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Search results - "Moneyer"
DenTMalApClQUrb.jpg
20 viewsDenarius - 111/110 B.C. Rome mint
APPIVS CL. PVLCHER, T. MALLIVS - Gens Mallia - Claudia.
Obv: Helmeted head of Roma right, quadrangular device behind
Rev.: Victory in triga right, T. MAL. (in monogr.) AP. CL. Q. VR. in ex.
Gs. 3,8 mm. 17,82
Crawf. 299/1b, Sear RCV 176, Grueber 1293

For Crawford, Q. VR would not mean Quaestores Urbani, but the name of a third moneyer, Q. Urbinius.
Maxentius
Augustus_As_Sextus_Nonius.jpg
2 Augustus AE As43 viewsAugustus AE As
6 BC
Moneyer Sextus Nonius Quinctilianus

CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT, bare head right / SEX NONIVS QVINCTILIAN IIIVIR AAAFF around large SC.

Cohen 474, RIC 439, Cohen 474, BMC 237
RI0008
Sosius
Augustus_moneyer_As.jpg
1 Augustus16 viewsAugustus
AE As. 7 B.C., P. Lurius Agrippa, moneyer

CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT, bare head right / PLVRIVS AGRIPPA IIIVIR AAAFF around large SC.

RIC 427. C 445. Sear ’88 510
Sosius
IMG_0362.JPG
C. Vibius C.f. C.n. Pansa Caetronianus9 viewsMoneyer issues of Imperatorial Rome. C. Vibius C.f. C.n. Pansa Caetronianus. 48 BC. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.73 g, 6h). Rome mint. Head of young Bacchus (or Liber) right, wearing ivy wreath / Ceres advancing right, holding a torch with each hand; plow to right. Crawford 449/2; CRI 21; Sydenham 946; Vibia 16. VF, toned, edge chip.

From the Archer M. Huntington Collection, ANS 1001.2.9.
ecoli
st.jpg
ENGLAND, NORMAN, Stephen (1135-1154), Silver Penny, Watford type .33 viewsENGLAND, NORMAN, Stephen (1135-1154), Silver Penny, Watford type .
Mint and moneyer uncertain . 1.0 gr
Crowned and diademed bust of king right, holding sceptre in his right hand .
Cross moline, with a fleur each angle .
North 873; SCBC 1278
Vladislav D
Cloacina.jpg
L. Mussidius Longus7 viewsMoneyer issues of Imperatorial Rome L. Mussidius Longus, 42 BCE AR denarius, Rome mint.Ancient Aussie
1390_L_Senticius.jpg
L. Sentius C.f. - AR denarius7 views²96 BC
¹101 BC
Rome
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
(AR)G·PVB
Jupiter in quadriga right, holding scepter, thunderbolt and reins
D
L·SENTI·C·F
¹Crawford 325/1b, SRCV I203, Sydenham 600, RSC I Sentia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,00g
ex Gorny & Mosch

Moneyer held praetorship in 93-89 BC.
Johny SYSEL
3420493.jpg
P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus33 viewsMoneyer issues of Imperatorial Rome. P. Clodius M.f. Turrinus. 42 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.89 g, 1h). Rome mint. Laureate head of Apollo right; lyre behind / Diana Lucifera standing right, bow and quiver on her shoulder, holding torch in each hand. Crawford 494/23; CRI 184; Sydenham 1117; Claudia 15. Good VF, toned, a few minor scratches beneath the toning.

From the RAJ Collection. Ex CNG Inventory 914993 (2012 NYINC); Sincona 4 (25 October 2011), lots 4160 or 4161 (part of), includes ticket from a French Collectio
1 commentsecoli
IMG_0351.JPG
Q. Sicinius11 viewsMoneyer issues of Imperatorial Rome. Q. Sicinius. Early 49 BC. AR Denarius (17.5mm, 3.89 g, 4h). Rome mint. Diademed head of Fortuna Populi Romani right / Palm frond with fillet and winged caduceus in saltire; wreath above. Crawford 440/1; CRI 1; Sydenham 938; Sicinia 5. Near VF, toned, some iridescence, banker’s marks and a couple scratches under tone on obverse, traces of deposits, a few minor marks on reverse.

Ex CNG
1 commentsecoli
ThoriusBalbus.jpg
#L. Thorius Balbus. 105 BC. AR Denarius32 viewsRome mint. ISMR behind, head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin headdress / L THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue, bull charging right.

"The obverse refers to the the cult of Juno Sospita at Lanuvium, the moneyer's birthplace. The reverse is likely a play on the moneyer's name (Taurus sounds like Thorius). Cicero described L. Thorius Balbus as a man who lived in such a manner that there was not a single pleasure, however refined or rare, that he did not enjoy. This is one of the most common republican denarii." -- Roman Silver Coins edited by David Sear and Robert Loosley
ancientone
00029x00~0.jpg
94 viewsAugustus. 27 BC-AD 14
Æ Dupondius (25mm, 5.96 g, 1 h)
Balkans region. Imitating a Rome mint issue of an uncertain moneyer. Struck early 1st century AD.
Corrupt legend in two lines within wreath; two imitative countermarks
Large (retrograde S)C
Ardatirion
pepin-saint-denis.JPG
D.892 Pepin the Brief (denier, Saint-Denis?)18 viewsPepin the Brief, king of the Franks (751-768)
Denier, Saint-Denis ? (751-768)

Silver, 1.22 g, 16 mm diameter, die axis 11 h

O/ RP under a bar; pellets in the field
R/ ΛVT / TRΔ / NO

RP on the obverse means Rex Pippinus, or maybe PiPpinus Rex (the first R would then have to be read twice, the first time as a P).
The reverse is more intricate. First, the mint was identified as Antrain in Brittany. However, a lead slab has been found in Saint-Denis, on which similiar dies had been tested. As a consequence these deniers may have been minted in Saint-Denis monastery. However the legend on the reverse is still unclear (name of a moneyer, abbreviation of a latine phrase ?).
Droger
edilred2-denier-crux.JPG
S.1148 Aethelred II (crux penny, Winchester)17 viewsAethelred II, king of the English (978-1013 and 1014-1016)
Crux penny (moneyer: Brithmaer, mint: Winchester)

A/ +ΛEDELRED REX ΛNGLR X (AE and NG ligated) around central circle enclosing diademed & draped bust left holding a scepter
R/ BYRTHMΛER M-O PIN (AR ligated) around central circle containing voided cross with pellet center, C R V X in angles

silver, 1.65 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 1h
1 commentsDroger
aethelred2-long-cross.JPG
S.1151 Aethelred II (long cross penny, Winchester)8 viewsAethelred II, king of the English (978-1013 and 1014-1016)
Long cross penny (moneyer: Godwine, mint: Canterbury, 997-1003)

A/ +ΛEDELRED REX ΛNGLO (AE and NG ligated) around central circle enclosing draped bust left
R/ +GODE-PINE-MΩO-CΛENT (NE and ΛE ligated) ; long voided cross with terminal lunettes

silver, 1.65 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 1h
Droger
cnut-pointed-helmet.JPG
S.1158 Cnut (pointed helmet penny, London)17 viewsCnut, king of England (1016-1035)
Pointed helmet penny (moneyer: Edwerd, mint: London, 1024-1030)

A/ +CNVT: - RECX A: around central circle enclosing bust in pointed helmet left holding scepter
R/ +ELEDERD ON LV(ND): around central circle enclosing quarters of short voided cross with circles in centre

silver, 1.04 g, diameter 18 mm, die axis 7h

Peck marks are very common on these pennies. A large part of them was minted in order to pay the danegeld (tax raised to pay tribute to Vikings to save a land from their raids). These peck marks are supposed to have been made by Danes when checking the penny was in good silver.

1 commentsDroger
edouard-conf-penny-hammer-cross.JPG
S.1182 Edward the Confessor (hammer cross penny, York)5 viewsEdward the Confessor, king of England (1042-1066)
Hammer cross penny (moneyer: Thorr, mint: York, 1059-1062)

A/ +EΛDPΛRD-DRE; crowned, bearded bust right, scepter before
R/ +DORR ON EOFRPICE (barred D); hammer cross, annulet in one quarter

silver, 1.40 g, diameter 18 mm, die axis 6h



Droger
guillaume1-penny-paxs.JPG
S.1257 William I the Conqueror (PAXS penny, London)15 viewsWilliam I the Conqueror, king of England (1066-1087)
PAXS penny (moneyer: Alfred, mint: London, 1083-1086?)

A/ +PILLELM RE; crowned bust facing, sceptre to right; clasp on shoulder
R/ +IELFRE ON LVNDN; cross with the letters PAXS in circles in the angles

silver, 1.40 g, diameter 18 mm, die axis 6h

This type may have been struck by William II, son of William I.


2 commentsDroger
AUGUSTUS_MONEYER_MAECILIVS.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS36 views27 BC - 14 AD, STRUCK Ca. 7 BC
AE As 28 mm 8.64 g
O:CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT
BARE HHEAD L
R: M MAECILIVS TVLLVS III VIR AAA FF AROUND LARGE SC
laney
augustus_2.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS27 views27 BC - 14 AD
struck ca. 6 BC
AE As 27 mm, 6.04 g
O: CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC P-OT, bare hd. r.
R: VOLVSVS VALER MESSAL IIIVIR A A A F F legend around large SC
Moneyer: L. Valerius Messala Volusus
laney
augustus_1.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS32 views27 BC - 14 AD
struck ca. 7 BC
AE As 27 mm, 6.04 g
O: CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNEC POT, bare head right.
R: M SALVIVS OTHO III VIR AAA F F around large S C.
cf. RIC 431
Moneyer: M. Salvius Otho
laney
LPisoFrugiDenarius_S235.jpg
(502a) Roman Republic, L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi, 90 B.C.157 viewsSilver denarius, S 235, Calpurnia 11, Crawford 340/1, Syd 663a, VF, rainbow toning, Rome mint, 3.772g, 18.5mm, 180o, 90 B.C. obverse: laureate head of Apollo right, scorpion behind; Reverse naked horseman galloping right holding palm, L PISO FRVGI and control number CXI below; ex-CNA XV 6/5/91, #443. Ex FORVM.


A portion of the following text is a passage taken from the excellent article “The Calpurnii and Roman Family History: An Analysis of the Piso Frugi Coin in the Joel Handshu Collection at the College of Charleston,” by Chance W. Cook:

In the Roman world, particularly prior to the inception of the principate, moneyers were allotted a high degree of latitude to mint their coins as they saw fit. The tres viri monetales, the three men in charge of minting coins, who served one-year terms, often emblazoned their coins with an incredible variety of images and inscriptions reflecting the grandeur, history, and religion of Rome. Yet also prominent are references to personal or familial accomplishments; in this manner coins were also a means by which the tres viri monetales could honor their forbearers. Most obvious from an analysis of the Piso Frugi denarius is the respect and admiration that Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi, who minted the coin, had for his ancestors. For the images he selected for his dies relate directly to the lofty deeds performed by his Calpurnii forbearers in the century prior to his term as moneyer. The Calpurnii were present at many of the watershed events in the late Republic and had long distinguished themselves in serving the state, becoming an influential and well-respected family whose defense of traditional Roman values cannot be doubted.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi, who was moneyer in 90 B.C., depicted Apollo on the obverse and the galloping horseman on the reverse, as does his son Gaius. However, all of L. Piso Frugi’s coins have lettering similar to “L-PISO-FRVGI” on the reverse, quite disparate from his son Gaius’ derivations of “C-PISO-L-F-FRV.”

Moreover, C. Piso Frugi coins are noted as possessing “superior workmanship” to those produced by L. Piso Frugi.

The Frugi cognomen, which became hereditary, was first given to L. Calpurnius Piso, consul in 133 B.C., for his integrity and overall moral virtue. Cicero is noted as saying that frugal men possessed the three cardinal Stoic virtues of bravery, justice, and wisdom; indeed in the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae, a synonym of frugalitas is bonus, generically meaning “good” but also implying virtuous behavior. Gary Forsythe notes that Cicero would sometimes invoke L. Calpurnius Piso’s name at the beginning of speeches as “a paragon of moral rectitude” for his audience.

L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi’s inclusion of the laureled head of Apollo, essentially the same obverse die used by his son Gaius (c. 67 B.C.), was due to his family’s important role in the establishment of the Ludi Apollinares, the Games of Apollo, which were first instituted in 212 B.C. at the height of Hannibal’s invasion of Italy during the Second Punic War. By that time, Hannibal had crushed Roman armies at Cannae, seized Tarentum and was invading Campania.

Games had been used throughout Roman history as a means of allaying the fears
of the populace and distracting them from issues at hand; the Ludi Apollinares were no different. Forsythe follows the traditional interpretation that in 211 B.C., when C. Calpurnius Piso was praetor, he became the chief magistrate in Rome while both consuls were absent and the three other praetors were sent on military expeditions against Hannibal.

At this juncture, he put forth a motion in the Senate to make the Ludi Apollinares a yearly event, which was passed; the Ludi Apollinares did indeed become an important festival, eventually spanning eight days in the later Republic. However, this interpretation is debatable; H.H. Scullard suggests that the games were not made permanent until 208 B.C. after a severe plague prompted the Senate to make them a fixture on the calendar. The Senators believed Apollo would serve as a “healing god” for the people of Rome.

Nonetheless, the Calpurnii obviously believed their ancestor had played an integral role in the establishment of the Ludi Apollinares and thus prominently displayed
the head or bust of Apollo on the obverse of the coins they minted.

The meaning of the galloping horseman found on the reverse of the L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi coin is more complicated. It is possible that this is yet another reference to the Ludi Apollinares. Chariot races in the Circus Maximus were a major component of the games, along with animal hunts and theatrical performances.

A more intriguing possibility is that the horseman is a reference to C. Calpurnius Piso, son of the Calpurnius Piso who is said to have founded the Ludi Apollinares. This C. Calpurnius Piso was given a military command in 186 B.C. to quell a revolt in Spain. He was victorious, restoring order to the province and also gaining significant wealth in the process.

Upon his return to Rome in 184, he was granted a triumph by the Senate and eventually erected an arch on the Capitoline Hill celebrating his victory. Of course
the arch prominently displayed the Calpurnius name. Piso, however, was not an infantry commander; he led the cavalry.

The difficulty in accepting C. Calpurnius Piso’s victory in Spain as the impetus for the galloping horseman image is that not all of C. Piso Frugi’s coins depict the horseman or cavalryman carrying the palm, which is a symbol of victory. One is inclined to believe that the victory palm would be prominent in all of the coins minted by C. Piso Frugi (the son of L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi) if it indeed signified the great triumph of C. Calpurnius Piso in 186 B.C. Yet the palm’s appearance is clearly not a direct reference to military feats of C. Piso Frugi’s day. As noted, it is accepted that his coins were minted in 67 B.C.; in that year, the major victory by Roman forces was Pompey’s swift defeat of the pirates throughout the Mediterranean.

Chrestomathy: Annual Review of Undergraduate Research at the College of Charleston. Volume 1, 2002: pp. 1-10© 2002 by the College of Charleston, Charleston SC 29424, USA.All rights to be retained by the author.
http://www.cofc.edu/chrestomathy/vol1/cook.pdf


There are six (debatably seven) prominent Romans who have been known to posterity as Lucius Calpurnius Piso:

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi: (d. 261 A.D.) a Roman usurper, whose existence is
questionable, based on the unreliable Historia Augusta.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Licinianus: deputy Roman Emperor, 10 January 69 to15 January
69, appointed by Galba.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso: Consul in 27 A.D.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso: Consul in 1 B.C., augur

Lucius Calpurnius Piso: Consul in 15 B.C., pontifex

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus: Consul in 58 B.C. (the uncle of Julius Caesar)

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi: Moneyer in 90 B.C. (our man)


All but one (or two--if you believe in the existence of "Frugi the usurper" ca. 261 A.D.) of these gentlemen lack the Frugi cognomen, indicating they are not from the same direct lineage as our moneyer, though all are Calpurnii.

Calpurnius Piso Frugi's massive issue was intended to support the war against the Marsic Confederation. The type has numerous variations and control marks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucius_Calpurnius_Piso
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/indexfrm.asp?vpar=55&pos=0

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


2 commentsCleisthenes
CnCorneliusLentulusMarcellinusARDenariusSear323.jpg
(503f) Cn. Cornelius Lentulus Marcellinus Silver Denarius87 viewsCn. Cornelius Lentulus Marcellinus Silver Denarius, Sear-323, Cr-393/1a, Syd-752, RSC-Cornelia 54, struck 76-75 BC at Spanish Mint, 3.94 grams, 18 mm. EF. Obverse: GPR above Diademed, draped and bearded bust of the Genius of the Roman People facing right, sceptre over shoulder; Reverse: EX in left field, SC in right field; CN LEN Q in exergue, Sceptre with wreath, terrestrial globe and rudder. An exceptional example that is especially well centered and struck on a slightly larger flan than normally encountered with fully lustrous surfaces and a most attractive irridescent antique toning. Held back from the Superb EF/FDC by a small banker's mark in the right obverse field, but still worthy of the finest collection of Roman Republican denarii. Ex Glenn Woods.

Re: CORNELIA 54:

“Cn. Cornelius Lentulus Marcellinus may be the same moneyer whose issues have been already described (no.s 702-704). Mommsen suggested that these coins were struck in 74 B.C. as a special issue, authorized by the Senate, to defray the cost of armaments against Mithridates of Pontus and the Mediterranean pirates. But Grueber’s view that they were struck in 76 B.C. by Cn. Cornelius Lentulus acting in the capacity of quaestor of Pompey, seems more in accordance with the evidence of finds" (see: G. ii, p. 359n and The Coinage of the Roman Republic, by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 1).

H. A. Seaby shows the coin with the smaller head (Roman Silver Coins Vol. I, Republic to Augustus pg. 33) while David R Sear shows a coin sporting a larger version (Roman Coins and Their Values, pg. 132).

“Cn. Lentulus strikes in Spain in his capacity as quaestor to the proconsul Pompey, who had been sent to the peninsula to assist Q. Caecillus Metellus Piusagainst sertorius”(Roman Coins and Their Values, by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg. 132).

This is not an imperatorial minted coin for Pompey. At the time these coins were minted the Procounsel Pompey was sent to Spain to aid in the war against Sertorius. The moneyer Cn Lentulus served as his Quaestor where he continued to mint coins for Rome.

CN = Cneaus; LEN = Lentulus

Cneaus was his first name. His last, or family name is Lentulus and this clan is a lesser clan within the Cornelii, which is what his middle name of Cornelius implies.

Q = This tells us that he was a Quaestor, or Roman magistrate with judicial powers at the time when the coin was issued, with the responsibility for the treasury. Had this been a position that he once held it would be noted on the coin as PROQ or pro [past] Questor.

For Further Reading on the Cornelia 54 & 55:

Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum, by H. A. Grueber. London, 1910, Vol. II, pgs. 358, 359, 52, 57

Roman Silver Coins Vol. I, Republic to Augustus, by H.A.Seaby 1952, pgs. 32-33

The Coinage of the Roman Republic, by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 122, 241

Roman Coins and Their Values, by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg. 132, 133

Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 407

by Jerry Edward Cornelius, April 2006, THE 81 ROMAN COINS OF THE CORNELIA
http://www.cornelius93.com/Cornelia54.html
1 commentsCleisthenes
AugI425.jpg
- 27 BC-14 AD - Augustus - RIC I 425 - Cornucopia and Altar Quadrans63 viewsEmperor: Augustus (r. 27 BC - 14 AD)
Date: 8 BC
Condition: VF
Denomination: Quadrans

Obverse: PVLCHER TAVRVS REGVLVS
Pulcher Taurus Regulus (moneyer)
S - C to left and right of cornucopia

Reverse: IIIVIR AAAFF round garlanded altar
The Three Men for Striking and Casting Gold, Silver and Bronze.

