consisting of four men in a small boat harpooning a whale; below, WHALE FISHERY / 1794 in two lines.
Edge: Plain.
Diameter 29mm | Die Axis 12
Dalton & Hamer: 306

The dies for this token were engraved by Thomas Wyon and it was manufactured by Thomas Mynd in Birmingham.
The token was issued by J. Fowler who was an oil merchant and tin-plate worker with a business at 78, Long Acre, at the West End of London.
*Alex
1795_GLAMORGAN_HALF-PENNY_TOKEN.JPG
1795 AE Halfpenny, Glamorgan, South Wales.62 viewsObverse: JESTYN • AP • GWRGAN • TYWYSOG • MORGANWG • 1091•. Crowned and robed bust of Jestyn ap Gwrgan facing left, wearing a small shield bearing the St George's cross suspended on a chain round his neck.
Reverse: Y • BRENHIN • AR • GYFRAITH •. Britannia facing left, seated on a globe, her right hand pointing to a ship, her left supporting a shield and a spear; behind her a cippus with a crown on top and a laurel branch leaning against it; in exergue, 1795.
Edge: "GLAMORGAN HALFPENNY" in raised letters, followed by three leaves.
Diameter: 29mm
Dalton & Hamer:3b (Glamorganshire)

This token is thought to have been engraved and manufactured by John Stubbs Jordan, a Birmingham ironfounder for his father, William Jordan, who had returned to South Wales, possibly to Merthyr Tydfil. The Jordens were of Welsh descent and had come to Staffordshire earlier in the century. The father, William Jorden, a victualler from Weaman Street, Birmingham, retired and moved back to South Wales in the early 1780s and in 1794 his son, John Stubbs Jorden, who had remained back in Birmingham, made this Welsh token for his father as a private piece.
This is the only eighteenth century token with Welsh legends.

Jestyn ap Gwrgan, or Gwrgant, was the last Prince and Lord of Glamorgan of British blood. He was of the royal house of Morganwg, which had a lineage stretching back over five centuries to Tewdrig (c.550-584 C.E.). The members of this royal house had links to the other royal houses of Wales through marriage, and were descendants of the celebrated Rhodri Mawr. Jestyn ap Gwrgan's base is believed to have been at Dinas Powis, south of Cardiff. He probably ruled Glamorgan for a little less than a decade around 1081-1090 C.E.
The popular version of historical events is that Jestyn, following a dispute with his rival Einion ap Collwyn, invited the Norman ruler Robert Fitzhamon, lord of Gloucester, and his twelve knights into the region to settle the matter. Once invited in, the Normans refused to leave, Jestyn was deposed and Fitzhamon, having established a lordship based in Cardiff, subsequently conquered the lowlands of Glamorgan, which was parcelled out to his followers. The undesirable mountainous parts of Glamorgan Fitzhamon left in Welsh control. However this story, dating from at least the 15th century, where it touches known historical facts, is demonstrably wrong.
Nowadays there are many people living in South Wales with the surname of Williams who claim to be descended from Jestyn ap Gwrgan. This is not impossible because Jestyn ap Gwrgan had a large family. Notable people who may have been descended from Jestyn ap Gwrgan are the Tudor Monarchs of England, Oliver Cromwell (whose real surname was Williams) and also, being of Welsh descent, Winston Churchill, Princess Diana and several Presidents of The United States of America.
1 comments*Alex
1795_NORTH_WALES_HALFPENNY.JPG
1795 AE Halfpenny, North Wales, Anglesey.17 viewsObverse: No legend. Druid's head wearing cowl facing left, surrounded by oak wreath; engraver's initial "W" (for Wyon) in raised letters at bottom of bust (see inset).
Reverse: RULE BRITANNIA. Britannia facing left, seated on globe, her right hand holding spear, her left arm holding laurel-branch and resting on shield at her side; in exergue, 1795.
Edge: PAYABLE IN LONDON, the rest engrailed.
Diameter: 29mm
Dalton & Hamer: 429
RARE

The diesinker for this token was Thomas Wyon and it was probably manufactured by Peter Kempson at his works in Birmingham.
The Druid's head was a feature of the Parys Mine in Anglesey, North Wales and was used on some of the earliest issues of 18th century Tokens.
This piece was issued for general circulation.
*Alex
18_Owls_from_Top_Tray.jpg
18 Owls11 viewscicerokid
IMG_2455.JPG
19 Constantius II75 viewsConstantius II
AE 2
23mm 4.51g
D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, helmeted soldier standing left, spearing fallen horseman who is wearing a bowl-shaped helmet, clutching the horse's neck. Star in left field. Mintmark SMHA.
Heraclea
RIC VIII 67
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
rjb_2012_07_09.jpg
19834 viewsCaracalla
Denarius
Obv: ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right viewed from front
Rev: PONTIF TRP III
Sol standing facing, head left, holding globe and spear
Rome mint
RIC - (cf 30)
Note from Curtis L Clay:
Denarii with bust seen from front in this era are very unusual.

With obv. legend ANTONINVS - AVGVSTVS I had previously been aware of only a single bust-front denarius obv. die: with rev. SECVRIT ORBIS in coll. of Forvm member septimus, used as his avatar, and with rev. PONT TR P II, same Securitas seated rev. type, in Oxford (Evans), from the East of England hoard of 1898.

Your coin is a new bust variety to my knowledge, of 200 AD and thus, as was to be expected, from a different obv. die than those two other bust-front denarii of 199.
mauseus
PCrassusDenAmazon.jpg
1ab Marcus Licinius Crassus172 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Pompey in 60 BC, killed at Carrhae in Parthia in 53 BC.

Denarius, minted by son, P Licinius Crassus, ca 54 BC.
Bust of Venus, right, SC behind
Amazon with horse, P CRASSVS MF.

These coins were probably minted to pay Crassus' army for the invasion of Parthia. The reverse figure is sometimes described as a warrior or Gaulish horseman, but this example clearly accords with those who identify the figure as a woman! Member of the first triumvirate, 59-53 BC.

Seaby, Licinia 18

Plutarch wrote of Crassus: People were wont to say that the many virtues of Crassus were darkened by the one vice of avarice, and indeed he seemed to have no other but that; for it being the most predominant, obscured others to which he was inclined. The arguments in proof of his avarice were the vastness of his estate, and the manner of raising it; for whereas at first he was not worth above three hundred talents, yet, though in the course of his political life he dedicated the tenth of all he had to Hercules, and feasted the people, and gave to every citizen corn enough to serve him three months, upon casting up his accounts, before he went upon his Parthian expedition, he found his possessions to amount to seven thousand one hundred talents; most of which, if we may scandal him with a truth, he got by fire and rapine, making his advantages of the public calamities. . . . Crassus, however, was very eager to be hospitable to strangers; he kept open house, and to his friends he would lend money without interest, but called it in precisely at the time; so that his kindness was often thought worse than the paying the interest would have been. His entertainments were, for the most part, plain and citizen-like, the company general and popular; good taste and kindness made them pleasanter than sumptuosity would have done. As for learning he chiefly cared for rhetoric, and what would be serviceable with large numbers; he became one of the best speakers at Rome, and by his pains and industry outdid the best natural orators. . . . Besides, the people were pleased with his courteous and unpretending salutations and greetings, for he never met any citizen however humble and low, but he returned him his salute by name. He was looked upon as a man well-read in history, and pretty well versed in Aristotle's philosophy. . . . Crassus was killed by a Parthian, called Pomaxathres; others say by a different man, and that Pomaxathres only cut off his head and right hand after he had fallen. But this is conjecture rather than certain knowledge, for those that were by had not leisure to observe particulars. . . .
2 commentsBlindado
PCrassusDenAmazon~0.jpg
1ab Marcus Licinius Crassus17 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Pompey in 60 BC, killed at Carrhae in Parthia in 53 BC.

Denarius, minted by son, P Licinius Crassus, ca 54 BC.
Bust of Venus, right, SC behind
Amazon with horse, P CRASSVS MF.

Seaby, Licinia 18

These coins were probably minted to pay Crassus' army for the invasion of Parthia, which led to its destruction. My synthesis of reviewing 90 examples of this issue revealed a female warrior wearing a soft felt Scythian cap with ear flaps; a fabric garment with a decorated skirt to the knees; probably trousers; an ornate war belt; a baldric; a cape, animal skin, or shoulder cord on attached to the left shoulder; and decorated calf-high boots. She matches the historically confirmed garb of the real amazons—Scythian horsewomen—and of course holds her steed. The horse’s tack is consistent with archeological discoveries of tack in use by Scythians and Romans.

Adrienne Mayor writes that amazon imagery on Greek vases suddenly appeared in 575-550 BC, initially depicting them in Greek-style armor. By the end of the century, as the Greeks learned more through direct and indirect contact with Scythians, they began to appear wearing archeologically confirmed Scythian-Sarmatian-Thracian patterned attire. (Adrienne Mayor, The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2014, 199-200). To this, artists added their own creative ideas regarding colors, fabric patterns, and decorations. “They dressed the warrior women in body-hugging ‘unitards’ or tunics, short chitons or belted dresses, sometimes over leggings or trousers. . . . In paintings and sculpture, pointed or soft Scythian caps with earflaps or ties (kidaris) soon replaced the Greek helmets, and the women wear a variety of belts, baldrics (diagonal straps), corselets, shoulder cords or bands, and crisscrossing leather straps attached to belt loops like those worn by the archer huntress Artemis. . . . Amazon footgear included soft leather moccasin-like shoes, calf-high boots (endromides), or taller laced boots (embades) with scallops or flaps and lined with felt or fur.” (Mayor, 202)

The artists apparently had detailed knowledge of gear used by real Scythian horsewomen to equip their imagined Amazons. “Archeological discoveries of well-preserved sets of clothing confirm that real horsewomen of ancient Scythian lands dressed much as did those described in Greek texts and illustrated in Scythian and Greek artwork.” (Mayor, 203)
1 commentsBlindado
PCrassusDenAmazon2.jpg
1ab_2 Marcus Licinius Crassus34 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Pompey in 60 BC, killed at Carrhae in Parthia in 53 BC.

Denarius, minted by son, P Licinius Crassus, ca 54 BC.
Bust of Venus, right, SC behind
Amazon with horse, P CRASSVS MF.

Seaby, Licinia 18

These coins were probably minted to pay Crassus' army for the invasion of Parthia. My synthesis of reviewing 90 examples of this issue revealed a female warrior wearing a soft felt Scythian cap with ear flaps (visible in this example); a fabric garment with a decorated skirt to the knees; probably trousers; an ornate war belt; a baldric; a cape, animal skin, or shoulder cord on attached to the left shoulder; and decorated calf-high boots. She matches the historically confirmed garb of the real amazons—Scythian horsewomen—and of course holds her steed. The horse’s tack is consistent with archeological discoveries of tack in use by Scythians and Romans.

Adrienne Mayor writes that amazon imagery on Greek vases suddenly appeared in 575-550 BC, initially depicting them in Greek-style armor. By the end of the century, as the Greeks learned more through direct and indirect contact with Scythians, they began to appear wearing archeologically confirmed Scythian-Sarmatian-Thracian patterned attire. (Adrienne Mayor, The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2014, 199-200). To this, artists added their own creative ideas regarding colors, fabric patterns, and decorations. “They dressed the warrior women in body-hugging ‘unitards’ or tunics, short chitons or belted dresses, sometimes over leggings or trousers. . . . In paintings and sculpture, pointed or soft Scythian caps with earflaps or ties (kidaris) soon replaced the Greek helmets, and the women wear a variety of belts, baldrics (diagonal straps), corselets, shoulder cords or bands, and crisscrossing leather straps attached to belt loops like those worn by the archer huntress Artemis. . . . Amazon footgear included soft leather moccasin-like shoes, calf-high boots (endromides), or taller laced boots (embades) with scallops or flaps and lined with felt or fur.” (Mayor, 202)
The artists apparently had detailed knowledge of gear used by real Scythian horsewomen to equip their imagined Amazons. “Archeological discoveries of well-preserved sets of clothing confirm that real horsewomen of ancient Scythian lands dressed much as did those described in Greek texts and illustrated in Scythian and Greek artwork.” (Mayor, 203)

Plutarch wrote of Crassus: People were wont to say that the many virtues of Crassus were darkened by the one vice of avarice, and indeed he seemed to have no other but that; for it being the most predominant, obscured others to which he was inclined. The arguments in proof of his avarice were the vastness of his estate, and the manner of raising it; for whereas at first he was not worth above three hundred talents, yet, though in the course of his political life he dedicated the tenth of all he had to Hercules, and feasted the people, and gave to every citizen corn enough to serve him three months, upon casting up his accounts, before he went upon his Parthian expedition, he found his possessions to amount to seven thousand one hundred talents; most of which, if we may scandal him with a truth, he got by fire and rapine, making his advantages of the public calamities. . . . Crassus, however, was very eager to be hospitable to strangers; he kept open house, and to his friends he would lend money without interest, but called it in precisely at the time; so that his kindness was often thought worse than the paying the interest would have been. His entertainments were, for the most part, plain and citizen-like, the company general and popular; good taste and kindness made them pleasanter than sumptuosity would have done. As for learning he chiefly cared for rhetoric, and what would be serviceable with large numbers; he became one of the best speakers at Rome, and by his pains and industry outdid the best natural orators. . . . Besides, the people were pleased with his courteous and unpretending salutations and greetings, for he never met any citizen however humble and low, but he returned him his salute by name. He was looked upon as a man well-read in history, and pretty well versed in Aristotle's philosophy. . . . Crassus was killed by a Parthian, called Pomaxathres; others say by a different man, and that Pomaxathres only cut off his head and right hand after he had fallen. But this is conjecture rather than certain knowledge, for those that were by had not leisure to observe particulars. . . .
1 commentsBlindado
PCrassusDenAmazon2~1.jpg
1ab_2 Marcus Licinius Crassus35 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Pompey in 60 BC, killed at Carrhae in Parthia in 53 BC.

Denarius, minted by son, P Licinius Crassus, ca 54 BC.
Bust of Venus, right, SC behind
Amazon with horse, P CRASSVS MF.

Seaby, Licinia 18

These coins were probably minted to pay Crassus' army for the invasion of Parthia, which led to its destruction. My synthesis of reviewing 90 examples of this issue revealed a female warrior wearing a soft felt Scythian cap with ear flaps (visible in this example); a fabric garment with a decorated skirt to the knees; probably trousers; an ornate war belt; a baldric; a cape, animal skin, or shoulder cord on attached to the left shoulder; and decorated calf-high boots. She matches the historically confirmed garb of the real amazons—Scythian horsewomen—and of course holds her steed. The horse’s tack is consistent with archeological discoveries of tack in use by Scythians and Romans.

Adrienne Mayor writes that amazon imagery on Greek vases suddenly appeared in 575-550 BC, initially depicting them in Greek-style armor. By the end of the century, as the Greeks learned more through direct and indirect contact with Scythians, they began to appear wearing archeologically confirmed Scythian-Sarmatian-Thracian patterned attire. (Adrienne Mayor, The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2014, 199-200). To this, artists added their own creative ideas regarding colors, fabric patterns, and decorations. “They dressed the warrior women in body-hugging ‘unitards’ or tunics, short chitons or belted dresses, sometimes over leggings or trousers. . . . In paintings and sculpture, pointed or soft Scythian caps with earflaps or ties (kidaris) soon replaced the Greek helmets, and the women wear a variety of belts, baldrics (diagonal straps), corselets, shoulder cords or bands, and crisscrossing leather straps attached to belt loops like those worn by the archer huntress Artemis. . . . Amazon footgear included soft leather moccasin-like shoes, calf-high boots (endromides), or taller laced boots (embades) with scallops or flaps and lined with felt or fur.” (Mayor, 202)

The artists apparently had detailed knowledge of gear used by real Scythian horsewomen to equip their imagined Amazons. “Archeological discoveries of well-preserved sets of clothing confirm that real horsewomen of ancient Scythian lands dressed much as did those described in Greek texts and illustrated in Scythian and Greek artwork.” (Mayor, 203)
2 commentsBlindado
GalbaDenVictory.jpg
1at Galba31 views68-69

Denarius

Laureate head, right, SER GALBA IMP CAESAR AVG P M TR P
Victory standing on globe, VICTORIA PR

RIC 111

Suetonius recorded: Servius Galba, the future emperor was born on the 24th of December, 3BC, in the consulship of Marcus Valerius Messala and Gnaeus Lentulus, at a hillside mansion near Terracina, on the left of the road to Fundi (Fondi). He was formally adopted by his stepmother Livia Ocellina, and took the name Livius and the surname Ocella, also changing his forename to Lucius, until he became Emperor.

It is common knowledge that when calling on Augustus to pay his respects, with other boys of his age, the Emperor pinched his cheek, and said in Greek: ‘You too will have a taste of power, my child.’ And when Tiberius heard the prophecy that Galba would be emperor in old age, he commented: ‘Well let him be, it’s no concern of mine.’

Galba achieved office before the usual age and as praetor (in 20AD), controlling the games at the Floralia, he was the first to introduce a display of tightrope-walking elephants. He next governed Aquitania, for almost a year, and not long afterwards held the consulship for six months (in 33AD). When Caligula was assassinated (in 41AD), Galba chose neutrality though many urged him to seize the opportunity for power. Claudius expressed his gratitude by including him among his intimate friends, and Galba was shown such consideration that the expedition to Britain was delayed to allow him to recover from a sudden but minor indisposition. Later he was proconsul in Africa for two years (44/45AD), being singled out, and so avoiding the usual lottery, to restore order in the province, which was riven by internecine rivalry and an indigenous revolt. He re-established peace, by the exercise of ruthless discipline, and the display of justice even in the most trifling matters. . . .

But when word from the City arrived that Nero was dead and that the people had sworn allegiance to him, he set aside the title of governor and assumed that of Caesar. He then began his march to Rome in a general’s cloak, with a dagger, hanging from his neck, at his chest, and did not resume the toga until his main rivals had been eliminated, namely the commander of the Praetorian Guard in Rome, Nymphidius Sabinus, and the commanders in Germany and Africa, Fonteius Capito and Clodius Macer. . . . His prestige and popularity were greater while winning power than wielding it, though he showed evidence of being a more than capable ruler, loved less, unfortunately, for his good qualities than he was hated for his bad ones.

He was even warned of the danger of imminent assassination, the day before his death, by a soothsayer, as he offered the morning sacrifice. Shortly afterwards he learnt that Otho had secured the Guards camp, and when his staff advised him to carry the day by his presence and prestige, by going there immediately, he opted instead to stay put, but gather a strong bodyguard of legionaries from their billets around the City. He did however don a linen corselet, though saying that frankly it would serve little against so many weapons. False reports, put about by the conspirators to lure him into appearing in public, deceived a few of his close supporters, who rashly told him the rebellion was over, the plotters overthrown, and that the rest of the troops were on their way to congratulate him and carry out his orders. So he went to meet them, with such confidence, that when a soldier boasted of killing Otho, he snapped out: ‘On whose authority?’ before hastening on to the Forum. The cavalrymen who had been ordered to find and kill him, who were spurring through the streets scattering the crowds of civilians, now caught sight of him in the distance and halted an instant before galloping towards him and cutting him down, while his staff ran for their lives.
Blindado
TrajanSestCeres~0.jpg
1bc Trajan48 views98-117

Sestertius
Laureate head, right, IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V PP
Roma and kneeling Dacian, SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI SC

RIC 485

Eutropius enthused: To [Nerva] succeeded ULPIUS CRINITUS TRAJANUS, born at Italica in Spain, of a family rather ancient than eminent for his father was the first consul in it. He was chosen emperor at Agrippina, a city of Gaul. He exercised the government in such a manner, that he is deservedly preferred to all the other emperors. He was a man of extraordinary skill in managing affairs of state, and of remarkable courage. The limits of the Roman empire, which, since the reign of Augustus, had been rather defended than honourably enlarged, he extended far and wide. He rebuilt some cities in Germany; he subdued Dacia by the overthrow of Decebalus, and formed a province beyond the Danube, in that territory which the Thaiphali, Victoali, and Theruingi now occupy. This province was a thousand miles in circumference.

He recovered Armenia, which the Parthians had seized, putting to death Parthamasires who held the government of it. He gave a king to the Albani. He received into alliance the king of the Iberians, Sarmatians, Bosporani, Arabians, Osdroeni, and Colchians. He obtained the mastery over the Cordueni and Marcomedi, as well as over Anthemusia, an extensive region of Persia. He conquered and kept possession of Seleucia, Ctesiphon, Babylon, and the country of the Messenii. He advanced as far as the boundaries of India, and the Red Sea, where he formed three provinces, Armenia, Assyria, and Mesopotamia, including the tribes which border on Madena. He afterwards, too, reduced Arabia into the form of a province. He also fitted out a fleet for the Red Sea, that he might use it to lay waste the coasts of India.

Yet he went beyond his glory in war, in ability and judgment as a ruler, conducting himself as an equal towards all, going often to his friends as a visitor, either when they were ill, or when they were celebrating feast days, and entertaining them in his turn at banquets where there was no distinction of rank, and sitting frequently with them in their chariots; doing nothing unjust towards any of the senators, nor being guilty of any dishonesty to fill his treasury; exercising liberality to all, enriching with offices of trust, publicly and privately, every body whom he had known even with the least familiarity; building towns throughout the world, granting many immunities to states, and doing every thing with gentleness and kindness; so that during his whole reign, there was but one senator condemned, and he was sentenced by the senate without Trajan's knowledge. Hence, being regarded throughout the world as next to a god, he deservedly obtained the highest veneration both living and dead. . . .

After having gained the greatest glory both in the field and at home, he was cut off, as he was returning from Persia, by a diarrhoea, at Seleucia in Isauria. He died in the sixty-third year, ninth month, and fourth day of his age, and in the nineteenth year, sixth month, and fifteenth day of his reign. He was enrolled among the gods, and was the only one of all the emperors that was buried within the city. His bones, contained in a golden urn, lie in the forum which he himself built, under a pillar whose height is a hundred and forty-four feet. So much respect has been paid to his memory, that, even to our own times, they shout in acclamations to the emperors, "More fortunate than Augustus, better than Trajan!"
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1bx Macrinus38 views217-218

Denarius

Laureate draped bust, right, IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG
Providentia stg, PROVIDENTIA DEORVM

RIC 80

According to the Historia Augusta, which concedes that almost nothing was known about Macrinus: Though of humble origin and shameless in spirit as well as in countenance, and though hated by all, both civilians and soldiers, he nevertheless proclaimed himself now Severus and now Antoninus. Then he set out at once for the Parthian war and thus gave no opportunity either for the soldiers to form an opinion of him, or for the gossip by which he was beset to gain its full strength. The senators, however, out of hatred for Antoninus Bassianus, received him as emperor gladly. . . . Now to his son, previously called Diadumenianus, he gave the name Antoninus (after he had himself assumed the appellation Felix) in order to avert the suspicion of having slain Antoninus. This same name was afterwards taken by Varius Elagabalus also, who claimed to be the son of Bassianus, a most filthy creature and the son of a harlot. . . .

And so, having been acclaimed emperor, Macrinus assumed the imperial power and set out against the Parthians with a great array, eager to blot out the lowliness of his family and the infamy of his early life by a magnificent victory. But after fighting a battle with the Parthians he was killed in a revolt of the legions, which had deserted to Varius Elagabalus. He reigned, however, for more than a year.

Macrinus, then, was arrogant and bloodthirsty and desirous of ruling in military fashion. He found fault even with the discipline of former times and lauded Severus alone above all others. For he even crucified soldiers and always used the punishments meted out to slaves, and when he had to deal with a mutiny among the troops, he usually decimated the soldiers but sometimes he only centimated them. This last was an expression of his own, for he used to say that he was merciful in putting to death only one in a hundred. . . .

This is one of my favorite pieces because I bought it completely covered with crud and set about cleaning it. Boy was I surprised!
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1by Diadumenianus15 views218

AE Nikopolis

Bare head, right, Portrait, right, M OPELLIOC ANTWNEINOC K

Hygieia standing left holding serpent patera, VP CTATI LONGINOV NIKOPOLITWN PROC ICTP

Son of Macrinus. I picked this out of a junk coins bowl many years ago.

Varbanov 3681
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1ch Maximinus51 views235-238

Denarius

Laureate draped bust, right, IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
Pax stg, PAX AVGVSTI

RIC 12

Herodian recorded: There was in the Roman army a man named Maximinus whose half-barbarian family lived in a village in the most remote section of Thrace. They say that as a boy he was a shepherd, but that in his youthful prime he was drafted into the cavalry because of his size and strength. After a short time, favored by Fortune, he advanced through all the military ranks, rising eventually to the command of armies and the governing of provinces.

Because of his military experience, which I have noted above, Alexander put Maximinus in charge of training recruits for the entire army; his task was to instruct them in military duties and prepare them for service in war. By carrying out his assignments thoroughly and diligently, Maximinus won the affection of the soldiers. He not only taught them their duties; he also demonstrated personally to each man what he was to do. . . .

He won their devotion by giving them all kinds of gifts and rewards. Consequently, the recruits, who included an especially large number of Pannonians, praised the masculinity of Maximinus and despised Alexander as a mother's boy. . . . The soldiers were therefore ready for a change of emperors. . . . They therefore assembled on the drill field for their regular training; when Maximinus took his position before them, either unaware of what was happening or having secretly made prior preparations for the event, the soldiers robed him in the imperial purple and proclaimed him emperor. . . .

When he assumed control of the empire, Maximinus reversed the situation, using his power savagely to inspire great fear. He undertook to substitute for a mild and moderate rule an autocracy in every way barbarous, well aware of the hostility directed toward him because he was the first man to rise from a lowly station to the post of highest honor. His character was naturally barbaric, as his race was barbarian. He had inherited the brutal disposition of his countrymen, and he intended to make his imperial position secure by acts of cruelty, fearing that he would become an object of contempt to the Senate and the people, who might be more conscious of his lowly origin than impressed by the honor he had won. . . .

[A]fter Maximinus had completed three years as emperor, the people of Africa first took up arms and touched off a serious revolt for one of those trivial reasons which often prove fatal to a tyrant. . . . The entire populace of the city quickly assembled when the news was known, and the youths proclaimed Gordian Augustus. He begged to be excused, protesting that he was too old. . . .

[In Rome], the senators met before they received accurate information concerning Maximinus and, placing their trust for the future in the present situation, proclaimed Gordian Augustus, together with his son, and destroyed Maximinus' emblems of honor. . . . Embassies composed of senators and distinguished equestrians were sent to all the governors with letters which clearly revealed the attitude of the Senate and the Roman people. . . . The majority of the governors welcomed the embassies and had no difficulty in arousing the provinces to revolt because of the general hatred of Maximinus. . . .


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AE3

Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, D N GRATIANVS P F AVG
Gratian standing right, holding labarum with Chi-rho on banner, and holding captive by hair, GLORIA ROMANORVM; Q to left, K over P to right, DSISCR in ex.

RIC 14c

Zosimus reports: [T] he emperor Valentinian, having favourably disposed the affairs of Germany, made provisions for the future security of the Celtic nations. . . . Valentinian was now attacked by a disease which nearly cost him his life. Upon his recovery the countries requested him to appoint a successor, lest at his decease the commonwealth should be in danger. To this the emperor consented, and declared his son Gratian emperor and his associate in the government, although he was then very young, and not yet capable of the management of affairs. . . .

When the affairs of the empire were reduced to this low condition, Victor, who commanded the Roman cavalry, escaping the danger with some of his troops, entered Macedon and Thessaly. From thence he proceeded into Moesia and Pannonia, and informed Gratian, who was then in that quarter, of what had occurred, and of the loss of the emperor [Valens] and his army. Gratian received the intelligence without uneasiness, and was little grieved at the death of his uncle, a disagreement having existed between them. Finding himself unable to manage affairs, Thrace being ravaged by the Barbarians, as were likewise Pannonia and Moesia, and the towns upon the Rhine being infested by the neighbouring Barbarians without controul, he chose for his associate in the empire, Theodosius, who was a native of a town called Cauca, in the part of Spain called Hispania Callaecia, and who possessed great knowledge and experience of military affairs. Having given him the government of Thrace and the eastern provinces, Gratian himself proceeded to the west of Gaul, in order, if possible, to compose affairs in that quarter. . . .

While the affairs of Thrace were, thus situated, those of Gratian were in great perplexity. Having accepted the counsel of those courtiers who usually corrupt the manners of princes, he gave a reception to some fugitives called Alani, whom he not only introduced into his army, but honoured with valuable presents, and confided to them his most important secrets, esteeming his own soldiers of little value. This produced among his soldiers a violent hatred against him, which being gradually inflamed and augmented incited in them a disposition for innovation, and most particulary in that part of them which was in Britain, since they were the most resolute and vindictive. In this spirit they were encouraged by Maximus, a Spaniard, who had been the fellow-soldier of Theodosius in Britain. He was offended that Theodosius should be thought worthy of being made emperor, while he himself had no honourable employment. He therefore cherished the animosity of the soldiers towards the emperor. They were thus easily induced to revolt and to declare Maximus emperor. Having presented to him the purple robe and the diadem, they sailed to the mouth of the Rhine. As the German army, and all who were in that quarter approved of the election, Gratian prepared to contend against Maximus, with a considerable part of the army which still adhered to him. When the armies met, there were only slight skirmishes for five days; until Gratian, |115 perceiving that the Mauritanian cavalry first deserted from him and declared Maximus Augustus, and afterwards that the remainder of his troops by degrees espoused the cause of his antagonist, relinquished all hope, and fled with three hundred horse to the Alps. Finding those regions without defence, he proceeded towards Rhaetia, Noricum, Pannonia, and the Upper Moesia. When Maximus was informed of his route, he was not negligent of the opportunity, but detached Andragathius, commander of the cavalry, who was his faithful adherent, in pursuit of Gratian. This officer followed him with so great speed, that he overtook him when he was passing the bridge at Sigidunus, and put him to death.
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1eu Theodosius24 views379-395

AE4

Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG
VOT V MVLT X within wreath, ASISC in ex

RIC 29d

Zosimus recorded: [Valentinian] commanded some legions from the stations in Pannonia and Moesia, to embark for Africa [to crush a rebellion]. On this the Sarmatians and the Quadi. . . , availing themselves, of the opportunity afforded by the departure of the legions for Africa, invaded the Pannonians and Moesians. . . . The barbarians therefore revenged themselves by plundering all the country along the Ister, carrying off all that they found in the towns. The Pannonians were by these means exposed to the cruelty of the barbarians, while the soldiers were extremely negligent in the defence of their towns, and committed as much mischief as the Barbarians themselves in all places on this side of the river. But Moesia was free from harm, because Theodosius, who commanded the forces there, courageously resisted the Barbarians, and routed them when they attacked him. By that victory he not only acquired great renown, but subsequently attained the imperial dignity. . . .

When the affairs of the empire were reduced to this low condition, Victor, who commanded the Roman cavalry, escaping the danger with some of his troops, entered Macedon and Thessaly. From thence he proceeded into Moesia and Pannonia, and informed Gratian, who was then in that quarter, of what had occurred, and of the loss of the emperor [Valens] and his army. Gratian received the intelligence without uneasiness, and was little grieved at the death of his uncle, a disagreement having existed between them. Finding himself unable to manage affairs, Thrace being ravaged by the Barbarians, as were likewise Pannonia and Moesia, and the towns upon the Rhine being infested by the neighbouring Barbarians without controul, he chose for his associate in the empire, Theodosius, who was a native of a town called Cauca, in the part of Spain called Hispania Callaecia, and who possessed great knowledge and experience of military affairs. Having given him the government of Thrace and the eastern provinces, Gratian himself proceeded to the west of Gaul, in order, if possible, to compose affairs in that quarter. . . .

During the stay of the new emperor, Theodosius, at Thesslonica, a great concourse arrived there from all parts of persons soliciting him on business, both public and private; who having obtained of him whatever he could conveniently grant, returned, to their homes. As a great multitude of the Scythians beyond the Ister, the Gotthi, and the Taiphali, and other tribes that formerly dwelt among them, had crossed the river, and were driven to infest the Roman dominions, because the Huns, had expelled them from their own country, the emperor Theodosius prepared for war with all his forces. . . . The army having made this good use of the occasion afforded by fortune, the affairs of Thrace, which had been on the brink of ruin, were now, the Barbarians being crushed beyond all hope, re-established in peace. . . .

Meanwhile, the emperor Theodosius, residing in Thessalonica, was easy of access to all who wished to see him. Having commenced his reign in luxury and indolence, he threw the magistracy into disorder, and increased the number of his military officers. . . . As he squandered the public money without consideration, bestowing it on unworthy persons, he consequently impoverished himself. He therefore sold the government of provinces to any who would purchase them, without regard to the reputation or ablity of the persons, esteeming him the best qualified who brought him the most gold or silver. . . .

Maximus, who deemed his appointments inferior to his merits, being only governor of the countries formerly under Gratian, projected how to depose the young Valentinian from the empire. . . . This so much surprised Valentinian, and rendered his situation so desperate, that his courtiers were alarmed lest he should be taken by Maximus and put to death. He, therefore, immediately embarked,and sailed to Thessalonica with his mother Justina. . . . [A]rriving at Thessalonica, they sent messengers to the emperor Theodosius, intreating him now at least to revenge the injuries committed against the family of Valentinian. . . . The emperor, being delivered from this alarm, marched with great resolution with his whole army against Maximus. . . . Theodosius, having passed through Pannonia and the defiles of the Appennines, attacked unawares the forces of Maximus before they were prepared for him. A part of his army, having pursued them with the utmost speed, forced their way through the gates of Aquileia, the guards being too few to resist them. Maximus was torn from his imperial throne while in the act of distributing money to his soldiers, and being stripped of his imperial robes, was brought to Theodosius, who, having in reproach enumerated some of his crimes against the commonwealth, delivered him to the common executioner to receive due punishment. . . . The emperor Theodosius, having consigned Italy, Spain, Celtica, and Libya to his son Honorius, died of a disease on his journey towards Constantinople.
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1ex Eugenius25 views392-394

AR siliqua

Bearded, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust rightt, DN EVGENIVS PF AVG
Roma seated left on cuirass, MDPS below, VIRTVS ROMANORVM

RIC 32c

Zosimus reports: Eugenius became the sincere friend of Arbogastes, who had no secret which he did not confide to him. Recollecting Eugenius, therefore, at this juncture, who by his extraordinary learning and the gravity of his conversation seemed well-adapted for the management of an empire, he communicated to him his designs. But finding him not pleased with the proposals, he attempted to prevail on him by all the arts he could use, and entreated him not to reject what fortune so favourably offered. Having at length persuaded him, he deemed it advisable in the first place to remove Valentinian, and thus to deliver the sole authority to Eugenius. With this view he proceeded to Vienna, a town in Gaul, where the emperor resided; and as he was amusing himself near the town in some sports with the soldiers, apprehending no danger, Arbogastes gave him a mortal wound. To this audacious action the soldiers quietly submitted, not only because he was so brave and warlike a person, but because they were attached to him through his contempt of riches. As soon as he had performed this action, he declared Eugenius emperor, and infused into them the most favourable hopes that he would prove an excellent ruler, since he possessed such extraordinary qualifications. . . .

