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Search results - "Octavian"
QuinMAntonio.jpg
50 viewsMark Antony Quinarius - 39 B.C.
Obv. III VIR R.P.C.
Diademed and veiled head of Concordia right
Rev. M ANTON C CAES
Clasped hands holding caduceus
Mint travelling with Octavian in Gaul
Craw. 529/4b, Sear RCV 1575
g. 1,8 mm. 15,1
Maxentius
QuinAugusto.jpg
49 viewsAR Quinarius - OCTAVIAN - Uncertain Italian mint - 29-27 BC.
Obv.: CAESAR IMP VII, bare head right
Rev.:ASIA RECEPTA, Victory standing left on cista mystica between two serpents erect.
gs. 1,7 mm. 13,4
RIC 276, Sear RCV 1568
Maxentius
rjb_ves_02_07.jpg
69b44 viewsVespasian 69-79 AD
AR denarius
Obv "IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG"
Laureate bust left
Rev "TR POT X COS VIIII"
Figure (Octavian?) on rostral column
Rome mint
RIC 120
1 commentsmauseus
107.jpg
Δ in circular punch219 viewsMACEDON (?). Thessalonica (?). Augustus. Æ 22. 27 B.C.- A.D. 14. Obv: KAIΣAP-(ΣEBAΣTOΣ) or similar. Laureate head right; countermark before chin. Rev: Inscription obliterated. City ethnic in wreath. Weight: 9.25 g. CM: Δ in circular punch, 5 mm. Howgego 706 (1 pc). Note: Howgego lists only one (!) coin of the period, where the countermark may be a Δ. That coin was struck for Octavian in Thessalonica, dated to 28/27 B.C. It is listed as "not verified" and the countermark described as A or Δ. In regard to [107], the countermark is very clearly Δ! Collection Automan.Automan
lg004_quad_sm.jpg
"As de Nîmes" or "crocodile" Ӕ dupondius of Nemausus (9 - 3 BC), honoring Augustus and Agrippa33 viewsIMP DIVI F , Heads of Agrippa (left) and Augustus (right) back to back, Agrippa wearing rostral crown and Augustus the oak-wreath / COL NEM, crocodile right chained to palm-shoot with short dense fronds and tip right; two short palm offshoots left and right below, above on left a wreath with two long ties streaming right.

Ӕ, 24.5 x 3+ mm, 13.23g, die axis 3h; on both sides there are remains of what appears to be gold plating, perhaps it was a votive offering? Rough edges and slight scrapes on flan typical for this kind of coin, due to primitive technology (filing) of flan preparation.

IMPerator DIVI Filius. Mint of COLonia NEMausus (currently Nîmes, France). Known as "As de Nîmes", it is actually a dupontius (lit. "two-pounder") = 2 ases (sometimes cut in halves to get change). Dupondii were often made out of a golden-colored copper alloy (type of brass) "orichalcum" and this appears to be such case.

Key ID points: oak-wreath (microphotography shows that at least one leaf has a complicated shape, although distinguishing oak from laurel is very difficult) – earlier versions have Augustus bareheaded, no PP on obverse as in later versions, no NE ligature, palm with short fronds with tip right (later versions have tip left and sometimes long fronds). Not typical: no clear laurel wreath together with the rostral crown, gold (?) plating (!), both features really baffling.

But still clearly a "middle" kind of the croc dupondius, known as "type III": RIC I 158, RPC I 524, Sear 1730. It is often conservatively dated to 10 BC - 10 AD, but these days it is usually narrowed to 9/8 - 3 BC.

It is a commemorative issue, honoring the victory over Mark Antony and conquest of Egypt in 30 BC. The heads of Augustus and Agrippa were probably positioned to remind familiar obverses of Roman republican coins with two-faced Janus. Palm branch was a common symbol of victory, in this case grown into a tree, like the victories of Augustus and Agrippa grown into the empire. The two offshoots at the bottom may mean two sons of Agrippa, Gaius and Lucius, who were supposed to be Augustus' heirs and were patrons of the colony. Palm may also be a symbol of the local Nemausian deity, which was probably worshiped in a sacred grove. When these coins were minted, the colony was mostly populated by the settled veterans of Augustus' campaigns, hence the reminiscence of the most famous victory, but some of the original Celtic culture probably survived and was assimilated by Romans. The crocodile is not only the symbol of Egypt, like in the famous Octavian's coins AEGYPTO CAPTA. It is also a representation of Mark Antony, powerful and scary both in water and on land, but a bit slow and stupid. The shape of the crocodile with tail up was specifically chosen to remind of the shape of ship on very common "legionary" denarius series, which Mark Antony minted to pay his armies just before Actium. It is probably also related to the popular contemporary caricature of Cleopatra, riding on and simultaneously copulating with a crocodile, holding a palm branch in her hand as if in triumph. There the crocodile also symbolized Mark Antony.

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was born c. 64-62 BC somewhere in rural Italy. His family was of humble and plebeian origins, but rich, of equestrian rank. Agrippa was about the same age as Octavian, and the two were educated together and became close friends. He probably first served in Caesar's Spanish campaign of 46–45 BC. Caesar regarded him highly enough to send him with Octavius in 45 BC to train in Illyria. When Octavian returned to Rome after Caesar's assassination, Agrippa became his close lieutenant, performing many tasks. He probably started his political career in 43 BC as a tribune of the people and then a member of the Senate. Then he was one of the leading Octavian's generals, finally becoming THE leading general and admiral in the civil wars of the subsequent years.

In 38 as a governor of Transalpine Gaul Agrippa undertook an expedition to Germania, thus becoming the first Roman general since Julius Caesar to cross the Rhine. During this foray he helped the Germanic tribe of Ubii (who previously allied themselves with Caesar in 55 BC) to resettle on the west bank of the Rhine. A shrine was dedicated there, possibly to Divus Caesar whom Ubii fondly remembered, and the village became known as Ara Ubiorum, "Altar of Ubians". This quickly would become an important Roman settlement. Agrippina the Younger, Agrippa's granddaughter, wife of Emperor Claudius and mother of Emperor Nero, would be born there in 15 AD. In 50 AD she would sponsor this village to be upgraded to a colonia, and it would be renamed Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium (colony of Claudius [at] the Altar of Agrippinians – Ubii renamed themselves as Agrippinians to honor the augusta!), abbreviated as CCAA, later to become the capital of new Roman province, Germania Inferior.

In 37 BC Octavian recalled Agrippa back to Rome and arranged for him to win the consular elections, he desperately needed help in naval warfare with Sextus Pompey, the youngest son of Pompey the Great, who styled himself as the last supporter of the republican cause, but in reality became a pirate king, an irony since his father was the one who virtually exterminated piracy in all the Roman waters. He forced humiliating armistice on the triumvirs in 39 BC and when Octavian renewed the hostilities a year later, defeated him in a decisive naval battle of Messina. New fleet had to be built and trained, and Agrippa was the man for the job. Agrippa's solution was creating a huge secret naval base he called Portus Iulius by connecting together lakes Avernus, Avernus and the natural inner and outer harbors behind Cape Misenum at the northern end of the Gulf of Naples. He also created a larger type of ship and developed a new naval weapon: harpax – a ballista-launched grapnel shot with mechanisms that allowed pulling enemy ships close for easy boarding. It replaced the previous boarding device that Romans used since the First Punic War, corvus – effective, but extremely cumbersome. A later defence against it were scythe blades on long poles for cutting ropes, but since this invention was developed in secret, the enemy had no chance to prepare anything like it. It all has proved extremely effective: in a series of naval engagements Agrippa annihilated the fleet of Sextus, forced him to abandon his bases and run away. For this Agrippa was awarded an unprecedented honour that no Roman before or after him received: a rostral crown, "corona rostrata", a wreath decorated in front by a prow and beak of a ship.

That's why Virgil (Aeneid VIII, 683-684), describing Agrippa at Actium, says: "…belli insigne superbum, tempora navali fulgent rostrata corona." "…the proud military decoration, gleams on his brow the naval rostral crown". Actium, the decisive battle between forces of Octavian and Mark Antony, may appear boring compared to the war with Sextus, but it probably turned out this way due to Agrippa's victories in preliminary naval engagements and taking over all the strategy from Octavian.

In between the wars Agrippa has shown an unusual talent in city planning, not only constructing many new public buildings etc., but also greatly improving Rome's sanitation by doing a complete overhaul of all the aqueducts and sewers. Typically, it was Augustus who later would boast that "he had found the city of brick but left it of marble", forgetting that, just like in his naval successes, it was Agrippa who did most of the work. Agrippa had building programs in other Roman cities as well, a magnificent temple (currently known as Maison Carrée) survives in Nîmes itself, which was probably built by Agrippa.

Later relationship between Augustus and Agrippa seemed colder for a while, Agrippa seemed to even go into "exile", but modern historians agree that it was just a ploy: Augustus wanted others to think that Agrippa was his "rival" while in truth he was keeping a significant army far away from Rome, ready to come to the rescue in case Augustus' political machinations fail. It is confirmed by the fact that later Agrippa was recalled and given authority almost equal to Augustus himself, not to mention that he married Augustus' only biological child. The last years of Agrippa's life were spent governing the eastern provinces, were he won respect even of the Jews. He also restored Crimea to Roman Empire. His last service was starting the conquest of the upper Danube, were later the province of Pannonia would be. He suddenly died of illness in 12 BC, aged ~51.

Agrippa had several children through his three marriages. Through some of his children, Agrippa would become ancestor to many subsequent members of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. He has numerous other legacies.
Yurii P
JULIAN_AND_OCTAVIAN.jpg
(01) OCTAVIAN AND DIVUS JULIUS CAESAR68 viewsca 28 - 27 BC
AE 20 mm 7.62 g
O: JULIUS CAESAR, BARE HEAD R
R: OCTAVIAN (AUGUSTUS) CAESAR, HEAD R
THESSALONICA
RPC 1554
laney
octavian_julius_b.jpg
(01) OCTAVIAN AND DIVUS JULIUS CAESAR22 viewsca 28 - 14 BC
AE 20 mm 7.62 g
O: ΘEOC, bare head of Julius Caesar right;
R: ΘECCAΛONI KEΩN, bare head of Augustus right
Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint; cf RPC 1554-1555
laney
aug_vic_stds.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS32 viewsAUGUSTUS
31 BC - 14 AD (time of Octavian/Augustus)
Æ 18mm 4.06 g  
O: VIC AVG, on either side of Nike standing left on globe, holding wreath and palm.
R: COHOR PRAE PHIL, three military standards.
Philippi
SNG ANS 677; SNG Copen 305, SGI 32. RPC 1651. No.3223.
laney
augustus_phil_victory.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS29 views31 BC - 14 AD (time of Octavian/Augustus)
AE 16 mm 3.30 g
O: VIC AVG, on either side of Nike standing left on globe, holding wreath and palm.
R: COHOR PRAE PHIL, three military standards.
Philippi
SNG ANS 677; SNG Copen 305, SGI 32. RPC 1651. No.3223.
laney
coins2.JPG
000c. Sextus Pompey76 viewsSextus Pompeius Magnus Pius, in English Sextus Pompey, was a Roman general from the late Republic (1st century BC). He was the last focus of opposition to the second triumvirate.

Sextus Pompeius was the youngest son of Pompey the Great (Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus) by his third wife, Mucia Tertia. His older brother was Gnaeus Pompeius, from the same mother. Both boys grew up in the shadow of their father, one of Rome's best generals and originally non-conservative politician who drifted to the more traditional faction when Julius Caesar became a threat.

When Caesar crossed the Rubicon in 49 BC, thus starting a civil war, Sextus' older brother Gnaeus followed their father in his escape to the East, as did most of the conservative senators. Sextus stayed in Rome in the care of his stepmother, Cornelia Metella. Pompey's army lost the battle of Pharsalus in 48 BC and Pompey himself had to run for his life. Cornelia and Sextus met him in the island of Mytilene and together they fled to Egypt. On the arrival, Sextus watched his father being killed by treachery on September 29 of the same year. After the murder, Cornelia returned to Rome, but in the following years Sextus joined the resistance against Caesar in the African provinces. Together with Metellus Scipio, Cato the younger, his brother Gnaeus and other senators, they prepared to oppose Caesar and his army to the end.

Caesar won the first battle at Thapsus in 46 BC against Metellus Scipio and Cato, who committed suicide. In 45 BC, Caesar managed to defeat the Pompeius brothers in the battle of Munda. Gnaeus Pompeius was executed, but young Sextus escaped once more, this time to Sicily.

Back in Rome, Julius Caesar was murdered on the Ides of March (March 15) 44 BC by a group of senators led by Cassius and Brutus. This incident did not lead to a return to normality, but provoked yet another civil war between Caesar's political heirs and his assassins. The second triumvirate was formed by Octavian, Mark Antony and Lepidus, with the intention of avenging Caesar and subduing all opposition. Sextus Pompeius in Sicily was certainly a rebellious man, but the Cassius and Brutus faction was the second triumvirate's first priority. Thus, with the whole island as his base, Sextus had the time and resources to develop an army and, even more importantly, a strong navy operated by Sicilian marines.

Brutus and Cassius lost the twin battles of Philippi and committed suicide in 42 BC. After this, the triumvirs turned their attentions to Sicily and Sextus.

But by this time, Sextus was prepared for strong resistance. In the following years, military confrontations failed to return a conclusive victory for either side and in 39 BC, Sextus and the triumvirs signed for peace in the Pact of Misenum. The reason for this peace treaty was the anticipated campaign against the Parthian Empire. Antony, the leader, needed all the legions he could get so it was useful to secure an armistice in the Sicilian front. The peace did not last for long. Octavian and Antony's frequent quarrels were a strong political motivation for resuming the war against Sextus. Octavian tried again to conquer Sicily, but he was defeated in the naval battle of Messina (37 BC) and again in August 36 BC. But by then, Octavian had Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, a very talented general, on his side. Only a month afterwards, Agrippa destroyed Sextus' navy off Naulochus cape. Sextus escaped to the East and, by abandoning Sicily, lost all his base of support.

Sextus Pompeius was caught in Miletus in 35 BC and executed without trial (an illegal act since Sextus was a Roman citizen) by order of Marcus Titius, Antony's minion. His violent death would be one of the weapons used by Octavian against Antony several years later, when the situation between the two became unbearable.

Sicilian Mint
Magn above laureate Janiform head
PIVS above, IMP below, prow of galley right
Sear RCV 348, RPC 671, Sydenham 1044a, Cohen 16
43-36 BC

Check
ecoli
IMG_8025.JPG
001. Octavian "Augustus" (41 B.C. - 14 A.D.)38 viewsAv.: IMP CAESAR DIVI F AVGVSTVS IMP XX
Rv.: TRIBVN POT XXXIII PONT MAXIM

AE As Ø27 / 9.3g
RIC 471 Rome, Cohen 226
Juancho
0017.jpg
0017 - Denarius Octavian 30-29 BC54 viewsObv/Octavian head as Apollo, laureate, r.
Rev/IMP CAESAR, rostral column surmonted by cloaked figure (Octavian?), r. holding spear, l. parazonium.

Ag, 20.1mm, 3.47g
Mint: Rome.
RIC I/271 [S] - BMCRE 633 - BMCRR 4349 - RCV 1559 - Cohen (Imp.) 124 - Cohen (Rep.) 86 - Calicó 686 - RSC Augustus 124
ex-Kuenker, auction 124, lot 8598
4 commentsdafnis
2160368.jpg
001a. Cleopatra VII and Mark Antony50 viewsSYRIA, Coele-Syria. Chalcis ad Libanum. Mark Antony, with Cleopatra VII. 36-31 BC. Æ 19mm (5.45 g, 12h). Dated RY 21 (Egyptian) and 6 (Phoenician) of Cleopatra (32/1 BC). Draped bust of Cleopatra right, wearing stephane / Bare head of Mark Antony right; dates in legend. RPC I 4771; Rouvier 440 (Berytus); SNG München 1006; SNG Copenhagen 383 (Phoenicia). Near Fine, green patina.

Chalcis was given by Antony to Cleopatra in 36 BC. At the culmination of his spectacular triumph at Alexandria two years later, further eastern territories - some belonging to Rome - were bestowed on the children of the newly hailed “Queen of Kings” (referred to as the “Donations of Alexandria”). Shortly after, Antony formally divorced Octavia, the sister of Octavian. These actions fueled Octavian’s propagandistic efforts to win the support of Rome’s political elite and ultimately led to the Senate’s declaration of war on Cleopatra in 32 BC.

Ex-CNG
ecoli
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001c. Lepidus16 viewsThe Triumvirs. Lepidus and Octavian. November-December 43 BC. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.35 g, 10h). Military mint traveling with Lepidus in Italy. Bare head of Lepidus right / Bare head of Octavian right. Crawford 495/2a; CRI 140; Sydenham 1323; RSC 2a. Near Fine, toned, struck off center, bankers’ marks.ecoli
Octavius_AR-Den__IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·III·VIR·_ITER·R·P·C__COS·ITER_·ET·TER·DESIG_DIVO·IVL_Crawford_540·2_Rare_Q-001_axis-5h_18mm_3,89g-s.jpg
002 a Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), Octavianus, Crawford 540-2, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS·ITER·ET·TER·DESIG Tetrastyle temple, DIVO·IVL, Rare!!!,479 views002 a Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), Octavianus, Crawford 540-2, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS·ITER·ET·TER·DESIG Tetrastyle temple, DIVO·IVL, Rare!!!,
Octavianus. Denarius, mint moving with Octavian 36 B.C.,
avers:- IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·III·VIR· ITER·R·P·C Head of Octavian r., slightly bearded.
revers:- COS·ITER·ET·TER·DESIG Tetrastyle temple within which veiled figure standing facing and holding lituus ; on architrave, DIVO·IVL and within pediment, star.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,89g, axis:- 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 36 B.C., ref: Crawford 540-2, Sydenham-1338,
Q-001
6 commentsquadrans
coin179.JPG
002a. Agrippa 54 viewsAgrippa

A close friend of Octavian (later Emperor Augustus), he won a name in the wars in Gaul before becoming consul in 37 He organized Octavian's fleet and is generally given much credit for the defeat (36 ) of Sextus Pompeius in the naval battles at Mylae and Naulochus (N Sicily). Agrippa took part in the war against Antony, and his naval operations were the basis of Octavian's decisive victory at Actium in 31 He was perhaps the most trusted of all Augustus' lieutenants and rendered many services, notably in putting down disorders in both the East and West. His third wife was Augustus' daughter Julia.

AS. M AGRIPPA L F COS III Head left, wearing rostral crown. / Neptune standing, head left, S C at sides.

It seems like the quality and price of Agrippa coins run the whole spectrum...I think a decent example can be had for as little as $20. This is a bit more than that but I am happy with the quality of the metal and portrait.
ecoli
2CrXTmC384gPtZ9JYce56FzdZ8pRzK.jpg
002d. Julia and Livia, Pergamon, Mysia43 viewsBronze AE 18, RPC I 2359, SNG Cop 467, aF, weight 3.903 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon mint, obverse ΛIBIAN HPAN CAPINOΣ, draped bust of Livia right; reverse IOYΛIAN AΦPO∆ITHN, draped bust of Julia right; ex Forum, ex Malter Galleries

Julia was Augustus' only natural child, the daughter of his second wife Scribonia. She was born the same day that Octavian divorced Scribonia, to marry Livia.

Julia's tragic destiny was to serve as a pawn in her father's dynastic plans. At age two, she was betrothed to Mark Antony's ten-year-old son, but the fathers' hostility ended the engagement. At age 14, she was married to her cousin but he died two years later. In 21 B.C., Julia married Agrippa, nearly 25 years her elder, Augustus' most trusted general and friend. Augustus had been advised, "You have made him so great that he must either become your son-in-law or be slain." Agrippa died suddenly in 12 B.C. and Julia was married in 11 B.C. to Tiberius.

During her marriages to Agrippa and Tiberius Julia took lovers. In 2 B.C., Julia was arrested for adultery and treason. Augustus declared her marriage null and void. He also asserted in public that she had been plotting against his own life. Reluctant to execute her, Augustus had her exiled, with no men in sight, forbidden even to drink wine. Scribonia, Julia's mother, accompanied her into exile. Five years later, she was allowed to move to Rhegium but Augustus never forgave her. When Tiberius became emperor, he cut off her allowance and put her in solitary confinement in one room in her house. Within months she died from malnutrition.
ecoli
Augustus_RIC_167aBlack.jpg
01 Augustus RIC 167a65 viewsAugustus 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. AR Denarius. Lugdunum Mint. 15 - 13 B.C. (3,71 gr) Obv: AVGVSTVS DIVI F, Bare head right. Rev: in ex. IMP X, Bull butting right.
RIC 167a, RSC 137, Sear 1610.

Ex: Poinsignon Numismatique

This coin has great beauty in its simplicity and it's also a great example of propaganda. Divi F (filius) means that Octavianus is not only Augustus but also the son of a god.
2 commentsPaddy
Denarius Augusto, Cayo y Lucio.jpg
01- 01 - AUGUSTO, CAYO y LUCIO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)92 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 3.5 gr.

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE" - Busto laureado a derecha.
Rev: "AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT" - Cayo y Lucio sus nietos de pié enfrentados c/u descansando su mano en un escudo redondo y lanza. En el campo centro superior Lituus (Báculo o cayado usado por los augures) a derecha y Simpulum (Copa pequeña) a Izquierda. "C L CAESARES" en exergo.

Acuñada 2 A.C. a 4 D.C.
Ceca: Lungdunum - Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #207 Pag.55 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1597 Pag.317 - BMCRE #533 - RSC Vol.1 #43 Pag.134 - Cohen Vol.1 #42 Pag.69 - DVM #51b Pag.67 - CBN #1651
mdelvalle
RIC_207_Denario_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01- 01 - AUGUSTO, CAYO y LUCIO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)39 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 3.5 gr.

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE" - Busto laureado a derecha.
Rev: "AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT" - Cayo y Lucio sus nietos de pié enfrentados c/u descansando su mano en un escudo redondo y lanza. En el campo centro superior Lituus (Báculo o cayado usado por los augures) a derecha y Simpulum (Copa pequeña) a Izquierda. "C L CAESARES" en exergo.

Acuñada 2 A.C. a 4 D.C.
Ceca: Lungdunum - Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #207 Pag.55 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1597 Pag.317 - BMCRE #533 - RSC Vol.1 #43 Pag.134 - Cohen Vol.1 #42 Pag.69 - DVM #51b Pag.67 - CBN #1651
mdelvalle
Denarius Augusto, Cayo y Lucio 2.jpg
01- 02 - AUGUSTO, CAYO y LUCIO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.) 103 viewsAR Denario 17 x 16 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE" - Busto laureado a derecha.
Rev: "AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT" - Cayo y Lucio sus nietos de pié enfrentados c/u descansando su mano en un escudo redondo y lanza. En el campo centro superior Lituus (Báculo o cayado usado por los augures) a izquierda y Simpulum (Copa pequeña) a derecha, "X" debajo. "C L CAESARES" en exergo.

Acuñada 2 A.C. a 4 D.C.
Ceca: Lungdunum - Lyon Francia
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #211 Pag.56 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1597 var Pag.317 - BMCRE #537 - RSC Vol.1 #43a Pag.134 - Cohen Vol.1 #43 Pag.69 - DVM #51c Pag.67 - CBN #1651
mdelvalle
RIC_211_Denario_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01- 02 - AUGUSTO, CAYO y LUCIO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.) 29 viewsAR Denario 17 x 16 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE" - Busto laureado a derecha.
Rev: "AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT" - Cayo y Lucio sus nietos de pié enfrentados c/u descansando su mano en un escudo redondo y lanza. En el campo centro superior Lituus (Báculo o cayado usado por los augures) a izquierda y Simpulum (Copa pequeña) a derecha, "X" debajo. "C L CAESARES" en exergo.

Acuñada 2 A.C. a 4 D.C.
Ceca: Lungdunum - Lyon Francia
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #211 Pag.56 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1597 var Pag.317 - BMCRE #537 - RSC Vol.1 #43a Pag.134 - Cohen Vol.1 #43 Pag.69 - DVM #51c Pag.67 - CBN #1651
mdelvalle
ABH_1581_Semis_IRIPPO.jpg
01-68 - Irripo, Hispania - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)19 viewsHoy Alcalá de Guadaira - Sevilla - España
AE Semis 19/21 mm 3.5 gr.

Anv: "IRIPPO" (Leyenda anti-horaria frente al busto)- Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a izquierda.
Rev: Figura femenina/Tyche sentada a izquierda, portando piña en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y cornucopia en izquierda; Guirnalda rodeando la alegoría.

Acuñada 30 A.C.
Ceca: Irippo - Hispania

Referencias: RPC I #55 P.76, Burgos #1581, Sear GICTV #17 Pag.3, Villaronga CNH #4 P.422, ABH (Ant) #1109 P.141, Ripolles #1919 P.251, Vv Pl.110 #1 a 4, Heiss #1 P.318 - Calicó #935-937, Guadan #922, ACIP #2630
mdelvalle
0116.JPG
0116 - Denarius Octavian 32-29 BC33 viewsObv/ Head of Venus r., wearing diadem.
Rev/ CAESAR DIVI F, Octavian l., in military dress, cloak flying behind, holding spear.

Ag, 20.2 mm, 3.51 g
Mint: Italy (Brundisium or Roma?)
RIC I/251 [S]
ex-Nomisma, auction e2, lot 18
dafnis
02_Octavian_RIC_I_266.jpg
02 Octavian RIC I 26633 viewsOctavian. AR Denarius. Italian Mint, possibly Rome. Autumn 30- summer 29 B.C. (3.45g, 19.8mm, 2h). Obv: Bare head right. Rev: IMP CAESAR on architrave of the Roman Senate House (Curia Julia), with porch supported by four short columns, statue of Victory on globe surmounting apex of roof, and statues of standing figures at the extremities of the architrave. CRI 421; RIC I 266; RSC 122.. Ex Andrew McCabe.1 commentsLucas H
Denarius MARCO ANTONIO y OCTAVIO.jpg
03-01 - MARCO ANTONIO y OCTAVIO (43 - 30 A.C.)48 views2do. Triunvirato (43 - 30 A.C.)
AR Denario 17 x 18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: Cabeza desnuda de MARCO ANTONIO viendo a derecha - "M ANT·IMP AVG III VIR R·PC·M·BARBAT Q P" Leyenda alrededor del busto.
Rev: Cabeza desnuda de un joven e inmaduro OCTAVIO con incipiente barba viendo a derecha - "CAESAR·IMP·PONT·III·VIR·R·P·C·" Leyenda alrededor del busto.

Acuñada primavera/verano 41 A.C.
Ceca: Ephesus - Hoy Turquía
Moneyer: Barbatius Pollio

Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1504 Pag.289 - Sear CRI #243 - Craw RRC #517/2 - Syd CRR #1181 - BMCRR (este) #100 - RSC Vol.1 #8a Pag.128 - Cohen Vol.1 #8 Pag.50 - Kestner #3793
mdelvalle
Craw_517_2_Denario_Marco_Antonio_y_Octavio.jpg
03-01 - MARCO ANTONIO y OCTAVIO (43 - 30 A.C.)20 views2do. Triunvirato (43 - 30 A.C.)
AR Denario 17 x 18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: Cabeza desnuda de MARCO ANTONIO viendo a derecha - "M ANT·IMP AVG III VIR R·PC·M·BARBAT Q P" Leyenda alrededor del busto.
Rev: Cabeza desnuda de un joven e inmaduro OCTAVIO con incipiente barba viendo a derecha - "CAESAR·IMP·PONT·III·VIR·R·P·C·" Leyenda alrededor del busto.

Acuñada primavera/verano 41 A.C.
Ceca: Ephesus - Hoy Turquía
Moneyer: Barbatius Pollio

Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1504 Pag.289 - Sear CRI #243 - Craw RRC #517/2 - Syd CRR #1181 - BMCRR (este) #100 - RSC Vol.1 #8a Pag.128 - Cohen Vol.1 #8 Pag.50 - Kestner #3793
mdelvalle
Denarius Octavio RIC 543a.jpg
06-01 - OCTAVIO (32 - 27 A.C.)63 viewsAR Denario 16.5 x 18 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: Cabeza desnuda de un joven e inmaduro Octavio viendo a derecha.
Rev: Escudo Español (?) circular con tres filas concéntricas de clavos de adorno y un broche central - "IMP" sobre, "CAE" campo izq., "SAR" campo der. y "DIVI F" debajo.

Acuñada 35/34 A.C.
Ceca: Incierta

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #543a Pag.85 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1546 Pag.299 - Sear CRI #392 - BMCRR (Galia) #119 (= BMCRE #309) - RSC Vol.1 #126 Pag.140 - Cohen Vol.1 #126 Pag.82
mdelvalle
RIC_543a_Denario_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
06-01 - OCTAVIO (32 - 27 A.C.)15 viewsAR Denario 16.5 x 18 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: Cabeza desnuda de un joven e inmaduro Octavio viendo a derecha.
Rev: Escudo Español (?) circular con tres filas concéntricas de clavos de adorno y un broche central - "IMP" sobre, "CAE" campo izq., "SAR" campo der. y "DIVI F" debajo.

Acuñada 35/34 A.C.
Ceca: Incierta

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #543a Pag.85 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1546 Pag.299 - Sear CRI #392 - BMCRR (Galia) #119 (= BMCRE #309) - RSC Vol.1 #126 Pag.140 - Cohen Vol.1 #126 Pag.82
mdelvalle
Quinarius OCTAVIO RIC 276.jpg
06-10 - OCTAVIO (32 - 27 A.C.)65 viewsAR Quinario 13 x 15 mm 1.5 gr.
Conmemora el sometimiento de la Provincia de ASIA en el año 30 A.C.

Anv: Cabeza desnuda de Octavio viendo a derecha - "CAESAR" detrás, "IMP VII" delante.
Rev: Victoria de pié a izquierda sobre una cesta mística, flanqueada por dos serpientes erectas, portando corona de laureles en mano derecha y palma sobre hombro izquierdo - "ASIA" campo derecho y "RECEPTA" en campo izquierdo.

Acuñada 29/28 A.C.
Ceca: Brundisium ó Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #276 Pag.61 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1568 Pag.302 - Sear CRI #429 - BMCRR (este) #240 (= BMCRE #647) - RSC Vol.1 #14 Pag.132 - Cohen Vol.1 #14 Pag.64 - CBM #902 - Babelon MRR B#145
mdelvalle
RIC_276_Quinario_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
06-10 - OCTAVIO (32 - 27 A.C.)15 viewsAR Quinario 13 x 15 mm 1.5 gr.
Conmemora el sometimiento de la Provincia de ASIA en el año 30 A.C.

Anv: Cabeza desnuda de Octavio viendo a derecha - "CAESAR" detrás, "IMP VII" delante.
Rev: Victoria de pié a izquierda sobre una cesta mística, flanqueada por dos serpientes erectas, portando corona de laureles en mano derecha y palma sobre hombro izquierdo - "ASIA" campo derecho y "RECEPTA" en campo izquierdo.

Acuñada 29/28 A.C.
Ceca: Brundisium ó Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #276 Pag.61 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1568 Pag.302 - Sear CRI #429 - BMCRR (este) #240 (= BMCRE #647) - RSC Vol.1 #14 Pag.132 - Cohen Vol.1 #14 Pag.64 - CBM #902 - Babelon MRR B#145
mdelvalle
0001JUL.jpg
1) Julius Caesar159 viewsDenarius, Rome, Moneyer P. Sepullius Macer, 44 BC, 4.03g. Cr-480/11, Syd-1072; Sear, Imperators-107b. Obv: Wreathed head of Caesar r., CAESAR before, D[IC]T PERPETVO behind. Rx: Venus standing l., looking downwards, holding Victory and scepter resting on star, P SEPVLLIVS behind, MACER downwards before. Same dies as Alfoldi, Caesar in 44 v. Chr., pl. LIII, 6-8. Banker's mark behind Caesar's eye. Good portrait. Some areas of flat striking, otherwise EF

Ex HJB - purchased on the Ides of March, 2011

Gaius Julius Caesar (Classical Latin: [ˈɡaː.i.ʊs ˈjuː.lɪ.ʊs ˈkaj.sar], July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC) was a Roman general, statesman, Consul and notable author of Latin prose. He played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire. In 60 BC, Caesar, Crassus and Pompey formed a political alliance that was to dominate Roman politics for several years. Their attempts to amass power through populist tactics were opposed by the conservative elite within the Roman Senate, among them Cato the Younger with the frequent support of Cicero. Caesar's conquest of Gaul, completed by 51 BC, extended Rome's territory to the English Channel and the Rhine. Caesar became the first Roman general to cross both when he built a bridge across the Rhine and conducted the first invasion of Britain.

These achievements granted him unmatched military power and threatened to eclipse the standing of Pompey, who had realigned himself with the Senate after the death of Crassus in 53 BC. With the Gallic Wars concluded, the Senate ordered Caesar to lay down his military command and return to Rome. Caesar refused, and marked his defiance in 49 BC by crossing the Rubicon with a legion, leaving his province and illegally entering Roman territory under arms. Civil war resulted, from which he emerged as the unrivaled leader of Rome.

After assuming control of government, Caesar began a program of social and governmental reforms, including the creation of the Julian calendar. He centralised the bureaucracy of the Republic and was eventually proclaimed "dictator in perpetuity". But the underlying political conflicts had not been resolved, and on the Ides of March (15 March) 44 BC, Caesar was assassinated by a group of senators led by Marcus Junius Brutus. A new series of civil wars broke out, and the constitutional government of the Republic was never restored. Caesar's adopted heir Octavian, later known as Augustus, rose to sole power, and the era of the Roman Empire began.

Much of Caesar's life is known from his own accounts of his military campaigns, and from other contemporary sources, mainly the letters and speeches of Cicero and the historical writings of Sallust. The later biographies of Caesar by Suetonius and Plutarch are also major sources. Caesar is deemed to be one of the greatest military commanders of history. Source: wikipedia
RM0001
13 commentsSosius
Aug_and_Caesar_2_v3.jpg
1) Julius Caesar & Octavian27 viewsJulius Caesar & Octavian
AE23 of Thessalonika.

ΘΕΟΣ, laureate head of Divus Julius right, countermark on neck / ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ, bare head of Augustus right.

RPC 1554
RM0017
Sosius
Augusto_COLONIA_PATRICIA.jpg
1-2-4 - AUGUSTUS (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)51 viewsColonia Patricia
Hispania Ulterior Bética

AE AS 26 mm 10.9 gr

Anv: ”PERM CAES AVG” – Cabeza desnuda, viendo a izquierda.
Rev: ”COLONIA PATRICIA” – Leyenda en dos lineas, dentro de una corona de hojas de roble.

Acuñada: aproximadamente 18 A.C. - 14 D.C.

Referencias: RPC #129 – SNG Cop #466 - Alvarez Burgos #1563 - Sear GICV I #16, Pag.3 - Sear '88 #537 - Cohen #607, Pag.150 - Lindgren #87 - Vives #165.3 - Heiss #6, Pag.298
mdelvalle
Augusto_JULIA_TRADUCTA.jpg
1-3-4 - AUGUSTUS (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)48 viewsColonia Julia Traducta
Hispania

AE AS 25 mm 13.3 gr

Anv: ”PERM CAES AVG” – Cabeza desnuda, viendo a izquierda.
Rev: ”IVLIA TRAD” – Leyenda en dos lineas, dentro de una corona de hojas de roble.

Acuñada: aproximadamente 15 A.C. - 14 D.C.