Rome mint
RIC I Augustus 425
3.14g; 18.2mm; 15°
Pep
0008~0.jpg
0008 - Denarius Aemilia 63 BC109 viewsObv/PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, veiled and diademed head of Concordia r.
Rev/L Aemilius Paullus standing to r. of trophy, Perseus and his two sons captive on the left, PAVLVS in ex.

Ag, 19.1mm, 3.78g
Moneyer: L Aemilius Lepidus Paullus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 415/1 [dies o/r: 240/267] - Syd.926 - RCV 297 - RSC Postumia 8 - Calicó 1216 - Cohen Postumia 7 - BMCRR 2839
ex-felixcuquerella (ebay)
2 commentsdafnis
0009.jpg
0009 - Denarius Papia 79 BC107 viewsObv/Head of Juno Sospita r., wearing goatskin, symbol behind.
Rev/Gryphon dancing r., symbol below, L PAPI in ex.

Ag, 19.9mm, 3.82g
Moneyer: L. Papius.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 384/1 [dies o/r: 211/211] - Syd. 773 - Calicó 1057 - RCV 311 - RSC Papia 1 - Cohen Papia 1
ex-Numismática Saetabis
1 commentsdafnis
0012.jpg
0012 - Denarius Postumia 81 BC64 viewsObv/HISPAN, veiled head of Hispania r.
Rev/A ALBIN S N, togate figure standing l. between legionary eagle and consular fasces, POST A F in ex.

Ag, 20.0mm, 3.88g
Moneyer: Postumius Albinus.
Mint: Rome aux.
RRC 372/2 [dies o/r: 198/220] - Syd.746 - RCV 297 - RSC Postumia 8 - Calicó 1216 - Cohen Postumia 7 - BMCRR 2839
ex-Incineratio Roma (vcoins)
dafnis
0014.jpg
0014 - Denarius Anonymous 209-8 BC137 viewsObv/Helmeted head of Roma r., X behind.
Rev/Dioscuri riding r., stars above their heads, dolphin below, ROMA in ex.

Ag, 19.0mm, 4.17g
Moneyer: anonymous.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 80/1a [dies o/r: 40/50] - BMCRR 423 - Syd. 214 - Calicó 20 - RCV 39 - RSC 20k
ex-Kuenker, auction 124, lot 8237
8 commentsdafnis
0015.jpg
0015 - Denarius Annia 82-1 BC59 viewsObv/C ANNI T F T N PRO COS EX S C, draped bust of Anna Perenna r., hair in a knot, winged caduceus behind, scale before, dot below.
Rev/Victory in galloping quadriga r., Q above, L FABI L F HISP in ex.

Ag, 19.2mm, 3.82g
Moneyer: Annius Luscus, L Fabius Hispaniensis.
Mint: Hispania.
RRC 366/1b [dies o/r: 18/(20)] - Syd.748a - BMCRR 352 - - Cohen Annia 1 - Calicó 116 - RCV 289 - RSC Annia 2a
ex-Kuenker, auction 124, lot 8326
1 commentsdafnis
0016.jpg
0016 - Denarius Cornelia 56 BC51 viewsObv/Head of Hercules r. in lion skin, SC and TAS in monogram behind, below winged paws.
Rev/Globe between jeweled wreath and three triumphal wreaths.

Ag, 19.9mm, 3.74g
Moneyer: Faustus Cornelius Sulla.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 426/4a [dies o/r: 33/37] - Syd. 882 - BMCRR 3912 - Cohen Cornelia 49 - Calicó 498 - RCV 385 - RSC Cornelia 61
ex-Kuenker, auction 124, lot 8390
1 commentsdafnis
0018.jpg
0018 - Denarius Thoria 105 BC51 viewsObv/ISMR, head of Juno Sospita r. in goat skin.
Rev/Bull charging r., C above, THORIVS below, BALBVS in ex.

Ag, 20.0mm, 3.93g
Moneyer: L. Thorius Balbus.
Mint: Gallia Cisalpina.
RRC 316/1 [dies o/r: 450/562] - Syd. 598 - BMCRR 1615 - Calicó 1300 - Cohen Thoria 1 - RCV 192 - RSC Thoria 1
ex-CNG
1 commentsdafnis
0019.jpg
0019 - Denarius Herennia 108-7 BC38 viewsObv/PIETAS, laureate head of Pietas r., control letter below chin.
Rev/M • HERENNI, Amphinomus carrying his father r.

Ag, 18.8mm, 3.88g
Moneyer: M. Herennius.
Mint: South Italiy (Reggio?)
RRC 308/1a [dies o/r: 120/(150)] - Syd. 567 - BMCRR 1231 - Calicó 615 - Cohen Herennia 1 - RCV 185 - RSC Herennia 1
ex-CNG
1 commentsdafnis
Augustus_AE-As_CAESAR_AVGVST_PONT_MAX_TRIBVNIC_POT_P_LVRIVS_AGRIPPA_IIIVIR_A_A_A_F_F__SdotC_RIC_428,_Cohen_446,_BMC_244_Rome_7-BC-Q-001_h_mm_gx-s.jpg
002 Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 428, Rome, AE-As, (moneyer P Lurius Agrippa), P LVRIVS AGRIPPA IIIVIR •A•A•A•F•F•, around large S•C, #191 views002 Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 428, Rome, AE-As, (moneyer P Lurius Agrippa), P LVRIVS AGRIPPA IIIVIR •A•A•A•F•F•, around large S•C, #1
avers:- CAESAR-AVGVST-PONT-MAX-TRIBVNIC-POT, Bare head left.
revers:- P-LVRIVS-AGRIPPA-IIIVIR•A•A•A•F•F•, around large S•C.
exe: S•C//--, diameter: 27,5mm, weight: 8,42g, axis:5h,
mint: Rome, date: 7 B.C., ref: RIC-I-428, C-446, BMC-244,
Q-001
quadrans
coin614.JPG
002. Augustus38 viewsAugustus. 27 BC-AD 14. Æ Dupondius (28mm, 12.15 g). Rome mint. Q. Aelius Lamia, moneyer. Struck 18 BC. Legend in three lines within wreath / Legend around large S C. RIC I 324; BMCRE 176; BN 236. Near VF, brown patina with tan high points, some scratches on obverse.1 commentsecoli
0024.jpg
0024 - Denarius Volteia 78 BC32 viewsObv/Laureate head of Jupiter r.
Rev/Capitoline temple, tetrastyle; M VOLTEI M F in ex.

Ag, 18.9mm, 3.94g
Moneyer: M. Volteius M.f.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 385/1 [dies o/r: 70/78] - Syd. 774 - RCV 312 - RSC Volteia 1 - Cohen Volteia 1
ex-Sayles & Lavender
dafnis
0029.jpg
0029 - Denarius Vibia 89-8 BC48 viewsObv/Laureate head of Apollo r.; PANSA behind, below control mark.
Rev/Minerva in quadriga r., holding spear and reins in l. and trophy in r.; C VIBIVS C F in ex.

Ag, 18.2mm, 3.90g
Moneyer: C.Vibius C.f. Pansa
Mint: Rome.
RRC 342/5b [dies o/r: 988/1097 (3b-5b)]
ex-LHS Numismatik, auction 100, lot 389
2 commentsdafnis
0030~0.jpg
0030 - Denarius Caecilia 81 BC31 viewsObv/Head of Pietas r. wearing diadem; before, stork.
Rev/Jug and lituus, IMPER in ex. Laurel-wreath border.

Ag, 19.5mm, 3.76g
Moneyer: Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius.
Mint: North Italy.
RRC 374/2 [dies o/r: 30/33] - BMCRR Spain 47 - Syd. 751 - RSC Caecilia 44 - RCV 302
ex-Gerhard Hirsch, auction 250/1, lot 796
1 commentsdafnis
0031.jpg
0031 - Denarius Cupienna 147 BC41 viewsObv/Helmeted head of Roma r.; behind cornucopiae, before X.
Rev/Dioscuri r., below L CUP, ROMA in ex.

Ag, 19.0mm, 4.34g
Moneyer: L.Cupiennus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 218/1 [dies o/r: 73/91] - RSC Cupienna 1 - Syd. 404
ex-Hess-Divo, auction 307, lot 1442
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0032~0.jpg
0032 - Denarius Marcia 134 BC32 viewsObv/Helmeted head of Roma r., behind modius, before crossed X.
Rev/Victory in biga r., holding reins in l. and whip in r. hand; below M MAR C, below RO MA divided by two grain ears.

Ag, 19.7mm, 3.79g
Moneyer: M.Marcius Mn.f.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 245/1 [dies o/r: 120/150] - BMCRR 1008 - Syd. 500.
ex-Valencia Coin Market 20 may 2007
dafnis
0033.jpg
0033 - Denarius Postumia 131 BC60 viewsObv/Helmeted head or Roma r., nehind apex, before crossed X.
Rev/Mars in quadriga r., holding spear, shield and reins in l. and trophy in r. hand; below L POST ALB, ROMA in ex.

Ag, 20.0mm, 3.92g
Moneyer: L.Postumius Albinus (son)
Mint: Rome.
RRC 252/1 [dies o/r: 47/59] - BMCRR Rome 1129 - RSC Postumia 1 - Syd. 472
ex-Münzen & Medaillen, auction 28 may 207, lot 1310
2 commentsdafnis
0034.jpg
0034 - Denarius Postumia 81 BC45 viewsObv/Bust of Diana r., draped, with bow and quiver over shoulder; above brucanium.
Rev/A POST A F S N ALBIN, rock on which stands lighted altar, bull on l., togate figure holding aspergillum over bull on r.

Ag, 19.8mm, 3.95g
Moneyer: A.Postumius A.f. S.n Albinus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 372/1 [dies o/r: 90/100] - BMCRR Rome 2836 - RSC Postumia 7 - Syd. 745.
ex-Herbert Grün, auction 47, lot 1594
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0035.jpg
0035 - Denarius Cassius 63 BC66 viewsObv/Head of Vesta l. wearing veil and diadem; on l. dish, on l. control letter.
Rev/Voter l., dropping tablet marked V into cista; on r., LONGIN III V.

Ag, 22.1mm, 3.89g
Moneyer: L.Cassius Longinus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 413/1 [dies o/r: 94/104] - BMCRR Rome 3931 - RSC Cassia 10 - Syd. 935.
ex-Tkalec, auction 27 apr 2007, lot 156
3 commentsdafnis
0036.jpg
0036 - Denarius Cassia 55 BC73 viewsObv/Head of Genius Populi Romani r. with sceptre over shoulder.
Rev/Eagle on thunderbolt r., on l. lituus, on r. jug, below Q CASSIVS.

Ag, 19.4mm, 3.59g
Moneyer: Q. Cassius Longinus
Mint: Rome.
RRC 428/3 [dies o/r: 126/140] - BMCRR Rome 3868 - RSC Cassia 7 - Syd. 916
ex-Tkalec, auction 27 apr 2007, lot 162
1 commentsdafnis
0037.jpg
0037 - Denarius Carisia 46 BC46 viewsObv/ Head of Sibyl r.
Rev/ Sphinx r.; above, T CARISIVS; in ex., III VIR.

Ag, 17.7 mm, 3.73 g
Moneyer: T. Carisius
Mint: Rome.
RRC RRC 464/1 [dies o/r: 117/130] - BMCRR Rome 4060 - RSC Carisia 10 - Syd. 983 - Calicó 389
ex-Baldwin’s, Argentum auction A207, lot 608
1 commentsdafnis
0043~0.jpg
0043 - Denarius Plaetoria 67 BC28 viewsObv/ Head of Cybele r.; behind, forepart of lion; before, globe; behind CESTIANVS downwards; before, SC downwards. Bead and reel border.
Rev/ M PLAETORIVS AED CVR EX SC; curule chair; control mark on l. Bead and reel border.

Ag, 19.0 mm, 3.82 g
Moneyer: M. Plaetorius Cestianus
Mint: Rome
RRC 409/2 [dies o/r: (49)/54] - BMCRR Rome 3574
ex-DNW, auction june 2007, lot 351
dafnis
0046.jpg
0046 - Denarius Licinia 47 BC37 viewsObv/Laureate head of Fides r., behind NERVA, before FIDES.
Rev/Horseman galloping r., dragging captive by the hair, A LICINI below, III VIR in field.

Ag, 18.5mm, 3.93g
Moneyer: A. Licinius Nerva.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 454/1 [dies o/r: 66/73] - Syd. 954 - RCV 430 - Calicó 891 - RSC Licinia 24.
ex-Inclinatio Roma (vcoins)
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0048.jpg
0048 - Denarius anonymous 115-4 BC61 viewsObv/ Helmeted head of Roma r.; behind, X; below, ROMA.
Rev/Roma seated r. on pile of shields, holding spear; before, she-wolf r. suckling twins; two birds in the field.

Ag, 22.0mm, 3.93g
Moneyer: anonymous.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 287/1 [dies o/r: 82/102] - Syd. 530 - RCV 164 - RSC 176 - Calicó 58 - BMCRR Italy 562
ex-Numismática y Arqueología J. Antonio Salvador
2 commentsdafnis
0049~0.jpg
0049 - Denarius Aemilia 114-3 BC39 viewsObv/ Laureate female bust (Roma?) r., veiled and wearing diadem; before, ROMA; behind, crossed X.
Rev/ Three arches, on which stands equestrian status - horseman wears cuirass and wreath, and holds spear in r. hand; around, MN AEMILIO; between arches, L E P.

Ag, 18.5 mm, 3.85 g
Moneyer: Mn. Aemilius Lepidus
Mint: Rome
RRC 291/1 [dies o/r: 283/354 - BMCRR Italy 590
ex-Jesús Vico, auction 116, lot 3080
1 commentsdafnis
0050.jpg
0050 - Denarius Lutatia 109-8 BC34 viewsObv/Helmeted head of Roma r., before CERCO, above (RO)MA, behind crossed X.
Rev/Galley r. within oak wreath, Q LVTATI above.

Ag, 18.5mm, 3.94g
Moneyer: Q Lutatius Cerco.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 305/1 [dies o/r: 135/169] - Syd. 559 - Calicó 914 - BMCRR Italy 636 - RCV 182.
ex-Valencia Coin Fair, 29 feb 2008
dafnis
0051.jpg
0051 - Denarius Scribonia 62 BC46 viewsObv/Diademed head of Bonus Eventus r., behind LIBO, before BON EVENT.
Rev/Well-head ornamented with garland and two lyres, tong at base, PVTEAL above, SCRIBON below.

Ag, 19.5mm, 3.42g
Moneyer: L Scribonius Libo.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 416/1b [dies o/r: 206/229] - Syd. 928 - Calicó 1247 - BMCRR Rome 3382 - RSC Scribonia 8-8b - RCV 367.
ex-Valencia Coin Fair, 29 feb 2008
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0055.jpg
0055 - Denarius Acilia 49 BC48 viewsObv/Head of Salus r., SALVTIS behind.
Rev/MN ACILIVS III VIR VALETV, Salus standing l. holding serpent.

Ag, 20.0mm, 3.89g
Moneyer: Mn. Acilius Glabrio.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 442/1a [dies o/r: 651/723 (1a+1b)] - Syd. 922 - BMCRR Rome 3944 - RCV 412 - RSC Acilia 8, 8a - Calicó 66.
ex-Incitatus Coins (vcoins)
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0060.jpg
0060 - Denarius Minucia 134 BC31 viewsObv/Helmeted head of Roma r., behind crossed X.
Rev/TI MINVCI C F on l., RO MA above, AVGVRINI on r.; 2 togate figures, one holding a simpulum, the other a lituus, standing by statue on column.

Ag, 19.0mm, 3.93g
Moneyer: Ti. Minucius C.f. Augurinus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 243/1 [dies o/r: 76/95] - RCV 120 - Syd. 494 - RSC Minucia 9 - Calicó 1026.
ex-Jean Elsen et Fils, auction 95, lot 311 (ex-colln. A.Senden)
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0061.jpg
0061 - Denarius Petilia 43 BC32 viewsObv/ Eagle on thunderbolt r.; above, PETILLIVS; below, CAPITOLINVS.
Rev/ Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus; roof is decorated with armed figure at each side and cuadriga at apex; within pediment, uncertain figure; between central four columns, hanging decorations; on l., S; on r., F.

Ag, 18.0 mm, 3.85 g
Moneyer: Petilllius Capitolinus
Mint: Rome.
RRC 487/2b [dies o/r: 85/74 (all var.] - BMCRR Rome 4222
ex-Spink, auction march 2008, lot 994 (ex-Glendining, auction april 1980, lot 159)
1 commentsdafnis
0062.jpg
0062 - Denarius Cordia 46 BC31 viewsObv/Conjoined heads of the Dioscuri with pilei, r., with star atop; behind, RVFVS III VIR.
Rev/MN CORDIVS, Venus (Aequitas?) standing l., holding scales & scepter.

Ag, 18.9mm, 3.52g
Moneyer: Mn. Cordius Rufus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 463/1a [dies o/r: 549/610 (1a+1b)] - RCV 440 - Syd. 976-976a - RSC Cordia 1-2c - Sear (Imp.) 63-63a -Calicó 465.
ex-Spink, auction march 2008, lot 994 (ex-Glendining, auction april 1976, lot 140)
dafnis
0071.jpg
0071 - Denarius Pomponia 66 BC30 viewsObv/Laureate head of Apollo r., two crossed flutes behind.
Rev/POMPONI MVSA, Euterpe, muse of lyric poetry, standing r., holding two flutes in r. hand.

Ag, 19.6mm, 3.88g
Moneyer: Q Pomponius Musa.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 410/5 [dies o/r: 10/11] - BMCRE Rome 3613 - Syd.815 - RCV 355 - RSC Pomponia 13 - Calicó 1184.
ex-Jesús Vico, auction nov 2008, lot 290
1 commentsdafnis
0076.jpg
0076 - Denarius Fabia 102 BC31 viewsObv/Veiled and turreted bust of Cybele r., behind EX A PV.
Rev/Victory in biga r., symbol below, stork before; C FABI C F in ex.

Ag, 20.0mm, 3.96g
Moneyer: C. Fabius C.f. Hadrianus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 322/1b [dies o/r: (64)/80] - Syd. 590.
ex-Künker, e-auction dec 2010, lot 776756
1 commentsdafnis
0077.jpg
0077 - Denarius Vibia 48 BC40 viewsObv/Head of Liber r., wearing ivy wreath; behind, PANSA.
Rev/Ceres walking r., carrying torches, plow before.

Ag, 19.0mm, 3.66g
Moneyer: C.Vibius Pansa Caetronianius.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 449/2 [dies o/r: 54/60]
ex-Artemide Aste, auction 5E, lot 1151
2 commentsdafnis
0078.jpg
0078 - Denarius Pomponia 66 BC42 viewsObv/Laureate head of Apollo r.; six pointed star behind.
Rev/Urania, the Muse of Astronomy, standing l., pointing with wand to globe on tripod.

Ag, 17.5mm, 3.87g
Moneyer: Q Pomponius Musa.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 410/8 [dies o/r: 10/11] - Syd. 823
ex-Soler y Llach/Martí Hervera, auction dec 2010, lot 3461
1 commentsdafnis
0079.jpg
0079 - Denarius Tituria 89 BC178 viewsObv/Bearded head of king Tatius r., before TA, behind SABIN.
Rev/Rape of Sabines, two Roman soldiers hurrying l. carrying two Sabines; L TITVRI in ex.

Moneyer: L. Titurius L.f. Sabinus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 344/1a [dies o/r: 294/327 (1a to 1c)] - Syd. 698
ex-Numismática Ramos
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0083.jpg
0083 - Denarius Vargunteia 130 BC42 viewsObv/Helmeted head of Roma r., behind M VARG, before crossed X.
Rev/Jupiter in slow quadriga r., ROMA in ex.