[Theodosius marched against Eugenius.] The emperor (having mourned for [his just deceased wife] a whole day, according to the rule of Homer), proceeded with his army to the war, leaving behind him his son Arcadius, who had some time previously been made emperor. This prince being young, his father, in order to amend the defects of his nonage, left with him Rufinus, who was prefect of the court, and acted as he pleased, even as much as the power of sovereignty enabled the emperor himself to do. Having done this, he took with him his younger son Honorius, quickly passed through the intermediate countries, and having exceded his expectations in crossing the Alps, arrived where the enemy was stationed : Eugenius being astonished at seeing him there whom he so little expected. But as he was arrived there, and consequently was under the necessity of engaging, he judged it most prudent to place the Barbarian troops in front, and to expose them first. He ordered Gaines with the troops under his command to make the first attack, and the other commanders of Barbarian soldiers to follow him, either cavalry, horse archers, or infantry. Eugenius then drew out his forces. When the two armies were engaged, so great an eclipse of the sun happened, that for more than half the time of the action it appeared rather to be night than day. As they fought therefore a kind of nocturnal battle, so great a slaughtor was made, that in the same day the greater part of the allies of Theodosius were slain, with their commander Bacurius, who fought very courageously at their head, while the other commanders escaped very narrowly with the remainder. When night came on and the armies had rallied, Eugenius was so elated with his victory, that he distributed money among those who had behaved with the greatest gallantry in the battle, and gave them time to refresh themselves, as if after such a defeat there was no probability of another engagement As they were thus solacing themselves, the emperor Theodosius about break of day fell suddenly on them with his whole forces, while they were still reclined |129 on the ground, and killed them before they knew of the approach of an enemy. He then proceeded to the tent of Eugenius, where he attacked those who were around him, killing many of them, and taking some of them in their flight, among whom was Eugenius. When they had got him in their power, they cut off his head, and carried it on a long spear around the camp, in order to shew those who still adhered to him, that it was now their interest to be reconciled to the emperor, inasmuch as the usurper was removed.
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2. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Obol 14 views(8.5mm, 0.66 g, 11h). Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig to left; all within incuse square. Kroll 13; HGC 4, 1665. VF, find patina, minor roughness.

CNG Auction 431, Lot: 178.
Dino
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20 Owls10 viewscicerokid
rjb_tgal_tar_01_07.jpg
251b16 viewsTrebonianus Gallus 251-3 AD
AE 32mm
Tarsus in Cillicia
Apollo standing right with bowl on altar
mauseus
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27 Owls16 viewscicerokid
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3. Attica, Athens. 300-287 BC. 130 viewsAr Hemidrachm (triobol).
Obv; Helmeted hd of Athena right.
Rev; Owl. Dark tone but good silver.
Scarce old collection coin.
1.97g. 13mm.
4 commentsCGPCGP
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304. Philip I26 viewsPhilip I

Philip the Arabian remains an enigmatic figure because different authors evaluated his reign with wildly divergent interpretations. Christian authors of late antiquity praised the man they regarded as the first Christian emperor. Pagan historians saw Philip as indecisive, treacherous and weak. Our lack of detailed knowledge about the reign makes any analysis highly speculative. Nonetheless, Philip's provincial and administrative background represents continuity with features of Severan government. His career has its closest parallel with that of Macrinus, an equestrian from the provinces who, a quarter of a century earlier, capped an administrative career by moving from the office of praetorian prefect to that of emperor. Unfotunately, they also shared the same fate - Philip only lasted half a decade.

AR Antoninianus. IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right / AEQVITAS AVGG, Aequitas standing left with scales & cornucopia. RIC 27b, RSC 9
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305c. Hostilian23 viewsGaius Valens Hostilianus Messius Quintus (died 251), was Roman emperor in 251. Hostilian was born in an unknown date, after 230, as the son of the future emperor Trajan Decius by his wife Herennia Cupressenia Etruscilla. He was the younger brother of emperor Herennius Etruscus.

Following his father's accession to the throne, Hostilian received the treatment of an imperial prince, but was always kept in the shade of his brother Herennius, who enjoyed the privileges of being older and heir. In the beginning of 251, Decius elevated his son Herennius to co-emperor and Hostilian succeeded him in the title of princeps iuventutis (prince of youth). These dispositions were made previous to a campaign against king Cniva of the Goths, to punish him over the raids on the Danubian frontier. Hostilian remained in Rome due to his inexperience, and empress Herennia was named regent.

The campaign proved to be a disaster: both Herennius and Decius died in the Battle of Abrittus and became the first two emperors to be killed by a foreign army in battle. The armies in the Danube acclaimed Trebonianus Gallus emperor, but Rome acknowledged Hostilian's rights. Since Trebonianus was a respected general, there was fear of another civil war of succession, despite the fact that he chose to respect the will of Rome and adopted Hostilian. But later in 251, plague broke out in Rome and Hostilian died in the epidemic. He was the first emperor in 40 years and one of only 13 to die of natural causes. His timely death opened the way for the rule of Trebonianus with his natural son Volusianus.

Hostilian. Moesia Superior. Viminacium AE 25 mm. 11.7 g. Obverse: C VAL HOST M QVINTVS CAE. Draped bust right. Reverse: P M S COL VIM AN XII. Moesia standing left between lion and bull.
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308. Valerian I23 viewsRIC 209 Valerian I 253-260 AD AR Antoninianus of Moesia. Radiate draped bust/Aequitas standing holding balance and cornucopia.

Publius Licinius Valerianus (ca. 200-260), known in English as Valerian, was Roman emperor from 253 to 260. His full Latin title was IMPERATOR · CAESAR · PVBLIVS · LICINIVS · VALERIANVS · PIVS FELIX · INVICTVS · AVGVSTVS — in English, "Emperor Caesar Publius Licinus Valerianus Pious Lucky Undefeated Augustus."

Unlike the majority of the usurpers of the crisis of the third century, Valerian was of a noble and traditional Senatorial family. Details of his early life are elusive, but his marriage to Egnatia Mariniana who gave him two sons: Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus and Valerianus Minor is known.

In 238 he was princeps senatus, and Gordian I negotiated through him for Senatorial acknowledgement for his claim as Emperor. In 251, when Decius revived the censorship with legislative and executive powers so extensive that it practically embraced the civil authority of the Emperor, Valerian was chosen censor by the Senate. Under Decius he was nominated governor of the Rhine provinces of Noricum and Raetia and retained the confidence of his successor, Trebonianus Gallus, who asked him for reinforcements to quell the rebellion of Aemilianus in 253. Valerian headed south, but was too late: Gallus' own troops killed him and joined Aemilianus before his arrival. The Raetian soldiers then proclaimed Valerian emperor and continued their march towards Rome. At the time of his arrival in September, Aemilianus' legions defected, killing him and proclaiming Valerian emperor. In Rome, the Senate quickly acknowledged him, not only for fear of reprisals, but also because he was one of their own.

Valerian's first act as emperor was to make his son Gallienus colleague. In the beginning of his reign the affairs in Europe went from bad to worse and the whole West fell into disorder. In the East, Antioch had fallen into the hands of a Persian vassal, Armenia was occupied by Shapur I (Sapor). Valerian and Gallienus split the problems of the Empire between the two, with the son taking the West and the father heading East to face the Persian threat.

By 257, Valerian had already recovered Antioch and returned the Syrian province to Roman control but in the following year, the Goths ravaged Asia Minor. Later in 259, he moved to Edessa, but an outbreak of plague killed a critical number of legionaries, weakening the Roman position. Valerian was then forced to seek terms with Shapur I. Sometime towards the end of 259, or at the beginning of 260, Valerian was defeated and made prisoner by the Persians (making him the only Roman Emperor taken captive). It is said that he was subjected to the greatest insults by his captors, such as being used as a human stepladder by Shapur when mounting his horse. After his death in captivity, his skin was stuffed with straw and preserved as a trophy in the chief Persian temple. Only after Persian defeat in last Persia-Roman war three and a half centuries later was his skin destroyed.
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313 - 2013 Edictum Mediolanense - Edict of Milan 28 viewsIn February 313, Emperor Constantine I, who controlled the western part of the Roman Empire, and Licinius, who controlled the Balkans, met in Milan and, among other things, agreed to treat the Christians benevolently.

When I, Constantine Augustus, as well as I, Licinius Augustus, fortunately met near Mediolanurn (Milan), and were considering everything that pertained to the public welfare and security, we thought, among other things which we saw would be for the good of many, those regulations pertaining to the reverence of the Divinity ought certainly to be made first, so that we might grant to the Christians and others full authority to observe that religion which each preferred; whence any Divinity whatsoever in the seat of the heavens may be propitious and kindly disposed to us and all who are placed under our rule. And thus by this wholesome counsel and most upright provision we thought to arrange that no one whatsoever should be denied the opportunity to give his heart to the observance of the Christian religion, of that religion which he should think best for himself, so that the Supreme Deity, to whose worship we freely yield our hearts) may show in all things His usual favor and benevolence. Therefore, your Worship should know that it has pleased us to remove all conditions whatsoever, which were in the rescripts formerly given to you officially, concerning the Christians and now any one of these who wishes to observe Christian religion may do so freely and openly, without molestation. We thought it fit to commend these things most fully to your care that you may know that we have given to those Christians free and unrestricted opportunity of religious worship. When you see that this has been granted to them by us, your Worship will know that we have also conceded to other religions the right of open and free observance of their worship for the sake of the peace of our times, that each one may have the free opportunity to worship as he pleases; this regulation is made we that we may not seem to detract from any dignity or any religion. Moreover, in the case of the Christians especially we esteemed it best to order that if it happens anyone heretofore has bought from our treasury from anyone whatsoever, those places where they were previously accustomed to assemble, concerning which a certain decree had been made and a letter sent to you officially, the same shall be restored to the Christians without payment or any claim of recompense and without any kind of fraud or deception, Those, moreover, who have obtained the same by gift, are likewise to return them at once to the Christians. Besides, both those who have purchased and those who have secured them by gift, are to appeal to the vicar if they seek any recompense from our bounty, that they may be cared for through our clemency. All this property ought to be delivered at once to the community of the Christians through your intercession, and without delay. And since these Christians are known to have possessed not only those places in which they were accustomed to assemble, but also other property, namely the churches, belonging to them as a corporation and not as individuals, all these things which we have included under the above law, you will order to be restored, without any hesitation or controversy at all, to these Christians, that is to say to the corporations and their conventicles: providing, of course, that the above arrangements be followed so that those who return the same without payment, as we have said, may hope for an indemnity from our bounty. In all these circumstances you ought to tender your most efficacious intervention to the community of the Christians, that our command may be carried into effect as quickly as possible, whereby, moreover, through our clemency, public order may be secured. Let this be done so that, as we have said above, Divine favor towards us, which, under the most important circumstances we have already experienced, may, for all time, preserve and prosper our successes together with the good of the state. Moreover, in order that the statement of this decree of our good will may come to the notice of all, this rescript, published by your decree, shall be announced everywhere and brought to the knowledge of all, so that the decree of this, our benevolence, cannot be concealed.
From Lactantius, De Mort. Pers., ch. 48. opera, ed. 0. F. Fritzsche, II, p 288 sq. (Bibl Patr. Ecc. Lat. XI).
Bohemian
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4 countermarks on Athens Tetradrachm183 views449-413 B.C. Attica Old style Tetradrachm

Obverse: Head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, hair in parallel curves. 4 countermarks across cheek.

Reverse: AOE Right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square. Test cut and counter punch, and countermark.

1 commentsDk0311USMC
DSC08133.jpg
4. Attica, Athens. 449-413 BC.83 viewsAR Hemidrachm

obv: Helmeted head of Athena right, profile eye
rev: Owl standing facing with closed wings, olive sprig. (Die break on owl)

2.1g, 12mm.
2 commentsDino
40_OWLS.jpg
40 Owls14 viewscicerokid
coin264.JPG
403. Carausius36 viewsMarcus Aurelius Mausaeus Carausius (d. 293) was a Roman usurper in Britain and northern Gaul (286–293, Carausian Revolt).

Carausius was a man of humble origin, a Menapian from Belgic Gaul who distinguished himself during Maximian's campaign against the Bagaudae rebels in Gaul in 286. As a result, he was appointed to command the Classis Britannica, a fleet based in the English Channel, with the responsibility of eliminating Frankish and Saxon pirates who had been raiding the coast. However, he was suspected of keeping captured treasure for himself, and even of allowing the pirates to carry out raids and enrich themselves before taking action against them, and Maximian ordered his execution. In late 286 or early 287 Carausius learned of this sentence and responded by declaring himself Emperor of Britain and northern Gaul.

He could count on the alliegance of the three legions based in Britain, as well as one in northern Gaul. How he was able to win support from the army when his command had been sea-based is uncertain. The emperor briefly assumed the title Britannicus Maximus in 285, and the British towns of Wroxeter and Caistor by Norwich towns show signs of destruction around this time, so it is possible Carausius won the army's support during military action in Britain shortly before his rebellion. Alternatively, if the accusations of larceny are true, he could perhaps afford to buy their loyalty. He also appears to have appealed to native British dissatisfaction with Roman rule: he issued coins with legends such as Restitutor Britanniae (Restorer of Britain) and Genius Britanniae (Spirit of Britain).

Maximian, busy with wars on the Rhine, was unable to challenge him immediately, but in the Autumn of 288 he began massing troops and ships for an invasion. In 289 an invasion of Britain intended to dislodge him failed badly due to storms, although a naval defeat is also possible. An uneasy peace continued until 293, during which Rome prepared for a second effort to retake the province, while Carausius began to entertain visions of legitimacy and official recognition. He minted his own coins and brought their value in to line with Roman issues as well as acknowledging and honouring Maximian and then Diocletian. Coinage is the main source of information about the rogue emperor; his issues were initially crude but soon became more elaborate and were issued from mints in Londinium, Rotomagnus and a third site, possibly Colonia Claudia Victricensis. A milestone from Carlisle with his name on it suggests that the whole of Roman Britain was in Carausius' grasp.

It has been speculated (namely, by the historian Sheppard Frere) that the rebellion of Carausius endangered Diocletian's vision of a strong, centralized government based on his tetrarchy. In any case, by early 293 Constantius Chlorus had gained control of northern Gaul, including the rebel's stronghold and port of Bononia, on which Carausius was heavily dependent. Constantius built a mole across the harbour mouth to ensure it did not receive maritime aid.

Constantius also regained the allegiance of the rebellious Gallic legion and defeated the Franks of the Rhine mouth who seem to have been working in league with Carausius. Weakened by these setbacks, Carausius was assassinated, possibly at York, by his treasurer, Allectus.

aVF/aVF Carausius Antoninianus / Pax / Green Patina and Nice Style

Attribution: RIC 895
Date: 287-293 AD
Obverse: IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right
Reverse: PAX AVG, Pax standing left, holding branch and transverse sceptre.
Size: 20.91 mm
Weight: 3 grams
ecoli
Parliament_of__44_Owls.jpg
44 Owls11 viewscicerokid
athenshemi.jpg
5. Attica, Athens. 393-300 BC.45 viewsAR Hemidrachm

obv: Helmeted head of Athena right, profile eye
rev: Owl standing facing with closed wings, olive sprig.
Svoronos 43ff, BMC 162ff.
2.1g, 12mm.
CGPCGP
50_FREE_OWLS_IN_FORMATION.jpg
50 OWLS16 viewsFormation of 50 Owlscicerokid
50_OK_OWLS.jpg
50 Parliament of Owls10 viewsFrom c 164 BC to 82 BC, The Athenian New Style silver coinage of tetradrachms.
Includes 3 imitations and 1 pseudo-Athenian New Style coin of Marcus Lucullus treasurer and moneyer of L C Sulla. How can anyone say they are not interesting beats me.
cicerokid
coin514.JPG
501. Constantine I Heraclea VOTA35 viewsHeraclea

Heraclea (Greek ‘Ηράκλεια), an ancient city of Lucania, situated near the modern Policoro, 3 m. from the coast of the Gulf of Taranto, between the rivers Aciris (Agri) and Sinis (Sinni) about 13 m. S.S.W. of Metapontum. It was a Greek colony founded by the Tarentines and Thurians in 432 BC, the former being predominant. It was chosen as the meeting-place of the general assembly of the Italiot Greeks, which Alexander of Epirus, after his alienation from Tarentum, tried to transfer to Thurii. Here Pyrrhus, king of Epirus, defeated the consul Laevinus in 280 BC, after he had crossed the river Sinis (see Battle of Heraclea). In 278 BC, or possibly in 282 BC, probably in order to detach it from Tarentum, the Romans made a special treaty with Heraclea, on such favourable terms that in 89 B.C. the Roman citizenship given to the inhabitants by the Lex Plautia Papiria was only accepted after considerable hesitation. We hear that Heraclea surrendered under compulsion to Hannibal in 212 BC and that in the Social War the public records were destroyed by fire. Cicero in his defence of the poet Archias, an adopted citizen of Heraclea, speaks of it as a flourishing town. As a consequence of its having accepted Roman citizenship, it became a municipium; part of a copy of the Lex Iulia Municipalis of 46 BC (engraved on the back of two bronze tablets, on the front of which is a Greek inscription of the 3rd century BC defining the boundaries of lands belonging to various temples), which was found between Heraclea and Metapontum, is of the highest importance for our knowledge of that law. It was still a place of some importance under the empire; a branch road from Venusia joined the coast road here. The circumstances of its destruction and abandonment was unknown; the site is now marked by a few heaps of ruins. Its medieval representative was Anglona, once a bishopric, but now itself a heap of ruins, among which are those of an 11th-century church.

Constantine I (AD 307-337)
AE3 - Vot XXX, .SMHB (Eyes to God)
AE-3 (AD 327-329)
OB: Plain-diademed head, right, looking upwards
CONSTANTINVS AVG.
REV: Wreath with VOT. /
XXX inscribed within
D. N. CONSTANTINI MAX. AVG.
. SMHB in exergue
Heraclea mint
RIC, Vol. VII, #92
Rated “Scarce” in RIC
ecoli
coins446.JPG
501. Constantine I Ostia Sol16 viewsOstia
Although Ostia was probably founded for the sole purpose of military defence — since through the Tiber's mouths armies could eventually reach Rome by water — in time the port became a commercial harbour, and a very important one too. Many of the goods that Rome received from its colonies and provinces passed through Ostia. In this role, Ostia soon replaced Pozzuoli (Puteoli, near Naples).

In 87 BC, the town was razed by Marius, and again in 67 BC it was sacked by pirates. After this second attack, the town was re-built and provided with protective walls by Cicero. The town was then further developed during the 1st century AD, mainly under the influence of Tiberius, who ordered the building of the first Forum. The town was also soon enriched by the construction of a new harbour on the northern mouths of the Tiber (which reaches the sea with a larger mouth in Ostia, Fiumara Grande, and a narrower one near to the current Fiumicino international airport). The new harbour, not surprisingly called Portus, was excavated from the ground at the orders of the emperor Claudius; it has an hexagonal form, in order to reduce the waves strength. The town was provided with all the services a town of the time could require; in particular, a famous lighthouse. Archaeologists also discovered the public latrinas, organised for collective use as a series of seats that lets us imagine today that the function was also a social moment. In addition, Ostia had a large theatre, public baths and a fire fighting service. You can still see the mosaic floors of the baths near today's entrance to the town.

Trajan too, required a widening of the naval areas, and ordered the building of another harbour, again pointing towards the north. It must be remembered that at a relatively short distance, there was also the harbour of Civitavecchia (Centum Cellae), and Rome was starting to have a significant number of harbours, the most important remaining Portus.

Ostia grew to 50,000 inhabitants in the 2nd century AD and in time focused its naval activities on Portus. With the end of the Roman Empire, Ostia fell slowly into decay, and was finally abandoned in the 9th century due to the fall of the Roman empire in combination with repeated invasions and sackings by Arab pirates; the inhabitants moved to Gregoriopolis. In the Middle Ages, bricks from buildings in Ostia were used for several other occasions. The Leaning Tower of Pisa was entirely built of material originally belonging to Ostia. A "local sacking" was carried out by baroque architects, who used the remains as a sort of marble store for the palazzi they were building in Rome. Soon after, foreign explorers came in search of ancient statues and objects. The Papacy started organising its own investigations with Pope Pius VII and the research still continues today. It has been estimated that two thirds of the ancient town have currently been found.

001. Constantine I Ostia

RIC VI Ostia 85 S

ecoli
486_P_Hadrian_Emmett960_2.jpg
5018A EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Drachm 117-18 AD Hadrian in quadriga42 viewsReference.
Emmett 960.2; RPC III, 5018A Köln 757; Dattari (Savio) 1585 var. (obv. legend); K&G 32.50
BMC 864 specimen has ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΙΑΝΟС (sic) ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС as obverse legend.

Issue L B = year 2

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑIΝΟС (sic) ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС
Laureate bust right No Beard, slight drapery

Rev. L B (date ry 2)
Emperor (Hadrian) standing in quadriga, right, laureate-headed, wearing toga, holding eagle-tipped sceptre and branch.

21.80 gr
34 mm
12 h

From the Syracuse Collection.

Note CNG.
Hadrian’s portraits on his early coins in Alexandria more closely resemble Trajan, as the engravers in the provinces waited for an official Imperial model or bust to be sent out. In this case, by Hadrian’s regnal year 2, the engravers might have had access to or knowledge of what Hadrian looked like, as the portrait on the present coin is beginning to morph into a more accurate representation of Hadrian’s Imperial image.
1 commentsokidoki
coin486.JPG
501b. Crispus BEATA Trier13 viewsTrier

The Romans under Julius Caesar subdued the Celtic Treverans in 58 to 50 BC. When the Roman provinces in Germany were reorganised in 16 BC, Augustus decided that Trier, then called Augusta Treverorum, should become the regional capital. From 259 to 274 Trier was the capital of the break away Gallic Empire. Later for a few years (383 - 388) it was the capital of Magnus Maximus, who ruled most of the western Empire.


The ruins of the Roman baths.Sacked by Attila in 451, it passed to the Franks in 463, to Lorraine in 843, to Germany in 870, and back to Lorraine in 895, and was finally united to Germany by Henry I the Fowler. The Archbishop of Trier was, as chancellor of Burgundy, one of the electors of the empire, a right which originated in the 12th or 13th century, and which continued until the French Revolution. The last elector removed to Koblenz in 1786; and Trier was the capital of the French department of Sarre from 1794 till 1814, after which time it belonged to Prussia.

RIC VII Trier 308

ecoli
030437LG.jpg
512. Procopius151 viewsProcopius (326 - May 27, 366), was a Roman usurper against Valentinian I, and member of the Constantinian dynasty.

According to Ammianus Marcellinus, Procopius was a native of Cilicia. On his mother's side, Procopius was cousin of Emperor Julian.

Procopius took part in the emperor Julian's campaign against the Persian Empire in 363. He was entrusted of leading 30,000 men towards Armenia, joining King Arsaces, and later return to Julian camp. At the time of Julian's death, there were rumors that he had intended Procopius to be his successor, but when Jovian was elected emperor by the Roman army, Procopius went into hiding to preserve his life. The ancient historians differ on the exact details of Procopius' life in hiding, but agree that he returned to public knowledge at Chalcedon before the house of the senator Strategius suffering from starvation and ignorant of current affairs.

By that time, Jovianus was dead, and Valentinian I shared the purple with his brother Valens. Procopius immediately moved to declare himself emperor. He bribed two legions that were resting at Constantinople to support his efforts, and took control of the imperial city. Shortly after this he proclaimed himself Emperor on September 28, 365, and quickly took control of the provinces of Thrace, and later Bithynia.

Valens was left with the task of dealing with this rebel, and over the next months struggled with both cities and units that wavered in their allegiance. Eventually their armies met at the Battle of Thyatira, and Procopius' forces were defeated. He fled the battlefield, but was betrayed to Valens by two of his remaining followers. Valens had all three executed May 27, 366.


Procopius - Usurper in the east, 365-6 , AE-3, Nicomedia mint


2.90g

Obv: Bust of Procopius, beared left "DN PROCOPIVS PF AVG"

Rev: Procopius standing head right, foot resting on a prow and leaning on a shield. "REPARATIO FEL TEMP" "SMNG" in the exergue.

RIC 10
ecoli73
614_P_Hadrian_Emmett_923_14.jpg
5738 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Drachm 129-30 AD Athena standing with Owl36 viewsReference.
Emmett 923.14; RPC III, 5738; Köln 1007

http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5738/10/

Issue L IΔ = year 14

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ - ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑ СƐΒ
Laureate draped and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r., seen from rear.

Rev. LΙ Δ
Athena standing facing, head l., holding owl and shield

26.60 gr
35 mm
11h
1 commentsokidoki
athensdrachm.jpg
6. ATTICA, Athens. Circa 460-404 BC. 189 viewsDrachm (14mm, 3.43 g, 6h). Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 10; SNG Copenhagen 41. Near VF, graffito on reverse.

CNG Electronic Auction 217, Lot: 66.
4 commentsCGPCGP
1117_P_Hadrian_RPC613.jpg
613 MACEDONIA, Dium AE 25 129-38 AD Athena standing9 viewsReference.
RPC III 613;

Obv. IMP CAES HADRIANO AVG OLYMPIO
Laureate, bust of Hadrian to right.

Rev. COL IVL AVG DIENSIS / D - D
Athena ständig front, head left, holding patera in right hand and spear in left; to left at feet owl; to right, coiled serpent.

5.78 gr
21 mm
6h
okidoki
878_P_Hadrian_RPC614.jpg
614 MACEDONIA, Dium AE 25 129-38 AD Athena standing16 viewsReference. very rare
RPC III 614 corr. (obverse legend).

Obv. IMP CAES HADRIANO AVG OLYMPIO
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Hadrian to right.

Rev. COL IVL AVG DIENSIS / D - D
Athena ständig front, head left, holding patera in right hand and spear in left; to left at feet owl; to right, coiled serpent.

5.20 gr
25 mm
6h
okidoki
869_P_Hadrian_Emmett1219.jpg
6417 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Nome Obol 126-27 AD Neith/Athena standing26 viewsReference.
Emmett 1219; RPC III, 6417; Dattari-Savio Pl. 310, 11119 (this coin); Dattari 6370 (this rev. illustrated)

Issue Saite

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑ СΕΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. СΑΙΤ, L ΙΑ
Neith/Athena standing, l., wearing helmet and aegis, holding spear in l. hand, owl, l., in r. hand.

5.85 gr
19 mm
12h

Note.
From the Dattari collection.
1 commentsokidoki
Moushmov_2696_ADRIANOPOLIS_Gordiano_III.jpg
69-62 - Adrianopolis - GORDIANO III (238 - 244 D.C.)12 viewsAdrianopolis, Tracia

AE Tetrasarión? 25 mm 10.7 gr.

Anv: "AVT K M ANT ΓOΡΔIANOC AV", Busto laureado, vest. y acoraz. a derecha.
Rev: "AΔΡIAN - OΠOΛEITΩN", Pallas Atenea portando Lanza en mano der. y búho en izq. a sus pies a su izq. un escudo.

Acuñada 238 - 244 D.C.

Referencias: Varbanov II #3742 var. (Escudo a su der.) (R4) Pag.308, Moushmov #2696,
mdelvalle
tet.jpg
7. Attica, Athens. 449-413 BC246 viewsAR tetradrachm
Head of Athena Right. Crested helmet. Archaic style almond shaped eye.
Owl standing right. Olive sprig/crescent left. AOE right.
SNGCop 31
24mm 17.0g
exMalter Galleries
9 commentsDino
AugustusAE19Sardeis.jpg
702a, Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.34 viewsAugustus, 27 BC - 14 AD. AE 19mm (5.98 gm). Lydia, Sardeis. Diodoros Hermophilou. Obverse: head right. Reverse: Zeus Lydios standing facing holding scepter and eagle. RPC I, 489, 2986; SNG von Aulock 3142. aVF. Fine portrait. Ex Tom Vossen.

De Imperatoribus Romanis:
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers

AUGUSTUS (31 B.C. - 14 A.D.)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

In the course of his long and spectacular career, he put an end to the advancing decay of the Republic and established a new basis for Roman government that was to stand for three centuries. This system, termed the "Principate," was far from flawless, but it provided the Roman Empire with a series of rulers who presided over the longest period of unity, peace, and prosperity that Western Europe, the Middle East and the North African seaboard have known in their entire recorded history. Even if the rulers themselves on occasion left much to be desired, the scale of Augustus's achievement in establishing the system cannot be overstated. Aside from the immense importance of Augustus's reign from the broad historical perspective, he himself is an intriguing figure: at once tolerant and implacable, ruthless and forgiving, brazen and tactful. Clearly a man of many facets, he underwent three major political reinventions in his lifetime and negotiated the stormy and dangerous seas of the last phase of the Roman Revolution with skill and foresight. With Augustus established in power and with the Principate firmly rooted, the internal machinations of the imperial household provide a fascinating glimpse into the one issue that painted this otherwise gifted organizer and politician into a corner from which he could find no easy exit: the problem of the succession.

(For a very detailed and interesting account of the Age of Augustus see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/auggie.htm)

Death and Retrospective

In his later years, Augustus withdrew more and more from the public eye, although he continued to transact public business. He was getting older, and old age in ancient times must have been considerably more debilitating than it is today. In any case, Tiberius had been installed as his successor and, by AD 13, was virtually emperor already. In AD 4 he had received grants of both proconsular and tribunician power, which had been renewed as a matter of course whenever they needed to be; in AD 13, Tiberius's imperium had been made co-extensive with that of Augustus. While traveling in Campania, Augustus died peacefully at Nola on 19 August, AD 14. Tiberius, who was en route to Illyricum, hurried to the scene and, depending on the source, arrived too late or spent a day in consultation with the dying princes. The tradition that Livia poisoned her husband is scurrilous in the extreme and most unlikely to be true. Whatever the case about these details, Imperator Caesar Augustus, Son of a God, Father of his Country, the man who had ruled the Roman world alone for almost 45 years, or over half a century if the triumviral period is included, was dead. He was accorded a magnificent funeral, buried in the mausoleum he had built in Rome, and entered the Roman pantheon as Divus Augustus. In his will, he left 1,000 sesterces apiece to the men of the Praetorian guard, 500 to the urban cohorts, and 300 to each of the legionaries. In death, as in life, Augustus acknowledged the true source of his power.

The inscription entitled "The Achievements of the Divine Augustus" (Res Gestae Divi Augustae; usually abbreviated RG) remains a remarkable piece of evidence deriving from Augustus's reign. The fullest copy of it is the bilingual Greek and Latin version carved into the walls of the Temple of Rome and Augustus at Ancyra in Galatia (for this reason the RG used to be commonly referred to as the Monumentum Ancyranum). Other evidence, however, demonstrates that the original was inscribed on two bronze pillars that flanked the entrance to the Mausoleum of Augustus in Rome. The inscription remains the only first-person summary of any Roman emperor's political career and, as such, offers invaluable insights into the Augustan regime's public presentation of itself.

In looking back on the reign of Augustus and its legacy to the Roman world, its longevity ought not to be overlooked as a key factor in its success. People had been born and reached middle age without knowing any form of government other than the Principate. Had Augustus died earlier (in 23 BC, for instance), matters may have turned out very differently. The attrition of the civil wars on the old Republican aristocracy and the longevity of Augustus, therefore, must be seen as major contributing factors in the transformation of the Roman state into a monarchy in these years. Augustus's own experience, his patience, his tact, and his great political acumen also played their part. All of these factors allowed him to put an end to the chaos of the Late Republic and re-establish the Roman state on a firm footing. He directed the future of the empire down many lasting paths, from the existence of a standing professional army stationed at or near the frontiers, to the dynastic principle so often employed in the imperial succession, to the embellishment of the capital at the emperor's expense. Augustus's ultimate legacy, however, was the peace and prosperity the empire was to enjoy for the next two centuries under the system he initiated. His memory was enshrined in the political ethos of the Imperial age as a paradigm of the good emperor; although every emperor adopted his name, Caesar Augustus, only a handful earned genuine comparison with him.

Copyright © 1999, Garrett G. Fagan.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Augustus (the first Roman emperor, in whose reign Jesus Christ was born) is without any doubt one of the most important figures in Roman history.

It is reported that when he was near death, Augustus addressed those in attendance with these words, "If I have played my part well, applaud!"

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr
Cleisthenes
athenstet1.JPG
8. Attica, Athens. 449-413 BC60 viewsAR tetradrachm
Head of Athena Right. Crested helmet. Archaic style almond shaped eye.
Owl standing right. Olive sprig/crescent left. AOE right. Test cuts owl head and tail.
SNGCop 39
22mm 17.3g
CGPCGP
anonym quadr-.jpg
81-161 AD - Anonymous AE quadrans - period of Domitian to Antoninus Pius, c81-161 AD37 viewsobv: Helmeted & draped bust of Minerva right
rev: S-C in fields, owl standing half right, head facing
ref: RIC II 7, C.7
3.41gms, 17-19mm
Scarce
berserker
domitian den.jpg
81-96 AD - DOMITIAN AR denarius - struck 96 AD29 viewsobv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TR P [XV] (laureate head right)
rev: IMP XXII [COS XVII] CENS PPP (Minerva standing right on prow right with javelin and sheild, owl at foot)
ref: RIC II 191 (C), C.293
mint: Rome
3.76gms, 19mm
berserker
domitian den01-.jpg
81-96 AD - DOMITIAN AR denarius - struck 96 AD142 viewsobv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TR P XV (laureate head right)
rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS PPP (Minerva standing right on prow right with javelin and sheild, owl at foot)
ref: RIC II 191, C.293 (2frcs)
2.89gms, 18mm
berserker
OWLS_44_LOW.jpg
A parliament of 44 Owls9 views40 official issues
3 Imitations
1 pseudo-Athenian
Basically from the beginning to the end with the Sullan pseudo -Athenian ethnicless New Style imitation which has the monogram of Marcus Lucullus, Quaestor in Greek.
cicerokid
PARLIAMENT_OF_OWLS.jpg
A Parliament of Owls6 views20 Athenian New Style tetradrachms
It was somewhat difficult to get these normally solitary aves together.

All have differing personalities some are large some are small, some are thin and some are not so thin.

Some are primadonnas, some are more down to earth.

When I got a line up just about right I would find that there had been a squabble and some had gone out of position, but in the end I got there.

20 Athenian New Style tetradrachms : Now this is a parliament of owls!



cicerokid
clazomenae.jpg
AE 10.7; Head of Athena r./ Ram standing l.; owl on l.4 viewsClazomenae, Ionia, 387 - 300 B.C. 1.45g,10.7mm. Head of Athena r. / Ram standing l.; owl on l. Cf. Imh. KM 67, 14. Ex. Gerhard RohdePodiceps
pergamon_bull_and_owl.jpg
AE 17.3; Athena/ ΠΕΡΓΑ Head of bull l.; behind, owl17 viewsPergamum, Mysia, c. 310 - 284 B.C. AE 5.19g, 17.3mm. Head of Athena l. /
ΠΕΡΓΑ Head of bull l.; behind, owl. BMC 111, 20. Ex Gerhard Rohde
Podiceps
pergamon_owl_cm.jpg
AE 19.2; Asklepios/ Serpent around omphalos; countermark: owl34 viewsPergamum, Mysia, 133 B.C. – Augustus. AE 19.2mm, 4.85g. Head of Asklepios laureate r. / ΑΣΚΛΗΠΙΟΥ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ Serpent around omphalos; countermark, owl. BMC 129, 161. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
pergamon_snake___owl.jpg
AE 19.8; Asklepios/ Serpent around omphalos; owl on left41 viewsPergamum, Mysia. 133 B.C. – Augustus. AE 19.8mm, 9.09g; Head of Asklepios laureate r. ΑΣΚΛΗΠΙΟΥ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ Serpent around omphalos; on l., owl. BMC 129, 160. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
Arrowhead_1.jpg
AE Arrowhead #0117 viewsNorthwestern Iran
1200-800 BC
12.5cm (4.9”)

Cf. Mahboubian (Art of Ancient Iran: Copper and Bronze), 390

Ex- Axel Guttmann Collection, Lot 27 (part of) Christies Sale 5524, Axel Guttman Collection of Ancient Arms and Armour, Part 2, 28 April 2004.

From Ancientresource.com:
“Axel Guttmann was the most famous collector of ancient militaria in the modern era, actually creating his own museum in Berlin to display his enormous collection.”