Referencias: RPC #108 – SNG Cop #459 - Sear GICV I #18, Pag.3 - Sear '88 #538 - Cohen #623, Pag.151 - Vives #164.13 - Heiss #2, Pag.336
mdelvalle
0023-065.jpg
1608 - Lepidus and Octavian, Denarius148 viewsDenarius minted in Italy, 42 BC
LEPIDVS PONT MAX III V R P C, bare head of Lepidus right (NT and MA in monograms)
C CAESAR IMPIII VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right (MP in monogram)
3.78 gr
Ref : HCRI # 140, RCV # 1523, Cohen # 2

The following from forum catalog :
"Lepidus was a faithful follower of Julius Caesar, and he served as Praetor and Consul. When Caesar was assassinated, Lepidus was in charge of the cavalry and commanded a legion. This position secured him a place in the Second Triumvirate along Marc Antony and Octavian. His cut was Africa. When Octavian attacked Sextus Pompey's Sicily, Lepidus' ships and troops supported him. In an uninspired move, Lepidus thought he could force Octavian to leave him the island. The two armies separated and isolated skirmishes occurred, but soon the soldiers sick of yet another civil war, acknowledging Octavian's superiority deserted Lepidus en-masse. Lepidus left the island as a simple civilian, retaining only his priesthood, but he was the only defeated Imperator not to suffer a violent death."
2 commentsPotator II
0023-056.jpg
1633 - Mark Antony, Denarius95 viewsStruck in a travelling mint, moving with Mark Antony in 41 BC
ANT AVG IMP III VI R P C, Head of Mark Antony right
Fortuna standing left, holding rudder in right hand and cornucopiae in left; at feet, stork; below, PIETAS COS
3,82 gr - 20 mm
Ref : Crawford # 516/2, Sydenham # 1174, HCRI # 241, C # 77
Ex. Auctiones.GmbH

The following comment is copied from NAC auction # 52/294 about the very rare corresponding aureus :
The year 41 B.C., when this aureus was struck at a mint travelling in the East with Marc Antony, was a period of unusual calm for the triumvir, who took a welcomed, if unexpected, rest after the great victory he and Octavian had won late in 42 B.C. against Brutus and Cassius at the Battle of Philippi. Antony’s original plan of organising an invasion of Parthia was put on hold after he sailed to Tarsus, where he had summoned Cleopatra VII, the Greek queen of Egypt. She was to defend herself against accusations that she had aided Brutus and Cassius before Philippi, but it is generally agreed that the summons was merely a pretext for Antony’s plan to secure aid for his Parthian campaign. Their meeting was anything but a source of conflict; indeed, they found much common ground, including their agreement that it was in their mutual interests to execute Cleopatra’s sister and rival Arsinoe IV, who had been ruling Cyprus. In addition to sharing political interests, the two agreed that Antony would winter in Egypt to share a luxurious vacation with Cleopatra that caused a further postponement of Antony’s designs on Parthia. Thus began another of the queen’s liaisons with noble Romans, a prior having been Julius Caesar (and, according to Plutarch, Pompey Jr. before him). During the course of his stay in Egypt Cleopatra was impregnated, which resulted in twins born to her in 40 B.C. But this care-free period was only a momentary calm in the storm, for trouble was brewing in both the East and the West. Early in 40 B.C. Syria was overrun by the Parthians, seemingly while Antony travelled to Italy to meet Octavian following the Perusine War, in which Octavian defeated the armies of Antony’s wife and brother. The conflict with Octavian was resolved when they signed a pact at Brundisium in October, and Syria was eventually recovered through the efforts of Antony’s commanders from 40 to 38 B.C.{/i]

5 commentsPotator II
0023-060np_noir.jpg
1638 - Mark Antony and Octavian, Denarius202 viewsDenarius minted in Asia minor c.41 BC
M ANT IMP AVG III RPCM BARBAT QP, Bare head of Mark Antony right
CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR RPC, Bare head of Octavian right
3.62 gr
Ref : HCRI # 243, RCV #1504, Cohen #8
Ex Coll Alain M.
4 commentsPotator II
0023-070np_noir.jpg
1641 - Mark Antony and Lucius Antonius, Denarius236 viewsDenarius minted in Ephesus in 41 BC
M ANT IMP AVG III VIR RPCM NERVA PROQ P, Bare head of Mark Antony right
L ANTONIUS COS, Bare head of Lucius Antonius right
3.58 gr
Ref : HCRI # 246, RCV #1509, Cohen #2
Following description taken from NAC auction 40, #617, about an other example of the same coin :
"This denarius, depicting the bare heads of Marc Antony and his youngest brother Lucius Antony, is a rare dual-portrait issue of the Imperatorial period. The family resemblance is uncanny, and one wonders if they truly looked this much alike, or if it is another case of portrait fusion, much like we observe with the dual-portrait billon tetradrachms of Antioch on which the face of the Egyptian queen Cleopatra VII takes on the square dimensions of Marc Antony. When Antony fled Rome to separate himself from Octavian and to take up his governorship in Gaul, Lucius went with him, and suffered equally from the siege of Mutina. This coin, however, was struck in a later period, when Lucius had for a second time taken up arms against Octavian in the west. Marc Antony was already in the east, and that is the region from which this coinage emanates. Since Lucius lost the ‘Perusine War’ he waged against Octavian, and was subsequently appointed to an office in Spain, where he died, it is likely that he never even saw one of his portrait coins."
3 commentsPotator II
0030-310np_noir.jpg
1685 - Octavian, Dupondius68 viewsMinted in Italy 38 BC
DIVI F, bare head of Octavian right
DIVOS IVLIVS, in a laurel wreath
27.07 gr
Ref : HCRI # 309, RCV # 1570
Potator II
0030-0210.jpg
1749 - Octavian, Denarius270 viewsItalian mint, possibly Rome, 31-30 BC
Anepigraph, bare head of Octavian left
CAESAR - DIVI F, Victory standing right on globe, holding wreath
3.84 gr
Ref : HCRI # 408, RCV # 1552v, Cohen # 66, RIC # 255
The following comment is taken from CNG, sale 84 # 957 :
"Following his victory at Actium, Octavian ordered a golden statue of Victory, standing on a globe and holding a wreath and palm, to be set up on an altar in the Curia in Rome. This statue had been captured by the Romans from Pyrrhus in 272 BC, and it assumed a somewhat tutelary mystique, protecting the Roman state from dissolution. In AD 382, the emperor Gratian ordered its removal. Two years later, the senator and orator Symmachus urged Valentinian II to replace it, a request that was met with stiff opposition from the bishop of Milan, Ambrose. Though it was briefly returned to its place by the usurper Eugenius, it was again removed following his defeat. Petitions to Theodosius I for its subsequent replacement were refused, on grounds that the once-important symbol of the gods’ blessing on the Roman Empire was now nothing more than a piece of paganism"
11 commentsPotator II
PompeyDenNeptune.jpg
1ac1 Pompey the Great28 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Crassus in 60 BC. Murdered in Egypt, 48 BC.

Denarius, minted by son Sextus Pompey

42-40 BC

Head of Pompey the Great right between jug and lituus
Neptune right foot on prow, flanked by the Catanaean brothers, Anapias and Amphinomus, with their parents on their shoulders

Struck by Sextus Pompey after his victory over Salvidienus and relates to his acclamation as the Son of Neptune. Although Sextus Pompey was the supreme naval commander, Octavian had the Senate declare him a public enemy. He turned to piracy and came close to defeating Octavian. He was, however, defeated by Marcus Agrippa at the naval battle of Naulochus (3 September 36 B.C.). He was executed by order of Mark Antony in 35 B.C.

SRCV I 1392, RSC I Pompey the Great 17, Sydenham 1344, Crawford 511/3a, BM Sicily 93

Plutarch said of Pompey: In Pompey, there were many [causes] that helped to make him the object of [the Roman people's] love; his temperance, his skill and exercise in war, his eloquence of speech, integrity of mind, and affability in conversation and address; insomuch that no man ever asked a favour with less offence, or conferred one with a better grace. When he gave, it was without assumption; when he received, it was with dignity and honour.
1 commentsBlindado
MarcAntDenOctavian.jpg
1ae Marc Antony and Octavian43 viewsFormed the Second Triumvirate, 43-33 BC, , along with Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. Antony killed himself in 30 BC.

Denarius
41 BC

Marc Antony portrait, right, M ANT IMP AVG III VIR RPCM BARBAT QP
Octavian portrait, right, CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR RPC

RSC 8

Plutarch described Antony thusly: Antony grew up a very beautiful youth, but by the worst of misfortunes, he fell into the acquaintance and friendship of Curio, a man abandoned to his pleasures, who, to make Antony's dependence upon him a matter of greater necessity, plunged him into a life of drinking and dissipation, and led him through a course of such extravagance that he ran, at that early age, into debt to the amount of two hundred and fifty talents. . . . He took most to what was called the Asiatic taste in speaking, which was then at its height, and was, in many ways, suitable to his ostentatious, vaunting temper, full of empty flourishes and unsteady efforts for glory. . . . He had also a very good and noble appearance; his beard was well grown, his forehead large, and his nose aquiline, giving him altogether a bold, masculine look that reminded people of the faces of Hercules in paintings and sculptures. It was, moreover, an ancient tradition, that the Antonys were descended from Hercules, by a son of his called Anton; and this opinion he thought to give credit to by the similarity of his person just mentioned, and also by the fashion of his dress. For, whenever he had to appear before large numbers, he wore his tunic girt low about the hips, a broadsword on his side, and over all a large coarse mantle. What might seem to some very insupportable, his vaunting, his raillery, his drinking in public, sitting down by the men as they were taking their food, and eating, as he stood, off the common soldiers' tables, made him the delight and pleasure of the army. In love affairs, also, he was very agreeable: he gained many friends by the assistance he gave them in theirs, and took other people's raillery upon his own with good-humour. And his generous ways, his open and lavish hand in gifts and favours to his friends and fellow-soldiers, did a great deal for him in his first advance to power, and after he had become great, long maintained his fortunes, when a thousand follies were hastening their overthrow.
1 commentsBlindado
FulviaQuinariusLion.jpg
1ae2 Fulvia45 viewsFirst wife of Marc Antony

ca 83-40 BC

AR Quinarius
Bust of Victory right with the likeness of Fulvia, III VIR R P C
Lion right between A and XLI; ANTONI above, IMP in ex

RSC 3, Syd 1163, Cr489/6

Fulvia was the first Roman non-mythological woman to appear on Roman coins. She gained access to power through her marriage to three of the most promising men of her generation, Publius Clodius Pulcher, Gaius Scribonius Curio, and Marcus Antonius. All three husbands were politically active populares, tribunes, and supporters of Julius Caesar. Fulvia married Mark Antony in 47 or 46 BC, a few years after Curio's death, although Cicero suggested that Fulvia and Antony had had a relationship since 58 BC. According to him, while Fulvia and Antony were married, Antony once left a military post to sneak back into Rome during the night and personally deliver a love letter to Fulvia describing his love for her and how he had stopped seeing the famous actress Cytheris. Cicero also suggested that Antony married Fulvia for her money. At the time of their marriage, Antony was an established politician. He had already been tribune in 49 BC, commanded armies under Caesar and was Master of the Horse in 47 BC. As a couple, they were a formidable political force in Rome, and had two sons together, Marcus Antonius Antyllus and Iullus Antonius.

Suetonius wrote, "[Antony] took a wife, Fulvia, the widow of Clodius the demagogue, a woman not born for spinning or housewifery, nor one that could be content with ruling a private husband, but prepared to govern a first magistrate, or give orders to a commander-in-chief. So that Cleopatra had great obligations to her for having taught Antony to be so good a servant, he coming to her hands tame and broken into entire obedience to the commands of a mistress. He used to play all sorts of sportive, boyish tricks, to keep Fulvia in good-humour. As, for example, when Caesar, after his victory in Spain, was on his return, Antony, among the rest, went out to meet him; and, a rumour being spread that Caesar was killed and the enemy marching into Italy, he returned to Rome, and, disguising himself, came to her by night muffled up as a servant that brought letters from Antony. She, with great impatience, before received the letter, asks if Antony were well, and instead of an answer he gives her the letter; and, as she was opening it, took her about the neck and kissed her."

After Julius Caesar was assassinated, Antony became the most powerful man in Rome. Fulvia was heavily involved in the political aftermath. After Caesar's death, the senate realized his popularity and declared that they would pass all of Caesar's planned laws. Antony had attained possession of Caesar's papers, and with the ability to produce papers in support of any law, Fulvia and Antony made a fortune and gained immense power. She allegedly accompanied Antony to his military camp at Brundisium in 44 BC. Appian wrote that in December 44 and again in 41 BC, while Antony was abroad and Cicero campaigned for Antony to be declared an enemy of the state, Fulvia attempted to block such declarations by soliciting support on Antony's behalf.

Antony formed the second triumvirate with Octavian (the future emperor Augustus) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus on 43 BC and began to conduct proscriptions. To solidify the political alliance, Fulvia's daughter Clodia was married to the young Octavian. Appian and Cassius Dio describe Fulvia as being involved in the violent proscriptions, which were used to destroy enemies and gain badly needed funds to secure control of Rome. Antony pursued his political enemies, chief among them being Cicero, who had openly criticized him for abusing his powers as consul after Caesar's assassination. Though many ancient sources wrote that Fulvia was happy to take revenge against Cicero for Antony's and Clodius' sake, Cassius Dio is the only ancient source that describes the joy with which she pierced the tongue of the dead Cicero with her golden hairpins, as a final revenge against Cicero's power of speech.

In 42 BC, Antony and Octavian left Rome to pursue Julius Caesar's assassins, Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus. Fulvia was left behind as the most powerful woman in Rome. According to Cassius Dio, Fulvia controlled the politics of Rome. Dio wrote that "the following year Publius Servilius and Lucius Antonius nominally became consuls, but in reality it was Antonius and Fulvia. She, the mother-in‑law of Octavian and wife of Antony, had no respect for Lepidus because of his slothfulness, and managed affairs herself, so that neither the senate nor the people transacted any business contrary to her pleasure."

Shortly afterwards, the triumvirs then distributed the provinces among them. Lepidus took the west and Antony went to Egypt, where he met Cleopatra VII. When Octavian returned to Rome in 41 BC to disperse land to Caesar's veterans, he divorced Fulvia's daughter and accused Fulvia of aiming at supreme power. Fulvia allied with her brother-in-law Lucius Antonius and publicly endorsed Mark Antony in opposition to Octavian.

In 41 BC, tensions between Octavian and Fulvia escalated to war in Italy. Together with Lucius Antonius, she raised eight legions in Italy to fight for Antony's rights against Octavian, an event known as the Perusine War. Fulvia fled to Greece with her children. Appian writes that she met Antony in Athens, and he was upset with her involvement in the war. Antony then sailed back to Rome to deal with Octavian, and Fulvia died of an unknown illness in exile in Sicyon, near Corinth, Achaea.
Blindado
BrutusDenLictors.jpg
1ag Marcus Junius Brutus64 viewsTook his own life in 42 BC after being defeated at Philippi by Antony and Octavian

Denarius, issued as moneyer, 54 BC
Head of Liberty, right, LIBERTAS
Consul L. Junius Brutus between lictors, preceded by accensus, BRVTVS

Seaby, Junia 31

Plutarch wrote: Marcus Brutus was descended from that Junius Brutus to whom the ancient Romans erected a statue of brass in the capitol among the images of their kings with a drawn sword in his hand, in remembrance of his courage and resolution in expelling the Tarquins and destroying the monarchy. . . . But this Brutus, whose life we now write, having to the goodness of his disposition added the improvements of learning and the study of philosophy, and having stirred up his natural parts, of themselves grave and gentle, by applying himself to business and public affairs, seems to have been of a temper exactly framed for virtue; insomuch that they who were most his enemies upon account of his conspiracy against Caesar, if in that whole affair there was any honourable or generous part, referred it wholly to Brutus, and laid whatever was barbarous and cruel to the charge of Cassius, Brutus's connection and familiar friend, but not his equal in honesty and pureness of purpose. . . . In Latin, he had by exercise attained a sufficient skill to be able to make public addresses and to plead a cause; but in Greek, he must be noted for affecting the sententious and short Laconic way of speaking in sundry passages of his epistles. . . . And in all other things Brutus was partaker of Caesar's power as much as he desired: for he might, if he had pleased, have been the chief of all his friends, and had authority and command beyond them all, but Cassius and the company he met with him drew him off from Caesar. . . . Caesar snatching hold of the handle of the dagger, and crying out aloud in Latin, "Villain Casca, what do you?" he, calling in Greek to his brother, bade him come and help. And by this time, finding himself struck by a great many hands, and looking around about him to see if he could force his way out, when he saw Brutus with his dagger drawn against him, he let go Casca's hand, that he had hold of and covering his head with his robe, gave up his body to their blows.
2 commentsBlindado
ClaudiusAE28Caesar_Augustus.jpg
1bb Octavian's Succession of Julius Caesar10 viewsClaudius, Philippi, Macedon
Date unknown

AE 26

TI CLAVDIVS CAES AVG P M TR P IMP P P, Bare head left
COL AVG IVL PHILIP, Statue of Divus Julius being crowned by statue of Divus Augustus

I'm guessing this coin was meant to emphasize the succession of legitimacy from Julius Caesar to Augustus.

RPC 1654
Blindado
MarcAntonyDenGalley.jpg
1bd Mark Antony Battles Octavian11 viewsMark Antony
32-31 BC

Denarius

Galley, ANT AVG III VIR R P C, counter-marked
Legionary eagle between two standards, counter-marked

Seaby, Mark Antony 26ff

Plutarch described the outbreak of the conflict thusly: That night Antony had a very unlucky dream, fancying that his right hand was thunderstruck. And, some few days after, he was informed that Caesar was plotting to take his life. Caesar explained, but was not believed, so that the breach was now made as wide as ever; each of them hurried about all through Italy to engage, by great offers, the old soldiers that lay scattered in their settlements, and to be the first to secure the troops that still remained undischarged. Cicero was at this time the man of greatest influence in Rome. He made use of all his art to exasperate the people against Antony, and at length persuaded the senate to declare him a public enemy, to send Caesar the rods and axes and other marks of honour usually given to proctors, and to issue orders to Hirtius and Pansa, who were the consuls, to drive Antony out of Italy.
Blindado
SextPompeyAs~0.jpg
1bd1 Sextus Pompey Battles Octavian8 viewsPompey the Great

As, minted by son Sextus Pompey
43-36 BC

Janiform head with features of Pompey the Great, MAGN above.
Prow of galley, PIVS above, IMP below.

This engraver had at best a dim notion of what the great man looked like! Pompey was a member of the first triumvirate, 59-53 BC.
Struck by Sextus Pompey after his victory over Salvidienus and relates to his acclamation as the Son of Neptune. Although Sextus Pompey was the supreme naval commander, Octavian had the Senate declare him a public enemy. He turned to piracy and came close to defeating Octavian. He was, however, defeated by Marcus Agrippa at the naval battle of Naulochus (3 September 36 B.C.). He was executed by order of Mark Antony in 35 B.C.

Sydenham 1044a
Blindado
COLNEM~0.jpg
20-10 BC Octavian and Agrippa173 viewsAugustus & Agrippa AE Dupondius
IMP DIVI F
back-to-back heads of Agrippa, wearing rostral crown, & Augustus, bare

COL NEM
palm shoot, crocodile before (not chained), two wreaths with long ties trailing above palm tip

Nemausus Mint
20-10 BC.

RPC 523

15.93g Heavy Early Issue!
5 commentsJay GT4
0030-405.jpg
2000 - Octavian & Agrippa, AE Dupondius 81 viewsArausio mint (Orange), 30-29 BC (Colonia Firma Julia Secundanorum Arausio)
IMP DIVI F (IMPerator DIVI Filii), bare heads of Augustus (right) and Agrippa (left), back to back
Prow of galley right, ram's head (?) enclosed in a medaillion above
17.61 gr - 28 mm.
Ref : RPC # 533
Ex. CNG e-auction #181/28, from the Patrick Villemur collection

Following comment taken from http://www.asdenimes.com/ :

Un très bel exemplaire du dupondius d'Orange. Têtes adossées d'Agrippa (à gauche) et Octave (à droite). Très beaux reliefs.
L’as (ou dupondius) d’Orange est très rare et nombre d'exemplaires connus (quelques dizaines) sont souvent de médiocre conservation. Le dupondius d'Orange préfigure le dupondius de Nîmes frappé à partir de 28/27 av. J.-C. et qui reprendra l’avers quasiment à l’identique (y compris les légendes), avec les profils d’Octave devenu Auguste et d’Agrippa. Le revers sera interprété de façon parodique sur l’as de Nîmes, puisque la galère sera remplacée par le crocodile qui garde à peu près la forme générale du vaisseau et dont l’oeil prophylactique (pas visible sur cet exemplaire : voir les as de Vienne page suivante) deviendra l’oeil du crocodile. On y ajoutera la palme pour former le mat et quelques autres accessoires tout aussi symboliques.
La tête de bélier représentée dans le médaillon du revers serait l’emblème des vétérans de la légio II Gallica qui a fondé la colonie d’Arausio vers 35 av. J.-C.
On distingue 2 types de dupondius d'Orange : ceux dont les portraits occupent la plus grande partie de l'avers et ceux qui montrent des têtes plutôt petites.
1 commentsPotator II
normal_Antony_and_Octavian_001.jpg
4) Antony and Octavian Denarius35 viewsMark Antony and Octavian
AR Denarius, 2.97g
Ephesus, spring/summer, 41 BC

M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV in monogram), Bare hd of Mark Antony right / CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, Bare head of Octavian right

Sear 1504

This series of coins commemorates the establishment of the second Triumvirate of November 43 B.C. between Antony, Octavian and Lepidus. Both sides bear the inscription "III VIR R P C", meaning "One of Three Men for the Regulation of the Republic. Within a few years Antony would depart Italy for the Eastern provinces.

The moneyer for this coin is M. Barbatius Pollio who was also a Questor in 41 BC. Barbatius bears the title of "Quaestor pro praetore" abbreviated to QP a distinction shared by his colleague L. Gelllius.

Photo and text credit goes to FORVM member Jay GT4, from whom I purchased the coin in 2011. Thanks, Jay!
RM0034
1 commentsSosius
0001SOS.jpg
4) Antony: Sosius49 viewsGAIUS SOSIUS
General to Antony
Æ 26mm (14.5 g). ~ 38 BC.
Cilicia, Uncertain Mint.

Bare head right / Fiscus, sella, quaestoria and hasta; Q below.

Coin has been attributed to multiple rulers, including Julius Caesar, Augustus and Brutus. Now believed to be Sosius, General to Antony and Governor of Syria.

RPC I 5409; Laffaille 324; Grant, FITA, pg. 13. aFine, brown patina, scratches. Rare.
0001SOS


Sosius was wily and accomplished man. A talented general, he received a triumph. However, he consistently picked the wrong side in Rome's Civil Wars (Senate vs. Caesar, then Antony vs. Octavian) yet somehow managed to keep his head.

According to Wikipedia:

Gaius Sosius was a Roman general and politician.

Gaius Sosius was elected quaestor in 66 BC and praetor in 49 BC. Upon the start of the civil war, he joined the party of the Senate and Pompey. Upon the flight of Pompey to Greece, Sosius returned to Rome and submitted to Julius Caesar.

After the assassination of Caesar, Sosius joined the party of Mark Antony, by whom in 38 BC he was appointed governor of Syria and Cilicia in the place of Publius Ventidius. As governor, Sosius was commanded by Antony to support Herod against Antigonus the Hasmonean, when the latter was in possession of Jerusalem. In 37 BC, he advanced against Jerusalem and after he became master of the city, Sosius placed Herod upon the throne. In return for this services, he was awarded a triumph in 34 BC, and he became consul along with Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus as his colleague in 32 BC.

When civil war broke out between Antony and Octavian, Sosius espoused the cause of Antony and violently attacked Octavian in the senate, for which he was forced to flee to the east. In 31 BC, Sosius commanded a squadron in Mark Antony's fleet with which he managed to defeat the squadron of Taurius Rufus – according to Dio 50.14 – and put it to flight, but when the latter was reinforced by Marcus Agrippa, Sosius's ally Tarcondimotus – the king of Cilicia – was killed and Sosius himself was forced to flee. At Actium, Sosius commanded the left wing of Antony's fleet. After the battle, from which he managed to escape, his hiding place was detected and Sosius was captured and brought before Octavian but, at the intercession of Lucius Arruntius, Octavian pardoned him. He returned to Rome and completed his building project on the temple of Apollo Medicus (begun in 34 BC), dedicating it in Octavian's name.

Unknown sons, but two daughters : Sosia and Sosia Galla, possibly by an Asinia,[1] a Nonia or an Aelia. However the name reappears with Q. Sosius Senecio, (consul in 99 and 107).[2] and Saint Sosius (275-305 AD).

Sosius attended the Ludi Saeculares in 17 according to an inscription CIL 6.32323 = ILS 5050 as a quindecimvir.
RM0002
4 commentsSosius
Augustus_thunderbolt.jpg
40 BC Octavian denarius164 viewsC CAESAR III VIR R P C
Bare haed of Octavian right

Q SALVIVS IMP COS DESIG
thunderbolt

Italy early 40 BC
3.43g

Sear 1541

SOLD!

David Sear says that this Q Salvius may be Quintus Salvius Salvidienus Rufus who was the boyhood friend and confidant of Octavian. In 42 BC Octavian made him admiral of his fleet and instructed him to attack Sextus Pompey in Sicily. Despite being beaten by Sextus he was granted the title of Imperator which appears on this coin.

After the battle of Philippi Salvidienus was given command of 6 Legions an sent to Spain however he quickly had to return to Italy to confront Fulvia (Antony's wife) and Lucius Antonius (Antony's brother). Salvidienus captured and destroyed the city of Sentinum and then moved on to Perusia with Agrippa to besiege Lucius Antony. At the end of the Perusian War Octavian sent Salvidienus to Gallia as Governor, with eleven legions. He was also designated as consul for 39 BC, although he had not reached senatorial rank.

Salvidienus proved to be unworthy of Octavian's trust and entered into secret negotiations with Mark Antony thinking that Antony would prevail. Unfortunately for Salvidienus, Antony and Octavian were reconciled and Antony informed Octavian of Salvidienus treachary. Antony's decision to inform on Salvidienus has been used to show his desire to settle the differences with Octavian. The senate declared Salvidienus a public enemy and shortly after he was killed, either by his own hand or by execution.
Jay GT4
Lepidus_and_Octavian.jpg
495/2a Lepidus and Octavian23 viewsLepidus and Octavian. Military mint traveling with Lepidus in Italy. 43 B.C., late. AR Denarius.(3.35g, 16mm, 6h). Obv:LEPIDVS•PONT•MAX•III•VIR•R•P•C•, bare head of Lepidus right Rev: CAESAR•IMP•III•VIR•R•P•C•, bare head of Octavian right. Cf Crawford 495/2a 2c-d; Syd. 1323; Cf RSC 2-2a; 2c-d. “From Group SGF”

I’ve sought a coin with a portrait of Lepidus, and while worn, the obverse portrait is clearly identifiable. 43 B.C. saw the establishment of the Second Triumvirate giving Lepidus, Antony, and Octavian dictatorial powers over the Roman State.
1 commentsLucas H
Marc_Antony_Cr496.jpg
496/1 Marc Antony45 viewsMarc Antony AR Denarius. 42 BC, Greek Mint. (3.62g, 17.8m, 2.3h). Obv: M ANTONI IMP, bare head right. Rev: III VIR R P C, facing head of Sol in a temple of two columns. RSC 12, Sear5 1467, Syd 1168, Cr496/1.

After Caesar’s death, Antony, Octavian, and Lepidus formed the Second Triumvirate. Ultimately, Lepidus was pushed to the side and Antony was defeated by Octavian at the battle of Actium. Fleeing back to Egypt, Antony and Cleopatra committed suicide in the face of their defeat by Octavian.
2 commentsLucas H
Octavian_Denarius_both.jpg
5) Octavian40 viewsOctavian
AR Denarius, Southern or Central Italian mint, summer 37 BC

IMP CAESAR DIVI F III VIR ITER R P C, bare head right / COS ITER ET TER DESIG, priestly implements: simpulum, sprinkler, jug & lituus.

Cr538/1, Syd 1334., Sear 1554
RM0035
1 commentsSosius
Augustus_Agrippa_Nemausus_2.jpg
5) Octavian and Agrippa26 viewsAUGUSTUS & AGRIPPA
AE As of Gaul, Nemausus, struck. ca. 10 BC - 10 AD

IMP DIVI F, back-to-back heads of Agrippa, in rostral crown, & Augustus, in oak wreath / COL NEM, crocodile chained to palm behind, wreath to left.

Sear 1730, Cohen 10, RPC 523/4

Not really Imperatorial, but it definitely refers to Octavian and Agrippa's Imperatorial achievements!
RM0016
Sosius
Ant_and_Oct_-_RPC_1551.jpg
5) Octavian and Antony13 viewsMark Antony & Octavian
Æ 28 Sestertius
Macedon, Thessalonica

Draped bust of Eleutheria right / Nike advancing left, holding wreath, palm branch.

RPC 1551; SNG Cop 374. Fine
RM0015
Sosius
Octavian_Fouree_Den_RIC_264~0.jpg
5) Octavian Fouree Denarius20 viewsOctavian
AR fouree denarius.

Octavian in quadriga right, IMP CAESAR in ex. / Victory right on prow, holding wreath.

RSC 115, RIC 264
RM0036
Sosius
coin599.JPG
501. Constantine I Alexandria Posthumous23 viewsAlexandria

The city passed formally under Roman jurisdiction in 80 BC, according to the will of Ptolemy Alexander but after it had been previously under Roman influence for more than a hundred years. Julius Caesar dallied with Cleopatra in Alexandria in 47 BC, saw Alexander's body (quipping 'I came to see a king, not a collection of corpses' when he was offered a view of the other royal burials) and was mobbed by the rabble. His example was followed by Marc Antony, for whose favor the city paid dearly to Octavian, who placed over it a prefect from the imperial household.

From the time of annexation onwards, Alexandria seems to have regained its old prosperity, commanding, as it did, an important granary of Rome. This fact, doubtless, was one of the chief reasons which induced Augustus to place it directly under imperial power. In AD 215 the emperor Caracalla visited the city and for some insulting satires that the inhabitants had directed at him, abruptly commanded his troops to put to death all youths capable of bearing arms. This brutal order seems to have been carried out even beyond the letter, for a general massacre ensued.

Even as its main historical importance had formerly sprung from pagan learning, now Alexandria acquired fresh importance as a centre of Christian theology and church government. There Arianism was formulated and where also Athanasius, the great opponent of both Arianism and pagan reaction, triumphed over both, establishing the Patriarch of Alexandria as a major influence in Christianity for the next two centuries.

As native influences began to reassert themselves in the Nile valley, Alexandria gradually became an alien city, more and more detached from Egypt and losing much of its commerce as the peace of the empire broke up during the 3rd century AD, followed by a fast decline in population and splendour.

In the late 4th century, persecution of pagans by Christians had reached new levels of intensity. Temples and statues were destroyed throughout the Roman empire: pagan rituals became forbidden under punishment of death, and libraries were closed. In 391, Emperor Theodosius I ordered the destruction of all pagan temples, and the Patriarch Theophilus, complied with his request. It is possible that the great Library of Alexandria and the Serapeum was destroyed about this time. The pagan mathematician and philosopher Hypathia was a prominent victim of the persecutions.

The Brucheum and Jewish quarters were desolate in the 5th century, and the central monuments, the Soma and Museum, fell into ruin. On the mainland, life seemed to have centred in the vicinity of the Serapeum and Caesareum, both which became Christian churches. The Pharos and Heptastadium quarters, however, remained populous and left intact.

veiled head only
DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
RIC VIII Alexandria 32 C3

From uncleaned lot; one of the nicer finds.
ecoli
coins209.JPG
502. Constantine II Siscia GLORIA EXERCITVS24 viewsSiscia

All that remains from prehistoric inhabitants on this area are small statues of idols and tools. Indigenous Illyrian tribes were conquered in the 4th century by the Celts. Celts ethically and culturally mixed with Illyric tribes and established on the right bank of the river Kupa a settlement called Segestica. Illyric and Celtic tribes succeeded in withstanding Roman pressures until the year 35 BC when Emperor Octavian with 12,000 soldiers conquered Segestica after a thirty - day siege.

After Romans had conquered Segestica, they built Siscia on the left bank of the river Kupa (right below the centre of today's Sisak). Siscia was the capital town of the Province of Pannonia Savia, where 40,000 inhabitants resided. The town had the forum, basilicas, temples, an empire mint, a theatre and two ports.
Christianity was spreading unstoppably and encompassed the town of Sisak. The first known Bishop of Sisak was Kvirin from 284 AD until his martyr's death, probably in the year 303 AD.
With gradual collapse of the Roman Empire, the importance of Sisak declined and the great migration brought to Sisak Huns, Gauls, Avars and Slavs. Slav tribes remained in this area and eventually the Slav language became dominant.

RIC VII Siscia 253 R3
ecoli
Anthony_Octavian.jpg
517/2 Octavian and Antony106 viewsMarcus Antonius and Octavian. AR Denarius. Ephesus Mint, Spring-Summer 41 B.C. (3.42g, 19.1m, 0h)). Obv: M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R PC M BARBAT Q P, bare head of Antony r., Rev: CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR [R P C], bare head of Octavian r. Craw. 517/2, RSC 8a, RCV 1504.

A duel portrait of two of the three triumvirs. This example has fairly complete legends, and high relief portraits. This coin was minted before the Treaty of Brundisium, where the empire was apportion between the triumvirs.
1 commentsLucas H
juliusoctavian33edit.jpg
534/2 Octavian, Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa44 viewsOctavian and M. Vipsanius Agrippa. AR Denarius. Military mint moving with Octavian. c. 38 A.D. (3.48g, 18.2mm, 6h). Obv: DIVOS IVLIVS DIVI F, confronting heads of Julius Caesar, wreathed r., Octavian, bare headed, l. banker's marks Rev: M AGRIPPA COS DESIG. Craw. 534/2, Vipsania 2.

An exceedingly rare issue, I had to have this despite its condition. Worn, but not beyond recognition, this was an issue under the authority of Agrippa who was governor of Gaul at the time. This is a first use of confronting busts which became more common on dynastic issues of the Empire. The picture does not show it well, but the reverse legend is all there.
1 commentsLucas H
TiberiusTributePennyRICI30RSCII16aSRCV1763.jpg
703a, Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Tribute Penny of Matthew 22:20-2148 viewsSilver denarius, RIC I 30, RSC II 16a, SRCV 1763, gVF, Lugdunum mint, 3.837g, 18.7mm, 90o, 16 - 37 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM, Pax/Livia seated right holding scepter and branch, legs on chair ornamented, feet on footstool; toned. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Tiberius (A.D. 14-37)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

Introduction
The reign of Tiberius (b. 42 B.C., d. A.D. 37, emperor A.D. 14-37) is a particularly important one for the Principate, since it was the first occasion when the powers designed for Augustus alone were exercised by somebody else. In contrast to the approachable and tactful Augustus, Tiberius emerges from the sources as an enigmatic and darkly complex figure, intelligent and cunning, but given to bouts of severe depression and dark moods that had a great impact on his political career as well as his personal relationships.

. . . .

Early life (42-12 B.C.)
Tiberius Claudius Nero was born on 16 November 42 B.C. to Ti. Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla. Both parents were scions of the gens Claudia which had supplied leaders to the Roman Republic for many generations. . . [I]n 39 B.C., his mother Livia divorced Ti. Claudius Nero and married Octavian, thereby making the infant Tiberius the stepson of the future ruler of the Roman world. Forever afterward, Tiberius was to have his name coupled with this man, and always to his detriment.

. . . .

Accession and Early Reign (A.D. 14 - 23)
The accession of Tiberius proved intensely awkward. After Augustus had been buried and deified, and his will read and honored, the Senate convened on 18 September to inaugurate the new reign and officially "confirm" Tiberius as emperor. Such a transfer of power had never happened before, and nobody, including Tiberius, appears to have known what to do. Tacitus's account is the fullest. . . Rather than tactful, he came across to the senators as obdurate and obstructive. He declared that he was too old for the responsibilities of the Principate, said he did not want the job, and asked if he could just take one part of the government for himself. The Senate was confused, not knowing how to read his behavior. Finally, one senator asked pointedly, "Sire, for how long will you allow the State to be without a head?" Tiberius relented and accepted the powers voted to him, although he refused the title "Augustus."

. . . .

Tiberius allowed a trusted advisor to get too close and gain a tremendous influence over him. That advisor was the Praetorian Prefect, L. Aelius Sejanus, who would derail Tiberius's plans for the succession and drive the emperor farther into isolation, depression, and paranoia.

Sejanus (A.D. 23-31)
Sejanus hailed from Volsinii in Etruria. He and his father shared the Praetorian Prefecture until A.D. 15 when the father, L. Seius Strabo, was promoted to be Prefect of Egypt, the pinnacle of an equestrian career under the Principate. Sejanus, now sole Prefect of the Guard, enjoyed powerful connections to senatorial houses and had been a companion to Gaius Caesar on his mission to the East, 1 B.C. - A.D. 4. Through a combination of energetic efficiency, fawning sycophancy, and outward displays of loyalty, he gained the position of Tiberius's closest friend and advisor.

. . . .

[I]n a shocking and unexpected turn of events, [a] letter sent by Tiberius from Capri initially praised Sejanus extensively, and then suddenly denounced him as a traitor and demanded his arrest. Chaos ensued. Senators long allied with Sejanus headed for the exits, the others were confused -- was this a test of their loyalty? What did the emperor want them to do? -- but the Praetorian Guard, the very troops formerly under Sejanus's command but recently and secretly transferred to the command of Q. Sutorius Macro, arrested Sejanus, conveyed him to prison, and shortly afterwards executed him summarily. A witch-hunt followed. . . All around the city, grim scenes were played out, and as late as A.D. 33 a general massacre of all those still in custody took place.

Tiberius himself later claimed that he turned on Sejanus because he had been alerted to Sejanus's plot against Germanicus's family. This explanation has been rejected by most ancient and modern authorities, since Sejanus's demise did nothing to alleviate that family's troubles.

. . . .

The Last Years (A.D. 31-37)
The Sejanus affair appears to have greatly depressed Tiberius. A close friend and confidant had betrayed him; whom could he trust anymore? His withdrawal from public life seemed more complete in the last years. Letters kept him in touch with Rome, but it was the machinery of the Augustan administration that kept the empire running smoothly. Tiberius, if we believe our sources, spent much of his time indulging his perversities on Capri.