Ag, 20.5mm, 3.90g
Moneyer: M. Vargunteius.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 257/1 [dies o/r: 107/134] - Syd. 507 - RCV 133
ex-Madrid Coin Market
1 commentsdafnis
0084.jpg
0084 - Denarius Calpurnia 67 BC78 viewsObv/Head of Apollo r., hair tied with band; behind, monogram.
Rev/Horseman r., holding palm; above, E retrograde and pellet; below, C PISO L F FRV.

Ag, 18.6mm, 3.45g
Moneyer: C. Calpurnius Piso Frugi.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 408/1b (o: 43 var./r: 47) [dies o/r: 144/175 (all var.)] - Syd. 850
ex-Baldwin's, NY Sale XXV, lot 149
2 commentsdafnis
0087.jpg
0087 - Denarius Aemilia/Plautia 58 BC44 viewsObv/ M SCAVR / AED CVR Kneeling figure r., holding olive branch and reins of camel standing beside him; on either side, EX – S·C. In exergue, REX ARETAS.
Rev/ P HVPSAE / AED CVR Jupiter in quadriga l. holding reins in l. hand and hurling thunderbolt with r.; behind, CAPTV. Below, C HVPSAE COS / PREIVE.

Ag, 18.6 mm, 3.96 g
Moneyers: M. Aemilius Scaurus, P. Plautius Hypsaeus
Mint: Rome.
RRC 422/1b [dies o/r: 336/373] - Bab. Aemilia , Plautia 10 - Syd. 912
ex-CNG Coins, auction e-248, lot 350
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0089.jpg
0089 - Denarius Furia 119 BC37 viewsObv/ M FOVRI L F, laureate head of Janus.
Rev/ Roma standing l., holding sceptre in l. hand and crowning trophy with r. hand; behind, ROMA; above, star; on the l. field, trophy surmounted by a helmet in the form of a boar's head and flanked by carnyx and shield on each side; in ex. PHILI.

Ag, 19.1 mm, 3.90 g
Moneyer: M. Furius L.f. Philus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 281/1 [dies o/r: 393/491] - BMCRR Italy 555 - Bab. Furia 18 - Sydenham 529
ex-inAsta, auction 38, lot 473
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0090.jpg
0090 - Denarius Plautia 47 BC27 viewsObv/ Head of Medusa facing, below L PLAVTIVS.
Rev/ Aurora holding palm and leading four horses; below, PLANCVS.

Ag, 19.9 mm, 4.02 g
Moneyer: L.Plautius.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 453/1c [dies o/r: 195/217 (all var.)] - Syd. 959 - RSC Plautia 15
ex-inAsta, auction 38, lot 514
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0093.jpg
0093 - Denarius Valeria 82 BC30 viewsObv/ Draped bust of Victory r., wearing pendant earring and necklace, (control letter behind).
Rev/ C VAL FLA (VAL in ligature) on l., IMPERAT on r., EX SC across lower fields, aquila between signa exhibiting vexilla marked H (for hastati) and P (for principes).

Ag, 18.2 mm, 3.47 g
Moneyer: C. Valerius Flaccus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 365/1a [dies o/r: 36/39 (var. 1a --> 1c)] - Syd. 747a
ex-Tintinna, auction e9, lot 1108
1 commentsdafnis
0095.jpg
0095 - Denarius Porcia 110-9 BC43 viewsObv/ Head of Roma in winged helmet r., (above, ROMA), P. LAECA l., X below.
Rev/ Military governor standing l., placing hand over citizen before him; after him, attendant standing r. and holding rods; in ex., PROVOCO.

Ag, 19.1 mm, 3.91 g
Moneyer: P. Porcius Laeca.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 301/1 [dies o/r: 88/110] - Syd. 571 - RSC Porcia 4
ex-AENP Coin Convention Valencia, feb 2011
1 commentsdafnis
0096.jpg
0096 - Denarius Aelia 138 AC27 viewsObv/ Head of Roma r. in winged helmet, X behind.
Rev/ Dioscuri galloping r., two stars above, P PAETVS below, ROMA in ex.

Ag, 21.0 mm, 3.84 g
Moneyer: P. Aelius Paetus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 233/1 [dies o/r: 73/91] - Syd. 455 - RSC Aelia 3
ex-AENP Coin Convention Valencia, feb 2012
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0099.jpg
0099 - Denarius Coelia 104 BC46 viewsObv/ Head of Roma l.
Rev/ Victory in biga left, C COIL below horses: above, A with point below; CALD in ex.

Ag, 19.0 mm, 3.94 g
Moneyer: C. Coelius Caldus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 318/1a [dies o/r: 72/90] - Syd. 582 - Bab. Coelia 2
ex-Jesús Vico, auction 125, lot 208
1 commentsdafnis
AS Augusto RIC 379~0.jpg
01-14 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)91 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 mm 9.0 gr.
Legado Monetario C GALLIUS LUPERCUS

Anv: "[CAE]SAR AVGVSTVS TRI
BV[NIC POTEST]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·GAL[LIVS C F LVPERCVS III V]IR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 16 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #379 Pag.70 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1679 Pag.330 - BMCRE #174 (=BMCRR #4510) - Cohen Vol.1 #436 Pag.124 - DVM #99a Pag.71 - CBN #428
mdelvalle
RIC_379_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-14 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)27 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 mm 9.0 gr.
Legado Monetario C GALLIUS LUPERCUS

Anv: "[CAE]SAR AVGVSTVS TRI
BV[NIC POTEST]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·GAL[LIVS C F LVPERCVS III V]IR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 16 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #379 Pag.70 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1679 Pag.330 - BMCRE #174 (=BMCRR #4510) - Cohen Vol.1 #436 Pag.124 - DVM #99a Pag.71 - CBN #428
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 386.jpg
01-15 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)56 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 25 mm 8.4 gr.
Legado Monetario L SURDINUS

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[L] SVRDINVS [III VIR A A A F F]" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 15 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #386 Pag.70 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1683 Pag.331 - BMCRE #144 (=BMCRR #4631) - Cohen Vol.1 #473 Pag.131 - DVM #99 var Pag.71 - CBN #483
mdelvalle
RIC_386_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-15 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)27 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 25 mm 8.4 gr.
Legado Monetario L SURDINUS

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[L] SVRDINVS [III VIR A A A F F]" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 15 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #386 Pag.70 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1683 Pag.331 - BMCRE #144 (=BMCRR #4631) - Cohen Vol.1 #473 Pag.131 - DVM #99 var Pag.71 - CBN #483
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 379.jpg
01-17 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)59 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 x 29 mm 9.9 gr.
Legado Monetario C PLOTIUS RUFUS

Anv: "[CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·PLOT[IVS·RVFVS·III VIR A·A·]A·F·F·" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 15 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #389 Pag.71 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1680 Pag.330 - BMCRE #153 (=BMCRR #4639) - Cohen Vol.1 #504 Pag.137 - DVM #99d Pag.71 - CBN #503/12
mdelvalle
RIC_389_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-17 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)23 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 x 29 mm 9.9 gr.
Legado Monetario C PLOTIUS RUFUS

Anv: "[CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·PLOT[IVS·RVFVS·III VIR A·A·]A·F·F·" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 15 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #389 Pag.71 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1680 Pag.330 - BMCRE #153 (=BMCRR #4639) - Cohen Vol.1 #504 Pag.137 - DVM #99d Pag.71 - CBN #503/12
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 427.jpg
01-23 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)59 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 24 mm 8.3 gr.
Legado Monetario PLURIUS AGRIPPA

Anv: "[CA]ESAR AVGVS[T PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PLVRIVS AGRIPPA [III VIR A A A F F]" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #427 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1686 Pag.331 - BMCRE #209 - Cohen Vol.1 #445 Pag.126 - DVM #100a Pag.71 - CBN #623
mdelvalle
RIC_427_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-23 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)19 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 24 mm 8.3 gr.
Legado Monetario PLURIUS AGRIPPA

Anv: "[CA]ESAR AVGVS[T PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PLVRIVS AGRIPPA [III VIR A A A F F]" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #427 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1686 Pag.331 - BMCRE #209 - Cohen Vol.1 #445 Pag.126 - DVM #100a Pag.71 - CBN #623
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 431.jpg
01-24 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)74 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 28 mm 11.7 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVST[PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M SALVIVS OTH[O III VI]R A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #431 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 Pag.331 - BMCRE #226 (=BMCRR #4693) - Cohen Vol.1 #515 Pag.139 - DVM #100b Pag.71 - CBN #687
mdelvalle
RIC_431_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-24 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)22 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 28 mm 11.7 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVST[PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M SALVIVS OTH[O III VI]R A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #431 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 Pag.331 - BMCRE #226 (=BMCRR #4693) - Cohen Vol.1 #515 Pag.139 - DVM #100b Pag.71 - CBN #687
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 431_1.jpg
01-25 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)62 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 25 mm 7.3 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVST [PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M SALVIVS OTH[O III VI]R A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #431 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 Pag.331 - BMCRE #226 (=BMCRR #4693) - Cohen Vol.1 #515 Pag.139 - DVM #100b Pag.71 - CBN #687
mdelvalle
RIC_431_AS_Octavio_Augusto_1.jpg
01-25 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)22 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 25 mm 7.3 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVST [PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M SALVIVS OTH[O III VI]R A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #431 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 Pag.331 - BMCRE #226 (=BMCRR #4693) - Cohen Vol.1 #515 Pag.139 - DVM #100b Pag.71 - CBN #687
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 432.jpg
01-26 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)107 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 mm 9.6 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "[CAE]SAR AVGVST PONT [MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a izquierda.
Rev: "M SALVI[VS OT]HO III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #432 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 var Pag.331 - Cohen Vol.1 #516 Pag.139 - DVM #100b var Pag.71 - CBN #708
mdelvalle
RIC_432_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-26 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)25 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 mm 9.6 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "[CAE]SAR AVGVST PONT [MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a izquierda.
Rev: "M SALVI[VS OT]HO III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #432 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 var Pag.331 - Cohen Vol.1 #516 Pag.139 - DVM #100b var Pag.71 - CBN #708
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 439.jpg
01-28 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.) 65 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 23 mm 7.9 gr.
Legado Monetario SEX NONIUS QUINCTILIAN

Anv: "CAESAR AVG[VST PONT MAX TRI]BVNIC POT" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[SEX N]ONIVS QVINC[TIL]IAN III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 6 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #439 Pag.76 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1687 Pag.331 - BMCRE #237 (=BMCRR #4667) - Cohen Vol.1 #474 Pag.76 - CBN #725
mdelvalle
RIC_439_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-28 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.) 24 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 23 mm 7.9 gr.
Legado Monetario SEX NONIUS QUINCTILIAN

Anv: "CAESAR AVG[VST PONT MAX TRI]BVNIC POT" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[SEX N]ONIVS QVINC[TIL]IAN III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 6 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #439 Pag.76 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1687 Pag.331 - BMCRE #237 (=BMCRR #4667) - Cohen Vol.1 #474 Pag.76 - CBN #725
mdelvalle
Cuadrante AUGUSTO RIC 420.jpg
01-38 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)59 viewsAE Cuadrante (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 17 mm 2.7 gr.
Legados Monetarios LAMIA, SILIUS y ANNIUS.

Anv: "LAMIA SILIVS ANNIVS" - Dos manos tomadas (Apretón de manos) que rodeán un Caduceo.
Rev: "III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".

Acuñada 9 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #420 var Pag.74 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1693 Pag.332/3 - Cohen Vol.1 #338 Pag.108 - BMCRE #200 (=BMCRR #4617) - CBN #568
mdelvalle
RIC_I_420v_Cuadrante_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-38 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)16 viewsAE Cuadrante (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 17 mm 2.7 gr.
Legados Monetarios LAMIA, SILIUS y ANNIUS.

Anv: "LAMIA SILIVS ANNIVS" - Dos manos tomadas (Apretón de manos) que rodeán un Caduceo.
Rev: "III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".

Acuñada 9 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #420 var Pag.74 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1693 Pag.332/3 - Cohen Vol.1 #338 Pag.108 - BMCRE #200 (=BMCRR #4617) - CBN #568
mdelvalle
Cuadrante AUGUSTO RIC 443var.jpg
01-40 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)78 viewsAE Cuadrante (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 18 mm 2.7 gr.
4 Legados Monetarios fueron designados cada año en 5 y 4 A.C., aunque curiosamente continuaron labrándose “triunviro III VIR”. Las cuñaciones en 5 A.C. (Legados APRONIUS, GALUS, MESSALLA y SISENNA) son desconcertantemente complejas, exhibiendo una multiplicidad de combinaciones de los cuatro nombres en anverso y reverso.

Anv: "MESSALLA SISENNA III VIR" - Leyenda alrededor de un yunque o altar.
Rev: "GALVS APRONIVS A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".

Las leyendas NO coinciden con las listadas en toda la Bibliografía que poseo, solo en RIC Vol.1 Nota de pié de página 77 menciona que CBN #777/8 lista 2 "imitaciones" con la leyenda coincidente con esta moneda, al no lucir como imitaciones RIC las atribuye a simples confusiones de los acuñadores al permutar las leyendas
Acuñada 5 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #447 var Pag.77 - CBN #777/8 (Como Imitaciones) - Sear RCTV #1699-1702 var Pag.333/4 - Cohen Vol.1 #420/25 var Pag.122 - DVM #110 var Pag.71 - BMCRE #258n
mdelvalle
RIC_I_447_Cuadrante_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-40 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)24 viewsAE Cuadrante (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 18 mm 2.7 gr.
4 Legados Monetarios fueron designados cada año en 5 y 4 A.C., aunque curiosamente continuaron labrándose “triunviro III VIR”. Las cuñaciones en 5 A.C. (Legados APRONIUS, GALUS, MESSALLA y SISENNA) son desconcertantemente complejas, exhibiendo una multiplicidad de combinaciones de los cuatro nombres en anverso y reverso.

Anv: "MESSALLA SISENNA III VIR" - Leyenda alrededor de un yunque o altar.
Rev: "GALVS APRONIVS A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".

Las leyendas NO coinciden con las listadas en toda la Bibliografía que poseo, solo en RIC Vol.1 Nota de pié de página 77 menciona que CBN #777/8 lista 2 "imitaciones" con la leyenda coincidente con esta moneda, al no lucir como imitaciones RIC las atribuye a simples confusiones de los acuñadores al permutar las leyendas

Acuñada 5 A.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #447 var Pag.77 - CBN #777/8 (Como Imitaciones) - Sear RCTV #1699-1702 var Pag.333/4 - Cohen Vol.1 #420/25 var Pag.122 - DVM #110 var Pag.71 - BMCRE #258n
mdelvalle
a3874.JPG
010 Augustus63 viewsAugustus Æ As. Struck 16 BC, C Cassius Celer, moneyer. CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRINVNIC POTEST, bust right / C CASSIVS CELER IIIVIR AAAFF around large S C. RIC 376. C. 409. BMC 169.Randygeki(h2)
0100.jpg
0100 - Denarius Furia 63 BC28 viewsObv/ Bust of Ceres r., wheat-ear behind; ear of barley before; III-VIR across fields; BROCCHI below.
Rev/ Curule chair between fasces; L FVRI CN F above.

Ag, 20.7 mm, 3.94 g
Moneyer: L. Furius Cn. f. Brocchus .
Mint: Rome.
RRC 414/1 [dies o/r: 110/122] - Syd. 902a
ex-Jesús Vico, auction 125, lot 221
dafnis
0101.jpg
0101 - Denarius Marcia 82 AC34 viewsObv/ Laureate head of Apollo r.
Rev/ Marsyas walking l. bearing wine skin on shoulder; behind, statue of Victory on column: before, L CENSOR.

Ag, 17.5 mm, 3.78 g
Moneyer: L. Censorinus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 363/1d [dies o/r: ~197/~228] - Syd. 737 - RSC Marcia 24
ex-M.Iglesias Alvarez, march 2011 (ex - Jesús Vico, auction 125, lot 232)
1 commentsdafnis
0111.jpg
0111 - Denarius Caecilia 81 BC84 viewsObv/ Diademed head of Pietas r., stork before.
Rev/ Elephant walking l., Q C M P I in ex.

Ag, 17.9 mm, 3.35 g
Moneyer: Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius.
Mint: North Italy.
RRC 374/1 [dies o/r: 88/98] - Syd. 750 - RSC Caecilia 43
ex-Gerhard Hirsch, auction may 2011, lot 411
dafnis
0121.jpg
0121 - Denarius Cipia 115-4 BC42 viewsObv/ Helmeted head of Roma r.; before, M CIPI MF; behind, X.
Rev/ Victory in biga r., holding reins and palm-branch tied with fillet; below, rudder; in ex. ROMA.

Ag, 17.5 mm, 3.93 g
Moneyer: M. Cipius M.f.
Mint: Roma.
RRC 289/1 [dies o/r: 535/669] - Bab. Cipia 1 - Syd. 546
ex-Numismática Hinojosa, eBay june 2011 - art. #350470428453
dafnis
0126.jpg
0126 - Denarius Marcia 56 BC104 viewsObv/ Diademed head of Ancus Marcius r.; behind, lituus and below, ANCVS.
Rev/ Equestrian statue standing on aqueduct, behind PHILIPPVS; at horse’s feet, flower. Below, AQVA MAR ligate within the arches of the aqueduct.

Ag, 20.0 mm, 3.37 g
Moneyer: L. Marcius Philippus.
Mint: Roma.
RRC 425/1 [dies o/r: 447/497] - Syd. 919 - Bab. Marcia 28
ex-J.B. González Redondo (denarios.org), jul 2011 (ex–CNG, auction e228, lot 274)
dafnis
Brutus-Syd-907.jpg
013. M. Junius Brutus.58 viewsDenarius, 54 BC, Rome mint.
Obverse: BRVTVS / Bust of L. Junius Brutus.
Reverse: AHALA / Bust of C. Servilius Ahala.
4.09 gm., 19 mm.
Syd. #907; RSC #Junia 30; Sear #398.

The moneyer of this coin is the same Brutus who killed Julius Caesar. However, this coin was minted about a decade earlier. It portrays two ancestors of Brutus:

1. L. Junius Brutus lead the Romans to expel their king L. Tarquinius Superbus. He was one of the founding fathers of the Roman Republic, and was elected one of the first consuls in 509 BC.

2. C. Cervilius Ahala. In 439 BC, during a food shortage in Rome, Spurius Maelius, the richest patrician, bought as much food as he could and sold it cheaply to the people. The Romans, always fearful of kings, thought he wanted to be king. So an emergency was declared and L. Cincinnatus was proclaimed Dictator. Maelius was ordered to appear before Cincinnatus, but refused. So Ahala, as Magister Equitam, killed him in the Forum. Ahala was tried for this act, but escaped condemnation by voluntary exile.
4 commentsCallimachus
0140.jpg
0140 - Denarius Plancia 55 BC39 viewsObv/ Head of Diana Planciana r., wearing causia; before, CN PLANCIVS; behind, AED CVR S C.
Rev/ Cretan ibex standing r., bow and quiver behind.

Ag, 18.5 mm, 4.00 g
Moneyer: Cn. Plancius.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 432/1 [dies o/r: 99/110] - Syd. 933 - RSC Plancia 1
ex-NAC, jul 2011 - art. #01062q00
dafnis
0141.jpg
0141 - Denarius Julia 103 BC33 viewsObv/ Helmeted head of Mars r.; above, control mark C; behind, CAESAR.
Rev/ Venus in biga of Cupids l., holding sceptre and reins; above control mark C; below, lyre; L IVLI L F in ex.

Ag, 17.0 mm, 4.09 g
Mint: Roma.
Moneyer: L. Iulius Caesar.
RRC 320/1 [dies o/r: 92/92] - Syd. 593a - RSC Julia 4
ex-Artemide Aste, auction 9E, lot 9194
dafnis
0147.jpg
0147 - Denarius Sicinia 49 BC45 viewsObv/ Diademed head of Fortuna r.; before, FORT; behind, PR.
Rev/ Palm branch tied with fillet and winged caduceus, in saltire; above, wreath; below, Q SICINIVS; III VIR at sides.