Description:
This arrowhead was part of lot 27 in Christies Sale 5524, Axel Guttman Collection of Ancient Arms and Armour, Part 2, London, April 2004. The lot (“A LARGE COLLECTION OF NORTH-WEST PERSIAN BRONZE ARROWHEADS. 2ND/EARLY 1ST MILLENNIUM B.C.”) consisted of an ancient bronze bowl with sculptural handles, filled to the brim with arrowheads of this type. A number of the arrowheads have since appeared on the market. Each is similar, with elongated deltoid head and long tang.
Robert L3
athna.jpg
AE Drachm of Syracuse Time of Dionysus I, ca 400 BC29 viewsObverse: Head of Athena facing left wearing a Corinthian helmet with an olive wreath on the bowl, inscription S Y R A
Reverse: 8-pointed Seastar between two dolphins
Calciati 62 (ref. Wildwinds) 28 mm. 34 grams

The coin has some damaged spots but overall shows the Greek love of beautiful forms. My Christmas present to myself this year.
1 commentsdaverino
IMG_4487-horz.jpg
Ae Pergamon with countermark Owl on the amphora22 viewsAe, Pergamon,
Obv: head of Zeus right
Rev: [ΑΣΚΛΗΠΙΟΥ ΣΩ]ΤΗΡΟΣ, serpent, countermark of Koinon (Galatia): Owl on the amphora
Diameter: 19mm
Weight: 9,15g
3 commentsTomasz P
thess.jpg
AE Trichalkon of the Thessalian League, 196-146 BC80 viewsObv: Laureate head of Apollo right
Rev: Th E S S A/ L O N in vertical columns; Apollo Itonia standing right, throwing spear w/right arm and holding shield w/left. On top of Athena's spear to left the Greek letters Th R A and to right an Owl.
References: BMC 49; Rogers 20; Nomos 4, 1385
Diameter 19 mm, Wt 7.6 gms

The Thessalian League was a confederacy of northern Greek city-states centered in Larissa. The letters above Athena's spear refer to the authorizing magistrate - in this case (Th R A)sylos whose complete name is given on silver staters of the period. A die match to lot 838 in the Triton XV sale (ACsearch)
1 commentsdaverino
Aeolis_aegae_2.PNG
Aeolis Aegae AE18 2nd-1st cent. BC5 viewsAeolis Aegae AE18 2nd-1st cent. BC

Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right, owl countermark on helmet
Reverse: Zeus advancing left, holding eagle and sceptre

Size: 18.01 mm Weight: 7.8 grams
Macedonian Warrior
lilowl.jpg
Aeolis, Neonteichos /Owl81 viewsAeolis, Neonteichos
AE10 0.85g 2nd cent. BC.

O: Hd Athena in close-fitting helm r.

R: Owl stg r, head turned facing; atop NE monogram
arizonarobin
IMG_2475.JPG
AEOLIS: Neonteichos12 viewsAiolis: Neonteichos. 3rd-2nd century BC. AE10 (.98g). Head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with griffin / Owl standing right, head facing; NE monogram below. SNG Copenhagen 244; SNG von Aulock 1670. (rare, a nicer CNG example went for $400+)Molinari
Agathopolis.jpg
Agathopolis - AE4 viewsc. 300 BC
young male head right wearing tania
facing double boddied owl
AΓA_ΘO
AMNG -; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG Stancomb -; BMC -; Head p. 258
ex Savoca
Johny SYSEL
ATHENA_OWL.jpg
AIOLIS, NEONTEICHOS83 viewsAE 10.3 mm 0.86 g
2nd CENTURY BC
OBV: HELMETED HEAD OF ATHENA R
REV: OWL STANDING R, HEAD FACING, ON NE MONOGRAM
AIOLIS, NEONTEICHOS
SEAR 4223 BMC 141 RARE
1 commentslaney
c16.jpg
AIOLIS, NEONTEICHOS19 viewsAIOLIS NEONTEICHOS.

Helmeted head of Athena
owl on NE monogram
SNG von Aulock 1669. SNG München 598.
ecoli
38854q00_Seleukid_Kingdom,_Alexander_I_Balas,_150_-_145_B_C__owl.jpg
Alexander I Balas, Owl; AE 1615 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 150 - 145 B.C. Bronze AE 16, Houghton and Lorber II 1794, SNG Spaer -, Fair, Antioch mint, 3.948g, 16.4mm, obverse diademed head of Alexander right, dot border; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ”, owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, uncertain control marks in ex. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
ATG_bust_Pergamon.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C.143 viewsAlexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC), better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

"Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.
Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr Joann Fletcher (http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml)
Cleisthenes
ATGlifetimeDrachmLydiaSardes.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Lifetime Issue104 viewsSilver drachm, Price 2553, VF, 4.297g, 16.4mm, 0o, Lydia, Sardes mint, c. 334 - 323 B.C. Lifetime Issue; Obverse: Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Reverse: BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, scepter in left, EYE monogram left, rose under throne. Ex FORVM.

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the 13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
AlexTheGreatMemphisTet.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Possible Lifetime Issue103 viewsThis is the same coin in my collection, different picture, as the Alexander tetradrachm listed as [300mem].

Silver tetradrachm, Price 3971, VF, 16.081g, 26.1mm, 0o, Egypt, Memphis mint, c. 332 - 323 or 323 - 305 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, legs crossed, eagle in right, scepter in left, rose left, DI-O under throne. Ex Pavlos S. Pavlou. Ex FORVM, "The Memphis issues are among the finest style Alexander coins. Experts disagree on the date of this issue. Some identify it as a lifetime issue and others as a posthumous issue (Joseph Sermarini).

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsJames Fitzgerald
untitled1_copy34.png
Alpha Bank17 viewsThis is an exact copy of a Tetradrachm from the Alpha Bank numismatic collection.The Athenian Owl the Tetradrachm of the city of Athens is the best known coin of antiquity.This coin exceeded the boundaries of the issuing authority and was widely used in international trade for a long period of time.Grant H
6E9790D0-4445-4942-A057-7EC757D7123C.jpeg
AMISOS (as Peiraieos) AR Drachm. EF/VF+. Hera - Owl over shield.12 viewsObverse: Head of Hera left, wearing ornamented stephanos.
Reverse: ΔΙ - AN / ΠEIP. owl, with wings spread, standing facing on shield.

Very nice exemplar of this scarce drachm, in EF/VF+ condition, really nice in hand, conserving complete details in both sides, bold reliefs and good quality silver.

HGC 7, 229. Amisos mint, 435-370 BC. 5,5 g - 18 mm
Mark R1
Amisos~1.jpg
Amisos - AR siglos8 viewsc. 400 - 360 BC
Aphro... magistrate
turreted head of Hera-Tyche left wearing stephanos ornamented with palmettes and annulets, triple-drop earrings and pearl necklace
owl standing facing on shield, grain ear left
AΦ_PO
ΠEIPA
SNG BM Black Sea 1059, SNG Stancomb 660, SNG Cop 122, Rec Gén 27, McClean 7351, HGC 7 229
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
amisos_3.jpg
Amisos, Pontos43 views300 – 125 B.C.
Silver Siglos (reduced)
3.83 gm, 15 mm
Obv.: Draped bust of Hera-Tyche right, wearing turreted stephane
Rev.: Owl facing with spread wings standing on shield; monogram to lower left.

SNG Black Sea 1110 var. (monogram);
HGC 7, 233
4 commentsJaimelai
amisos_2_50.jpg
Amisos, Pontos25 views300 - 125 B.C.
Silver Reduced Half Siglos
1.71 gm, 13.5 mm
Obv.: Head of Hera-Tyche right, wearing mural crown
Rev.: Owl facing with spread wings standing on shield; “A” to left; below ΑΣΚΛΕΟΥΣ
SNG Black Sea 1114;
BMC 13, p.14, 14-15;
Sear 3635;
HGC 7, 234
1 commentsJaimelai
Ancient_Greek_Zoo.jpg
Ancient Greek Bestiary366 viewsClockwise: Lion of Chersonessos, Dyrrhachion Cow, Calf and Wasp; Dove of Sikyon; Pegasos of Leukas (mythical); Lion and Bull of Tarsos; Macedonian Horse and Human.
Center: Owl of Athens.
Of the animals listed above, it is said that the human animal is the most violent and destructive of all.
4 commentsJason T
tyre_shekel_imitation.jpg
Ancient imitation: Phoenicia, Tyre, Ca. 390-377 B.C. Shekel14 viewsAncient imitation: Phoenicia, Tyre, Ca. 390-377 B.C. Shekel. Melkart riding hippocamp right / Owl standing right, crook and flail over wing. Ex Sayles & LavenderPodiceps
11_anonymous(45).jpg
Anonymous issue, time of Domitian to Marcus Aurelius (c. 81-180 AD). Æ Quadrans 1,96g, 14mm.21 viewsObv: Bust of Minerva, draped, helmeted, r.
Rev: S - C, owl standing l., head to front.
RIC 8, BM.
xanthos
11_anonymous(44).jpg
Anonymous issue, time of Domitian to Marcus Aurelius (c. 81-180 AD). Æ Quadrans 2,18g, 15mm.30 viewsObv: Bust of Minerva, draped, helmeted, r.
Rev: S - C, owl standing r., head to front.
RIC 7, C. 7.
xanthos
11_anonymous(43).jpg
Anonymous issue, time of Domitian to Marcus Aurelius (c. 81-180 AD). Æ Quadrans 2,78g, 15mm.27 viewsObv: Bust of Minerva, draped, helmeted, r.
Rev: S - C, owl standing r., head to front.
RIC 7, C. 7.
xanthos
quadran-.jpg
Anonymous Quadrans, Athena / Owl18 viewsAnonymous Quadrans, Athena / Owl
Time of Domitian (81-96 AD)
Obverse: draped and helmeted bust of Athena right
Reverse: owl half right between S C.

RIC II 7, Sear I 2918
Tanit
Anonymous-quadrans-group-2.gif
Anonymous quadrantes group 02 Minerva owl left23 viewsQuadrans
2.91 g, 13.9 mm, 12 h.
Obv. No legend. Helmeted bust of Minerva right.
Rev. Owl left. SC in field.
RIC 8.
cckk
Anonymous-quadrans-group-2-~0.gif
Anonymous quadrantes group 02 Minerva owl left exergue29 viewsQuadrans
2.57 g, 14.5 mm, 6 h.
Obv. No legend. Helmeted bust of Minerva right, aegis on breast.
Rev. Owl left. SC in exergue.
RIC 8.
cckk
Anonymous-quadrans-group-4.gif
Anonymous quadrantes group 02 Minerva owl right21 viewsQuadrans
3.01 g, 14.3 mm, 6 h.
Obv. No legend. Helmeted bust of Minerva right.
Rev. Owl right. SC in field.
RIC 7.
cckk
Anonymous-quadrans-group-3.gif
Anonymous quadrantes group 02 Minerva owl right exergue19 viewsQuadrans
2.56 g, 14.2 mm, 7 h.
Obv. No legend. Helmeted bust of Minerva right.
Rev. Owl right. SC in exergue.
RIC 7.
cckk
coinD_copy.jpg
Antiochos VIII & Cleopatra22 viewsAE 19, Antiochos VIII & Cleopatra, 123 BC, Obv: Radiate head of Antiochus right. Rev: Owl standing right, head facing on prostrate amphora / ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ ΚΑΙ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΞΟΥ, IE in ex. , Seleukid date 190 (123 BC), XF. S 7139, B.M.C.4.87,10, SC 2263, Hoover HGC 9, 1189 (S).Molinari
Antiochos_VIII_GCV_7139.JPG
Antiochos VIII, Grypos (with Cleopatra Thea), 125 - 121 BC37 viewsObv: No legend, diademed, radiate head of Antiochos facing right.

Rev: BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ / KΛEOΠATRAΣ on right, KAI / BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY on left, owl facing, perched on an overturned amphora, qp (Seleucid date 190 = 124 - 123 BC) below.

Æ 19, Antioch mint, 124 - 123 BC

6.2 grams, 17 x 19 mm, 0°

GCV II 7139, SNG Spear 2443
1 commentsSPQR Coins
antiochus_VIII_owl.jpg
Antiochus VIII & Cleopatra Thea; owl, AE1814 viewsSeleucid Empire Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII 125-121 B.C. 18mm, 5.3 g. Obverse: Radiate bust of Antiochus VIII right. Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ ΚAΙ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, owl, wings closed, facing standing on sideways amphora. SNGCop 376, Sear GCV II: 7139. Podiceps
Antiochus_VIII.jpg
Antiochus VIII and Cleopatra Thea - AE3 viewsAntioch
123-122 BC
radiate head of Antiochus VIII right
facing owl standing on amphora
BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ / KΛEOΠATPAΣ // KAI / BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY
ϘP
Houghton-Lorber II 2263
ex Lanz
Johny SYSEL
cleopatra.jpg
Antiochus VIII and Cleopatra Thea 125-121 B.C.21 viewsObv. Radiate head of Antiochos right
Rev. BASILISSHS KLEOPATRAS KAI BASILEWS ANTIOXOY, owl standing facing on amphora
Skyler
OWL2.jpg
ANTIQUITIES, Greek, South Italian “Owl skyphos”, 4th Century B.C.40 viewsA South Italian “Owl skyphos”
This is one of the most iconic pieces of pottery from the ancient Greek world, showing the owl Goddess Athena.
A piece that would of had much sentimental value to its original owners, reminding them as they drank wine of their homeland in Athens.
Totally intact and lovely style.
75mm x 145mm across the handles
Mid 4th century BC
superflex
rim0015.jpg
ANTIQUITIES, Roman, Molded and cast glass bowls20 viewsFrom left to right.
1st c.B.C. - 1st c. A.D. Roman amber colored cast and linear-cut ribbed bowl, 37 ribs, the interior decorated with horizontal bands of wheel-cut lines below the rim and around the middle of the body. Some pitting and weathering, incrustations inside. 10.5 x 5.5cm.
2nd - 4th century A.D. Roman colorless (greenish) cast bowl (patella cup) with hollow tube concave base, convex sides, broad rim with two hollow tubes (not folded). Intact with light weathering on some parts, large pontil mark. 9 x 5.7cm.
c.1st century BC - 1st century AD. Roman cast and ribbed glass bowl in a pale green glass, with a wheel-cut tondo inside the bowl. Intact, with weathering and a lot of iridescence. 13 x 5cm.
collectantic
IMG_9344.JPG
Apulia, Teate15 viewsAPULIA, Teate. Circa 225-200 BC. Æ Quincunx, Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; four pellets above / Owl standing right on Ionic capital; four pellets in exergue. SNG ANS 742; SNG France 1420; SNG Morcom 224 var. (pellets right on reverse); HN Italy 702a.ecoli
IMG_0562.JPG
Apulia. Teate6 viewsApulia, Teate, Uncia, c. 225-220 BC; AE; Head of Athena r., wearing crested Corinthian helmet, Rv. TIATI, owl standing r. with closed wings; below one pellet. Dotted border. HNItaly 702d; SNG Copenhagen -; SNG ANS 752.ecoli
AthensTet.jpg
AR Athens Tetradrachm27 viewsAR Athens Tetradrachm, 440 – 420 B.C., Athens, 25.8mm, 17.12g, 45°, SNG Cop 32.
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right, wearing earring. Countermark on cheek.
Rev: AΘE. Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent behind.
Marti Vltori
athens.JPG
AR Tetradrachm, Athens72 viewsAR Tetradrachm, Athens, ca. 450 BC, Obv: Athena in crested helm right; Rev: Owl standing, branch left, ΑΘΕ left, three test cuts, otherwise Nice Very Fine. Ex. Pegasi.3 commentsMolinari
Huth-40(1).jpg
Arabia Felix, Lihyan: Anonymous (ca. 2nd-1st century BCE) Æ Hemidrachm (BMC Arabia pl. LV 2-9; Huth 40)11 viewsObv: Devolved head ot Athena to right
Rev: Owl standing right, head facing; to left, olive sprig
Dim: 15 mm, 2.31 g, 6 h
Quant.Geek
Huth-40.jpg
Arabia Felix, Lihyan: Anonymous (ca. 2nd-1st century BCE) Æ Tetradrachm (BMC Arabia pl. LV 2-9; Huth 40)25 viewsObv: Devolved head ot Athena to right
Rev: AΘE Owl standing right, head facing; to left, olive sprig
Dim: 23 mm, 12.83 g, 9 h
1 commentsQuant.Geek
Arabia_1a_img.jpg
Arabia Felix: Himyarites and Sabaeans (ca. 3rd Century BC) AR Drachm 16 viewsObv:- Helmeted head of Athena right; Sabaean "N" (mark of value) on cheek.
Rev:- Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind, AΘE before
BMC 24 ff.

4.36 gms
Max diameter 15.51 mm
maridvnvm
Munro-Hay_1_4i2.jpg
Arabia Felix: Himyarites and Sabaeans (ca. 3rd Century BC) AR Drachm (Munro-Hay 1.4i2)50 viewsObv: Helmeted head of Athena right; Sabaean "N" (mark of value) on cheek.
Rev: Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind, AΘE before, monogram below.
2 commentsSpongeBob
arabia_0_6g.jpg
Arabia; Saba. Athens owl imitation: 0.6g8 viewsArabia; Saba. Athens owl imitations: small fraction. 0.6g. Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right, three olive leaves, Rev: ΑΘΕ, owl right, head facingPodiceps
arabia_2_6g.jpg
Arabia; Saba. Athens owl imitation: hemidrachm, 2.6g11 viewsArabia; Saba. Athens owl imitations: hemidrachm. 2.6g. Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right, three olive leaves, Saba letter G, Rev: ΑΘΕ, owl right, head facingPodiceps
aristotle.jpg
Aristotle, 384-322 B.C.27 viewsAristotle was born in Stagira in north Greece, the son of Nichomachus, the court physician to the Macedonian royal family. He was trained first in medicine, and then in 367 he was sent to Athens to study philosophy with Plato. He stayed at Plato's Academy until about 347. Though a brilliant pupil, Aristotle opposed some of Plato's teachings, and when Plato died, Aristotle was not appointed head of the Academy. After leaving Athens, Aristotle spent some time traveling, and possibly studying biology, in Asia Minor (now Turkey) and its islands. He returned to Macedonia in 338 to tutor Alexander the Great; after Alexander conquered Athens, Aristotle returned to Athens and set up a school of his own, known as the Lyceum. After Alexander's death, Athens rebelled against Macedonian rule, and Aristotle's political situation became precarious. To avoid being put to death, he fled to the island of Euboea, where he died in 322 B.C.

Aristotle is said to have written 150 philosophical treatises. The 30 that survive touch on an enormous range of philosophical problems, from biology and physics to morals to aesthetics to politics. Many, however, are thought to be "lecture notes" instead of complete, polished treatises, and a few may not be the work of Aristotle but of members of his school.

A full description of Aristotle's contributions to science and philosophy is beyond the scope of this gallgery. Suffice it to say that Aristotle became virtually lost to Western Civilization during the so-called "dark ages." In the later Middle Ages, Aristotle's work was rediscovered and enthusiastically adopted by medieval scholars. His followers called him Ille Philosophus (The Philosopher), or "the master of them that know," and many accepted every word of his writings -- or at least every word that did not contradict the Bible -- as eternal truth. Fused and reconciled with Christian doctrine into a philosophical system known as Scholasticism, Aristotelian philosophy became the official philosophy of the Roman Catholic Church. As a result, some scientific discoveries in the Middle Ages and Renaissance were criticized simply because they were not found in Aristotle. It is one of the ironies of the history of science that Aristotle's writings, which in many cases were based on first-hand observation, were used to impede observational science.

"Mine is the first step and therefore a small one, though worked out with much thought and hard labor. You, my readers or hearers of my lectures, if you think I have done as much as can fairly be expected of an initial start. . . will acknowledge what I have achieved and will pardon what I have left for others to accomplish," Aristotle.

See: http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/history/aristotle.html hosted by the University of California, Berkeley Museum of Paleontology.
Cleisthenes
G_354_Pergamon.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Asklepios, snake, omphalos, c/m owl20 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE 21, 200-133 BC
Obv.: laureate head of bearded Asklepios
Rev.: ΑΣΚΛΗΠΙΟΥ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ, snake coiled around omphalos, without monogram, countermark owl

AE, 10.6g, 20.5mm
Ref.: SNG France 1815 (with countermark)
1 commentsshanxi
G_312_Pergamon.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Asklepios, snake, Omphalos, owl9 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE 17
Obv.: laureate head of bearded Asklepios
Rev.: AΣKΛHΠIOY ΣΩTHPOΣ, Asklepian snake coiled around omphalos, owl standing on the snake's back
AE, 8.66g, 17.3mm
Ref.: BMC Mysia p. 129, 160; SNGvA 1371; SNG BnF 1813; SNG Cop -
Ex Forvm Ancient Coins
shanxi
Pergamon_49.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Athena, bull, owl 9 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE18, 3rd century BC
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena left.
Rev: ΠΕΡΓA, Head and neck of bull left, owl right, without monogram
AE, 4.23g, 17mm
SNG von Aulock 1352; SNG Paris 1574
shanxi
Pergamon_35.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Athena, bull, owl15 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE18, 3rd century BC
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena left. (countermark on helmet)
Rev: ΠΕΡΓA, Head and neck of bull left, owl right, monogram above
AE, 4.48g, 17x18mm
SNG Copenhagen 333; SNG France 1575, BMC Mysia p.112, 20-21
shanxi
Pergamon_40.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, boukranion, owl12 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE21, 2nd-1st centuries BC
Obv: Facing boukranion; star above.
Rev: ΞOATIΣ, Owl standing right on palm, head left, wings spread; monogram to left.
AE, 8.70g, 21mm
Ref.: SNG Tübingen 2442
shanxi
Pergamon_24.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl with closed wings, Athena15 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE12
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ, Owl standing slightly right
AE, 0.85g, 11.7mm
Ref.: SNG Copenhagen 381-2, var (size, no wreath)
Ex Bankhaus Aufhäuser 1988
Ex Dr. P. Vogl collection
Ex Pecunem Gitbud&Naumann Auction 42, Lot 195
shanxi
Pergamon_26.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl with closed wings, Athena, 29 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE18
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right, countermark griffin
Rev: ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΑΡΕΙΑΣ, Owl standing slightly right, all within ring of lines and dots
AE, 5.45g, 18.3mm
Ref.: SNG von Aulock 7488
Ex Gitbud&Naumann 2015
1 commentsshanxi
G_305_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl with closed wings, wreath, Athena5 viewsMysia, Pergamon
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right, decorated with 8-pointed star
Rev: ΑΘΗΝΑΣ, ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ, ethnic vertically downward to right and left of owl standing facing 3/4 to right; all within laurel-wreath.
Æ, 12.7mm, 1.50g
Ref.: SNG Copenhagen 381-2; BMC 185-6.
shanxi
Pergamon_02.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena34 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE18, 200-30 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: AΘHNAΣ NIKHΦOPOY, owl with closed wings on thunderbolt
AE, 18mm, 3.29g
Ref.: SGCV II 3964
Ex Gitbud&Naumann
1 commentsshanxi
Pergamon_15.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena21 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: little Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, without monogram
AE, 3.70g, 18.6mm
Ref.: SNG France 1920-4
shanxi
Pergamon_09.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, Π Δ monogram37 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE17, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, monograms Π Δ below
AE, 2.51g, 17.3mm
Ref.: BMC 133, 201
1 commentsshanxi
Pergamon_44.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, ΓA HM monograms 21 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE18, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, ΓA HM monograms
AE, 3.28g, 16mm
Ref.:
2 commentsshanxi
Pergamon_46.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, ΓA MA monograms 12 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE18, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, ΓA MA? monograms
AE, 3.28g, 15.4mm
Ref.:
Ex Forvm Ancient Coins Shop
shanxi
Pergamon_38.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, ΣAΣ A[P] monograms 12 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE17, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, monograms ΣAΣ A[P] left and right
(the first Σ in the monogram area might be the last letter of ΑΘΗΝΑΣ)
AE, 3.01g, 16.5mm
Ref.:
shanxi
G_356_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, A Π monogram17 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE17, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, monograms A Π below
AE, 3.93g, 18mm
Ref.:
1 commentsshanxi
Pergamon_24~0.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, A PA monograms22 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE16-17, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, monograms A PA left and right
AE, 2.48g, 16.4mm
shanxi
G_317_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, AP MH monograms8 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE16, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, AP MH monograms left and right
AE, 3.26g, 16mm
Ref.: BMC 202
shanxi
G_282_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, club, Γ 18 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE15, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, club and large Γ left and right
AE, 2.67g, 15mm
Ref.:
1 commentsshanxi
G_349_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, club, B7 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE16, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, club and B left and right
AE, 2.58g, 16mm
Ref.:apparently unpublished
shanxi
Pergamon_20.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, K Σ monogram27 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE18, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: little Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, K Σ monogram
AE, 2,99g, 17.6mm
Ref.: BMC 133,197; SNG France 1920-2
1 commentsshanxi
G_315_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, MΦ ΓA monograms10 viewsAsia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, MΦ ΓA monograms
Mysia, Pergamon
AE17, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, monograms MΦ / ΓA below
AE, 3.25g, 16mm
Ref.: BMC p.133, 204
shanxi
Pergamon_12.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, MH monogram27 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE17, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, MH monogram left
AE, 2.55g, 16.2mm
1 commentsshanxi
Pergamon_33.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, TK ΠΛ monograms15 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE17, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, monograms TK ΠΛ left and right
AE, 2.83g, 16.7mm
Ref.: SNG France 1913
shanxi
Pontos_Amisos_01.jpg
Asia Minor, Pontos, Amisos, Siglos28 viewsPontos, Amisos
AR Reduced Siglos, 4th century BC
Obv.: Draped bust of Hera right, wearing turreted diadem
Rev.: Owl standing facing with spread wings, monograms
Ag, 3.69g, 17.4 mm
Ref.: SNG Copenhagen 129 var.
Ex Lanz Numismatik
1 commentsshanxi
148.jpg
Asklepios, hld. serpent-staff210 viewsPHRYGIA. Acmoneia. Nero. Æ 20. Circa A.D. 65. Obv: (NEPWNACE)BACTOИ-AKMONE(IC). Laureate head right, aegis on chest; above crescent; beneath winged caduceus (not visible); Countermark before. Rev: (CEP)OYHNIOYKAΠITWNO(CKAIIOYΛIACCEOYHPAC), EΠI APX TO Г in field to right. Zeus enthroned left, in right extended hand holding phiale over owl, resting left arm on sceptre. Ref: BMC 43; SNG Cop 29; RPC 3176. Axis: 330°. Weight: 4.27 g. Magistrate: L. Servinius Capito (archon). Third issue. CM: Asklepios standing, holding serpent-encircled staff, in rectangular punch, 4.5 x 9 mm. Howgego 241 (12 pcs). Note: There was a local cult of Asklepios. Collection Automan.1 commentsAutoman
42841_Assos,_Troas,_c__400_-_241_B_C_.jpg
Assos; AE10; Athena left, owl countermark / griffin left16 viewsTroas, Assos. c. 400-241 B.C. Bronze AE 10, SNG Cop 237, SNG Von Aulock 7587, F, Assos mint, weight 3.944g, maximum diameter 15.4mm, die axis 0o, c. 400 - 241 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena left, owl countermark from Pergamum; reverse ΑΣΣΙ, griffin seated left; green patina; Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Athena_Owl_Tet_2d.jpg
Athena * Owl, Athenian AR Tetradrachm * 449-413 BC.480 views
Athena * Owl, Archaic style Athenian Silver Tetradrachm.

Obv: Head of Athena right-facing, archaic almond shaped eye, crested helmet engraved with three olive-leaves & floral scroll, wire necklace, circular earring, hair neatly drawn across forehead in parallel curves and which falls below the neck guard of the helmet in elegant, looped coils, neck truncated with row of dots.
Rev: AOE vertical in right field, Owl standing erect to the right, head facing, prong tail, feet resting on bottom line of the lower plane of the incuse, pellet in center of forehead; to left olive twig and crescent, all engraved within incuse square.

Exergue: (None)

Mint: Athens
Struck: 449-413 BC.

Size: 22.26 x 23.63 mms
Weight: 17.8 grams
Die axis: 90°

Condition: Absolutely gorgeous. Beautifully toned, bright, clear, lustrous silver with superb high-relief details both sides.

Refs:*
Sear, GC, 2526; Vol. I, pg. 236.

12 commentsTiathena
anon_2.jpg
Athena / Owl half right8 viewsAnonymous Quadrans, Athena / Owl, Time of Domitian (81-96 AD)
Obverse: draped and helmeted bust of Athena right
Reverse: owl half right between S C. RIC II 7, Sear I 2918. ex areich
Podiceps
anon.jpg
Athena / Owl half right7 viewsAnonymous Quadrans, Athena / Owl, Time of Domitian (81-96 AD)
Obverse: draped and helmeted bust of Athena right
Reverse: owl half right between S C. RIC II 7, Sear I 2918. ex areich
Podiceps
Anonymous_Quadrans,_Athena___Owl.JPG
Athena / Owl half right8 viewsAnonymous Quadrans, Athena/ Owl. time of Domitian (81-96 AD) 15mm, 2.7g. Obverse: draped and helmeted bust of Athena right. Reverse: owl half right between S C. RIC II 7, Sear I 2918. ex areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
Athen_owl_Tetradrachm_.jpg
Athena and her owl 172 viewsIn Greek mythology, a Little Owl baby (Athene noctua) traditionally represents or accompanies Athena, the virgin goddess of wisdom, or Minerva, her syncretic incarnation in Roman mythology. Because of such association, the bird often referred to as the "owl of Athena" or the "owl of Minerva" has been used as a symbol of knowledge, wisdom, perspicacity and erudition throughout the Western world.
The reasons behind the association of Athena and the owl are lost in time. Some mythographers, such as David Kinsley and Martin P. Nilsson suggest that she may descend from a Minoan palace goddess associated with birds and Marija Gimbutas claim to trace Athena's origins as an Old European bird and snake goddess.
On the other hand, Cynthia Berger theorizes about the appeal of some characteristics of owls such as their ability to see in the dark to be used as symbol of wisdom while others, such as William Geoffrey Arnott, propose a simple association between founding myths of Athens and the significant number of Little Owls in the region (a fact noted since antiquity by Aristophanes in The Birds and Lysistrata).
In any case, the city of Athens seems to have adopted the owl as proof of allegiance to its patron virgin goddess, which according to a popular etiological myth reproduced on the West pediment of the Parthenon, secured the favor of its citizens by providing them with a more enticing gift than Poséidon.
Owls were commonly reproduced by Athenians in vases, weights and prize amphoras for the Panathenaic Games. The owl of Athena even became the common obverse of the Athenian tetradrachms after 510 BC and according to Philochorus, the Athenian tetradrachm was known as glaux throughout the ancient world and "owl" in present day numismatics. They were not, however, used exclusively by them to represent Athena and were even used for motivation during battles by other Greek cities, such as in the victory of Agathocles of Syracuse over the Carthaginians in 310 B.C. in which owls flying through the ranks were interpreted as Athena’s blessing or in the Battle of Salamis, chronicled in Plutarch's biography of Themistocles.
(Source: Wikipédia)
moneta romana
Athena_Tetra.jpg
Athena Pi Style Tetradrachm , Eye-in-profile.68 viewsObverse : Head of Athena right, 

Reverse : owl standing , head facing, olive sprig and crescent left , AOE right.

17 Gr

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
Attica_beauty_(1_sur_1).jpg
Athena. Classical Beauty Fifth century BC186 viewsc 431/ 415 BC
"Archaic style" head of Athena, wearing crested helmet ornamented with olive leaves and floral scroll, on Athen tetradrachm

I consider this coin as historical to the extent that athenian owl tetradrachm was the first widely used international coinage.

Here, all the coin :
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=lastup&cat=21343&pos=0
2 commentsmoneta romana
454-404_BC_-_Athenian_Tetradrachm.jpg
Athenian Classical Tetradrachm -- 454-404 BC19 views16.99 g, 22 mm, 270°
Athens Mint
Silver Tetradrachm
Near VF, toned, test cut on reverse, minor deposits and light scratches.
Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31

Obverse: Classical Bust of Athena.
Reverse: AOE; Owl, Crescent, and Olive Sprig Within Incuse Square.

Owls were the first widely used international coin. They popularized the practice of putting a head on the obverse of a coin and an animal on the reverse. Athena was goddess of both wisdom and warfare and was the patron goddess of Athens. The owl is Athena's attribute or mascot. According to mythology, Athena at times took the very form of her owl. The owl species depicted on Athenian Owls is the Athena Noctua, also called the Little Owl or Minerva Owl.
Hydro
Athena_2.jpg
Athenian Owl445 viewsAttica-Athens
Silver tetradrachm
449-414 B.C.
16.54g, 24mm, 0o
13 commentsmihali84
Athens_Owl.jpg
Athenian Owl478 viewsAttica-Athens
Silver tetradrachm
449-414 B.C.
17g, 24mm, 45o
Interesting Countermark on reverse
6 commentskypros84
Image1.JPG
Athenian Owl Silver Tetradrachm c. 454-414 B.C.57 viewsAthens. c. 454-414 BC. AR tetradrachm (24mm, 17.20 gm, 8h).
Obv: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet ornamented with three laurel leaves and vine scroll.
Rev: ΑΘΕ Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind, all within incuse square.
Ref: SNG Copenhagen 32.
Extremely Fine.
mjabrial
Athensowl.jpg
Athenian Tetradrachm25 viewsSilver Tetradrachm minted in Athens between 300-262 BC. 16.81 g

Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right

Rev: Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent to l, AΘE in right field
chuy1530
athens.jpg
athens78 viewsAthens, Greece,Tetradrachm, 449-413 B.C.
Obverse- Head of Athena right.
Reverse- AQE right, owl standing right.
17.gm, 21.mm.
1 commentsb70
a142.jpg
Athens44 viewsAttica - Athens
Tetradrachm
Obverse:Head of Athena right in crested helmet
Revarse:Owl standing right, head facing, olive spring and crescent to left

22.14mm 12.77gm

MODERN CAST FAKE

I bought it as "unknown" 12$ at ebay
maik
a_127f.JPG
Athens127 viewsAttica-Athens
Tetradrachm 450-404 bc
Obverse:Helmeted head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves
Reverse:ATHE ; owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind

16.68gm 24.85mm

Sear 2526
2 commentsmaik
g_041.JPG
Athens79 viewsAttika,Athens "new style" 168-50 b.c
Tetradrachm 115 - 114 BC

Obverse:Head of Athena,wearing helmet
Reverse:Owl standing right on amphora;ΑΘΕ magistrates names ΜΗΤΡΟΔΩΡΟΣ ΚΑΛΛΗ at left and ΔΗΜΟΣΘΕ right;grapes right;ΣΦ under amphora

28.67mm 16.71gm

Sear 1 pages 239-240 , Thompson 635
3 commentsmaik
athenowl.jpg
Athens AR Classical Tetradrachm 454-431 BC14 viewsOBVERSE: Helmeted head of Athena right
REVERSE: Owl perched right, Olive leaves and crescent moon in left field; ethnic [AOE] in right field obscured by obverse test punch.