. . . .

Tiberius died quietly in a villa at Misenum on 16 March A.D. 37. He was 78 years old. There are some hints in the sources of the hand of Caligula in the deed, but such innuendo can be expected at the death of an emperor, especially when his successor proved so depraved. The level of unpopularity Tiberius had achieved by the time of his death with both the upper and lower classes is revealed by these facts: the Senate refused to vote him divine honors, and mobs filled the streets yelling "To the Tiber with Tiberius!" (in reference to a method of disposal reserved for the corpses of criminals).

Tiberius and the Empire
Three main aspects of Tiberius's impact on the empire deserve special attention: his relative military inertia; his modesty in dealing with offers of divine honors and his fair treatment of provincials; and his use of the Law of Treason (maiestas).

. . . .

Conclusion
. . . Tiberius's reign sporadically descended into tyranny of the worst sort. In the right climate of paranoia and suspicion, widespread denunciation led to the deaths of dozens of Senators and equestrians, as well as numerous members of the imperial house. In this sense, the reign of Tiberius decisively ended the Augustan illusion of "the Republic Restored" and shone some light into the future of the Principate, revealing that which was both promising and terrifying.

[For the entire article please refer to http://www.roman-emperors.org/tiberius.htm]

Copyright © 1997, Garrett G. Fagan. Used by permission.

"Some of the things he did are hard to believe. He had little boys trained as minnows to chase him when he went swimming and to get between his legs and nibble him. He also had babies not weaned from their mother breast suck at his chest and groin . . . "
(Suetonius. The Twelve Caesars. Trans. Robert Graves. London: Penguin Books, 1979. XLIV).

Jesus, referring to a "penny" asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible(Joseph Sermarini).


Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
EpirusAugustus3.jpg
Achaea, Epirus, Nikopolis, AE18. Augustus (under Hadrian) (Divus)/ Head of boar96 viewsObv: AVGOVCTO CKTICTHC, Head of Augustus r., bare.
Rev: NΕIΚΟΠΟ(Λ) ΕW(C), Head of boar r.
Oikonomidou Augustus 56-57

Nikopolis, Epirus was founded in 28 BC by Octavian in memory of his victory over Antony and Cleopatra at Actium.
1 commentsancientone
Agrippa.jpg
Agrippa55 viewsAgrippa, as (struck under Caligula).
Son-in-law of Augustus.
RIC 58.
11,37 g, 28-29 mm.
Rome, 37-41 A.D.
Obv. M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left wearing rostral crown.
Rev. S C either side of Neptune standing left holding dolphin and trident.

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a renowned Roman general and close friend of Octavian (Augustus). As general, Agrippa defeated the forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium. In 21 B.C., Augustus married his own daughter Julia to Agrippa. By Julia, Agrippa had two daughters, Vipsania Julia Agrippina and Vipsania Agrippina maior, and three sons, Gaius, Lucius and Agrippa Postumus.
1 commentsMarsman
Agrippa S C.jpg
Agrippa- Anepigraphic79 viewsAgrippa – 63- 12 BC, Military commander and friend of Augustus

Obverse:

Head left wearing a rostral crown.

M.(Marcus) AGRIPPA L.F. (Lucius Filius = son of Lucius) COS. III (Consul for the third time.)

M:Marcus
L.F: Lucius Filius = son of Lucius
COS. III: Consul for the third time

Agrippa he wears a crown on his head which is decorated by prows of (war)ships, a so-called 'rostral crown' probably given to him to honour him as a fleetcommander during the battle of Actium, the decisiove battle in which Octavian defeated Marc Antony and Cleopatra.

Reverse:

S—C, Senatus Consulto

The reverse is 'anepigraphic' without text, apart from S.C. (Senatus Consulto = by approval of the Senate) Neptune holds a trident and has a dolphin on his outstretched hand. Neptune too is a reference to the sea and Agrippa's nautical carreer.

Domination: AS, Copper, 29 mm

Mint: Rome. This AS of Agrippa is struck under Caligula.

AGRIPPA
63 - 12 BC
Roman General
Agrippa was the companion of Octavian by the time Caesar was murdered in 44 BC. Agrippa was Octavian's most brilliant military commander. He defeated Pompeius in two naval battles and was responsible for for Octavian's victory over Mark Antony. When Octavian became emperor under the name Augustus Agrippa was second only to the emperor in authority. He suppressed rebellions, founded colonies and built an extensive road-network throughout the Roman empire.
John Schou
ppsectetORweb.jpg
Antioch, Revised Posthumous Philip, RPC 413654 viewsAntioch Mint, revised posthumous Philip, year = 19 (31/30 B.C.) AR, 26mm 14.39g, RPC 4136, Newell, no. 23
O: Diademed head of Philip Philadelphus, r.
R: BAEILEWE FILIPPOY EPIFANOYE FILADELFOY, Zeus, seated l., holding Nike and scepter
EX: THI
* "In the early fifties, the Romans revived the coinage of King Philip Philadelphus to be their coinage of Syria, copying his types (portrait of Philip/Zeus seated l.), though in a debased style. The coinage lasted from then until the reign of Augustus, and was discussed most recently by H.R. Baldus (in CRWLR, pp. 127-30, with earlier references for H. Scying, E. T. Newell, A. R. Bellinger and C. M. Kraay). The first issues were made with the monogram of Gabinius (57-55 BC), Crassus (54/53 BC) and Cassius (52/51 BC). There after the establishment of a Caesarian era at Antioch in 44/48 BC, their monogram was replaced by one standing for Antioch )or ‘autonomous’: see Wr. 21) and the coins were dated in the exergue by the years of this era. Year 3-12 and, then with a new style (see E. T. Newell, NC, 1919, pp. 69ff.; Baldus, p. 150, n. 14) 19-33 are known.
It may seem odd that the Romans chose the Tetradrachm of Philip (92-83 BC) to revive, rather than those of the last king, Antiochus XII; it is true that the last substantial issue of Seleucid tetradrachms was made by Philip, so that his would have comprised a most important proportion of the currency (so Newell, pp 80-4; M. J. Price ap. Baldus, op. cit., p. 127), but it is hard to see that this provides a sufficient reason, and it is possible that some other consideration might be relevant. While Antiochus (c. 69-65 BC) was away campaigning against the Arabs, the people of Antioch revolted and put forward, as king, Philip, the son of Philip Philadelphus. As the claims of Antiochus were rejected by Pompey when he formed the province, the Roman view may have been that Philip was the last legitimate Seleucid king, and, if so, his coins would naturally have been chosen as the prototype of the Roman coinage in Syria.
The Philips were interrupted from year 12 until year 19, and it seems that in this gap the tetradrachms of Cleopatra and Antony were produced. The evidence for their production at Antioch, however, does not seem sufficient, and they have been catalogued elsewhere, under ‘Uncertain of Syria’ (4094-6). It is certain, however, that a unique drachm portraying Antony was produced at Antioch during this period, as it bears the ethnic ANTIOXEWN MHTPOPOLEWS. See also addenda 4131A.
After the defeat of Antony, the coinage of posthumous Philip was revived in 31/30 BC, though it is not clear whether this represents a conscious decision to avoid putting Octavian’s portrait on the coinage, as happened in Asia and Egypt (similarly, the portrait does not appear on city bronzes of Syria before the last decade BC) or whether it is just the simple reinstatement of the previous type, after the new type of Antony and Cleopatra became unacceptable. At any rate the coinage continued until at least year 33 (= 17/16 BC). Current evidence does not permit us to be sure that it continued any later, to the year 36 (= 14/13 BC), as Newell thought, though this is not impossible."

RPC I, pp. 606-607
casata137ec
ANTKAI.jpg
Antony and Octavian 296 viewsAntony and Octavian

Α Γ Ω N Ο Θ Ε Σ Ι Α
Bust of Agonotheseia right

ANT KAI within wreath

Æ 22 mm.
11.07g
RPC I, 1552. SNG ANS 819. SNG Copenhagen 375. BMC 64.

Ex-Aegean

Refers to the establishment of Games to commemorate Antony & Octavian's victory over Cassius & Brutus at Philipi in 42 B.C. The cheif organizers of these games were known as Agonothetes; Agonotheseia, who appears on the obverse, was the personification of the Games.

Rare, historical
1 commentsJay GT4
Antonyquinarius.jpg
Antony quinarius86 viewsIII VIR R P C
Diademed and veiled head of Concordia right

M ANTON C CAESAR
Two hands clasped round caduceus

Mint moving with Octavian in Gaul
39 BC

1.57g

Crawford 529/4b. Sydenham 1195. Sear, Imperators 304

From a very old collection
Museum number 175 on obverse.
Could use some more cleaning but I don't want to loose the number.
2 commentsJay GT4
leg_vii.jpg
AR Legionary Denarius LEG VII56 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C, galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG VII, legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

The VII Claudia Pia Fidelis is one of the oldest Imperial legions, on campaign with Caesar during his conquest of Gaul and Caesar's British invasions. During the civil war against Pompey, the seventh served at Pharsalus in 48BC and later in Africa at Thapsacus. The unit later served with Octavian at the Philippi. The unit seems to have existed into the 4th century AD, where it was recorded guarding the Middle Danube.
3 commentsWill Hooton
leg_xxiii.jpg
AR Legionary Denarius LEG XXIII49 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C, galley r. mast with banners at prow,

LEG XXIII, legionary eagle between two standards.

Cohen 60.

This Legion seems to have been raised by Marc Antony and later disbanded by Octavian after the former's defeat.

Thanks to Jay for identifying and attributing the coin.
1 commentsWill Hooton
Hispania_Repiblican2.JPG
AS OF IRIPPO. Hispania, Irippo (area of Seville), 28 views25 mm, 5.07 g. Semis. ca.30 BC. IRIPPO,
inscription before bare head of Augustus (Octavian) right / female seated left holding pine cone and cornucopiae.
RPC 55; Burgos 1238; Mionnet 402. _2050
Antonivs Protti
Augustus_06.jpg
Asia Minor, Ionia, Ephesus, Octavian, Pax28 viewsOctavian
Ionia, Ephesus
Cistophorus (ca. 28 BC).
Obv.: IMP CAESAR DIVI F COS VI LIBERTATIS P R VINDEX, Laureate head right.
Rev.: PAX, Pax standing left, holding caduceus; to right, serpent rising left from altar; all within wreath.
Ag, 11.51g, 26mm
Ref.: RIC² 476, RPC I 2203, CRI 433.
Ex Numismatik Naumann, auction 53, lot 447
2 commentsshanxi
Athlit_Ram_Haifa.jpg
Athlit Bronze War Galley Ram70 viewsThe Athlit ram, found in 1980 off the coast of Israel near at Athlit Bay (just south of Haifa), is the one of a few surviving ancient war galley rams. Carbon 14 dating of timber remnants date it to between 530 BC and 270 BC. It was once fit on the prow of an ancient oared warship. This would be driven into the hull of an enemy ship in order to puncture it and thus sink, or at least disable, the ship. It is made of a single casting of bronze weighing 465kg and measures about 2.10m long. The ram is thus one of the largest bronze objects to survive from the ancient world and is currently on display in the National Maritime Museum, Haifa, Israel. Captured rams were once used to ornament Octavian's battle monument at Actium, Greece. Only the sockets that held them remain. The valuable bronze was melted long ago.

Sources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_ram
http://www.learningsites.com/Athlit/AthlitRam_home.php

For other recovered galley rams see:
https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2013/04/rare-bronze-rams-found-at-site-of-final.html
https://www.historytoday.com/ann-natanson/roman-naval-power-raising-ram
1 commentsJoe Sermarini
00389q00.jpg
Augustus12 viewsAR-Denarius
Laureated head to right
RV: Octavianus with spear and parazonium stg. on rostral cippus; all between IMP ¦ CAESAR
Rome
RIC 271
Julianus of Pannonia
VICAVG.jpg
Augustus52 viewsVIC - AVG
Victory standing left on base holding wreath and palm

COHOR PRAE PHIL
three standards

Philippi, Macedonia mint

27 B.C. - 14 A.D. or later

2.81g 17mm

SGIC 32, RPC 1651

Typically attributed to Octavian to commemorate the defeat of Cassius and Brutus at the battle of Philippi. It is also suggested it may be from the time of Claudius or Nero


Jay GT4
63761q00.jpg
Augustus89 viewsRoman Imperatorial
Octavian Caesar
(Reign as ‘Augustus’ 1st Emperor of the Roman Empire 27 BC-14 AD)
(b. 63 BC, d. 14 AD)


Obverse: Bare head of Octavian facing right

Reverse: IMP CAESAR, Facing head of Octavian on ithyphallic boundary stone of Jupiter Terminus, winged thunderbolt below

Reverse refers to Octavian's reestablishment of boundaries in the east after the battle of Actium and review of the client kingdoms established by Mark Antony (in particular return of Roman territory from Cleopatra and her children)

Silver Denarius
Minted in Italy 30-29 BC




Translations:

Imperatorial=The Imperatorial period extends from the outbreak of civil war between Julius Caesar and Pompey in January 49 BC and ends early 27 BC when Caesar's adopted heir Octavian was given the title "Augustus" by the Senate, effectively making him the sole ruler of the entire Roman territory. 

IMP CAESAR=Imperator(Commander-in-Chief) Caesar(Octavian took Julius Caesar’s name after he was posthumously adopted by him in 44 BC)


Reference
RIC I 269a
2 commentsSphinx357
PtolemyREX.jpg
AUGUSTUS & PTOLEMY OF NUMIDIA AE semis174 viewsAVGVSTVS DIVI F
bare head of Augustus right

C LAETILIVS APALVS II V Q, REX PTOL (Ptolemy, King) within diadem

Carthago Nova, Spain, under sole 'duovir quinqunennales' C Laetilius Apalus.

18.5mm, 5.3g.
RPC 172.

Ex-Incitatus

Ptolemy of Numidia was the son of King Juba II of Numidia and Cleopatra Selene II. He was also the grandson of Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII on his mohter's side. He was named in honor of the memory of Cleopatra VII, the birthplace of his mother and the birthplace of her relatives. In choosing her son's name, Cleopatra Selene II created a distinct Greek-Egyptian tone and emphasized her role as the monarch who would continue the Ptolemaic dynasty. She by-passed the ancestral names of her husband. By naming her son Ptolemy instead of a Berber ancestral name, she offers an example rare in ancient history, especially in the case of a son who is the primary male heir, of reaching into the mother's family instead of the father's for a name. This emphasized the idea that his mother was the heiress of the Ptolemies and the leader of a Ptolemaic government in exile.

Through his parents he received Roman citizenship and was actually educated in Rome. Amazingly he grew up in the house of his maternal aunt, and Antony's daughter Antonia Minor, the youngest daughter of Mark Antony and the youngest niece of Augustus. Antonia was also a half-sister of Ptolemy's late mother, also a daughter of Mark Antony. Antonia Minor's mother was Octavia Minor, Mark Antony's fourth wife and the second sister of Octavian (later Augustus). Ptolemy lived in Rome until the age of 21, when he returned to the court of his aging father in Mauretania.

Ptolemy was a co-ruler with his father Juba II until Juba's death and was the last semi-autonomous ruler of Africa. On a visit to Rome in 40 AD he was seen by the Emperor Caligula in an amphitheather wearing a spectacular purpal cloak. A jealous Caligula had him murdered for his fashionable purple cloak.

Sold to Calgary Coin Feb 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
spaincart2.jpg
Augustus ( Octavian) Colonial Patricia, Spain 27 BCE-14 CE19 viewsObverse: PER ACE AVG, head of Octavian to the left.
Reverse: COLO PATR, Aspergilo (holy water sprinkler),
prefericulo (peripheral ring), lituo (curved stick used for worship)
and patera (shallow bowl).
14 mm., 2.0 g., AB 1566
sold 2-2018
NORMAN K
octavian_quinarius_k.jpg
Augustus (as Octavian), 27 BC - AD 14.10 viewsAR Quinarius, 14mm, 1.7g, 7h; Italian mint (Rome?), 29-28 BC.
Obv.: CAESAR IMP • VII; bare head right.
Rev.: ASIA on right, RECEPTA on left; Victory, draped, standing left, holding wreath in right hand and palm frond in left over left shoulder on cista mystica flanked by two interlaced snakes with heads erect.
Reference: RIC I 276
From the Orfew Collection
John Anthony
RIC_Claudius_on_Augustus_Martini-Pangerl_58.JPG
Augustus (Caius Julius Caesar Octavianus) (27 B.C. – 14 A.D.) and Tiberius (Tiberius Julius Caesar) (14-37 A.D.)29 viewsHowgego 602, Martini-Pangerl 58, on a RIC I (Augustus) ___

Countermark of Tiberius often encountered on coins found in the Moesia region (Bulgaria), on an AE as (25 mm) issued by Augustus in the name of a moneyer. Rome mint.

Obv: [illegible], bare head of Augustus, right.

Rev: [illegible], S—C in field, TI•C•A countermark within a rectangular incuse.

From an uncleaned coin lot.
Stkp
RIC_Augustus_RIC_I_427.JPG
Augustus (Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus) (27 B.C. - 14 A.D.)36 viewsRIC I (Augustus) 427

AE As (26-27 mm.), Rome mint, struck, 7 B.C.

Obv: CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT, bare head right.

Rev: P LVRIVS AGRIPPA III VIR AAA FF, around large S C.

Note: P. Lurius Agrippa was a moneyer, and the reverse legend refers to the board of three moneyers (tres viri auro argento aere flando feriundo).

RIC rarity C

From an uncleaned coin lot.
Stkp
RIC_Augustus_RIC_I_379.JPG
Augustus (Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus) (27 B.C. – 14 A.D.)27 viewsRIC I (Augustus) 379

AE As (28 mm.), Rome mint, struck, 16 B.C.

Obv: CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRINVNIC POTEST, bare head right.

Rev: C GALLIVS LVPERCVS III VIR AAA FF, around large S C.

Note: C. Gallius Lupercus was a moneyer, and the reverse legend refers to the board of three moneyers (tres viri auro argento aere flando feriundo).

RIC rarity C

From an uncleaned coin lot.
1 commentsStkp
RIC_Augustus-Caligula_Martini-Pangerl_90,_95__etc.JPG
Augustus (Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus) (27 B.C. – 14 A.D.) and Tiberius (Tiberius Julius Caesar) (14-37 A.D.) or Caligula (Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus) (37-41 A.D.)26 viewsMartini-Pangerl 90 (re TI•CÆ), 75 & 83 (re AVG), 98 (re helmet), 95-97 (re dolphin)

AE 23-26 mm

Obv: TI•CÆ, AVG and helmet countermarks on an unidentified undertype.

Rev: Dolphin countermark on an unidentified undertype.

The TI•CÆ countermark is late Augustinian and is often combined with the dolphin and helmet countermarks. The AVG countermark is probably associated with Tiberius or Caligula.

From an uncleaned coin lot.
Stkp
colonial_patricia[1].jpg
Augustus (Octavian) Colonial Patricia, Spain 27 B.C.E. - 14 C.E.14 viewsObverse - PER ACE AVG. Head of Octavio to the left
Reverse - COLO PATR. Aspergilo, prefericulo, lituo and patera.
14 mm., 2.0g. AB 1566
NORMAN K
DSC04118.JPG
Augustus AE Obv11 viewsAugustus/Octavian; 25 BC
AE 27mm/9.4 g Cyprus Mint,
OBV; CAESAR, bare head of Augustus right
REV: AVGVSTVS within laurel wreath.
RIC 486, BMCRE 731, RPC 2235.
Philip G
DSC04119.JPG
Augustus AE Rev10 viewsAugustus/Octavian; 25 BC
AE 27mm/9.4 g Cyprus Mint,
OBV; CAESAR, bare head of Augustus right
REV: AVGVSTVS within laurel wreath.
RIC 486, BMCRE 731, RPC 2235.
Philip G
H1a.jpg
Augustus AR Denarius46 viewsOne of my favorites.

Augustus AR Denarius. Spanish mint. 27-26 BC. Octavian, bare, r. / IMP (above) CAE - SAR DIVI F. Round shield with concentric rows of studs and central boss. RIC 543a

RARE
GOOD VERY FINE
SUPERLATIVE PORTRAIT

Ex. W. Uibeleisen Collection
Ex. Münzen & Medaillen AG Basel 81 (1995), 173.
Ex. Hess-Divo 2007
Trajan
Augustus,_17mm_,_3,34g,.jpg
Augustus AR Denarius. Octavian: Senator, Consul & Triumvir from 43 BC; de-facto sole ruler from 27 BC; proclaimed Augustus, emperor 12 BC - 14 AD.101 viewsCAESAR AVGVSTVS, bare head left / OB/CIVES/SERVATOS within wreath. 17mm., 3,34g
RIC 77b. RSC 209a. _15935
Antonivs Protti
octavian_spanish_mint_caetra.jpg
Augustus As, Caetra9 viewsObverse: IMP AVG DIVI F. Bust of Augustus. Palm branch in the left field and caduceus in the right.
Reverse: Iberian shield, called caetra.
Mint: Northwestern Hispania (Lucus?). Minted around the time of the Cantabrian campaign.

Weight: 9,78 g. Diameter: 25 mm. Axis: 0º.

Reference: RPC I 4.
Manuel
AUG_267.jpg
Augustus Denarius RIC 26724 viewsOctavian denarius. Bare head right / Octavian in quadriga facing on triumphal arch for Victory at Actium inscribed IMP CAESAR. RSC 123. Aldo
Augustus_otho.jpg
Augustus moneyer's series AE As39 viewsCAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT

Rev. M SALVIVS OTHO III VIR A A A FF around large SC

Rome 7 BC
Sear 1685
Titus Pullo
AUG_276.jpg
Augustus Quinarius RIC 27610 viewsOctavian AR Quinarius. Uncertain Italian mint, 29-27 BC. CAESAR IMP VII, bare head right / ASIA RECEPTA, Victory standing left on cista mystica between two serpents erect. BMCRE 647, RSC 14. Aldo
ric_126_augustus.jpg
Augustus RIC 0126 75 viewsAugustus (27 BC-AD 14), Denarius, Uncertain Spanish mint (Colonia Patricia?), 17-16 BC, (19 mm 3.73 g).
Obv: Bare head right
Rev: Augustus, Capricorn right, holding globe attached to rudder between front hooves; cornucopia above its back.
RIC I 126; RSC 21 SRCV (2000) 1592.
Purchased October 28, 2016 from vcoins store London Coin Galleries Ltd.




Although Augustus was the second Caesar covered by Suetonius, he really was the first ruler of the new Roman empire. Originally known by the name Octavian, he became Augustus as the new ruler of the empire.

The coin below is special to me for two reasons. First, I love the
anepigraphic (no legend) obverse. I feel this gives an elegant look to the portrait and make the portrait the focus of the coin. Many emperors were very particular as to how their images appeared on their coins and Augustus was no exception. It is difficult to tell when a coin of Augustus was issued by the portrait alone because his portraits did not age very much from his beginnings as emperor until his death.

Another reason I like this coin is the reverse. It depicts a Capricorn with globe and rudder. These devices appear on other coins of Augustus, and other emperors used them as well. Augustus would be associated with the image of the Capricorn for much of his rule.

Although this is not a perfect coin because of its imperfect flan shape, the combination of a great portrait and the Capricorn meant I had to have it.
4 commentsorfew
Augustus_RIC_222.jpg
Augustus RIC 022444 viewsOctavian as Augustus, 27 BC – 14 AD Denarius
Lugdunum circa 13-14,
18mm., 3.56g.
Obv: Laureate head r.
Rev. Tiberius in triumphal quadriga r., holding laurel branch and eagle-tipped sceptre.
RSC 301. RIC 224.
Ex: Naville Numismatics Live auction 50 Lot 439 June 23, 2019
3 commentsorfew
augustus_169.jpg
Augustus RIC I, 169140 viewsAugustus 27 BC - AD 14
AR - Denar, 3.82g, 18mm
Lugdunum 15 - 13 BC
obv. AVGVSTVS - DIVI F
bare head r.
rev. bull butting l.
exergue: IMP X
RIC I, 169; C.141
scarce; EF portrait!

1. The bull resembles the coins of Thurioi. Octavian has had the nickname Thurinus, because his ancestors came from Thurioi.
2. Then it is a general allusion to Gaul, inspired by coins of Massala. Augustus was 16-13 in Gaul to reorganize it.
1 commentsJochen
Augustus-Denarius-RIC-264.JPG
Augustus Silver Denarius-RIC-26429 viewsAR Denarius, 30BC-14AD
Obverse: Victory standing right on prow, holding wreath
Reverse: IMP CAESAR, Octavian in slow quadriga right
RIC 264
20mm, 3.4gm
Broken and repaired, rough surfaces.
1 commentsJerome Holderman
Augustus_Victory_Over_Brutus.jpg
Augustus Victory over Brutus27 viewsAugustus, Philippi, (Macedon Northern Greece) 27 BC - 10 BC, 20mm, 5.64g, BMC 23, Sear 32
OBV: VIC AVG, Victory standing on globe left.
REV: COHOR PRAEPHIL, 3 legionary standards

Commemorates the battle of Philippi, 42 B.C., in which Octavian and Antony defeated the Republican tyrannicides Brutus and Cassius, who subsequently committed suicide. Augustus later settled the veterans of a Praetorian Cohort at Philippi, and he conferred upon them the right to mint coins, of which this is an example. The images on this coin presumably refer to the Emperor's above described victory in 42 BC.
The winged victory standing on a globe representing the cosmos.
Such a coin is delivering, without words but in clear images that everyone would have understood, the message that Augustus now rules the world.
All the old political institutions were reestablished and the "dignity" of the Senate was restored, but actual power was now in the hands of one man alone.
Romanorvm
Octavian_RIC_270~0.JPG
Augustus, 27 BC - 14 AD32 viewsObv: No legend, laureate head of Octavian, as Jupiter Terminus, facing right, thunderbolt behind.

Rev: IMP CAESAR, Octavian seated left on a curule chair holding Victory in his right hand.

Note: This coin was issued to honor Octavian after his victory over Marc Antony at Actium.

Silver Denarius, Uncertain Italian Mint, ca. 30 - 29 BC

3.37 grams, 20 mm, 270°

RIC I 270, RSC 116, S1562, VM 24
SPQR Coins
Octavian_RIC_271.JPG
Augustus, 27 BC - 14 AD34 viewsObv: No legend, laureate head of Octavian, as Apollo, facing right.

Rev: IMP - CAESAR, cloaked statue of Octavian standing, facing, holding a spear and a parazonium atop a rostral column.

Silver Denarius, uncertain Italian mint, 30 - 29 BC

3.4 grams, 19 mm, 270°

RIC I 271, RSC 124, S1559, VM 30
SPQR Coins
Octavian_RIC_253.JPG
Augustus, 27 BC - 14 AD 33 viewsObv: No legend, diademed head of Pax facing right, olive branch before, cornucopia behind. Banker's mark on Pax's cheek.

Rev: (CA)ESAR - DIVI F, Octavian in military attire, walking right, his right hand raised and holding a spear over his left shoulder.

Denarius, Rome mint (?), c. 32 - 31 BC

3.8 grams, 19.3 mm, 270°

RIC I 253, RSC 72, S1549, VM 17
1 commentsSPQR Coins
Octavian_RIC_267.JPG
Augustus, 27 BC - 14 AD109 viewsObv: No legend, bare head of Octavian facing right.

Rev: IMP CAESAR inscribed on architrave of the Actian arch, depicted as a single span surmounted by a statue of Octavian in a facing triumphal quadriga.

Silver Denarius, Uncertain Italian mint, 30 - 29 BC

3.4 grams, 20 mm, 270°

RIC I 267, RSC 123, S1558, VM 29
3 commentsSPQR Matt
augustus-ebora.jpg
Augustus- RPC 16813 viewsOctavian as Augustus, 27 BC – 14 AD
Bronze, Carthago Nova after 27 BC.
Laureate head r. DIVIF AVGVSTVS
Simpulum aspergiullum, securis and apex.
Duumviri C. Varius Rufus und Sextus Iulius Pollio
xokleng
Augustus_British Museum.jpg
Augustus; September 23, 63 BC–August 19, AD 1410 viewsAugustus (Latin: IMP•CAESAR•DIVI•F•AVGVSTVS; September 23, 63 BC–August 19, AD 14), known as Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (English Octavian; Latin: C•IVLIVS•C•F•CAESAR•OCTAVIANVS) for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, was the first and among the most important of the Roman Emperors.Cleisthenes
RIAugustusAsCounterM~0.JPG
AVG and TICAE on AUGUSTUS AS (25 BC)317 views(26mm - 10.8g). Obv: Bust right (CAESAR), countermarked "AVG" (AVGUSTUS) & "TICAE" (TIBERIUS CAESAR). Rev: Legend within wreath (AVGVSTVS). Minted in Ephesus. Reference for this coin is RIC 486. Augustus was adopted by Julius Caesar as heir. After the assassination of Caesar, Octavian and Mark Antony fought together and won the resulting Civil War. They shared the rule of the Roman Empire. Antony's alliance with Cleopatra provoked a split with Octavian that led to a new Civil War. At the Battle of Actium (31 BC) Antony was defeated and Octavian became the sole ruler of the Empire. He was declared "Augustus" and became the proto-type emperor of Rome.1 commentskerux
Philippi.jpg
Battle of Philippi commemerative coin22 viewsPhilippi, Macedonia, 41 B.C. - 68 A.D.
Obverse: VIC - AVG, Victory standing left on base holding wreath and palm
Reverse: COHOR PRAE PHIL, three military standards

The Battle of Philippi was the final battle in the Wars of the Second Triumvirate between the forces of Mark Antony and Octavian (the Second Triumvirate) against the forces of Julius Caesar's assassins Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus in 42 BC, at Philippi in Macedonia.
Dk0311USMC
0123-Consul_20Fs.jpg
Bonaparte I° Consul - 20 francs or An 12 A45 viewsAtelier de Paris (A)
BONAPARTE PREMIER CONSUL, tête nue a gauche
REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, couronne de lauriers entourant 20 FRANCS en deux lignes. A l'exergue . coq . AN 12. . A .
Tranche inscrite DIEU PROTEGE LA FRANCE
6.44 gr
Ref : Le Franc VIII # 510/2
The revolution has ended, Bonaparte is soon becoming Napoleon I Empereur, as Octavian became Augustus (note the similarities on this portrait with those of Augustus on the "bull butting" denarii), but still unsure of what is going on. We see many contradictory messages for a laïque republic : a consul on obverse, a republic on reverse, a revolutionary calendar (An 12) and ... God save France on the edge...
Now you know why you find french people so romantic...
11-249
Potator II
C__Vibius_Pansa_C_f.jpg
C. Vibius C.f. C.n. Pansa Caetronianus - AR denarius14 viewsRome
48 BC
mask of Pan right
PANSA
radiate Jupiter Axurus seated left, holding patera and long scepter
IOVIS·AXVR·_C·VIBIVS·C·F·C·N
Crawford 449/1a; SRCV I 420; Sydenham 947; RSC I Vibia 18; Sear CRI 20
3,9g
ex Roma Numismatics

Coin depicts radiated beardless Jupiter Axurus who seems to be simmilar to the Apollo, Sol or Syrian Jupiter Heliopolitanus. His temple complex from the first century BC stood on the cliff above town Terracina which gave to the world the word terrace.

Moneyer was adoptive son of C Vibius C.f. Pansa. He became tribune in 51 BC and supported Caesar. In 43 BC he and Aulus Hirtius were sent with two senate armies to attack Marc Antony. Their armies won the battle of Forum Gallorum near Mutina but Hirtius died in the battle and Pansa was mortally wounded so Octavian Caesar became commander of the whole army.
Johny SYSEL
AncientRomanEmpire-AR-denarius-JuliusCaesar-046800.jpg
Caesar93 viewsRoman Imperatorial
Gaius Julius Caesar
(Reign as Dictator and/or Consul of the Roman Republic 49-44 BC)
(b. 100 BC, d. 44 BC)


Obverse: DICT.IN PERPETVO CAESAR, Wreathed and veiled head of Caesar facing right

Reverse: C MARIDIANVS, Venus holding Victory, resting elbow on shield set on globe, facing left



Silver Denarius
Minted in Rome February-March, 44 BC



Translations:

Imperatorial=The Imperatorial period extends from the outbreak of civil war between Julius Caesar and Pompey in January 49 B.C. and ends early 27 B.C. when Caesar's adopted heir Octavian was given the title "Augustus" by the Senate, effectively making him the sole ruler of the entire Roman territory. 

DICT.IN PERPETVO CAESAR=Dictator for Life Julius Caesar

C MARIDIANVS=Moneyer Caius Cossutius Maridianus

References:
Crawford 480/15
RSC 42

1 commentsSphinx357
Cappadocia.JPG
Cappadocia13 viewsThe Cappadocians, supported by Rome against Mithridates VI of Pontus, elected a native lord, Ariobarzanes, to succeed (93 BC); but in the same year Armenian troops under Tigranes the Great (Tigran) entered Cappadocia, dethroned king Ariobarzanes and crowned Gordios as the new client-king of Cappadocia, thus creating a buffer zone against the encroaching Romans. It was not until Rome had deposed the Pontic and Armenian kings that the rule of Ariobarzanes was established (63 BC). In the civil wars Cappadocia was now for Pompey, now for Caesar, now for Antony, now against him. The Ariobarzanes dynasty came to an end and a certain Archelaus reigned in its stead, by favour first of Antony and then of Octavian, and maintained tributary independence until AD 17, when the emperor Tiberius, on Archelaus' death in disgrace, reduced Cappadocia at last to a Roman province. Much later it was a region of the Byzantine Empire.ancientone
caracalla-denarius-reshoot.jpg
Caracalla (209 AD) AR Denarius21 viewsRoman Imperial, Caracalla (209 AD) AR Denarius, 1.8g, 19mm

Obverse: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate head right.

Reverse: LIBERTAS AVG, Libertas standing left holding pileus & sceptre.

Reference: RIC 161, RSC 143, Sear (RCV 2000) 6817

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
bpCelticCorrSilver.jpg
CELTIC, Gaul, Boii tribe, AR half-unit.165 views.9 gm 9.3 mm
Struck 200-150 BC.
Blank obverse.
Reverse: Horse prancing left, pellet above, torque below.
Listed in the Celtic Coin Atlas of Henri de la Tour, but only as a line drawing.
Three similar coins auctioned in CNG 31, 1994, lots 8-10.
The Boii were a Celtic tribe that settled in Northern Italy bounded to the south by the Rubicon river. Considered by Julius Caesar to be the "good" Gauls. Area was annexed as Rome's third Provence after Sicily and Corsica. Merged into Italia by Octavian in 42 BC as part of his 'Italicisation' program during the second Triumvirate.
1 commentsMassanutten
Octavian_Antoninus_R695_fac.jpg
Cr. 517/2, Octavian, Mark Antony17 viewsOctavian and Mark Antony
Denarius 41 BC
Obv.: CAESAR·IMP·PONT·III·VIR·R·P·C: Head of Octavian right, bearded; around, inscription. Border of dots.
Rev.: M·ANT·IMP·AVG·III·VIR·R·P·C·M·BARBAT·Q·P: Head of M. Antonius right; around, inscription. Border of dots.
Ag, 3.81g, 18.1mm
Ref.: Crawford 517/2
Ex Christoph Gärtner 44. Auktion Numismatik, Lot 4055 D
4 commentsshanxi
11062v.jpg
Crawford 417/1a, Roman Republic, Rome mint, moneyers L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus and L. Scribonius Libo, 62 BC., AR Denarius.72 viewsRoman Republic, Rome mint, moneyers L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus and L. Scribonius Libo, 62 BC.,
AR Denarius (18-20 mm / 3,72 g),
Obv.: [P]AVLLVS. LEPIDVS - CONCORD head of Concordia r., wearing veil and diadem.
Rev.: PVTEAL SCRIBON / LIBO , Puteal Scribonianum (Scribonian well, the "Puteal Scribonianum" well in the Forum Romanum near the Arch of Fabius), decorated with garland and two lyres, hammer at base.
Crawf. 417/1a ; Syd. 927 ; Bab. / Seaby Aemilia 11 ; Kestner 3422 ; BMC Rome 3383 ; CNR Aemilia 62 .
Rare

A puteal was a classical wellhead, round or sometimes square, set round a well opening to keep people from falling in. Such well heads (putealia) might be of marble, enriched with bas-reliefs. - The puteal is on the reverse of the coin adorned with garlands and two lyres. It is generally stated that there were two putealia in the Roman forum; but C. F. Hermann, who has carefully examined all the passages in the ancient writers relating to this matter (Ind. Lect. Marburg. 1840), comes to the conclusion that there was only one such puteal at Rome. It was in the forum, near the Arcus Fabianus, and was dedicated in very ancient times either on account of the whetstone of the Augur Navius (cf. Liv. I.36), or because the spot had been struck by lightning. It was subsequently repaired and re-dedicated by Scribonius Libo, who had been commanded to examine the state of the sacred places. Libo erected in its neighbourhood a tribunal for the praetor, in consequence of which the place was, of course, frequented by persons who had law-suits, such as money-lenders and the like.