Ag, 17.5 mm, 4.03 g
Moneyer: Q. Sicinius.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 440/1 [dies o/r: 129/143] - Syd.938
ex-CNG, auction e260, lot 453 (ex–Dante Alighieri colln., CNG auction e219, lot 406).
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0148.jpg
0148 - Denarius Rustia 76 BC30 viewsObv/ Helmeted head of Minerva r.; behind, SC; before, crossed X.
Rev/ Ram r., L RVSTI in ex.

Ag, 18.5 mm, 3.74 g
Moneyer: L.Rustius.
Mint: Roma.
RRC 389/1 [dies o/r: 42/47] - Syd. 782 - RSC Rustia 1
ex-Numismatica Tintinna, auction e11, lot 1063
dafnis
0152.jpg
0152 - Denarius Rubria 87 BC45 viewsObv/ Laureate head of Jupiter r., with sceptre over shoulder; behind, DOSSEN.
Rev/ Triumphal quadriga r., side-panel decorated with thunderbolt; (above, Victory with wreath); L RVBRI in ex.

Ag, 16.9 mm, 3.52 g
Moneyer: L. Rubrius Dossenus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 348/1 [dies o/r: 178/208] - Syd. 705 - RSC Rubria 1
ex-VAuctions, auction 267, lot 39
dafnis
0158.jpg
0158 - Denarius Fabia 126 BC27 viewsObv/ Head of Roma with winged helmet r., behind, crossed X.
Rev/ Q. Fabius Pictor seated l. wearing cuirass and helmet, and holding spear and apex, leaning on shield inscribed QVI / RIN; to the r., N FABI; to the l., PICTOR; ROMA in ex.

Ag, 18.2 mm, 3.85 g
Moneyer: N. Fabius Pictor.
Mint: Rome.
RRC RRC 268/1a [dies o/r: 4/5] - Syd. 517 - RSC Fabia 11
ex-CGB, list Rome 30, art. #brm_262510 (ex- CGB, auction 49, lot 471)
1 commentsdafnis
0164.jpg
0164 - Denarius Norbana 83 BC102 viewsObv/ Diademed head of Venus r.; behind, control mark CL; below, C NORBANVS.
Rev/ Corn ear, fasces with axe and caduceus.

Ag, 19.0 mm, 3.89 g
Moneyer: C.Norbanus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 357/1b [dies o/r: 156/173 (all var.)] - Syd. 739 - RSC Norbana 2
ex-Auctiones, auction e3, lot 106 (ex-De La Tour colln., Hess-Divo, auction 314, lot 1350) (ex-Varesi, auction nov 1989, lot 175)
dafnis
0169.jpg
0169 - Denarius Hostilia 48 BC46 viewsObv/Female head r., wearing oak-wreath.
Rev/Victory advancing r., holding caduceus and palm-branch, L HOSTILIVS before, SASERNA behind.

Ag, 18.5mm, 3.95g
Moneyer: L. Hostilius Saserna.
Mint: Roma.
RRC 448/1a [dies o/r: 99/110 (var. 1a+1b)] - Syd.951 - RSC Hostilia 5
ex-AUREA Numismatika, auction 49, lot 3207
2 commentsdafnis
0172.jpg
0172 - Denarius Cassia 55 BC34 viewsObv/Head of Liberty r., LIBERT behind, Q CASSIVS before.
Rev/Curule chair within temple of Vesta; to l., urn; to r., voting tablet inscribed AC.

Ag, 18.1mm, 4.02g
Moneyer: Q. Cassius Longinus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 428/2 [dies o/r: 60/67] - Syd. 918 - RSC Cassia 8
ex-Valencia Coin Market, Dec 2012
1 commentsdafnis
0175.jpg
0175 - Denarius Mussidia 42 BC41 viewsObv/Head of Concordia r.; behind CONCORDIA.
Rev/Shrine of Venus Cloacina, inscribed CLOACIN; L MVSSIDIVS LON(GVS) around.

Ag, 16.2mm, 4.46g
Moneyer: L. Mussidius Longus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 494/42 [dies o/r: 87/97 (all var.)] - RSC Mussidia 6 - Syd. 1093 - Sear Imp. 188
ex-VAuctions 303, lot 388 (ex-Ivar Gault colln., CNG e-auction 271, lot 397)
3 commentsdafnis
0180.jpg
0180 - Semis Roman Republic 42-36 BC41 viewsObv/Head of Minerva (?) r.
Rev/Statue standing l. on top of pedestal; (CV)-IN on both sides.

AE, 22.2 mm, 5.60 g
Moneyer: anonymous.
Mint: Carthago Nova.
APRH/151 - CNH/7 [R2]
ex-Ibercoin, auction 16.1, lot 2018
dafnis
0183.jpg
0183 - Denarius Nonia 59 BC26 viewsObv/ Head of Saturn r., before SVFENAS, behind SC, harpa and conical stone.
Rev/ PR L V P F, Roma seated l. over pile of arms, holding scepter and sword, crowned by Victory standing l. behind; SEX NONI in ex.

Ag, 19.9 mm, 3.65 g
Moneyer: M. Nonius Sufenas.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 2421/1 [dies o/r: 56/62] - Syd. 885 - RSC Nonia 1
ex-Jesús Vico, auction 137, lot 203
dafnis
0187.jpg
0187 - Denarius Pompeia 137 BC67 viewsObv/Helmeted head of Roma r.; behind, jug; before, X.
Rev/She-wolf suckling twins Romulus and Remus; behind, ficus Ruminalis with birds and to the l. Faustulus; around, SEX PO FOSTLVS; in ex., ROMA.

Ag, 20.6mm, 3.74g
Moneyer: Sextus Pompeius Fostlus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 235/1c [dies o/r: 127/159 (all var.)] - BMCRR Rome 927 - Pompeia 1 - Syd. 461a
ex-Naville Numismatics, auction e6, lot 80
1 commentsdafnis
0189.jpg
0189 - Denarius Plautia 60 BC50 viewsObv/ Head of Neptune r.; behind, trident; before, P YPSAE SC.
Rev/ Jupiter in quadriga r., holding reins and thunderbolt; below C YPSAE COS PRIV; behind, CEPIT.

Ag, 19.7 mm, 3.88 g
Moneyer: P. Plautius Hypsaeus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 420/1a [dies o/r: 34/38 (all var.)]
ex-NAC, auction 78, lot 674
1 commentsdafnis
0192.jpg
0192 - Denarius Valeria 45 BC50 viewsObv/ Diademed head of Apollo Soranus r., ACISCVLV(S) behind, with acisculus; star above.
Rev/ Europa riding bull r., holding veil above; in ex., L VALERIV(S).

Ag, 3.75 g
Moneyer: L. Valerius Acisculus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 474/1a - BMCRRE Rome 4099 - Sear Imp. 90.
ex-Soler y Llach, auction 83, lot 151.
1 commentsdafnis
0193.jpg
0193 - Denarius Sulpicia 69 BC41 viewsObv/ Veiled bust of Vesta r.; behind, S C.
Rev/ Knife, simpulum and axe; AE CVR in field; P GALB in ex.

Ag
Moneyer: P. Sulpicius Galba.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 406/1 - RSC I/Sulpicia 7.
ex-Jesús Vico, auction 140, lot 79.
dafnis
0199.jpg
0199 - Denarius Licinia 55 BC50 viewsObv/ Laureate bust of Venus r., togate and with stephane; behind, SC.
Rev/ Female figure standing front, leading horse and holding spear; at feet, cuirass and shield; around, P CRASSVS M F.

Ag, 4.09 g
Moneyer: P. Licinius Crassus M.f.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 430/1 - BMCRR Rome 3901 - Syd. 929 - RSC Licinia 18
ex-Bremens-Belleville, november 2014, lot 363 (ex-St.Florian monastery, Dorotheum, june 1956, lot 2764 / ex. Apostolo Zeno colln., 18th c.)
1 commentsdafnis
Augustus_RIC_288.jpg
02 Augustus RIC 28821 viewsAugusts 27 B.C.- 14 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome mint, 19 B.C. P. Petronius Turpilianus, moneyer. (3.65g, 18.2m, 0h). Obv: TVRPILIANS IIIVIR FERON, Diad. and draped bust of Feronia r. Rev: CAESAR AVGVSTVS SIGN RECE, Parthian kneeling r. presenting standard w. X marked vexillum. RIC 288, BMC 14, RSC 484.

A historical type commemorating the return of the standards lost by Crassus at the battle of Carrhae during his Parthian campaign in 53 B.C. Rome was humiliated by the defeat and loss of several Legionary Eagles. Crassus and several of his generals were killed. Through diplomacy, Augusts secured the return of the Eagles, an important victory to tout on his coinage.

I've been wanting this type for some time because of it's historic significance, but as it's outside of my primary collecting area, I was willing to compromise on condition. This example is worn, but clearly recognizable. The obverse has banker's marks which seem to disappear or become much more scarce on denarii towards the end of the Republic and beginning of the Empire.
Lucas H
Augustus_RIC_359.jpg
02 Augustus RIC I 035960 viewsAugustus 27 B.C.-14 A.D. Moneyer L. Vinicius. Rome Mint. 16 B.C. (3.72g, 18.8m, 5h). Obv: Anepigraphic, bare head right. Rev: L Vinicivs in ex., Triumphal arch inscribed SPQR IMP CAE in two lines sur. by Quadriga bearing Augustus, r. holding laurel-branch, l. scepter; smaller arch on sides w archer on l. and slinger on r. RIC I 359 (R2). RSC 544.

This coin depicts Augustus’ triple arch, perhaps the first in Rome. Beginning as a double arch to commemorate his victory at Actium, the third arch was probably added to commemorate the return of the lost standards from Parthia. For a scarce type, this example is well centered and has good details on the reverse including complete legends.
3 commentsLucas H
0204_RPCI_169.jpg
0204 - Semis Augustus 20 BC-23 AC15 viewsObv/Lotus flower, around IVBA REX IVBAE F II VIR QV.
Rev/Priesthood accessories, around CN ATELIVS PONTI II V Q.

Ag, 22.9mm, 5.02g
Moneyer: anonymous.
Mint: Carthago Nova.
RPC I/169 [7-20c.]
ex-Herrero, auction may 2015, lot 2043.
dafnis
0229_REPROM_RRC313_1b.jpg
0229 - Denarius Memmia 106 BC9 viewsObv/ Laureate head of Saturn l., harpa and ROMA behind; before, control mark.
Rev/ Venus on biga r., holding scepter and reins. Above, Cupid flying l. and holding wreath; below, L MEMMI GAL.

Ag, 18.9 mm, 3.93 g
Moneyer: father of L. and C. Memmii L.f. Gal.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 313/1b [dies o/r: 131/164 all var.]
ex-CNG, auction e436, lot 455 (ex-A McCabe, direct purchase to Künker am Dom, 2018)
dafnis
0233_REPROM_RRC423_1.jpg
0233 - Denarius Servilia 57 BC8 viewsObv/ Head of Flora with flower crown; behind, lituus; around, FLORAL PRIMVS.
Rev/ Soldiers facing each other, holding swords and shields; in ex., C SERVEIL; C F on field.

Ag, 18.8 mm, 3.85 g
Moneyer: C. Servilius C.f.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 423/1 [dies o/r: 99/110]
ex-DNW, auction Feb 2019, lot 683
1 commentsdafnis
306-augustus as-ctmk01.jpg
027 BC-14 AD - AUGUSTUS AE As - struck by P. Lurius Agrippa moneyer (7 BC)58 viewsobv: [CAESAR] AVGVST PONT [MAX TRIBVNIC POT] (with AVG countermark)
rev: P LVRIVS [AGRIPPA] IIIVIR [AAA FF] / S.C.
ref: RIC I 426
9.18gms, 26mm
berserker
augustus quadr-.jpg
027 BC-14 AD - AUGUSTUS AE quadrans - struck 5 BC66 viewsobv: GALVS.MESSALLA.III.VIR
rev: SISENNA.APRONIVS.AAA.FF / S.C.
ref: RIC I 443, C.352
mint: Rome, 3.03gms, 16mm
Moneyers Apronius, Galus, Messalla, and Sisena.

The quadrans (literally meaning "a quarter") was a low-value Roman bronze coin worth 1/4th of an as. After ca. 90 BC, when bronze coinage was reduced to the semuncial standard, the quadrans became the lowest-valued coin in production.
berserker
augustus RIC344-RRR.jpg
027 BC-14 AD - AUGUSTUS AR denarius - struck by P. Licinius Stolo, moneyer (17 BC)83 viewsobv: AVGVSTVS TR POT (Augustus, laureate, wearing cloak and short tunic, on horseback riding right, holding patera in right hand - banker's mark)
rev: P STOLO III VIR (Salii or priest of Mars's cap (same than apex flaminis) between two studded oval shields (ancilia)).
ref: RIC I 344 (R3); BMCRE 76; RSC 439 (80frcs)
mint: Rome
3.53gms,18-19mm
Extremely rare

History: The Ludi Saeculares were spread over a period of three days (from May 31 to June 3), and Augustus celebrated them to inaugurate the beginning of a new age. On the reverse of this coin the ancilias (sacred shields) symbolised the music at festivals. The "jumping priests" or Salii marched to the Regia, where was the shrine of Mars, in which the ancilia (the sacred shield, and its 11 copies) of Mars were stored. The Salii wearing apex, taking the bronze Ancilia, and danced through the streets carrying poles with the shields mounted on them in their left hands. With their other hand, they banged the shields with a drumstick.
3 commentsberserker
augustus_RIC373.jpg
027 BC-14 AD - AVGVSTVS AE as - struck by Ascinius Gallus moneyer (16 BC)65 viewsobv: CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST (bare head right)
rev: C ASINIVS C F GALLVS III VIR AAAFF around large SC
ref: RIC I 373, Cohen 369 (2frcs)
mint: Rome
9.60gms, 25mm

Ascinius Gallus, the former moneyer was an important senator, who married Vipsania, the daughter of Agrippa. On the death of Augustus, briefly, he was offered as a possible alternate to the throne, instead of Tiberius. After the death of Vipsania, he was also an ally of Agrippina Senior, and the "leak green party," a possible plot against the throne identified by Sejanus. He was executed for treason by Tiberius during the Praetorian Prefect's nominal rule of the capital.
berserker
238-augustus as.jpg
027 BC-14 AD - AVGVSTVS AE as - struck by C. Plotius Rufus moneyer (15 BC)49 viewsobv: CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST (bare head right)
rev: C PLOTIVS RVFVS III VIR AAA FF / S.C.
ref: RIC I 389, C.504 (2frcs)
mint: Rome
11.06gms, 28mm

The moneyers were called tresviri aere argento auro flando feriundo, literally "three men for striking (and) casting bronze, silver (and) copper (coins)". The title was abbreviated III. VIR. AAA. FF. on the coinage itself. These men were also known collectively known as the tresviri monetalis or sometimes, less correctly, as the triumviri monetales.
berserker
augustus_RIC381.jpg
027 BC-14 AD - AVGVSTVS AE dupondius - struck by Cnaeus Piso Cn F moneyer (15 BC)53 viewsobv: AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST in wreath
rev: CN PISO CN IIIVIR A A A F F around large SC
ref: RIC I 381 (R), Cohen 378 (2frcs)
mint: Rome
10.33gms, 25mm
Rare

Augustus was awarded all the powers of the tribunate (tribunitia potestas) in addition to the governing authority of the consulate, cementing him as a supreme individual princeps, or emperor.
berserker
Denarius MARCO ANTONIO y OCTAVIO.jpg
03-01 - MARCO ANTONIO y OCTAVIO (43 - 30 A.C.)48 views2do. Triunvirato (43 - 30 A.C.)
AR Denario 17 x 18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: Cabeza desnuda de MARCO ANTONIO viendo a derecha - "M ANT·IMP AVG III VIR R·PC·M·BARBAT Q P" Leyenda alrededor del busto.
Rev: Cabeza desnuda de un joven e inmaduro OCTAVIO con incipiente barba viendo a derecha - "CAESAR·IMP·PONT·III·VIR·R·P·C·" Leyenda alrededor del busto.

Acuñada primavera/verano 41 A.C.
Ceca: Ephesus - Hoy Turquía
Moneyer: Barbatius Pollio

Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1504 Pag.289 - Sear CRI #243 - Craw RRC #517/2 - Syd CRR #1181 - BMCRR (este) #100 - RSC Vol.1 #8a Pag.128 - Cohen Vol.1 #8 Pag.50 - Kestner #3793
mdelvalle
Craw_517_2_Denario_Marco_Antonio_y_Octavio.jpg
03-01 - MARCO ANTONIO y OCTAVIO (43 - 30 A.C.)20 views2do. Triunvirato (43 - 30 A.C.)
AR Denario 17 x 18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: Cabeza desnuda de MARCO ANTONIO viendo a derecha - "M ANT·IMP AVG III VIR R·PC·M·BARBAT Q P" Leyenda alrededor del busto.
Rev: Cabeza desnuda de un joven e inmaduro OCTAVIO con incipiente barba viendo a derecha - "CAESAR·IMP·PONT·III·VIR·R·P·C·" Leyenda alrededor del busto.