This type of owl is from the high point of Athens' domination of the Greek world. According to Reid Goldsborough's classification it is distinguished by the confident smile on the face of Athena, her full rounded features and, on the reverse, the short legged owl. The coin is somewhat crystallized as seen by the surfaces and its low conductivity. Crystallization is rarely found in Owls, I suspect because their high relief required heating the planchet strongly before striking. Not a perfect coin but the character of Athena nicely represents the opinion that the Athenians had of themselves in their heyday.

weight 16.95 gms
daverino
Athènes 224-198 BC.jpg
Athens - AE 12 (224-198 BC)14 viewsHead of helmeted Athena right
A Θ E , owl standing right, head facing, in wreath
Ginolerhino
1452_Athens_drachm.jpg
Athens - AR drachm7 views431-393 BC
head of Athena right - almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll
owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent left
AΘE
SNG Cop 41; Kroll 10; Dewing 1601; Svoronos pl. 11, 20; HGC 4 1631
ex Künker
Johny SYSEL
Athens_tetra_1.jpg
Athens - AR tetradrachm51 views431-393 BC
head of Athena right - almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll
owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent left
AΘE right
Phoenician contermark
bēth yōdh
(Type C), Sear 2526
16,5g 22mm

Three cuts over the owl probably weren't test cuts but intentional destruction of a symbol of unpopular Athens.
Johny SYSEL
Athens.jpg
Athens - AR tetradrachm28 views431-393 BC
head of Athena right - almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll
owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent left
AΘE
(Type C), Sear 2526
16,5g 22mm
ex Jiří Militký
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
Athènes 2.jpg
Athens - tetradrachm (IVth C. BC)32 viewsObv.: head of Athena right weraing helmet and wreath. Phoenician countermark on her cheek.
Rev.: AΘE , owl right.
Ginolerhino
Athènes 1.jpg
Athens - tetradrachm (Vth - IVth C. BC)29 viewsObv.: head of Athena right, wearing helmet and wreath.
Rev.: AΘE , owl right.
Ginolerhino
athens_01.jpg
Athens AR Tetradrachm78 viewsObv: Head of Athena right, with profile eye.
Rev: AQE - Owl standing right, head facing, olive twing and crescent behind.
Year: 4th century BC
Ref: Sear 2537
3 commentsoa
2v0jzlx.jpg
Athens AR Tetradrachm22 viewsAthens Tetradrachm 120 - 110 b.c
12h, 11g, 26mm.
O: Head of Athena facing right.
R: Standing owl
Ref: due to weight, possible Fouree.
Andrew B2
8y82lk.jpg
Athens AR Tetradrachm26 viewsAR Tetradrachm. 430 - 322 b.c
12g, 19mm, 9h.
O: Head of Athena facing right
R: Standing owl. Olive branch on Left, AOE on right.
Ref: Work In Progress (on ID board)
Andrew B2
Athens_Attica.jpg
ATHENS ATTICA AR Tetradrachm, Thompson 477a, New Style Owl55 viewsOBV: Helmeted head of Athena right
REV: Owl standing right, head facing, on overturned amphora; to left, eagle standing right on thunderbolt; Gamma on amphora, ΗΡΑ in exergue; all within laurel wreath
16.8g
Minted at Athens, 127/26 BC
1 commentsLegatus
worn_owl.jpg
Athens c. 393-300 BC, tetradrachm48 viewsAttica. Athens c. 393-300 BC, tetradrachm, 16.23 g, eye seen in profile, Sear GCV I: 2537.1 commentsPodiceps
EmerGTetAttica.jpg
Athens Emergency Issue Plated Tetradrachm Circa 406-404 BC938 viewsQuote from David Sear:

"Athens was the greatest power in the Greek world throughout most of the 5th century BC. Its famous 'owl' coinage, principally of silver tetradrachms, possibly commenced in 510 BC on the occasion of the downfall of the tyrant Hippias. On these celebrated coins the helmeted head of the goddess Athena was accompanied by her attendant owl and the first three letters of the ethnic 'AQE'. Later, a diadem of olive leaves was added to Athena's helmet and a cresent moon was placed in the reverse field, though the precise chronological significance of these changes remains uncertain. To the intense chagrin of the Spartans Athens became the leader of the Greek states, including those of Ionia, in the epic struggle against the expansionist policies of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. The victories at Salamis (480 BC) and the Eurymedon (circa 467) clearly established the Athenian supremacy in the Aegean world. Initially, the Delian League (founded in 477) was an alliance of independent states sharing a common cause under the leadership of Athens. It gradually developed into an Athenian maritime empire with the member cities obliged to pay an annual tribute into the League's treasury on Delos. In 454 this treasury, amounting to 5,000 talents of silver, was actually removed to Athens and the vast wealth was openly employed for the aggrandizement of the city, now under the leadership of the great statesman Pericles. Vast building projecdts, such as the monumental edifices on the Acropolis, were financed in this way. From 431, however, Athens became embroiled in the protracted Peloponnesian War and increasingly the wealth of the state was dissipated in this futile cause. This attractive tetradrachm belongs to the exceptionally large ouput of Athenian 'owls' made during the second half of the 5th century. In contrast to the artistic development taking place at mints in other parts of the Mediterranean world, the late archaic style of the earlier 5th century became 'frozen' on these issues which represent the first truly imperial coinage of the Greek world. As Athens restricted or forbade the issue of independent currency at many of the cities within her sphere of influence the 'owls' came to circulate over an increasingly wide area. But this all came to an end with the defeat of Athens by Sparta in 404 BC and during the period immediately preceding this catastrophe the Athenians were reduced to the desperate expedient of issuing bronze tetradrachms and drachms with a thin surface coating of silver. This specimen is an excellent example of this emergency coinage the production of which drew contemporary comment from Aristophanes who, in his play Frogs (717ff), compares the decline in the quality of the leading citizens with the recent debasement of the Athenian coinage."
3 commentsGunner
athens_newStyle_AR30_16_82g.jpg
Athens New Style tetradrachm157 viewsPolycharm(os), Nikog(enes), and Aianti-, magistrates, struck 133/2
30mm, 16.82g, 11h
ob: head of Athena Parthenos right, wearing necklace, pendent earring, and triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with the protomes of four horses above the visor, a Pegasos in flight rightward above the raised earpiece, and a curvilinear ornament on the shell
rev: Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; A-ӨE above ΠOΛY-XAPM/NIKOΓ/AIAN/TI (magistrates’ names) in five lines across field; winged kerykeion to left, B on amphora, ΔI below; all within wreath

Thompson 377 var. (same obv. die; unlisted month/control letters combination)

ex Triton XIV, Lot: 216
3 commentsareich
2_PALMS_ROMA_March_2019.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 160/59 BC39 viewsObv: Athena right in tri-form helmet
Thompson issue 5 16.97 Gm 32 mm
Thompson Catalogue: Obs:New : Rev:New
Rev:ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on amphora
2 Magistrates monograms beside each a single palm.
Symbol: 2 Palms
All surrounded by an olive wreath
4 commentscicerokid
Both_No_Symbol_1.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 161/0 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
34.2mm 16.97g Thompson issue 4
Thompson catalogue : Obs 13 : Rev (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates monograms in both fields
No symbol type
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
ISIS_Post_Sulla.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 83/2 BC8 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29 mm 16.82 gm Thompson issue 82 Thompson catalogue:ll69a
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Θ control ΔI below
2 magistrates : ARCHITIMOS DEMETRI
RF symbol : Isis
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Savoca_15th_28052017_800_X__resisze_Beatyl_with_Fillets.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 84/3 BC6 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
28 mm 16.47 gm Thompson issue 81 Thompson catalogue: Obs 1160 ? Rev: NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark B control [] below
2 magistrates : KLEOPHANES EPITHETHES
RF symbol : Beatyl with Fillets
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_Tyche_Staff___Cornucopia~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 100/9 BC3 viewsObs : Athena Parthanos right in tri-form helmet
16.25g 29mm Thompson issue 65
Thompson catalogue: Obs 875 : Rev NEW
REV : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathanaic amphora
on which month mark Λ control ME below
3 magistrates : DOSITHEOS XARIAS XAIR
RF symbol : Tyche, Staff & Cornucopia
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_DIONYSOS~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 104/3 BC5 viewsObs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
32mm !6.75g Thompson issue 61
Thompson catalogue Obs 802 : Rev h (not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Η ? control ΑΠ below
3 magistrates : ANDREAS CHIRANAUTES DEMETRI
RF symbol : Dionysus & Demeter
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_QUIVER~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 109/8 BC3 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos in tri-form helmet
30mm 16.64gm Thompson issue 56
Thompson catalogue: Obs 724 : Rev ? (altered)
Rev : AΘE ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Δ/Γ control ΠΕ below
3 magistrates : DAMON SOSIKRATES KRITON
RF symbol : Quiver & Bow
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_NEW_TRIP.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 113/2 BC6 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29mm 16.73 gm Thompson issue 52
Thompson catalogue : Obs 680 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark M control ME below
3 magistrates : EUMAREIDES KLEOMEN PYRRI
RF symbol : Triptolemos in biga pulled by snakes
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_GRAPES~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 115/4 BC5 viewsbs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.56g 29mm Thompson issue 50
Thompson catalogue : Obs 639 : Rev ? (altered)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Γ/Β/Α control ΣΦ below
3 magistrates : METRODOROS DEMOSTHE(N) KALLIPH / PYRROS
RF symbol : Bunch of Grapes on vine leaf
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_NEW_DOUBLE_CORNUCOPIA~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 120/9 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
28mm 16.50g Thompson issue 45
Thompson catalogue: Obs 543 : Rev f/g (not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Δ control ΔΙ below
3 magistrates : APHRODiSI DIOGE PHILOX
RF symbol : Double Cornucopia with Fillets
All surrounded within an olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_DIOSCURI~0.jpg
Athens New Style tetradrachm 123/2 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthanos right in tri-form helmet
16.23g 30mm Thompson issue (new) 42
Thompson catalogue: 479g
REV : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathanaic amphora
on which month mark Δ control ΣΦ below
3 magistrates : MIKION EURYKLEI BOYKATTHES
RF symbol : Dioscuri
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_PROW~0.jpg
Athens New Style tetradrachm 124/3 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos in tri-form helmet
16.81g 30mm Thompson issue (new) 41
Thompson catalogue : 532
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Ε control ΣΦ below
3 magistrates : KAPAIX EPGOKLE KLE
RF symbol : Prow of Ship
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_TRIPOD~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 125/4 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29mm 16.67g Thompson issue 40
Thompson catalogue : 470f
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Θ control ΜΕ below
3 magistrates : POLEMON ALKETES ARIS
LF symbol : Tripod
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_FULMEN~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 126/5 BC3 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.65gm 32mm Thompson issue 39
Thompson catalogue Obs 450 : Rev b (not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Ε control ΗΡ below
3 magistrates : EPIGENE SOSANDROS ELIODO
LF symbol : Eagle on Thunderbolt
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_CADUCEUS~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 133/2 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29mm 17.06g Thompson issue 32
Thompson catalogue: Obs 378 : Rev d (not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Ε control ΔΙ below
3 magistrates : POLYCHARM NIKOG DIONYSIOU
LF symbol : Winged Caduceus
All surrounded within an olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_ASKLEPIOS~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 135/4 BC4 viewsbs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.63g 29.2mm Thompson issue 30
Thompson catalogue: Obs 354 : Rev NEW
Rev : AΘE ethnic
Owl standing on overturned Panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Ν control ΗΡ below
3 magistrates : MENED EPIGENO ARISTE
LF symbol : Asklepios clutching stick with snake entwined
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_LIONSKIN~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 136/5 BC5 viewsObs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.81 g 31.5mm Thompson issue 29
Thompson catalogue: Obs 332: Rev c (not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Δ control: ΗΡ below
3 magistrates : HRA ARISTOPH POLYM
LF symbol: Bow Club & Lionskin
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_NEW_NIKE.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 137/6 BC2 viewsbs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.82gm 30mm Thompson issue 28
Thompson catalogue: Obs 315 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Β control ΜΕ below
2 magistrates : MIKI ΘΕΟΦΡΑ
RF symbol : Nike driving Quadriga
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_HELIOS~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 138/7 BC2 viewsbs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
33mm 16.87gm Thompson issue 27
Thompson catalogue : 288a
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Α control ΗΡ in LF
LF - ΓΛΑΥ RF - ΕΧΕ
2 magistrates
RF symbol : Radiate facing bust of Helios
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_Aplustre~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 139/8 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet: No Pegasos
32.8mm 16.87g Thompson issue (new) 26
Thompson catalogue : Obs 264 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
upon which month mark Κ control AN below
2 complex magistrates monograms in both fields
RF symbol : Aplustre
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_EAGLE~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 141/0 BC4 viewsObs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
35mm 16.53gm Thompson issue 24
Thompson catalogue : Obs 230 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Δ control ΣΦ below
2 complex magistrates monograms
RF symbol : Eagle perching on right monogram
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
APOLLO_BOTH~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 143/2 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.00 gm 34.4mm Thompson issue 22
Thompson catalogue : Obs 188 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on which
month mark Θ below left control mark ME 2 magistrates : ΔΙΟΦΑ ΔΙΟΔΟ
LF symbol : Apollo
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_THRYSOS~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 144/3 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.75gm 34mm Thompson issue 21
Thompson catalogue : Obs : GAZIANTEP 185 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Ε control ΤΙ below
2 complex magistrates monograms
RF symbol : Filleted Thyrsos
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
HORSE_BOTH~1.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 145/4 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.70 gm 34.8mm Thompson issue 20
Thompson catalogue : Obs 160 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on which
month mark Γ : LF control mark ΣΦΑΙ
2 magistrates : ΠΑΔΩ ΛΥΣΙΑ
RF symbol :Forepart of Bridled Horse
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_TRIDENT.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 147/6 BC7 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.74 gm 34mm Thompson issue 18
Thompson catalogue : Obs 127 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
below control mark ΠΡΟ
2 magistrates : ΑΔΕΙ ΗΛΙΟ
RF symbol : Trident Head
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Dionysos_Mine_Cornucopia_Both.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 148/7 BC10 viewsObs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
31mm 16.59gm Thompson issue 17
Thompson catalogue: Obs 120/NEW?: Rev (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates : AMMO ΔΙΟ
LF symbol : Cornucopia
EY below amphora
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_PALM_LEAF.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 149/8 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
34mm 16.64g Thompson issue 16
Thompson catalogue: Obs 109 : Rev (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : AΘE ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which 2 control letters Ε ? : RF month mark Ι
ΠOΛΥ , TI - MPΔ monogram
2 magistrates : ΠΟΛΥ TIMARCHIDES
Symbol : Palm Leaf (oblique behind owl)
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_KERNOS~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 150/9 BC2 viewsObs: Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
34.5mm 16.70gm Thompson issue 15
Thompson catalogue: Obs 99: Rev (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates : AMMO ΔΙΟ
LF symbol : Kernos
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_NEW_TERM_of_HERMES.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 151/0 BC3 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
32 3 mm 17.20 g Thompson Issue 14
Thompson catalogue: Obs 87 : Rev NEW
Rev : AΘE ethnic
Owl Standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark M/B
2 magistrates mongrams in both fields
LF symbol : Term of Hermes
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_SERPENTS.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 152/1 BC3 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
33mm 16.92 g Thompson Issue 13
Thompson catalogue: Obs 80 ?? : Rev 79a
Rev : AΘE ethnic
Owl Standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Ζ
XM monogram left, AΦN monogram right
2 magistrates : MOSCHOS PHANIAS
RF symbol : 2 Serpents
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_CICADA~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 153/2 BC2 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
34.2mm 16.80 g Thompson issue 12
Thompson catalogue : Obs 66 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month letter A
2 magistrates monograms in both fields
LF symbol : Cicada
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_PILAII.jpg
Athens New Style tetradrachm 154/3 BC2 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
34.5mm 16.72g Thompson issue 11
Thompson catalogue : Obs 60 : Rev (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 complex magistrates monograms in both fields
RF symbol : Caps of Dioscuri
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_GRAIN_EAR.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 155/4 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
33mm 17.2gm Thompson issue 10
Thompson catalogue: Obs 50 : Rev: (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 Complex magistrates monograms in both fields
LF symbol: Ear of Grain
All surrounded by olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_TROPHY_EXCELLENT.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 156/5 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
32mm 16.82gm Thompson issue 9
Thompson catalogue: Obs 43 : Rev: (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 Complex magistrates monograms in right field
LF symbol: Trophy
All surrounded by olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_NIKE_WREATH_PHOTO~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 157/6 BC2 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
Lions tailed pegasos type
33.8 mm 16.32gm Thompson issue 8
Thompson catalogue: 34b ? ( not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates monograms in both fields
RF symbol:Nike presenting Wreath
All surrounded by olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_TOP_RUDDER_REV.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 158/7 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos in tri-form helmet wearing aegis
15 55g 32.5mm Thompson issue 7
Thompson catalogue : Obs 27 : Rev NEW (no rudder)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates monograms : NAUKRATES ARI....
NO RUDDER SYMBOL BELOW LF MONOGRAM
EXE graffito below left centre olive wreath
All within surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_CLUB_again.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 159/8 BC2 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
16.94gm 36mm Thompson Issue 6
Thompson catalogue : Obs 22 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
LF monogram RF monogram Π ω
2 magistrates
RF symbol : Club
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_Cornucopia_161_BC.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 161/0 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
32mm 16.66g Thompson issue 4
Thompson catalogue : Obs 13 : Rev: 3c (not in plates)/ NEW?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates monograms in both fields
RF symbol: Cornucopiae
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
PHANIAS_BOTH.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 162/1 BC2 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
33.6mm 16.73g Thompson issue 3
Thompson catalogue : Obs 10 : Rev NEW/ f/g (not in plates)?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates
1 monogram in LF - ΦΑΝΙ in RF
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Kernos_Bakhos_Both.gif
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 163/2 BC8 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
35.5mm 16.29g Thompson issue 2
Thompson catalogue : Obs 7 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates
1 monogram in LF & in RF
2 Symbols Kernos in RF: Bakhos below amphora
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
T_OBV___REV_2~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 164/3 BC6 viewsObs: Athena Parthenos in tri-form helmet
right,wearing Aegis, Biga on neckguard
No border of dots
33.5 mm 16.15gm Thompson issue 1
Thompson catalogue:Obs 3 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
2 magistrates monograms in both fields
All surrounded by olive wreath with single tie
cicerokid
STAG_299_16_60_g.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 79/8 BC27 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
30 mm 16.60 gm Thompson issue 86 Thompson catalogue: Obs 1217 Rev: New/Not in plztes?
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark ? control ? below
2 magistrates : NESTOR MNASEAS
RF symbol : Stag
All surrounded by an olive wreath
1 commentscicerokid
Poppy_BOTH.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 82/1 BC5 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29 mm 16.82 gm Thompson issue 83 Thompson catalogue: Obs 1183 Rev: not in plates/ NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark K control ΔI below
2 magistrates : LYSANDROS OINOPHILOS
RF symbol : Poppy Head between 2 Grain Ears
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Athens_CNG_GRIFFIN_2011.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 89/88 BC12 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
32 mm 16.78 gm Thompson issue (new) 77
Thompson catalogue: Obs:1131 Rev: Not in plates
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark B control EΠ below
3 magistrates : APELLICON GORGIAS DIOGE
RF symbol : Leaping Griffin
All surrounded by an olive wreath
1 commentscicerokid
Roma_and_Nike.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 90/89 BC10 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
30.5 mm 15.67 gm corroded Thompson issue (new) 76
Thompson catalogue: 1128a
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Γ control ΠΡ below
3 magistrates : KOINTOS KLEAS DIONYSI
RF symbol : Roma & Nike
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_ROMA_EXCELLENT~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 91/0 BC2 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29.9 mm 16.4 gm Thompson issue (new) 75
Thompson catalogue: Obs1122/Rev1123 NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark H/Z control ΣTΕ/ΔΑ below
2 magistrates : XENOCLES HARMOXENOS
RF symbol : Roma seated
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_D___T.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 92/1 BC2 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
30 mm 16.2 gm Thompson issue (new) 74
Thompson catalogue: Obs1076/Rev Not in plates/NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Δ control ?? below
2 magistrates : XENOCLES HARMOXENOS
RF symbol : Dolphin & Trident
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_New_Pegassos~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 94/3 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
28.5mm 16.25 gm Thompson issue (New) 67
Thompson catalogue: Obs 972 : Rev NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Θ control Α Π below
3 magistrates : ARIST(I)ON PHILON HGEAS
RF symbol : Drinking Pegasos
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_Gorgoneon.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 95/4 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
28.5mm 16.76 gm Thompson issue (New) 66
Thompson catalogue: 937a ? (not in plates)
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Γ control MH below
3 magistrates : NIKETES DIONYSIOS MENE
RF symbol : Gorgon Head
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
NOW_BOTH_COILED_SERPENT~0.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm 97/6 BC4 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
28 mm 16.8 gm Thompson issue 70
Thompson catalogue: Obs NEW: Rev 1019 (altered) NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark Ζ/Γ control ΣΟ/ΠΕ below
2 magistrates : XENOCLES HARMOXENOS
RF symbol : Coiled Serpent
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
BOTH_IMITATION_CICADA.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm c153/2 BC4 viewsObs : Athena
32.5mm 16.27g Die axis: 6 o'clock
Thompson catalogue : IMITATION
Obs : 1350 Rev : NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic Above symbol LF Cicada
Below ΠΟ
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Both_DIOKLES_TO_DEY.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm c47 BC17 viewsbs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet with tr-partite earings
27mm 17.04gm Thompson (new) issue 105
Thompson catalogue: Obs: I260 Rev:NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark A: control ΣΩ below
2 magistrates : DIOKLES TO DEY MEDEIOS
RF symbol : Hygieia
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Both__Ares_New_Style__80_BC.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm c80/9 BC5 viewsbs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29mm 16.04gm Thompson (new) issue 85
Thompson catalogue: IMITATION 1419ba
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora on
which month mark Α control ΔΙ below
2 magistrates : EUMELOS THEOXENID(E)S
RF symbol : Ares
All within a surrounding olive wreath
cicerokid
Superb_Both_Aetolia.jpg
Athens New Style Tetradrachm c90/9 BC6 viewsObs : Athena Parthenos right in tri-form helmet
29 mm 16.53 gm Thompson issue (new) 75
Thompson catalogue: IMITATION Obs : 1420 Rev : NEW
Rev : ΑΘΕ ethnic
Owl standing on overturned panathenaic amphora
on which month mark A control ? below
2 magistrates : XENOCLES HARMOXENOS
RF symbol : Aetolia ?
All surrounded by an olive wreath
cicerokid
Athens Old Style Tetradrachm.JPG
Athens Old Style Tetradrachm88 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 449-413 BC, Athens Greece
Obverse: Helmeted Head of Athena Right
Reverse: AOE, Owl standing right, olive sprig and crescent left.
25mm, 17.3gm
1 commentsJerome Holderman
00001-athensOwl.jpg
Athens Owl67 viewsAthens Owl Tetradrachm
24 mm 17.14 gm
Head of Athena right
Owl standing right
2 commentsJohn Campbell
Athens_Owl_Tetradrachm.JPG
Athens Owl Tetradrachm70 viewsSilver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526, gVF, toned, Athens mint, weight 16.994g, maximum diameter 24.7mm, die axis 270o, c. 420 - 413 B.C.;
OBV: head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves;
REV: ΑΘΕ right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;

EX: Forvm Ancient Coins

Click on the image for a large more detailed close-up picture.
1 commentsRomanorvm
owl6.jpg
Athens tetradrachm169 viewsAthens --AR Tetradrachm (after 449BC). Helmeted head of athena right, owl standing right within incuse square. Sear 2526. 3 commentsfeatherz
Athens4drC.JPG
Athens Tetradrachm108 viewsObv. Helmeted head of Athena right
Rev. Owl standing right, olice branch in left corner, AOE down right side.
Sear 2526.
1 commentsLordBest
athenstet.jpeg
Athens Tetradrachm56 views449-413 B.C. Attica Old style Tetradrachm 17g

Obverse: Head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, hair in parallel curves. Test cut and Countermark on cheek.
Reverse: AOE Right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square. Test cuts and counter punch in eye.

2 commentsDk0311USMC
athens.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm230 viewsTetradrachm (AR), 17.05g, 28mm, 6h. Ca. 449-404. Flament pl. IV, 2 (this coin). ex Glendinning, 18-20 April 1955 no383. Waxy deposit in Athena's ear and below the earring was cleaned, see the new photo in my gallery (I initialy believed it was horn silver)6 commentspaparoupa
Athens.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm157 viewsArchaic head of Athena r., with almond shaped eye, wearing crested helmet
ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round
earring.

ΑΘΕ right
owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, prong tail, to left olive twig
and crescent, all within incuse square

Athens 449-413 BC

16.74g

SNG Copenhagen 31; Sear 2526

Ex-Calgary Coin

Sold back Feb 2019
8 commentsJay GT4
owl.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm (Van Alfen 35)40 viewsAttica, Athens, AR Tetradrachm. 393-300 B.C.. Obv: Head of Athena right, eye in profile. Rev: Owl standing to r., head facing, to r. A-theta-E, to left, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square, test cut. 22 mm, 16.58 grams. Van Alfen, Peter. American Journal of Numismatics, second series, volume 16-17, number 35, this coin.2 commentsLucas H
Athens_owl.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm 449BC-413BC50 viewsDie axis 45 degrees
Sear2526
Unusual concave left side of incuse square, possably from an impacted die
Paul D3
va18.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm Athena and Owl29 viewsAthens. 4th Century B.C.. Athenian tetradrachm. 17.05g. Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile, test cut. Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing , to right AOE, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square. Van Alfen, AJN, 16-17, 18, this coin. Ex Amphora.
1 commentsLucas H
va17.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm Athena and Owl18 viewsAthens. 4th Century B.C.. Athenian tetradrachm. 17.06g. Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile, test cut. Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing , to right AOE, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square, two test cuts. Van Alfen, AJN, 16-17, 17, this coin. Ex Amphora.
1 commentsLucas H
va67.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm Athena and Owl eastern31 viewsAthens. 4th Century B.C.. Easter style Athenian tetradrachm. 16.99 g. Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile. Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing , to right AOE, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square. Test cut. Van Alfen, AJN, 16-17, 67, this coin. Ex Amphora.
1 commentsLucas H
owl,_van_alfen_56.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm Athena and Owl eastern38 viewsAthens. 4th Century B.C.. Easter style Athenian tetradrachm. 16.21 g. Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile. Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing , to right AOE, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square. Van Alfen, AJN, 16-17, 56, this coin. Ex Amphora.1 commentsLucas H
Athens_Tetradrachm_Athena_and_Owl_eastern.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm Athena and Owl eastern43 viewsAthens. 4th Century B.C.. Eastern style Athenian tetradrachm. (16.7 g, 21x25.4mm, 9h). Obverse: Head of Athena right, eye in profile. Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing , to right AO[E], olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square. Crack on obverse at 3 o'clock, two test cuts on reverse. Ex Amphora.

Van Alfen, AJN, 16-17, 57, this coin. Style Group II. The "A" of the ethnic on the reverse is missing a portion of one leg, giving it the appearance of a backwards "P."
2 commentsLucas H
ATHENS.jpg
Athens Tetradrachm, 16,95 gram, 25 mm. C.449 to 413 BC31 viewsAthens Tetradrachm, 16,95 gram, 25 mm.

Obv. Head of Athena right, wearing crested helmet.

Rev. Owl standing right, head facing.
Lee S
Athens Tetradrachm-2.JPG
Athens Tetradrachm-254 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 449-413 BC, Athens Greece
Obverse: Helmeted Head of Athena Right
Reverse: AOE, Owl standing right, olive sprig and crescent left.
22 X 25mm, 16.9gm
1 commentsJerome Holderman
athena_owl.jpg
Athens Triobol (Hemidrachm)30 viewsAttica. Athens c. 393-300 B.C. AR Triobol (Hemidrachm), 2,07g, Obv: Head of Athena right (obv. off-centered). Rev: ATHE, Owl standing facing, wings closed, olive-branch on either side. BMC 11.168. Sear GCV I: 2539.Podiceps
90201q00_(1).jpg
Athens, 449-413 B.C.50 viewsOld Style Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526, F, test cuts, Athens mint, weight 17.053g, maximum diameter 24.3mm, die axis 315o, c. 449 - 413 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AΘE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square; ex CNG auctionjimmynmu
Athens_1b_img~1.jpg
Athens, AR Tetradrachm, ca 393 - 370 BC74 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll
Rev:– owl standing right, head facing, to right ATE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent
Minted in Athens c. B.C. 393 - 370.
Reference:– Flamen p. 126, 1 (Pi I); Svoronos Athens plate 19, 17; SNG Cop -
Ex-Forum Ancient Coins
16.699g, 24.31mm, 270o

The following information was provide by Forum with the coin:-

"Transitional style tetradrachms include all of the wide spectrum of variants with the eye in profile issued after the classic "old style" almond eye tetradrachms but before the broad thinner flan "new style" tetradrachms. Recent research has classified variations of the transitional style - Pi Type, Quadridigité Style, Heterogeneous Style and sub-groups of the styles, and proposed chronologies for the different styles and groups.

This coin is the earliest transitional type, the first Pi style type, essentially identical to the "old style" with the exception of the eye in profile. The "Pi" designation is based on the P shape of the floral spiral and palmette ornamentation on the helmet bowl. The coin can be classified as Pi style, group 1. The floral ornament on examples this early do not yet resemble Pi."
maridvnvm
Athens_1b_img.jpg
Athens, AR Tetradrachm, ca 393 - 370 BC89 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll
Rev:– owl standing right, head facing, to right ATE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent
Minted in Athens c. B.C. 393 - 370.
Reference:– Flamen p. 126, 1 (Pi I); Svoronos Athens plate 19, 17; SNG Cop -
Ex-Forum Ancient Coins
16.699g, 24.31mm, 270o

The following information was provide by Forum with the coin:-

"Transitional style tetradrachms include all of the wide spectrum of variants with the eye in profile issued after the classic "old style" almond eye tetradrachms but before the broad thinner flan "new style" tetradrachms. Recent research has classified variations of the transitional style - Pi Type, Quadridigité Style, Heterogeneous Style and sub-groups of the styles, and proposed chronologies for the different styles and groups.

This coin is the earliest transitional type, the first Pi style type, essentially identical to the "old style" with the exception of the eye in profile. The "Pi" designation is based on the P shape of the floral spiral and palmette ornamentation on the helmet bowl. The coin can be classified as Pi style, group 1. The floral ornament on examples this early do not yet resemble Pi."
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Athens_1d_img.jpg
Athens, AR Tetradrachm, ca 393-350 BC44 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right with realistic profile eye, wearing crested Attic helmet, earring and necklace, bowl ornamented with spiral and three olive leaves .
Rev:– ATE, right, Owl standing right, head facing, crescent and olive sprig with berry behind
Minted in Athens from . c.393-350 B.C.
Reference:– SNG Cop 64, SGCV I 2537
maridvnvm
077_2.jpg
Athens, Attica31 views287 - 270 B.C.
Bronze AE13
2.70 gm, 13 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing crested Corinthian helmet
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, wings closed, A to left, Θ to right, all within corn wreath
Sear 2565;
BMC 11, p.22, 229;
Kroll 53;
HGC 4, 1737
Jaimelai
athens_50.jpg
Athens, Attica15 views353-294 B.C.
Silver Triobol
1.95 gm, 12 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing crested
Attic helmet and round ear ring, eye in profile
Rev.: Owl standing facing, on either side olive branches with two pairs of leaves;
A / Ε - Θ around
Kroll 19;
HGC 1642;
Sear 2539;
BMC 11, p.16, 162

Jaimelai
023~5.JPG
Athens, Attica28 views449 - 413 B.C.
Silver Obol
0.72 gm, 8 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing crested Attic helmet and round ear ring
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, wings closed A Θ E to right, olive sprig (single leaf and berry) behind
Sear 2530; BMC 11, p.10, 99
1 commentsJaimelai
026_(2).jpg
Athens, Attica63 views307 - 300 B.C.
Bronze AE14
4.16 gm, 14 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing Corinthian helmet with three crests, adorned with serpent
Rev.: Owl standing left, head facing, wings closed
A to right, H Θ to left, all in olive wreath
Kroll 50; [SNG Copenhagen 94]
BMC 11, p.22, 240
HGC 4, 1719
3 commentsJaimelai
Athena_angled.jpg
Athens, Attica35 views307 - 300 B.C.
Bronze AE14
4.16 gm, 14 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing Corinthian helmet with three crests, adorned with serpent
Rev.: Owl standing left, head facing, wings closed
A to right, H Θ to left, all in olive wreath
Kroll 50; [SNG Copenhagen 94]
BMC 11, p.22, 240

Same coin shot on angle to show thickness and sculpture of coin. "The heaviness of the Owl-left coinage is matched by the exceptional quality of its alloy, die engraving and striking, making it altogether one of the most carefully prepared bronze coinages ever minted at Athens." from Kroll 1993.
Jaimelai
athens_33.jpg
Athens, Attica21 views454 - 404 B.C.
Silver Tetradrachm
17.04 gm, 25 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena with frontal eye right, wearing crested Attic helmet with three olive leaves above visor and floral scroll on bowl
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind, all in square incuse; A Θ E to right
HGC 4, 1597;
Sear 2526;
BMC 11, 62
Jaimelai
Triobol_33.jpg
Athens, Attica45 views454 - 404 B.C.
Silver Triobol
2.11 gm, 13 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing crested
Attic helmet and round ear ring
Rev.: Owl standing facing, on either side olive branches with two pairs of leaves;
A / Ε - Θ around
Kroll 12;
HGC 1641;
Sear 2528;
BMC 11, p.9, 82-89
Jaimelai
o_50.JPG
Athens, Attica17 views400/390-294 B.C.
Silver Hemiobol
0.34 gm, 6.5 mm
Obv.: Head of Athena right wearing crested Attic helmet and round ear ring, eye in profile
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, wings closed, olive leaf behind; A Θ E to right
HGC 1682;
Sear 2531 var.;
[SNG Cop 59]
[Svoronos pl. 17, 52–56]
Jaimelai
Athens_hemiobol.JPG
Athens, Attica29 views454-404 BC
AR Hemiobol (7mm, 0.30g)
O: Helmeted head of Athena right.
R: Owl standing right with head facing, olive sprig behind; AΘE to right, all within incuse square.
Kroll 14; SNG Cop 59; Sear 2531v
ex Artifact Man

1 commentsEnodia
Athens_tetradrachm.jpg
Athens, Attica Tetradrachm70 viewsAR Tetradrachm
Size: 23 mm Weight: 16.73 grams Die axis: 9h

Athens, Attica
454 – 415 BCE

Obverse: Head of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above the visor and a floral scroll on the bowl. Hair is drawn in parallel curves, wears a round earring.

Reverse: Owl standing to right, head facing with tail feathers as a single protrusion. Olive sprig and crescent moon to upper left. AΘE to right.

Notes:
- Some porosity and crystallisation, attractive style. Possible bankers mark on cheek.

Ex Freeman & Sear, 2008
2 commentsPharsalos
4070_4071.jpg
Athens, Attica, AE18, Athena advancing right.25 viewsAE18
Athens, Attica
Greece
Mid 20's - 19BC
18.0mm
O: NO LEGEND; Helmeted head of Athena Parthenos, right.
R: NO LEGEND; Athena advancing right, holding transverse spear and aegis, owl to right, all within olive wreath.
Exergue: AΘΕ, left field.
Kroll 149; Svoronos plate 80, 29.
Harlan Berk
Chicago Coin Expo 4/6/17 4/17/17
1 commentsNicholas Z
Athens_owl.jpg
Athens, Greece, Eye-in-Profile Style Pi Type III or IV, Tetradrachm, c. 353 - 340 B.C.174 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Sear GCV I 2547, (SNG München 96), (SNG Delepierre 1479), gVF, banker's mark, 16.358g, 22.8mm, 225 deg., Obv. head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll, no pellet above earring; Rev. owl standing right, head facing, to right AθE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent; nicely centered on a very tight round flan, slight evidence that it was stuck on a demonetized folded/hammerred flan; slightly toned.



The style of Athena's face with the banker's mark have great appeal to me. I bought it for my 50th birthday!

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins

Photo by Forvm Ancient Coins
9 commentsSteve E
AthenTetVF.jpg
Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, 449 - 413 B.C.121 viewsSilver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526, VF, near full crest, Athens mint, 16.410g, 25.1mm, 90o. Obverse: head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; Reverse: AQE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square.

This coin is one of the most familiar of all the coins struck throughout the ancient Mediterranean. The images of Athena and her Owl, while not static, changed undramatically, in an unhurried and deliberate way. Although its production rests firmly during the time that numismatists call the Classical era (479 BC --336 BC), this coin's "style" better reflects the earlier Archaic period.

The Athenian "Owl" (until its debasement as a result of the Peloponnesian War) was the standard of its day. Between the late 5th century BC and the late 3rd century BC, these coins were the currency against which all other coins were measured. This high esteem was due to the Athenian tetradrachms' consistent weight and quality of silver.