The Puteal Scribonianum (Scribonian Puteal) or Puteal Libonis (Puteal of Libo), building in the Forum at Rome, dedicated or restored by a member of the Libo family, perhaps the praetor of 204 BC, or the tribune of the people in 149 BC. In its vicinity the praetor's tribunal, removed from the comitium in the 2nd century BC, held its sittings, which led to the place becoming the haunt of litigants, money-lenders and business people. According to ancient authorities, the Puteal Libonis was the name given to an erection (or enclosure) on a spot which had been struck by lightning; it was so called from its resemblance to the stone curb or low enclosure round a well (puteus) that was between the temples of Castor and Vesta, near the Porticus Julia and the Arcus Fabiorum (arch of the Fabii), but no remains have been discovered. The idea that an irregular circle of travertine blocks, found near the temple of Castor, formed part of the puteal is now abandoned. See Horace, Sat. ii.6.35, Epp. i.19.8; Cicero, Pro Sestio, 8; for the well-known coin of Lucius Scribonius Libo, representing the puteal of Libo, which rather resembles a cippus (sepulchral monument) or an altar, with laurel wreaths, two lyres and a pair of pincers or tongs below the wreaths (perhaps symbolical of Vulcan as forger of lightning), see C. Hulsen, The Roman Forum (Eng. trans. by J. B. Carter, 1906), p. 150.

L. Scribonius Libo, was the father-in-law of Sextus Pompey, the son of Pompey the Great. On the breaking out of the civil war in 49, he sided with Pompey, and was given command of Etruria. Shortly afterwards he accompanied Pompey to Greece, and was actively engaged in the war that ensued. On the death of Bibulus (48) he had the given command of the Pompeian fleet. In the civil wars following Caesar's death, he followed the fortunes of his son-in-law Sextus Pompey. In 40, Octavian married his sister Scribonia, and this marriage was followed by a peace between the triumvirs and Pompey (39). When the war was renewed in 36, Libo for a time supported Pompey, but, seeing his cause hopeless, he deserted him in the following year. In 34, he was consul with Mark Antony.

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
MAntDeL14.jpg
Crawford 544/29, Marc Antony, for Legio XIV, Denarius, 32-31 BC.84 viewsMarc Antony, for Legio XIV (Gemina Martia Victrix), Patras mint (?), 32-31 BC.,
Denarius (16-17 mm / 3,63 g),
Obv.: above: [AN]T AVG , below: [III VI]R R P C , under oar right, filleted scepter or mast with fluttering banners on prow.
Rev.: LEG - XIV , Aquila (legionary eagle) between two military standards.
Crawf. 544/29 ; Bab. (Antonia) 123 ; BMC 208 ; Sear 369 ; Syd. 1234 .

Die Legio XIV wurde 41 v. Chr. von Augustus aufgestellt. Sie war seit 9 n. Chr. in Moguntiacum (Mainz) stationiert und kämpfte später unter Claudius in Britannien, wo sie 60 oder 61 n. Chr. half, Boudicca niederzuwerfen. Später war die Legion u. a. in Vindobona (Wien) und Carnuntum stationiert. Sie war an den Usurpationen des Saturninus und Regalianus beteiligt.

Legio XIV Gemina Martia Victrix was a legion of the Roman Empire, levied by Octavian after 41 BC. The cognomen Gemina (twin in Latin) suggests that the legion resulted from fusion of two previous ones, one of them possibly being the Fourteenth legion that fought in the Battle of Alesia. Martia Victrix (martial victory) were cognomens added by Nero following the victory over Boudica. The emblem of the legion was the Capricorn, as with many of the legions levied by Augustus.
Invasion of Britain
Stationed in Moguntiacum, Germania Superior, since AD 9, XIIII Gemina Martia Victrix was one of four legions used by Aulus Plautius and Claudius in the Roman invasion of Britain in 43, and took part in the defeat of Boudicca in 60 or 61. In 68 it was stationed in Gallia Narbonensis.
Rebellion on the Rhine
In 89 the governor of Germania Superior, Lucius Antonius Saturninus, rebelled against Domitian, with the support of the XIVth and of the XXI Rapax, but the revolt was suppressed.
Pannonian defense
When the XXIst legion was lost, in 92, XIIII Gemina was sent in Pannonia to substitute it, camping in Vindobona (Vienna). After a war with the Sarmatians and Trajan's Dacian Wars (101-106), the legion was moved to Carnuntum, where it stayed for three centuries. Some subunits of Fourteenth fought in the wars against the Mauri, under Antoninus Pius, and the legion participated to the Parthian campaign of Emperor Lucius Verus. During his war against the Marcomanni, Emperor Marcus Aurelius based his headquarters in Carnuntum.
In support of Septimius Severus
In 193, after the death of Pertinax, the commander of the Fourteenth, Septimius Severus, was acclaimed emperor by the Pannonian legions, and above all by his own. XIIII Gemina fought for its emperor in his march to Rome to attack usurper Didius Julianus (193), contributed to the defeat of the usurper Pescennius Niger (194), and probably fought in the Parthian campaign that ended with the sack of the capital of the empire, Ctesiphon (198).
In support of imperial candidates
In the turmoil following the defeat of Valerian, tXIIII Gemina supported usurper Regalianus against Emperor Gallienus (260), then Gallienus against Postumus of the Gallic empire (earning the title VI Pia VI Fidelis — "six times faithful, six times loyal"), and, after Gallienus death, Gallic Emperor Victorinus (269-271).
5th century
At the beginning of the 5th century, XIIII Gemina still stayed at Carnuntum. It probably dissolved with the collapse of the Danube frontier in 430s. The Notitia Dignitatum lists a Quartodecimani comitatensis unit under the Magister Militum per Thracias; it is possible that this unit is XIV Gemina.

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
A22-067.jpg
crw 528/3 . Mark Antony and Octavian , AR Denarius , 41 BC46 viewsMark Antony and Octavian , AR Denarius , 41 BC
21 mm , 3.50 g . Military Mint Traveling with Antony in Syria (?)
M . ANTON . IMP . III . VIR . R . P . C . AVG
Bare head of Marc Antony right
CAESAR . IMP . PONT . III . VIR . R . P . C .
Bare head of Octavian right
Sydenham 1194; Crawford 528/3
Ex JHE .
1 commentsVladislav D
529.jpg
crw 529/4b Mark Antony and Octavian , AR Quinarius , 39 BC43 views Mark Antony and Octavian , AR Quinarius , 39 BC
15 mm.,1.87 grams . Military mint travelling with Octavian in Gaul
R . P . C-III . VIR .
Veiled, diademed head of Concordia right
M . ANTON-C . CAESAR
Clasped hands holding upright caduceus with spear-point base
Crawford 529/4b; CRI 304; Sydenham 1195; RSC 67 (Mark Antony)
Vladislav D
535,1.jpg
crw 535/1 . Octavian and Divus Julius Caesar . Æ Sestertius or Dupondius. 38 BC49 viewsOctavian and Divus Julius Caesar . Æ Sestertius or Dupondius. 38 BC .
30 mm , 20.80 grams . Italian (?) mint .
Obverse : CAESAR DIVI F, bare head of Octavian right .
Reverse : DIVOS IVLIVS, wreathed head of Divus Julius Caesar right .
Crawford 535/1; Sydenham 1335; RPC 620
1 commentsVladislav D
Augustus_Provident_SC_2b.jpg
Divus Augustus | Altar & PROVIDENT * AD. Æ As - 27 BC-14 AD127 views
Divus Augustus | Altar & PROVIDENT * AD. Bronze As.

Obv: Radiate head of Divus Augustus, left-facing: DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER
Rev: Altar-enclosure with double panelled doors, closed; uncertain ornaments at the top, PROVIDENT beneath.

Exergue: None.

Mint: Rome
Struck: 31-37 AD
(Struck under Tiberius)

Size: 29.15 mm.
Weight: 9.71 grm.
Die axis: 180°

Condition: Quite worn but with yet clearly visible images both sides; most obverse legend visible & legible, showing: [DIVV]S AVGVSTVS [P]ATER. Some light red-ish encrustration on the upper-right of the obverse, behind top of portrait.

Refs:*
BN, 132
Cohen, 228
RIC I, 81 (Tiberius)
BMCRE, 146 (Tiberius)

AUGUSTUS: Gaius Octavius Thurinus, later Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, was born Sept. 23, 63 BC. After defeating his rivals he is given the title 'Augustus' by which he became known thenceforth.
Tiathena
8100LG.jpg
Divus Julius Caesar4 viewsOctavian and Divus Julius Caesar. ca. 36 BC AE “As” (halved dupondius)
Obverse: Octavian and Divus Julius Caesar.
[IMP CAESAR DIVI F DIVI IVLI]; Bare heads of Caesar and Octavian (this half showing head of Julius Caesar).
Reverse: [C.I.V] above prow right with superstructure
jimbomar
060.JPG
Divus Julius Caesar & Octavian Æ24 of Thessalonika. c. 28 - 27 B.C.34 viewsDivus Julius Caesar & Octavian Æ24 of Thessalonika.

Divus Julius Caesar & Octavian Æ24 of Thessalonika. QEOC, head of Julius Caesar right / QESSA L O NIKEWN, head of Octavian right. RPC 1554.
Antonio Protti
_Divus_Julius_Octavian.jpg
Divus Julius Caesar and Octavian97 viewsMACEDON, Thessalonica. Divus Julius Caesar and Octavian. 28-27 BC? Æ 23mm 7.93g
O: Wreathed head of Julius Caesar right; c/m: ligate NK in circle
R: Bare head of Octavian right; D below.
For coin: Touratsoglou, Thessaloniki, Em. 1, 27 (V5/R25); RPC I 1554; SNG ANS 824; for c/m: Howgego 625.

The D has been interpreted as either a denomination mark (four assaria) or, more likely, a date - year four of the Actian era (28/7 BC). The ligate NK monogram has been generally accepted as a reference to Nero (Nerwn Kaisar). This is problematic considering that Thessalonica had abundant coinages issued under Claudius and Nero, such that countermarking these quite older coins would be unlikely. Touratsoglou (p. 105) follows Kraay's suggestion that the NK is an abbreviation for Nike (NiKh), and was applied to the coins during celebrations of the city's 50th anniversary of its grant of liberty by the Romans. All but two of the known specimens of this countermark occur on the coins of this first issue of Thessalonica, and the wear on the countermarks is nearly identical to that of the coins, suggesting that the countermarks could not have been applied very long after the coins entered circulation.
Nemonater
EB0362_scaled.JPG
EB0362 Mark Antony & Octavian24 viewsMark Antony & Octavian, AR Denarius, 32-31 BC
Obv: M ANTON IMP III VIR R P C AVG, bare head of Antony right. Unknown letter (banker's mark) under chin.
Rev: CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right.
References: Syd. 1181,1194; sear5 1506.
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 3.469 grams.
Note: Sold.
1 commentsEB
EB0528_scaled.JPG
EB0528 Augustus / Julius Caesar18 viewsAugustus, AE 31, Uncertain Gallic or Italian mint, ca 38 BC.
Obv: C[AESAR] DIVI F, Head of Octavian to right with slight
beard.
Rev: [DIV]OS IVLIVS, Laureate head of Caesar right.
References: Cohen 3; Sydenham 1336; RPC 620.
Diameter: 31mm, Weight: 15.64 grams.
EB
gallienus-aeterna-reshoot.jpg
Gallienus BI Antoninianus20 viewsRoman Imperial, Gallienus BI Antoninianus, 3.0g, 24mm

Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate head right.

Reverse: ROMAE AETERNA, Roma helmeted, seated left on shield, holding victory on globe and spear right.

Reference: Unlisted

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
gallienus-sol-reshoot.jpg
Gallienus BI Antoninianus. Milan mint21 viewsRoman Imperial, Gallienus BI Antoninianus. Milan mint, sole reign, 2.0g, 21mm

Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate head right.

Reverse: ORIENS AVG, Radiate Sol standing left, holding globe & raising right hand.

Reference: RIC 495

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
gordian-3-reshoot.jpg
Gordian III AR Antoninianus. 238-24420 viewsRoman Imperial, Gordian III AR Antoninianus. 238-244, 3.1g, 20mm

Obverse: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: PM TR P VI COS II P P, Apollo seated left with branch and arm resting on lyre.

Reference: RIC 90, RSC 272.

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
hadrian-denarius-reshoot.jpg
Hadrian AR Denarius, 117-138 AD17 viewsRoman Imperial, Hadrian AR Denarius, (117-138 AD), 3.1g, 18mm

Obverse: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, Laureate head right, slight drapery on left shoulder.

Reverse: COS III, Pudicitia standing left, covering face with veil.

Reference: RIC 176, RSC 392.

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
Herodwithscriptcopy.jpg
Herod I (the Great)111 viewsHerod I (the Great). 40-4 BCE. Æ 8 Prutot, 22mm, 5.82 g. Samaria mint. Dated RY 3 (40 BCE). O: Ceremonial bowl (lebes) on tripod; date L Γ (Year 3) to left, monogram to right. Greek Inscription: BAΣIΛEΩΣ HPΩΔOΥ (of King Herod.) R: Military helmet with cheek guards and straps, star above, palms flanking. Meshorer 44; Hendin 486; RPC I 4901.


Although there is debate over exactly what year “Year 3” refers to, the monogram TP may well indicate the third year of Herod’s tetrarchy. Josephus writes that Mark Antony appointed Herod as tetrarch (TETPAPXHΣ) in 42 B.C.E., which would bring us to 40/39 B.C.E. This is also when Herod was crowned as King of Judaea by the Roman Senate with the approval of Octavian (soon to be Augustus.)

This dating helps to explain the meaning of the obverse image of a soldier’s helmet. Although Herod was appointed as king, the Hasmonaean king, Mattathias Antigonus, was still ruling over Judea and did not recognize Roman authority. Herod would therefore have to raise an army, which he did, and, after a three month siege, conquered Jerusalem in 37 B.C.E.


Although Herod accomplished a great deal during his thirty-year + reign, including the building of massive palaces and amphitheaters and enlarging the temple, he is most remembered as a jealous, paranoid murderer, willing to do anything to maintain his political power.

Herod ordered the death of his Hasmonaean wife Mariamne and her brother Aristobulus. Later he had his two sons by Mariamne killed as well. This effectively eliminated the most serious threats to his power in Judaea. Caesar Augustus observed that it was safer to be Herod’s pig than Herod’s son. His wickedness reached its peak years later when, in fear of a rival king, he ordered the killing of all the boys two years of age and under in Bethlehem.

The Bible writer Matthew records Jesus’ birth taking place, “in the days of Herod the king.” A star led astrologers to Herod proclaiming the birth “of the one born king of the Jews.” The resulting slaughter of these children fulfilled the prophesy at Jeremiah 31:15, “This is what Jehovah has said, ‘In Ra′mah a voice is being heard, lamentation and bitter weeping; Rachel weeping over her sons. She has refused to be comforted over her sons, because they are no more.’”
4 commentsNemonater
lg1_quart_sm.jpg
IMP•CAESAR•DIVI•F•AVGVSTVS•IMP•XX / •PONTIF•MAXIM•TRIBVN•POT•XXXIIII / Ӕ As (10-12 A.D.)11 viewsIMP • CAESAR • DIVI • F • AVGVSTVS • IMP • XX, bare head left / • PONTIF • MAXIM • TRIBVN • POT • XXXIIII, huge letters S•C, no field or mint marks.

Ӕ, 26-27mm, 5.77g, die axis 5h (slightly turned coin alignment), material: supposed to be pure red copper.

IMPerator (originally meant "supreme commander", Augustus started to use it as a title)
CAESAR (Augustus adopted the last name from Julius, this is not a title yet)
DIVI Filius (Son of the divine [Julius], Augustus was thus named, having been adopted by Caesar as his son) AVGVSTVS (following his defeat of Mark Antony and Cleopatra in 31 BC Senate granted Octavian this new name, meaning "majestic")
IMPerator XX (Vicesimum) (i. e. "invested with the twentieth imperial acclaim", second 'imperator' means his military title, a victorious general, the number refers to important victories when the title was renewed) PONTIFex MAXIMus (the high priest, starting with Augustus the emperor was always the head of state religion)
TRIBVNitia POTestas (Tribunal power, the function of the tribune of the people, originally an important republican official, was "hijacked" by Augustus when he was building the imperial structure of power and subsequently became another emperor's title, renewed every year and thus very useful for dating coins)
XXXIIII (Augustus got his tribunal power for life in 23 BC, during the Second Settlement with the Senate, so the 34th tribunal year of Augustus gives us 11 AD as the year of issue of the coin, ±1 since the coin could have been minted slightly before or after, and there is alos some uncertainty about when exactly the tribunal year number was increased by)
SC = [Ex] Senatus Consulto (Senatus is genitive, Consulto is ablative of Consultum) = by decree of the Senate, i. e. the authority of the Senate approved minting of this coin (necessary to justify issue of copper alloy coins for which the intrinsic value was not obvious)
As or assarius – the lowest-valued Roman coin (in times of Augustus minted of pure red copper).

The size and weight of the coin, large SC and the bare head of the emperor (who actually looks really like a typical official portrait of Augustus) all point towards an early imperial as. Unfortunately due to a very poor condition of the coin all that can be reliably gathered from the legends: IMP… left of the neck, …(DI)VI… top of the head on obverse and …XII… 10-11 o'clock on reverse, perhaps also …PONTI… at 2 o'clock and a few other letters, that get increasingly unreliable. Fortunately to my knowledge this excludes all of the coins except just one as of Augustus: RIC 471, Cohen 226, BMC 275, minted in Rome, with the legends as given above and very common. The closest other coin fitting the general outlook is Ӕ as of Tiberius (RIC 44, Cohen 25, BMC 91), but for it the obverse legend starts with TI and DIVI never gets close to 12 o'clock. And the face of Tiberius typically looks noticeably different.

Still, I will be very grateful if anybody looking at this coin points out any other possibilities for identification.

No biographical info here, since Augustus (reign 27 BC - 14 AD) is too well known.
Yurii P
Augustus_Irippo.jpg
Irippo, (area of Seville),Hispania. AE Semis, 30 BC51 views Obv. IRIPPO, before bare head of Augustus (Octavian) right
Rev. female seated left holding pine cone and cornucopiae
1 commentsSkyler
fc15.jpg
Joe Geranio Collection -Cn. Domitius L.f. Ahenobarbus. 41-40 BC. AR Denarius23 viewshe Republicans. Cn. Domitius L.f. Ahenobarbus. 41-40 BC. AR Denarius (20mm, 3.61 g, 7h). Uncertain mint along the Adriatic or Ionian Sea. Head right / Prow right surmounted by a military trophy. Crawford 519/2; CRI 339; Sydenham 1177; Domitia 21. Fine, lightly toned, minor porosity and scratches, banker’s mark on each side.

Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus accompanied his father at Corfinium and Pharsalus on the side of Pompey. After his pardon by Julius Caesar, he retired to Rome in 46 BC. After Caesar's assassination, Ahenobarbus supported Brutus and Cassius, and in 43 BC was condemned under the terms of the Lex Pedia for complicity in the assassination. Ahenobarbus achieved considerable naval success against the Second Triumvirate in the Ionian theater, where this denarius was certainly minted, but finally, through the mediation of Gaius Asinius Pollio, he reconciled with Mark Antony, who thereupon made him governor of Bithynia. He participated in Antony's campaign against the Parthians, and was consul in 32 BC. When war broke out between Antony and Octavian, Ahenobarbus initially supported Antony, but, disgusted by Antony’s relationship with Cleopatra, sided with Octavian shortly before Actium. His only child, Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, was married to Antonia Maior, the daughter of Mark Antony and Octavia. Their son, Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus, married Agrippina Minor, the sister of the emperor Caligula, and was the father of the emperor Nero. Anyone may use as long as credited to Joe Geranio Collection.
Joe Geranio
JubaII.jpg
Juba II & Cleopatra Selene90 viewsREX IVBA
Diademed and draped bust right, club over shoulder

BACIΛICCA KΛEOΠATPA
Headdress of Isis, with stalks of grain, crescent above

Caesarea mint, 25 B.C. - 24 A.D

12.62g

Bronze AE 27, Alexandropoulos 209, Mazard 351 (RRR), SNG Cop 605, De Luynes 4013

Very Rare! Excellent for the type!

From a very old collection


Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (Daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today.

Sold to Calgary Coin Feb 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
JubaCleo.jpg
Juba II & Cleopatra Selene daughter of Antony62 viewsJuba II of Mauretania and Cleopatra Selene

REX IVBA REGIS IVBA E F R A VI
Head of Juba II left.

BACIΛICCA KΛE - OΠATPA
Cleopatra Selene left

dated year 6 = 20-19 BC.

3.12g

Rare

Ex-D. Loates Fine Arts; Ex-William McDonald Collection; Ex-Geoffrey Bell 2012 Fall Auction lot 273

SNG Cop. 546 ; Mazard 357 ; Sear 6000 ; Müller III, 108, 87

Wildwinds example


Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (Daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today. A partial inscription attributed to her reads:

The moon herself grew dark, rising at sunset,
Covering her suffering in the night,
Because she saw her beautiful namesake, Selene,
Breathless, descending to Hades,
With her she had had the beauty of her light in common,
And mingled her own darkness with her death
Jay GT4
Juba_II.jpg
Juba II and Cleopatra Selene217 viewsREX IVBA
Diademed head right

BACIΛICCA KΛEOΠATPA
Star and crescent.

Caesarea; 25 B.C.-23 A.D
17 mm, 2.62 gm

MAA 85; SNG Copenhagen 590; Mazard 300.
VF, toned
Scarce

Ex-ANE

Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today.
6 commentsJay GT4
Jubaselene.jpg
Juba II and Cleopatra Selene84 viewsJuba II of Mauretania and Cleopatra Selene

REX IVBA REGIS IVBA E F R A VI
Head of Juba II left.

BACIΛICCA KΛE - OΠATPA
Cleopatra Selene left

dated year 6 = 20-19 BC.

3.12g

Rare

Ex-William McDonald Collection

SNG Cop. 546 ; Mazard 357 ; Sear 6000 ; Müller III, 108, 87

Wildwinds example


Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (Daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today. A partial inscription attributed to her reads:

The moon herself grew dark, rising at sunset,
Covering her suffering in the night,
Because she saw her beautiful namesake, Selene,
Breathless, descending to Hades,
With her she had had the beauty of her light in common,
And mingled her own darkness with her death.
2 commentsJay GT4
julia-mamaea-reshoot.jpg
Julia Mamaea (222-235 AD) AR Denarius25 viewsRoman Imperial, Julia Mamaea (222-235 AD) AR Denarius, 1.5g, 19mm

Obverse: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, Diademed, draped, bust right.

Reverse: VENVS GENETRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and sceptre, cupid at feet.

Reference: RIC 355, RSC 72.

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
jchdup865.JPG
Julius Caesar98 viewsOCTAVIAN & DIVUS JULIUS CAESAR AE heavy dupondius. Struck in GAUL, at Colonia Viennensis, circa 36 BC. IMP CAESAR (written above and below portraits) IMP DIVI F DIVI IVLI, (written counterclockwise along edge). Bare heads of Julius Caesar and Octavian back to back (Caesar on left). Reverse - Prow of galley with pyramidal superstructure right. RPC I 517. 29x17mm, 9.6g. Rare.

Halved, presumably for change as was the custom.
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Julius___Augustus.jpg
Julius Caesar & Octavian93 viewsWreathed head of Julius Caesar right, ΘEOΣ downward before neck.

Bare head of Octavian right, Δ below neck, ΘEΣΣA - ΛONIKEΩN downward on left and upward on right.

Thessalonica, Macedonia, Year 4 = 28-27 BC.
AE 21
10.6g

RPC 1554. BM 58. Varbanov 5153. Touratsoglou, Thessaloniki, p. 143, no. 42 (V10/R39), pl. 1

Of all the coins of this type that I've searched online all of them with a counter mark are a Monogram of NK, in circular punch, 6.5 mm. Howgego 625 (25 pcs). Likely the countermark refers to NEPO KAICAP (Nero Caesar).

"The Δ has been interpreted as either a denomination mark (four assaria) or, more likely, a date - year four of the Actian era (28/7 BC). The ligate NK monogram has been generally accepted as a reference to Nero (Nerwn Kaisar). This is problematic considering that Thessalonica had abundant coinages issued under Claudius and Nero, such that countermarking these quite older coins would be unlikely. Touratsoglou (p. 105) follows Kraay's suggestion that the NK is an abbreviation for Nike (NiKh), and was applied to the coins during celebrations of the city's 50th anniversary of its grant of liberty by the Romans. All but two of the known specimens of this countermark occur on the coins of this first issue of Thessalonica, and the wear on the countermarks is nearly identical to that of the coins, suggesting that the countermarks could not have been applied very long after the coins entered circulation."


SOLD
1 commentsJay GT4
Julius_Caesar_and_Octavian_Macedonia.JPG
Julius Caesar and Octavian Macedonia18 viewsJulius Caesar & Octavian, Thessalonika, 27BC - 14 AD, 21.46mm, 6.4g, RPC 1555, Moushmov 6659, BMC 58, SGI 151,
OBV: QEOC, Laureate bust of Julius Caesar right
REV: ΘEΣΣAΛONIKEΩN (QECCALONIKEWN), bare head of Octavian right
Romanorvm
JC_voconius_combined.jpg
Julius Caesar Craw 526/431 viewsDivus Julius Caesar Denarius. 40 BC. Q Voconius Vitulus, quaestor. 20.39 mm 3.36 g
Obv:Laureate head right
Rev: Q•VOCONIVS above, S-C to sides, VITVLVS•Q / DESIG below, bull-calf advancing left.
Crawford 526/4, Sydenham 1133. Ex: Frank Robinson.




Of all of my coins, this one depicts the Roman figure best known. The famous Julius Caesar was famous during his own time as a victorious general and able statesman. He was dictator for five year after which he was murdered. You can still see the place where he was murdered if you visit the Forum of Rome. His assassination was supposed to restore the republic, but after a nasty civil war Octavian, later Augustus, would come to power and rule successfully until his death.

This coin was not minted in Julius Caesar's lifetime. It was instead minted about 4 years after his death. This is a divus issue. That is, it depicts Julius caesar as a god. It has been speculated that one of the reasons that he was assassinated was because he put his own portrait on coins. The obverse of coins was to be used for gods or kings. It was seen by some that Julius Caesar was naming himself king. Rome had a bad history with kings and this idea was unacceptable. One irony is that after the assassination, Brutus, one of the assassins, put his own portrait on coins.
orfew
EM006_Julius_Caesar.JPG
Julius Caesar; 46 - 44BC42 viewsÆ Sestertius (poss. Dupondius)
Struck ca. 38BC, generally attributed to an unknown "Southern Italian" mint.
Rev. - Wreathed head of Julius Caesar right, DIVOS JVLIVS around
Obv. - Bare head of Octavian right, wearing slight beard CAESAR (DIVI), around
13.82 grams
28 mm

While obviously Julius Caesar does not qualify as a First Century Roman Emperor, I figured that a coin depicting his posthumous image might technically allow me to complete a "12 Caesars" set until a lifetime portrait in bronze can be found.
1 commentscmcdon0923
763_425_Marcius_Philippus.JPG
L. Marcius Philippus - AR denarius6 viewsRome
²57 BC
¹56 BC
diademed head of Ancus Marcius to right, lituus behind
ANCVS
equestrian statue right on 5 archs of aquaduct (Aqua Marcia), flower below
PHILIPPVS
A-Q-V-A-(MAR)
¹Crawford 425/1, SRCV I 382, Sydenham 919, RSC I Marcia 28
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,7g
ex Lucernae

Coin shows moneyer's ancestors. Ancus Marcius on obverse was the fourth legendary king who rulled 642 – 617 BC from who Marcii claimed their origin. On reverse there could be statue of Preator Q. Marcius Rex on aquaduct Aqua Marcia which he repaired in 144-140 BC. It was the longest Roman aquaduct which bringed water to Rome from 91 km far source. Aquaduct was financed from money gained by looting of Carthage and Corinth.
Moneyer became consul in 38 BC. He was half-brother of Octavianus Augustus.
Johny SYSEL
L_Marcius_Philippus_denarius_18x20mm_3_77g.jpg
L. Marcius Philippus denarius40 views18x20mm, 3.77g
obv: ANCVS; diademed head of King Ancus Marcius right, lituus behind
rev: PHILIPPVS; aqueduct (the Aqua Marcia) surmounted by equestrian statue, flower below horse, A Q V A and MAR monogram between arches of aqueduct

The reverse of this coin refers to the construction of the Aqua Marcia in 144 BC. The moneyer was the step-brother of Octavian, the future emperor Augustus.

ex HD Rauch, summer auction 2009, lot 545
1 commentsareich
III.jpg
LEGIO III21 viewsMarcus Antonius, Marc Anthony, Silver denarius, Crawford 544/15, Sydenham 1217, BMCRR 193, RSC I 28, EF, but poorly struck, Patrae? mint, 3.527g, 21.7mm, 315o, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - III, legionary eagle between two standards, border of dots. This legion was probably Caesar's old III Gallica, which fought for Antony. Another possibility is III Cyrenaica, which was perhaps taken over from Lepidus. The III Augusta was probably an Octavian legion. ex FORVMPodiceps
unnamed.png
Macedon, Julius Caesar3 viewsMacedon under Roman rule, the first is Octavian, with Julius Caesar 28/7 BC (AE 20mm, 10.8 gm) RPC 1554.Ancient Aussie
319_Greek_BMC23.JPG
MACEDONIA, Philippi . Ae-20 of Augustus, 27 BC-14 AD.13 viewsReference.
BMC 23; Sear 32; RPC I 1651;SNG ANS 677; SNG Copenhagen 305

Obv. VIC-AVG
Victory standing left on globe, holding wreath and Palm

Rev. COHOR-PRAEPHIL
Three Legionary standards

5.61 gr.
20 mm

Extra:
Commemorates the battle of Philippi, 42 B.C., in which Octavian and Antony defeated the Republican tyrannicides Brutus and Cassius,
okidoki
philippi_RPC1651.jpg
Macedonia, Philippi, anonymous, RPC 165164 viewsAE 19 (Semis?), 6.72g
struck about AD 41-68
obv. VIC - AVG
Victoria advancing r. on prow, holding palmbranch in l. arm and wreath in
raised r. hand
rev. COHOR - PRAE / PHIL
around three standards
RPC 1651; SNG ANS 674-681; SNG Copenhagen 305-306
EF, brown patina, extraordinary good condition for this type

In 42 BC at the city of Philippi Octavian, the later emperor Augustus, defeated Brutus and Cassius, the assassins of Caesar. Following the battle, Philippi became a Roman colony and discharged veterans receiving land allotments settled permanently in the area. Special privileges were allowed to these Roman colonists, such as exemption from taxes and the right to own and market property, and to struck their own coins.

The Victory on the obv. resembles the famous Nike of Samothrace.
Jochen
divusjulius.jpg
Macedonia, Thessalonica. Octavian/Julius Caesar31 viewsMACEDON, Thessalonica. Octavian, with Divus Julius Caesar. 27 BC-AD 14. Æ 24mm (8.52 g, 12h). Struck under Domitian, AD 81-96. Bare head of Divus Julius right / Bare head of Augustus right. RPC I 1555ancientone
100_0729.JPG
Marc Antony22 viewsRef Marc Antony RSC 32 denarius
Marc Antony AR Denarius. 32-1 BC. Praetorian galley travelling right / LEG V, legionary Eagle between two standards. Cr544/18, Syd 1221.

Legion V was founded in transalpine Gaul in 52 BCE by Julius Caesar. It was the first legion to be recruited in the provinces, and Caesar paid the soldiers from his private purse. After playing key roles in Caesar's conquest of Gaul , the Fifth Alauda was also with Caesar when he crossed the Rubicon in 49BC. It then went on to fight the Republicans in the African campaign (46BC).

After Caesar's assassination in 44BC, the Fifth Alauda sided with Antonius, and participated in Antonius' ill-fated war against the Parthians. From there, the Fifth Alauda fought against Marcus Agrippa at the battle of Actium, and after Antonius' defeat, Octavian assumed control of the legion and transferred it to Merida .
simmurray
coin7.jpg
Marc Antony 18 viewsRef Marc Antony RSC 32 denarius
Marc Antony AR Denarius. 32-1 BC. Praetorian galley travelling right / LEG V, legionary Eagle between two standards. Cr544/18, Syd 1221.

Legion V was founded in transalpine Gaul in 52 BCE by Julius Caesar. It was the first legion to be recruited in the provinces, and Caesar paid the soldiers from his private purse. After playing key roles in Caesar's conquest of Gaul , the Fifth Alauda was also with Caesar when he crossed the Rubicon in 49BC. It then went on to fight the Republicans in the African campaign (46BC).

After Caesar's assassination in 44BC, the Fifth Alauda sided with Antonius, and participated in Antonius' ill-fated war against the Parthians. From there, the Fifth Alauda fought against Marcus Agrippa at the battle of Actium, and after Antonius' defeat, Octavian assumed control of the legion and transferred it to Merida .
simmurray
Antoct_k.jpg
Marc Antony & Octavian, M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetor. 18 viewsAR denarius, 20mm, 3.5g, 12h; Ephesos Mint 41 BC.
Obv.: M ANT IMP AVG III R P C M BARBAT Q P; Bare head of Antony right.
Rev.: CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C; Bare head of Octavian right, with slight beard.
Reference: Crawford 517/2; CRI 243; Sydenham 1181.
From the Orfew Collection, 17-24-165
2 commentsJohn Anthony
00mantoct.jpg
MARC ANTONY and OCTAVIAN 61 viewsAR denarius. Ephesus 41 BC. 3.78 grs. Bare head of Antony right. M.ANT.IMP.AVG.III.VIR.R.P.C.M.BARBAT.Q.P. / Bare head of Octavian right. CAESAR.IMP.PONT.III.VIR.R.P.C. Craw 517/2. RSC Mark Antony and Augustus 8.
Stack 11/90,N 14.
benito
00manyoct.jpg
MARC ANTONY AND OCTAVIAN35 viewsAR denarius. Ephesus 41 BC. 3.78 grs. Bare head of Antony right. M.ANT.IMP.AVG.III.VIR.R.P.C.M.BARBAT.Q.P. / Bare head of Octavian right. CAESAR.IMP.PONT.III.VIR.R.P.C. Craw 517/2. RSC Mark Antony and Augustus 8.
Stack 11/90,N 14.

1 commentsbenito
Antony_Octavian_denarius.jpg
Marc Antony and Octavian denarius portraits45 viewsMARK ANTONY and OCTAVIAN. Silver denarius. Moneyer: M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore. Ephesus, Spring-Summer 41 BC. Obv: M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P. Bare head of Mark Antony right. Rev: CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C. Bare head of Octavian right. Crawford 517/2; CRI 243. Weight: 3.91 g. Diameter: 13 mm.
This coin was struck to pay Antony's troops shortly after he and the young Octavian completed their defeat of Caesar's assassins. Several months later would come his first meeting with Cleopatra.
3 commentsOctavianus
Denarius1.jpg
Marc Antony Denarius19 viewsDenarius minted in Asia minor c.41 BC
Obv: M ANT IMP AVG III RPCM BARBAT QP, Bare head of Marc Antony right
Rev: CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR RPC, Bare head of Octavian right
Tanit
marc_antony_denar_legXVI.jpg
MARC ANTONY legionary denarius - 32-31 BC62 viewsobv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C (praetorian galley right)
rev: LEG XVI (Legio XVI Gallica - the legion from Gaul) (legionary eagle between two standards)
ref: Cr544/31, RSC 48, Albert1732 (100eur)
3.35g, 17mm

This legion was founded in 41 or 40 by Octavian, who needed it to put an end to Sextus Pompeius' occupation of Sicily. This legio also took part in the war of the first Marcomanni, against king Maroboduus in Czechia in 6 AD. They fought against German tribes: in the winter of 40/41, Servius Sulpicius Galba (the future emperor) overcame the Chatti. As the part of the army of Germania Inferior (led by Vitellius), XVI Gallica surrendered, at Bonn in April 70, and were renamed XVI Flavia Firma by Vespasianus.
berserker
marc_antony_denar_legXIX.jpg
MARC ANTONY legionary denarius - 32-31 BC58 viewsobv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C (praetorian galley right)
rev: LEG XIX (legionary eagle between two standards)
ref: Crawford 544/35, RSC 55, Syd 1242, Albert1736 (100eur)
2.15gms, 16mm

The massive issue of legionary denarii minted under Mark Antony was used to pay for military preparations for the comming war with Octavian. They tend to be of baser metal, leading some modern numismatists to classify them as "money of necessity," and they provide a record of the number of legions in Antony's army. This legionary denarii are known for being of much lower- grade silver than the comparable official Roman denarii.
The Legio XIX was founded in 41 or 40 BC, after the battle of Philippi by Octavian. The legion were completely destroyed in the Teutoburg Forest.
berserker
McAlee262.jpg
Marc Antony Tetradrachm12 viewsMinted in 39 B.C. at Ephesus to commemorate the wedding of Marc Antony and Octavia, sister of Octavian.1 commentsPaul F
Agrippa~0.jpg
Marcus Agrippa 40 viewsM AGRIPPA L F COS III
head of Agrippa left wearing rostral crown

Rev. SC either side of Neptune standing holding dolphin and trident

Issued by Caligula in honour of his deceased grandfather Agrippa

Minted in Rome 37-41 A.D.