Acuñada primavera/verano 41 A.C.
Ceca: Ephesus - Hoy Turquía
Moneyer: Barbatius Pollio

Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1504 Pag.289 - Sear CRI #243 - Craw RRC #517/2 - Syd CRR #1181 - BMCRR (este) #100 - RSC Vol.1 #8a Pag.128 - Cohen Vol.1 #8 Pag.50 - Kestner #3793
mdelvalle
Zsigmond,_(1387-1437_AD),_AR-Den,_H-575,_C2-120A,_U-448,_P-116,_mOnETSIGISmVnDI,_REGISVnGARIE,_1387-9AD,_Q-001,_4h,_13,2-14,2mm,_0_62g-s.jpg
032 Sigismund, ( Sigismund of Luxemburg)., King of Hungary, (1387-1437 A.D.) AR-Denar, H-575, C2-120A, U-448, P-116, Rare! #0164 views032 Sigismund, ( Sigismund of Luxemburg)., King of Hungary, (1387-1437 A.D.) AR-Denar, H-575, C2-120A, U-448, P-116, Rare! #01
avers: ✠mOnЄT SIGISmVnDI, Patriarchal (short!) cross.
reverse: ✠•RЄGIS•VnGARIЄ, Four-part shield, Árpádian stripes, and Brandenburg eagle.
exergue, mint mark: -/-//--, diameter: 13,2-14,2mm, weight: 0,62g, axis:4h,
mint: Hungary, Buda, Moneyer: Onforio Bardi(?) (by Pohl), date: 1387-1389 A.D. (by Pohl), ref: Huszár-575, CNH-2-120A, Unger-448, Pohl-116, Rare!
Q-001

Sigismund of Luxemburg
quadrans
Zsigmond,_(1387-1437_AD),_AR-Den,_H-575,_C2-120A,_U-448,_P-116,_mOnETSIGISmVnDI,_REGISVnGARIE_ET_C_,_1387-9AD,_Q-001,_6h,_13,5mm,_0_39g-s.jpg
032 Sigismund, ( Sigismund of Luxemburg)., King of Hungary, (1387-1437 A.D.) AR-Denar, H-575/576, C2-120A/121A, U-448/449, P-116/117, Hybrid variation, Very Rare!!! #0163 views032 Sigismund, ( Sigismund of Luxemburg)., King of Hungary, (1387-1437 A.D.) AR-Denar, H-575/576, C2-120A/121A, U-448/449, P-116/117, Hybrid variation, Very Rare!!! #01
avers: ✠mOnЄT SIGISmVnDI, Patriarchal (short!) cross.
reverse: ✠•RЄGIS VnGARIЄ ЄT C, Four-part shield, Árpádian stripes and Brandenburg eagle. The reverse legend is the same as the Huszár-576, CNH-2-121A, Unger-449, Pohl-117,
exergue, mint mark: -/-//--, diameter: 13,5mm, weight: 0,39g, axis:6h,
mint: Hungary, Buda, Moneyer: Onforio Bardi(?) (by Pohl), date: 1387-1389 A.D. (by Pohl), ref: Huszár-575/576, CNH-2-120A/121, Unger-448/449, Pohl-116/117, Hybrid denar, Very Rare !!!
Q-001

Sigismund of Luxemburg
1 commentsquadrans
Zsigmond,_(1387-1437_AD),_H-578,_C2-124A,_U-450-fvar_,_P-118-2,_AR-Den,_mOn_SIG-ISmVnDI,_REGIS_VnGARIE_ET_C_,_B-_L,_1436_AD,_Q-001,_8h,_15-16mm,_0,61g-s.jpg
032 Sigismund, ( Sigismund of Luxemburg)., King of Hungary, (1387-1437 A.D.) AR-Denar, H-578, C2-124A, U-450-fvar., P-118-02, #0177 views032 Sigismund, ( Sigismund of Luxemburg)., King of Hungary, (1387-1437 A.D.) AR-Denar, H-578, C2-124A, U-450-fvar., P-118-02, #01
avers: mOn•SIG ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross, mint-mark on each side B-•L.
reverse: ✠•RЄGIS•VnGARIЄ•ЄT•C•, Shield with Árpadian(Hungarian) stripes.
exergue, mint mark: B/•L//--, diameter: 14,5-15,5mm, weight: 0,68g, axis:8h,
mint: Hungary, Buda, Moneyer: Leonardo Bardi, date: after 1436 A.D. (by Pohl), ref: Huszár-578, CNH-2-124A, Unger-450-fvar., Pohl-118-02,
Q-001

Sigismund of Luxemburg
1 commentsquadrans
Zsigmond,_(1387-1437_AD),_H-578,_C2-124A,_U-450-k,_P-118-4,_AR-Den,_mOn_SIG-ISmVnDI,_REGIS_VnGARIE_ET_C_,_C-L,_1436_AD,_Q-001,_11h,_14,5-15,5mm,_0_68g-s.jpg
032 Sigismund, ( Sigismund of Luxemburg)., King of Hungary, (1387-1437 A.D.) AR-Denar, H-578, C2-124A, U-450-k., P-118-04, #0166 views032 Sigismund, ( Sigismund of Luxemburg)., King of Hungary, (1387-1437 A.D.) AR-Denar, H-578, C2-124A, U-450-k., P-118-04, #01
avers: mOn•SIG ISmVnDI, Patriarchal cross, mint-mark on each side C-L.
reverse: ✠•RЄGIS•VnGARIЄ•ЄT•C•, Shield with Árpadian(Hungarian) stripes.
exergue, mint mark: C/L//--, diameter: 14,5-15,5mm, weight: 0,68g, axis:11h,
mint: Hungary, Kassa (today Slovakia : Kosice), Moneyer: Ladislaus Csápy or Leonardo Bardi, date: after 1434-1436 A.D. (by Pohl), ref: Huszár-578, CNH-2-124A, Unger-450-k., Pohl-118-04,
Q-001

Sigismund of Luxemburg
1 commentsquadrans
049_BC-_Q__SICINIVS_III__VIR__C__COPONIVS__PR__S__C__Crawford_444-1a__Sydenham_939__RSC_Sicinia_1_Q-001_5h_16,5mm_3,31g-s.jpg
049 B.C., Q. Sicinius and C. Coponius., Denarius, Crawford 444/1a, C•COPONIVS• PR•S•C•, Club of Hercules, arrow and bow,131 views049 B.C., Q. Sicinius and C. Coponius., Denarius, Crawford 444/1a, C•COPONIVS• PR•S•C•, Club of Hercules, arrow and bow,
avers: Q•SICINIVS III•VIR, diademed head of Apollo right, star below.
revers: C•COPONIVS• PR•S•C•, Hercules' club surmounted by lion skin, scalp right, bow on right, arrow on left.
exergo: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5mm, weight: 3,31g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 49 B.C., ref: Crawford 444/1a, Sydenham 939, Sicinia 1,
Q-001
"An important type, one of the first of the "Imperatorial" series. Struck at a military mint in the East, 49 B.C., after the moneyer, owing his appointment to Pompey the Great, fled Caesar's advance upon Rome with the Praetor Coponius (commander of the fleet), and part of the Senate (thus the S C on the reverse, to lend legitimacy to the coinage). Coponius is likely the father or grandfather of the man by the same name who served as procurator in Judaea under Augustus, from A.D. 6 to A.D. 9."
quadrans
Tituria1DenSabines.jpg
0a Abduction of the Sabines21 viewsL Titurius Sabinus, moneyer
90-85 BC

Head of Tativs, right, SABIN behind
Two Roman soldiers bearing women

Seaby, Tituria 1

When the hour for the games had come, and their eyes and minds were alike riveted on the spectacle before them, the preconcerted signal was given and the Roman youth dashed in all directions to carry off the [Sabine] maidens who were present. The larger part were carried off indiscriminately, but some particularly beautiful girls who had been marked out for the leading patricians were carried to their houses by plebeians told off for the task. One, conspicuous amongst them all for grace and beauty, is reported to have been carried off by a group led by a certain Talassius, and to the many inquiries as to whom she was intended for, the invariable answer was given, "For Talassius." Hence the use of this word in the marriage rites. Alarm and consternation broke up the games, and the parents of the maidens fled, distracted with grief, uttering bitter reproaches on the violators of the laws of hospitality and appealing to the god to whose solemn games they had come, only to be the victims of impious perfidy. The abducted maidens were quite as despondent and indignant. Romulus, however, went round in person, and pointed out to them that it was all owing to the pride of their parents in denying right of intermarriage to their neighbours. They would live in honourable wedlock, and share all their property and civil rights, and - dearest of all to human nature - would be the mothers of freemen. He begged them to lay aside their feelings of resentment and give their affections to those whom fortune had made masters of their persons. An injury had often led to reconciliation and love; they would find their husbands all the more affectionate, because each would do his utmost, so far as in him lay, to make up for the loss of parents and country. These arguments were reinforced by the endearments of their husbands, who excused their conduct by pleading the irresistible force of their passion - a plea effective beyond all others in appealing to a woman's nature.

The feelings of the abducted maidens were now pretty completely appeased, but not so those of their parents.

Livy, History of Rome 1.9-1.10
1 commentsBlindado
MariusFundania1Denarius.jpg
0aa Caius Marius40 viewsC. Fundanius, moneyer
101-91 BC

Denarius

Helmeted head of Roma right, control-mark C behind

"Triumphator" (Marius) in quadriga right, holding laurel-branch and staff; a rider sits on near horse, holding laurel-branch, Q above, C FVNDAN in exergue

The reverse shows Marius as triumphator in the quadriga. He holds sceptre and laurel branch. On one of the horses rides his son. The children of the triumphator were - according to tradition - allowed to share the triumph of their father. The Q above refers to the office as quaestor the mintmaster held while minting these coins. FORVM Ancient Coins says of a similar piece, "The reverse refers to Marius triumph after victories over the Cimbri and Teutones. The rider on the near horse is Marius's son, at that time eight years old." Andrew McCabe comments, "The Triumphator on the Fundania denarius is usually taken to be Marius, with his young son on horseback. This would make it the first Roman coin to explicitly portray a living Roman politician. "

Seaby Fundania 1

Marius rose from common origins to become the First Man in Rome. Plutarch in his Life writes: There is a likeness of Marius in stone at Ravenna, in Gaul, which I myself saw quite corresponding with that roughness of character that is ascribed to him. Being naturally valiant and warlike, and more acquainted also with the discipline of the camp than of the city, he could not moderate his passion when in authority. . . . He was born of parents altogether obscure and indigent, who supported themselves by their daily labour; his father of the same name with himself, his mother called Fulcinia. He had spent a considerable part of his life before he saw and tasted the pleasures of the city; having passed previously in Cirrhaeaton, a village of the territory of Arpinum, a life, compared with city delicacies, rude and unrefined, yet temperate, and conformable to the ancient Roman severity. He first served as a soldier in the war against the Celtiberians, when Scipio Africanus besieged Numantia; where he signalized himself to his general by courage far above his comrades, and particularly by his cheerfully complying with Scipio's reformation of his army, being almost ruined by pleasures and luxury. It is stated, too, that he encountered and vanquished an enemy in single combat, in his general's sight. In consequence of all this he had several honours conferred upon him; and once when at an entertainment a question arose about commanders, and one of the company (whether really desirous to know, or only in complaisance) asked Scipio where the Romans, after him, should obtain such another general, Scipio, gently clapping Marius on the shoulder as he sat next him, replied, "Here, perhaps. . . ."

The consul Caecilius Metellus, being declared general in the war against Jugurtha in Africa took with him Marius for lieutenant; where, eager himself to do great deeds and services that would get him distinction, he did not, like others, consult Metellus's glory and the serving his interest, and attributing his honour of lieutenancy not to Metellus, but to fortune, which had presented him with a proper opportunity and theatre of great actions, he exerted his utmost courage. . . . Marius thus employed, and thus winning the affections of the soldiers, before long filled both Africa and Rome with his fame, and some, too, wrote home from the army that the war with Africa would never be brought to a conclusion unless they chose Caius Marius consul. . . .He was elected triumphantly, and at once proceeded to levy soldiers contrary both to law and custom, enlisting slaves and poor people; whereas former commanders never accepted of such, but bestowed arms, like other favours, as a matter of distinction, on persons who had the proper qualification, a man's property being thus a sort of security for his good behavior. . . .

[In Marius' fourth consulship,] The enemy dividing themselves into two parts, the Cimbri arranged to go against Catulus higher up through the country of the Norici, and to force that passage; the Teutones and Ambrones to march against Marius by the seaside through Liguria. . . . The Romans, pursuing them, slew and took prisoners above one hundred thousand, and possessing themselves of their spoil, tents, and carriages, voted all that was not purloined to Marius's share, which, though so magnificent a present, yet was generally thought less than his conduct deserved in so great a danger. . . . After the battle, Marius chose out from amongst the barbarians' spoils and arms those that were whole and handsome, and that would make the greatest show in his triumph; the rest he heaped upon a large pile, and offered a very splendid sacrifice. Whilst the army stood round about with their arms and garlands, himself attired (as the fashion is on such occasions) in the purple-bordered robe, and taking a lighted torch, and with both hands lifting it up towards heaven, he was then going to put it to the pile, when some friends were espied with all haste coming towards him on horseback. Upon which every one remained in silence and expectation. They, upon their coming up, leapt off and saluted Marius, bringing him the news of his fifth consulship, and delivered him letters to that effect. This gave the addition of no small joy to the solemnity; and while the soldiers clashed their arms and shouted, the officers again crowned Marius with a laurel wreath, and he thus set fire to the pile, and finished his sacrifice.
Blindado
Cornelia51QuinVict.jpg
0aa Defeat of Hannibal on Sicily, 222 BC11 viewsCn. Lentulus, moneyer
90-85 BC

Quinarius

Laureled head of Jupiter, right
Victory crowning trophy, CN LENT in ex

Seaby, Cornelia 51

Possibly a reference to this event: [Q. Fabius Maximus, afterwards called Cunctator] broke up his camp at Suessula and decided to begin by an attack on Arpi. . . . Now at last the enemy was roused; there was a lull in the storm and daylight was approaching. Hannibal's garrison in the city amounted to about 5000 men, and the citizens themselves had raised a force of 3000. These the Carthaginians put in front to meet the enemy, that there might be no attempt at treachery in their rear. The fighting began in the dark in the narrow streets, the Romans having occupied not only the streets near the gate but the houses also, that they might not be assailed from the roofs. Gradually as it grew light some of the citizen troops and some of the Romans recognised one another, and entered into conversation. The Roman soldiers asked what it was that the Arpinians wanted, what wrong had Rome done them, what good service had Carthage rendered them that they, Italians-bred and born, should fight against their old friends the Romans on behalf of foreigners and barbarians, and wish to make Italy a tributary province of Africa. The people of Arpi urged in their excuse that they knew nothing of what was going on, they had in fact been sold by their leaders to the Carthaginians, they had been victimised and enslaved by a small oligarchy. When a beginning had been once made the conversations became more and more general; at last the praetor of Arpi was conducted by his friends to the consul, and after they had given each other mutual assurances, surrounded by the troops under their standards, the citizens suddenly turned against the Carthaginians and fought for the Romans. A body of Spaniards also, numbering something less than a thousand, transferred their services to the consul upon the sole condition that the Carthaginian garrison should be allowed to depart uninjured. The gates were opened for them and they were dismissed, according to the stipulation, in perfect safety, and went to Hannibal at Salapia. Thus Arpi was restored to the Romans without the loss of a single life, except in the case of one man who had long ago been a traitor and had recently deserted. The Spaniards were ordered to receive double rations, and the republic availed itself on very many occasions of their courage and fidelity.

Livy, History of Rome, 24.46-47
Blindado
Sulla_L_Manlius_den.jpg
0ab Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix23 viewsL Manlivs, moneyer
82-72 BC

Denarius

Head of Roma, right, MANLI before, PRO Q behind
Sulla in walking quadriga, crowned by Victory, L SVLLA IM in ex.

Seaby, Manlia 4

Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix (c. 138 BC – 78 BC) was a Roman general and conservative statesman. He had the distinction of holding the office of consul twice, as well as reviving the dictatorship. Sulla was awarded a grass crown, the most prestigious and rarest Roman military honor, during the Social War. He was the first man to lead an army to Rome to settle a political dispute, in this case with Marius. In late 81 BC, he stunned the world by resigning his near-absolute powers, restoring constitutional government. After seeing election to and holding a second consulship, he retired to private life and died shortly after.

As to the person, Plutarch wrote: LUCIUS Cornelius Sylla was descended of a patrician or noble family. . . . His general personal appearance may be known by his statues; only his blue, eyes, of themselves extremely keen and glaring, were rendered all the more forbidding and terrible by the complexion of his face, in which white was mixed with rough blotches of fiery red. . . . And when supreme master of all, he was often wont to muster together the most impudent players and stage-followers of the town, and to drink and bandy jests with them without regard to his age or the dignity of his place, and to the prejudice of important affairs that required his attention. When he was once at table, it was not in Sylla's nature to admit of anything that was serious, and whereas at other times he was a man of business and austere of countenance, he underwent all of a sudden, at his first entrance upon wine and good-fellowship, a total revolution, and was gentle and tractable with common singers and dancers, and ready to oblige any one that spoke with him. It seems to have been a sort of diseased result of this laxity that he was so prone to amorous pleasures, and yielded without resistance to any temptation of voluptuousness, from which even in his old age he could not refrain. He had a long attachment for Metrobius, a player. In his first amours, it happened that he made court to a common but rich lady, Nicopolis by name, and what by the air of his youth, and what by long intimacy, won so far on her affections, that she rather than he was the lover, and at her death she bequeathed him her whole property. He likewise inherited the estate of a step-mother who loved him as her own son. By these means he had pretty well advanced his fortunes. . . . In general he would seem to have been of a very irregular character, full of inconsistencies with himself much given to rapine, to prodigality yet more; in promoting or disgracing whom he pleased, alike unaccountable; cringing to those he stood in need of, and domineering over others who stood in need of him, so that it was hard to tell whether his nature had more in it of pride or of servility. As to his unequal distribution of punishments, as, for example, that upon slight grounds he would put to the torture, and again would bear patiently with the greatest wrongs; would readily forgive and he reconciled after the most heinous acts of enmity, and yet would visit small and inconsiderable offences with death and confiscation of goods; one might judge that in himself he was really of a violent and revengeful nature, which, however, he could qualify, upon reflection, for his interest.
Blindado
Aemilia10.jpg
0ac Conquest of Macedonia13 viewsPaullus Aemilius Lepidus, moneyer
109-100 BC

Denarius

Veiled head of Concord, right, PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA
TER above trophy, L. Aemelius Lepidus on right, Perseus and his two sons as prisoners on left, PAVLLVS in ex.

Seaby, Aemelia 10

L. Aemelius Paullus defeated the Macedonians in 168 BC and brought Perseus and his sons to Rome to adorn his triumph.

Three days after the battle Perseus arrived at Amphipolis, and from that city he sent heralds with a caduceus to Paulus. In the meanwhile Hippias, Midon, and Pantauchus, the principal men among the king's friends who had fled from the field of battle to Beroea, went and made their surrender to the Roman consul. In the case of others also, their fears prompted them, one after another, to do the same. The consul sent his son Q. Fabius, together with L. Lentulus and Q. Metellus, with despatches to Rome announcing his victory. He gave the spoils taken from the enemy's army lying on the field of battle to the foot soldiers and the plunder from the surrounding country to the cavalry on condition that they were not absent from the camp more than two nights. The camp at Pydna was shifted to a site nearer the sea. First of all Beroea, then Thessalonica and Pella, and almost the whole of Macedonia, city by city, surrendered within two days.

Livy, History of Rome, 44.45
Blindado
LFarsuleiusDen.jpg
0b Italy Gets Roman Citizenship13 viewsL Farsuleius Mensor, moneyer
76-71 BC

Denarius

Diademed and draped head of Liberty, right, SC below, MENSOR before, cap of Liberty and number behind
Roma in biga helping togate figure mount, L FARSVLEI in ex.

Appears to allude to the Lex Julia of 90 BC, by which all of Italy gained Roman citizenship

Seaby, Farsuleia 1
Blindado
0001JUL.jpg
1) Julius Caesar159 viewsDenarius, Rome, Moneyer P. Sepullius Macer, 44 BC, 4.03g. Cr-480/11, Syd-1072; Sear, Imperators-107b. Obv: Wreathed head of Caesar r., CAESAR before, D[IC]T PERPETVO behind. Rx: Venus standing l., looking downwards, holding Victory and scepter resting on star, P SEPVLLIVS behind, MACER downwards before. Same dies as Alfoldi, Caesar in 44 v. Chr., pl. LIII, 6-8. Banker's mark behind Caesar's eye. Good portrait. Some areas of flat striking, otherwise EF

Ex HJB - purchased on the Ides of March, 2011

Gaius Julius Caesar (Classical Latin: [ˈɡaː.i.ʊs ˈjuː.lɪ.ʊs ˈkaj.sar], July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC) was a Roman general, statesman, Consul and notable author of Latin prose. He played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire. In 60 BC, Caesar, Crassus and Pompey formed a political alliance that was to dominate Roman politics for several years. Their attempts to amass power through populist tactics were opposed by the conservative elite within the Roman Senate, among them Cato the Younger with the frequent support of Cicero. Caesar's conquest of Gaul, completed by 51 BC, extended Rome's territory to the English Channel and the Rhine. Caesar became the first Roman general to cross both when he built a bridge across the Rhine and conducted the first invasion of Britain.

These achievements granted him unmatched military power and threatened to eclipse the standing of Pompey, who had realigned himself with the Senate after the death of Crassus in 53 BC. With the Gallic Wars concluded, the Senate ordered Caesar to lay down his military command and return to Rome. Caesar refused, and marked his defiance in 49 BC by crossing the Rubicon with a legion, leaving his province and illegally entering Roman territory under arms. Civil war resulted, from which he emerged as the unrivaled leader of Rome.

After assuming control of government, Caesar began a program of social and governmental reforms, including the creation of the Julian calendar. He centralised the bureaucracy of the Republic and was eventually proclaimed "dictator in perpetuity". But the underlying political conflicts had not been resolved, and on the Ides of March (15 March) 44 BC, Caesar was assassinated by a group of senators led by Marcus Junius Brutus. A new series of civil wars broke out, and the constitutional government of the Republic was never restored. Caesar's adopted heir Octavian, later known as Augustus, rose to sole power, and the era of the Roman Empire began.