"The little elf-like owl dear to ancient Athens had greenish-blue-gray eyes that could see clearly where humans could not. Glaukopis -- the "shining eyed one" was often shortened to glaux, a nickname for the tetradrachm that bore the owl's likeness" (http://notes.utk.edu/bio/unistudy.nsf/0/da0222e2e80272fd85256785001683e4?OpenDocument).

It is only with the emergence of the Imperial coinage of Alexander the Great (beginning quickly after his ascension to the throne in 336 BC) that the ancient world had another coin as widely accepted. As Martin J. Price notes, "“The impressive list of twenty-three mints on Asian soil and one in Egypt, all used to strike Alexander’s imperial coinage during his lifetime, shows that there was a conscious policy of providing this form of money on an empire-wide basis" (Price, Martin J. The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. Zurich: The Swiss Numismatic Society in Association with British Museum Press, 1991. 72).

More than two millennia after the Athenian Tetracrachm was first struck, the 26th President of The United States, Theodore Roosevelt (b. 1858; d. 1919), is said to have carried an Athenian "Owl" in his pocket--to remind him just how beautiful a coin could be.

J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
Athens_tet.jpg
Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, 449 - 413 B.C.118 viewsSilver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31ff; Starr pl. xxii, 6; SGCV I 2526, VF, test cut, Athens mint, weight 16.870g, maximum diameter 24.5mm, die axis 225o, obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AQE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;


The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.

Ex Forum
1 commentsPhiloromaos
Athens_Tetradrachm.jpg
Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, 449 - 413 B.C.462 viewsSilver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526, EF, light scuff on cheek, 17.184g, 25.6mm, 180o, Athens mint, obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AQE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;

A superb beauty ex FORVM .


The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.

*With my sincere thank , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
9 commentsSam
Athens,_Greece,_Old_Style_Tetradrachm,_c__454_-_404_B_C_.jpg
Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, c. 454 - 404 B.C.198 views*In honor of Christmas and Chanukah , from FORVM , new to my collection ;
A masterpiece example of group Copenhagen 31 .

My best wishes to all of you.


Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG München 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, EF, fabulous owl, well centered on a tight flan, no test cuts, a little obverse die wear, contact marks, 17.168g, 25.0mm, 90o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse AQE right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square.

The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
EX FORVM .
The Sam Mansourati Collection.
4 commentsSam
Athens,_Greece,_Old_Style_Tetradrachm,_c__454_-_404_B_C_~0.jpg
Athens, Greece, Old Style Tetradrachm, c. 454 - 404 B.C.109 viewsIn honor of Christmas :
Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Munchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, Choice EF, bold well centered strike, high relief as usual for the type, attractive surfaces, graffito on reverse, small edge cracks, 17.176g, 24.7mm, 30o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AQE downward on right, all within incuse square.

The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.

FORVM Ancient Coins. / From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
10 commentsSam
AthensOwl.jpg
Athens, Greece, Pi-Style III Tetradrachm, 353 - c. 340 B.C63 viewsSilver tetradrachm, 17.1g, Athens mint, oval flan, typical of the type.
O: Head of Athena right with eye seen in true profile, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and pi-style floral scroll, pellet in ear.
R: Owl standing right, head facing, to right AΘE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent, pellet over eyes.
- Kroll Pi-Style p. 244, fig. 8; Flament p. 126, 3; SNG Cop 63; SNG Munchen 96; SNG Delepierre 1479; Svoronos Athens pl. 20: 2

Unlike the customary flans of 5th and earlier 4th century Athenian tetradrachms that have solid, rounded edges from having been cast in a mold, these were struck on thick planchets made of flattened, folded-over, older tetradrachms. The flattened coins were not just folded in two but were folded over a second time to produce a planchet of three or four layers

There are three distinct features of this type of Athens Owl coinage. 1st, they have flans that are commonly misshapen. A number of them are so distorted that numismatists and collectors in Greece have long referred to them as “logs” (koutsoura); these are the tetradrachms in the form of long, stretched ovals with one or two nearly straight sides. 2nd, since the flans, of whatever shape, were ordinarily too small for the full relief designs of the dies, relatively few pi-style coins were minted with their entire obverse and/or reverse type showing. 3rd, just as the diameters and surface areas of the pi flans are generally smaller than those of Athenian tetradrachms of the 5th century and of the first half of the 4th century, they tend also to be exceptionally thick.

The name Pi-style refers to the floral helmet ornament on the obverse which resembles the Greek letter pi (P) bisected by a long central tendril.
5 commentsNemonater
Athens1a_img.jpg
Athens, Silver tetradrachm137 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right, droopy eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and bent-back palmette, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves.
Rev:– ΑΘΕ, right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;
Minted in Athens from . B.C. 449 - 413.
Reference:– SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526

Ex- Forum Ancient Coins where they graded it gVF, "X" Graffiti on obverse, test cut on reverse.

17.070g, 26.1mm, 270o
5 commentsmaridvnvm
Athens_1c_img.jpg
Athens, Silver tetradrachm52 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right, droopy eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and bent-back palmette, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves.
Rev:– ΑΘΕ, right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;
Minted in Athens from . B.C. 449 - 413.
Reference:– SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526

Test cut on Athena's neck, bankers mark on jaw with graffiti on cheek. Small test cut through eye of owl and running in the field to the right of the owl through the leg.

17.06g, 23.32mm, 90o
maridvnvm
Athens_1c_img~0.jpg
Athens, Silver tetradrachm34 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right, droopy eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and bent-back palmette, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves.
Rev:– ΑΘΕ, right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;
Minted in Athens from . B.C. 449 - 413.
Reference:– SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526

Test cut on Athena's neck, bankers mark on jaw with graffiti on cheek. Small test cut through eye of owl and running in the field to the right of the owl through the leg.

17.06g, 23.32mm, 90o

Updated image using new photography setup.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Athens_1a_img.jpg
Athens, Silver tetradrachm 39 viewsObv:– Head of Athena right, droopy eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and bent-back palmette, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves.
Rev:– ΑΘΕ, right, owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, all within incuse square;
Minted in Athens from . B.C. 449 - 413.
Reference:– SNG Cop 31 ff., SGCV I 2526

Ex- Forum Ancient Coins where they graded it gVF, "X" Graffiti on obverse, test cut on reverse.

17.070g, 26.1mm, 270o

Updated image using new photography setup.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
athens_owl~0.jpg
Athens; Head of Athena right/ AΘH, Owl left, AE 169 viewsAthens, 3rd century B.C. 16mm, 3.08g. Obverse: helmeted head of Athena right
Reverse: AΘH, owl left. Cf. Klein 205, Svor. Pl. 106, 61. Ex areich
Podiceps
2690084.jpg
ÁTICA - ATENAS29 viewsAR Tetradracma 23 mm 16.99 gr.

Anv: Cabeza de Atenas vistiendo Casco coronado, crestado y ornamentado con tres hojas de oliva y detalles florales.
Rev: "A Θ E" – Búho parado a derecha, su cabeza viendo al frente. Una rama de olivo y medialuna detrás.
Según el catálogo "Imperial Persian Coinage" de G.F. Hill editado en 1919, el resello/contramarca/marca de Banquero que aparece en esta moneda, se encuentra individualizada con el numero 45ff, según el Autor se trataría de una creciente (hay seis tipos diferentes) y posiblemente realizada en la región indo-bactriana.

Acuñación: 431 - 413 A.C.
Ceca: Atenas - Ática

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.I #2526 Pag.236 – BMC Vol.11 (Attica, Megaris, Aegira) #67/71 Pag.7 – SNG Copenhagen #31 - Kroll #8 - SNG VIII Hart #774/7 - Headlam #360/1
1 commentsmdelvalle
2690083.jpg
ÁTICA - ATENAS13 viewsAR Tetradracma 23 mm 16.99 gr.

Anv: Cabeza de Atenas vistiendo Casco coronado, crestado y ornamentado con tres hojas de oliva y detalles florales.
Rev: "A Θ E" – Búho parado a derecha, su cabeza viendo al frente. Una rama de olivo y medialuna detrás.
Corte/marca de comprobación en la frente de búho en reverso.

Acuñación: 431 - 413 A.C.
Ceca: Atenas - Ática

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.I #2526 Pag.236 – BMC Vol.11 (Attica, Megaris, Aegira) #67/71 Pag.7 – SNG Copenhagen #31 - Kroll #8 - SNG VIII Hart #774/7 - Headlam #360/1
mdelvalle
rjb_greek4_08_07.jpg
Attica - Athens21 viewsAR hemiobol
449-413 BC
O - Helmeted head of Athena right
R - Owl standing right, AΘE
Possibly an eastern imitation
mauseus
rjb_greek3_08_07.jpg
Attica - Athens25 viewsAR drachm
449-413 BC
O - Helmeted head of Athena right
R - Owl standing right, AΘE
mauseus
greece~1.jpg
Attica - Athens (400/390-353 BC)41 viewsAR tetradrachm (24mm, 17.12 gm, 9h). Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; AΘE to right; all within incuse square. Kroll 15. SNG Copenhagen 64.RobertBohn
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Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm 18.5 mm 17.10g 9h typical oblong flan from folding.16 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right with profile eye and pi-style palmette.Owl standing right head facing olive sprig and crescent behind.Grant H
FotorCreated~85.jpg
Attica Athens AR plated Tetradrachm 22mm 15.39 g 9h22 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right,with frontal eye.Rev owl standing right,head facing olive sprig and crescent moon behind,all within incuse square.Grant H
FotorCreated~79.jpg
Attica Athens emergency issue AR plated Drachm circa 454-404 BC 13 mm 3.20g21 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.Rev owl standing right head facing,olive sprig behind all within incuse square.Grant H
FotorCreated~67.jpg
Attica Athens emergency issue AR plated Obol circa 406-404 BC 0.32 g23 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.Rev AOE owl standing right.
Unpublished as a fouree,but of Harlan Berk BBS .
NGC VG 3/2 2490353-003
Grant H
FotorCreated~3.jpg
Attica Athens emergency issue circa 406-404 BC 23.88mm 11.622g 9h20 viewsHead of Athena right wearing round earring and pearl necklace,and creasted helmet ornamented with three olive leaves along front edge,palmette on bowl and spiral behind ear.Her hair drawn across forehead in parallel curves.Rev AOE before owl standing right head facing,in erect posture,the tail feathers represented as a single prong,olive sprig and lunar crescent in upper field to left all within incuse square.Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Diobol circa 430-322 BC10 mm 1.15 g 12h28 viewsHead of Athena right of fine style but rough execution,wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet,the front adorned with three upright olive leaves, and the back with a floral ornament.Rev double bodied owl head facing. Grant H
FotorCreated~63.jpg
Attica Athens AR Hemidrachm circa 454-404 BC 12mm 1.87g 3h18 viewsHead of Athena of fine style eye in profile but rough execution,wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet,the front adorned with three upright olive leaves and the back a floral ornament.Rev owl facing wings closed AOE on either side an olive branch.Grant H
FotorCreated~68.jpg
Attica Athens AR Hemidrachm circa 454-404 BC 13mm 1.99g 3h17 viewsHead of Athena right of fine style eye in profile but of rough execution wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet,the front adorned with three upright olive leaves and the back a floraql ornament.Rev owl facing wings closed AOE,on either side an olive branch.Grant H
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Attica Athens AR obol circa 454-404 BC 9mm 0.68g28 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.Rev owl standing right,head facing,olive sprig behind,all within incuse square.Grant H
FotorCreated~1.jpg
Attica Athens AR Drachm circa 450-430 BC 16mm 4.17g 5h23 viewsHead of Athena right of archaic style,eye in profile wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet.Rev AOE owl standing right head facing olive sprig as on the tetradrachm,but no crescent moon all in incuse square.Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Drachm circa465-460 BC 4.35g71 viewsHead of Athena right of archaia style,wearing earring and close-fitting crested helmet with single volute ornament behind.Rev AOE Incuse square, within which owl right,behind olive-spray with two leaves and berry. 2 commentsGrant H
FotorCreated~32.jpg
Attica Athens AR Hemiobol circa 450 BC 7mm 0.33g 4h 21 viewsHead of Athena right of archaic style,wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet as on decadrachm.Rev incuse square within which owl right behind olive leaf with berry AOE.Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Obol circa 450 BC 8.60 mm 0.727g 6h26 viewsHead of Athena right wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves along front edge palmette on bowl,and spiral behind ear.Rev AOE retrograde before owl standing right head facing olive leaf with berry in upper field to left all within incuse square.
Obols are relatively more numerous in this group than in any previously.It is tempting to connect this odd fact with the introduction by Perikles of state pay for various public activities in terms of obols perday.Starr p.56
Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Obol circa 450-430 BC 8.5mm 0.64g 3h14 viewsHead of Athena right of archaic style wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet.Rev AOE owl standing right head facing,behind olive leaves with berry all within incuse square. Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Obol circa 454-404 BC 10 mm 0.65g 11h25 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.Rv. Owl standing right head facing,olive sprig behind,all within incuse square.Grant H
Athens_Silver_Tetradrachm.jpg
Attica Athens AR silver Tetradrachm121 viewsAttica Athens AR silver Tetradrachm - some horn silver on the reverse which could be improved
Size: 22.5mm Weight: 16.69 grams
Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right. Countermark on cheek, test cut through helmet
Reverse: AΘE, Owl standing right, head facing, crescent and olive sprig behind, the same countermark on the reverse
Antonivs Protti
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Attica Athens AR Tetardrachm circa 430-322 BC 21mm 17.05 g 1h13 viewsHead of Athena right,eye in profile wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet.Rev owl standing right with head facing,wings closed behind crescent and olive sprig with two leaves.Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 154-3 BC 35mm 16.13g 12h19 viewsHead of Athena Parthenos right wearing pendent earring and close fitting helmet with triple crest,adorned in front with the foreparts of four or more horses abreast,on the side with a flying Pegasos and on the back with a scroll resembling an aplustre,border of dots.Rev AOE owl right head facing wings closed standing on amphora lying on its side.The whole in olive wreath.Caps of the Dioskouroi to lower right monograms flanking owl.Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 350-294 BC 22mm 17.06g 9h 14 viewsHead of Athena right with profile eye.Rev owl standing right head facing olive sprig and crescent moon behind.Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 353- 294 BC21mm 17.22g 6h16 viewsHead of Athena right with eye in profile,wearing close fitting helmet,and round earring.Rev owl standing right head facing,behind olive sprig and crescent moon.Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 353-294 BC 23mm 17.05g 7h16 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right with profile eye and Pi style palmetle.Rev owl standing right head facing olive sprig and crescent moon behind.Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 430-322 BC 27mm 16.85g 3h17 viewsHead of Athena right of fine style,eye in profile wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet,the front adorned with three upright olive leaves,and the back with a floral ornament.Rev AOE owl standing right head facing wings closed.Behind crescent moon and olive sprig with two leaves and berry.Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 440-430 BC 27mm16.87g 5h17 viewsHead of Atnena to right wearing disc earring,pearl necklace and a creasted helmet adorned with three olive leaves and a spiral palmette.Rev AOE owl standing to right head facing the viewer,to left olive sprig and crescent moon all within incuse square.
With lots of crest showing
Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 480-450 BC 23mm 16.25g 2h14 viewsHead of Athena right of archaic style weareing round earring,and close fitting crested helmet.Rev owl standing right,wings closed,behind crescent moon and olive spray.All within incuse square.Grant H
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Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 482-480 BC 23mm 16.58g 1h13 viewshead of Athena right in an unwreathed crested helmet,crest support on helmet is ornamented with a line small chevrons and dots.Coarse style with a large eye and thick lips,row of studs on side of helmet,round earring.Rev owl standing right head facing,head and eyes large.AOE right left an olive spray with two leaves and berry,all within an incuse square.Grant H
FotorCreated~84.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm circa 510-480 BC 22mm 16.91g 11h17 viewsHead of Athena of very archaic style right,wearing round earring and close fitting crested helmet with simple volute ornament behind.Rev AOE owl right head facing and wings closed,behind olive spray. Grant H
ATTICA_ATHENS.jpg
Attica Athens AR Tetradrachm, SG 2537, Owl28 viewsOBV: Helmeted head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor & a spiral palmette on the bowl; eye in profile
REV: AQE, owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig & crescent behind
16.9g, 22mm

Minted at Athens, 350-300 BC
Legatus
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Attica Athens AR Tetradradchm circa 393-294 BC 20mm 17.09g 2h 18 viewsHead of Athena rightof more advanced style the eye seen in true profile,she wears crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll.Rev owl standing right, head facing,to right AOE to left olive twig and crescent moon. Grant H
Attica,_Athens_new_style_owl_w_amphora_tet.jpg
ATTICA ATHENS CIRCA 165 B.C. NEW STYLE 8 viewsHelmeted head of Athena, r.
Owl standing r. on amphora; I on amphora; winged caduceus in l. field; DI below.AQE / POLU-XARM / NIKOG / QEMIS-TOKLH
Thompson 379d
jaseifert
Owl.jpg
Attica Owl15 viewsAttica Owl
Sear 2537

Athens AR Tetradrachm. c350 BC, Head of Athena right in ivy-crested helmet, eye in profile / Owl standing right, head facing, olive twig and crescent behind, AØE before. BMC 144, SNGCop 65.
simmurray
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Attica Owl80 viewsSear 2537

Athens AR Tetradrachm. c350 BC, Head of Athena right in ivy-crested helmet, eye in profile / Owl standing right, head facing, olive twig and crescent behind, AØE before. BMC 144, SNGCop 65.
1 commentssimmurray
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Attica, AR Tetradrachm.8 viewsAthens 350 B.C. 15.80g - 24.3mm, Axis 3h.

Obv: Head of Athena right in ivy-crested helmet, eye in profile.

Rev: A-Θ-E - Owl standing right, head facing, olive twig and crescent behind, A-Θ-E before. Test cut on the owl and bankers mark in front.

BMC 144, SNG Cop 65; Sear SG 2537.
scarli
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Attica, Athens835 viewsAthens, ca. 449-413 BC. Silver tetradrachm.
Denomination : Silver tetradrachm.
Size : 23.7 x 24.3 mm Weight : 17.20 grams.
Reference : Sear-2526.
Grade : gVF and better centered than usual with a significant part of the crest showing.
Obverse : Head of Athena right.
Reverse : Owl standing right, with an olive sprig and crescent moon over its shoulder, with a AQE to the right.
Ex-Calgary Coin 1150
8 commentsecoli
152481LG.jpg
ATTICA, Athens398 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 168/5-50 BC. AR New Style Tetradrachm (30mm, 16.74 gm). Struck circa 136/5 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / A-QE, owl standing right on amphora; magistrates MI-KI and QEO-FRA; Nike in quadriga right in right field, M on amphora, SW below amphora; all within wreath. Cf. Thompson 315-323 (unlisted dies). EF, lightly toned. Ex -CNG STORE 8951 commentsecoli
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Attica, Athens36 viewsAttica, Athens
130-90 BC

O: Helmeted head of Athena right
R: Two owls standing facing on a thunderbolt, AOE below; all within wreath

Ae; 14mm; 3.43g
arizonarobin
attica_res3.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS22 viewsca. 80 - 40 BC
AE 21.5 mm 6.05 g
O: Helmeted head of Athena Parthenos
R: A-Q[E] Owl standing within wreath
laney
Attica_Athens_res_b.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS37 views133/132 BC
New Style Tetradrachm, 16.91 g, 30 mm
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right,
Rx: Owl standing on amphora, winged caduceus left, magistrates ΠOΛYXAPM, NIKOΓ, and ΘEMIΣTOKΛH, month [I] on amphora, ME below
Thompson-379e-i
(ex HJBerk)
2 commentslaney
new_tet_athens_10_21_res.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS103 views133/132 BC
New Style Tetradrachm, 16.91 g, 30 mm
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right,
Rx: Owl standing on amphora, winged caduceus left, magistrates ΠOΛYXAPM, NIKOΓ, and ΘEMIΣTOKΛH, month [I] on amphora, ME below
Thompson-379e-i
(ex HJBerk)
2 commentslaney
198_xlarge_66c8652abf68d7f955c61e8c6b67c171.jpg
Attica, Athens55 viewsAR Tetradrachm (25mm, 17.09g)
c. 454-404 BCE

O: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet
R: AΘE, Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent left; all within incuse square


SNG München 49; Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597
2 commentsSalaethus
athena_owl_attica.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS23 viewsca. 454-404 BC
AR Tetradrachm 25 mm max., 17 g
O: Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested decorated Attic helmet
R: Owl standing right, head facing; olive spring and crescent to left; AΘE to right, all within incuse square
laney
athena_owl_attica~0.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS26 viewsca. 454-404 BC
AR Tetradrachm 25 mm max., 17 g
O: Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested decorated Attic helmet
R: Owl standing right, head facing; olive spring and crescent to left; AΘE to right, all within incuse square
laney
athens_owl_k.jpg
Attica, Athens11 viewsAR tetradrachm, 25mm, 17g, 3h; 449-404 BC
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena right, archaic eye.
Rev.: A Θ E; Owl right, tail as single prong.
Reference: Cf. SNG Cop. 1621, 17-12-525
1 commentsJohn Anthony
IMG_0561.JPG
ATTICA, Athens7 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 322/17-307 BC. Æ . Helmeted head of Athena right / Two owls confronted, heads facing; Eleusis ring between; all within olive wreath. Kroll 44; SNG Copenhagen 92. ecoli
IMG_0559.JPG
ATTICA, Athens15 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 322/17-307 BC. Æ (15mm, 2.26 g, 6h). Helmeted head of Athena right / Two owls standing confronted, heads facing; AΘ between; all within wreath. Kroll 46; HGC 4, 1726. ecoli
IMG_0500.JPG
ATTICA, Athens11 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 335-322/17 BC. Æ Dichalkon (1.85 g, 1h). Helmeted head of Athena right / Double-bodied owl standing, bodies confronted, head facing; crescent and olive-sprig above. Kroll 43; SNG Copenhagen 72-3.ecoli
athens.jpg
Attica, Athens (353 - 294 B.C)44 viewsAR Tetradrachm
O: Helmeted head of Athena right
R: AΘE Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent to left; all within incuse square.
16.59g
21 mm
Kroll -; HGC 4, 1599

Ex. Numismatik-Naumann, Auction 52, Lot 126
4 commentsMat
AthensTetradrachmNewStyle.jpg
Attica, Athens Silver Tetradrachm, New Style, c. 115/114 B.C.34 viewsAttica, Athens Silver Tetradrachm, New Style, c. 115/114 B.C.
31.4mm, 16.61 grams.
Obv: Head of Athena to right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with a palmette and gryphon.
Rev: Owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, on amphora, cluster of grapes on vine in right field, Δ on amphora, ΠE below.
Ref: Thompson 633g.
About Extremely Fine.
1 commentsmjabrial
greek46.jpg
Attica, Athens Ar "New Style" Tetradrachm146 views(135-134 BC). Mened-, Epigeno-, and Diod(o)-, magistrates.
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; magistrates’ names in fields; to left, Asklepios standing left, holding serpent-entwined scepter; B on amphora, ΓΛ below; all within wreath.
Thompson 348f (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen 240 (same obv. die).
12 commentsMinos
athe.jpg
Attica, Athens Ar Tetradrachm107 views(454-415 BC)
Obv.: Head of Athena right in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring and bead necklace.
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind, AOE before.
Starr, pl. xxii, 6´. SNG Cop. 31ff.
9 commentsMinos
greek68.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm66 views(454-415 BC)
Obv.: Head of Athena right in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring and bead necklace.
Rev.: Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind, AOE before.
2 commentsMinos
attica_owl.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm15 viewsAttica, Athens
AR Tetradrachm
c350 BC
Head of Athena right in ivy-crested helmet, eye in profile / Owl standing right, head facing, olive twig and crescent behind, AØE before.
"Eye in profile" type, struck with rusty reverse die

Discussed and authenticated on FORVM board - Thanks rover1.3 and Joe Sermanini!

Sear 2537, BMC 144, SNGCop 65.
Sosius
Attica_Athens_AR_Tetradrachm.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm25 viewsAttica, Athens AR Tetradrachm, Circa 460-440 BC
weight = 17.00g, 25 mm
NGC AU* - Strike 5/5 - Surface 5/5 - Die Shift [4163031-001]

Obv: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet ornamented with laurel leaves and vine scroll
Rev: ΑΘΕ, Owl with wings folded standing right, head facing; behind, olive-spray and crescent; all within incuse square

Kroll 8. Dewing 1591-8. SNG Copenhagen 31. Ex. Stacks Coin Galleries sale of November 1992, Lot 108.
1 commentsKevin P
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Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm.69 views Circa 454-404 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31. 16.01g, 23mm, well centred.
Ex.Savoca Coins.
3 commentsCanaan
s-l500.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Tetradrachm. Eastern imitation.85 viewsObv. Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev. Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind, AΘE to right; all within incuse square.
17.06g, 22.2mm.
Kroll 15; SNG Copenhagen 64. Bankers marks on both sides.
Ex. London Ancient Coins LAC.
2 commentsCanaan
greek83.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Triobol45 views(454-404 BC)
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena.
Rev.: Owl standing facing between olive sprays.
SNG Copenhagen 44.
1 commentsMinos
greek82~0.jpg
Attica, Athens AR Triobol (Clean)30 views(454-404 BC)
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena.
Rev.: Owl standing facing between olive sprays.
SNG Copenhagen 44.
Minos
G001.jpg
Attica, Athens Classical Owl Type Tetradrachm24 viewsTest cut to right of owls headZaph0dd
Athens_hemiobol_comb.jpg
Attica, Athens Hemiobol111 viewsATTICA, ATHENS
AR Hemiobol.
454(?)–415 BC.

O: Head of Athena right with frontal eye, in crested Attic helmet adorned with olive leaves above visor / R: AQE, owl standing three-quarters r, olive sprig behind, all in incuse square.

Svoronos pl. 17, 52–56. SNG Cop 59–61, Sear sg2531 VF

4 commentsSosius
100359.jpg
Attica, Athens Tetradrachm21 views Attica, Athens. Ca. 454-404 B.C. AR tetradrachm (23 mm, 15.76 g, 9 h). Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye / ΑΘΕ, owl standing right, head facing; above and behind, olive sprig and crescent; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31. Two test cuts.
TLP
AthensOwlI.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena and Owl41 viewsAttica, Athens, 449-413 BC, silver tetradrachm, 21 mm, 16.88 g.
O: Head of Athena to right, the eye seen in facing, archaic style, banker's mark on cheek.
R: Owl standing to right, head facing; to right A-theta-E; to left, olive twig and crescent, all within incuse square, two test cuts and crescent banker's mark in field.

This was the first true "silver dollar" of the ancient world, the coins manufactured in Athens circulated wherever the Greeks travelled. Furthermore, similar coins were struck at a number of Eastern mints, and this may be one of them.

Dark toning with beautiful dark blue highlights.
Nemonater
Athen_AR-Tetradrachm_-BC_Sear-_Q-001_11h_28,5mm_16,68g-s.jpg
Attica, Athens, ( 123-122 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm (New style), Sear , Athena and Owl,113 viewsAttica, Athens, ( 123-122 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm (New style), Sear , Athena and Owl,
Obv:– Helmeted head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet.
Rev:– A-ΘE across top, magistrates' names MIK-IΩN, EVRVKΛEI, APE/ΣTO/Σ across fields, (), Owl standing facing on amphora, To right, the Dioscouri standing left, one holding patera, both holding staffs. Κ letter on amphora, ΣΦ below..
diameter: 28,5mm, weght: 16,68g , axis: 11h,
mint: Attica, Athens, date:123-122 B.C., ref.:Thompson 488 d/e/f, (Svoronos JAN X, 173; BMC 459; cf Sear 2555-2559 (magistrates).???)
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Athen_AR-Tetradrachm_-BC_Sear-_Q-001_11h_29,5mm_16,41g-s.jpg
Attica, Athens, ( 126-125 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm (New style), Sear , Athena and Owl,132 viewsAttica, Athens, ( 126-125 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm (New style), Sear , Athena and Owl,
Obv:– Head of Athena right wearing Attic helmet.
Rev:– A-QE across top, magistrates' names BOY/ΛAP/ME left, EΠI/ΓEN, and ΣΩΣAN/ΔROΣ to right (Boylar, Epigenus and Sosandros), Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; to left, an eagle standing right on thunderbolt. Amphora letter I and control ME below.
diameter: 29,5mm, weght: 16,41g , axis: 11h,
mint: Attica, Athens, date: 126-125 B.C., ref.:Thompson 453e, ,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
ATTICA,_Athens_AR-Triobol_Helmeted_head_of_Athena_right_Owl_standing_facing_between_two_olive-sprigs_A_E_SNG-Cop-68_cc-393-300-BC_Q-001_axis-9h_10,5-12mm_2,00g-s.jpg
Attica, Athens, (393-300 B.C.), AR-Triobol, SNG Cop. 68, Athena and Owl,80 viewsAttica, Athens, (393-300 B.C.), AR-Triobol, SNG Cop. 68, Athena and Owl,
Obv:– Helmeted head of Athena right
Rev:– Owl standing facing between two olive-sprigs. Large A Θ E.
diameter: 10,5-12mm, weght: 2,00g , axis: 9h,
mint: Attica, Athens, date: 393-300 B.C., ref.:SNG Cop. 68,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Athen_AR-Tetradrachm-449-413_BC,_Sear_2526_23mm_17,19g.jpg
Attica, Athens, (449-413 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm, Sear 2526, Athena and Owl,298 viewsAttica, Athens, (449-413 B.C.), AR-Tetradrachm, Sear 2526, Athena and Owl,
Obv:– Head of Athena right, wearing crested helmet ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll
Rev:– owl standing right, head facing, to right AΘE in large lettering, to left olive sprig and crescent
diameter: 23mm, weght: 17,19g , axis- h,
mint: Attica, Athens, date: 449-413 B.C., ref.:Sear 2526,
Q-001
5 commentsquadrans
01008AB.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS, 121-120 BC85 viewsTetradrachm, 29mm, 16.8g
"Three graces" type New Style, Magistrates EURYKLEI, ARIARI and XENOKRA. Control ΔI.

O: Head of Athena wearing triple crested Arthenian helmet ornamented with Pegasos and foreparts of horses
R: Owl stg r facing an upturned amphora, 3 figures adv

SGC-2557
4 commentsAZRobbo
01009AB.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS, 125-124 BC61 viewsTetradrachm, 29mm, 16.78g
"Tripod" type New Style, THEODOTOS as 3rd magistrate, "A" Month

O: Head of Athena wearing triple crested Arthenian helmet ornamented with Peasos and foreparts of horses
R: Owl stg r facing an upturned amphora, Tripod in LF, ΜΕ under amphora, 3 Magistrates POLEMON ALKETES THEOLTOS, all surrounded by wreath

Thompson 466a (s.o.d.)

Ex Freeman & Sear
2 commentsAZRobbo
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ATTICA, ATHENS, 420-404 BC88 viewsTetradrachm, 420-404BC, 24mm, 16.9g

O - Helmeted head of Athena right
R - Owl standing right, head facing; AOE in fr., olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square.

SNG Cop 31
1 commentsrobertpe
1000AB.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS, 449-413 BC197 viewsTetradrachm, 24mm, 17.14g

O: Head of Athena right, wearing helmet ornamented with vine scroll and laurel leaves.
R: Owl facing standing right, head facing, AΘE to right, olive sprig and crescent to left, all within incuse square.

After 449 BC. Helmeted head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor & a spiral palmette on the bowl / AΘE, owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig & crescent behind.

SNG Copenhagen 31. SG.2526

Ex Washington Numismatic Gallery
7 commentsAZRobbo
01024AB.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS, 449-413 BC68 viewsTetradrachm , 22mm, 16.85g

O.Head of Athena right, wearing helmet with necklace
R. AΘE, owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig & crescent behind, ; all within incuse square.

Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31

Ex CNG, 262, Lot 95
2 commentsrobertpe
01023AB.jpg
ATTICA, ATHENS, 449-413 BC49 viewsTetradrachm , 25mm, 16.96g

O.Head of Athena right, wearing helmet with necklace
R. AΘE, owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig & crescent behind, ; all within incuse square.

Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31

Ex CNG - 262, Lot 90
1 commentsrobertpe
Attica,_Athens,_AR_Tetradrachm_.jpg
Attica, Athens, 454-413 BC, AR Tetradrachm 47 viewsHead of Athena right, wearing created Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above visor and floral design on bowl.
Owl facing standing right, head facing, AΘE to right, olive sprig and crescent to left, all within incuse square.

SNG Copenhagen 31; Sear 2526.

(23 mm, 17.04 g, 9h).
Freeman & Sear.
3 commentsn.igma
Athens_Tetradrachm_.jpg
Attica, Athens, 454-413 BC, AR Tetradrachm34 viewsHead of Athena right, wearing created Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above visor and floral design on bowl.
Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig & crescent behind, AΘE to right, all within incuse square.

Svoronos pl. 13, 20.

(24 mm, 17.07 g, 7h).
Harlan J. Berk Buy or Bid Sale 184, 7 May 2013, 63; ex-Freeman & Sear 2008
1 commentsn.igma
DSC05515.JPG
ATTICA, ATHENS, AR Trihemiobol, weight 1,02 g, diameter 11 mm, after 449 BC96 viewsATTICA, ATHENS, AR Trihemiobol, weight 1,02 g, diameter 11 mm, after 449. BCSNGCop 50
Obs:Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: Owl standing facing, wings spread; olive sprig above.
Beautifuly centered and struck to high relief and good metal. A splendid example of the ancient work of art. The design of this Trihemiobol is ultimately derived from the famous Athenian Dekadrachm. The dekadrachms (and this coin too) stand apart from the Athenian coinage. (the transformation of the revers type from an owl in profile to one facing the viewer)


Antonio Protti
Attica,.JPG
ATTICA, ATHENS, AR Trihemiobol, weight 1,02 g, diameter 11 mm, after 449 BC178 viewsATTICA, ATHENS, AR Trihemiobol, weight 1,02 g, diameter 11 mm, after 449. BCSNGCop 50

Obs:Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: Owl standing facing, wings spread; olive sprig above.