Sold!
Titus Pullo
aprippa1.JPG
Marcus Agrippa, Struck under Caligula34 viewsRome mint, struck under Caligula, A.D. 37
Obverse: M • AGRIPPA • L • F • COS • III, head of Agrippa left, wearing rostral crown
Reverse: S C across field, Neptune standing facing, head left, holding small dolphin in right hand and trident in left.

General of the battle of Actium, and friend of Octavian Augustus
1 commentsDk0311USMC
syd1181.jpg
Marcus Antonius and Augustus45 viewsMark Antony and Octavian (Augustus)
Spring or summer 41 BC
Ephesus
3.72 g
22 mm
--- M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P.
Bare head of Mark Antony, right.
--- CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C.
Bare head of Octavian, right.
Sydenham 1181 - Crawford 517/2
2 commentsArgentoratum
1486_Thessalonica~7.jpg
Marcus Antonius and Octavian Caesar - Thessalonica4 views37 BC
head of Agonothesia right
AΓΩNOΘEΣIA
legend within wreath
ANT / KAI
RPC I 1552; SNG Copenhagen 375
12,5g 23mm
Johny SYSEL
AntonyOctavian.jpg
Marcus Antonius and Octavian Denarius211 viewsM ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV in monogram)
Bare hd of Mark Antony right

Rev
CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C
Bare head of Octavian right

Ephesus spring/summer 41 BC

3.54g

Sear 1504

This series of coins commemorates the establishment of the second Triumvirate of November 43 B.C. between Antony, Octavian and Lepidus. Both sides bear the inscription "III VIR R P C", meaning "One of Three Men for the Regulation of the Republic. Within a few years Antony would depart Italy for the Eastern provinces.

The moneyer for this coin is M. Barbatius Pollio who was also a Questor in 41 BC. Barbatius bears the title of "Quaestor pro praetore" abbreviated to QP a distinction shared by his colleague L. Gelllius.

From the Enrico collection
6 commentsJay GT4
marcus-aurelius-denarius-reshoot.jpg
Marcus Aurelius, Denarius, 172-173 AD18 viewsRoman Imperial, Marcus Aurelius, Denarius, (172-173 AD), 3.2g, 18mm

Obverse: M ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXVII, Laureate head right.

Reverse: IMP VI COS III, Emperor standing left holding branch and sceptre.

Reference: RIC 282, Cohen 305

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
Marcus_Lepidus.jpg
Marcus Lepidus Imperator128 viewsLaureate head of Roma (?) right

M LEPIDVS
Below equestrian statue of M. Aemelius Lepidus (consul 187 and 175 BC) right, carrying trophy

Rome, 61 BC

3.79g

Rare!

Sear 371, RPC 419/1, CRR 827-828b

Freed from a NGC Holder, graded strike 4/5; surface 4/5.

Marcus Lepidus strikes this coin early in his career as moneyer. After Julius Caesar's assassination he became Pontifex Maximus and formed the Second Triumvirate with Antony and Octavian. He would keep his post as Pontifex Maximus until his death. The office then became the sole procession of the Emperors.
7 commentsJay GT4
mariniana-peacock-reshoot.jpg
Mariniana, AR Antoninianus, 254-258 AD, Viminacium21 viewsRoman Imperial, Mariniana, AR Antoninianus, 254-258 AD, Viminacium, 1.2g, 19mm

Obverse: DIVAE MARINIANAE, Veiled and draped bust right on crescent.

Reverse: CONSECRATIO, Peacock standing, head right, tail in splendor.

Reference: RIC 4; RSC 4

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
38348q00.jpg
Mark Antony105 viewsMark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., Silver denarius, cf. Crawford 544/14, Sydenham 1216, BMCRR 190, and RSC I 27 ff., Fair, Patrae?, 2.818g, 17.7mm, 180o, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - [...], legionary eagle between two standards, border of dots Ex Forvm


The silver for this issue may have come from the Ptolemaic treasury, and this coin may have been present at the Battle of Actium.

"The Battle of Actium was the decisive confrontation of the Final War of the Roman Republic. It was fought between the forces of Octavian and the combined forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII. The battle took place on 2 September 31 BC, on the Ionian Sea near the city of Actium, at the Roman province of Epirus vetus in Greece. Octavian's fleet was commanded by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, while Antony's fleet was supported by the ships of Queen Cleopatra of Ptolemaic Egypt.
Octavian's victory enabled him to consolidate his power over Rome and its dominions. To that end, he adopted the title of Princeps ("first citizen") and some years after the victory was awarded the title of Augustus by the Roman Senate. This became the name by which he was known in later times. As Augustus, he would retain the trappings of a restored Republican leader; however, historians generally view this consolidation of power and the adoption of these honorifics as the end of the Roman Republic and the beginning of the Roman Empire."
3 commentsrandy h2
Antony_Sol.jpg
Mark Antony225 viewsM ANTONI IMP
Bare head of Marcus Antonius right, bearded

III VIR R P C
Distyle temple containing facing bust of Sol on disk

Epirus? Autumn of 42 BC

3.44g

Sear 1467
Scarce
Ex-Incitatus

David Sear in "The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators" says:

The reappearance of IMP in Antony's titulature suggests that this issue is subsequent to the second battle of Philippi (23 October), though as the Triumvir is still bearded it must have been struck quite soon after the deaths of Brutus and Cassius before orders had been given for the modification of the portrait. With Caesar's murder now avenged both Antony and Octavian could shave the beards which they had worn as a sign of mourning."
11 commentsJay GT4
Antony.jpg
Mark Antony & Octavian AR Denarius64 viewsWhat can I say? I'm a sucker for iridescent toning.

Mark Antony & Octavian AR Denarius. Ephesus mint, 41 BC. M. Barbatius Pollio, moneyer. M ANT. IMP AVG III VIR. R. PC. M. BARBAT Q P, bare head of Antony right / CAESAR. IMP. PONT. III. VIR. R. P. C., bare head of Octavian right, in slight beard. Cr517/2.

EXTREMELY FINE
Ex. Kunker 2007
2 commentsTrajan
AntonyCaesarportrait.jpg
Mark Antony & Julius Caesar portrait denarius202 viewsM ANTON IMP R P C
Bare head of Mark Antony right, bearded, lituus behind

CAESAR DIC
Wreathed head of Caesar right, capis behind

Gaul, November 43 BC

Imperators 123, Crawford 488/2, Sydenham 1166, Cohen 3, BMCRR Gaul 55, 57

3.05g

Rare!

Ex-Alberta coins

From Sears Imperator's:

"This issue would appear to be a revival of the type struck by Antony in the spring during the war around Mutina. After his Gallic adventures Antony, accompanied by his ally Lepidus, was now back in Cisalpine Gaul to meet with his former opponent Octavian. The conference between the three men at Bononia in early November, set the seal on the formation of the Second Triumvirate, an event commemorated by this issue. It clearly belongs to the period immediately following the agreement at Bononia as the form of the triumviral titulature (R P C) had not yet been expanded to the normal III VIR R P C. A distinctive feature of this coinage is the portrait of Antony which has a strangely elongated form, giving it something of the appearance of a caricature. Presumably, Antony's retinue at this time lacked the services of a die-engraver competent in the art of portraiture."
4 commentsJay GT4
126e.jpg
Mark Antony & Octavian Denarius (Syd 1181; RCV 1504)93 viewsMark Antony & Octavian, Silver Denarius, mint of Ephesus, 41 B.C. 3.55g

Obv: M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, head of Antony right

Rev. CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, head of Octavian right

12h (Cr 517/2; Syd 1181; RCV 1504). Small banker’s mark on obverse, attractive old iridescent cabinet tone, nearly extremely fine.

Ex. Baldwin & Sons
Summer 2011 Argentum Auction, Lot 26, 04/06/2011
David Heuer Collection, David Heuer of Memphis, Tennessee, USA
5 commentsKained but Able
Antony_Thessalonica.jpg
Mark Antony AE 27 mm 77 views Mark Antony

ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ ΕΛΕΥΘΕPΙΑΣ
Draped bust of Eleutheria right

M ANT AYT Γ KAI AYT
Nike advancing left, holding wreath and palm

MACEDON, Thessalonica
Circa 37 BC.

Weight: 18.8 gm
Diameter: 27 mm

Very Scarce!

RPC 1551; SNG Copenhagen 374,
1 commentsJay GT4
Antony_and_Octavian_001.jpg
Mark Antony and Octavian 147 viewsM ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV in monogram)
Bare hd of Mark Antony right

Rev
CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C
Bare head of Octavian right

Ephesus spring/summer 41 BC

2.97g

Sear 1504

This series of coins commemorates the establishment of the second Triumvirate of November 43 B.C. between Antony, Octavian and Lepidus. Both sides bear the inscription "III VIR R P C", meaning "One of Three Men for the Regulation of the Republic. Within a few years Antony would depart Italy for the Eastern provinces.

The moneyer for this coin is M. Barbatius Pollio who was also a Questor in 41 BC. Barbatius bears the title of "Quaestor pro praetore" abbreviated to QP a distinction shared by his colleague L. Gelllius.


SOLD!
1 commentsTitus Pullo
mark.jpg
Mark Antony and Octavian (41 B.C.)62 viewsAR Denarius
M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore
O: Bare head of Mark Antony right.
R: Bare head of Octavian right, wearing slight beard.
Ephesus mint, Spring-early summer 41 B.C.
3.5g
20mm
Crawford 517/2; CRI 243; Sydenham 1181

This series of coins commemorates the establishment of the second Triumvirate of November 43 B.C. between Antony, Octavian and Lepidus. Both sides bear the inscription "III VIR R P C", meaning "One of Three Men for the Regulation of the Republic. Within a few years Antony would depart Italy for the Eastern provinces.

The moneyer for this coin is M. Barbatius Pollio who was also a Questor in 41 BC. Barbatius bears the title of "Quaestor pro praetore" abbreviated to QP a distinction shared by his colleague L. Gelllius.
6 commentsMat
Handshake_Quinarius.jpg
Mark Antony and Octavian - Quinarius - Sear Imperators 3049 viewsObv: diademed and veiled head of Concordia right, III VIR R P C around
Rev: clasped r. hands holding caduceus, M ANTON C CAESAR around
Size: 13 mm
Weight: 1,6 g
Mint: Military mint travelling with Octavian in Gaul
Date: late 39 BC
Ref: RSC 67, Crawford 529/4b, Sear Imperators 304
vs1969
image.jpeg
Mark Antony and Octavian . AE As . 37 BC.40 viewsMark Antony and Octavian . AE As . 37 BC.
13.20g, 22mm . Thessalonica Mint . 37 BC.
Obv: Diademed head of Agonothesia, right.
Rev: legand ANT/KAI in two lines within wreath.
RPC(1) 1552, SNG ANS 819, SNG Copenhagen 375
Ex Andrew McCabe collection

1 commentsVladislav D
Antony_Octavian.jpg
Mark Antony and Octavian Caesar - AR denarius10 viewsmoneyer M. Barbatius Pollio
Ephesus?
spring - early summer 41 BC
head of Mark Antony right
M·ANT·I(MP)·(AV)G·III·VIR·R·P·C·M·BARBAT·Q·P
head of Octavian Caesar right
CAESAR·IMP·PONT·III·VIR·R·P·C·
Crawford 517/2, RSC I Mark Antony and Augustus 8, BMCRR 103, Sydenham 1181, SRCV I 1504
3,3g
ex Künker

Moneyer held unusal office quaestor pro praetore in the east in 41-40 BC. He accompanie Mark Antony after the battle of Philippi. He was probably also Curule Aedile. He restored aedicula shrine on the Forum Romanum and fountain of goddess Juturna (Lacus Iuturnae).
Johny SYSEL
reconciliation.jpg
Mark Antony and Octavian Reconciliation Denarius30 viewsMarcus Antonius and Octavianus Reconciliation Denarius, 41 BC, military mint moving with Marc Antony.
Obverse: M ANT IMP AVG IIIVIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, bare head of Marc Antony right.
Reverse: CAESAR IMP PONT IIIVIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right.
Crawford 517/2, 17-19 mm, 3.23 g.
b70
marc_antony_03.jpg
Mark Antony AR Legionary Denarius27 viewsObv: ANT AVG / III VIR R P C - Praetorian galley right.
Rev: Legionary eagle between two standards; below, LEG XIII.
Date: 32-31 BC
Ref: BMC 205, RSC Mark Antony 41
Notes: This legion was used by Julius Caesar's heir Octavian, who had to put an end to Sextus Pompeius' occupation of Sicily, which put the grain supply of Rome into peril. On one occasion, soldiers of the Thirteenth saved Octavian's life. When Pompeius was defeated, Octavian and his fellow triumvir Mark Antony started a war, which culminated in the naval battle off Actium (31 BC), where Octavian defeated his opponent and won the supremacy in the Mediterranean world.
3 commentsoa
ANTVARVS.jpg
Mark Antony denarius100 viewsBare head of a bearded Mark Antony right

C VIBVS VARVS
Fortuna standing left holding Victory and cornucopiae

Rome 42 BC

3.25g

Rough but much better in hand!

Sear 1466, RRC 494/32

ex-Londinium

Fortuna holding Victory shows the confidence the Triumvirs had in defeating the Ruplicans, namely Brutus and Cassius. Varus also struck this type for Octavian. It is interesting to note that on the evidence of stylistic similarity it is possible that the die-engraver responsible for the triumviral portraits was later transferred from the Capitoline mint to Antony's military mint outside the city.

The fact that Antony is again shown bearded is in reference to his mourning for Caesar's death. Only after Caesar was avenged would Antony be shown as a typical clean shaven Roman.
4 commentsJay GT4
madenOR.jpg
Mark Antony denarius, BMC 19326 viewsPatrae(?) mint, Mark Antony denarius, Triumvir and Imperator, 32-31 B.C. AR, 17.4mm 3.25g , Crawford 544/15, Sydenham 1217, BMC 193, RSC I 28
O: ANT dot AVG / III VIR dot R dot P dot C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots
R: LEG - III, legionary eagle between two standards, border of dots

This legion was probably Caesar's old III Gallica, which fought for Antony. Another possibility is III Cyrenaica, which was perhaps taken over from Lepidus. The III Augusta was probably an Octavian legion.

1 commentscasata137ec
Antony_Fleet_galley.jpg
Mark Antony Fleet coinage157 viewsMarcus Antonius Fleet coinage (Light Series)

M ANT IMP TERT COS DESIG ITER ET TERT III VIR RPC
Conjoined heads of Marcus Antonius and Octavia right

M OPPIVS CAPITO PRO PR PRAEF CLASS FC
Galley under sail right

Tarentum (?) summer 37 BC
4.13g

Sear 1497, RPC 1470, CRI 296,

Very rare in any condition

Cleaned by Kevin at NRC.

The legendary Fleet coinage of Antony belongs to two series, heavy and light. The "light series" is thought to have been minted at a later date, possibly just after Antony returned from his conference with Octavian in 37 BC. The meeting saw the Pact of Tarentum. Part of that agreement saw Antony loan 120 ships to Octavian along with his Admirals Altratinus and Capito.

A fine insight into Antony's administrative abilities can be seen by his fleet coinage that came in sestertius, dupondius and as denominations. Of note is that Antony's "Fleet Coinage" shows the appearance of the first sestertius in bronze rather than silver. When Octavian (Augustus) reformed the coinage 20 years later he maintained the exact same denominations; sestertius, dupondius and as. After Actium Octavian also kept many if not all of the client Kings in their positions and territories. A strong case for Antony's capabilities as an administrator.

M. Oppius Capito occupied an important position in Antony's inner circle although little is known of him. Capito's coins are more abundant than those of his colleagues and only Capito's coins include the title "Praefectus classis" (Prefect of the fleet). Most of his coins are found in Greece and were probably minted in Piraeus, the harbor complex of Athens. Athens at this time was the home of Antony and Octavia so it is likely that Capito's mint would be located here.

Sold to Calgary Coin Jan 2016
4 commentsJay GT4
LEG_III~0.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG III 156 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C

galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG III
legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

SOLD

Legio III Gallica was levied by Julius Caesar around 49 BC, for his civil war against the conservative republicans led by Pompey.

The legion took part in all Julius Caesar's campaigns against his enemies, including the battles of Pharsalus and Munda. Following Caesar's death, III Gallica was integrated in the army of Mark Antony for his campaigns against the Parthians. They were included in the army levied by Fulvia and Lucius Antonius (Antony's wife and brother) to oppose Octavian, but ended by surrendering in Perugia, in the winter of 41 BC. After the battle of Actium and Antony's suicide, the III Gallica was sent again to the East, where they garrisoned the province of Syria.

III Gallica was used in Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo's campaign against the Parthians over the control of Armenia (63). Corbulo's successes triggered emperor Nero's paranoia of persecution and eventually the general was forced to commit suicide. After this, III Gallica is transferred to Moesia province, in the Danube border.
Titus Pullo
LEGIO_III.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG III 109 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C

galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG III
legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

Legio III Gallica was levied by Julius Caesar around 49 BC, for his civil war against the conservative republicans led by Pompey.

The legion took part in all Julius Caesar's campaigns against his enemies, including the battles of Pharsalus and Munda. Following Caesar's death, III Gallica was integrated in the army of Mark Antony for his campaigns against the Parthians. They were included in the army levied by Fulvia and Lucius Antonius (Antony's wife and brother) to oppose Octavian, but ended by surrendering in Perugia, in the winter of 41 BC. After the battle of Actium and Antony's suicide, the III Gallica was sent again to the East, where they garrisoned the province of Syria.

III Gallica was used in Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo's campaign against the Parthians over the control of Armenia (63). Corbulo's successes triggered emperor Nero's paranoia of persecution and eventually the general was forced to commit suicide. After this, III Gallica is transferred to Moesia province, in the Danube border.
Titus Pullo
LEGIIII.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary denarius LEG IIII124 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG IIII
legionary eagle between two standards

3.22g

Patrae mint 32-31BC

Sear Imperator's 353; Crawford 544/16; Cohen 29

Ex-Gutierrez Ruesga Spain

RARE

This type with LEG IIII rather than LEG IV is quite rare. No examples were found in the Delos Hoard of 1905





In its first years, the whereabouts of IV Scythica are uncertain, although it is probable that it took part in Antony's campaign against the Parthians. The name suggests that it fought against the Scythians. After the battle of Actium and Antony's suicide, Octavian transferred IV Scythica to the Danube province of Moesia. The legion is reported to have taken part in civilian tasks, such as the building and keeping of roads. In his youth, future emperor Vespasian served in this legion.

SOLD! Forum Auction January 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
ANTLEGIV.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG IV71 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley right, mast with banners at prow

LEG IV
Legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

3.34g

ex-Arcade coin

The coin that started it. This was my first Mark Antony coin!

In its first years, the whereabouts of IV Scythica are uncertain, although it is probable that it took part in Antony's campaign against the Parthians. The name suggests that it fought against the Scythians. After the battle of Actium and Antony's suicide, Octavian transferred IV Scythica to the Danube province of Moesia. The legion is reported to have taken part in civilian tasks, such as the building and keeping of roads. In his youth, future emperor Vespasian served in this legion.
2 commentsJay GT4
LEG_VI.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG VI 100 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG VI legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

The photo appears to show this as LEG VII but in hand you can see that the second I is a scratch
Background History on the VI Legion

Raised in Cisalpine Gaul in 58 BC by Julius Caesar, the Sixth Legion served with him during his tenure as governor and was withdrawn to Spain in 49 BC where it earned the title “Hispaniensis”.

Later seeing action at Pharsalus in 48 BC, Julius Caesar took the 6th to Alexandria to settle the dispute in Egypt with Cleopatra. Alexandria was laid to siege and the 6th was almost wiped out losing almost two thirds of its entire manpower. Julius Caesar eventually triumphed when reinforcements arrived.

Julius Caesar took his “Veteran Sixth Legion” with him to Syria and Pontus. The Legion then served in Pontus under Caesar in 48 BC and 47 BC. This culminated in the battle of Zela where victory was won by Legio VI.

During Caesar’s African war against Scipio, the Sixth Legion deserted en masse from Scipio to reinforce Caesar and fought under him.

The legion was disbanded in 45 BC after Munda establishing a colony at Arelate (Arles), but was re-formed by Lepidus the following year (44 BC) and given over to Marcus Antonius the year after that. Following the defeat of the republican generals Cassius and Brutus in successive battles at Philippi in 42 BC and the subsequent division of control between Antony and Octavian, a colony was again formed from retired veterans at Beneventum in 41 BC (this is the colony which it is believed became Legio VI Victrix) and the remainder of Legio VI Ferrata was taken by Antony to the East where it garrisoned Judea.

Legio VI fought in the Parthian War in 36 BC.

Another Legio VI Victrix evidently saw action at Perusia in 41 BC, which presents us with a problem because the official Legio VI Ferrata was at that moment with Anthony in the East. This is explained in Lawrence Keppie's excellent book The Making of the Roman Army - from Republic to Empire (pp.134); “Octavian did not hesitate to duplicate legionary numerals already in use by Antony. The latter had serving with him legio V Alaudae, legio VI Ferrata and legio X Equestris. Soon we find Octavian's army boasting of a legio V (the later Macedonica), legio VI (the later Victrix) and legio X (soon to be Fretensis). Of these, legio V and legio X, and less certainly legio VI, bore under the empire a bull-emblem which would normally indicate a foundation by Caesar; but the true Caesarian legions with these numerals (Alaudae, Ferrata and Equestris) were with Antony.”

It would seem, therefore, that Octavian had again used the veterans of Caesars Sixth Legion, this time from those left at Beneventum, to form the core of his own Sixth Legion used at Perusia.

Both Legio VI’s (Ferrata and Victrix) fought at the Battle of Actium, after this event the legio VI Ferrata was dispatched back to Judea and the next time we hear of the legio VI Victrix was in Spain.

Legio VI Ferrata was severely mauled at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC by the forces loyal to Caesar's nephew and heir, Octavian. Following the Battle of Actium, another colony of veterans seems to have been created at Byllis, probably together with soldiers from other legions, and the remainder of VI Ferrata was moved to Syria/Judea where it was to remain.

From 9 BC to 73 AD the VI Ferrata was garrisoned the area of Judea. It was in this time frame that Jesus Christ was tried before Pontius Pilatus, the Roman Governor of Judea.

From 54 AD to 68 AD the Legion served under Corbulo at Artaxata and Tigranocerta against the Parthians. In 69 AD the Legion returned to Judea and fought in the Jewish Civil War. As the Jewish Civil War wound down, the sixth was placed under Mucianis and fought against Vitellius. Legion VI was largely responsible for Mucianis victory over the forces of Vitellius during the brief Roman Civil War .
Titus Pullo
LEG_VIII.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG VIII83 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG VIII
legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

3.63g

This legion is not LEG VIII Augusta which was disbanded by Caesar and re-enlisted by Octavian.

Ex-Forum
5 commentsJay GT4
ANTLEGX.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG X101 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG X
Legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

LEG X (later called Gemina) was levied in 59 BC or earlier by Julius Caesar. It was the first legion levied by him personally and was raised in Spain. It played a major role in the Gallic war featuring prominently in Caesar's "Gallic Wars." Legio X was his most trusted and loyal Legion. In 45 BC the Legion was disbanded and given land grants in Southern Gaul.

During the civil war that followed Caesar's assassination, Legio X was reconstituted by Lepidus in the winter of 44/43 BC making use of many retired legionaries who re-enlisted. It was eventually turned over to Antony and fought for him until the final Battle of Philippi. The veterans obtained lands near Cremona, and an inscription reports that the name of the legion at the time was Veneria, "devoted to Venus." This alluded to Julius Caesar's claimed descent from Venus.

The newly levied Tenth was then taken by Antony to Armenia for his Parthian campaign. During Antony's civil war, the legion fought for him until his defeat at the Battle of Actium, after which the legion changed sides and moved into Octavian's army. They were then taken to Egypt to finish off Antony and Cleopatra. Octavian never fully trusted the 10th Legion as it had been fiercely loyal to both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. After Antony's death Octavian left the legion in the East in Syria. In 29 BC the legion was due to be discharged. When the legionaries pressed for their release and land grants Octavian was slow in complying. Suetonius says that the entire legion rioted and Octavian dishonorably discharged the entire legion.

Octavian now recruited new legionaries to fill the 10th Legion in its traditional recruiting grounds of Spain. Some of the senior Centurions may have re-enlisted for a third term to serve with the 10th. These men would have been in their late 40's or early 50's. The new legionaries marched over land to Syria to take up their posting. The new 10th Legion's home base was on the Euphrates to keep an eye on the Parthians.

The next discharge date would be 14-13 BC. This time the 10th Legion was settled in Beirut and the city was given Colony status. Ten years later the 10th Legion under Publius Quintilius Varus was marched down to Jerusalem to garrison the city after Herod the Great died. The 10th Legion would remain in Jerusalem until 6 AD.
2 commentsJay GT4
ANTVESPcounter.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary denarius LEG X IMPVESP139 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley r. mast with banners at prow
IMPVESP counter mark above galley

LEG X?
Legionary eagle between two standards IMPVESP countermark


Patrae mint 32-31BC

3.01g

Ex-Incitatus

Obverse countermarked IMPVESP during Vespasian's reign showing this denarius was in circulation for well over 100 years! In hand I can make out X for the legion number but can't be sure if any other numerals appear after it. This countermark appears mostly on late Republican and Imperatorial denarii, although denarii of Augustus and denarii of the Flavians struck at Ephesus are also recorded. The MP VES countermarks circulated specifically within the province of Asia Minor. Martini noted that the output of silver coinage in relation to the civic bronze for this region was much smaller during the Julio-Claudian period. This suggests the denarii were countermarked to validate locally circulating silver coinage at an acceptable weight while the regional mints opened by Vespasian were gearing up production, a theory which the countermarking of cistophori with the contemporary MP VES AVG countermarks seems to support. The similarly countermarked Flavian denarii struck at Ephesus can be accounted for then as examples accidentally countermarked by unobservant mint workers during the transition.



LEG X (later called Gemina) was levied in 59 BC or earlier by Julius Caesar. It was the first legion levied by him personally and was raised in Spain. It played a major role in the Gallic war featuring prominently in Caesar's "Gallic Wars." Legio X was his most trusted and loyal Legion. In 45 BC the Legion was disbanded and given land grants in Southern Gaul.

During the civil war that followed Caesar's assassination, Legio X was reconstituted by Lepidus in the winter of 44/43 BC making use of many retired legionaries who re-enlisted. It was eventually turned over to Antony and fought for him until the final Battle of Philippi. The veterans obtained lands near Cremona, and an inscription reports that the name of the legion at the time was Veneria, "devoted to Venus." This alluded to Julius Caesar's claimed descent from Venus.

The newly levied Tenth was then taken by Antony to Armenia for his Parthian campaign. During Antony's civil war, the legion fought for him until his defeat at the Battle of Actium, after which the legion changed sides and moved into Octavian's army. They were then taken to Egypt to finish off Antony and Cleopatra. Octavian never fully trusted the 10th Legion as it had been fiercely loyal to both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. After Antony's death Octavian left the legion in the East in Syria. In 29 BC the legion was due to be discharged. When the legionaries pressed for their release and land grants Octavian was slow in complying. Suetonius says that the entire legion rioted and Octavian dishonorably discharged the entire legion.

Octavian now recruited new legionaries to fill the 10th Legion in its traditional recruiting grounds of Spain. Some of the senior Centurions may have re-enlisted for a third term to serve with the 10th. These men would have been in their late 40's or early 50's. The new legionaries marched over land to Syria to take up their posting. The new 10th Legion's home base was on the Euphrates to keep an eye on the Parthians.

The next discharge date would be 14-13 BC. This time the 10th Legion was settled in Beirut and the city was given Colony status. Ten years later the 10th Legion under Publius Quintilius Varus was marched down to Jerusalem to garrison the city after Herod the Great died. The 10th Legion would remain in Jerusalem until 6 AD.
5 commentsJay GT4
antony_mark_XII.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XII 69 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG XII
legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

This was Caesar's 12th legion, raised in 58 BC for the campaign against the Helvetii. It served throughout the wars in Gaul (58 to 49), Italy (49), and at Pharsalus (48). It was disbanded 46-45 BC and the colonists were settled at Parma. The legion was reformed in 44-43 BC most likely by Lepidus. The legion was then passed to Antony in 41-31 BC and was present at Actium. It appears on Antony's coinage as LEG XII ANTIQVAE. Colonists were settled at Patrai, Greece alongside men of Legio X Equestris, perhaps by Antony, more likely by Octavian soon after Actium.

The legion's whereabouts during most of Augustus' reign is unclear. The 12th was very possibly the unnamed third legion (with III Cyrenaica and XXII Deiotariana) stationed in Egypt. That unnamed legion disappears from Egypt at just about the same time that Legio XII Fulminata is first found in Syria. By early in the reign of Tiberius, the 12th legion was based at Raphanae.
Titus Pullo
Antony_XII_Ant~0.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XII ANTIQVAE65 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley right mast with banners at prow

LEG XII ANTIQVAE
Legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31 BC
3.33g

SEAR 1480

This was Caesar's 12th legion, raised in 58 BC for the campaign against the Helvetii. It served throughout the wars in Gaul (58 to 49), Italy (49), and at Pharsalus (48). It was disbanded 46-45 BC and the colonists were settled at Parma. The legion was reformed in 44-43 BC most likely by Lepidus. The legion was then passed to Antony in 41-31 BC and was present at Actium. It appears on Antony's coinage as LEG XII ANTIQVAE. Colonists were settled at Patrai, Greece alongside men of Legio X Equestris, perhaps by Antony, more likely by Octavian soon after Actium.

The legion's whereabouts during most of Augustus' reign is unclear. The 12th was very possibly the unnamed third legion (with III Cyrenaica and XXII Deiotariana) stationed in Egypt. That unnamed legion disappears from Egypt at just about the same time that Legio XII Fulminata is first found in Syria. By early in the reign of Tiberius, the 12th legion was based at Raphanae.
Jay GT4
LegXIIANT.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XII ANTIQVAE116 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley right mast with banners at prow

LEG XII ANTIQVAE
Legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31 BC
3.57g

SEAR 1480

Ex-Londinium Coins

This was Caesar's 12th legion, raised in 58 BC for the campaign against the Helvetii. It served throughout the wars in Gaul (58 to 49), Italy (49), and at Pharsalus (48). It was disbanded 46-45 BC and the colonists were settled at Parma. The legion was reformed in 44-43 BC most likely by Lepidus. The legion was then passed to Antony in 41-31 BC and was present at Actium. It appears on Antony's coinage as LEG XII ANTIQVAE. Colonists were settled at Patrai, Greece alongside men of Legio X Equestris, perhaps by Antony, more likely by Octavian soon after Actium.

The legion's whereabouts during most of Augustus' reign is unclear. The 12th was very possibly the unnamed third legion (with III Cyrenaica and XXII Deiotariana) stationed in Egypt. That unnamed legion disappears from Egypt at just about the same time that Legio XII Fulminata is first found in Syria. By early in the reign of Tiberius, the 12th legion was based at Raphanae.
4 commentsJay GT4
LegXII.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XIII69 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG XIII legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

SOLD

Purchased as a low budget LEG XII upon viewing in hand it is definately a 13th Legion

Legio XIII was levied by Julius Caesar in 57 BC, before marching against the Belgae, in one of his early interventions in intra-Gallic conflicts.

During the Gallic wars (58-51 BC), Legio XIII was present at the Battle against the Nervians, the siege of Gergovia, and while not specifically mentioned in the sources, it is not unreasonable to assume that Legio XIII was also present for the Battle of Alesia.

Forced to choose either the end of his political career, or civil war, Caesar brought Legio XIII across the Rubicon river and into Italy. The legion remained faithful to Caesar during the resulting civil war between Caesar and the conservative Optimates faction of the senate, whose legions were commanded by Pompey. Legio XIII was active throughout the entire war, fighting at Dyrrhachium (48 BC) and Pharsalus (48 BC). After the decisive victory over Pompey at Pharsalus, the legion was to be disbanded, and the legionaries "pensioned off" with the traditional land grants; however, the legion was recalled for the Battle of Thapsus (46 BC) and the final Battle of Munda (45 BC). After Munda, Caesar disbanded the legion, retired his veterans, and gave them farmlands in Italy.

Reconstituted by Octavian in 41 BC.
Its standard was the lion.
1 commentsTitus Pullo
AntonyLEGXIII.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XIII93 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG XIII legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

New Photo

Legio XIII was levied by Julius Caesar in 57 BC, before marching against the Belgae, in one of his early interventions in intra-Gallic conflicts.

During the Gallic wars (58-51 BC), Legio XIII was present at the Battle against the Nervians, the siege of Gergovia, and while not specifically mentioned in the sources, it is not unreasonable to assume that Legio XIII was also present for the Battle of Alesia.

Forced to choose either the end of his political career, or civil war, Caesar brought Legio XIII across the Rubicon river and into Italy. The legion remained faithful to Caesar during the resulting civil war between Caesar and the conservative Optimates faction of the senate, whose legions were commanded by Pompey. Legio XIII was active throughout the entire war, fighting at Dyrrhachium (48 BC) and Pharsalus (48 BC). After the decisive victory over Pompey at Pharsalus, the legion was to be disbanded, and the legionaries "pensioned off" with the traditional land grants; however, the legion was recalled for the Battle of Thapsus (46 BC) and the final Battle of Munda (45 BC). After Munda, Caesar disbanded the legion, retired his veterans, and gave them farmlands in Italy.

Reconstituted by Octavian in 41 BC.
Its standard was the lion.
Jay GT4
ANT_CLASSICAE.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XVII CLASSICAE155 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley right mast with banners at prow

LEG XVII CLASSICAE
Legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31 BC

2.99g

Crawford 544/10, Sydenham 1238, BMCRR 223, RSC I 50

Very scarce

Not the greatest coin but one that was missing from my collection. The ending of "CLASSICAE" is clearly seen on the reverse.

LEG XVII CLASSICAE was raised by Antony and was later disbanded or lost it's identity after the battle of Actium, being incorporated into Octavian's legions. The cognomen "Classica" seems to relate to special naval duties assigned to this regiment by Antony.
1 commentsJay GT4
Scarpus~0.jpg
Mark Antony Scarpus denarius101 viewsM ANTO COS III IMP III
Head of Jupiter Ammon right

ANTONIO AVG SCARPVS IMP
Victory walking right holding wreath and palm

Cyrene summer of 31 BC
2.86g
Sear 1486

In the will of Caesar, Scarpus received one eighth of certain legacies after the legacies given to Octavian. He along with his cousins from the will became heirs to his great uncle.

Scarpus became an ally to Mark Antony and commanded for him against the war on Marcus Brutus and Cassius Longinus. In the years leading up to Actium 31 BC, Antony appointed Scarpus to the military command of Cyrenaica. Scarpus had with him four legions to command. During his time in Cyrenaica Scarpus had control of the currency mint in Cyrene, as he became a moneyer. Scarpus had issued various coins bearing Antony’s name and Scarpus’ name was inscripted as an issuer of these coins.

After Antony & Cleopatra were defeated by Octavian at Actium, Scarpus withdrew his support from Antony and gave his support (including his legions) to Octavian. Antony after the defeat sailed back to North Africa and sent messengers to Scarpus for help.
Scarpus refused to see Antony’s messengers and put them to death. He gave his legions to Gaius Cornelius Gallus, Octavian’s lieutenant to command.

Augustus then appointed his cousin as Governor of Cyrenaica. Scarpus as he did for Antony, became a moneyer and issued various coins bearing Augustus’ name. On these coins, Scarpus had his name inscripted as an issuer of the coins.
2 commentsJay GT4
legioxxiiLG.jpg
Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.62 viewsMARCUS ANTONIUS (Marc Antony) AR silver legionary denarius. Legion XXIII. 18mm, 3.5g. Struck at a military mint, likely Patrae, 32-31 BC. Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley sailing. Reverse: LEG XXIII, eagle between standards. Ex Incitatus.

Legion XXII, the 22nd, is the second-last legion in the series and one of the scarcer types of the regular numbered legions.

Marcus Antonius (in Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) (January 14, 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. He was an important supporter and the loyal friend of Gaius Julius Caesar as a military commander and administrator, despite his blood ties, through his mother Iulia, to the branch of Caesars opposed to the Marians and murdered by them. After Caesar's assassination, Antony formed an official political alliance with Octavian (Augustus) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, known to historians today as the Second Triumvirate.