Much of Caesar's life is known from his own accounts of his military campaigns, and from other contemporary sources, mainly the letters and speeches of Cicero and the historical writings of Sallust. The later biographies of Caesar by Suetonius and Plutarch are also major sources. Caesar is deemed to be one of the greatest military commanders of history. Source: wikipedia
RM0001
13 commentsSosius
2750063-1.jpg
1) Julius Caesar24 viewsIMPERATORIAL ROME
Julius Caesar
AR Denarius (16mm, 2.97 g, 11h)
42 BC. Posthumous issue. Rome mint. L. Mussidius Longus, moneyer.

Laureate head right / Rudder, cornucopia on globe, winged caduceus, and flamen’s cap.

Crawford 494/39b; CRI 116; Sydenham 1096c; RSC 29. Fine, porous, bankers’ marks on obverse.

Property of Princeton Economics acquired by Martin Armstrong. Ex Stack’s (3 December 1996), lot 769.

Ex CNG
RM0008
1 commentsSosius
Cordia_2_Den_6.jpg
1) The Caesarians: Cordia 215 viewsIMPERATORIAL ROME
Mn Cordius Rufus
Moneyer under Julius Caesar
AR Denarius, 46 BC.

RVFVS III VIR, conjoined heads of the Dioscuri, right & in pilei with star atop / MN CORDIVS, Venus (Aequitas?) standing left, holding scales & sceptre.

Cordia 2, Sear5 #440
RM0024
Sosius
Cordia_3a_Den_3.jpg
1) The Caesarians: Cordia 3a16 viewsIMPERATORIAL ROME
Mn Cordius Rufus
Moneyer under Julius Caesar
AR Denarius, 46 BC.

RVFVS S.C., diademed head of Venus right / MN. CORDIVS, Cupid on dolphin right.

Cr463/3, Syd 977, Cordia 3a. Cracked and glued, spotty toning
RM0025
Sosius
Glabrio_den_4.jpg
1) The Caesarians: Man Acilius Glabrio 26 viewsROMAN IMPERATORS
Man Acilius Glabrio
Moneyer for Caesar
AR Denarius. 49 BC.

SALVTIS, head of Salus right / MN ACILIVS III VIR VALETV, Salus standing left holding serpent.

Syd 922, Cr442/1a, Acilia 8, sear5 #412
RM0027
1 commentsSosius
37_1_b.jpg
1.22 L. Scribonius Libo46 viewsAR Denarius
Rome, 62 BC

rev. PVTEAL SCRIBON
Puteal Scribonum - a sacred spot in the Forvm struck by lightning. A monument was built on the spot, and that is where the moneyers congregated
Zam
HENRY_II_Tealby_AR_Penny.JPG
1154 - 1189, HENRY II, AR 'Tealby' Penny, Struck 1158 - 1163 at Canterbury (?), England33 viewsObverse: (HE)NRI • R(EX• A -). Crowned facing bust of Henry II, his head facing slightly to the left, holding sceptre tipped with a cross potent in his right hand. Crown has three vertical uprights each topped by a fleur-de-lis.
Reverse: + (ROGI)ER : ON : (C)A(NT) surrounding short cross potent within beaded circle, small cross potents in each quarter. Moneyer: Rogier, cognate with the modern English name of Roger. Mintmark: Cross potent.
Uncommonly clear Class A bust
Diameter: 20mm | Weight: 1.3gms | Die Axis: 4
Flan chipped and cracked
SPINK: 1337

For the first few years of Henry II's reign the coins of King Stephen continued to be produced, but in 1158, in order to restore public confidence in the currency, a new 'cross and crosslet' coinage was introduced in England which was of sufficient importance for the contemporary chroniclers to record that 'a new money was made, which was the sole currency of the kingdom.' While this coinage was acceptable in terms of weight and silver quality, it is notorious for its ugly appearance, bad craftsmanship and careless execution. In fact the 'Tealby' coinage is among the worst struck of any issue of English regal coinage, so much so that collectors consider it something of a bonus if they are able to make out the name of the moneyer, or the mint, from the letters showing.
The cross and crosslet type coinage of King Henry II is more often called 'Tealby' because of the enormous hoard of these coins which was found in late 1807 at Bayons Manor farm near Tealby in Lincolnshire. This hoard, which originally amounted to over 5,700 pieces, was first reported in the Stamford Mercury of the 6th November 1807, but unfortunately the majority of the coins, more than 5,000 of them, were sent to be melted at the Tower of London and only some 600 pieces were saved for national and important private collections.
A total of 30 mints were employed in the initial 'Tealby' recoinage, however once the recoinage was completed only 12 mints were permitted to remain active and this marks the beginning of the gradual decline in the number of mints which were used to strike English coins.
The 'Tealby' issue continued until 1180 when a new style coin of much better workmanship, the short-cross penny, was introduced.
2 comments*Alex
Sergius_Silius.jpg
116-115 BC M. Sergius Silus263 viewsHelmeted head of Roma right
EX SC before, ROMA and XVI in monogram gehind

Helmeted horseman galloping left, holding sword and severed Gallic head in left hand
M SERGI below, SILVS in ex, Q below horses's forelegs

Rome 116-115 BC

3.91g
VF+

Sear 163, RRC 286/1

This issuer strikes as a quaestor and by special decree of the Senate (EX Senatus Consulto). Quaestors were the immediate superiors of the moneyers and under unusual circumstances occasionally utilized their authority to produce coins.

Ex-Lucernae

2011 Forum Best of Type winner
8 commentsJay GT4
William_the_lion_AR_penny.JPG
1169 - 1214, William I “the lion”, AR Penny, Struck 1205 - 1230 at Perth or Edinburgh, Scotland20 viewsObverse: + LE REI WILAM•: Head of William I facing left, wearing crown of pellets, sceptre to left, within inner circle of pellets. All surrounded by outer circle of pellets. Cross potent in legend.
Reverse: + hVE WALTER: Voided short cross, six pointed star in each angle, within inner circle of pellets. All surrounded by outer circle of pellets. Cross potent in legend. (No mint name on coin. Moneyers: Hue (cognate with the modern English name of Hugh) and Walter, the Edinburgh and Perth moneyers working jointly)
Short cross, phase B. Late William I and posthumous issue struck c.1205 to c.1230.
William I died in 1214 but it would appear that although Alexander II was 16 years old when he came to the throne he continued his father's issues for some 15 years and struck no coins in his own name until around 1230.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 1.3gm | Die Axis: 6
SPINK: 5029

William I was not known as "the Lion" during his own lifetime, the title was attached to him because of his flag or standard, a red lion rampant on a yellow background which went on to become the Royal Banner of Scotland which is still used today.

William I was crowned on 24th December 1165, he came to the throne when his elder brother Malcolm IV died at the age of 24 on 9th December 1165.
Early in his reign William attempted to regain control of Northumbria which had been lost, in 1157 during the reign of Malcolm IV, to the Anglo-Normans under Henry II. He thereby lent support to the English barons who rebelled against Henry II in 1173. In 1174 however, while actively assisting the rebels at the Battle of Alnwick, William was captured by Henry's forces and taken to Falaise in Normandy. He was forced, under the terms of the Treaty of Falaise which he signed in December, to do homage for the whole of Scotland and also to hand over the castles of Roxburgh, Berwick and Edinburgh. Edinburgh, however, was later returned to him as part of the dowry of Ermengarde, a cousin of Henry II, whom William married in 1186.
The Treaty of Falaise remained in force for the next fifteen years until the new English King Richard the Lionheart, needing money for the Third Crusade, agreed to terminate it in return for 10,000 marks. William also attempted to purchase Northumbria from Richard, however his offer of 15,000 marks was rejected due to him wanting all the castles within the lands, something Richard was not willing to concede.
Relations between Scotland and England remained tense during the first decade of the 13th century and in August 1209 King John decided to exploit the weakening leadership of the ageing Scottish monarch by marching a large army to Norham on the south side of the River Tweed. William bought John off with the promise of a large sum of money, and later, in 1212, he agreed to his only surviving son Alexander, marrying John's eldest daughter, Joan.
William I died in Stirling in 1214 and lies buried in Arbroath Abbey, which he is credited with founding in 1178. He was succeeded by his son, who reigned as Alexander II.
3 comments*Alex
King_John_AR_Penny.JPG
1199 – 1216, John, AR Short cross penny, Struck 1205 - 1216 at Winchester, England22 viewsObverse: HENRICVS REX around central circle enclosing a crowned, draped and bearded facing bust of the king holding a sceptre tipped with a cross pommee in his right hand, bust extending to edge of flan.
Reverse: +ANDREV•ON•WI around voided short cross within circle, crosslets in each quarter. Moneyer: Andrev, cognate with the modern English name of Andrew.
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 1.2gms | Die Axis: 4
Class 5b
SPINK: 1351

The class four type short cross pennies of Henry II continued to be struck during the early years of John's reign, but in 1205 a recoinage was begun and new short cross pennies of better style replaced the older issues. Sixteen mints were initially employed for this recoinage but they were reduced to ten later on. All John's coins continued to bear his father's (Henry II) title of henricvs rex.

John was King of England from 1199 until his death in 1216. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the first Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.
John, the youngest of the five sons of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, was not expected to inherit significant lands which resulted in him being given the nickname John Lackland. However, after the failed rebellion of his elder brothers between 1173 and 1174, John became Henry's favourite child. He was appointed Lord of Ireland in 1177 and given lands in England and on the continent. John's elder brothers William, Henry and Geoffrey died young and when Richard I became king in 1189, John was the potential heir to the throne. John unsuccessfully attempted a rebellion against Richard's administration whilst his brother was participating in the Third Crusade but despite this, after Richard died in 1199, John was proclaimed King of England.
Contemporary chroniclers were mostly critical of John's performance as king, and his reign has been the subject of much debate by historians from the 16th century onwards. These negative qualities have provided extensive material for fiction writers since the Victorian era, and even today John remains a recurring character within popular culture, primarily as a villain in films and stories regarding the Robin Hood legends.
2 comments*Alex
1205_-_1216_John_AR_Penny_Dublin.JPG
1199-1216, John, AR Penny, Struck 1207 – 1211 at Dublin, Ireland10 viewsObverse: IOHANNES REX around triangle enclosing a crowned and draped facing bust of King John holding, in his right hand, a sceptre tipped with a cross pommée which extends through the side of the triangle into the legend. Quatrefoil to right of bust.
Reverse: ROBERD ON DIVE around triangle containing sun over crescent moon and a star in each angle. Cross pattée at apex of each point of the triangle and above legend on each of the three sides. Moneyer: Roberd, cognate with the modern English name of Robin.
Third issue “REX” coinage, struck to the same weight and fineness as the English standard.
This was the only coinage struck by King John in his own name.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 1.2gms | Die Axis: 4
SPINK: 6228

John was King of England from 1199 until his death in 1216. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the first Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.
John, the youngest of the five sons of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, was not expected to inherit significant lands which resulted in him being given the nickname John Lackland. However, after the failed rebellion of his elder brothers between 1173 and 1174, John became Henry's favourite child. He was appointed Lord of Ireland in 1177 and given lands in England and on the continent. John's elder brothers William, Henry and Geoffrey died young and when Richard I became king in 1189, John was the potential heir to the throne. John unsuccessfully attempted a rebellion against Richard's administration whilst his brother was participating in the Third Crusade but despite this, after Richard died in 1199, John was proclaimed King of England.
King John contracted dysentery at Lynn in 1216 but, just before his death, he managed to dictate a brief will. This will still survives and as part of it John requested: "I will that my body be buried in the church of St. Mary and St. Wulfstan of Worcester".
Some of King John's favourite hunting grounds were in Worcester, at Kinver and Feckenham, and he had a special affection for Saint Wulfstan, one of the two great Anglo-Saxon saints whose shrines and tombs were also at Worcester. Both Saint Wulfstan and Saint Oswald can be seen in miniature beside the head of the effigy of King John on his tomb.
Medieval effigies usually show the subject in the prime of life, however the effigy on King John's tomb is unique in that not only is it a life-like image of him, it is also the oldest royal effigy in England.
King John's tomb has been opened twice, once in 1529 and again in 1797. At the first opening it was said that John's head was covered with a monk's cowl, however it is now thought that this was probably his coronation cap. When the tomb was opened for the second time the antiquarians responsible discovered that a robe of crimson damask had originally covered the king's body but, by 1797, most of the embroidery had deteriorated. They also found the remains of a sword which lay down the left side of the body along with parts of its scabbard.
3 comments*Alex
Henry_III_short_cross_penny.JPG
1216 – 1272, Henry III, AR Penny, Struck 1217 - 1242 at London, England (Short cross type)2 viewsObverse: HENRICVS REX around central circle enclosing a crowned, draped and bearded facing bust of Henry III holding a sceptre tipped with a cross pommee in his right hand.
Reverse: + GIFFREI ON LVND. Voided short cross dividing legend into quarters, crosslets in each quarter of inner circle. Cross pattée in legend. Moneyer: Giffrei, cognate with the modern English name of Geoffrey.
Issue type 7c, distinguished by the degraded portrait and large lettering.
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 1.1gms | Die Axis: 4
SPINK: 1356C

Henry III was the eldest son of King John and came to the throne at the age of nine. He was king of England from 1216 until his death in 1272, ruling longer than any other English monarch until the reign of George III.
Henry expressed a lifelong interest in architecture and much of what constitutes the Tower of London today is a result of Henry’s work, he added several towers and a curtain wall to expand the White Tower beginning in 1238. Westminster Abbey however, is considered to be Henry's greatest building work. The project began in 1245, when Henry sent his architect Henry de Reynes to visit the French cities of Rheims, Chartres, Bourges and Amiens and Paris’s royal chapel Sainte-Chapelle to learn the Gothic technique that he much admired.
The Westminster Abbey that stood previously on the site had been erected by Edward the Confessor in 1042. Edward the Confessor was a hero of Henry’s, and he probably named his son (the future Edward I) after him. The foundations and crypt are still those of Edward the Confessor’s Abbey, but everything above ground today is the building begun by Henry III. The tomb of Edward the Confessor was moved to a new position of honour in 1269 at the very centre of the new abbey, and when Henry III died in 1272 he was buried beside Edward’s shrine in the exact position the bones of his hero had lain for 200 years.
*Alex
HENRY_III.JPG
1216 – 1272, Henry III, AR Penny, Struck 1248 - 1250 at London, England (Long cross type)44 viewsObverse: HENRICVS REX : III. Crowned bust of Henry III facing within circle of pellets. Mintmark: Six pointed star.
Reverse: NICOLE ON LVND. Voided long cross dividing legend into quarters, trefoil in each quarter of inner circle. Moneyer: Nicole, cognate with the modern English name of Nicholas. The surname Nicole originates in the Netherlands where it was notable for its various branches, and associated status or influence. The modern given name Nicole is a French feminine derivative of the masculine given name Nicolas.
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 1.3gms | Die Axis: 6
SPINK: 1363

The First Barons' War (1215–1217) was a civil war in England in which a group of rebellious barons led by Robert Fitzwalter and supported by a French army under the future Louis VIII of France, waged war against King John of England. The war resulted from King John's refusal to accept and abide by the Magna Carta, which he had been forced to put his seal to on 15th June 1215, as well as from Louis' own ambitions regarding the English throne.
It was in the middle of this war that King John died leaving his son, the nine year old Henry III (who had been moved to safety at Corfe Castle in Dorset along with his mother, Queen Isabella) as his heir.
On his deathbed John appointed a council of thirteen executors to help Henry reclaim the kingdom, requesting that his son be placed into the guardianship of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke. The loyalists decided to crown Henry immediately to reinforce his claim to the throne. William knighted the boy, and Cardinal Guala Bicchieri, the papal legate to England, then oversaw his coronation at Gloucester Cathedral on 28th October 1216. In the absence of the archbishops of either Canterbury or York, Henry was anointed by the bishops of Worcester and Exeter, and crowned by Peter des Roches, bishop of Winchester. During the civil war the royal crown had been lost, so instead, the ceremony used a simple gold corolla belonging to Queen Isabella. In 1217, Henry's forces, led by William Marshal, finally defeated the rebels at the battles of Lincoln and Sandwich.
Henry's early rule was dominated first by Hubert de Burgh, 1st Earl of Kent and Justiciar of England and Ireland, then by Peter des Roches, and they re-established royal authority after the war. In 1225 Henry promised to abide by the final and definitative version of the Magna Carta, freely authenticated by the great seal of Henry III himself, which protected the rights of the major barons and placed a limit on royal power. It is the clauses of this, the 1225 Magna Carta signed by Henry III, not the King John Magna Carta of 1215, which are on the Statute Books of the United Kingdom today.
4 comments*Alex
128-1_Decia_2.jpg
128/1. Decia - denarius (206-200 BC)19 viewsAR Denarius (uncertain mint, 206-200 BC)
O/ Helmeted head of Roma right; X behind head.
R/ The Dioscuri galloping right; shield & carnyx below horses; ROMA in exergue.
4.01g; 20.5mm
Crawford 128/1 (less than 10 obverse dies/less than 12 reverse dies)
- Privately bought from Münzen & Medaillen Basel.
- Ex collection of Elvira Elisa Clain-Stefanelli (1914-2001), former director of the National Numismatic Collection (part of the Smithsonian Institute).
- Naville Numismatics Live Auction 29, lot 479.

* Anonymous (shield & carnyx), Decius?:

This very rare issue has traditionally been attributed to a descendant of a line of three heroes named Publius Decius Mus. The first of that name was Consul in 340 BC; he received the Grass Crown after having saved his army from destruction against the Samnites, then sacrificed himself at the Battle of Vesuvius during his consulship in an act of devotio (exchanging his life against the victory of his army). His son was four times Consul (312, 308, 297 and 295 BC) and similarly sacrificed himself at the Battle of Sentinum in 295 BC against a coalition of Etruscans, Samnites, and Gauls. The third of that name was Consul in 279 BC and fought against Pyrrhus, who successfully thwarted his attempt to sacrifice himself like his ancestors (cf. discussion in Broughton, vol. I, p. 193).

300 years later, Trajan restored several issues of the Republic, including this one, but with the addition of DECIVS MVS on the obverse (RIC 766). Babelon thus assumed that this denarius was minted by the son of the last Publius Decius Mus (Decia 1). In this hypothesis, the shield and Carnyx refers to the second Mus -- the one who fought the Gauls.

However, Crawford contested this view, writing: "The restoration of this issue by Trajan with the added legend DECIVS MVS provides no grounds whatever for supposing that it was originally struck by someone of that name - the family was certainly extinct by this period."

It is still very strange that Trajan picked this rare denarius, from an irregular mint, for restoration. He could have chosen many other anonymous issues of the early Roman coinage, and simply add the name of Decius Mus. It thus shows that the imperial mint had retained some specimens or archives of previous issues up to the 3rd century BC, because due to its rarity, this denarius had already disappeared from circulation by the time of Trajan. A list of the magistrates behind each issue could therefore have been kept as well; Trajan might have selected the moneyers whom he thought were significant for the history of Rome and restored their issue. A Publius Decius Subulo was living in these years (Livy, xliii. 17) and perhaps minted this coin; his name could have been preserved in the archives of the mint, which might have led Trajan to pick his denarius for restoration.
1 commentsJoss
Faust.jpg
137 BC Sextus Pompeius57 viewsHelmeted head of Roma right, X below chin, jug behind

FOSTLVS SEX POM
ROMA in Ex.
She-wolf standing rightsuckling the twins Romulus and Remus, fig tree in background with three birds, the shepherd Faustulus standing right behind

Rome 137 BC
Sear 112
CRR 461

ex-ANE

This moneyer was the husband of Lucilia (sister of the poet C. Lucilius) and father to Cn. Pompeius Sex. f Strabo, and grandfather of Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great). He may also have been praetor in 119 BC.
2 commentsJay GT4
Manlia4.jpg
1aa Reign of SVLLA23 viewsL Manlivs, moneyer
82-72 BC

Denarius

Head of Roma, right, MANLI before, PRO Q behind
Sulla in walking quadriga, crowned by Victory, L SVLLA IM in ex.