The design of this Trihemiobol is ultimately derived from the famous Athenian Dekadrachm. The dekadrachms (and this coin too) stand apart from the Athenian coinage. (the transformation of the revers type from an owl in profile to one facing the viewer)

4 commentsAntonivs Protti
G_303_Athens_fac.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Double bodied owl5 viewsAttica. Athens
AE 14
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: AΘE, Double bodied owl standing facing; in each upper corner olive spray; Eleusis ring below
AE, 1.58g, 14.5mm
Ref.: Kroll 43
shanxi
G_294_Athens_fac.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Hemiobol24 viewsAttica. Athens
Hemiobol (after 449)
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: A Θ Ε, Owl standing right, olive spring.
Ag, 0.33g, 7mm
Ref.: Kroll 14, SNG Copenhagen 59
Ex E.E. Clain-Stefanelli collection

photographic image (top) and electron microscopic image (bottom)

1 commentsshanxi
G_052_Athen_fac~0.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, New Style Tetradrachm10 viewsAttica. Athens
New Style Tetradrachm
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: Owl standing right on amphora, Dioscuri left, holding sceptre and patera, A - ΘE flanking owl's head, MIKIΩN EYPYKΛEI ΣΩKRATHΣ magistrates, ME below amphora, E on amphora. All within wreath
AR, 16.22g,29mm
Ref.: Thompson 483 a,b
Ex Pegasi Numismatics, 1999
shanxi
G292_Athens_fac.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, New Style Tetradrachm18 viewsAttica. Athens
New Style Tetradrachm
Obv: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet
Rev: Owl standing right on amphora, no symbol, A - ΘE flanking owl's head, ΔIOTIMOΣ MAΓAΣ XAPINAYTHΣ magistrates, ΣΦ below amphora, Γ on amphora. All within wreath
AR, 16.47g, 28mm
Ref.: Thompson 656 a,b
Ex Sothebys London, June 2000
1 commentsshanxi
G_368_Athens.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Obol13 viewsAttica. Athens
Obol (454-404 BC)
Obv: Head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet decorated with olive wreath.
Rev: AΘΕ, Owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent behind.
Ag, 0.63g, 9.3mm
Ref.: SNG Copenhagen 53-6, SNG München 49.
Ex Numismatik Naumann, Auction 80, Lot 871 (part of)
1 commentsshanxi
G_301_Athens_fac2.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Tetradrachm36 viewsAttica. Athens
Silver tetradrachm, ca. 454-404 BC
Av: Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye.
Rv: AΘE. Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left; all within incuse square.
AR, 17.16g, 23mm
Ref.: Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597.
2 commentsshanxi
G_310_Athen_fac.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Tetradrachm15 viewsAttica. Athens
Silver tetradrachm, ca. 454-404 BC
Av: Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye.
Rv: AΘE. Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left; all within incuse square.
AR, 17.15g, 23.1mm
Ref.: Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597.
shanxi
G_024_Athen_fac.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Transitional Pi-Style Tetradrachm17 viewsAttica. Athens
Silver tetradrachm, Ca. 353-297 BC
Transitional Pi-Style
Av: Head of Athena right with profile eye in crested Attic helmet ornamented with three olive leaves above visor
Rv: ΑΘΕ, owl of later style standing three-quarters right, olive sprig and crescent moon behind
AR, 17.01g, 23mm
Ex Pegasi Numismatics, 1999
1 commentsshanxi
Athen_01.jpg
Attica, Athens, Athena, Owl, Triobol45 viewsAttica. Athens
Triobol (454-404 BC)
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev: A - Θ - Ε, Owl standing facing between olive sprays.
Ag, 2.0g, 11mm
Ref.: Kroll 12.
Ex Pecunem Gitbud&Naumann auction 29
1 commentsshanxi
athen_SNGcop31.jpg
Attica, Athens, SNG Copenhagen 31194 viewsThe famous Attic owl, 449-413 BC
AR - tetradrachm (classic style), 17.1g, 24.2mm
obv. Archaic head of Athena r., with almond shaped eye, wearing crested helmet
ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round
earring.
rev. AQE right
owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, prong tail, to left olive twig
and crescent, all within incuse square
SNG Copenhagen 13; Sydenham 2526
nice VF, good metall (Thanks to Salem!)
7 commentsJochen
attica_athen_Thompson715b.jpg
Attica, Athens, Thompson 715b168 viewsAttica, Athens, 110/109 BC
AR - tetradrachm ('New Style'), 16.64g, 33mm
struck under magistrates Zoilos, Euandros and Lysippos
obv. Head of Athena Parthenos, wearing crested Attic helmet, decorated with gryphion, r.
rev. Owl, stg. r. on amphora reclined r.
in l. and r. field A - QE
beneath ZOI - LOS / EYA / NDRO / LYSI / PP
in r. feld grain, beneath a bee
Amphora inscribed with Gamma (number of month)
beneath SF
All within olive wreath
ref. Thompson 715b
EF, slightly toned

A must for every collector. I have waited a long time for this coin. A wonderful portrait!
9 commentsJochen
GRK_Athens_tetradrachm.JPG
Attica, Athens.46 viewsSear 2526, SNG Copenhagen 31.

AR Tetradrachm (24 mm.), struck 454 to 393 B.C.

Obv: Head of Athena right wearing helmet Athena's helmet decorated with floral scroll and three olive leaves.

Rev: AΘE to left, owl standing right, olive sprig and crescent to left; all within incuse.
1 commentsStkp
Attica_Athens_Thompson363fg.jpg
Attica, Athens. 16 viewsAttica, Athens. 134-133 BC. New style AR Tetradrachm (16.73 gm). Head of Athena parthenos r., wearing crested Attic helmet. / Owl r., standing on prostrate amphora, A-OE above. Magistrates Timarchos, Nikago(ras), and Sosig- TIM-APXO[Y] / NIKAΓO / ΣΩΣIΓ to r.; anchor and star to l., [Δ] on amphora, ME beneath. VF. HGC 4 #1602 (C); Thompson 363 f&g; Svoronos, Monnaies, pl. 50, 5; HGC 4 #1602. cf SNG ANS 719.
Christian T
Attica_Athens_SNG-Cop32.jpg
Attica, Athens.13 viewsAttica, Athens. 449-413 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.17 gm). Head of Athena r., wearing crested Attic helmet decorated w/ 3 olive leaves over visor & spiral palmette on bowl / Owl standing r., head facing; crescent moon and olive sprig behind. nEF. CNG 46 #281. SNG Cop 32; HGC 4 #1597(C); Flament 2007 Gp II. Christian T
Attica_Athens_SNG-Cop31ff.jpg
Attica, Athens.13 viewsAttica, Athens. 449-413 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.99 gm). Head of Athena r., wearing crested Attic helmet decorated w/ olive leaves, bankers marks on cheek. / Owl standing r., head facing; crescent moon and olive sprig behind. VF. HGC 4 #1597 (C) SNG Cop 31ff; Kroll 8; Flament 2007 Gp II.Christian T
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-Mx3SLs6f4XPx.jpg
Attica, Athens. (Circa 454-404 BC)42 viewsAR Tetradrachm

24mm, 16.57g

Obv: Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace with pendants, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl

Rev: Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square.

Test cuts on both sides.

Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597
2 commentsNathan P
00221q00.jpg
Attica, Athens. (Circa 454-449 BC)28 viewsAR Tetradrachm

25 mm, 17.20 g

This is a transitional Owl tetradrachm that bridges the early classical owls (minted from 478-454) with the subsequent mass classical (standardized) coinage, which really got going in the early 440s BC to finance Pericles' building projects like the Parthenon and then later the Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC) vs. Sparta. The 454 date is critical in that it was the year that Athens moved the treasury of the Delian league (confederation of Greek states led by Athens to defend against the Persian threat) from Delos to Athens.

This coin shares many attributes of Starr V early classical coinage (465-454 BC). On the obverse, the olive leaves on Athena's helmet connect to her diadem with small stems (which disappear in the mass coinage). In addition, the palmette leaves on Athena's helmet are smaller, less decorative, and more realistic. Finally, Athena is smiling (she starts to frown as the war with Sparta goes badly) and is more beautifully depicted than in the more hastily produced mass coinage.

On the reverse, like with the Starr V coins, the incuse is quite noticeable and the AOE (short for AOENAION, or "Of the Athenians") is written in smaller letters (they are much bigger in the mass coinage). Also, the owl is stouter, has smaller eyes, and his head is at an angle rather than parallel to the ground like all later issues.

The only difference between the Starr V owls and this example is in the owl's tail - in Starr V it ends with three small feathers. On this coin and all subsequent coinage the owl's tail ends in a single prong. Given all the other similarities to Starr V it is likely this coin was minted soon after the Treasury's move from Delos to Athens - perhaps 454/453.
2 commentsNathan P
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-VwCSeKXIBCf~2.jpg
Attica, Athens. (Circa 475-465 BC)17 viewsAR Tetradrachm

24 mm, 17.19 g

Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right

Reverse: Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig to left; all within incuse square.

Starr Group IV, HGC 4, 1595. Test cut on reverse.

Chester Starr arranged Athens' coinage from ca. 480 until the mid 5th century into five groups, and his chronology is still widely accepted today (although the dating of the final groups is now considered too late). The style of the "transitional" Athenian tetradrachms from the late 470s through the early 450s B.C. – Starr's groups II through V – is considered the high mark of Athenian coinage. By the time of Starr's Group IV, production of tetradrachms had steadily increased and the uptick in the number of required dies (and engravers) necessitated a greater standardization of style. On the obverse, the head of Athena changes little from Starr's Group III – the goddess has a bold profile and retains her "archaic smile"; the hair on her forehead is arranged in two waves, with a small bend above the eye; and on her helmet, her leaves float above the visor (sometimes referred to as a "laurel wreath," these leaves were first introduced after the victory over the Persians in 480/79 BC). One difference from Group III is the helmet's palmette, which goes from pointing to the adjacent olive leaf to more parallel. On the reverse, the back leg of the Group IV's owl often stretches further back and the tail feather no longer touches the rear claw.
1 commentsNathan P
PCW-G6443.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. 449-413 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.24 gm; 22 mm)30 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind. SNG Cop. 31; Starr pl. XXII, 7. Nicely struck on a compact flan. Elegant style with a full crest. Shallow marks on Athena's cheek. Choice Extremely Fine. Not from the recent hoards. Nice old-cabinet toning. 4 commentsMark R1
IMG_0083.JPG
ATTICA, Athens. AR Tetradrachm95 viewsCirca 454-404 B.C. 17.15 grams. Obverse: archaizing head of Athena right. Reverse: owl standing right, olive sprig left upper corner with crescent moon below, ethnic to right field, all within incuse square. Kroll 8. HGC 4, 1597. SNG Copenhagen 31. SNG Munchen 49. Dewing 1591-7. Gulbenkian 519-21. Kraay & Hirmer 362. Choice EF, well centered, high relief (as usual).
Ex CNG
The quintessential "Old Style" or "Classical Style" silver tetradrachm representative coin of Classical Athens called "glaukes" or owls. Silver probably came from the mines of Laurion or from member city states of the Delian League. Countless articles and exhaustive studies had been made regarding the enormous output of these coins during its remarkable existence. One of the early trade coins of the ancient world and undeniably well travelled from the Pillars of Hercules to ancient India, hence its ubiquitous nature. What more could be said of it?
3 commentsJason T
new_style_tripod.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. c. 165-42 BC. 14 viewsAR Tetradrachm (29mm, 16.7 g, 12h).
New Style coinage. Polemon, Alketes and Aris, magistrates.
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev.: A - ΘE / ΠΟΛΕ - ΜΩΝ / ΑΛΚΗ – ΤΗΣ / APIΣ; Owl standing right on amphora; to tripod to left, Θ on amphora, ΣΦ below.
Reference:Thompson 469a / 17-61-550
1 commentsJohn Anthony
30783LG.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 142/141 BC143 viewsATTICA, Athens. Circa 142/141 BC. AR New Style Tetradrachm (32mm, 16.46 g, 12h) . Thompson 209b (same rev. die)
Helmeted head of Athena right / A-QE, owl standing right on amphora; Macedonian helmet surmounted by a star to right, G on amphora, EM to left, magistrates DH/MH & IE/RW; all within wreath.
Ex CNG ; Ex Wayne C. Phillips
2 commentsVladislavs D
new_style_k.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 165-42 BC 12 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 27mm, 16.6g, 12h, New Style. Socrates, Dionysodoros, and Zoilos, magistrates. Struck 116/5 BC.
Obv.: Helmeted head of Athena right.
Rev.: A-ΘE / ΣOKΡ / ATHΣ / ΔIONΥ / ΣOΔΩ / MOY / ΣΩI; Owl standing right, head facing, on amphora; in right field, facing cult statue of Apollo Delios, holding Three Graces and bow; B on amphora, ΣO below.
Reference: Thompson 616a / 17-47-601
1 commentsJohn Anthony
Tet_1.jpg
Attica, Athens. Circa 449-404 B.C. AR Tetradrachm27 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing right, head facing; olive spray and crescent behind; all within incuse square.
Maximum Diameter: 27.9 mm
Weight: 16.21 g

Six test cuts.
1 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
Tet_2.jpg
Attica, Athens. Circa 449-404 B.C. AR Tetradrachm, Sear 2526, SNG Cop 3121 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right, in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / AΘE, owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind.
Maximum Diameter:
Weight: 17.14 g

Two test cuts.
TheEmpireNeverEnded
Greece-Athens_45403.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC10 viewsAR Tetradrachm (24mm, 17.00 g, 8h). Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597. VF, toned, bankers’ marks, graffiti.Christopher B2
Greece-Athens_45402.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC16 viewsAR Tetradrachm (24mm, 17.00 g, 8h). Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent to left; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597. VF, toned, bankers’ marks, graffiti.1 commentsChristopher B2
Kroll_8.jpg
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 454-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm36 views(24mm, 17.20 g, 2h).
Helmeted head of Athena right, with frontal eye / Owl standing right, head facing; olive sprig and crescent behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597. Good VF, toned. Attractive early style.

This tetradrachm belongs among the earlier period of the “frontal eye” issues of the mid-late 5th century. The palmette is still delicate, as is the general style of the owl, and the incuse is rather deep and abruptly transitions to the flat surface.
1 commentsLeo
athenstet.jpg
Attica, Athens. Tetradrachm.88 viewsAttica, Athens. Circa 449-404 BC. AR Tetradrachm (23mm, 16.95 g). Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet / Owl standing right, head facing; olive spray and crescent behind; all within incuse square. Kroll 8; SNG Copenhagen 31. VF, lightly porous, scratches on obverse, reverse test cut.2 commentsCANTANATRIX
IMG_3970.jpg
Attica. Athens58 viewsAttica. Athens circa 454-404 BC.
Drachm AR

13mm., 4,13g.

Head of Athena with profile eye to right, wearing disc earring, pearl necklace and a crested Attic helmet adorned with three olive leaves and a pi-style palmette /
ΑΘΕ, owl standing to right, head facing the viewer, olive sprig with berry in upper left field, all within incuse square.

very fine

Kroll 10; HGC 4, 1631.
6 commentsRandygeki(h2)
ZomboDroid_24042019221139.jpg
ATTICA. Athens. Circa 430s -420s BC. AR Tetradrachm.7 viewsObv: Head of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves and palmette.

Rev: ΑΘΕ Owl standing right, head facing; to left, olive sprig and crescent; all within incuse square.
Kroll 8; HGC 4, 1597.
F, test cuts.
26mm // 16,65g.
Canaan
DSC_0006.JPG
ATTICA. Athens. Ca. 2nd-1st centuries BC. AR tetradrachm9 viewsATTICA. Athens. Ca. 2nd-1st centuries BC. AR tetradrachm (34mm, 16.94 gm, 12h). NGC XF 4/5 - 3/5, brushed, die shift. New Style coinage, ca. 148/7 BC, Ammo(nius) and Dio-, magistrates. Head of Athena right, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with a vine scroll, Pegasus above solid upturned cheek flap / A-ΘE / AM/MΩ / ΔIO, owl standing facing on overturned amphora; kerchnos in left field, A below, all within wreath. Thompson 101a. 3 commentsMark R1
Owl.jpg
Attica: Athens Tetradrachm112 viewsArchaic head of Athena r., with almond shaped eye, wearing crested helmet
ornamented with three olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round
earring.

ΑΘΕ right
owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, prong tail, to left olive twig
and crescent, all within incuse square

16.8g

SNG Copenhagen 13; Sydenham 2526
ex-Time Machine Vcoins
2 commentsJay GT4
spaincart2.jpg
Augustus ( Octavian) Colonial Patricia, Spain 27 BCE-14 CE19 viewsObverse: PER ACE AVG, head of Octavian to the left.
Reverse: COLO PATR, Aspergilo (holy water sprinkler),
prefericulo (peripheral ring), lituo (curved stick used for worship)
and patera (shallow bowl).
14 mm., 2.0 g., AB 1566
sold 2-2018
NORMAN K
coin17~0.JPG
Augustus AE Quadrans20 viewsAugustus AE Quadrans. Rome Mint 2BC-12 AD. Moneyer C. Rubellius Blandus. Obverse: III VIR•A•A•A•F•F•, garlanded altar with bowl-shaped top. Reverse: C•RVBELLIVS BLANDVS•, around large S C. RIC I: 467. ecoli
augustus_322.jpg
Augustus RIC I, 322680 viewsAugustus 27 BC - AD 14
AR - Denar, 3.83g, 20mm, Rome 19 BC, by moneyer Q Rustius
obv. Q RVSTIVS - FORTVNA, ANTIAT (in ex., hard to see!)
Busts, draped, jugate, r., of Fortuna Victrix, helmeted, holding patera in l.
hand, and Fortuna Felix, wearing stephane;
both busts rest on bar terminating at each end in a ram' s head
rev. CAESARI . AVGVSTO
A highly ornamented rectangular altar with a bowl on it, inscribed in front
FOR.RE
ex.: EX.S.C.
RIC I, 322; BMCR 2
R2; about VF, toned

FORTVNA ANTIATIS, Fortuna of Antium, one of the most important places of Fortuna worshipping, as two goddesses, sisters, FORTVNA VICTRIX, more male, and FORTVNA FELIX, more female. Or as two aspects of only one goddess?
On the rev. the altar of FORTVNA REDVX, erected by the Senatus for the lucky return of Augustus 19BC with the 53 standards from the Parthians in Rome near the Porta Capuana.
Q Rustius celebrates Augustus and his own hometown Antium.
4 commentsJochen
augustus_322~0.jpg
Augustus RIC I, 32290 viewsAugustus 27 BC - AD 14
AR - Denar, 3.83g, 20mm, Rome 19 BC, by moneyer Q Rustius
obv. Q RVSTIVS - FORTVNAE (AE ligate)
in ex. ANTIAT (hardly to see!)
Busts, draped, jugate, r., of Fortuna Victrix, helmeted, holding patera in l.
hand, and Fortuna Felix, wearing stephane;
both busts rest on bar terminating at each end in a ram' s head
rev. CAESARI . AVGVSTO
A highly ornamented rectangular altar with a bowl on it, inscribed in front
FOR.RE
ex.: EX.S.C.
RIC I, 322; BMCR 2
R2; about VF, toned

FORTVNA ANTIATIS, Fortuna of Antium, one of the most important places of Fortuna worshipping, as two goddesses, sisters, FORTVNA VICTRIX, more male, and FORTVNA FELIX, more female. Or as two aspects of only one goddess?
On the rev. the altar of FORTVNA REDVX, erected by the Senatus for the lucky return of Augustus 19BC with the 53 standards from the Parthians in Rome near the Porta Capuana.
Q Rustius celebrates Augustus and his own hometown Antium.





Jochen
augustus_467_3.jpg
Augustus RIC I, 46723 viewsAugustus 27 BC - AD 14
AE - Quadrans, 3.37g, 13.4mm
Rome 4 BC
obv.: C RVBELLIVS BLANDVS
around SC
rev.: IIIVIR AAAFF
garlanded altar with bowl-shaped top
RIC I, 467; cf. C.511; BMCR. 269
Scarce; good F

IIIVIRI MONETALES = the three mint magistrates, elected by the Senatus
(In this case really IVviri monetales!)
AAAFF = aere argento auro flando feriundo, for the casting and striking of bronze, silver and gold
Jochen
Aurelian_RIC_V,_I_62_Third_example.jpg
Aurelian, AE Antoninianus, RIC V, I 62 Third example5 viewsAurelian
Augustus, 270 – 275 A.D.

Coin: AE Antoninianus, Silvered

Obverse: IMP AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust facing right. Aegis on left shoulder.
Reverse: ORIENS AVG, Sol, advancing to the left, raising his right hand in Blessing, holding the Globe with his left, trampling a bound Palmyran to the left, another bound Palmyran to the right looks back to Sol. XXI in the right field, VI in the left. A Lion, prowling to the left, in exergue.

Weight: 3.09 g, Diameter: 21.5 x 21.7 x 0.9 mm, Die axis: 180°, Mint: Rome, Reference: RIC V, I 62
Masis
Tetradracma_Ateniense.jpg
ÁTICA - ATENAS99 viewsEmisión realizada en el siglo de Aristóteles.
AR Tetradracma 20 mm 17.1 gr.

Anv: Cabeza de Atenas vistiendo Casco coronado, crestado y ornamentado con tres hojas de oliva y detalles florales.
Rev: "A Θ E" – Búho parado a derecha, su cabeza viendo al frente. Un ramo de olivo y medialuna detrás.
El viejo formato almendrado del ojo de Atenas en los tetradracmas anteriores al 393 A.C., cambia a un ojo mas real de perfil. Esta es una muy extensa serie, donde la gran mayoría fue acuñada muy descuidadamente en cospeles irregulares y de gran espesor.

Acuñación: 393 - 300 A.C.
Ceca: Atenas - Ática

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.I #2537 Pag.237 – BMC Vol.11 (Attica, Megaris, Aegira) #132/44 – SNG Copenhagen #63/4 - SNG München #91 - SNG Lockett #1873 - SNG Delepierre #1469 - Dewing #1635 - SNG VIII Hart #786
4 commentsmdelvalle
athens_ae_owl.jpg
Æ 10. Frontal owl10 viewsAttica, Athens Æ10. 406-393 B.C. 1,15 g,. Helmeted head of Athena right / Owl standing: E A Q. Babelon, Traité, Pl. CXCII 6, III 95; Cf SNG München, Attika 67-73.Podiceps
athens_2_bodied.jpg
Æ 11, Double-bodied owl15 viewsAttica, Athens, c. early or mid-330's-322/317 BC, 1.81g. Obv: Head of Athena r.; Rx: Double-bodied owl, beneath Eleusis ring. BMC-222..;The Athenian Agora-43; Svoronos-35-42, pl. 22. AE 11. Ex D. Lepczyk Auction; Ex John Twente Collection; Ex H.J.BerkPodiceps
athens.jpg
Æ 12, owl standing right, head facing15 viewsAthens, Greece, c. 120 - 140 A.D. Bronze AE 12, BMC Attica p. 101, 730, F, Athens mint, 2.543g, 15.6mm, 180o, obverse helmeted bust of Athena right; reverse “ΑΘΗ”, owl standing right, head facing, olive spray behind. Ex FORVMPodiceps
athens_owl.jpg
Æ 13; Athena/ owl8 viewsAthens, 3rd-2nd century B.C. Æ 13 mm. Helmeted bust of Athena right / Owl standing to right, head facing. Sear GCV I: 2565. Ex Sayles & Lavender. Podiceps
athens_owls.jpg
Æ 13; Head of Athena r./ Double-bodied owl, kalathos23 viewsAttica Athens, 3rd Century B.C. AE 12.89mm, 1.77g; Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right. Reverse: Two confronting owls, heads overlapping at center, kalathos in exergue. SNG 92, BMC pl. VI / 6. Podiceps
athens_2_bodied~0.jpg
Æ 14, Diobol; Double-bodied owl, kalathos in ex14 viewsAthens, Attica, Greece, 350 - 262 B.C. Bronze diobol, SGCV I 2563; BMC Attica p. 21, 220 ff., F, 3.442g, 14.3mm, 180o, obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse “AQE”, double-bodied owl, head facing, olive sprays above, kalathos (basket) in ex. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Athens_2_owls.jpg
Æ 14; Head of Athena r./ Two owls20 viewsAthens, Attica, AE 14mm, 2.7g Ca. 3rd c. B,C. Head of Athena right in crested Attic helmet / Two owls standing towards one another left and right, heads turned facing, within wreath. ΑΘΕ in exergue. Kroll 46; SNG Copenhagen 89. Podiceps
rjb_2019_05_10.jpg
Baktria4 viewsAR obol
c.295-285 BC
O - Kalathos
R - Double bodied owl with single head in shallow incuse square
Bopearachchi, Sophytes 10; SNG ANS 11; CNG 100, lot 1630
mauseus
1475_Bactria_didrachm.jpg
Baktria - AR didrachm12 viewsuncertain mint in Oxus region
295/3-285/3 BC
head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and spiral palmette on the bowl wire necklace, round earring
monogram
owl standing right, grape bunch over tail; prow above
AΘE
Roma XIV, 331; Bopearachchi, Sophytes Series 1A; SNG ANS 6; N&A 43-45
ex Roma

From the 1960s Andragoras-Sophytes Group, present in Germany in 1975, subsequently exported to the USA.
Johny SYSEL
1399_Baktria_drachm2.jpg
Baktria - AR drachm4 viewsuncertain mint in Oxus region
305-294 BC
head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl
eagle standing left, head right, grape cluster on vine with leaf above
Roma XIV, 334; Bopearachchi, Sophytes Series 2A; SNG ANS 14-16; Mitchiner 26c; N&A 52-57

ex Roma numismatics
From the 1960s Andragoras-Sophytes Group, present in Germany in 1975, subsequently exported to the USA.
Johny SYSEL
1398_Baktria3.jpg
Baktria - AR tetradrachm5 viewsuncertain mint in Oxus region
295/3-285/3 BC
head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and spiral palmette on the bowl wire necklace, round earring
monogram
owl standing right, grape bunch over tail; olive sprig and crescent above
AΘE
Roma XIV, 354; Bopearachchi, Sophytes Series 1A; Mitchiner 13e; N&A 13-15; SNG ANS -; Svoronos pl. 109, 8; Leu 83, 263
17,0g
ex Roma

From the 1960s Andragoras-Sophytes Group, present in Germany in 1975, subsequently exported to the USA.
Johny SYSEL
Baktria_AthenianOwlImitation_SNG-ANS9.jpg
Baktria, Athenian owl imitation9 viewsBaktria, Athenian owl imitation. 393-300 BC. AR Hemidrachm (1.46 gm). Head of Athena r., crested helmet ornamented with olive leaves. Bunch of grapes on vine behind. / Owl stdg r., wings closed, olive twig to l. AOE to r. VF. Boperachichi Sophytes (1996) series 1A; SNG ANS 9 #9; Svornos pl 17 #34-36; MIG -. cf HGC 4,1644.Christian T
Nabataean_pottery_1.jpg
BCC cg824 viewsNabataean Pottery Fragments
1st - 2nd century CE?
Four small fragments found near
each other, with old breaks. Probably
part of a decorated plate or bowl of
very fine clay. The Nabataeans were
well-known for their extraordinary
“eggshell thin” decorated ceramic work.
A fairly unusual surface find from the
beach south of Caesarea Maritima, 1973.
Overall length and width: 3.3cm.x3.0cm.
Thickness: less than 2.0mm.
v-drome
BCC_G18_Roman_Gem_.jpg
BCC g1836 viewsRoman Gem Stone
Intaglio 1st-3rd cent.CE
Caesarea Maritima
Female figure, possibly Demeter / Hygeia,
standing left, holding sacrificial bowl and
sceptre? or snake.
Translucent Red Carnelian
10.5x7.8x2.5mm. 0.29gm.
cf. Amorai-Stark, Hershkovitz, “Gemstones,
Finger Rings, and Seal Boxes from Caesarea
Maritima, The Hendler Collection”, #52 and
#54. c. Shay Hendler, Tel Aviv 2016.

Also possible, but perhaps less likely: Venus
standing. cf. Anit Hamburger, "Gems from
Caesarea Maritima", Atiqot English Series,
Vol. VIII, 1968, #45.
v-drome
3547.jpg
Black-glazed Handled bowl37 viewsBlack-glazed bowl in buff terracotta with single horizontal handle.

Apulian, S. Italy. 4th century B.C. Maximum diameter 12.11 cm (4.77 inches).

Intact with minor wear and soil deposits consistent with prolonged burial.

Ex Lincolnshire, England private collection.
1 commentsTLP
Bramsen 0310.JPG
Bramsen 0310. Légion d'Honneur, 1804.479 viewsObv. Laureate head of Napoleon ANDRIEU F below.
Rev.the cross of the order, in the centre of which the eagle of France stands on the fulmen of Jove, encircled with a flat ring, on which the motto, HONNEUR . ET . PATRIE. is impressed. A wreath of the branches of oak and laurel, with their fruit, surrounds the cross behind AUSPICE NEAPOLEONE GALLIA RENOVATA. Exergue, DENON DIRT. JALEY FT.

The engraving is of the highest quality. Some scratches on the obverse, not particularly visible in hand. The scratches on the portrait itself do not penetrate the patination to bare metal.

Laskey's Narrative:
Napoleon having been elected First Consul for life, immediately marked his great event by instituting the order of the Legion of Honour, which, by joining personal decoration with pecuniary stipend, answered two purposes, that of reconciling the people of France to the restoration of artificial rank in society, and also or securing to Napoleon himself the personal attachment of all those connected with the institution; in short it was a cheap, but efficacious mode of giving bribes to all ranks both in military and civil life, and therefore likely to be attended with the best consequences to his own popularity.


On this occasion, Joseph Bonaparte, the Consul's brother, was made the grand officer of the order.

It was also decreed that the legion should be composed of fifteen cohorts, and a council of administration; that each cohort should consist of seven grand officers, twenty commandants, thirty officers, and 350 legionaries; and that the First Consul should always be the chief of the legion, and of the council of administration. The members were to be military men, who had distinguished themselves in the war, or citizens, who, by their knowledge, talents, and virtues, had contributed to establish or defend the republic.



LordBest
spear_collage.jpg
Bronze Age Reworked Dagger43 viewsAn ancient European Bronze Age reworked dagger, dating to approximately 800 BC.

Of rare and unusual form, with a long ridged handle, slender blade and prominent central rib. Unusually, this piece appears to have originally been made as a spear head, subsequently broken (possibly in battle), and reworked into a dagger. Beating marks from this process of reworking are still clearly visible.
A weapon such as this would have been used in battle by the early Celtic peoples and their predecessors, indeed the period to which this artifact dates was characterized by migrations and invasions of warrior led groups across Europe. The late Bronze Age appears to have been a time of widespread warfare and social upheaval, ultimately carried on the back of weapons such as this.

Length: 8 ½ inches.


Provenance:
Ex-Collection of Henk Huffener (1923 – 2006), a respected artist, officially honored hero of the Dutch resistance, and successful antiques dealer, with establishments in Surrey and Kensington, England.
Huffener was born in Utrecht in 1923. One of nine children, he soon became known for his artistic talents, most notably for his still lifes, portraits, and abstractionist works. Huffener, inspired by his father, also became immersed in the world of anti-fascist activism. Come the start of the war, he began traveling the Netherlands, helping Jews escape Nazi-occupied Europe by providing them with forged papers, and hiding them from their persecutors. This incredible bravery and selflessness was documented in The Other Schindlers by Agnes Grunwald-Spier (2010), and Huffener was honoured by Yad Vashem as 'Righteous Among the Nations' in 1998. His wartime contributions were also commemorated posthumously in March 2010, when Prime Minister Gordon Brown awarded him the Hero of the Holocaust medal for "the service of humanity."
Huffener eventually moved to England in the 1950s, establishing his own antiques business in 1959 in Albury, Surrey. Here, his knowledge and collections grew to encompass antiquities, ethnographic art, glass, paintings and fossils. Also noted for his restoration skills, Huffener was much respected in his field, coming to befriend Herbert Reiser, one of the world's leading collectors.
Salaethus
owl.jpg
Bronze Coin from Camarina Sicily11 viewsA bronze coin minted in Camarina, Sicily between 410 and 405 BC. 15 mm. My 'winking owl' coin.chuy1530
Bronze-Knife_Q-001_19x59mm_6,06ga-s.jpg
Bronze-Knife from the "Hallstatt culture" #174 viewsBronze-Knife from the "Hallstatt culture" #1
type: Bronze-Knife. Two holes are for rivets that attached a handle with C-shaped rim.
size: 19x59mm,
weight: 6,06g,
date: Early iron age 8th to 6th centuries B.C.,
ref: ???.
distribution: "By the 6th century BC, it spanned across territories north-south from the Main, Bohemia, the Little Carpathians, the Swiss plateau, the Salzkammergut, down to the border between Lower Styria and Lower Carniola, and from the western zone, that included Champagne-Ardenne, the Upper Rhine, and the upper Danube, to the eastern zone, that included Vienna Basin and the Danubian Lowland, for some 1000 km. " from Wikipedia.
Q-001
"The Hallstatt culture was the predominant Central European culture from the 8th to 6th centuries BC (European Early Iron Age), developing out of the Urnfield culture of the 12th century BC (Late Bronze Age) and followed in much of Central Europe by the La Tène culture. It is commonly associated with Proto-Celtic and Celtic populations in the Western Hallstatt zone and with (pre-)Illyrians in the eastern Hallstatt zone." from Wikipedia.
quadrans
Kroton~0.jpg
Bruttium, Kroton (Circa 530-500 BC)27 viewsAR Nomos

28 mm, 7.82 g

Obverse: Tripod, legs surmounted by wreaths and terminating in lion's feet, two serpents rising from the bowl, set on basis of three lines, the center dotted, koppa-P-O (KRO - short for Kroton) to left

Reverse: Incuse tripod as obverse, but wreaths and serpents in outline.

HN Italy 2075; SNG ANS 231; Bement 272.

The importance of the Delphic oracle to the founding of Kroton was celebrated on its coinage from the earliest days. Despite later myths ascribing the founding of Kroton to Herakles, the city's historical oikist is recorded as Myskellos of Rhypai who, on consulting the Delphic oracle about his lack of children was given the response that Apollo would grant children, but that first Myskellos should found the city of Kroton 'among fair fields'. After being given directions on how to locate the site, Myskellos travelled to southern Italy to explore the land that he had been assigned, but seeing the territory of the Sybarites and thinking it superior, he returned once more to the oracle to ask whether he would be allowed to change. The answer came back that he should accept the gifts that the god gave him. A further element of the story is that Myskellos was accompanied on his expedition by Archias of Corinth; the Delphic oracle gave the pair the choice between health and wealth. Archias elected wealth, and was assigned the site of Syracuse, while Myskellos chose health: the favourable climate of Kroton, the eminent skill of its physicians and the prowess of its athletes later earned its citizens this reputation for good health.
1 commentsNathan P
MISC_Bulgaria_Stratsimir.jpg
Bulgaria, Second Empire, Vidin Kingdom. Ivan Stratsimir (1356-1396)11 viewsDimnik & Dobrinić 11/10.1.3; Raduchev & Zhekov 1.14.6; cf. Youroukova & Penchev 107; Ljubić III, 2; cf. Moushmov 7542.

AR Groši/grosh (described in older references as a half groši/grosh); Third Chronological Group, variant B; Vidin mint; struck circa 1380-1385; .74 g., 17.52 mm. max., 0°

Obv.: Nimbate bust of Christ with cross within halo, raising right hand in benediction and holding Gospel book in left hand, IC - XC (= Jesus Christ) across field, all within beaded circle, abbreviated legend +IW СRАЦИМИР ЦРББ (= Ivan Stratsimir Tsar of the Bulgars).

Rev.: Nimbate Ivan Stratsimir wearing domed crown seated facing, holding scepter decorated with a lily forming a trefoil (with the lily depicted in heraldic manner; i.e., the central petal stands upright but the side petals bend downward) in his right hand and an akakia in his left, axe between his feet, abbreviated legend +IW СRАЦИМИР ЦРББ (= Ivan Stratsimir Tsar of the Bulgars).

Ivan Alexander divided his kingdom between his two sons. Ivan Stratsimir received Vidin. In 1365, the Hungarian King Louis I of Anjou captured Vidin. Sratsimir and his family were held captive in Croatia for four years but in 1369 Sratsimir was restored to his throne under Hungarian overlordship. After the Ottoman invasion in 1388, he was forced to acknowledge Ottoman overlordship and garrisons. In 1396 Sratsimir and his subjects aligned themselves with the anti-Ottoman Crusade led by the Hungarian king Sigismund of Luxemburg. The crusade ended in disaster at the battle of Nikopol on September 25, 1396. By the end of 1397 Sultan Bayezid I approached Vidin and, assured by the promise of his safety, Ivan Stratsimir came out to meet him. On the order of Bayezid I, Ivan Stratsimir was arrested and conveyed to Bursa, while the Sultan confiscated the contents of the Vidin treasury. Sratsimir's fate is unknown. Vidin was likely annexed by the Ottoman Empire in 1397, but at least part of the realm remained under the control of Sratsimir's son and heir Constantine II.
Stkp
G_354_Pergamon_countermark~0.jpg
c/m owl, Pergamon8 viewsc/m owl, Pergamon

click to see the coin
shanxi
4360011.jpg
Caabria Tarentum AR diobol circa 325-280 BC 13mm 1.16g 2h Vlasto 1344 this coin7 viewsHelmeted head of Athena left,with wreath on bowl/Herakles holding club,strangling the Nemean Lion.Grant H
CalabriaOwl2.jpg
Calabria Tarentum AR Drachm149 viewsHead of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet adorned with Skylla preparing to hurl a stone

Owl standing to right on olive branch, head facing; ZOR (magistrate) to right, TAP to left.