The triumvirate broke up in 33 BC. Disagreement between Octavian and Antony erupted into civil war, the Final War of the Roman Republic, in 31 BC. Antony was defeated by Octavian at the naval Battle of Actium, and in a brief land battle at Alexandria. He and his lover Cleopatra committed suicide shortly thereafter.

For anyone tempted to laud Marcus Antonius, to Antony's great shame read what Plutarch wrote about what Antony did to Cicero:

Plutarch: Cicero's Death

But in the meantime the assassins were come with a band of soldiers, Herennius, a centurion, and Popillius, a tribune, whom Cicero had formerly defended when prosecuted for the murder of his father. Finding the doors shut, they broke them open, and Cicero not appearing, and those within saying they knew not where he was, it is stated that a youth, who had been educated by Cicero in the liberal arts and sciences, an emancipated slave of his brother Quintus, Philologus by name, informed the tribune that the litter was on its way to the sea through the close and shady walks. The tribune, taking a few with him, ran to the place where he was to come out. And Cicero, perceiving Herennius running in the walks, commanded his servants to set down the litter; and stroking his chin, as he used to do, with his left hand, he looked steadfastly upon his murderers, his person covered with dust, his beard and hair untrimmed, and his face worn with his troubles. So that the greatest part of those that stood by covered their faces whilst Herennius slew him. And thus was he murdered, stretching forth his neck out of the litter, being now in his sixty-fourth year. Herennius cut off his head, and, by Antony's command, his hands also, by which his Philippics were written; for so Cicero styled those orations he wrote against Antony, and so they are called to this day.

When these members of Cicero were brought to Rome, Antony was holding an assembly for the choice of public officers; and when he heard it, and saw them, he cried out, "Now let there be an end of our proscriptions." He commanded his head and hands to be fastened up over the rostra, where the orators spoke; a sight which the Roman people shuddered to behold, and they believed they saw there, not the face of Cicero, but the image of Antony's own soul.

Translation by John Dryden: http://intranet.grundel.nl/thinkquest/moord_cicero_plu.html

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
DSCN7085.JPG
Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG VI. AR 16-18mm17 viewsMark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG VI.

Obv. ANT•AVG / III •VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots.

Rev. LEG - VI, legionary eagle between two standards, border of dots.

"The VI Ferrata, the "Ironclad", was an old legion of Caesar's that fought for Antony. It was retained by Augustus, and later served in Syria and Judaea. The VI Victrix, on the other hand, was one of Octavian's legions. This coin-type was 'restituted' by Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, presumably in connection with the latter's Eastern campaigns."
Lee S
Mattatayah_Antigonus.jpg
Mattatayah Antigonus33 viewsBronze prutah, 14mm, 1.53g. Jerusalem mint. O: Retrograde Paleo-Hebrew inscription, Mattatayah, surrounded by wreath and border of dots. R: Double cornucopia adorned with ribbons, barley grain between horns, border of dots. Hendin 1164

In 40 BCE, Mattatayah Antigonus, youngest son of Aristobulus II, bribed the Parthians to assist him in his invasion of Jerusalem. Josephus reports that after their conquest, Mattatayah tore into Hyrcanus II ears with his teeth in order to permanently disqualify him from being High Priest. Later this same year, the Roman Senate and Octavian appointed Herod King of Judaea.

After years of fighting, Herod, with the help of Roman troops under Gaius Sosius, took Jerusalem and captured Antigonus in 37 BCE. His later execution at Antioch ended five generations of Hasmonean rule, now replaced by what would become the Herodian Dynasty.
1 commentsNemonater
mauretanien_jubaII_SNGcop574.jpg
Mauretania, Juba II, SNG Copenhagen 57433 viewsMauretania, Juba II, 25 BC - AD 23
AR - drachm, 3.24g, 17.83mm, 180°
struck AD 11 (?)
obv. REX IVBA
diademed head of Juba r.
rev. BACIL - ICC - A KLEO[PA]TRA.
Crown of Isis with grain-ears, below crescent
ref. SNG Copenhagen 574
about VF, obv. a bit excentrically
pedigree:
ex Marc Breitsprecher
ex Harlan J. Berk

Iuba II., like his father, was one of the Roman client kings. Grown up in Rome and educated by Octavia, sister of Octavian, he was appointed as king of Mauretania by Augustus in 25 BC. He was highly cultivated and promoted the Hellenistic culture. Her 1. wife was Kleopatra, daughter of the famous Kleopatra VII and Marcus Antonius. Her time of death is disputed and therewith the dating of this coin. Kleopatra Selene, like her mother, thought herself the incarnation of Isis, whose celestial body was the moon. Therefore on the crescent the crown of Isis above crescent.

One of the rare coins with Greek and Latin legends!
2 commentsJochen
GG-AugMerc33__10~0.jpg
Mercury127 viewsOctavian, AR Denarius of Eastern Mint (?), B.C.32-31

Obv: Bare head of Octavian right
Rev: Naked Mercury seated on a rock, petasus hanging down his back, playing a lyre. CAESAR DIVI F

RIC.257 Sear RCV I 1550 RSC I 61 BMCRE.596 BMCRR East 236

In addition to Mercury's position as messenger of the gods and patron of merchants there was another belief about him that on occasion he was a cunning thief, and was thus the patron of thieves. One story relates how he stole some oxen from Apollo. Whilst in hiding he found a tortoise in a cave. From the shell and some strings drawn across it he invented the lyre. As he was playing it Apollo heard the sound and was so charmed by it that he allowed Mercury to keep the oxen, and the lyre was from then on was also associated with Apollo. However, with this coin here the petasus denotes that the lyre is being played by Mercury.
1 commentsnemesis
Legionair.jpg
Miles Legio X, 58 - 57 B.C. (Gallic Wars)110 viewsMiles or Miles Gregarius was the Roman army rank for the basic private level foot soldier.

Legio X Equestris was one of the four legions used by Julius Caesar in 58 B.C. for his invasion of Gaul. In the Gallic wars, X Equestris played an important role on Caesar's military success, fighting under Caesar in virtually every battle. For this reason the Xth is sometimes said to be his favorite. Legio X saved the day in the battle against the Nervians in 57 BC. Together with the IXth, the Xth defeated the Atrebates, moved against the Belgians on the other side of the river and captured the enemy camp. From that position, the Xth could see how desperate the situation was for the XII Victrix as well as the VIIth. So, it quickly charged downhill, crossed the river, and attacked the Nervii from the rear, trapping them so that there was little hope of survival.

In Caesar's campaigns Legio X was present in the battle against the Nervians, the invasions of Britain, and the siege of Gergovia. They remained faithful to Caesar in the civil war against Pompey, being present in the battles of Pharsalus (49 BC) and Munda (45 BC). In 45 BC Caesar disbanded the legion, giving the veterans farmlands near Narbonne. During the civil war that followed Caesar's assassination, Legio X was reconstituted by Lepidus (winter 44/43), and fought for the triumvirs until the final Battle of Philippi.

The Xth later followed Mark Antony in Armenia, during his Parthian campaign. During Antony's civil war, the legion fought for Mark Antony until the defeat in the Battle of Actium, after which the legion moved into Octavian's army. The veterans settled in Patras. When the legion rebelled under Augustus, it was disbanded, stripped of its Equestris title, and, being populated with soldiers from other legions, renamed X Gemina. (Source: wikipedia)

Scale of this model: 75mm (1/24)
1 commentsRomaVictor
Cordius.jpg
Mn. Cordius Rufus - AR denarius6 viewsRome or Athens
46 BC
conjoined heads of the Dioscuri with laureate pilei right, stars above
RVFVS III VIR
Venus Verticordia standing left, holding scales and scepter, Cupid on her shoulder
(MN)·CORDI
SRCV I 440, RSC I Cordia 2b, Sydenham 976a, Crawford 463/1b
3,65g

Moneyer is the only known member of Cordia gens. Later he served as preator and proconsul under Octavian.
After scandal with Vestal virgins the temple was dedicated to Venus Verticordia ("Venus the changer of hearts") in Rome 114 BC . Venus Verticordia is on one hand pun for Cordia and on the other hand supports Julius Caesar. Iulii claimed that their origin comes from Iulus son of Aeneas who was son of Venus.
Johny SYSEL
[901a]_NervaAntiochAE26.jpg
Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D., Antioch, Syria195 viewsBronze AE 26, BMC Syria, p. 182, 261, aVF, Antioch mint, weight 13.524g, maximum diameter 25.0mm, die axis 0o, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; Obverse: IMP CAESAR NERVA AVG III COS, laureate head right; Reverse: large S C in wreath, D below; unbelievable portrait. Ex FORVM. Photo courtesy FORVM.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families
Nerva (96-98 A.D.)

David Wend

Introduction
Although short, the reign of Marcus Cocceius Nerva (A.D. 96-98) is pivotal. The first of Edward Gibbon's so-called "Five Good Emperors," Nerva is credited with beginning the practice of adopting his heir rather than selecting a blood relative. Claimed as an ancestor by all the emperors down to Severus Alexander, he has traditionally been regarded with much good will at the expense of his predecessor, Domitian.

Ancestry
Nerva could claim eminent ancestry on both sides of his family. On the paternal side, his great-grandfather, M. Cocceius Nerva, was consul in 36 B.C.; his grandfather, a distinguished jurist of the same name, accompanied Tiberius on his retirement to Capri in 26 A.D. On his mother's side an aunt, Rubellia Bassa, was the great-granddaughter of Tiberius. In addition, a great-uncle, L. Cocceius Nerva, played a part in the negotiations that secured a treaty between Octavian and Antony in 40 B.C

Early Career and Life under Domitian
Nerva was born on 8 November, 30 A.D. Little is known of his upbringing beyond the fact that he belonged to a senatorial family and pursued neither a military nor a public speaking career. On the other hand, he did hold various priesthoods and was a praetor-designate. More importantly, as praetor designate in 65, Nerva was instrumental in revealing the conspiracy of Piso against the emperor Nero.

As a result, he received triumphal ornaments and his statue was placed in the palace. Following Nero's fall in 68, Nerva must have realized that support of Vespasian and the Flavian cause was in his best interests. In 71 his loyalty was rewarded with a joint consulship with the emperor, the only time that Vespasian ever held the office without his son Titus. It was under the reign of Vespasian's other son, Domitian, that Nerva's political fortunes were ultimately determined, however. He shared the ordinary consulship with Domitian in 90, an honor that was perhaps the result of his alerting the emperor about the revolt of Antonius Saturninus, the governor of Upper Germany, in 89. Even so, like so many others of the senatorial class, Nerva came under scrutiny in the final years of Domitian's reign, when the emperor was unwilling to tolerate any criticism.

Whether or not Nerva was forced to withdraw from public life during Domitian's final years remains an open question. What is not in dispute is that he was named emperor on the same day that Domitian was assassinated in September, 96. Indeed, in some respects the accession was improbable, since it placed the Empire under the control of a feeble sexagenarian and long-time Flavian supporter with close ties to the unpopular Domitian. On the other hand, Nerva had proven to be a capable senator, one with political connections and an ability to negotiate. Moreover, he had no children, thereby ensuring that the state would not become his hereditary possession.

Imperial Initiatives
Upon taking office, Nerva made immediate changes. He ordered the palace of Domitian to be renamed the House of the People, while he himself resided at the Horti Sallustiani, the favorite residence of Vespasian. More significantly, he took an oath before the senate that he would refrain from executing its members. He also released those who had been imprisoned by Domitian and recalled exiles not found guilty of serious crimes. Nevertheless, Nerva still allowed the prosecution of informers by the senate, a measure that led to chaos, as everyone acted in his own interests while trying to settle scores with personal enemies.

In the area of economic administration Nerva, like Domitian, was keen on maintaining a balanced budget. In early 97, after appointing a commission of five consular senators to give advice on reducing expenditures, he proceeded to abolish many sacrifices, races, and games. Similarly, he allowed no gold or silver statues to be made of himself. Even so, there was some room for municipal expenditure. For the urban poor of Italy he granted allotments of land worth 60 million sesterces, and he exempted parents and their children from a 5% inheritance tax. He also made loans to Italian landowners on the condition that they pay interest of 5% to their municipality to support the children of needy families. These alimentary schemes were later extended by Trajan, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius.

Because he reigned only briefly, Nerva's public works were few. By early 98 he dedicated the forum that Domitian had built to connect the Forum of Augustus with the Forum of Peace. It became known as the Forum of Nerva, or the Forum Transitorium. Nerva also built granaries, made repairs to the Colosseum when the Tiber flooded, and continued the program of road building and repairs inaugurated under the Flavians. In addition, pantomime performances, supressed by Domitian, were restored.

In the military realm, Nerva established veterans' colonies in Africa, a practice that was continued by the emperor Trajan. Normal military privileges were continued and some auxiliary units assumed the epithet Nervia or Nerviana. We are not well informed beyond these details, and any military action that may have occurred while Nerva was emperor is known sketchy at best.

Nature of Nerva's Government
Nerva's major appointments favored men whom he knew and trusted, and who had long served and been rewarded by the Flavians. Typical was Sextus Julius Frontinus. A consul under Vespasian and governor of Britain twenty years earlier, Frontinus came out of retirement to become curator of the water supply, an office that had long been subject to abuse and mismanagement. He helped to put an end to the abuses and published a significant work on Rome's water supply, De aquis urbis Romae. As a reward for his service, Frontinus was named consul for the second time in 98. Similarly, the emperor's own amici were often senators with Flavian ties, men who, by virtue of their links to the previous regime, were valuable to Nerva for what they knew. Thus do we find the likes of A. Didius Gallus Fabricius Veiiento, one of Domitian's ill-reputed counselors, seated next to Nerva at an imperial dinner. Nerva was less willing to consult the Senate as a whole. In many cases he preferred the opinions of his own consilium, and was less submissive than many senators would have liked. This attitude may have been responsible for hostile discontent among several senators.

Mutiny of the Praetorians and the Adoption of Trajan
It was not long before the assassination of Domitian came to work against the new emperor. Dissatisfied that Domitian had not been deified after his death, the praetorian guards mutinied under Casperius Aelianus in October 97. Taking the emperor as hostage, they demanded that Nerva hand over Domitian's murderers. The emperor not only relented, but was forced to give a public speech of thanks to the mutineers for their actions. His authority compomised, Nerva used the occasion of a victory in Pannonia over the Germans in late October, 97 to announce the adoption of Marcus Ulpius Traianus, governor of Upper Germany, as his successor. The new Caesar was immediately acclaimed imperator and granted the tribunicia potestas. Nerva's public announcement of the adoption settled succession as fact; he allowed no time to oppose his decision. From the German victory, Nerva assumed the epithet Germanicus and conferred the title on Trajan as well. He also made Trajan his consular colleague in 98.

Death and Deification
On January 1, 98, the start of his fourth consulship, Nerva suffered a stroke during a private audience. Three weeks later he died at his villa in the Gardens of Sallust. From his headquarters at Cologne, Trajan insisted that Nerva's ashes be placed in the mausoleum of Augustus and asked the senate to vote on his deification. We are further told that he dedicated a temple to Nerva, yet no trace of it has ever been found. Nor was a commemorative series of coins issued for the Deified Nerva in the wake of his death, but only ten years later.

Conclusion
Nerva's reign was more concerned with the continuation of an existing political system than with the birth of a new age. Indeed, his economic policies, his relationship with the senate, and the men whom he chose to govern and to offer him advice all show signs of Flavian influence. In many respects, Nerva was the right man at the right time. His immediate accession following Domitian's murder prevented anarchy and civil war, while his age, poor health and moderate views were perfect attributes for a government that offered a bridge between Domitian's stormy reign and the emperorships of the stable rulers to follow.

Copyright (C) 1998, David Wend.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
0114.jpg
Octacian, Bronze, Macedonia30 viewsOctacian, Bronze, Macedonia:

RPC, I, 1554. (not verified)
28-27 BC,
AE (g 10,53; mm 21; h 12);

Av: Crowned head of Caesar r.; before, [Θ]EOΣ,
Rv: ΘEΣΣA - ΛONIKEΩN, bare head of Octavianus r.; below, Δ. RPC, I, 1554.

For me a great coin to own a portrait of Caesar, without having to pay the amounts being asked for one struck in Rome

Ex Bertolami Fine arts, Auction 24, Numismatics, London, 23.06.2016, #593
1 commentsNorbert
38515q00.jpg
Octavian148 viewsOctavian, Triumvir and Imperator, Augustus 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D

Silver denarius, Fair, rough, Italian (Rome?) mint, weight 3.495g, maximum diameter 18.5mm, die axis 270o, c. 29 - 27 B.C.; obverse IMP CAESAR, Octavian, holding olive branch, driving triumphal quadriga right; reverse Victory standing right on prow, wreath in right, palm over shoulder in left

RIC 264, RSC 155 - RSC 115?, sear5 1555 ex Forvm


"This coin commemorates Octavian's victory at Actium and his triumph. The silver for this issue may have come from the Ptolemaic treasury"
7 commentsRandygeki(h2)
00010-augustus.jpg
Octavian32 viewsAugustus Denarius
19 mm 3.76 gm
O:AVGVSTVS DIVI F PONT MAX PATER PATRIAE
Laureate head right
R: C L CSESARES AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT
Caius & Lucius standing with spears & shields
1 commentsJohn Campbell
100_0761.JPG
Octavian79 viewsOctavian Denarius. 29-27 BC. Bare head right / IMP - CAESAR, trophy composed of helmet, cuirass, shield, and crossed spears set on prow of galley right. RSC 119, RIC 265a, sear5 #1556.
5 commentssimmurray
pmaugtrof.jpg
OCTAVIAN50 viewsAR denarius. Autumn 30-summer 29 BC. 3.76 grs. Bare head right / Trophy facing, set on prow of galley right; crossed rudder and anchor at base. IMP CAESAR in fields.
RSC 119


1 commentsbenito
pmaugtrof~0.jpg
OCTAVIAN27 viewsAR denarius. Autumn 30-summer 29 BC. 3.76 grs. Bare head right / Trophy facing, set on prow of galley right; crossed rudder and anchor at base. IMP CAESAR in fields.
RSC 119

benito
octavian33.jpg
OCTAVIAN66 viewsAR denarius. 32-31 BC. 3,89 grs. Diademed head of Pax right. Olive branch at right, cornucopiae behind / Octavian walking right, raising right hand and holding spear over shoulder. CAESAR DIVI F across fields.
RIC 253. RSC 72.
benito
octaviano66.jpg
OCTAVIAN21 viewsAR denarius. 32-31 BC. 3,89 grs. Diademed head of Pax right. Olive branch at right, cornucopiae behind / Octavian walking right, raising right hand and holding spear over shoulder. CAESAR DIVI F across fields.
RIC 253. RSC 72.
benito
560_large_4c29983d26c06c4cbc8c12a42a771dc9.jpg
Octavian5 viewsCuria Julia senate house denarius 29 BC, Octavian. 3.5gm.Ancient Aussie
Agrippa_RIC_I_160.jpg
Octavian & Agrippa, AE Dupondius, RIC I 16015 viewsOctavian & Agrippa
As joint Consuls, 28 - 27 B.C.

Coin: AE Dupondius, commemorating the Battle of Actium in 31 B.C.

Obverse: IMP / P - P / DIVI F, busts of Agrippa, left, wearing the Rostral crown with Laural Wreath and Octavian, right, wearing a Laural Wreath, back to back.
Reverse: COL - NEM, a Crocodile, chained to a Palm Tree. A Wreath in the upper left field, its ribbons trailing into the upper right.

Weight: 12.11 g, Diameter: 26.8 x 26.8 x 2.5 mm, Die axis: 0°, Mint: Nemausus (Nimes), Gallia Narbonensis, 10 - 14 A.D. Reference: RIC I 160

Veterans from the battle of Actium were retired there.
The Crocodile chained to a Palm Tree symbolizes the defeat and control of Egypt by Rome.
2 commentsMasis
0081.jpg
Octavian & Agrippa, Denarius24 viewsRRC 534/3
38 bc

Av: Bare head of Octavian r.(bearded). Around: IMP CAESAR DIVI IVLI F
Rv: M•AGRIPPA COS/ DESIG in two lines across field

Ex LAC Auction 45, lot 213; 08. Sept 2015
1 commentsNorbert
octant.jpg
Octavian & Marc Antony90 viewsOCTAVIAN & MARCUS ANTONIUS (Marc Antony) AR silver Triumvirate issue denarius. CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right. Reverse - M ANT IMP AVG (MP and AV both in monogram) III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P, bare head of Antony right. Struck at Ephesus mint, Spring - Summer 41 BC. RCV 1504, RARE. 19mm, 3.7g. Holed for suspension in antiquity.1 commentsfordicus
octavian74.jpg
Octavian "heavy dupondius" 34 views 'sestertius/heavy dupondius'.(or perhaps As)

Southern Italian mint - Brundisium?, 38 BC.

OBV: CAESAR DIVI F, bare & slightly bearded head right, no star in field. Reverse - DIVOS IVLIVS, two lines within wreath.

Condition: F


RPC 621, RCV 1569/1570. 30mm, 14.9g.
Recycled photo.
cliff_marsland
octavian.jpg
Octavian (Augustus)57 viewsAugustus (Octavian 30-29BC ) -- AR Denarius. Bare head right /Triumphal arch with IMP CAESAR on architrave, surmounted by quadriga bearing Octavian. RIC I 267; Sear CRI 481; Sear RCV 1558; RSC 123. 1 commentsfeatherz
Octavian_Caesar2.jpg
Octavian - Sestertius or dupondius - Sear Imperators 30815 viewsObv: bare head of Octavian r., with slight beard, CAESAR before, DIVI F behind
Rev: wreathed head of Julius Caesar r., DIVOS before, IVLIVS behind
Size: 31,77 mm
Weight: 16,24 g
Mint: Southern Italian mint (?)
Date: 38 BC
Ref: Crawford 535/1, RPC 620, Sydenham 1335, Cohen 3-4, Sear Imperators 308
vs1969
RRC529-4.jpg
Octavian and Antonius, Concordia (Quinarius)45 viewsObv. IIIVIR RPC, veiled and diademed head of Concordia right;
Rev. C CAESAR M ANTON, clasped hands with Caduceus;
Gaul, 40/39 B.C.
14 mm, 1,83 gr.
References: RRC429/4b, RSC 67, Sear 1575

The coinage was struck soon after the Treaty of Brundisium, in which the IIIViri Rei Publicae Constituendae (Triumvirs for the Confirmation of the Republic), Octavian (Caesar), Antony and Lepidus divided the Roman sphere of influence amongst themselves. To cement the alliance, Antony married Octavian's sister, Octavia. Some have believed to see her features in the face of Concordia, thus showing the importance of the politic marriage.
1 commentsSyltorian
Augustus01.jpg
Octavian AR Denarius83 viewsThe latest addition to my Augustus collection. Thanks to all those who have posted comments on my other coins!

Obv: Laureate head of Octavian as Jupiter Terminus facing right, thunderbolt behind
Rev: IMP CAESAR - Octavian seated facing left on curule chair, holding Victory

RIC-I-270-S, RSC-116, Sear-1562, struck 29-27BC at Uncertain Italian Mint
5 commentsTrajan
Octavian_denarius_prow.jpg
Octavian AR Denarius Prow & Quadriga, circa 30BCE50 viewsAR Denarius
Octavian, 27BCE - 14CE
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 3.52 grams, Die axis: 8h

Obverse: Anepigraphic, Victory standing on prow to right, holding palm branch over her left shoulder and extends laurel wreath in right hand.

Reverse: IMP. CAESAR
Octavian standing in triumphal quadriga to right, holds reigns in left hand and extends (olive or laurel) branch in right hand.

Mint: Either Brundisium or Rome.

Notes:
- This historically fascinating denarius celebrates the Battle of Actium in which Agrippa and Octavian triumphed over Antony and Kleopatra. The obverse die is the first of the entire IMP CAESAR series of Octavian; the die is shared with the last of the CAESAR DIVI F denarii of the same design. The reverse may refer to Octavian’s entry into Alexandria following the battle of Actium (31/30 BCE), or the triple triumph subsequently awarded to him in Rome (29BCE) – the dating of the type is still not precisely known.
- After the great struggles between the triumvirs, many soldiers from the vast standing armies needed to be de-commissioned and paid. It is possible that this early type was minted using silver from the Ptolemaic treasury seized by Octavian following the Battle of Actium.
- Brundisium (modern day Brindisi) in southern Italy was Octavian’s naval base, which is where this type may have been minted to pay the soldiers. Alternatively the mint may have been Rome.
- Obverse and reverse die match to LHS Numismatik Auction 103, lot 333, 2008.

Ex Praefectus Coins 2015, Ex Nomos Obolos 2 lot 204, 2015

Thank you to Mr Curtis Clay for confirming the die link and providing the published reference to this fact: C.H.V. Sutherland, 1976, Octavian’s Gold and Silver Coinage from c. 32 to 27 B.C.
3 commentsPharsalos
Octavian_AR_denarius,_32-29_AD,_Brundisium.jpg
Octavian AR denarius, 31-30 BC, Rome66 viewsOctavian
AR denarius – 19mm
Italian (Rome?) mint, 31-30 BC
bare head r.
Mercury (or Apollo?),naked, seated right on rock upon which is spread his cloak, petasus (or shield?) slung on his back, holding lyre with both hands
CAESAR DIVI F
RIC 257, CRI 401, BMCRR 4335
1 commentsArdatirion
Octavian_AR_Denarius.png
Octavian AR Denarius. Rome.104 viewsBare head of Octavian right / Arch surmounted by facing Quadriga bearing Octavian.
aF. 3.31 Gr.
Ref; RSC I: 123.

8 commentsSam
coin22.jpg
Octavian AR Quinarius.13 viewsOctavian AR Quinarius. Uncertain Italian mint, 29-27 BC. CAESAR IMP VII, bare head right / ASIA RECEPTA, Victory standing left on cista mystica between two serpents erect. BMCRE 647, RSC 14. Britanikus
Octavian.jpg
Octavian AR Quinarius. 29-27 BC.10 viewsCAESAR IMP VII, bare head right / ASIA RECEPTA, Victory standing left on cista mystica between two serpents erect.RIC 276 , BMCRE 647, RSC 14.Britanikus
1340_Augustus_Antioch.jpg
Octavian Augustus - Antioch5 viewsAR tetradrachm
2 BC
laureate head right
ΚΑΙΣΑΡΟΣ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΥ
Tyche seated right, holding palm; below rivergod Orontes swimming right
EΤΟΥΣ__ΝΙΚΗΣ
ΘK / (ΥΠΑ) ΙΓ / (AVT)
RPC I 4155; Prieur 54
ex Naville Numismatics
Johny SYSEL
iuliatrad.jpg
Octavian Augustus As, Iulia Traducta (RPC 108)5 viewsIulia Traducta mint, 23 BC - 10 BC. 25 mm, 11.5 g, 270º.

Obverse: PERM CAES AVG Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust, looking right.

Reverse: IVLIA / TRAD Legend inside laurel wreath.

Reference: RPC 108.
Manuel
Octavian_Caesar.jpg
Octavian Caesar - AR denarius19 viewsItalian mint
summer 37 BC
head right IMP·CAESAR__DIVI·F·III·VIR·ITER·R·P·C
sacrificial implements: simpulum (ladle), aspergillum (sprinker), ewer (jug), lituus (augural wand) COS·ITER·ET·TER·DESIG
Crawford 538/1, SRCV I 1544, RSC I 91, BMCRR Gaul 116
3,5g
ex Rauch
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
1474_Octavian_Actium.jpg
Octavian Caesar - AR denarius13 viewsRome?
autumn 30 BC - summer 29 BC
head right
Octavian’s Actian arch surmounted by large statue of Octavian in facing triumphal quadriga
IMP·CAESAR
RIC I 267, SRCV I 1558, RSC I 123, Sear CRI 422, BMCRR 4348
ex Bertolami
Johny SYSEL
Octavian_Cistophorus_Pax.jpg
Octavian Cistophorus Pax143 viewsObv.
IMP CAESAR DIVI F COS VI LIBERTATIS P R VINDEX
Laureate head right

Rev.
PAX
Pax standing left holding cadeucus, cista mystica behind, all within wreath
4 commentsancientdave
Kunker_Aug.jpg
Octavian Denarius - Pax (RIC 252)97 viewsAR Denarius
Brundisium or Rome, circa 32-29 BC
3.43g

Obv: Bare head of Octavian (R)

Rev: Pax, draped, standing left, holding olive branch and cornucopiae
CAESAR DIVI F

RIC 252 BMC 605

Künker Auction 280, 466
Ex. Hannelore Scheiner collection
Sear, The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49-27 BC, London 1998, Nr. 399.
7 commentsKained but Able
Octavian_RPC_5062.jpg
Octavian Diobol17 viewsOctavian
AE24 Diobol of Alexandria.
Year 41 = 11/12 AD
Head right / Nike standing left, L MA at sides.
BMC 4, Dattari 28, RPC 5062.
Not pretty, but pretty rare!
Sosius
Augustus9_opt.jpg
Octavian Dupondius, CR535/v1, Deified Julius Caesar37 viewsOBV: CAESAR DIVI F, bare head of Octavian right
REV: DIVOS IVLIVS, wreathed head of Caesar right
17.9g, 30mm

Minted at Uncertain Gallic or Italian mint, 38 BC
Coin of Octavian before he became emperor, issued to deify Julius Caesar
Legatus
Octav_quin_2.jpg
Octavian Quinarius39 viewsAR Quinarius (29-28 BC)
Obv: CAESAR IMP VII ; bare hd. of Octavian r.
Rev: ASIA RECEPTA ; Victory stg. l. on cista mystica, flanked by two snakes

RIC 276 . CRI 429 . BMCRR East 240 (= BMCRE 647) . RSC 14
Tanit
Augustus1_opt.jpg
Octavian Quinarius, RIC 276, Victory68 viewsOBV: CAESAR IMP VII, bare head right
REV: ASIA RECEPTA, Victory standing left on cista mystica between two serpents erect
1.8g, 12mm

Uncertain Italian mint, 29-27 BC
1 commentsLegatus
Octavian.png
Octavian – RSC-12410 viewsOctavian Denarius. Autumn 30 - Summer 29 BC BC. Laureate bust right / IMP - CAESAR, statue of Octavian on rostral column. RSC 124; RCV 1159; RIC 271; HCRI 423Bud Stewart
augustus_alex.jpg
Octavian, Alexandria eagle14 viewsOctavian, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt. Bronze diobol, Dattari 2, RPC I 5001, BMC Alexandria 2, Kampmann and Ganschow 2.5, Fair, porous, Alexandria mint, 12.547 g, 25.1 mm, 0o, first series, c. 30 - 28 B.C.; obverse “QEOU UIOU”, bare head right; reverse “KAISAROS AUTOKRATOROS”, eagle standing left, double cornucopia before, “P” behind. RPC notes, "Struck in two denominations, with the value marks P and M. The value marks and the reverse type (eagle and cornucopia) provide a direct link with the coinage of Cleopatra, indicating that these are the earliest coins of the reign. The absence of “SEBASTOS” in the otherwise very full legend suggests a date of 30 - 28 B.C."ex FORVMPodiceps
Crawford_523-1a.jpg
Octavian, AR Denarius, Crawford 523/1a5 viewsOctavian (Augustus)
As Triumvir, 43 - 33 BC.

Coin: AR Denarius

Obverse: C●CAESAR●III VIR●R●P●C, bare headed bust of Octavian facing right.
Reverse: Q●SALVIVS●IMP●COS●DESIG, winged Thunderbolt of Jove.

Weight: 3.20 g, Diameter: 17.4 x 16.7 x 1.3 mm, Die axis: 270°, Mint: Issued by the Moneyer Q. Salvidienus Rufus Salvius, from a military mint traveling with Octavian in Italy circa 40 B.C. Reference: Crawford 523/1a
Masis
Octaviano.JPG
Octavian, AR Denarius, Foundation of Nicopolis4 viewsOctavian AR Denarius. Rome, 29 - 27 BC.

Celebrating the foundation of Nicopolis in Epirus.

Obv.: Laureate bust of Apollo of Actium, right, with features of Octavian
Rev.: Octavian, veiled and in priestly robes, ploughing right with team of oxen
Exe.: IMP CAESAR
RIC I 272

Diameter: 20mm.
Weight: 3.7g
Jose Polanco
IMG_2098q.JPG
Octavianus Augustus127 viewsVatican museumsJohny SYSEL
Augustus_altar_Providentia.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - AE as8 viewsposthumous - struck by Tiberius
Rome
22-30 AD
radiate head left
DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER
altar
S C
PROVIDENT
RIC I Tiberius 81, BMCRE I 146, Cohen 228 (Augustus), SRCV I 1789
6,22g
Johny SYSEL
291_Augustus_Lyon.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - AE as9 views1 Aug 10 - 6 BC
Lugdunum
laureate head right
CAESAR__PONT MAX
front elevation of the Altar of Lugdunum, decorated with the corona civica between laurels, these flanked by nude male figures, Victories on columns, facing one another
ROM ET AVG
RIC I 230, BMCRE I 550, SRCV I 1690

The Altar of Lugdunum and the Sanctuary of the Three Gauls were dedicated by Augustus on 1 August 10 BC.
Johny SYSEL
348_Augustus_quadrans.JPG
Octavianus Augustus - AE quadrans6 viewsLamia, Silius and Annius moneyers
Rome
9 BC
altar
III•VIR•A•A•A•F•F•
cornucopiae
LAMIA SILIVS ANNIVS
S C
RIC I 422
2,75g
Johny SYSEL
856_Augustus_sestertius~0.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - AE sestertius10 viewsCn. Piso Cn.f. moneyer
Rome
15 BC
wreath (corona civica), two laurel branches at sides
OB / CIVES / SERVATOS
S C
•CN•PIƧO•CN F•III VIR•A•A•F•F
RIC I 380 (R2), BMCRE I 139, Cohen I 377, SRCV I 1649
ex Gitbud and Naumann
Johny SYSEL
366_Augustus_Amphipolis_.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - Amphipolis7 views31-27 BC
bare head right
ΚΑΙΣΑΡ / ΘΕΟΥ ΥΙΟΣ
Artemis Tauropulos riding bull right
AMΦΙΠOΛEΙΤΩΝ
RPC I 1626; SNG ANS 164 - 165; SNG Cop 89 - 91; SNG Tübingen 994; BMC Macedonia p. 52, 73
10,38g 19mm
Johny SYSEL
Augustus_Antiochia_ad_Maeandrum.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - Antiochia ad Maeandrum8 views27 BC - 14 AD
bare head right
CEB_A_CTOC
Athena atNDING left, holding spear and shield
Π_AIΩNIOY CYNAPXIA ANTI / OXEΩN
3,3g 16mm
RPC 2834; BMC 28; SNG Munich 76.
Johny SYSEL
374_Augusus.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - AR denarius5 viewsLugdunum
2 BC - 4 AD
laureate head right
CAESAR AVGVSTVS__DIVI F PATER PATRIAE
Gaius and Lucius standing front, each with a hand resting on a round shield, a spear; in field above, a lituus right and simpulum left (in "b9"-like formation)
AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT
C L CAESARES
RIC I 207, RSC I 43, BMCRE I 533, BnF I 1651 ff., SRCV I 1597
3,61g
Johny SYSEL
758_Augustus.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - AR denarius5 viewsLugdunum
8 BC
laureate head right
AVGVSTVS__DIVI•F
Caius Caesar on horseback riding right, holding sword and reins; to left, aquila right between two signa
C•CAESAR
AVGVS•F
RIC I 199, BMCRE I 500, RSC I 40
ex Lucernae
Johny SYSEL
722_Augustus_Emerita.JPG
Octavianus Augustus - AR Quinarius5 viewsEmerita
P. Carisius, legatus pro praetore
circa 25 - 23 BC
bare head right
AVGVST
Victory standing right, placing wreath on a trophy consisting of helmet and cuirass; dagger and sword hilt at base of trophy.
P CARIS_I__LEG
RIC 1a; sear5 1642; RSC 386
1,56g
ex Lucernae
Johny SYSEL
1291_Augustus2.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - Asia ?4 viewsAE as
27-23 BC
head right
CAESAR
legend within laureate wreath
AVGVSTVS
RPC I 2235/RPC I 4100?, McAlee 190, RIC I 486, SNG Cop 143, Cohen I 34
8,6g 21-23mm
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
Augustus_Bilbilis.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - Bilbilis31 viewsAE as
2-14 AD
L. Cor. Calidus and L. Semp. Rutilus, duoviri.
Laureate head right
AVGVSTVS·DIVI·F PATER·PATRIAE·
Name and titles of the duoviri around wreath.
(MVN)·(AV)GVSTA·BILBILIS / L·COR·C(AL)IDO·L·SEMP.R(VT)ILO
II·VIR
RPC I 129, 395; Alvarez Burgos 164, 1294; SNG München 22; SNG Copenhagen 617
14,1g 29mm
ex ibercoins auction
ex Lucernae
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
1293_Augustus_Calagurris~0.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - Calagurris16 viewsAE as
14-37 AD
laureate head right
TI AVGVS DIVI AVGVSTI F IMP CAESAR
bull right
L·F(VL)·SPARSO / L·S(AT)VRNINO
M·C·I II / VIR
RPC I 448
14,6g 29mm
ex Aurea
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
849_Augustus_Celsa.JPG
Octavianus Augustus - Celsa6 viewsAE as
L. Baggius and Mn. Flavius Festus
14-5 BC
laureate head right
AVGVSTVS·_DIVI·F·
bull right
·C·V·I·CEL·
II·VIR
L·BAGGIO
(MN)·FESTO
Villaronga-Benages 3164e, RPC I 273, SNG Cop 540
11,1g 27mm
ex Lucernae
Johny SYSEL
611_Augustus_Laodicea_Phrygia.JPG
Octavianus Augustus - Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia8 viewsc. 15 BC
bare bust right seen from behind
ΣEBAΣTOΣ
serpent-entwined staff
ZEVΞIΣ / ΦIΛAΛHΘHΣ / ΛAOΔIKEΩN
RPC I, 477, 2895. SNG von Aulock 3837. SNG München 375
2,51g 15mm
Johny SYSEL
611_Augustus_Laodicea.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia8 viewsc. 15 BC
laureate head right, lituus right
ΣEBAΣTOΣ
Zeus Laodicea standing left with eagle and staff
ZEVΞIΣ / ΦIΛAΛHΘHΣ / ΛAOΔIKEΩN
RPC 2894; SNG Cop. 555.
5,15g 18mm
Johny SYSEL
778_Augustus_Nemausus.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - Nemausus14 viewsAE dupondius
9-3 BC
Head of Agrippa left, wearing rostral crown, and head of Augustus right, wearing oak wreath
IMP / DIVI F
Chained crocodile standing right; palm and filleted wreath behind
COL_NEM
RIC I 158, RPC I 524, SNG Cop 699, SNG Tübingen 152, SRCV I 1730
13,1g 26mm
ex Aurea numismatika
Johny SYSEL
893_Augustus_Philippi.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - Philippi10 views27 BC - 14 AD
head right
AVG
2 priests with yoke of 2 oxen right plowing the pomerium (sacred boundary)
RPC I 1656, Varbanov III 3770, SNG Cop 282, BMC Macedonia 86
4,4g 16mm
ex Gitbud and Naumann
Johny SYSEL
892_Augustus_Philippi.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - Philippi9 views27 BC - 14 AD
head right
AVG
2 priests with yoke of 2 oxen right plowing the pomerium (sacred boundary)
RPC I 1656, Varbanov III 3770, SNG Cop 282, BMC Macedonia 86
5,5g 17mm
ex Gitbud and Naumann
Johny SYSEL
Augustus_-_Tiberius2.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - Thessalonica11 views4-14 AD
laureate head of Augustus right
ΘEΣΣAΛONI_KEΩN
bare head of Tiberius right
TIBEPIOΣ__KAIΣAP
RPC 1565; Moushmov 6683, SNGCop 400, BMC 74, SGI 176
8,35g 23-21mm
Johny SYSEL
Augustus_-_Tiberius.jpg
Octavianus Augustus - Thessalonica11 views4-14 AD
laureate head of Augustus right
ΘEΣΣAΛON_IKEΩN
bare head of Tiberius right
TIBEPIOΣ__KAIΣAP
RPC 1565; Moushmov 6683, SNGCop 400, BMC 74, SGI 176
9,85g 20mm
Johny SYSEL
0020.jpg
Octavianus, Denarius16 viewsRRC 540/2
36 b.c.