Seaby, Manlia 4

Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix (c. 138 BC – 78 BC) was a Roman general and conservative statesman. He had the distinction of holding the office of consul twice, as well as reviving the dictatorship. Sulla was awarded a grass crown, the most prestigious and rarest Roman military honor, during the Social War. He was the first man to lead an army to Rome to settle a political dispute, in this case with Marius. In late 81 BC, he stunned the world by resigning his near-absolute powers, restoring constitutional government. After seeing election to and holding a second consulship, he retired to private life and died shortly after.

As to the person, Plutarch wrote: LUCIUS Cornelius Sylla was descended of a patrician or noble family. . . . His general personal appearance may be known by his statues; only his blue, eyes, of themselves extremely keen and glaring, were rendered all the more forbidding and terrible by the complexion of his face, in which white was mixed with rough blotches of fiery red. . . . And when supreme master of all, he was often wont to muster together the most impudent players and stage-followers of the town, and to drink and bandy jests with them without regard to his age or the dignity of his place, and to the prejudice of important affairs that required his attention. When he was once at table, it was not in Sylla's nature to admit of anything that was serious, and whereas at other times he was a man of business and austere of countenance, he underwent all of a sudden, at his first entrance upon wine and good-fellowship, a total revolution, and was gentle and tractable with common singers and dancers, and ready to oblige any one that spoke with him. It seems to have been a sort of diseased result of this laxity that he was so prone to amorous pleasures, and yielded without resistance to any temptation of voluptuousness, from which even in his old age he could not refrain. He had a long attachment for Metrobius, a player. In his first amours, it happened that he made court to a common but rich lady, Nicopolis by name, and what by the air of his youth, and what by long intimacy, won so far on her affections, that she rather than he was the lover, and at her death she bequeathed him her whole property. He likewise inherited the estate of a step-mother who loved him as her own son. By these means he had pretty well advanced his fortunes. . . . In general he would seem to have been of a very irregular character, full of inconsistencies with himself much given to rapine, to prodigality yet more; in promoting or disgracing whom he pleased, alike unaccountable; cringing to those he stood in need of, and domineering over others who stood in need of him, so that it was hard to tell whether his nature had more in it of pride or of servility. As to his unequal distribution of punishments, as, for example, that upon slight grounds he would put to the torture, and again would bear patiently with the greatest wrongs; would readily forgive and he reconciled after the most heinous acts of enmity, and yet would visit small and inconsiderable offences with death and confiscation of goods; one might judge that in himself he was really of a violent and revengeful nature, which, however, he could qualify, upon reflection, for his interest.
Blindado
APlautiusDenJudea.jpg
1ab Conquest of Judea11 viewsA. Plautius, moneyer
c. 54 BC

Denarius

Turreted head of Cybele, A PLAVTIVS before, AED CVR SC behind
Bacchius kneels right with camel at his side, extending olive branch, BACCHIVS in ex., IVDAEVS in right

Seaby, Plautia 13

The reverse appears to Pompey's conquest of Judaea in 63 BC.

Josephus recorded of Pompey's conquest of Jerusalem: And when he was come to the city, he looked about where he might make his attack; for he saw the walls were so firm, that it would be hard to overcome them; and that the valley before the walls was terrible; and that the temple, which was within that valley, was itself encompassed with a very strong wall, insomuch that if the city were taken, that temple would be a second place of refuge for the enemy to retire to. . . . Aristobulus's party was worsted, and retired into the temple, and cut off the communication between the temple and the city, by breaking down the bridge that joined them together, and prepared to make an opposition to the utmost; but as the others had received the Romans into the city, and had delivered up the palace to him, Pompey sent Piso, one of his great officers, into that palace with an army, who distributed a garrison about the city, because he could not persuade any one of those that had fled to the temple to come to terms of accommodation; he then disposed all things that were round about them so as might favor their attacks, as having Hyrcanus's party very ready to afford them both counsel and assistance. . . . But Pompey himself filled up the ditch that was oil the north side of the temple, and the entire valley also, the army itself being obliged to carry the materials for that purpose. And indeed it was a hard thing to fill up that valley, by reason of its immense depth, especially as the Jews used all the means possible to repel them from their superior situation; nor had the Romans succeeded in their endeavors, had not Pompey taken notice of the seventh days, on which the Jews abstain from all sorts of work on a religious account, and raised his bank, but restrained his soldiers from fighting on those days; for the Jews only acted defensively on sabbath days.
Blindado
BrutusDenLictors.jpg
1ag Marcus Junius Brutus64 viewsTook his own life in 42 BC after being defeated at Philippi by Antony and Octavian

Denarius, issued as moneyer, 54 BC
Head of Liberty, right, LIBERTAS
Consul L. Junius Brutus between lictors, preceded by accensus, BRVTVS

Seaby, Junia 31

Plutarch wrote: Marcus Brutus was descended from that Junius Brutus to whom the ancient Romans erected a statue of brass in the capitol among the images of their kings with a drawn sword in his hand, in remembrance of his courage and resolution in expelling the Tarquins and destroying the monarchy. . . . But this Brutus, whose life we now write, having to the goodness of his disposition added the improvements of learning and the study of philosophy, and having stirred up his natural parts, of themselves grave and gentle, by applying himself to business and public affairs, seems to have been of a temper exactly framed for virtue; insomuch that they who were most his enemies upon account of his conspiracy against Caesar, if in that whole affair there was any honourable or generous part, referred it wholly to Brutus, and laid whatever was barbarous and cruel to the charge of Cassius, Brutus's connection and familiar friend, but not his equal in honesty and pureness of purpose. . . . In Latin, he had by exercise attained a sufficient skill to be able to make public addresses and to plead a cause; but in Greek, he must be noted for affecting the sententious and short Laconic way of speaking in sundry passages of his epistles. . . . And in all other things Brutus was partaker of Caesar's power as much as he desired: for he might, if he had pleased, have been the chief of all his friends, and had authority and command beyond them all, but Cassius and the company he met with him drew him off from Caesar. . . . Caesar snatching hold of the handle of the dagger, and crying out aloud in Latin, "Villain Casca, what do you?" he, calling in Greek to his brother, bade him come and help. And by this time, finding himself struck by a great many hands, and looking around about him to see if he could force his way out, when he saw Brutus with his dagger drawn against him, he let go Casca's hand, that he had hold of and covering his head with his robe, gave up his body to their blows.
2 commentsBlindado
AugustusDenApollo.jpg
1ai Augustus25 views27 BC-14 AD

Denarius
Laureate head left, AVGVSTVS DIVI F
Apollo stg. Right, IMP XII

Van Meter notes that after about 15 BC, Augustus moved the production of gold and silver to Lugdunum and underscored the end of the moneyer issues by using "IMP" on the reverse.

RIC 180

Suetonius summarized Augusts' life in these words: He lost his father at the age of five (58BC). At twelve he delivered a funeral oration in honour of his grandmother Julia, Julius Caesar’s sister (51BC). At sixteen, having assumed the toga, he was decorated by Caesar during the African triumph (46BC) even though he had been too young to fight. When Caesar went to conquer Pompey’s sons in Spain (in 46BC), Augustus followed, despite still being weak from severe illness, and despite being shipwrecked on the way, with a minimal escort, over roads menaced by the enemy, so endearing himself greatly to Caesar, who quickly formed a high opinion of Augustus’ character, beyond merely his energetic pursuit of the journey.
After recovering the Spanish provinces, Caesar planned an expedition against the Dacians, to be followed by an attack on Parthia, and sent Augustus ahead (in 45BC) to Apollonia in Illyria, where he spent his time studying. When news came of Caesar’s assassination (in 44BC), and that the will named him as the main heir, Augustus considered seeking protection from the legions quartered there. However he decided it would be rash and premature, and chose to return to Rome, and enter on his inheritance, despite the doubts expressed by his mother, and strong opposition from his stepfather, the ex-consul Marcius Philippus.

Augustus went on to levy armies and rule the State; firstly for a twelve-year period (from 43BC to 30BC), initially with Mark Antony and Lepidus and then (from 33BC) with Antony alone; and later by himself for a further forty-four years (to his death in AD14).

In his youth he was betrothed to Servilia, the daughter of Publius Servilius Vatia Isauricus, but on his reconciliation with Mark Antony following their first dispute, the troops begged them to become allied by some tie of kinship, and he married (in 43BC) Claudia, Antony’s stepdaughter, born to Fulvia and Publius Clodius Pulcher, even though Claudia was barely of marriageable age. However he quarrelled with Fulvia, and divorced Claudia before the marriage had been consummated.

Not long afterwards (in 40BC), he married Scribonia, whose previous husbands had been ex-consuls, and to one of whom she had borne a child. He divorced her also ‘tired’, he wrote, ‘of her shrewish ways,’ and immediately took Livia Drusilla from her husband Tiberius Nero though she was pregnant at the time (38BC), loving and esteeming her alone to the end.
Blindado
LHostiliusSasDenGallia.jpg
1ba Caesar's Siege of Massilia11 viewsL Hostilivs Saserna, moneyer
49-44 BC

Denarius, 48 BC

Head of Gallia, right, Gaulish trumpet behind
HOSTILIVS SASTERNA, Diana of Ephesus with stag

Seaby, Hostilia 4

This piece appears to refer to Julius Caesar's siege of Massilia (Marseille) during the civil war in 49 BC.

In The Civil Wars, Julius Caesar recorded: While this treaty was going forward, Domitius arrived at Massilia with his fleet, and was received into the city, and made governor of it. The chief management of the war was intrusted to him. At his command they send the fleet to all parts; they seize all the merchantmen they could meet with, and carry them into the harbor; they apply the nails, timber, and rigging, with which they were furnished to rig and refit their other vessels. They lay up in the public stores, all the corn that was found in the ships, and reserve the rest of their lading and convoy for the siege of the town, should such an event take place. Provoked at such ill treatment, Caesar led three legions against Massilia, and resolved to provide turrets, and vineae to assault the town, and to build twelve ships at Arelas, which being completed and rigged in thirty days (from the time the timber was cut down), and being brought to Massilia, he put under the command of Decimus Brutus; and left Caius Trebonius his lieutenant, to invest the city.
Blindado
200-2_Pinaria.jpg
200/2. Pinaria - as (155 BC)12 viewsAE As (Rome, 155 BC)
O/ Laureate head of Janus; I above.
R/ Prow right; NAT above; I before; ROMA below.
26.59g; 33mm
Crawford 200/2 (13 specimens in Paris)

* Pinarius Natta:

This moneyer came from the old patrician gens Pinaria (Cicero, De Divinatione, ii. 21). Despite its ancestry, this gens produced very few noteworthy members, although some of them are recorded until the empire.

The cognomen Natta is old; the first known Pinarius to bear it was Lucius Pinarius Natta, Magister Equitum in 363, and Praetor in 349 BC. Then, nobody else of that name is recorded until our moneyer, and his probable brother (RRC 208, 150 BC), who are both completely unknown apart from their coins. Finally, the last Natta of the Republic was a Pontifex in 56, brother-in-law to Clodius Pulcher, the famous Tribune (Cicero, Pro Domo, 118). It seems that the Nattae had lost their political influence early, but retained some religious duties until the end of the Republic, as Cicero says that they learnt "their sacred ceremonies from Hercules himself" (Pro Domo, 134).

The Pinarii indeed claimed to descend from a mythical Pinarius, who had welcomed Hercules with a banquet when he came to Latium (Livy, i. 7). This myth was so deeply stuck in the Roman mythology that it was still used by Caracalla on an unique aureus (leu 93, lot 68).
Joss
207-1_Decimia.jpg
207/1. Decimia or Flavia? - denarius (150 BC)10 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 150 BC)
O/ Helmeted head of Roma right; X behind.
R/ Luna in biga right, holding whip & reins; FLAVS below; ROMA in exergue.
3.95g; 19mm
Crawford 207/1 (61 obverse dies/76 reverse dies)
- Collection of Frederick Sydney Clark (1923-2016), British collector in East Sussex.
- Toovey's, 01/11/2017, Lot 701.

* Decimius Flavus or Gaius Flavius Fimbria:

This issue has been given to a member of the plebeian gens Decimia, of Samnite origin. The gens was relatively new at the time since its first identified member Numerius Decimius distinguished himself during the Second Punic War (Livy, xxii. 24), and probably received the Roman citizenship as a result. Two Decimii used the cognomen Flavus: a military tribune in 207 named Gaius Decimius Flavus (Livy, xxvii. 14), and his probable son of the same name, who was Urban Praetor in 184, but died immediately after his election (Livy, xxxix. 38).

Three other Decimii are then known: Marcus, Gaius, and Lucius, all ambassadors in Greece in 172-171 (Livy, xlii. 19, 35, 37 respectively). They were possible sons of the Praetor of 184, in which case our moneyer was the son of one of them, although nothing is known of him. However, none of them had a cognomen and Flavus simply meant "blond hair", a rather common cognomen unlikely to feature alone on a coin.

So the name could refer to another gens; it is indeed possible to read it as FLAVIVS. This name, widespread during the Empire after Vespasian, was nevertheless uncommon in the second century and therefore distinctive enough so that the moneyer did not need to add the rest of his name. Besides, only one Flavius is known in this century: the Popularis Gaius Flavius C.f. Fimbria, Consul in 104 alongside Marius. Fimbria was therefore born no later than 146 (the Consulship was reserved to men aged at least 42 years old), a date which would remarkably fit with his father moneyer in 150 and therefore in his 20s. As Fimbria was a novus homo, the moneyership held by his father would testify the ascension of the family before him.
Joss
21-Eanred.jpg
21. Eanred.31 viewsAE sceat or styca, ca 810-841.
Obverse: +ERANREDEX (retrograde).
Reverse: +FORDRED / cross.
Moneyer: Fordred.
1.23 gm., 12 mm.

North #186; Seaby #864 (old #860).
1 commentsCallimachus
22-Offa.jpg
22. Offa.30 viewsPenny, ca 787-792, Canterbury mint.
Obverse: +OFFA REX+ / bust of Offa.
Reverse: +LULLA
Moneyer: Lulla.
1.05 gm., 16 mm.
North #313; Seaby #906 (old #905).
Callimachus
23-Burgred.jpg
23. Burgred.23 viewsPenny, ca 866-874; possibly minted in London.
Obverse: BVRGRED REX M / Diademed bust of Burgred.
Reverse: MON / +HVSSA / ETA / Three pellets after ETA.
Moneyer: Hussa.
1.38 gm., 19 mm.
North #423; Seaby #938.
Callimachus
24-Alfred.jpg
24. Alfred.35 viewsPenny, first coinage 871-875, mint ?.
Obverse: +AELBRED REX / bust of Alfred.
Reverse: MON / EALHERE / ETA
Moneyer: Ealhere.
1.21 gm., 19 mm.
North #627; Seaby #1057.

The similarities of the lunnettes coinage of Burgred and the first coinage of Alfred has long been noted. There is evidence of an agreement between Mercia and Wessex to produce a unified coinage in the two states. This agreement was continued by Burgred and Alfred. At the beginning of Alfred's reign in 871, there were just two mints operating in Mercia and Wessex: London and Canterbury. Philip Grierson, in his book Medieval European Coinage: Volume 1, The Early Middle Ages, has Ealhere a moneyer in Canterbury.

A more detailed analysis of Alfred's coinage comes to a different conclusion. The Lunettes Coinage of Alfred the Great by A. W. Lyons & W. A. Mackay (2008, BNJ 78, 4) places this obverse die in Group 2 Mercian Style Lunettes, variant IV: "Horizonal bust." Characteristics: Bust lacks a bonnet, the hair is comprised of several horizontal lines usually ending in pellets and sloping between 45 to 60 degrees. Double-banded diadem surmounted by a crescent. Distinctively cut "wedge" lips. The eye is a small circle with a dot in the center.

The reverse die of this coin is Lunettes type C (illustrated under Burgred in North, p. 67.) However, Table 2B does not show the moneyer Ealhere using reverse type Lunette C. So coins with this die combination were evidentally not known to Lyons & Mackay.

Table 2D, listing all the moneyers of Alfred's Lunette coinage, says Ealhere used obverse dies of Group 1 variant I, and Group 2 variant IV (the obverse die on this coin). Lyons & Mackay suggest that Ealhere was located in central or west Wessex as he used London and Canterbury dies.
Callimachus
249-3_Maenia.jpg
249/3. Maenia - quadrans (133 BC)13 viewsAE Quadrans (Rome, 132 BC)
O/ Head of Hercules right, wearing lion's skin; 3 pellets behind.
R/ P MAE ANT M F above prow right; 3 pellets before; ROMA below.
4.65g, 19mm
Crawford 249/3 (28 specimens in Paris)
- Ex-Thersites Collection (bought on 18 April 1986)
- Roma Numismatics, e-sale 33, lot 336.

* Publius Maenius M.f. Antiaticus:

Antiaticus belonged to the plebeian gens Maenia, but his relatives are not known. Other Maenii are recorded in the 2nd century, such as Titus, Gaius, and Quintus Maenius, Praetors respectively in 186, 180, and 170, or Publius Maenius, moneyer in 194-190. However, Antiaticus mentioned on his coins that he was the son of Marcus, who is not known, and none of the aforementioned Maenii shared his cognomen.

Antiaticus must have therefore belonged to another branch of the gens, which descended from Gaius Maenius, Consul in 338, Dictator in 320 and 314, who defeated the Volsci by taking their city of Antium in 338, thus putting an end to the Second Latin War and also the conquest of Latium. The cognomen Antiaticus comes from this victory, for which Gaius Maenius was also rewarded by a statue on the Forum, possibly at the top of a column (Cicero, Pro Sestio, 58; Livy, VIII, 13).

The life of Antiaticus is still very obscure, and it seems he did not hold other office. He is only known through his coins.

Eckel read ME at the end of this legend and conjectured that it might have been the first letters of an agnomen Megellus or Medulinus (V, p. 240-1), but it seems very unlikely that a moneyer could have received an agnomen so early in his career. Perhaps Eckhel could not see good examples of this type; in any case, the legend on this coin clearly reads as MF, for "Marcus filius".
Joss
25-Viking-Edmund.jpg
25. Danelaw: Vikings of East Anglia: St Edmund Memorial Coinage.22 viewsPenny, ca 890-905.
Obverse: +SC EADMVN RI / Large A with small crosses on each side.
Reverse: +DAEMOND MOTI / Large cross.
Moneyer: Daemond.
1.29 gm., 18 mm.
North #483; Seaby #960.

There are over 60 moneyers with Germanic or Norse names found on the St Edmund coins in the Cuerdale Hoard (c. 905). This number suggests there were quite a few mints producing this coinage. Several of the moneyers are also found on coinage of Edward the Elder and Athelstan from other parts of the country. This suggests that this issue, although in the name of the martyred East Anglian king, extended beyond East Anglia, and perhaps continued until East Anglia was regained by the English in 917-18. For more information, see A New History of the Royal Mint by Christopher E. Challis (Cambridge University Press, 1992).
Callimachus
261-1_Domitia.jpg
261/1. Domitia - denarius (128 BC)11 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 128 BC)
O/ Helmeted head of Roma right; corn-ear behind; XVI below chin.
R/ Victory in biga right, holding reins in left hand and whip in right hand; ROMA above; man fighting lion below; CN DOM in exergue.
3.84g; 18mm
Crawford 261/1 (71 obverse dies/89 reverse dies)

* Gnaeus Domitius (Calvinus?):

Our moneyer belonged to the old plebeian gens Domitia, but his identity is unknown. Babelon and ancient numismatists thought he was Ahenobarbus, the Consul of 96 BC, but it is not possible as he was already moneyer in 118 (the Narbo issue). Crawford postulated that he was from a collateral branch of the Ahenobarbi, and therefore a cousin of the Consul of 96, because he considered here that the Senatus Consultum De Agro Pergameno dates from 131 BC, but it is now dated 101, thus the Cn. Domitius Cn. f. mentioned there is doubtless the future Consul of 96*.