3.07g

Circa 281-276 BC.

Vlasto 1048. McGill 135, Cote 348, Sear 367v.
8 commentsJay GT4
Calabria_Tarentum_Drachm_Athena_and_Owl.jpg
Calabria Tarentum Drachm Athena and Owl47 viewsCALABRIA, Tarentum, Circa 280 - 272 BC, AR Drachm, 17mm, 2.85g, 10h, Neumenios - magistrate, Vlasto 1062-3, HN Italy 1015
OBV: Head of Athena right, wearing helmet decorated with Skylla
REV: NEYMHNIOΣ to left, Owl standing right, head facing, on olive branch, API to right

EX: CNG electronic auction, 270 lot 5

2 commentsRomanorvm
Vlasto_1077.jpg
Calabria, Taras Drachm circa 280-27234 viewsAR 16mm., 3.21g. Head of Athena l., wearing helmet decorated with Skylla. Rev. Owl standing r. on thunderbolt, with open wings. Vlasto 1077. Historia Numorum Italy 1018.

Attractive old cabinet tone, Good Very Fine.
2 commentsLeo
Vlasto_836.jpg
Calabria, Taras.52 viewsSilver Nomos (6.64 g), ca. 272-240 BC.
Sy… and Lykinos, magistrates. Youth on horseback left, crowning horse with wreath; behind and below in two lines, magistrate's names: ΣY and ΛYKI/NOΣ. Reverse: TA-PAΣ, Phalanthos riding dolphin left, hurling trident; behind, owl standing left, head facing. Vlasto 836; HN Italy 1025. Gorgeous iridescent toning. Superb Extremely Fine.
1 commentsLeo
103002.jpg
CALABRIA, Tarentum183 viewsTaranto was founded in 706 BC by Dorian immigrants as the only Spartan colony, and its origin is peculiar: the founders were Partheniae, sons of unmarried Spartan women and perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta); these unions were decreed by the Spartans to increase the number of soldiers (only the citizens of Sparta could become soldiers) during the bloody Messenian Wars, but later they were nullified, and the sons were forced to leave. According to the legend Phalanthus, the Parthenian leader, went to Delphi to consult the oracle and received the puzzling answer that he should found a city where rain fell from a clear sky. After all attempts to capture a suitable place to found a colony failed, he became despondent, convinced that the oracle had told him something that was impossible, and was consoled by his wife. She laid his head in her lap and herself became disconsolate. When Phalanthus felt her tears splash onto his forehead he at last grasped the meaning of the oracle, for his wife's name meant clear sky. The harbour of Taranto in Apulia was nearby and he decided this must be the new home for the exiles. The Partheniae arrived and founded the city, naming it Taras after the son of the Greek sea god, Poseidon, and the local nymph Satyrion. A variation says Taras was founded in 707 BC by some Spartans, who, the sons of free women and enslaved fathers, were born during the Messenian War. According to other sources, Heracles founded the city. Another tradition indicates Taras himself as the founder of the city; the symbol of the Greek city (as well as of the modern city) is Taras riding a dolphin. Taranto increased its power, becoming a commercial power and a sovereign city of Magna Graecia, ruling over the Greek colonies in southern Italy.

In its beginning, Taranto was a monarchy, probably modelled on the one ruling over Sparta; according to Herodotus (iii 136), around 492 BC king Aristophilides ruled over the city. The expansion of Taranto was limited to the coast because of the resistance of the populations of inner Apulia. In 472 BC, Taranto signed an alliance with Rhegion, to counter the Messapii, Peuceti, and Lucanians (see Iapygian-Tarentine Wars), but the joint armies of the Tarentines and Rhegines were defeated near Kailìa (modern Ceglie), in what Herodotus claims to be the greatest slaughter of Greeks in his knowledge, with 3,000 Reggians and uncountable Tarentines killed. In 466 BC, Taranto was again defeated by the Iapyges; according to Aristotle, who praises its government, there were so many aristocrats killed that the democratic party was able to get the power, to remove the monarchy, inaugurate a democracy, and expel the Pythagoreans. Like Sparta, Tarentum was an aristocratic republic, but became democratic when the ancient nobility dwindled.

However, the rise of the democratic party did not weaken the bonds of Taranto and her mother-city Sparta. In fact, Taranto supported the Peloponnesian side against Athens in the Peloponnesian War, refused anchorage and water to Athens in 415 BC, and even sent ships to help the Peloponnesians, after the Athenian disaster in Sicily. On the other side, Athens supported the Messapians, in order to counter Taranto's power.

In 432 BC, after several years of war, Taranto signed a peace treaty with the Greek colony of Thurii; both cities contributed to the foundation of the colony of Heraclea, which rapidly fell under Taranto's control. In 367 BC Carthage and the Etruscans signed a pact to counter Taranto's power in southern Italy.

Under the rule of its greatest statesman, strategist and army commander-in-chief, the philosopher and mathematician Archytas, Taranto reached its peak power and wealth; it was the most important city of the Magna Graecia, the main commercial port of southern Italy, it produced and exported goods to and from motherland Greece and it had the biggest army and the largest fleet in southern Italy. However, with the death of Archytas in 347 BC, the city started a slow, but ineluctable decline; the first sign of the city's decreased power was its inability to field an army, since the Tarentines preferred to use their large wealth to hire mercenaries, rather than leave their lucrative trades.

In 343 BC Taranto appealed for aid against the barbarians to its mother city Sparta, in the face of aggression by the Brutian League. In 342 BC, Archidamus III, king of Sparta, arrived in Italy with an army and a fleet to fight the Lucanians and their allies. In 338 BC, during the Battle of Manduria, the Spartan and Tarentine armies were defeated in front of the walls of Manduria (nowadays in province of Taranto), and Archidamus was killed.

In 333 BC, still troubled by their Italic neighbours, the Tarentines called the Epirotic king Alexander Molossus to fight the Bruttii, Samnites, and Lucanians, but he was later (331 BC) defeated and killed in the battle of Pandosia (near Cosenza). In 320 BC, a peace treaty was signed between Taranto and the Samnites. In 304 BC, Taranto was attacked by the Lucanians and asked for the help of Agathocles tyrant of Syracuse, king of Sicily. Agathocles arrived in southern Italy and took control of Bruttium (present-day Calabria), but was later called back to Syracuse. In 303 BC-302 BC Cleonymus of Sparta established an alliance with Taranto against the Lucanians, and fought against them.

Arnold J. Toynbee, a classical scholar who taught at Oxford and other prestigious English universities and who did original and definitive work on Sparta (e.g. The Journal of Hellenic Studies, vol. xxxiii 1913 p. 246-275) seemed to have some doubts about Tarentum (Taranto) being of Spartan origin.

In his book The Study of History vol. iii p. 52 he wrote: "...Tarentum, which claimed a Spartan origin; but, even if this claim was in accordance with historical fact..." The tentative phrasing seems to imply that the evidence is neither conclusive or even establishes a high degree of probability of the truth that Tarentum (Taranto) was a Spartan colony.

CALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 302-281 BC. AR Drachm (17mm, 2.91 gm). Helmeted head of Athena right, helmet decorated with Skylla hurling a stone / Owl standing right head facing, on olive branch; Vlasto 1058; SNG ANS 1312; HN Italy 1015. VF.

Ex-Cng eAuction 103 Lot 2 190/150
2 commentsecoli
Calabria_Tarentum_SNG-ANS1307.jpg
Calabria, Tarentum.13 viewsCalabria, Tarentum. 3002-280 BC. AR Drachm (2.97 gm). Head of Athena r. in Attic helmet ornamented with Skylla hurling stone. / Owl stdg r., head facing, club and IOP to r. VF. Bt. Herakles Numismatics, 2011. SNG ANS 1307; Vlasto 1054; HNItaly 975; HGC 1 823; SNG Cop 955.Christian T
IMG_0011~0.jpg
Calabria, Tarentum. c281-272 BC103 viewsAR Drachm. 17mm. 3.2 gms.
Helmeted head of Athena left; helmet decorated with skylla hurling a stone / TARANTINWN, owl standing right on thunderbolt, wings spread; SW right.
Vlasto 1068ff
6 commentsDino
Taras_Stater.jpg
Calabria. Tarentum. Ar Didrachm. C. 272-240 BC. SCARCE. 78 viewsObv; Nude youth on horseback.
Rev; Taras astride dolphin; owl behind.
SNG Ans 1165ff.
Good silver and surfaces.
6.53g.
19mm.

Ex Den of Antiquity
4 commentsPhiloromaos
T1086LG.jpg
CALABRIA. Tarentum. Circa 280-272 BC36 viewsAR drachm (15mm, 3.17g). .
Helmeted head of Athena left; helmet decorated with Skylla hurling a stone / Owl standing right on thunderbolt, wings spread. Vlasto 1077ff.
ecoli
Calciatti_III_Owl_and_Lizard_3_Pellets.JPG
Calciatti III Owl and Lizard 3 Pellets21 viewsRARE bronze tetras, Calciati III, Kamarina mint
413 - 405 BC, Kamarina
Bronze tetras, Calciati III, 68, 39; SNG München 421, VF, 3.314g, 14.5mm, 225o, Kamarina mint, obverse head of Athena right, wearing
Phrygian helmet decorated with wing, dot border; reverse KAMA, owl standing left on one leg, lizard in other talon, three pellets
(indicating denomination) below;
Got a case of BD and had to clean it. Thus the odd repatination colors.

Very rare

EX: Forvm Ancient Coins
Romanorvm
Caligula_and_Agripin.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Bronze Fourre Denarius Fourree6 viewsC CAESAR AVG PON M TR POT III COS III - Laureate head right
AGRIPPINA MAT C CAES AVG GERM - Draped bust of Agrippina right
Mint: Rome (40AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 2.85g / 18mm / 180
Rarity: Rare
References:
RIC I 22 (official)
Lyon 179 (official)
RSC 6 (official)
Acquisition/Sale: numismaticaprados Ebay

The Gary R. Wilson Collection

The reverse legend translates: 'Agrippina mother of Gaius Caesar Augustus Germanicus'

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

The accession of Gaius (Caligula) to the imperial throne on the death of his great-uncle Tiberius signalled a kind of "golden age" in that for the first time, not only did a direct biological descendant of Augustus become emperor, but one who could also claim a direct link with several important Republican figures. Through his mother, Agrippina Sr., Gaius was descended from Augustus, and also Agrippa, the victor of Actium. Gaius' father Germanaicus was the son of Nero Claudius Drusus and nephew of Tiberius, sons of Augustus' widow, Livia. Through his mother Antonia, Germanicus was the grandson of Mark Antony and Octavia, the sister of Augustus. Accordingly, many of his coins recall his dynastic connections to both the Julians and the Claudians as well as his own family, and included in their designs his mother and his three sisters.

“TO MAKE AN INEXPERIENCED AND ALMOST UNKNOWN YOUNG MAN, BROUGHT UP UNDER A SERIES OF AGED AND REPRESSIVE GUARDIANS, MASTER OF THE WORLD, ALMOST LITERALLY OVERNIGHT, ON THE SOLE RECOMMENDATION THAT HIS FATHER HAD BEEN A THOROUGHLY DECENT FELLOW WAS TO COURT DISASTER IN A QUITE IRRESPONSIBLE FASHION.”
–BARRETT, CALIGULA: THE CORRUPTION OF POWER (1990)

THE ASSASSINATION OF CALIGULA
THE emperor Caligula came to his death in the following manner:

Of course his wanton and remorseless tyranny often awakened very deep feelings of resentment, and very earnest desires for revenge in the hearts of those who suffered by it; but yet so absolute and terrible was his power, that none dared to murmur or complain. The resentment, however, which the cruelty of the emperor awakened, burned the more fiercely for being thus restrained and suppressed, and many covert threats were made, and many secret plots were formed, from time to time, against the tyrant's life.

Among others who cherished such designs, there was a man named Cassius Chærea, an officer of the army, who, though not of high rank, was nevertheless a man of considerable distinction. He was a captain, or, as it was styled in those days, a centurion. His command, therefore, was small, but it was in the prætorian cohort, as it was called, a sort of body-guard of the commander-in-chief, and consequently a very honorable corps. Chærea was thus a man of considerable distinction on account of the post which he occupied, and his duties, as captain in the life guards, brought him very frequently into communication with the emperor. He was a man of great personal bravery, too, and was on this account held in high consideration by the army. He had performed an exploit at one time, some years before, in Germany, which, had gained him great fame. It was at the time of the death of Augustus, the first emperor. Some of the German legions, and among them one in which Chærea was serving, had seized upon the occasion to revolt. They alledged many and grievous acts of oppression as the grounds of their revolt, and demanded redress for what they had suffered, and security for the future. One of the first measures which they resorted to in the frenzy of the first outbreak of the rebellion, was to seize all the centurions in the camp, and to beat them almost to death. They gave them sixty blows each, one for each of their number, and then turned them, bruised, wounded, and dying, out of the camp. Some they threw into the Rhine. They revenged themselves thus on all the centurions but one. That one was Chærea. Chærea would not suffer himself to be taken by them, but seizing his sword he fought his way through the midst of them, slaying some and driving others before him, and thus made his escape from the camp. This feat gained him great renown.

One might imagine from this account that Chærea was a man of great personal superiority in respect to size and strength, inasmuch as extraordinary muscular power, as well as undaunted courage, would seem to be required to enable a man to make his way against so many enemies. But this was not the fact. Chærea was of small stature and of a slender and delicate form. He was modest and unassuming in his manners, too, and of a very kind and gentle spirit. He was thus not only honored and admired for his courage, but he was generally beloved for the amiable and excellent qualities of his heart.

The possession of such qualities, however, could not be expected to recommend him particularly to the favor of the emperor. In fact, in one instance it had the contrary effect. Caligula assigned to the centurions of his guard, at one period, some duties connected with the collection of taxes. Chærea, instead of practicing the extortion and cruelty common on such occasions, was merciful and considerate, and governed himself strictly by the rules of law and of justice in his collections. The consequence necessarily was that the amount of money received was somewhat diminished, and the emperor was displeased. The occasion was, however, not one of sufficient importance to awaken in the monarch's mind any very serious anger, and so, instead of inflicting any heavy punishment upon the offender, he contented himself with attempting to tease and torment him with sundry vexatious indignities and annoyances.

It is the custom sometimes, in camps, and at other military stations, for the commander to give every evening, what is called the parole or password, which consists usually of some word or phrase that is to be communicated to all the officers, and as occasion may require to all the soldiers, whom for any reason it may be necessary to send to and fro [38] about the precincts of the camp during the night. The sentinels, also, all have the password, and accordingly, whenever any man approaches the post of a sentinel, he is stopped and the parole is demanded. If the stranger gives it correctly, it is presumed that all is right, and he is allowed to pass on,—since an enemy or a spy would have no means of knowing it.

Now, whenever it came to Chærea's turn to communicate the parole, the emperor was accustomed to give him some ridiculous or indecent phrase, intended not only to be offensive to the purity of Chærea's mind, but designed, also, to exhibit him in a ridiculous light to the subordinate officers and soldiers to whom he would have to communicate it. Sometimes the password thus given was some word or phrase wholly unfit to be spoken, and sometimes it was the name of some notorious and infamous woman; but whatever it was, Chærea was compelled by his duty as a soldier to deliver it to all the corps, and patiently to submit to the laughter and derision which his communication awakened among the vile and wicked soldiery.

If there was any dreadful punishment to be inflicted, or cruel deed of any kind to be performed, Caligula took great pleasure in assigning the duty to Chærea, knowing how abhorrent to his nature it must be. At one time a senator of great distinction named Propedius, was accused of treason by one of his enemies. His treason consisted, as the accuser alledged, of having spoken injurious words against the emperor. Propedius denied that he had ever spoken such words. The accuser, whose name was Timidius, cited a certain Quintilia, an actress, as his witness. Propedius was accordingly brought to trial, and Quintilia was called upon before the judges to give her testimony. She denied that she had ever heard Propedius utter any such sentiment as Timidius attributed to him. Timidius then said that Quintilia was testifying falsely: he declared that she had heard Propedius utter such words, and demanded that she should be put to the torture to compel her to acknowledge it. The emperor acceded to this demand, and commanded Chærea to put the actress to the torture.

It is, of course, always difficult to ascertain the precise truth in respect to such transactions as those that are connected with plots and conspiracies against tyrants, since every possible precaution is, of course, taken by all concerned to conceal what is done. It is probable, however, in this case, that Propedius had cherished some hostile designs against Caligula, if he had not uttered injurious words, and that Quintilia was in some measure in his confidence. It is even possible that Chærea may have been connected with them in some secret design, for it is said that when he received the orders of Caligula to put Quintilia to the torture he was greatly agitated and alarmed. If he should apply the torture severely, he feared that the unhappy sufferer might be induced to make confessions or statements at least, which would bring destruction on the men whom he most relied upon for the overthrow of Caligula. On the other hand, if he should attempt to spare her, the effect would be only to provoke the anger of Caligula against himself, without at all shielding or saving her. As, however, he was proceeding to the place of torture, in charge of his victim, with his mind in this state of anxiety and indecision, his fears were somewhat relieved by a private signal given to him by Quintilia, by which she intimated to him that he need feel no concern,—that she would be faithful and true, and would reveal nothing, whatever might be done to her.

This assurance, while it allayed in some degree Chærea's anxieties and fears, must have greatly increased the mental distress which he endured at the idea of leading such a woman to the awful suffering which awaited her. He could not, however, do otherwise than to proceed. Having arrived at the place of execution, the wretched Quintilia was put to the rack. She bore the agony which she endured while her limbs were stretched on the torturing engine, and her bones broken, with patient submission, to the end. She was then carried, fainting, helpless, and almost dead, to Caligula, who seemed now satisfied. He ordered the unhappy victim of the torture to be taken away, and directed that Propedius should be acquitted and discharged.

Of course while passing through this scene the mind of Chærea was in a tumult of agitation and excitement,—the anguish of mind which he must have felt in his compassion for the sufferer, mingling and contending with the desperate indignation which burned in his bosom against the author of all these miseries. He was wrought up, in fact, to such a state of frenzy by this transaction, that as soon as it was over he determined immediately to take measures to put Caligula to death. This was a very bold and desperate resolution. Caligula was the greatest and most powerful potentate on earth. Chærea was only a captain of his guard, without any political influence or power, and with no means whatever of screening himself from the terrible consequences which might be expected to follow from his attempt, whether it should succeed or fail.

So thoroughly, however, was he now aroused, that he determined to brave every danger in the attainment of his end. He immediately began to seek out among the officers of the army such men as he supposed would be most likely to join him,—men of courage, resolution, and faithfulness, and those who, from their general character or from the wrongs which they had individually endured from the government, were to be supposed specially hostile to Caligula's dominion. From among these men he selected a few, and to them he cautiously unfolded his designs. All approved of them. Some, it is true, declined taking any active part in the conspiracy, but they assured Chærea of their good wishes, and promised solemnly not to betray him.

The number of the conspirators daily increased. There was, however, at their meetings for consultation, some difference of opinion in respect to the course to be pursued. Some were in favor of acting promptly and at once. The greatest danger which was to be apprehended, they thought, was in delay. As the conspiracy became extended, some one would at length come to the knowledge of it, they said, who would betray them. Others, on the other hand, were for proceeding cautiously and slowly. What they most feared was rash and inconsiderate action. It would be ruinous to the enterprise, as they maintained, for them to attempt to act before their plans were fully matured.

Chærea was of the former opinion. He was very impatient to have the deed performed. He was ready himself, he said, to perform it, at any time; his personal duties as an officer of the guard, gave him frequent occasions of access to the emperor, and he was ready to avail himself of any of them to kill the monster. The emperor went often, he said, to the capitol, to offer sacrifices, and he could easily kill him there. Or, if they thought that that was too public an occasion, he could have an opportunity in the palace, at certain religious ceremonies which the emperor was accustomed to perform there, and at which Chærea himself was usually present. Or, he was ready to throw him down from a tower where he was accustomed to go sometimes for the purpose of scattering money among the populace below. Chærea said that he could easily come up behind him on such an occasion, and hurl him suddenly over the parapet down to the pavement below. All these plans, however, seemed to the conspirators too uncertain and dangerous, and Chærea's proposals were accordingly not agreed to.

At length, the time drew near when Caligula was to leave Rome to proceed to Alexandria in Egypt, and the conspirators perceived that they must prepare to act, or else abandon their design altogether. It had been arranged that there was to he a grand celebration at Rome previous to the emperor's departure. This celebration, which was to consist of games, and sports, and dramatic performances of various kinds, was to continue for three days, and the conspirators determined, after much consultation and debate, that Caligula should be assassinated on one of those days.

After coming to this conclusion, however, in general, their hearts seemed to fail them in fixing the precise time for the perpetration of the deed, and two of the three days passed away accordingly without any attempt being made. At length, on the morning of the third day, Chærea called the chief conspirators together, and urged them very earnestly not to let the present opportunity pass away. He represented to them how greatly they increased the danger of their attempts by such delays, and he seemed himself so full of determination and courage, and addressed them with so much eloquence and power, that he inspired them with his own resolution, and they decided unanimously to proceed.

The emperor came to the theater that day at an unusually early hour, and seemed to be in excellent spirits and in an excellent humor. He was very complaisant to all around him, and very lively, affable, and gay. After performing certain ceremonies, by which it devolved upon him to open the festivities of the day, he proceeded to his place, with his friends and favorites about him, and Chærea, with the other officers that day on guard, at a little distance behind him.

The performances were commenced, and every thing went on as usual until toward noon. The conspirators kept their plans profoundly secret, except that one of them, when he had taken his seat by the side of a distinguished senator, asked him whether he had heard any thing new. The senator replied that he had not. "I can then tell you something," said he, "which perhaps you have not heard, and that is, that in the piece which is to be acted to-day, there is to be represented the death of a tyrant." "Hush!" said the senator, and he quoted a verse from Homer, which meant, "Be silent, lest some Greek should overhear."

It had been the usual custom of the emperor, at such entertainments, to take a little recess about noon, for rest and refreshments. It devolved upon Chærea to wait upon him at this time, and to conduct him from his place in the theater to an adjoining apartment in his palace which was connected with the theater, where there was provided a bath and various refreshments. When the time arrived, and Chærea perceived, as he thought, that the emperor was about to go, he himself went out, and stationed himself in a passage-way leading to the bath, intending to intercept and assassinate the emperor when he should come along. The emperor, however, delayed his departure, having fallen into conversation with his courtiers and friends, and finally he said that, on the whole, as it was the last day of the festival, he would not go out to the bath, but would remain in the theater; and then ordering refreshments to be brought to him there, he proceeded to distribute them with great urbanity to the officers around him.

In the mean time, Chærea was patiently waiting in the passage-way, with his sword by his side, all ready for striking the blow the moment that his victim should appear. Of course the conspirators who remained behind were in a state of great suspense and anxiety, and one of them, named Minucianus, determined to go out and inform Chærea of the change in Caligula's plans. He accordingly attempted to rise, but Caligula put his hand upon his robe, saying, "Sit still, my friend. You shall go with me presently." Minucianus accordingly dissembled his anxiety and agitation of mind still a little longer, but presently, watching an opportunity when the emperor's attention was otherwise engaged, he rose, and, assuming an unconcerned and careless air, he walked out of the theater.

He found Chærea in his ambuscade in the passage-way, and he immediately informed him that the emperor had concluded not to come out. Chærea and Minucianus were then greatly at a loss what to do. Some of the other conspirators, who had followed Minucianus out, now joined them, and a brief but very earnest and solemn consultation ensued. After a moment's hesitation, Chærea declared that they must now go through with their work at all hazards, and he professed himself ready, if his comrades would sustain him in it, to go back to the theater, and stab the tyrant there in his seat, in the midst of his friends. Minucianus and the others concurred in this design, and it was resolved immediately to execute it.

The execution of the plan, however, in the precise form in which it had been resolved upon was prevented by a new turn which affairs had taken in the theater. For while Minucianus and the two or three conspirators who had accompanied him were debating in the passage-way, the others who remained, knowing that Chærea was expecting Caligula to go out, conceived the idea of attempting to persuade him to go, and thus to lead him into the snare which had been set for him. They accordingly gathered around, and without any appearance of concert or of eagerness, began to recommend him to go and take his bath as usual. He seemed at length disposed to yield to these persuasions, and rose from his seat; and then, the whole company attending and following him, he proceeded toward the doors which conducted to the palace. The conspirators went before him, and under pretense of clearing the way for him they contrived to remove to a little distance all whom they thought would be most disposed to render him any assistance. The consultations of Chærea and those who were with him in the inner passage-way were interrupted by the coming of this company.

Among those who walked with the emperor at this time were his uncle Claudius and other distinguished relatives. Caligula advanced along the passage, walking in company with these friends, and wholly unconscious of the fate that awaited him, but instead of going immediately toward the bath he turned aside first into a gallery or corridor which led into another apartment, where there were assembled a company of boys and girls, that had been sent to him from Asia to act and dance upon the stage, and who had just arrived. The emperor took great interest in looking at these performers, and seemed desirous of having them go immediately into the theater and let him see them perform. While talking on this subject Chærea and the other conspirators came into the apartment, determined now to strike the blow.

Chærea advanced to the emperor, and asked him in the usual manner what should be the parole for that night. The emperor gave him in reply such an one as he had often chosen before, to insult and degrade him. Chærea instead of receiving the insult meekly and patiently in his usual manner, uttered words of anger and defiance in reply; and drawing his sword at the same instant he struck the emperor across the neck and felled him to the floor. Caligula filled the apartment with his cries of pain and terror; the other conspirators rushed in and attacked him on all sides; his friends,—so far as the adherents of such a man can be called friends,—fled in dismay. As for Caligula's uncle Claudius, it was not to have been expected that he would have rendered his nephew any aid, for he was a man of such extraordinary mental imbecility that he was usually considered as not possessed even of common sense; and all the others who might have been expected to defend him, either fled from the scene, or stood by in consternation and amazement, leaving the conspirators to wreak their vengeance on their wretched victim, to the full.

In fact though while a despot lives and retains his power, thousands are ready to defend him and to execute his will, however much in heart they may hate and detest him, yet when he is dead, or when it is once certain that he is about to die, an instantaneous change takes place and every one turns against him. The multitudes in and around the theater and the palace who had an hour before trembled before this mighty potentate, and seemed to live only to do his bidding, were filled with joy to see him brought to the dust. The conspirators, when the success of their plans and the death of their oppressor was once certain, abandoned themselves to the most extravagant joy. They cut and stabbed the fallen body again and again, as if they could never enough wreak their vengeance upon it. They cut off pieces of the body and bit them with their teeth in their savage exultation and triumph. At length they left the body where it lay, and went forth into the city where all was now of course tumult and confusion.

The body remained where it had fallen until late at night. Then some attendants of the palace came and conveyed it away. They were sent, it was said, by Cæsonia, the wife of the murdered man. Cæsonia had an infant daughter at this time, and she remained herself with the child, in a retired apartment of the palace while these things were transpiring. Distracted with grief and terror at the tidings that she heard, she clung to her babe, and made the arrangements for the interment of the body of her husband without leaving its cradle. She imagined perhaps that there was no reason for supposing that she or the child were in any immediate danger, and accordingly she took no measures toward effecting an escape. If so, she did not understand the terrible frenzy to which the conspirators had been aroused, and for which the long series of cruelties and indignities which they had endured from her husband had prepared them. For at midnight one of them broke into her apartment, stabbed the mother in her chair, and taking the innocent infant from its cradle, killed it by beating its head against the wall.
Atrocious as this deed may seem, it was not altogether wanton and malignant cruelty which prompted it. The conspirators intended by the assassination of Caligula not merely to wreak their vengeance on a single man, but to bring to an end a hated race of tyrants; and they justified the murder of the wife and child by the plea that stern political necessity required them to exterminate the line, in order that no successor might subsequently arise to re-establish the power and renew the tyranny which they had brought to an end. The history of monarchies is continually presenting us with instances of innocent and helpless children sacrificed to such a supposed necessity as this.
Gary W2
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Campania, Hyria.10 viewsSRCV 294 var. (Athena facing right), HN Italy 539, Rutter 88.

AR nomos, struck c.a. 400-395 B.C., 7.02 gr., 20.19 mm. max., 0°.

Obv.: Head of Athena left, in Attic helmet decorated with owl and laurel branch.

Rev.: Man-headed bull walking left, YDINAI above.
Stkp
Hyria.jpg
Campania, Hyrianoi. (Circa 405-400 BC)36 viewsFourrée Nomos (20.5mm, 6.33 g)

Obverse: Head of Athena wearing crested helmet decorated with olive-wreath and owl.

Reverse: Man-faced bull standing r. on exergual line, YDINA (retrograde) above. YDINA is in Oscan script and means "Urina", another name for Hyria.

For prototype, cf. HN Italy 539.

The city, named both Nola (new city) and Hyria (which Nola likely arose from), was situated in the midst of the plain lying to the east of Mount Vesuvius, 21 miles south of Capua. While Neapolis was the focus of minting in this general area, Neapolitan designs were adopted by several new series of coins, some of them bearing legends in Oscan script referring to communities that are otherwise unknown (such as the Hyrianoi). Complex die linking between these different series indicate, at the very least, close cooperation in minting. Didrachms sharing motives (Athena/man headed bull), but with legends referring to different issuing communities on the reverse, testify to the integration into a common material culture in Campania in the late fifth to early fourth century. The die sharing and use of legends in Oscan script allow for an interpretation of these issues as indigenous coinages struck in the Campanian mileu.

The influence of Athens on Hyria can be seen not only in the great number of Greek vases and other articles discovered at the old city but by the adoption of the head of Pallas with the Athenian owl as their obverse type.

This particular coin is an ancient forgery, which were quite common in Magna Graecia and typically of much higher quality than fourrees produced elsewhere. In ON THE FORGERIES OF PUBLIC MONEY [J. Y. Akerman
The Numismatic Chronicle and Journal of the Numismatic Society, Vol. 6 (APRIL, 1843–JANUARY, 1844), pp. 57-82] it is noted that ancient forgeries tend "to be most abundantly found to belong to the most luxurious, populous, and wealthy cities of Magna Graecia...Nor is it surprising that the luxury and vice of those celebrated cities should have led to crime; and among crimes, to the forging of money, as furnishing the means for the more easy gratification of those sensual indulgences, which were universally enjoyed by the rich in those dissipated and wealthy cities. Many of the coins of the places in question having been originally very thickly coated, or cased with silver (called by the French, fourrees), pass even now among collectors without suspicion."
1 commentsNathan P
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Campanian tazza18 viewsSmall Campanian black glazed tazza or stemmed bowl, c. early 3rd century BC.mauseus
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Caracalla, 198–217 CE45 viewsAR denarius, Rome, 213 CE; 3.43g., 19.4mm., BMCRE 48–9, RIC 206a, RSC 220. Obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT; head laureate right. Rx: PM TR P XVI COS IIII PP; Hercules, naked, standing half-left, holding branch and club with lion's skin.

Notes: Second issue of the sole reign of Caracalla. Perhaps the bearded figure on the reverse is intended to represent Caracalla as Hercules; its head bears a strong resemblance to Caracalla's "angry scowl" portrait as shown on the obverse.
2 commentsMichael K5
Caracalla_RIC100.jpg
Caracalla, 198–217 CE35 viewsAR denarius, Rome, 208 CE; 3.15g. RIC 100, RSC 447. Obv: ANTONINVS - PIVS AVG; head laureate right. Rx: PONTIF TR P – XI COS III PP; Mars, in military dress, with cloak floating behind, standing front, (or moving slowly left), looking right, holding spear and shield.

Notes: Twenty-first issue of the joint reign of Severus and Caracalla.

Provenance: Ex Hirsch 287 (7 February 2013), lot 2355.
1 commentsMichael K5
Caracalla_Perge_Artemis_AE18_3_1g.jpg
Caracalla, Perge, Artemis, AE1840 views18mm, 3.1g
obv: AV K M A[VP...ANTO] NINOC CE B; laureate, draped (and cuirassed?) bust right, countermark (owl or eagle?)
rev: ΠEPΓAIΩN; Artemis facing, head right, holding arrow in right, bow in left hand
areich
Chaulukyas.jpg
Chaulukyas of Gujarat, Silver drachm. Fire altar. A.D. 1030-112012 viewsChaulukyas of Gujarat, Silver drachm. Fire altar. A.D. 1030-1120. 15mm, 4.09g. 
Obverse: Stylised head of anonymous ruler imitating Peroz. Sun and moon symbol above. 
Reverse: Stylised fire altar. 
Reference: Deyell 158. The design of this coin was influenced by Sasanian coins, probably at second or third hand as knowledge of the coins of that very successful empire spread. Coins of the Sasanian Peroz were brought into Northern India by invading Huns in the 6th Century. Ex MoremothPodiceps
WangMang2.jpg
China: Han Interregnum, Usurper Wang Mang, 7-22 A.D.88 viewsChina: Han Interregnum, Usurper Wang Mang, 7-22 A.D. AE24 mm, Cash. Obv: Huo Chuan. Schjoth-165.

"As soon as his [Wang Mang's] power was sufficiently consolidated, 3 years after his return to court, lists of his political opponents were drawn up, and hundreds were executed. Shortly after this he established a new penal colony in Tibet in the far West, a sort of ancient gulag. Unfortunately we have no direct account as to the nature of the crimes of those exiled to Tibet. In 6 AD the reins of power were still more firmly in his grasp, and Mang ordered his first reform of the coinage. Fundamentally this was a stratagem to nationalize the gold stocks, and put the empire back on a copper standard. Gold was requisitioned and exchanged against very high value bronze tokens. Two years later the tokens were demonetized. The cash assets of the aristocracy and the wealthy merchants must have been largely wiped out overnight. It is in the first couple of years of Mang's independent reign that the astonishing breadth of his reform proposals appear. His reforms include:

1) the abolition of slavery.
2) the nationalization of land.
3) standard plots of arable land for all adult males who wished to work them.
4) farming families grouped in hamlets of 6 or 8, with a common tax assessment.
5) a national bank offering fair rates of interest to all.
6) government market activity to counteract cornering and monopolization.
7) a new currency system in 15 denominations - circulating by government fiat.
8) defeat of the Huns

His new taxes include

taxes to be paid in cash or kind on cultivated land (one tenth)

triple rates to be paid on uncultivated land (parks and gardens etc.)

c) all self-employed or professional people outside farming shall register for income tax, which will be universally levied at 10% per annum. Those avoiding registration, or submitting false accounts to be sentenced to one years hard labour.

d) the state monopolies on iron, salt, silk, cloth and coinage to be retained

e) a new state monopoly on wine to be introduced.

Discussion of the proposals

1) Events in his private life show Mang's abhorrence of slavery. He vilified the political system of the legalists, established in the Chin dynasty (221-206 BC) specifically by alluding to the manner in which they established market places for male and female slaves, "putting human beings in auction pens as if they were cattle."

Reforms 2, 3, 5 & 6) The nationalization of land and its distribution amongst the peasant farmers themselves is of course one solution to the central economic problem in all pre-modern civilizations, (which presumably finds its roots in the bronze age and persisting right down to the machine age). Peasants must have security of tenure and just returns for their labour, otherwise they will not be encouraged to work effectively - and the state and all within it will thereby be impoverished. However if they are made private landowners then clever, unscrupulous, hard-working individuals within and outwith the peasantry will begin to gain land at the expense of their neighbours. The chief mechanisms of this gradual monopolization of the land by a class of people distinguished by their wealth are:

Preying upon private 'misfortune', (illness, death, and marriage expenses) by loansharking.
Preying upon public misfortunes (bad harvests) by loansharking.
Creating shortages by rigging the markets, exacerbating private and public misfortunes, and then loansharking.

Unfairly biasing tax assessments, creating and exacerbating private and public misfortunes, and then loansharking.