Ex Dr. Busso Peus Nachf. Auction 378, Lot. 418, 28.04.2004,
1 commentsNorbert
accoleius_Cr486.1.jpg
P. Accoleius Lariscolus, Crawford 486/161 viewsAR - Denarius, 3.90gm, 19.7mm.
Rome, 43 BC
obv. P. ACCOLEIVS - LARISCOLVS
Archaisized bust of Diana Nemorensis, draped, r.
rev. Triple cult statue of Diana Nemorensis (Diana, Hecate, Selene) facing,
supporting on their hands and shoulders a bar; behind them a grove of five
cypresses; the figure on the left (Diana) holds a bow in her outer hand, the
figure on the right (Selene) a poppy.
Crawford 486/1; Sydenham 1148; Accoleia 1
gVF, light toning, with a reasonably unobtrusive banker's mark.

Regarding the hairstyle of the obv. portrait this coin is from a later period of this issue (A. Alföldi). The family of the mint-master is originated from Aricia at the Lake Nemi where stood the grove and the temple of Diana Nemorensis. Here too votiv-inscriptions of the Accoleii have been found. Octavian's mother was from Aricia. Perhaps Octavian himself has influenced the selection of this coin-motive.

For more informations please look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'
1 commentsJochen
vicphilOR.jpg
Philippi, RPC I 165138 viewsMacedon, Philippi, Time of Augustus, Circa 31 B.C.-14 A.D.AE, 19mm 4.56g, RPC I 1651, SNG ANS 677, SNG Copenhagen 305
O: VIC AVG, Nike standing left on globe, holding wreath and palm
R: COHOR PRAE PHIL, three military standards
(minted to commemorate the victory of Octavian and Marc Antony over Brutus and Cassius)
2 commentscasata137ec
eumenia_BMCphrygia21.jpg
Phrygia, Eumeneia (Fulviana), Fulvia BMC Phrygia 2133 viewsFulvia, wife of Marcus Antonius, c. 41-40 BC
AE 20, 7.43g
struck under magistrate Zmertorix, son of Philonidas
obv. Head of Fulvia as winged Nike, draped, with chignon, r.
rev. Athena, in chiton and peplos, helmeted, advancing l., holding spear and round
shield
FOVLOVIANWN / ZMERTORIGOC / FILWNIDOV
RPC I 3139; BMC Phrygia 21
rare, good F

Fulvia was the first real woman depicted on a coin!

Fulvia was first married to P. Clodius, the Roman firebrand. After his violent death in 52 BC she married C. Scribonius Curio, who likewise met an untimely end in Africa. She married Mark Antony in 44 BC, and became an outspoken defender of his interests in Rome while he campaigned in the east (and enjoyed the attentions of Cleopatra). The city of Eumenia was re-named Fulviana in her honor by Antony's partisans. By 40 BC Fulvia's strident attacks on Octavian had provoked a reaction, and she had to flee first to southern Italy and then to Greece. She met Antony at Athens, where he upbraided her for antagonizing Octavian when he was trying to maintain a semblance of cordial relations. Fulvia died at Sicyon shortly thereafter. Sometime afterward these coins struck at "Fulviana" had their ethnic scratched off.
Jochen
740-3.png
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII with Ptolemy XV, AR tetradrachm, Year 11 (42/1 BC)36 views44-30 BC
12.6 Grams
Obv.: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis
Rev.: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, palm over shoulder; date LIA (Yr 11) to left, ΠA to right.
Purchased on eBay
Grade: XF; Strike 5/5; Surface 3/5
Ptolemy XV Philopator Philometor Caesar was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned jointly with his mother Cleopatra VII of Egypt, from September 2, 47 BC. Between the death of Cleopatra, on August 12, 30 BC, and his own death on August 23, 30 BC, he was nominally the sole pharaoh. He was killed on the orders of Octavian, who would soon become the Roman emperor Augustus. He was the eldest son of Cleopatra VII, and possibly the only son of Julius Caesar, for whom he was named.
2 commentsRichard M10
McAlee429.jpg
Quinarius of Octavian8 viewsMinted in 29 or 28 B.C. at an uncertain Italian mint (Rome?).Paul F
0005-Republique-Ags.jpg
Republic in silver156 viewsA virtual tray showing a selection of silver coins minted during the roman republic, from the ROMANO she-wolf suckling twins didrachm to Octavian denarii
Please, click to enlarge
Full description attribution and references of the coins are available in my republic gallery
3 commentsPotator II
Roemetalces_I_Augustus.jpg
Rhoemetalces I - AE4 viewsThrace or Macedonia
11 BC - 12 AD
diademed head of Rhoemetlalces I right
BAΣIΛEΩΣ__POIMHTAΛK_OY
bare head of Octavian Augustus right
KAIΣAPOΣ__ΣEBAΣTOY
RPC I 1718; Youroukova 194; BMC Thrace p. 209, 7; SNG Cop 1192; SNG Tub 974; SNG Evelpidis 1124
ex Roma Numismatics
Johny SYSEL
TitusVenus.jpg
RIC 0016 Titus denarius138 viewsIMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M
Laureate head of Titus right

TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII PP
Venus standing right her back turned towards spectator, holding helmet and transverse spear and resting on column

Rome 79AD

2.89g

Sear 2507
RIC 16 (R2)

This reverse type is copied from the coinage of Octavian
2 commentsJay GT4
Augustus_-_RIC_I_86A.jpg
RIC I 86A36 viewsOctavian as Augustus, 27 BC – 14 AD Denarius Colonia Patricia (?) circa 19 BC, AR 18mm., 3.73g. CAESAR – AVGVSTVS Bare head r. Rev. SIGNIS – RECEPTIS Aquila on l. and standard on r. flanking, S – P / Q – R arranged around shield inscribed CL V. C 265. BMC 417. RIC 86a. CBN 1132.
3 commentsAldo
IMG-20161218-WA0003.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion VI Denarius38 viewsRome, The Imperators
Mint traveling with Antony, ca. 31 BC
AR Denarius

Obv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; Galley right.

Rev: LEG VI; Aquilia between two standards.

Reference: Crawford 544/19; HCRI 356

Provenance: ex CNG 103 (Sep 2016) Lot 664; ex Kirk Davis FPL 37 (Jan 2002), No. 45.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding.

2 commentsCarausius
deictator denarius.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - REPUBLIC - P CLODIVS31 viewsRoman Republic Denarius - Apollo & Diana - Rome, Imperatorial Period 42 BC - Octavian, Antony, Lepidus, Dictators, Silver Denarius Obv: no legend - Apollo head right with lyre behind head Rev: M-F (on left) P CLODIVS (on right) - Diana Lucifera standing right holding long torch in each hand. Rome mint 42 BC = M. Crawford, Vol. I, p. 506, 494/23, Vol. II, Pl. LIX, 17; D. Sear I, p. 163, 492, 3.28 g.
This coin refers to the Sabine origin of the moneyer's family, worship of Diana was introduced into Rome by the Sabines.
dpaul7
AntonyLeg2.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion II Denarius19 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.64g; 17mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG II; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/14; Sydenham 1216; HCRI 349; BMCRR East 190-92; Antonia 105.

Provenance: Ex Pat Coyle Coll. [Goldberg Auction 69 (29 May 2012) Lot 3471]; NAC 40 (16 May 2007), Lot 624.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Forty examples of the LEG II variety appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii, making it one of the most common varieties of the series.

The Legio II was likely a legion that was disbanded after Actium.
2 commentsCarausius
463910.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion III Denarius27 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Mark Antony, 31 BCE.
Mint travelling with Antony.
AR Denarius (3.69g; 18mm).

Obv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; Galley right.

Rev: LEG III; Aquilia between two standards.

Reference: Crawford 544/15; HCRI 350; Syd 1217; Viereck, Die Römische Flotte (1975), p. 292 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: ex CNG Classical Numismatic Review (Jul 2017); ex Triton IV (5 Dec 2000), Lot 432; ex Sternberg XII (18 Nov 1982), Lot 512; ex H.D.L. Viereck Collection (bef. 1975).

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding.
2 commentsCarausius
AntonyLegV.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion V Denarius27 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.79g; 19mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG V; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/18; HCRI 354; Sydenham 1221; BMCRR (East) 196; Banti 75 (this coin); Antonia 110.

Provenance: Ex Kress 109 (24-25 Oct 1958), Lot 749.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Thirty-seven examples of the LEG V variety appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii, making it one of the most common varieties of the series. However, an example with a verifiable old provenance, such as this coin, is quite rare.
2 commentsCarausius
AntonyXVIIClassicaeCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Antony Legion XVII Classicae Denarius18 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.41g; 20mm).
Military Mint traveling with Antony, 32-1 BCE.

Obverse: ANT AVG LLL VIR R P C; galley facing right.

Reverse: LEG XVII CLASSICAE; Aquilia between two standards.

References: Crawford 544/10; Sydenham 1238; HCRI 373; BMCRR East 223; Antonia 128

Provenance: Ex Nomisma 58 (6 Nov 2018) Lot 214.

Produced by Antony in the lead-up to his final defeat at Actium by Octavian’s navy (commanded by Agrippa), the legionary series was a huge issue that recognized 23 legions under Antony’s command. These coins would continue to circulate throughout the Empire for several centuries after Antony’s loss, partly because their notoriously debased silver discouraged hoarding. Only 8 examples of the LEG XVII Classicae type appeared in the 1905 Delos hoard of 604 Antony Legionary denarii.

The Legio XVII Classicae was likely a legion of marines formed by Antony and disbanded after Actium. They were not the Legio XVII destroyed at Tuetoburg Forest under Varus in 9 CE.
2 commentsCarausius
ArriusSecundus.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, M. Arrius Secundus, AR Denarius - Crawford 513/250 viewsRome, The Imperators.
M. Arrius Secundus. 41 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.82g; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: M. ARRIVS - SECVNDVS; bare head, with slight beard, facing right.

Reverse: Victory honors - wreath, spear and phalera.

References: Crawford 513/2; HCRI 319; Sydenham 1084; BMCRR 4210; Arria 2.

Provenance: Nomisma 59 (14 May 2019) Lot 134; Munzen und Medaillen XIX (5-6 Jun 1959) Lot 172; Munzhandlung Basel 10 (15 Mar 1938) Lot 486.

M. Arrius Secundus was likely son of Quintus Arrius, who had a victory in the Servile War against one of Spartacus’ lieutenants, but subsequently lost a battle to Spartacus himself. He was the only member of his gens to strike coins, and not much else is known about him.

The slightly-bearded, obverse portrait, while probably depicting the moneyer’s father, Quintus Arrius, also bears a striking resemblance to contemporaneous portraits of Octavian. However, without any inscription naming Caesar, a positive identification of the portrait remains debated by scholars. David Sear suggests that the portrait is deliberately ambiguous, as the political and military climate was very risky and the moneyer likely wanted plausible deniability that the portrait was Octavian. The reverse shows awards of victory granted to the moneyer’s father for his Servile War victory: a laurel wreath, golden spear and phalera (a military decoration attached to a harness and worn over a cuirass).
2 commentsCarausius
1521044195142126439108.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, 32 BCE59 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 32 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.72g; 18mm).
Athens Mint.

Obv: ANTON AVG IMP III COS DES III III V R P C. Bare head of Antony facing right.

Rev: ANTONIVS AVG IMP III, in two lines.

References: Crawford 542/2; HCRI 347; Sydenham 1209.

Provenance: Ex Andrew McCabe Collection [CNG eSale 385 (26 Oct 2016) Lot 470]; CNG 49 (17 Mar 1999), Lot 1316; Reinhold Faelten Collection [Stack's (20 Jan 1938) Lot 1495].

On the obverse, behind Antony’s ear, a small letter P, likely an engraver’s signature, is hidden within the hair line. This coin was struck in Athens in 32 BCE, while Antony and Cleopatra lived extravagantly among the Greeks. The coin’s inscription refers to a designated third consulship that Antony was supposed to share with Octavian in 31 BCE. Around the time this coin was minted, Antony notified his wife, Octavia (Octavian’s sister), in Rome that he was divorcing her. Octavian was outraged. Cleopatra’s growing influence over Antony was soon used by Octavian as progaganda to unite Italy and the West against Antony. Thus, the designated third consulship referenced on this coin never occurred, as the designated consuls went to war instead, ending with Antony’s naval defeat at Actium in September 31 BCE.
5 commentsCarausius
AntonySolDen.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius28 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marc Antony, 44-31 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.95g; 18mm).
Military mint travelling with Antony, 42BCE.

Obverse: Antony's bearded head right; M ANTONI - IMP (ligate).

Reverse: Facing bust of Sol within distyle temple; III - VIR - R·P·C, around.

References: Crawford 496/1; HCRI 128; Sydenham 1168; BMCRR (Gaul) 62; Antonia 34.

Provenance: Italian export permit No. 13168 of 2018; ex Nomisma 32 (2006), Lot 129.

This coin was likely struck shortly after Brutus’s and Cassius’s defeat at Philippi in 42 BCE. Antony is still shown with his beard of mourning (he and Octavian would not shave until Caesar’s assassination was avenged), and it’s likely that the die engravers had not yet been instructed to remove the beard following Philippi. This is the last bearded image of Antony to appear on his coinage. There were two versions of this coin type: one with IMP spelled the standard way; the other with IMP ligate, as on this example. The ligate version is the scarcer version of the two. The reverse type emphasizing Sol was a common theme on Antony’s eastern coinage, perhaps reflecting his growing enchantment with eastern Hellenistic culture.
2 commentsCarausius
AntCaesSchottCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius - Crawford 488/228 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius. 43 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.19g; 19mm).
Military mint in Cisalpine Gaul.

Obverse: M.A[NTON IMP RPC]; Antony's bare, bearded head facing right; lituus behind.

Reverse: CAESAR DIC; Laureate head of Julius Caesar facing right; jug behind.

References: Crawford 488/2; HCRI 123; Sydenham 1166; BMCRR (Gaul) 55; Antonia 5-6.

Provenance: Ex Roma E-Live Auction 1 (25-6 Jul 2018) Lot 531; Bernard Poindessault Collection [Oger-Blanchet (17 Nov 2017) Lot 148]; Edouard Schott Collection [E. Bourgey (21 Mar 1972) Lot 337].

This is one of Antony’s earliest issues following the creation of the Second Triumvirate with Octavian and Lepidus. The titulature "RPC" (tip of "C" just barely visible beneath Antony’s portrait on this specimen) reflects the new status. Antony is depicted with a slight beard of mourning, as is Octavian on his coins until the defeat of the Tyrannicides at Philippi the following year. Both Antony and Caesar have symbols of the augurate behind their portraits, as both were members of the college of augurs, and this served to highlight their common bond. The somewhat comical portrait style is reflective of the military mint, with limited die engraver talent.
1 commentsCarausius
AntonyVarusCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, AR Denarius - Crawford 494/324 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marc Antony and C. Vibius Varus, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.78g; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: Bare head of Antony with mourning beard, facing right.

Reverse: Fortuna facing left, holding Victory and cornucopia; flanked by C*VIBIVS - VARVS

References: Crawford 494/32; HCRI 149; Sydenham 1144; BMCRR 4293; Vibia 29; Antonia 26

Provenance: Ex JD Collection [NAC Auction 72 (16 May 2013), Lot 1265]; UBS Auction 78 (9 Sep 2008) Lot 1136; acquired from Hubert Herzfelder (d. Mar 1963).


This, one of the finest depictions of Antony on Roman coinage, depicts him with a beard of mourning for Julius Caesar. Antony and Octavian would wear such beards until the Liberators were defeated at Philippi later in 42 BCE. The moneyer, Varus, also struck similar coins for Octavian, though on a much smaller scale. Because of similar style on a later military mint issue by Antony, some scholars postulate that Antony so loved his portrait on the above coin type that he drafted the die engraver into his military mint.

The reverse alludes to the expectation of good fortune and victory for the Triumvirs over the Liberators.
1 commentsCarausius
LepidusCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, AR Denarius - Crawford 495/2d51 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Aemilius Lepidus and Octavian, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.70g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Italy.

Obverse: LEPIDVS· PONT· MAX· III· V· R· P· C; bare head of Lepidus facing right.

Reverse: C· CAESAR· IMP· III· VIR· R ·P· C; bare head of Octavian facing right.

References: Crawford 495/2d; HCRI 140a; Sydenham 1323var (rev legend); Aemilia 35var (rev legend); BMCRR (Africa) 29-31var (rev legend); Banti & Simonetti 7 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Leu Numismatik Auction 8 (30 Jun 2019) Lot 949; Bank Leu 7 (9 May 1973) Lot 317; Joseph Martini Collection [Baranowsky (25 Feb 1931) Lot 1273] and [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (24 Feb 1930) Lot 1334]; Rodolfo Ratto Fixed Price List (1927) Lot 629; Dr. Bonazzi Collection a/k/a Riche Collection [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (23 Jan 1924) Lot 1352].

This reverse die differs from most of this denarius issue in that the inscription begins with the initial “C” for Octavian's first name (Caius), while the remainder of the issue begins, simply, "CAESAR." The coins appear to celebrate the formation of the Second Triumvirate, although it is unclear why Lepidus did not also strike coins with Antony’s portrait.

This particular example appeared in a remarkable number of important Roman Republican coin sales between 1924-1931, including sales of the collections of Dr. Bonazzi and Joseph Martini.
4 commentsCarausius
OctavAntonQuinar2.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian and Antony, AR Quinarius - Crawford 529/4b15 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Antony and Octavian, 39 BCE.
AR Quinarius (1.60g; 14mm).
Military mint moving with Octavian.

Obverse: III ·VIR - R·P·C; veiled and diademed head of Concordia facing right.

Rev: M·ANTON - C·CAESAR; two hands clasped around caduceus.
References: Crawford 529/4b; HCRI 304; BMCRR (East) 128.

The coin likely celebrates the reconciliation of Octavian and Antony, memorialized by the pact at Brundisium in October of 40 BCE. Sear suggests that Octavian may have issued this type in Gaul, a former Antony stronghold and a big user of quinarii.
1 commentsCarausius
OctaviandupondiusKnobloch.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AE 315 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Octavian, 38 BCE.
AE 31 (16.72g; 31mm).
Italian mint.

Obverse: DIVI F; Bare head of Octavian facing right; star before.

Reverse: DIVOS IVLIVS inscription in two lines within laurel wreath.

References: Crawford 535/2; HCRI 309; RBW 1823 (this coin); Sydenham 1336; BMCRR (Gaul) 108-110; Julia 101.

Provenance: Ex RBW Collection [CNG e-Sale 364 (2 Dec 2015), Lot 190] and [NAC 63 (17 May 2012), Lot 572]; ex Stack's (30 Apr 1986), Lot 1761; ex Frederick Knobloch Collection [Stack's (3 May 1978), Lot 737].

While probably a dupondius or sestertius, the actual denomination of this coin is uncertain, thus I call it AE 31. The star on the obverse may represent the bright comet that was seen for 7 days shortly after the assassination of Julius Caesar and was interpreted as a sign of his divinity. The reverse refers to the laurel wreath that the Senate granted Julius Caesar the right to wear at all times. The coin type is certainly Octavian’s attempt to portray himself as the son and rightful heir of the god Julius.
Carausius
4320276.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AR Denarius13 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Octavian and Lucius Cornelius Balbus, 41 BCE
AR Denarius (3.36 grams; 18mm).
Military mint in Italy.

Obverse: C•CAESAR • III • VIR R•P•C; Bare head of Octavian, facing right.

Reverse: Club; BALBVS above, PRO • PR below

References: Crawford 518/1; HCRI 298; Sydenham 1325a; BMCRR (Gaul) 83-5; Julia 91.

Provenance: Ex Andrew McCabe Collection [CNG Esale 432 (14 Nov 2018) Lot 276]; ex American Numismatic Society Collection 1001.1.12863 [CNG 96 (14 May 2014) Lot 732]; ex Archer M. Huntington (d. 1955) Collection.

This scarce type was produced by Octavian’s legate, Lucius Cornelius Balbus, as propraetor. Balbus was a native of Gades (Cadiz) in Spain where there was a temple to Hercules, to which the Club reverse alludes. Balbus was favored and honored by both Pompey and Caesar. Upon Caesar’s assassination, he allied with Octavian who appointed him praetor urbanus and ultimately, in 40 BCE, he received the consulship (the first foreign-born citizen to do so). He was extremely wealthy and bequeathed 25 denarii to every Roman citizen in his will!
1 commentsCarausius
OctavianCuriaRaw.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AR Denarius29 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Octavian, 44-27 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.92g; 20mm).
Italian Mint, Summer 30-29 BCE.

Obverse: Octavian’s bare head, facing right.

Reverse: Roman Senate House; IMP CAESAR on architrave.

References: RIC 266; HCRI 421; BMCRR 4358; Julia 161.

Provenance: Ex Heritage Auction 3063 (16 Jan 2018) Lot 33381; Spink Num. Circ. Vol LXXVIII, No. 6 (June 1970), inv. #6871, pl. 11.

The coin celebrates the dedication of the Curia Julia, a new meeting house for the Roman Senate, construction of which was commenced under Julius Caesar and completed by Octavian circa 29 BCE. Julius Caesar was assassinated at the Theater of Pompey where the Senate was meeting while construction of this new Senate house was underway. It is both ironic and politically astute that Octavian should commemorate this new Senate house on a coin, given that his hold on power made the Senate effectively irrelevant. The structure still stands today, having been restored through the imperial period and later converted to a church.
3 commentsCarausius
3365112l.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Octavian, AR Denarius - Crawford 538/120 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Octavian, 44-27 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.79g; 20mm).
Italian Mint, Summer 37 BCE.

Obverse: IMP CAESAR-DIVI·F·III·VIR·ITER R·P·C; Octavian’s bare head, bearded and facing right.

Reverse: COS·ITER·ET·TER·DESIG; Simpulum, aspergillum, jug and lituus.

References: Crawford 538/1; Sydenham 1334; HCRI 312; BMCRR (Gaul) 116.

Provenance: Ex Ernst Ploil Collection [NAC 101 (24 Oct 2017), Lot 41]; Peus 386 (26 Apr 2006), Lot 663; Astarte 5 (1999), Lot 703.

The obverse inscription records the renewal of the second triumvirate in 37 BCE.
4 commentsCarausius
z49832.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, P. Clodius, AR Denarius - Crawford 494/23 - Sear Plate Coin!8 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Publius Clodius M. f. Turrinus, 41 BCE.
AR Denarius (4.01g; 20mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Laureate head of Apollo, facing right; lyre behind.

Reverse: Diana facing with head right, holding a torch in each hand; M.F – P.CLODIVS in fields.

References: Crawford 494/23; Sear, HCRI 184 (this coin illustrated); BMCRR 4290-1; Sydenham 1117.

Provenance: Ex The Mayflower Collection [Heritage Auction (30 April 2012), Lot 26089]; ex J. Schulman Auction 262 (14 May 1975), Lot 1249.

Nothing certain is known of this moneyer besides his coins. The Clodii were an old patrician family of Sabine origin that also had plebeian branches. It is impossible to know whether this moneyer was of the patrician or plebeian side of the family, though his use of the spelling Clodius suggests he was plebeian. Some researchers have suggested (others disagree) that he was the Clodius sent into Macedonia by Caesar in 48 BCE, who fought on the side of Antonius in the Perusine War, and who was put to death by order of Octavian in 40 BCE.
Carausius
4303550l.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Sextus Pompey, AR Denarius30 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Sextus Pompey, 42-36 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.49g; 20mm).
Sicilian mint, 42-40 BCE.

Obverse: MAG PIVS IMP ITER; Pharos of Messina with two windows and a balcony, surmounted by statue of Neptune wearing helmet and holding trident and resting foot on prow; galley with aquila passing before.

Rev: PRAEF CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C; the monster, Scylla, her body terminating in two fish-tails and the foreparts of three dogs, facing left and wielding a rudder with two hands.

References: Crawford 511/4a; HCRI 335; Sydenham 1348; BMCRR (Sicily) 18-19; Banti 8/3 (this coin illustrated); Pompeia 22.

Provenance: Ex Kuenker Auction 312 (8 Oct 2018), Lot 2712; Walter Niggeler (d. 1964) Collection [Leu/Muenzen und Medaillen (21-22 Oct 1966), Lot 964].

Sextus Pompey was younger son of Pompey the Great. After Caesar's assassination, in 43 BCE, he was honored by the Senate with the title "Commander of the Fleet and Sea Coasts" (Praefectus classis et orae maritimae). Shortly following this honor, the Second Triumvirate was formed and placed Sextus' name on their proscription list. Sextus soon occupied Sicily where he provided haven to other Romans proscribed by the Triumvirs. He retained control of Sicily from 42 to 36 BCE. In 42 BCE, Octavian sent Salvidienus Rufus to dislodge Sextus, but Rufus was defeated. It was likely between this defeat of Rufus and the Pact of Misenum with the Triumvirs (39 BCE) that Sextus struck much of his coinage, including this type. The rough seas around Sicily were beneficial to Sextus and particularly rough on his enemies, thus Neptune and the marine monster Scylla, destroyer of ships, are prominently displayed on this coin.
3 commentsCarausius
Mark_Oct.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Mark Antony & Octavian62 viewsMark Antony & Octavian 43 B.C.

Obv: M ANTON IMP III VIR RPC
Rev: CAESAR IMP III VIR RPC
Barry
004.jpg
Roman Imperators, Mark Antony & Octavian, 43 to 33 BC.175 viewsMarcus Antonius, 43–33 BC.
AR Denarius, Ephesus mint, spring-summer 41 BC.
Obv. M ANT IMP AVG III R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV in monogram), bare head of M. Antonius right.
Rev. CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavianus right.
RSC 8 (I, 128); Crawford 517/2; Sydenham -.
3,83g, 19mm.
Provenance: Dr.Busso Peus Nachf, Auction 395, lot 232.
1 commentsapyatygin
Antony1.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Mark Antony & Octavian, RSC 8188 viewsMark Antony & Octavian 43 B.C.

Obv: M ANT IMP AUG III VIR RPCM BARBAT QP
Rev: CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR RPC
3 commentsBarry
0023-070.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, MARK ANTONY and LUCIUS ANTONIUS denarius132 viewsEphesus mint, 41 BC
M ANT IMP AVG III VIR RPCM NERVA PROQ P, Bare head of Mark Antony right
L ANTONIUS COS, Bare head of Lucius Antonius right
3.58 gr
Ref : RCV #1509, Cohen #2
Lucius Antonius was the youngest brother of Mark Antony, and Consul in 41 BC
His coinage is rare, one type of aureus, two types of denarius
Following description taken from NAC auction 40, #617, about an other example of the same coin :
"This denarius, depicting the bare heads of Mark Antony and his youngest brother Lucius Antony, is a rare dual-portrait issue of the Imperatorial period. The family resemblance is uncanny, and one wonders if they truly looked this much alike, or if it is another case of portrait fusion, much like we observe with the dual-portrait billon tetradrachms of Antioch on which the face of the Egyptian queen Cleopatra VII takes on the square dimensions of Mark Antony. When Antony fled Rome to separate himself from Octavian and to take up his governorship in Gaul, Lucius went with him, and suffered equally from the siege of Mutina. This coin, however, was struck in a later period, when Lucius had for a second time taken up arms against Octavian in the west. Mark Antony was already in the east, and that is the region from which this coinage emanates. Since Lucius lost the ‘Perusine War’ he waged against Octavian, and was subsequently appointed to an office in Spain, where he died, it is likely that he never even saw one of his portrait coins."
5 commentsPotator II
bpPI1C1MarcAnt.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Mark Antony, Denarius, 32-31 BC63 viewsObv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley right, mast with banners at prow.
Rev: LEG XXI
Legionary eagle between two standards.
3.5 gm, 18 mm, Mint: Patria (?), S 1479, RSC 58.
Comment: One of the legionary series struck in vast quantities to pay for his impending war against Octavian. Minted from inferior silver supplied from Cleopatra and sometimes referred to as 'money of necessity'.
ex-Berk
Massanutten
8__Bronze_César_et_Octave.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Octavian & Julius Caesar. AE53 views- Bronze, Octave et Jules César, Thessalonique, 28-27 avant J.-C (Bronze) Sear GIC 151 75
Avers : Tête couronnée de Jules César.
Revers : Tête nue d’Octave.
Roger D2
0030-0210~0.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, OCTAVIAN Denarius RIC 255403 viewsItalian mint, possibly Rome, 31-30 BC
Anepigraph, bare head of Octavian left
CAESAR - DIVI F, Victory standing right on globe, holding wreath
3.84 gr
Ref : HCRI # 408, RCV # 1552v, Cohen # 66, RIC # 255
8 commentsPotator II
GG-AugMerc33__10.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Octavian, AR Denarius36 viewsObv: Bare head of Octavian right
Rev: Naked Mercury seated on a rock, petasus hanging down his back, playing a lyre. CAESAR DIVI F

RIC.257 Sear RCV I 1550 RSC I 61 BMCRE.596 BMCRR East 236
3 commentsnemesis
bpPI1A2Octavian.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Octavian, Denarius, Scarce 32-31 BC105 viewsObverse: Anepigraphic
Diademed head of Pax right, olive branch before and cornucopia behind.
Rev: CAESAR DIVI F
Octavian in military attire, walking right with his hand raised in adlocutio to the troops and holding spear over left shoulder.
3.6 gm, 18 mm, Mint: Italy Uncertain (Brundisium or Rome). RIC 253, S 1549, Seaby RSC 72.
Comment: Struck to pay the legions for his war against Antony. Not often seen even in this condition.
2 commentsMassanutten
16777q00.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Octavian, Triumvir and Imperator, Silver Denarius, SRCV I 1558, RSC I 123, RIC I 267, Sear CRI 422, BMCRR 4348129 viewsSH16777. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1558, RSC I 123, RIC I 267, Sear CRI 422, BMCRR 4348, EF, lustrous, weight 3.781g, maximum diameter 20.9mm, die axis 180o, Italian (Rome?) mint, obverse bare head of Octavian right; reverse IMP CAESAR on architrave of the Actian arch, depicted as a single span surmounted by a large statue of Octavian in a facing triumphal quadriga; mirror luster, slight rainbow toning, struck flat on the top edge of the reverse, banker's marks
3 commentsJoe Sermarini
Octav_quin.jpg
Roman Octavian Quinarius43 viewsAR Quinarius (29-28 BC)
Obv: CAESAR IMP VII ; bare hd. of Octavian r.
Rev: ASIA RECEPTA ; Victory stg. l. on cista mystica, flanked by two snakes

RIC 276 . CRI 429 . BMCRR East 240 (= BMCRE 647) . RSC 14
Tanit
cesar.jpg
Roman Octavian Sestertius22 viewsOCTAVIAN, with DIVUS JULIUS CAESAR. 38 BC.
Æ Sestertius
Obv: CAESAR before, DIVI F behind, bare head of Octavian right, wearing slight beard
Rev: DIVOS before, IVLIVS behind, head of Divus Julius Caesar right, wearing wreath.
Crawford 535/1; RPC I 620; CRI 308; Sydenham 1335; BMCRR Gaul 106; Cohen 3 (Julius Caesar)Tanit
Tanit
Screenshot_2017-04-30_23_19_46.png
Roman Provincial, Macedon, Marc Antony and Octavian, AE28.5 viewsThessalonica Year 5 = 37 B.C. 15.53g - 28.6mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: ΘEΣΣAΛONIKEΩN EΛEYΘEΠIAΣ - Draped bust of Eleutheria to right.

Rev: M ANT AVT Γ KAI AVT - Nike advancing left, holding wreath in right hand and palm in left.

RPC 1551; SNG Copenhagen 374.
Christian Scarlioli
L. Marcius Philippus.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Marcia - L. Marcius Phillippus. Denarius 56 B.C.1898 viewsObv: Diademed head of King Ancus Marcius right, lituus behind, ANCVS below.
Rev: Aqueduct (the Aqua Marcia) represented as an arcade of five arches surmounted by equestrian statue right, AQVA MAR (MAR in monogram) within arches, PHILIPPVS on left.
RCV I : 382 | RSC I : Marcia 28.

This moneyer was the step-brother of Octavian, who was just seven years old at the time of this issue. The reverse of this coin commemorates the construction, in 144 B.C., of the Aqua Marcia by Q. Marcius Rex, whose statue appears above the aqueduct.
18 commentsthe_Apostate
4483606l.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, AR Denarius - Crawford 419/1c19 viewsRome, The Republic.
M. Lepidus, 61 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.97g; 20mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Laureate and diademed female head, facing right; palm branch behind.

Reverse: Horseman advancing toward right with trophy over l shoulder; AN. XV. P.H.O.C.S. around; M.LEPIDVS in exergue.

References: Crawford 419/1c; Sydenham 830a; BMCRR 3644; Aemilia 22.

Provenance: Ex Fernandez Coll. [Aureo & Calico Alba Longa Auction (7 Nov 2018) Lot 85]; Leo Benz Collection [Lanz 88 (23 Nov 1988) Lot 118]; Künst und Münzen 18 (June 1978), Lot 250.

This coin was produced by Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, later triumvir with Octavian and Antony, during his early political career. The reverse celebrates the Second Punic War heroism of his ancestor, also named M. Aemilius Lepidus, who killed an enemy and saved a citizen at the age of 15 and in whose honor a statue was erected in Rome. That statue may be depicted on this coin. The reverse inscription abbreviates “AN[norum] XV PR[ogressus] H[ostem] O[ccidit], C[ivem] S[ervavit]” (Aged 15, he killed an enemy and saved a citizen.)
2 commentsCarausius
43BC_AccoleiusLariscolus.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Publius Accoleius Lariscolus. AR denarius, Rome, 43 BC36 viewsObv. Diana Nemorensis to right. Behind P ACCOLEIVS, in front LARISCOLVS.
Rev. Triple cult statue of Diana Nemorensis ( consisting of Diana, Hekate and Selena ) standing facing, supporting beam on which there are five trees.
Coin: Sear maintains that this coin commemorates the town of Aricia, the place of origin of the moneyer's family. Diana Nemoerensis was the chief deity of Aricia, and the ruins of her temple there are still visible today. Octavian's mother, Atia, was born in the town.
Ref. Albert 1542, Crawford 486/1, Sear 484.
3.41 gr, 18mm.
Bohemond
auguste_aegvptos.jpg
Roman, Augustus, Octavianus338 viewsCAESAR DIVI F COS VI
AEGVPTO CAPTA
RIC 545 (R3) ; Cohen 4 (30 Fr) ; BMC 653
ex Forvm Ancient Coins
Collection Frédéric Weber
4 commentsfrederic W
sabina-denarius-reshoot.jpg
Sabina denarius. 117-238 AD14 viewsRoman Imperial, Sabina denarius, (117-238 AD), 2.0g, 16mm

Obverse: SABINA AVGVSTA, Diademed and draped bust right, hair in queue down neck.

Reverse: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre.

Reference: RIC 395a, RSC 43, Sear (RCV 2000) 3921, BMC 940

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
salonina-1-reshoot.jpg
Salonina AE Antoninianus. Rome, 253-268 AD18 viewsRoman Imperial, Salonina AE Antoninianus, Rome mint, (253-268 AD), 2.3g, 19mm

Obverse: SALONINA AVG, Diademed draped bust right on crescent.

Reverse: VENVS GENETRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and sceptre, Cupid at her feet.

Reference: RIC V-1 30, RSC 121a; Sear5 10657.

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
salonina-reshoot.jpg
Salonina Billon Antoninianus, Asian mint, 255-258 AD24 viewsRoman Imperial, Salonina Billon Antoninianus. Asian mint, 255-258 AD. 3.3g, 21mm

Obverse: CORN SALONINA AVG, Diademed draped bust right on crescent.

Reverse: CONCORDIA AVGG, Gallienus and Salonina standing facing each other, clasping hands.

Reference: RIC 63, Cohen 31; RSC 31; Sear 10630

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
1487_Seleukos.jpg
Seleukos I - AE4 viewsc. 285-280 BC
Sardis
winged head of Medusa right, snakes in hair
bull butting right
BAΣIΛEΩΣ
ΣEΛEYKOY / Ξ
Houghton-Lorber I 21(2), Newell WSM 925, SNG Spaer 23, SGCV II 6852, HGC 9 92a (R1)
Johny SYSEL
Septimius_Severus_(193-211)_legionary_denarius_(Legio_XI_Claudia)_(AR).png
Septimius Severus (193-211) legionary denarius (Legio XI Claudia) (AR)21 viewsObv.: IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG (Laureate head of emperor) Rev.: LEG XI CL (Legionary eagle between two standards) Exergue: TR P COS Diameter: 17,5 mm Weight: 3,2 g RIC 12

The 11th Claudia was originally recruited by Caesar and used later by Octavian. They supported Septimius Severus' bid for the throne against Didius Iulianus.
Nick.vdw
septimius-severus-reshoot.jpg
Septimius Severus AR Denarius. 200-201 AD22 viewsRoman Imperial, Septimius Severus AR Denarius, (200-201 AD), 1.6g, 18mm

Obverse: SEVERVS AVG PART MAX, Laureate head right.

Reverse: RESTITVTOR VRBIS, Septimius standing left, holding patera in right hand over tripod altar, & spear in left.

Reference: RIC 167, RSC 599.

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
Sextus.jpg
Sextus Pompey75 viewsMAG PIVS IMP ITER
Bare head of Pompey Magnus right; capis behind, lituus before

Neptune standing left, holding aplustre in right hand, resting right foot on prow, between the Catanaean brothers, Anapias and Amphinomus, carrying their parents on their shoulders, PRAEF above, CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C in two lines in exergue.

Uncertain mint in Sicily, (Catania?)

37-36 BC

3.25g

Rare

Crawford 511/3a; Sydenham 1344; Sear 334; RRC 511/3a; BMCRR Sicily 7; Pompeia 27; Catalli 2001, 824

Ex-Londinium

Numiswiki:
Struck by Sextus Pompey after his victory over Salvidienus and relates to his acclamation as the Son of Neptune. Although Sextus Pompey was the supreme naval commander, Octavian had the Senate declare him a public enemy. He turned to piracy and came close to defeating Octavian. He was, however, defeated by Marcus Agrippa at the naval battle of Naulochus (3 September 36 B.C.). He was executed by order of Mark Antony in 35 B.C
1 commentsJay GT4
rr_1074_revised_Large.jpg
Sextus Pompey -- Pompey the Great and Neptune with Catanaean Brothers41 viewsSextus Pompey, Imperator and Prefect of the Fleet
[Youngest Son of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great)]

Obv: [MAG⦁PIVS⦁IMP⦁ITER]; portrait of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus r.; behind jug; before lituus. Border of dots.
Rev: above, [PRAE (AE ligatured) F]; in exergue, CLAS⦁ET⦁[ORAE (AE ligatured)⦁MAR (ligatured) IT⦁EX⦁S⦁C]; Neptune standing l., wearing diadem, aplustre in r. hand, cloak over l. arm, r. foot on prow,; on either side a Catanaean brother bearing one of his parents on his shoulders1. Border of dots.
Denomination: silver denarius; Mint: Sicily, uncertain location2; Date: summer 42 - summer 39 BC3; Weight: 3.68g; Diameter: 17mm; Die axis: 30º; References, for example: Sear CRI 334; BMCRR v. II Sicily 7, 8, 9, and 10; Sydenham 1344; Crawford RRC 511/3a.

Notes:

Obverse legend: MAG[NUS]⦁PIVS⦁IMP[ERATOR]⦁ITER[UM]
Reverse legend: PRAEF[ECTUS]⦁CLAS[SIS]⦁ET⦁ORAE⦁MARIT[IMAE]⦁EX⦁S[ENATUS]⦁C[ONSULTO]

1Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily appears a bit hesitant in his pronouncement that the representation of the Catanaean brothers in fact refers to Sextus’ title Pius (p. 561), but Sear CRI appears to have no such hesitation when he states “...the type illustrates the theme of ‘Pietas’ in connection with the assumption of the name Pius.” (p.203). DeRose Evans (1987) goes further (pp. 115 - 116), arguing that Sextus chose the Catanaean brothers (“...he consciously identifies himself with the south Italian heroes”) as a way to deliberately contrast his Pietas with that of Octavian’s.
2Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily tentatively suggests Catana as a possible location and Sear CRI follows suit.
3This is the date range argued for in Estiot 2006 (p. 145). Estiot recommends returning to Crawford’s proposal of 42 - 40 BC. Crawford RRC, p. 521 suggests the period in 42 BC after Sextus Pompey defeated Q. Salvidienus Rufus. Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily, p.560 proposes 42 - 38 BC and Sydenham, p. 210 follows suit. DeRose Evans (1987), p. 129 offers a time between late summer 36 and September 36 BC.

Provenance: From the collection of W. F. Stoecklin, Amriswil, Switzerland, acquired from Hess AG in Luzern prior to 1975. Ex Dr. Jacob Hirsch 33, 17 November 1913, lot 1058

Photo credits: Shanna Schmidt Numismatics

Sources

BMCRR: Grueber, H. A. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum v. II. London: 1910.
Crawford, Michael H. Roman Republican Coinage v. I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019 reprint with the 1982 corrections.
DeRose Evans, Jane. "The Sicilian Coinage of Sextus Pompeius (Crawford 511)" in Museum Notes (American Numismatic Society), vol. 32 (1987): 97 - 157.
Estiot, Sylviane. “Sex. Pompée, La Sicile et La Monnaie: Problèmes de Datation.” In Aere Perennivs, en hommage á Hubert Zehnacker, édité par Jacqueline Champeaux et Martine Chassignet. Paris: L’Université Paris - Sorbonne, 2006.
Sear, David R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. London: Spink, 1998.
Sydenham, Edward A. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. New York: Arno Press, 1975, rev. ed.
2 commentsTracy Aiello
Augustus_Colonia_Patricia.jpg
Spain - AE Dupondius, Colonia Patricia, (Córdoba)12 views32 mm / 15.25 gr.

Octavian: Senator, Consul and Triumvir from 43 BC; de-facto sole ruler from 27 BC; proclaimed Augustus, emperor 12 BC - 14 AD.

Augustus AE 33mm of Colonia Patricia (Corduba), Spain. PERMISSV CAESARIS AVGVSTI, bare head left / COLONIA PATRICIA, aquila between legionary standards.

Burgos 1562. RPC 128
Antonivs Protti
Augustus_Calagurri.jpg
SPAIN - Calagurris, Calahorra (La Rioja) Ae As13 viewsOctavian: Senator, Consul and Triumvir from 43 BC; de-facto sole ruler from 27 BC; proclaimed Augustus, emperor 12 BC - 14 AD.

29 mm / 13.68 gr.

Augustus AE As of Calagurris, Spain. C Semp Barba III and Q Baeb Flavus, Duovirs. IMP CAESAR AVGVSTVS P P, laureate head right / M CAL I C SEMP BARBA III Q BAEB FLAVO II VIR, bull standing right.

Burgos 319. Calagurris, RPC 447
Antonivs Protti
chalkis_octavian_RPC4775.jpg
Syria, Coele-Syria, Chalkis ad Libanum, Octavian, RPC 47745 viewsOctavian, 31 BC - AD 14
AE 22, 6.46g, 22.26mm, 330°
struck 27-26 BC (= year 286)
obv. L ZΠ NE - KAI (from upper l.)
Bare head of Octavian r.
rev. ZHNOΔOPOV TETPAPXOV KAI APXIPEΩC (from upper r.)
Bare head of Zenodoros l.
ref. RPC 4774; BMC 7; SNG Copenhagen 417; SNG France 9-10
rare, F+
Jochen
Battle_of_Actium.jpg
The Battle of Actium, by Lorenzo A. Castro, 1672.29 viewsThe Battle of Actium was a naval battle of the Roman Civil War between Mark Antony and Octavian (Caesar Augustus). It was fought on September 2, 31 BC, near the Roman colony of Actium in Greece (near the modern-day city of Preveza), on the Ionian Sea. Octavian's fleet was commanded by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, Antony's fleet was supported by the fleet of his lover, Cleopatra, queen of Ptolemaic Egypt. The battle was won by the forces of Octavian, whose victory led him to be titled the Princeps Augustus, and eventually to be considered the first Roman Emperor; for this reason the date of the battle is often used to mark the end of the Roman Republic and the beginning of the Roman Empire.

Cleisthenes
Mark_Antony_and_Octavian.JPG
The Triumvirs. Mark Antony and Octavian18 viewsSpring-early summer 41 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.82 g, 12h). Ephesus mint. M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore.
Bare head of Antony right; M • ANT • I(MP) • (AV)G • III • VIR • R • P • C • M BARBAT • Q • P around
Bare head of Octavian right, wearing slight beard; CAESAR • IMP • PONT • III • VIR • R • P • C • around.
Crawford 517/2; CRI 243; RSC 8a; Sydenham 1181; Kestner 3793-5; BMCRR East 100. VF, toned, a few light scratches under tone.
Leo
tomis_lysimachos_AMNG2480.jpg
Thracia, Tomis, in the name of Lysimachos, AMNG I/2, 248039 viewsLysimachos, kingdom of Thracia
AV - Stater, 8.30g, 20mm, 0°
Tomis, 44-42 BC
obv. head of deified Alexander r., diademed and with horn of Ammon, behind dot and
monogram(?)
rev. BASILEW[S] l., LYSIMAXOY r.
in between Athena Nikophoros sitting l., in extended r. hand holding Nike, crowning the
name of the ruler, l. elbow leaning on shield, spear leaning behind, QEM in l. field,
TO in field below throne; under throne trident to l., dolphin above and below
ref. AMNG I/2, 2480, pl. XXI,6 (crude style, portrait is reminiscent of Pharnakes II); De Callatay p.141 (D4/R1);
Fabricius 308 (obv. same die); Müller 273; SNG Copenhagen 1091(same dies); SNG Stockholm 839 (obv. same die)
EF, mint state
pedigree:
ex Harlan J.Berk

Imitation of a gold stater of Lysimachos (323-281 BC), struck to pay the Thracian mercenaries of Brutus, the assassin of Julius Caesar, for his campaign against Octavian and Marcus Antonius. The style more crude than the original. There is an alternative interpretation: Issued under Mithridates VI, 88-87 BC.
Jochen
Titus_RIC_V205.JPG
Titus (as Caesar), 69 - 79 AD 52 viewsObv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, laureate head of Titus facing right.

Rev: TR POT VIII (COS) VII, Venus standing right, seen from behind, nude except for drapery around her thighs, holding a helmet in her extended right hand, resting left elbow on a column and holding a traverse spear in her left hand.

Note: Reverse was copied from the coinage of Octavian.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, January 1 - June 24, 79 AD

3.3 grams, 15.9 mm, 180°

RIC II Vespasian 205, RSC 332, S2448, VM 29/1

Ex: FORVM
4 commentsSPQR Coins
TitusNeptuneRome.jpg
Titus / Neptune45 viewsTitus as Caesar AR Denarius, Rome Mint, 72-73 AD, 18mm., 3.13g.
O: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Titus, bearded, laureate, right.
R: NEP RED; Neptune standing left, right foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
- RIC V366 (C), BMC V80, RSC 121

Not the easiest coin to find, only four specimens in Reka Devnia hoard. This type of "Neptune the Returner" refers to the sea voyages of Vespasian and Titus from the East to Rome in 70 and 71 AD respectively .
Researchers have long recognized that many of Vespasian's and Titus' reverse types recall types from earlier reigns, most especially those from the age of Augustus. Attempts have been made to connect his ‘Augustan’ types with the centenaries of the Battle of Actium (ending in 70) and the ‘foundation’ of the empire (ending in 74), but all seem to have failed, as the relevant types are strewn throughout Vespasian’s ten-year reign. It is perhaps better to view his recycling of types as a political strategy favored by Vespasian and Titus, but subsequently abandoned by Domitian. In this case we have a depiction of the sea-god Neptune that certainly is derived from Octavian’s pre-Imperial coinage struck in commemoration of Actium.
4 commentsNemonater
titus_as_caesar_star_prow1.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC 950151 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VI; Prow r.; above eight pointed star
RIC 950 (R). BMC 226. RSC 68. BNC 202.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This rare star and prow reverse is shared with Vespasian (not a very common one for him as well!) and is a copy of one issued by Marc Antony. Vespasian copied many types from the past, this is perhaps an odd choice for a reverse considering Antony was an enemy of Octavian. Why this particular type was chosen remains a mystery to me.

The BMC states the star and prow symbolizes the victorious admiral.

This denarius is rated R by the RIC, but as far as it's availability in the market place I would rate it R2! This was a most vexing coin for me to locate, again a friend who shares a common collecting niche as I came to the rescue and offered this one to me.

Quite a nice find. Not only a rare type, but also the portrait is wonderful, imho.

5 commentsvespasian70
T10a.jpg
Titus RIC 1059 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII; Statue of radiate male figure with spear and parazonium on rostral column
RIC 10 (R). BMC p. 224 note. RSC - . BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This type is not particularly rare but with this reverse legend it is. The reverse legend lacks "P P" which indicates this denarius was minted very early in the reign. The lack of "P P" combined with IMP XIIII - dates it to summer, 79 AD. The radiate figure on a column is a copy of a denarius minted by Augustus and was also issued by Vespasian earlier in 79. Mattingly speculates the reverse depicts the 120 ft high Colossus erected by Nero and moved by Vespasian during his sixth consulship to the Sacred Way. However, it is far more likely to be an imitative design copying a similar type struck for Octavian (BMCRE i, 103, 633).

The coin itself is well worn but has a strong, artistic portrait.

David Atherton
15562dentLG.jpg
Titus RIC 2862 viewsAR Denarius, 3.44g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P; Statue of radiate male figure with spear and parazonium on rostral column
RIC 28 (C). BMC 13. RSC 272. BNC 11.
Acquired from Herakles Numismatics, May 2011.

The reverse is a carry-over type from Vespasian's last issue before his death. Mattingly speculates the reverse depicts the 120 ft high Colossus erected by Nero for his Golden House (BMCRE p. xlii). According to Dio, the enormous statue was moved by Vespasian in his sixth consulship and set up on the Scared Way. However, it is far more likely to be an imitative design copying a similar type struck for Octavian (BMCRE i, 103, 633).

A decent, well centred example of this common type.
1 commentsDavid Atherton
Titus_RIC_10.JPG
Titus, 79 - 81 AD92 viewsObv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM, laureate head of Titus facing right.

Rev: TRP VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII PP, radiate figure atop of a rostral column.

Note: The reverse of this coin was inspired by one of Octavian (RIC I 271).

Silver denarius, Rome mint, 79 AD

3.3 grams, 18 mm, 180°

RIC II 10, RSC 272, S2509 (var.), VM 30/3
SPQR Coins
Trajan_Eagle_ProvincialBlack.jpg
Trajan Provincial39 viewsTrajan 98-117 AD. AR Tetradrachm. Tyre, Phoenicia. 117 AD. (13.59g, 23.72 mm) Obv: ΔHMAPX EX KA YΠAT S (= TR P XXI COS VI), Laureate head right. Rev: [AYTOKP K]AIC NEP TPAIANOC API CEB ΓEPM [ΔAK ΠAPΘ] (With all of Trajan's honorary titles: Germanicus, Dacicus, Optimus, Parthicus), Eagle on a thunderbolt, head left.
Prieur 1513

Ex: Octavian Coins

People call these tetradrachms "big chunks of silver", and they are right!
Paddy
Trajan_HorsebackBlack.jpg
Trajan RIC 543; Woytek 317bD 37 viewsTrajan 98-117 AD. AE Sestertius. Rome Mint. Second half 107 - 110 AD. (23,20g, 31mm) Obv: IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder. Rev: S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Emperor riding right, thrusts spear at Dacian in front of horse; in ex. S C.
Woytek 317bD; RIC 543; C 508

Ex: Octavian Coins, Lucernae, V-coins
1 commentsPaddy
Tray4.jpg
Tray489 viewsSestertius from Octavian to Trebonian Gallus1 commentsPekka K
246.jpg
Trophy113 viewsCILICIA. Uncertain colonial mint. Octavian. Æ 19 (Semis). Ca 31-30 B.C. Obv: (P)RINCEPSFELIX. Bare head right; countermark on neck. Rev: COLONIA-(IVLIA-IIVIR). Two humpded oxen pulling plow to left; in field to left two monograms: (1) VE, (2) TER. Ref: RPC 4083. Axis: 270°. Weight: 5.59 g. Note: The mint has been the subject of some discussion. The monograms of the revers refer to the names of the duovirs. CM: Trophy in circular punch, 5 mm. Howgego - (3 pcs in RPC, though). Collection Automan.Automan
valerian-1-1-reshoot.jpg
Valerian I AR Antoninianus. 253-260 AD17 viewsRoman Imperial, Valerian I AR Antoninianus, (253-260 AD), 3.3g, 23mm

Obverse: IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: VIRT-VS AVGG, Valerian and Gallienus facing each other, one holding spear and globe, the other Victory and spear.

Reference: RIC 293v, Cohen 276

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
valerian-1-reshoot.jpg
Valerian I BI Antoninianus. 253-260 AD22 viewsRoman Imperial, Valerian I BI Antoninianus, (253-260 AD), 2.1g, 20mm

Obverse: IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped bust right.

Reverse: ORIENS AVGG, Sol standing left, right hand raised, left hand holding whip.

Reference: RIC 106, Cohen 140; Sear5 9950

EX: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
vespNeptune~0.jpg
Vespasian97 viewsIMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII
Laureate head of Vespasian right

NEP RED
Neptune standing left, right foot on globe, holding aplustre and sceptre

Antioch
76 AD

2.46g

Sear 2276, RIC 361

Scarce!

The reverse of this type is copied from the coinage of Octavian

Sold Forum Auctions Feb 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
Vespasian_RIC_II_943.jpg
Vespasian RIC II 094342 viewsVespasian 69-79 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 77-78 A.D. (3.03 g, 18.8m, 6h). Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right. Rev: COS VIII in exergue, Oxen, two, yoked left. RIC II 943.

This denarius was part of an agricultural issue of Vespasian. The oxen reverse closely resembles a type issued by Octavian and earlier Republican denarius of L. Cassius Caecianus.
2 commentsLucas H
V688sm.jpg
Vespasian RIC-688228 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 74 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR in exergue; Vespasian stg. r., with branch and sceptre, in quadriga r.
Rev: VESP AVG across field; Victory on prow r., with wreath and palm
RIC 688 (R). BMC 147. RSC 569. BNC 121.
Ex Nomos Obolos 4, 21 February 2016, lot 575. Ex GH Collection. Ex Superior Galleries, The Moreira sale, Part II, 10-11 December 1988, lot 2374.

A major feature of Vespasian's coinage is in its use of antiquarian styled types and recycled ones from previous eras. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman Silver Coinage have shown that a big component of Vespasian's silver bullion consisted of recycled denarii from the republic and early empire. Vespasian's moneyers were removing the older worn coinage and replacing them with brand new coins and in the process keeping some of the familiar reverse designs that the Roman public had grown accustomed to.

With that in mind, this very rare coin which copies not only the reverse design from a denarius of Octavian, it also copies the obverse. The only change is with the reverse legend VESP AVG to indicate Vespasian's authority. Being undated, it is difficult to correctly place in the series. RIC assigns it to 74 AD based on the legends. D. Hendin to 71-72, just after Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph for the Jewish War.

This denarius is so rare I have only been able to locate six other examples, all of which are in public collections: BM 3 examples (one plated), Paris (BNC 121, obv die match with mine), Berlin (rev die match with mine), and ANA NY. Curtis Clay has kindly informed me of several other examples offered at auction: "Glendining, 1952, Ryan Part 5, part of lot 2147, not illustrated, 'only fine but rare.' Perhaps the same coin as Trau Sale, 1935, lot 625, pl. 8: a worn example. Stack's, Knobloch, May 1980, lot 300. VF, but small edge chip (the ANA NY coin). Leu, April 1982, lot 327, VF."

I think the RIC frequency rating of 'rare' really underestimates the rarity of the type.

Fantastic old cabinet toning on a large 20mm flan.
17 commentsDavid Atherton
vesp rostral column.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1065121 viewsAR denarius, 3.51g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: TR POT X COS VIIII; Radiated figure, naked except for slight drapery round thighs, standing r., r. leg bent, resting l. arm bent on column, holding helmet in extended r. hand and transverse spear in l.
RIC 1065 (R). BMC 254. RSC 559. BNC 222.
Acquired from Glenn W. Woods, December 2003.

This denarius is part of the last issue struck for Vespasian in 79. Mattingly speculates the reverse depicts the 120 ft high Colossus erected by Nero for his Golden House (BMCRE p. xlii). According to Dio, the enormous statue was moved by Vespasian in his sixth consulship and set up on the Scared Way. However, it is far more likely to be an imitative design copying a similar type struck for Octavian (BMCRE i, 103, 633).

Fine style. The irregular flan shape is only a minor detraction.
1 commentsVespasian70
vesp l. rostral column.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1066148 viewsAR Denarius, 3.41g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: TR POT X COS VIIII ; Radiate figure, naked standing facing, holding vertical spear in right hand and parazonium, projecting sideways, in left, on column with anchor on front and three 'rostra' projecting on either side
RIC 1066 (R). BMC 253. RSC 560. BNC -.
Acquired from Ancient Caesar, November 2007.

This coin is part of Vespasian's last issue before his death in June of 79 AD. Mattingly speculates the reverse depicts the 120 ft high Colossus erected by Nero for his Golden House. According to Dio, the enormous statue was moved by Vespasian in his sixth consulship and set up on the Scared Way. However, it is far more likely to be an imitative design copying a similar type struck for Octavian (BMCRE i, 103, 633).

A rare left facing portrait of the type, it is wonderfully centred, in good condition, and in a pleasing style.


4 commentsVespasian70
Philippi_3-Standards_2b.jpg
Victory | Three Military Standards, COHOR PRAE PHIL * Philippi, Macedonia, Æ19 - 27 B.C. - 14 A.D.293 views
Victory | Three Military Standards * Philippi Commemorative

Obv: Victory, striding left, holding frond in left hand over left shoulder, closed laurel wreath in outstretched right hand: VIC AV[G]
Rev: Three Military Standards: COHOR PRAE PHIL (to left, right and exergue, repectively).

Exergue: PHIL

Mint: Philippi (Mint moving with Octavian and/or Antonius?).
Struck: 27 B.C. - 14 A.D.
*(See note below regarding dating)

Size: 19.245 mm.
Weight: 4.31 grm.
Die axis: 180°

Condition: Quite fine, considerably better in hand than my best photos can portray.

Refs:*
S 521
BMC 23
RPC 1651
Vagi / CHRE 347

COHOR PRAE PHIL - '(Honoring) the Praetorian Guard of Philippi.'

* This issue may date rather to the reign of Claudius or Nero.
1 commentsTiathena
42576q00.jpg
[303a] Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I, 312 - 280 B.C.121 viewsSilver drachm, Houghton and Lorber 131(8), Newell ESM 91a-b (same obv die), gVF, Seleukeia mint, weight 4.239g, maximum diameter 17.1mm, die axis 270o, obverse laureate head of Zeus; reverse Athena driving quadriga of horned elephants right, anchor above, BASILEWS on left, SELEUKOU in ex; ex CNG auction 82, lot 713. Ex FORVM.

Seleukos (often spelled Seleucus) I Nikator, Founder of a Hellenistic Dynasty in the Orient
Born into a well-placed family in Macedon, trained as a royal page to King Philip II, trusted companion and chief of the élite bodyguard of Alexander the Great, he spent half his life in the shadow of more ambitious soldiers. Yet he eventually rose above all of them, and the kingdom he founded rivalled Ptolemaic Egypt in brilliance and almost in longevity, for Cleopatra VII ended her life, surrendering Egypt to Octavian, only a generation after Rome reduced what remained of the Seleukid Empire to the Province of Syria.
http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/908680

Seleucus I (surnamed for later generations Nicator, Greek: Σέλευκος Νικάτωρ, i.e. Seleucus Victor) (ca. 358 BCE–281 BCE), was a Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great. In the wars of the Diadochi that took place after Alexander's death, Seleucus established the Seleucid dynasty and the Seleucid Empire.

Seleucus was the son of Antiochus from Orestis, one of Philip's generals, and of Laodice. In 333 BC, as a young man of about twenty-three, he accompanied Alexander into Asia and won distinction in the Indian campaign of 326 BC. In 324 BCE Seleucus took as wife Apama, with whom he had four children: two daughters, Apama and Laodice, and two sons, Antiochus & Achaeus.

When the Macedonian empire was divided in 323 BC (the "Partition of Babylon"), Seleucus was given the office of chiliarch, which attached him closely to the regent Perdiccas. Subsequently, Seleucus had a hand in the murder of Perdiccas during the latter's unsuccessful invasion of Egypt in 321 BC.

At the second partition, at Triparadisus (321 BC), Seleucus was given the government of the Babylonian satrapy. In 316 BC, when Antigonus had made himself master of the eastern provinces, Seleucus felt himself threatened and fled to Egypt. In the war which followed between Antigonus and the other Macedonian chiefs, Seleucus actively cooperated with Ptolemy and commanded Egyptian squadrons in the Aegean Sea.

The victory won by Ptolemy at the battle of Gaza in 312 BC opened the way for Seleucus to return to the east. His return to Babylon was afterwards officially regarded as the beginning of the Seleucid Empire and that year as the first of the Seleucid era. Master of Babylonia, Seleucus at once proceeded to wrest the neighbouring provinces of Persia, Susiana and Media from the nominees of Antigonus. A raid into Babylonia conducted in 311 BC by Demetrius, son of Antigonus, did not seriously check Seleucus' progress. Over the course of nine years (311-302 BC), while Antigonus was occupied in the west, Seleucus brought the whole eastern part of Alexander's empire as far as the Jaxartes and Indus Rivers under his authority.

In 305 BC, after the extinction of the old royal line of Macedonia, Seleucus, like the other four principal Macedonian chiefs, assumed the title and style of basileus (king). He established Seleucia on the Tigris as his capital.

In the year 281 B.C., at the age of 77, Seleukos was assassinated by Ptolemy Ceraunus (the eldest son of Ptolemy I Soter). All of the "principal" Diadochi; Antigonas Monophthalmos, Antipater, Kassander, Ptolemy, Lysimichus and Seleukos; had now joined their great king, Alexander, in death.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seleucus_I_Nicator

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
5 commentsCleisthenes
SeleukosISNGSpaer23.jpg
[303b] Seleucid Kingdom, Seleukos I, 312 - 281 B.C.83 viewsBronze AE 19, WSM 925, SNG Spaer 23, VF, Antioch mint, 7.994g, 19.2mm, 225o; Obverse: winged Gorgon head right; Reverse: BASILEWS SELEUKOU, bull butting right, X in exergue.


Seleukos I Nikator, Founder of a Hellenistic Dynasty in the Orient
Born into a well-placed family in Macedon, trained as a royal page to King Philip II, trusted companion and chief of the élite bodyguard of Alexander the Great, he spent half his life in the shadow of more ambitious soldiers. Yet he eventually rose above all of them, and the kingdom he founded rivalled Ptolemaic Egypt in brilliance and almost in longevity, for Cleopatra VII ended her life, surrendering Egypt to Octavian, only a generation after Rome reduced what remained of the Seleukid Empire to the Province of Syria.
http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/908680

Seleucus I (surnamed for later generations Nicator, Greek: Σέλευκος Νικάτωρ, i.e. Seleucus Victor) (ca. 358 BCE–281 BCE), was a Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great. In the wars of the Diadochi that took place after Alexander's death, Seleucus established the Seleucid dynasty and the Seleucid Empire.

Seleucus was the son of Antiochus from Orestis, one of Philip's generals, and of Laodice. In 333 BC, as a young man of about twenty-three, he accompanied Alexander into Asia and won distinction in the Indian campaign of 326 BC. In 324 BCE Seleucus took as wife Apama, with whom he had four children: two daughters, Apama and Laodice, and two sons, Antiochus & Achaeus.

When the Macedonian empire was divided in 323 BC (the "Partition of Babylon"), Seleucus was given the office of chiliarch, which attached him closely to the regent Perdiccas. Subsequently, Seleucus had a hand in the murder of Perdiccas during the latter's unsuccessful invasion of Egypt in 321 BC.

At the second partition, at Triparadisus (321 BC), Seleucus was given the government of the Babylonian satrapy. In 316 BC, when Antigonus had made himself master of the eastern provinces, Seleucus felt himself threatened and fled to Egypt. In the war which followed between Antigonus and the other Macedonian chiefs, Seleucus actively cooperated with Ptolemy and commanded Egyptian squadrons in the Aegean Sea.

The victory won by Ptolemy at the battle of Gaza in 312 BC opened the way for Seleucus to return to the east. His return to Babylon was afterwards officially regarded as the beginning of the Seleucid Empire and that year as the first of the Seleucid era. Master of Babylonia, Seleucus at once proceeded to wrest the neighbouring provinces of Persia, Susiana and Media from the nominees of Antigonus. A raid into Babylonia conducted in 311 BC by Demetrius, son of Antigonus, did not seriously check Seleucus' progress. Over the course of nine years (311-302 BC), while Antigonus was occupied in the west, Seleucus brought the whole eastern part of Alexander's empire as far as the Jaxartes and Indus Rivers under his authority.

In 305 BC, after the extinction of the old royal line of Macedonia, Seleucus, like the other four principal Macedonian chiefs, assumed the title and style of basileus (king). He established Seleucia on the Tigris as his capital.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seleucus_I_Nicator

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
AusgustusActiumDenarius.jpg
[603a] Octavian, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.49 viewsAR denarius; BMC 461; struck at Lugdunum between 15-13 BC , C 1411, RIC 171a; Date: 17.8 mm, 3.5 grams; F+; Obverse: AVGVSTVS [DI]VI F, Bare head right; Reverse: IMP X, Apollo standing facing, holding plectrum in right hand and lyre in left, ACT in exergue. A decent denarius commemorating The Battle of Actium against Antony in 31 BC. Ex McSorley Westchester Stamp and coin show 1970. Ex Ancient Imports.


De Imperatoribus Romanis:
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers

AUGUSTUS (31 B.C. - 14 A.D.)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

In the course of his long and spectacular career, he put an end to the advancing decay of the Republic and established a new basis for Roman government that was to stand for three centuries. This system, termed the "Principate," was far from flawless, but it provided the Roman Empire with a series of rulers who presided over the longest period of unity, peace, and prosperity that Western Europe, the Middle East and the North African seaboard have known in their entire recorded history. Even if the rulers themselves on occasion left much to be desired, the scale of Augustus's achievement in establishing the system cannot be overstated. Aside from the immense importance of Augustus's reign from the broad historical perspective, he himself is an intriguing figure: at once tolerant and implacable, ruthless and forgiving, brazen and tactful. Clearly a man of many facets, he underwent three major political reinventions in his lifetime and negotiated the stormy and dangerous seas of the last phase of the Roman Revolution with skill and foresight. With Augustus established in power and with the Principate firmly rooted, the internal machinations of the imperial household provide a fascinating glimpse into the one issue that painted this otherwise gifted organizer and politician into a corner from which he could find no easy exit: the problem of the succession.

(For a very detailed and interesting account of the Age of Augustus see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/auggie.htm)

Death and Retrospective

In his later years, Augustus withdrew more and more from the public eye, although he continued to transact public business. He was getting older, and old age in ancient times must have been considerably more debilitating than it is today. In any case, Tiberius had been installed as his successor and, by AD 13, was virtually emperor already. In AD 4 he had received grants of both proconsular and tribunician power, which had been renewed as a matter of course whenever they needed to be; in AD 13, Tiberius's imperium had been made co-extensive with that of Augustus. While traveling in Campania, Augustus died peacefully at Nola on 19 August, AD 14. Tiberius, who was en route to Illyricum, hurried to the scene and, depending on the source, arrived too late or spent a day in consultation with the dying princes. The tradition that Livia poisoned her husband is scurrilous in the extreme and most unlikely to be true. Whatever the case about these details, Imperator Caesar Augustus, Son of a God, Father of his Country, the man who had ruled the Roman world alone for almost 45 years, or over half a century if the triumviral period is included, was dead. He was accorded a magnificent funeral, buried in the mausoleum he had built in Rome, and entered the Roman pantheon as Divus Augustus. In his will, he left 1,000 sesterces apiece to the men of the Praetorian guard, 500 to the urban cohorts, and 300 to each of the legionaries. In death, as in life, Augustus acknowledged the true source of his power.

The inscription entitled "The Achievements of the Divine Augustus" (Res Gestae Divi Augustae; usually abbreviated RG) remains a remarkable piece of evidence deriving from Augustus's reign. The fullest copy of it is the bilingual Greek and Latin version carved into the walls of the Temple of Rome and Augustus at Ancyra in Galatia (for this reason the RG used to be commonly referred to as the Monumentum Ancyranum). Other evidence, however, demonstrates that the original was inscribed on two bronze pillars that flanked the entrance to the Mausoleum of Augustus in Rome. The inscription remains the only first-person summary of any Roman emperor's political career and, as such, offers invaluable insights into the Augustan regime's public presentation of itself.

In looking back on the reign of Augustus and its legacy to the Roman world, its longevity ought not to be overlooked as a key factor in its success. People had been born and reached middle age without knowing any form of government other than the Principate. Had Augustus died earlier (in 23 BC, for instance), matters may have turned out very differently. The attrition of the civil wars on the old Republican aristocracy and the longevity of Augustus, therefore, must be seen as major contributing factors in the transformation of the Roman state into a monarchy in these years. Augustus's own experience, his patience, his tact, and his great political acumen also played their part. All of these factors allowed him to put an end to the chaos of the Late Republic and re-establish the Roman state on a firm footing. He directed the future of the empire down many lasting paths, from the existence of a standing professional army stationed at or near the frontiers, to the dynastic principle so often employed in the imperial succession, to the embellishment of the capital at the emperor's expense. Augustus's ultimate legacy, however, was the peace and prosperity the empire was to enjoy for the next two centuries under the system he initiated. His memory was enshrined in the political ethos of the Imperial age as a paradigm of the good emperor; although every emperor adopted his name, Caesar Augustus, only a handful earned genuine comparison with him.

Copyright © 1999, Garrett G. Fagan.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Augustus (the first Roman emperor, in whose reign Jesus Christ was born) is without any doubt one of the most important figures in Roman history.

It is reported that when he was near death, Augustus addressed those in attendance with these words, "If I have played my part well, applaud!"

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr
Cleisthenes
     
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