The end result of this tendency is likely to be that the bulk of farmers lack security of tenure and or just returns, and cease to work effectively, to the impoverishment of all. Reforms 2, 3 & 5 bear on this problem in an obvious way.

Reform 6 - the "Five Equalizations" is a little more complicated, so I shall explain it at greater length. Fundamentally it required the installation of government officials at the five important markets of the empire who would "buy things when they were cheap and sell them when they were dear." In more detail: "The superintendent of the market, in the second month of each of the four seasons, shall determine the true price of the articles under their responsibility, and shall establish high, middle and low prices for each type of item. When there are unsold goods on the market, the superintendent shall buy them up at the cost (low?) price. When goods become expensive (ie exceed the high price?) the superintendent shall intervene to sell goods from the official store (and thereby reduce the price)." The regulation thus allows markets to operate, but provides for state intervention to stop speculation . . . Mang's regulations allow for a review and revision of the trading bands four times a year.

4). In resettling the people securely on the land, Mang choose to group them into "chings" of 6 or 8 families - attempting to restore the traditional "well field" system. This provided for the regular exchange of land between the families, to give all a go at the best ground, and for joint responsibility for a common tax demand. The ching system was believed, by the Confucian party in the 1st century BC at least, to have been destroyed by the growth of mercantilist exploitation under the Chin legalists. There are hints that the state went on to use the ching structure in crime prevention measures, by making all members of the ching culpable for the unreported crime of any single member. The installation of a land nationalization scheme under the banner of a return to the ancient Chou system of 'chings' had a great deal of propaganda value amongst the Confucian elite which surrounded Mang. A sentimental view of rural working class life seems to be a common weakness amongst aristocratic and middle class intellectuals of all periods. Mang's own observations of the labouring poor would necessarily have been made at a distance - perhaps he too shared in this sentimental myopia. The evidence suggests that the peasantry did not welcome this aspect of the reforms

7) Food was the first concern of Confucian government, but coinage was the second. Only fair prices could encourage the farmers. Only markets could create fair prices. Only with coins could markets exist. Mang introduced a rational set of 15 denominations of coin, valued from 1 to 1,000 cash and circulated by government fiat. Mang did not invent the idea of fiat or fiduciary currency, a brief attempt had been made to circulate one in China a century earlier. However Mang was the first to systematically think through the matter in a practical context, and to apply it over a protracted period. Future successful ancient and medieval experiments with fiat currency, first in China, then in Japan and Central Asia, and unsuccessful ones in medieval India and Persia all looked back - directly or indirectly - to Mang. The first successful fully fiduciary currencies in Europe are products of the 20th century, more than 700 years after Europeans became aware of Chinese practices. (I am neglecting a great deal of late Roman copper coin here of course. I am by no means knowledgeable on such coins, but my understanding is that in principle, if not in practice, Rome was generally on the silver or the gold standard, and copper was exchangeable on demand.) On my own reading of the text, Mang's main concern is to get gold and silver off the market, so they could not be used to bid his tokens down - his coinage was intended to replace gold coinage, not supplement it."--Robert Tye

For a more complete study of Wang Mang, see Robert Tye's compositon about this enigmatic leader at http://www.anythinganywhere.com/info/tye/Wang%20Mang.htm
Cleisthenes
ARM_Hetoum_I_tram.JPG
Cilician Armenia. Hetoum I (1226-1270)79 viewsBedoukian Group III, 1096 var. (reverse legend); cf. Nercessian 337

AR tram/drachm (average weight 2.96 grams; average purity 92%), 2.90 g., 20.10 mm, max, 0°.

Obv: + ԿԱՐՈՂՈ – ԹԻՆ ԱՅ Է (= Garoghout Iun Aye = By the Will of God), Queen Zabel (left and King Hetoum right crowned and wearing royal vestments, standing and facing, both holding a long cross, dot on cross.

Rev: ՀԵԹՈՒՄ ԹԱԳԱՒՈ ՀԱ (= Hetoum Takavor Hayots = Hetoum King of the Armenians), crowned lion walking right with left paw raised, cross behind lion.

The obverse showing the king and queen openly acknowledges the fact that Zabel was of royal lineage and that Hetoum was her consort. Although Zabel died in 1252, Hetoum continued to strike coins with this design until his resignation in 1270.

The obverse inscription and long cross are a match for Bedoukian 1095-1098. The final word of the reverse inscription in this sequence becomes progressively shorter, from ՀԱՅՐ (on B. 1095) to ՀԱՅ (on B. 1096) to just Հ (on B. 1098). There is no ՀԱ (this coin) which would correspond to the missing catalog number B. 1097 in the sequence.

The coins are divided by Bedoukian into seven groups (as well as a transitional period), with the numbering of the groups based on the order of issue. Although critical of Bedoukian's classification of the trams of Levon I, Metcalf approves his classification of the Hetoum I trams.
1 commentsStkp
ARM_Hetoum_I_tram_Bedoukian_Group_I.jpg
Cilician Armenia. Hetoum I (1226-1270) 24 viewsBedoukian Group I, 878; cf. Nercessian 332

AR tram (average weight 2.96 grams; average purity 92%), 2.82 g., 20.78 mm, max, 0°.

Obv: ԿԱՐՈՂՈԹ – ԻՆՆ ԱՅ Է (= Garoghout Iun Aye = By the Will of God), Queen Zabel left and King Hetoum right crowned and wearing royal vestments, standing and facing, both holding a long cross, star on cross.

Rev: ՀԵԹՈՒՄ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ ՀԱՅՈ° (ՈՐ ligate) (= Hetoum Takavor Hayots = Hetoum King of the Armenians), crowned lion standing right holding long cross with left paw.

The obverse showing the king and queen openly acknowledges the fact that Zabel was of royal lineage and that Hetoum was her consort. Although Zabel died in 1252, Hetoum continued to strike coins with this design until his resignation in 1270.

The coins are divided by Bedoukian into seven groups (as well as a transitional period), with the numbering of the groups based on the order of issue. Although critical of Bedoukian's classification of the trams of Levon I, Metcalf approves his classification of the Hetoum I trams.
Stkp
ARM_Hetoum_I_tram_Bedoukian_Group_V.jpg
Cilician Armenia. Hetoum I (1226-1270)17 viewsBedoukian Group V, 1220 ; cf. Nercessian 342

AR tram (average weight 2.91 grams; average purity 83%), 2.82 g., 22.37 mm, max, 0°.

Obv: ԿԱՐՈՂՈԻ – ԹԻՆՆ ԱՅ Է (= Garoghout Iun Aye = By the Will of God), Queen Zabel left and King Hetoum right crowned and wearing royal vestments, standing and facing, both holding a long cross, no dot or star on cross.

Rev: ՀԵԹՈՒՄ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ ՀԱՅ (ՈՐ ligate) (= Hetoum Takavor Hayots = Hetoum King of the Armenians), crowned lion walking right with left paw raised, star below lion and cross behind.

The obverse showing the king and queen openly acknowledges the fact that Zabel was of royal lineage and that Hetoum was her consort. Although Zabel died in 1252, Hetoum continued to strike coins with this design until his resignation in 1270.

The coins are divided by Bedoukian into seven groups (as well as a transitional period), with the numbering of the groups based on the order of issue. Although critical of Bedoukian's classification of the trams of Levon I, Metcalf approves his classification of the Hetoum I trams.
Stkp
Civil_War_Letter.jpg
Civil War Era Letter130 viewsI have copied the letter verbatim, so the misspellings are as they were originally written. I got this letter from an abandoned farmhouse in Kansas that belonged to my paternal grandfather's father. No one I asked was able to give me information as to who these people were. Perhaps they are related to me, but I have yet to corroborate this. The letter was in the original envelope.

Treasurer’s Office, Wood County, Ohio
Perrysburg, March 12, 1864

Cousin Dwight,
Dear Sir
I have expressed you this day
at New Haven one hundred and
Twenty five dollars to apply
on Charles Smiths note.
He would like to hold the
balance for another year, should
it suit you, We have been very
much afflickted for the past
three weeks, three of our children
having the Scarlet fever, in its worst
form. The two babies two and a ½
years old, and your name sake
Dwight who is five and a ½ years old.
Two of them are much better (Dwight
and Mary) Howard we have but
little hope of at this time, he is
very sick. You will please acknowle(dge)
the amount received and Ably yours
John A. Norster
5 commentsNoah
collage7~2.jpg
Cleopatra Thea & Antiochus VIII41 viewsCleopatra Thea & Antiochus VIII
Antioch 125-121 BC

O: Head of Antiochus VIII, with ray diademed to right
R: Owl on recumbant amphora
2 commentsarizonarobin
Antiochus_VIII~1.jpg
Cleopatra Thea & Antiochus VIII 125-121 BC14 viewsCleopatra Thea & Antiochus VIII AE18. Weight 5.60g. Antioch mint, 125-121 BC. Radiate head of Antiochos right / ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ ΚΑΙ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY, owl standing facing on amphora. SNGCop 376, SNGIs 2441ff.ddwau
Cleopatra_Thea_and_Antiochos_VIII~0.JPG
Cleopatra Thea and Antiochos VIII27 viewsCleopatra Thea and Antiochos VIII, 125 - 121 BC, Hoover 1189, SC 2263, Antioch, year 191 (122 - 121 BC)
OBV: Diademed and radiate head right
REV: Owl standing facing on overturned amphora; date and aplustre in exergue
21mm, 8.1g
Romanorvm
AntiochosVIII.jpg
Cleopatra Thea and Antiochos VIII Epiphanes (Grypos)51 views125-121 BC
19 mm, 5.90 g
obv: radiate and diademed head of Antiochos right
rev: ΒΑΣΙΛIΣΣHΣ KΛEOΠATPA ΘEAΣ / KAI ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟY; owl standing right on amphora, head facing
Hoover p. 241, #1189
2 commentsareich
Coin10.jpg
Coin 1014 viewsRajas of Sivaganga, Tamil 'Na'(wab). Coins acknowledging the Nawab of Arcot. Issued after 1764?

12 mm
Daniel F
Commodus_Minerva_1a.jpg
Commodus * Minerva with Owl - 183-184 AD. AR Denarius95 views
Commodus * Minerva with Owl - 183-184 AD.
Silver Denarius

Obv: M COMMODVS ANTON AVG PIVS, laureate head of Commodus, facing right.
Rev: P M TR P VIIII IMP VI COS IIII PP, Minerva advancing right, brandishing a javelin in right hand and holding a shield in her left, with an owl at her feet, to right - facing.

Tribunician Power (Tribunicia Potestas) held nine times, Consular four times.
A handsome portrait of Commodus, with clear, sharp & high relief features.

Exergue: (Blank)

Mint: Rome
Struck: 183-184 AD.

Size: 19 mm.
Weight: 2.8 grams
Die axis: 180 degs.

Condition: Beautiful, bright, clear lustrous silver.

Refs:*
RSC 424
RIC III 72
BMC IV, 120
Sear Roman Coins & their Values (2000 Edition), #5668

Tiathena
CONTINE1-36.jpg
Constantine I RIC VII 18851 viewsObv: CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG
rosette-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: GLORIA EXERCITVS
two soldiers holding spears & shields with two standards
between them.
SMNG in ex.
17mm 2.5 gmOWL365
OWL365
const_gallus_siscia_333.jpg
Constantius Gallus, RIC VIII, Siscia 33349 viewsConstantius Gallus, Caesar AD 351-354, cousin of Constantius II
AE 2 (Centenionalis), 4.98g, 23mm
Siscia, 1th series, 2nd officina, 28 Sept. 351 - 6 Nov. 355
obv. DN CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C
Bust, draped and cuirassed, bare-headed, r.
behind head letter A
rev. FEL TEMP RE - PARATIO
Soldier, helmeted stg. l., spearing fallen horseman; horseman, bearded and wearing bowl-shaped helmet, std. l. on horse, turned r. and raising hand against the soldier; r. on the ground his shield (RIC type FH3 reaching)
in upper l. field III
in ex. BSIS
RIC VIII, Siscia 333; LRBC 1203
about VF, slightly rough

Here too the horseman doesn't wear a Phrygian bonnet but rather a bowl-shaped helmet. His beard looks like a walrus moustache! Not in Helvetica's FH lists.
Jochen
const_gallus_siscia_351_#2.jpg
Constantius Gallus, RIC VIII, Siscia 351 #238 viewsConstantius Gallus, Caesar AD 351-354, cousin of Constantius II
AE 3 (Centenionalis), 2.27g, 18.9mm
Siscia, 4th series, 1st officina, 28 Sept. 351 - winter 355
obv. DN CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C
Bust, draped and cuirassed, bare-headed, r.
rev. FEL TEMP RE - PARATIO
Soldier, helmeted stg. l., spearing fallen horseman; horseman, wearing pointed hat, std. l. on horse, turned r. and raising hand against the soldier. (RIC type FH3 reaching)
in ex. ASIS
RIC VIII, Siscia 351; C.10
about VF, green patina
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

I think this is not the usual pointed Phrygian bonnet, but a different bowl-shaped helmet. So not in Helvetica's FH lists.
Jochen
4.PNG
Constantius II, Nicomedia.15 viewsConstantius II, Nicomedia. AE4 15mm (Thickness 2mm) Weight ?

Obverse: DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right

Reverse:FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman who is bearded, wearing a bowl-shaped, brimmed helmet, reaching backwards. Gamma in left field
discwizard
037_Marcus-Aurelius_AE-26_M-AVR-ANTONINVS-AVG-Laur-cuirass-r__C-L-I-COR-Minerva-l_-holding-Nike-altar-spear-r_owl_st_facing_Corinth-160-180-AD_Q-001_h_26mm_12,81g-s.jpg
Corinth, Achaea, 037 Marcus Aurelius (161-180 A.D.), AE-26, Minerva/Athena standing left,66 viewsCorinth, Achaea, 037 Marcus Aurelius (161-180 A.D.), AE-26, Minerva/Athena standing left,
avers:- M-AVR-ANTONINVS-AVG, Laureate-headed bust of Marcus Aurelius wearing cuirass, right.
revers:- C-L-I-COR, Minerva/Athena standing, left, holding Victoria/Nike over altar and spear; to right, owl standing, facing.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 26mm, weight: 12,81g, axis: 4h,
mint: Corinth, Achaea, date: 161-180 AD., ref: BCD Corinth 688, Lanz 105 (26/11/2001), coll. BCD, http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/5160/
Q-001
quadrans
Corinthian_Stemmed_Terracotta_Dish.jpg
Corinthian Stemmed Terracotta Dish, ca. 5th century BCE12 viewsShallow, wide-mouthed bowl set atop a modestly flared stem. Painted decoration in rusty orange and black appears on the interior around the circumference and around the tondo, and around the exterior below the rim

Height: 2 5/8"; Diameter: 6"

Ex Living Torah Museum collection
Quant.Geek
Atheny~0.jpg
Countermark on Athens - AR tetradrachm 181 views431-393 BC
head of Athena right - almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll
owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent left
AΘE right
Phoenician contermark
bēth yōdh (yōdh~hand; bēth~house
(Type C), Sear 2526
RARE CONTERMARK
16,5 g 22 mm
Johny SYSEL
normal_Athens_Owl~0.jpg
Countermark on Athens Owl283 viewsAttica-Athens
Silver tetradrachm
449-414 B.C.
17g, 24mm, 45o
Interesting Countermark on reverse
1 commentskypros84
Claudia_12_Den.jpg
Cr 512/2 - Claudia 13 8 viewsC. Clodius Vestalis.
AR Denarius, 41 BC.

Laureate draped bust of Flora right; lily at shoulder / Veiled Vestal virgin seated left, holding a two-handled bowl.

Cr512/2, Syd 1135, Claudia 13, Sear5 #499 Fine
RR0011
Sosius
Crispa IVNO.jpg
Crispina- IVNO LVCINA61 viewsCrispina, wife of Commodus, Augusta 178 -182 A.D.

Obverse:

CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair knotted in a bun in back

CRISPINA AVGVSTA

CRISPINA: Crispina
AVGVSTA: Augusta

Reverse:

IVNO LVCINA S C,

IVNO: Juno, goddess
LVCINA: Light
S C: Senatus Consulto


IVNO LVCINA (Goddess of light) S C, Juno standing left, holding patera (a bowl used to pour libations) and scepter

Domination:Middlle Bronze, Orichalcum Sstertius/ Dupondius, 25 mm

Mint: Rom
John Schou
Arretine_bowl.jpg
Decorated arretine bowl57 viewsArretine bowl (ca. 9cm x 19.5cm) ca. 2nd cent. A.D.. Repeating pattern of cloaked male figure blowing horn while engaged in a sexual act with a female bending forward and looking back. Elaborate floral spacing design followed by a cherub on a pedestal within an arch supported by spiral fluted columns.

additional information from Harlan J. Berk: Erotic bowls of this type are extremely rare and this example appears to be unrecorded. Restored from many fragments, but only two significant loses to the rim with one extending into the design.
3 commentsCharles S
DMATIUS-1.jpg
Delmatius RIC VII 22786 viewsObv: FL DALMATIVS NOB C
laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: GLORIA EXERCITVS
two soldiers, each holding reversed spear & resting on shield, standing on either side of standard
SMTSr in ex.
17mm 1.7 gm
OWL365
OWL365
37498_Delos,_Athenian_Cleruchy,_c__2nd_-_1st_Century_B_C_.jpg
Delos, Athenian Cleruchy, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C. AE 9, Owl on column13 viewsDelos, Athenian Cleruchy, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C. Bronze AE 9, Svoronos, Athens, plate 106, 39-40; BMC -; SNG Cop -, Fine, Delos mint, 1.175g, 9.7mm, 0o, obverse head right; reverse A [“Θ”] E, owl on column; rare. A cleruchy was a special type of colony developed by Athens. Unlike the colonies of other cities, the cleruchs kept Athenian citizenship. Using the cleruchy system, Athens kept population growth under control, while increasing its economic and military power. Besides Delos, other cleruchies were at Salamis, Chalkis, on Samos, and in Thracian Chersonese. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
domitian_owl.jpg
Denarius; IMP XXI COS XVI CENS P P P; Minerva with owl; RIC 73013 viewsDomitianus Denarius, 90 A.D. Rome. 17-18mm, 3.31g. Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI, laureate head right. 
Rev: IMP XXI COS XVI CENS P P P, Minerva standing right on prow, brandishing spear and shield, owl before. RIC II, 730 (new); RIC II, 167a (old). Good fine, toned. Ex Rutten & WielandPodiceps
00domitlechuza~0.jpg
DOMITIAN25 viewsAR denarius. 92 AD. 3,18 grs. Laureate head right. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI / Minerva standing right on ship,brandishing javelin and armed with shield. Owl at feet. IMP XXI COS XVI CENS P P P.
RIC 166. RSC 273.
benito
00domitlechuza.jpg
DOMITIAN43 viewsAR denarius. 92 AD. 3,18 grs. Laureate head right. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XI / Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column,brandishing javelin and armed with shield. Owl at feet. IMP XXI COS XVI CENS P P P.
RIC 166. RSC 273.
benito
Domitian.jpg
Domitian31 viewsRoman Empire
Imperator Titus Flavius Caesar Domitianus Augustus Germanicus
(Reign as 11th Emperor: Sept. 14th, 81-Sept. 18th, 96)
(Born: Oct. 24th, 51, Died: Sept. 18th, 96 [age: 44])

Obverse: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XI, Head of Domitian wearing laurel wreath and facing right

Reverse: IMP XXI COS XVI CENS P PP, Minerva standing on a galley's prow (or a rostral column), holding spear and shield, owl at feet

Silver Denarius (18.2mm, 3.63g)
Minted in Rome circa 92


Understanding the inscriptions:

IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM=Imperator Caesar Domitianus Augustus Germanicus
Sphinx357
RS042-Roman-AR_denarius,_Domitian_(ca_81-96_AD)-019600.JPG
DOMITIAN (81-96 AD), AR denarius, Minerva, struck ca. 92 AD70 viewsObverse- IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P P TR P XI, laureate head right.
Reverse- IMP XXI COS XVI CENS P P P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, holding spear and shield, owl at feet.
RIC 730, RSC 274, 18.2 mm, 3.63 g.
NGC Ch VF (Strike 5/5, Surface 3/5), cert. #4095350-005.
Ex-Zuzim Judaea, January 2011, through VCoins store (purchased raw).
Comments: I think this type is relatively common but the coin is a really bright and lustrous example and grabbed my eye. I was frankly surprised it didn't grade XF or better, but I don't really care so much about technical grades anyway- I slabbed my Twelve Caesars coins mostly for display purposes. NGC did recognize the super sharp strike on this piece. I see they attribute the object Minerva is standing on as a "prow", while Wildwinds has it as the "capital of (a) rostral column". Eh, whatever. I really like this piece and it will serve my set for quite some time unless a similarly attractive and lustrous piece with a more interesting reverse comes along.


4 commentslordmarcovan
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-YzDJ0RvuoZO9-Domitian_Quadrans.jpg
Domitian (Augustus) Coin: Bronze Quadrans 4 views(no legend) - Rhinoceros standing left.
IMP DOMIT AVG GERM - Legend surrounding large S C
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (84-85 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 2.57g / 17mm / 12h
References:
RIC II (second edition)251
Sear 2835
Cohen 674
BMC 498
Paris 539-541
Provenances:
NUMISMÁTICA PRADOS
Acquisition/Sale: NUMISMÁTICA PRADOS VCoins $0.00 03/19

The Gary R. Wilson Collection.

From The Hazelton Collection: The Rhinoceros in the Room
Domitian quadrantes, RIC 248-251
January 6, 2019



Sollicitant pavidi dum rhinocerota magistri

seque diu magnae colligit ira ferae,

desperabantur promissi proelia Martis;

sed tandem rediit cognitus ante furor.

namque gravem cornu gemino sic extulit ursum,

iactat ut inpositas taurus in astra pilas.

Fearfully its handlers poked at the rhinoceros, while he slowly gathered his fierce ire; they despaired of the promised battle, worthy of Mars himself, but at last his previously-known ferocity returned. See, with his twin horns, how he tosses the heavy bear into the sky as a bull throws a straw dummy!

Martial, De Spectaculis Liber, xxii.



omnis habet sua dona dies: nec linea dives

cessat et in populum multa rapina cadit;

nunc veniunt subitis lasciva nomismata nimbis,

nunc dat spectatas tessera larga feras.

Every day brings its own gifts: the line of riches doesn't cease but falls upon the grasping populace; now suddenly fun and frivolous coins rain down, now the grand token offers spectacular beasts.

Martial, VIII.lxxvii.7-10

And according to T.V. Buttrey ("Domitian, the Rhinoceros, and the Date of Martial's Liber De Spectaculis," The Journal of Roman Studies, 2007) fun and frivolity might have been the purpose of the coin. Of course I'm talking about Domitian's rhinoceros quadrans, in four varieties, RIC 248-251. Prof Buttrey points out that the Latin "lasciva nomismata," which previous editors have taken to refer to the obscene spintriae minted under the Julio-Claudians (for use in the bordellos where the emperor's numismatic portrait shouldn't appear), actually just means "playful coins," or, as I have translated the second passage from Martial, "fun and frivolous coins."

Were these rhinoceros coins the same ones that Domitian showered upon Martial's grasping populace during the gladiatorial games? Yes, without a doubt. Prof Buttrey thought so, and so do I.

Furthermore I believe, contrary to RIC, that these coins were in continuous use throughout the reign (from Domitian's adoption of the title "Germanicus," GERM, in 83 until the end). The quantity of surviving coins compared with other varieties of the same denomination support this theory. In my opinion, the reason that they aren't dated is because a date would constitute an expiration date and thus restrict their future use.

However, it seems to me that we ought to be able to place them into a consecutive order even without a date. The rhinoceros quadrantes contain two overlapping variables to consider when determining their chronology, whether the rhinoceros is facing left or right and whether the reverse inscription starts at the top or at the bottom. Clearly, since they do overlap, the two variables can't both be relevant to the question of dating.
Gary W2
Domitianavs_x-2b.jpg
Domitian * Minerva with Owl, 81-96 AD. AR Denarius585 views
Domitianvs * Minerva with Owl, 88 AD. Silver Denarius
" ~ My service to the state is listed here ~ "

Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI * Domitian, Laureate head right facing.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P – Minerva helmeted & armed right-facing, surmounting Rostrum, holding thunderbolt (or javelin) in right hand, arm raised to throwing position, and shield at the ready on left arm, her owl, facing, at her feet to the right.

Exergue: Occupied by capital-piece of rostrum column.

Mint: Rome
Struck: January-August 88 AD.

Size: 22 mm.
Weight: 2.96 grams
Die axis: 180°

Condition: Absolutely gorgeous. Beautiful bright, clear luster with tri-colored cabinet toning (rainbow effect) on the reverse.

Refs:*
RSC 236
RIC II, 108a
BMC 103(v)
Cohen 218(v)
Sear RCV I (2000), 2730(v), page 495

12 commentsTiathena
Domitian_507.jpg
Domitian - AR denarius46 viewsRome
1 Jan - 13 Sep 87 AD
laureate head right
IMP•CAES•DOMIT•AVG__GERM•P•M•TR•P•VI
Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column,
holding spear and shield, owl at foot right
IMP•XIIII•COS•XIII•CENS•P•P•P
RIC 507 (C), BMC 103, RSC 218
3,18g 19-18 mm
Johny SYSEL
Domitian_RIC_75.jpg
Domitian - [RIC II part 1 75 (R2), RSC II 568d, BMCRE II 22 note, BnF III 20]67 viewsSilver denarius, aVF, 3.325g, 17.3mm, 180 degree, Rome mint, 81 A.D.

Obv. - IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMITIAN AVG P M, laureate head left

Rev. - TR P COS VII DES VIII P P, tripod lebes, ornamented with fillets, lion paw feet, and loop handles above the bowl, surmounted by a cover (Pythia's seat?) ornamented with a dolphin

A nice, toned example of a very rare head left variant.
___________

Purchased from Forum Ancient Coins

Ex. FORVM Dealer Photo

Sold 25Apr2015 to Lucas Harsh Collection
3 commentsrenegade3220
capt AE 28.BMP
Domitian 81-96 AD60 viewsDomitian LARGE Judaea Capta Hendin-748

Domitian, 81-96 AD, AE 27 mm,
Struck at the mint of Caesarea Maritima as part of the Flavian Judaea Capta series. Laureate bust Domitian to right/Minerva in prow to left, small owl at feet right, behind her is a field trophy of arms. Hendin-748.
Maritima
shinynew_jg_001.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius57 viewsDomitian AR Denarius
18.1 mm, 180º, 93/4 AD.
Laureate head right / Minerva standing right, wielding javelin and holding shield. Owl to right.
Obverse legend: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIII
Reverse legend: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P
1 commentsTkonnova
Domitian_ric_164_2_edited.jpeg
Domitian AR Denarius52 viewsDomitianus (81 - 96 AD).
Denarius. 83 AD Rome.
(20 mm 3.47 g)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M. Head with laurel wreath on the right.
Rev: TR POT II COS VIIII DES XP P. Minerva with lance and shield on capital standing to the right, in front of it an owl.
RIC 164 (R2); C.606; BMC 41
Ex: Silbury Coins January 28 2018



On first glance this looks like just another Minerva reverse denarius. However, there are 2 features which make it interesting. Firstly, it was minted in 83 CE. This makes it a first issue Minerva denarius. The Minerva series would dominate the denarii issues for the rest of Domitian's rule. Another piece of information which makes this coin interesting is that the silver of which it is composed is nearly 100% fine. This was due to monetary reforms instituted by Domitian.

Of course this coin is interesting for other reasons as well, including its rarity and condition. The new RIC II Part 1 (2007) designates this coin as R2 which means very few examples known. The other factor which needs to be considered is its condition. Personally I am not obsessed with the grades of ancient coins as I find grades to be difficult and not very useful at all. The portrait on the obverse is striking. Just look at that full head of hair. Of course it is the reverse where this coin really shines. The depiction of Minerva is fully detailed and quite sharp over 1900 years after it was minted. The full legends on both sides of the coin also make this coin both attractive and desirable. I was very fortunate to find this one.

This coin shall have an important place in my 12 Caesars collection.
4 commentsorfew
Domitian_RIC_427.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius47 viewsAR Denarius (19mm, 3.30g, 6h). Rome mint, struck 86 (First Issue).
IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P V, head laureate right; IMP XI COS XII CENS P P P, Aventine Minerva replica (ἀπεικόνισμα) standing right on processional litter (ferculum), with spear and shield, owl to right (M2).
RIC 427 (R), BMC 90 p. 318 note , RSC 74.
Purchased from James Hazelton
1 commentsorfew
Domitian_RIC_675.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius41 viewsDomitian AR Denarius (19mm, 3.23g, 6h). Rome mint, struck c. Sept 14, 88 - c. Sept 13, 89 (Sixth Issue).
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII, head laureate right;
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P, Minerva stg. R on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r. owl. (M2).
RIC 675 (R2), BMC--, RSC –
3 commentsorfew
domitian_RIC_333.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius40 viewsDomitian AR Denarius
(20.5 mm 3.22 g)
Obv: Laureate head r, IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TR P IIII
Rev: Minerva stg r on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r owl
IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P
RIC 333; BMC 78(cross symbol), Cohen 180
Purchased from Phillipe Saive Numimatique March 15, 2019
4 commentsorfew
DomitianTRPIIII.jpg
Domitian AR Denarius AD 85131 viewsDomitian. AD 81-96. AR Denarius, 20mm, 3.50g. Rome mint. Struck AD 85
O: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Laureate bust Domitian right with aegis
R: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P; Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column with spear and shield; aegis draped over back with snakes around; owl to right.
- RIC 334

Minerva was clearly the favorite goddess and patroness of Domitian, evidenced here by his wearing of her aegis.
In the Thebaid Minerva is represented as a terrifying battle goddess, entrusted with Jupiter's horrible aegis, that terrifies the Thebans. The popular perception of Domitian as cruel and capricious was entirely consistent with the wanton destructiveness of Minerva in the epic.

What scene is portrayed on the center of the capital?
From Dressel, Berlin Medallions (published 1973), p. 14, note 1: 'Cohen 237 note says, "a standing figure and a seated figure". Gnecchi, Medaglioni I, p. 43, 4 says "two small figures, the one on the left seated and the second one kneeling before the seated figure". As can be seen on many of the more carefully engraved specimens [Dressel continues], the first figure is shown seated right, while the second figure kneels before the first figure, with arms raised in entreaty.'
6 commentsNemonater
Domitian8.jpg
DOMITIAN Denarius RIC 657 (R ), Minerva57 viewsOBV: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG - GERM P M TR P VIII Head laureate right
REV: IMP XVII COS XIIII CENS P P P Minerva fighting right with spear and shield atop capital of rostral column, owl at her feet
3.55g, 18.44mm

Minted at Rome, 88-89 AD
3 commentsLegatus
domitian_minerva.jpg
Domitian Denarius. 90 AD.11 viewsDomitian Denarius. 90 AD. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIIII, laureate head right / IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, holding spear and shield, owl at feet. RSC 262. RIC 690
3.00g.
Britanikus
Domitian_Minerva~0.JPG
Domitian Minerva14 viewsObverse: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV, laureate head right
Reverse: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P, Minerva standing right on prow, brandishing javelin in right hand and holding round shield in left; at feet to right, owl standing facing. 95 - 96 AD
Rome, 17mm, 3.2g, RIC II 788 Maybe RIC II 191? RSC 293, BMCRE 231
Romanorvm
Domitian_RIC_690.jpg
Domitian RIC 69026 viewsRIC 690 Domitian Denarius. 90 AD. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIIII, laureate head right /

IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, holding spear and

shield, owl at feet. RSC 262.
renegade3220
Domitian_RIC_II_334.jpg
Domitian RIC II 033477 viewsDomitian. 81-96 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 85 A.D. (3.08g, 22mm, 6h). Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII, laureate head right with aegis. Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT PP, Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column with spear and shield; to r. owl (M2). RIC II 334 (R2).

This is one of a scare issue of precious metal coinage from 85 A.D. immediately after the fineness of the silver and the weight were reduced to standards approximating those of Nero. In addition to the issue itself being scarce, the use of the aegis on the portrait is very rare in Domitian’s coinage. Despite the flan flaw, this is a decent example of a scarce type.
8 commentsLucas H
Domitian_RIC_II_343.jpg
Domitian RIC II 034333 viewsDomitian. 81-96 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint 85 A.D. (3.22g, 20.4mm, 6h). Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TR P V, laureate head right. Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield, to right, owl (M2). RIC II 342 (R2).

A common reverse from a scarce issue in 85 A.D. This was issued just after the silver coinage was refined again, this time reducing the fineness back to Neronian standards. 85 A.D. saw the addition of the Censorial title for Domitian reduced here to CENS POT. This specimen is a much better color than the picture shows and is well centered with complete legends.
2 commentsLucas H
Domitian_RIC_II_686.jpg
Domitian RIC II 06869 viewsDomitian. 81-96 A.D. Rome Mint 89, 14 Sept.-31 Dec.. (3.31g,, 6h). Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TR P VIIII, laureate head right. Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS PPP, Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2). RIC II 686.

Another common Domitian in decent condition with full and legible legends. During this time, Domitian was rapidly accumulating Imperatorial titles indicating intense military activity. Domitian did not take the Consulship in 89 A.D., and with IMP XXI and TR P VIIII this issue came at the end of 89 A.D.

Lucas H
Domitian,_RIC_720.jpg
Domitian RIC II 072087 viewsDomitian 81-96A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 90-91 A.D. Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P X, laureate head right. Rev: IMP XXI COS XV CENS P P P, Minerva standing right on rostral capital column M2, holding spear and shield, owl at feet. RIC 720, RSC 266.

One of my favorite coins, not because of it's rarity or condition, but rather it was one of my first successful auctions, and one of my first "nicer" denarii with clear legends.
5 commentsLucas H
Domitian_RIC_II_771.jpg
Domitian RIC II 077128 viewsDomitian 81-96 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint (3.21g, 18.1mm, 6h). Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII, laureate head right. Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CNES P P P, Minerva standing right on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to right owl. (M2). RIC II 771.

During 95 A.D, Domitian’s coinage continued with the same well established pattern of Minerva types. Although worn, the agies is clear on Minerva’s back in this example. The legends are also complete on this example despite its wear.
Lucas H
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Domitian RIC II, 167a68 viewsDomitian AD 81 - 96
AR - Denar, 3.34g,
Rome AD 92
obv. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XI
laureate head r.
rev. IMP XXI COS XVI CENS P PP
Minerva, helmeted, wearing Aedis, standing r. on columna rostrata(!), brandishing
javelin and and holding shield; owl at her feet; below two
figures (Jupiter and worshipping figure, ref. to Curtis Clay)
(Minerva type 2)
RIC II, 167a; C.274; BMC 189
EF
1 commentsJochen
domitian_191~0.jpg
Domitian RIC II, 19183 viewsMinerva-5 views
Domitian 81 - 96
AR - Denar, 3.62g, 18mm
AD 95/96
obv. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XV
laureate head r.
rev. IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P PP
Minerva standing r. on columna rostrata(!), brandishing
javelin and and holding shield; owl at her feet; below two
figures (Jupiter and worshipping figure, ref. to Curtis Clay)
(Minerva type 2)
RIC II, 191; C.293
EF
Jochen
D164_obv.JPG
Domitian RIC-164140 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome mint, 83 AD
RIC 164 (R2). BMC 41. RSC 606.
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT II COS VIIII DES X P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

Minted between March and 13 September 83 AD, this denarius is part of a series that introduced the four main Minerva reverse types that would dominate the denarii of the reign. The type here, Minerva on rostral column (not prow as normally described), makes it debut as well.

83 saw an increased fineness of the precious metal coinage to Augustan standards, which explains this specimens size and weight - 21 mm, 3.35 grams. A bit of corrosion on the obverse does not detract from a wonderful coin in hand.

Historical note - Mons Graupius, Agricola's climatic battle in Scotland, most likely occurred in the fall of 83 soon after this coin was minted.
4 commentsDavid Atherton