Gnaeus Domitius was more likely a Calvinus, from the other main stirps of the Domitii, but none of them is known during the 2nd century.

The figure below the chariot on the reverse is quite mysterious. Earlier numismatists thought it was a reference to the dogs fought by Ahenobarbus, the Consul of 122 who vanquished the Allobroges, but it is impossible as the battle was fought in 121, seven years after the denarius. Crawford considers the beast to be a lion, and therefore a reference to games organised by an Aedile; the corn-ear on the obverse would be a further reference to an aedileship.

* Harold B. Mattingly, "The Date of the Senatus Consultum De Agro Pergameno" in The American Journal of Philology, Vol. 93, n°3, 1972, pp. 412-423.
Joss
27-Edward-Elder.jpg
27. Edward the Elder.25 viewsPenny, 899-924.
Obverse: +EADVVEARD REX / small cross.
Reverse: DEORV / + + + / VALD MO
Moneyer: Deorwald.
1.57 gm., 21 mm.
North #649; Seaby #1087.
Callimachus
28-Aethelstan.jpg
28. Aethelstan.38 viewsPenny, 927-939, York mint.
Obverse: +EÐELSTAN REX TO BRIT / small cross; C privy mark at left of cross.
Reverse: +REGNALD MO EFORǷIC / small cross.
Moneyer: Regnald.
1.48 gm., 22.5 mm.
North #672; Seaby #1093.

Aethelstan was the first British king to be styled "King of All Britain" on his coins (Rex Totius Britanniae). Regnald was also a moneyer for the Vikings when they were in control of York.

Provenance: the Schembrai Collection.
1 commentsCallimachus
Sergia_1a.jpg
286/1 M. Sergius Silus68 viewsM. Sergius Silus. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 116-115 B.C. (3.81g, 17.98mm, 9h). Obv: Helmeted head of Roma, EcX SC before, ROMA X (XVI ligature) behind. Rev: helmeted horseman galloping left, holding sword and severed Gallic head in left hand, Q below horse’s forelegs, M SERGI below, SILVS in ex. RSC I Sergia 1a, Sear 163, Ex Warren Esty.

The reverse depicts the grandfather of the moneyer, who, during the Punic War, reportedly suffered 23 wounds and the loss of a hand but continued the fight. The EX SC on the obverse indicates the coin was struck by a quaestor by special decred of the Senate. Quaestors were the immediate supervisors of the moneyers, but occasional struck udner their own name as well.
3 commentsLucas H
29-Eadmund.jpg
29. Eadmund.17 viewsPenny, 939-946.
Obverse: +EADMVND REX / Small cross.
Reverse: HVNSI / + + + / GE MO
Moneyer: Hunsige.
1.22 gm., 22 mm.
North #689; Seaby #1105.

Perhaps of interest on this coin is the up-side-down A instead of a V in the king's name.
Callimachus
298-1_Caesia.jpg
298/1. Caesia - denarius (112-1 BC)15 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 112-111 BC)
O/ Bust of Apollo seen from behind, with head turned to left and thunderbolt in right hand; APO on right.
R/ Lares Praestites seated facing, with dog between, each holding staff in left hand; bust of Vulcan with tongs over shoulder above; LA on left; PRE on right; L CAESI in exergue.
3.79 g; 20mm
Crawford 298/1 (50 obverse dies/62 reverse dies)
- Collection of Walter Mirko Stoecklin, Winterthur, Switzerland, acquired prior to 1981. W. M. Stoecklin was the third member of a dynasty of coin collectors based in Switzerland.
- Obolos 9, lot 34.

* Lucius Caesius:

Our moneyer is the first known member of the minor gens Caesia, but the rest of his life is completely unknown. Mommsen (Monnaie Romaine, II, p.370) thought that he could have been the father of Lucius Caesius, praetor in 75 BC (Cicero, In Verrem, II, 1, 130), but there were other Caesii around this time, so they were not necessarily related.

The deity represented on the reverse could be Apollo, as shown by the monogram behind his head, or Vejovis, an obscure god with the attributes of both Apollo and Jupiter (especially the thunderbolt). The reverse depicts the Lares Praestites, the guardians of the city of Rome, whom Ovid described their statues with a dog between them (Ovid, Fasti, v. 129-145).

The bust of Vulcan and the tongs were possibly the emblems of the moneyers.
1 commentsJoss
089.jpg
3) The Tyrannicides: Albinus Bruti f.21 viewsIMPERATORIAL ROME
AR Denarius (16mm, 3.60 g, 3h). Rome mint, 48 BC.
Moneyer: Albinus Bruti f.

Bare head of Pietas right / Two clasped hands holding winged caduceus.

Crawford 450/2; CRI 26; Sydenham 942; Postumia 10. VF.
RM0003
Sosius
Junia_30_denarius.jpg
3) The Tyrannicides: Brutus19 viewsMARCUS JUNIUS BRUTUS
Moneyer
AR Denarius. (3.5g), 54 BC.

BRVTVS, bare head of L Junius Brutus right / AHALA, bare head of C Servilius Ahala right.

Syd 907, Cr433/2, Junia30; aF

Marcus Junius Brutus (early June, 85 BC – 23 October, 42 BC), often referred to as Brutus, was a politician of the late Roman Republic. He is best known in modern times for taking a leading role in the assassination of Julius Caesar ten years after this coin was minted.
RM0032
Sosius
Postumia_10_Den.jpg
3) The Tyrannicides: Postumia 10 Denarius16 viewsIMPERATORIAL ROME
AR Denarius (16mm, 3.60 g, 3h). Rome mint, 48 BC.
Moneyer: Albinus Bruti f.

Bare head of Pietas right / Two clasped hands holding winged caduceus.

Crawford 450/2; CRI 26; Sydenham 942; Postumia 10. Good VF, slightly spotty tone, minor flan flaw on obverse.

ex CNG
RM0037
1 commentsSosius
30-Eadred.jpg
30. Eadred.24 viewsPenny, 946-955.
Obverse: +E.AD.RED.REX A / Small cross.
Reverse: ÐEODM / +++ / AER M
Moneyer: Theodmaer.
1.44 gm., 22 mm.
North #706; Seaby #1113.

Provenance: Ex Richard Cyril Locket (1873-1950), Glendinings Part I, June 1955, lot 592 (part).
Callimachus
31-Eadwig.jpg
31. Eadwig.13 viewsPenny, 955-959, possibly minted in York.
Obverse: +E-A-DǷIG REX / Small cross.
Reverse: HERIG / +++ / 'ER MO
Moneyer: Heriger.
1.40 gm., 21 mm.
North #724; Seaby #1122.

Provenance: Tetney Hoard, 1945.
E.J. Winstanley Collection.
1 commentsCallimachus
32-Eadgar.jpg
32. Eadgar.28 viewsPenny (group HT 1 NE V (northeast Midlands)), 959-975.
Obverse: +EADGAR REX / small cross.
Reverse: IVE M / +++ / ONET
Moneyer: Ive.
1.34 gm., 21 mm.
North #741; Seaby #1129.
1 commentsCallimachus
323-1_-_Ivlia.jpg
323/1. Julia - denarius (101 BC)8 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 101 BC)
O/ Helmeted head of Roma right; corn-ear behind.
R/ Victory in biga right, holding reins in both hands; L IVLI below.
3.84g; 19mm
Crawford 323/1 (47 obverse dies/59 reverse dies)

* Lucius Julius:

Although our moneyer belonged to the very famous gens Julia, his life is completely unknown. The Julii had been among the important patrician gentes of the early Republic, but fell in obscurity in the fourth century. In the second century, a new branch emerged, the Julii Caesares, but Crawford notes that our moneyer cannot be a Caesar because he did not use this cognomen and his coins lack a reference to Venus (cf. RRC 258 and 320).

The corn ear on the obverse refers to grain distributions, which often featured on Republican coins (RRC 242, 243, 245, 260, 261, 306, 330).
Joss
33-Edward-Martyr.jpg
33. Edward the Martyr.41 viewsPenny, 975-978, Stamford mint.
Obverse: +EADǷEARD REX ANGLO / Diademed bust of Edward.
Reverse: +ǷACER M-O STAMFO. / small cross.
Moneyer: Wacer.
1.36 gm., 20 mm.
North #763; Seaby #1142.
Callimachus
34b-Aethelred-II-N766.jpg
34a. Aethelred II.47 viewsPenny, 979-985, First Hand type, York mint.
Obverse: +ÆÐELRED REX ANGLOX / Diademed bust of Aethelred, right.
Reverse: +ZTYR M-O EOFER / Hand of Christ between A and ω .
Moneyer: Ztyr.
1.42 gm., 21 mm.
North #766; Seaby #1144.

The moneyer Ztyr is not listed as being a moneyer for Aethelred's First Hand type from York. However, there is a moneyer named Styr at York who coined for Edward the Martyr, 975-978. Ztyr is probably the same man.
2 commentsCallimachus
34-Aethelred-II.jpg
34b. Aethelred II.39 viewsPenny, 991-997, Lincoln mint.
Obverse: ÆÐELRED REX ANGLOX / Bust of Aethelred, scepter in front of face.
Reverse: +COLGRIM M-O LIN / Cross with the letters CRVX in angles.
Moneyer: Colgrim.
1.15 gm., 20 gm.
North #770; Seaby #1148
1 commentsCallimachus
35a-Cnut-N1157.jpg
35a. Cnut.18 viewsPenny, 1017-1023; Lincoln mint.
Obverse: +CNVT REX ANGLORV. / Crowned bust of Cnut, in quatrefoil.
Reverse: +ÆÐELMER MO LINC / long cross, voided, on quatrefoil.
Moneyer: Aethelmer.
1.03 gm., 18.5 mm.
North #781; Seaby #1157.

Provenance: Found in Tetford, Lincolnshire, September 1, 2005.
(Recorded: EMC. 2006.0016; PAS. DENO-00C081.)
2 commentsCallimachus
35-Cnut.jpg
35b. Cnut.28 viewsPenny, 1023-1029; London mint.
Obverse: +CNVT REX AN / Bust of Cnut, wearing pointed helmet, sceptre in front.
Reverse: +EADǷOLD ON LVND / short cross, voided.
Moneyer: Eadwold.
1.08 gm., 18 mm.
North #787; Seaby #1158.
Callimachus
37-Harthacnut.jpg
37. Harthacnut.24 viewsPenny, 1035-1042; Lund, Denmark (now Sweden) mint.
Obverse: +HARÐECNVT / Crowned and cuirassed bust of Harthacnut.
Reverse: +TOCI ON LVDI / Cross, with a crescent in the second and fourth quarters.
Moneyer: Toci.
1.02 gm., 17 mm.
Seaby #1170.
Callimachus
379-1_Procilia.jpg
379/1. Procilia - denarius (80 BC)8 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 80 BC)
O/ Laureate head of Jupiter right; S C downwards behind.
R/ Juno Sospita standing right, holding shield and hurling spear; snake before; L PROCILI/F downwards behind.
3.57g
Crawford 379/1 (104 obverse dies/116 reverse dies)

* Lucius Procilius:

The life of Procilius is sparsely known. Besides, he is the only recorded member of the gens Procilia for the Republic and the lack of a cognomen further indicates a humble origin. Dictionaries often record two different Procilius (a historian and a politician), but they were possibly the same person. Since there are 35 years between this denarius and the dated events of Procilius' life, the moneyer could have been the father of the politician and historian.

Regarding Procilius the historian, none of his writings has survived, even as fragments, but he is quoted by Varro about the origin of the Lacus Curtius on the Forum (Latin Language, v. 148), Pliny the Elder on a text related to Pompey (Natural History, viii. 2), and Cicero alludes that he wrote on Greek constitutions (Atticus, ii. 2). The scope of his works must have therefore been quite extensive. In the aforementioned letter, Cicero shows his dislike for Procilius, which is perhaps related to Procilius' political role.

Indeed, in other letters, Cicero mentions that Procilius was also a Tribune of the Plebs in 56, and that he was allied to Gaius Porcius Cato (Cato the Younger's cousin) and Marcus Nonius Sufenas, also Tribunes that year. They supported Publius Clodius Pulcher, Tribune in 59 and Aedile in 56, who -- as Tribune -- had banned Cicero from Rome for his repression of the Catiline Conspiracy, hence the animosity of Cicero towards Procilius. In 56, Pulcher and the three tribunes, including Procilius, prevented the elections from taking place, in order to force an interregnum, so that Crassus and Pompey could be chosen consuls for 55 (Cassius Dio, Roman History, xxxix. 27-33).

They used violence and bribery to prevent this election and were therefore sued. Cato and Sufenas were acquitted, but Procilius was found guilty on 4 July 54 (Cicero, Atticus, iv. 15). Apparently, he was not condemned for the complete illegality of his deeds, but because he had killed a man in his house; and Cicero complains that 22 judges on 49 still wanted to absolve him. In the following letter to Atticus (ii. 16), Cicero adds that there are rumors about Sufenas and his judges, possibly about corruption, but does not give more details.

The use of Juno Sospita refers to the town of Lanuvium, where she was worshiped, probably the hometown of Procilius.

Joss
38-Edward-Confessor.jpg
38. Edward the Confessor.15 viewsPenny, 1059-1062; Hastings mint.
Obverse: +EADǷAIRD RE / Crowned bust of Edward, bearded, with sceptre in front.
Reverse: +DVNING ON HEST / Short cross, voided, with hammer ends.
Moneyer: Duning.
1.28 gm., 19 mm.
North #828; Seaby #1182.
Callimachus
394-1b_-_Postumia.jpg
394/1b. Postumia - denarius (74 BC)21 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 74 BC)
O/ Bust of Diana right, draped, with bow and quiver over shoulder.
R/ Hound running right; spear below; C POSTVMI in exergue.
3.96g; 17mm
Crawford 394/1b (192 obverse dies/213 reverse dies, both varieties)
- ex Lockdales 145, lot 1414.

* Gaius Postumius At. or Ta. (Albinus Atilianus?):

This variant without the monogram in exergue is very rare; only three reverse dies seem to exist.

The moneyer belonged to the great patrician gens Postumia, but his family is much more difficult to ascertain. The patrician Postumii had few different branches and only one had survived by the 1st century: the Albini. There were also plebeian Postumii.

His obverse with Diana reproduces those of Aulus Postumius S.f. S.n. Albinus (RRC 335/9), and his probable son Postumius A.f. S.n. Albinus (RRC 372/1), thus implying that he was a member of the patrician family. However, the Albini never used the praenomen Gaius. It is nonetheless possible that our moneyer was adopted into the gens, as it occurred with Decimus Junius Brutus (RRC 450), adopted by an Aulus Albinus. The Postumii seem to have had difficulties producing male heirs; they indeed had 9 consulships between 186 and 99 BC, but very few magistrates bore that name in the 1st century. The disaster of the campaign against Jugurtha by the brothers Spurius and Aulus Postumius Albinus might have hit the gens hard; Aulus was also murdered during the Social War (Livy, Periochae, 75).

The monogram in exergue could therefore be deciphered as AT for the plebeian gens Atilia -- the possible family of Gaius Albinus before his adoption. Another moneyer, Lucius Atilius Nomentanus, likewise ligatured the first two letters of his name on his denarii in 141 (RRC 225/1). This theory would explain both the unusual praenomen for the gens and the monogram. His adoptive father could also be one of the two moneyer mentioned above.

Crawford links the moneyer with a Gnaeus Postumius who accused Lucius Licinius Murena, the consul elect for 62, of bribery in the famous Pro Murena by Cicero (56-58), who also says that Postumius was a (unsuccessful) candidate to the praetorship that year. The case was won by Cicero and no doubt that accusing a Consul of bribery did not help his career and the fate of the Albini, as they disappeared from history after this.
1 commentsJoss
normal_Antony_and_Octavian_001.jpg
4) Antony and Octavian Denarius36 viewsMark Antony and Octavian
AR Denarius, 2.97g
Ephesus, spring/summer, 41 BC

M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV in monogram), Bare hd of Mark Antony right / CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, Bare head of Octavian right

Sear 1504

This series of coins commemorates the establishment of the second Triumvirate of November 43 B.C. between Antony, Octavian and Lepidus. Both sides bear the inscription "III VIR R P C", meaning "One of Three Men for the Regulation of the Republic. Within a few years Antony would depart Italy for the Eastern provinces.

The moneyer for this coin is M. Barbatius Pollio who was also a Questor in 41 BC. Barbatius bears the title of "Quaestor pro praetore" abbreviated to QP a distinction shared by his colleague L. Gelllius.

Photo and text credit goes to FORVM member Jay GT4, from whom I purchased the coin in 2011. Thanks, Jay!
RM0034
1 commentsSosius
40-Harold-II.jpg
40. Harold II.76 viewsPenny, 1066; London mint.
Obverse: +HAROLD REX ANG / Crowned bust of Harold, sceptre in front.
Reverse: +SǷETMAN ON LVN / Across field and between two lines: PAX
Moneyer: Swetman.
1.20 gm., 19 mm.
North #836; Seaby #1186.
1 commentsCallimachus
42-William-II.jpg
42. William II.34 viewsPenny, 1093-1096; London mint.
Obverse: +ǷILLELM REIX / Crowned bust, facing, between two stars.
Reverse: +ǷVLFPORD ON LV / Voided cross.
Moneyer: Wulfword.
1.38 gm., 21 mm. North #853; Seaby #1260.

The moneyer ǷVLFPORD (Wulfword) is found at three mints: London, Ipswich, and Stamford. On this coin the city is not well-struck, but enough can be made out to determine it is LV, which is London.
1 commentsCallimachus
423-1_Servilia2.jpg
423/1. Servilia - denarius (57 BC)31 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 57 BC)
O/ Head of Flora right; lituus behind; FLORAL PRIMVS before.
R/ Two soldiers facing each other and presenting swords; C SERVEIL in exergue; C F upwards on right.
3.87g; 18mm
Crawford 423/1 (99 obverse dies/110 reverse dies)
- ROMA Numismatics, E-Sale 42, lot 484.
- Artemide Aste, 11-12 June 2016, lot 253.

* Gaius Servilius C.f. (Brocchus?):

The gens Servilia was originally patrician, but our moneyer was most likely a plebeian because at this time, the only remaining patrician branch of the gens was the Caepiones. The Servilii Gemini, likewise patricians at first, lost their status during the Second Punic War for an unknown reason and their descendants had erratic cognomina, making it difficult to reconstruct the genealogical tree of the gens. The one given by Crawford for RRC 239 is dubious, although possible.

Crawford also says that our moneyer was perhaps a brother of Marcus Servilius C.f., Tribune of the Plebs in 43 BC. He was possibly the Gaius Servilius Brocchus, son of Gaius, mentioned as Military Tribune by Flavius Josephus (Jewish Antiquities, xiv. 229), who tells that he served under the Consul L. Cornelius Lentulus Crus in Asia. It would match a career started in the 50, during which the Pompeian party was dominating, and continued as Pompey's supporter during the Civil War.

The meaning of his denarius has been debated. According to Crawford, the obverse legend refers to the priesthood of Flora, probably held by the gens, contradicting the view of Mommsen, who thought it was celebrating the establishment of the Ludi Florales in 173. This view has been in turn challenged by Robert Palmer, but without giving an explanation of his own*. It should also be mentioned that Pliny the Elder tells that there were statues of Flora, Triptolemus and Ceres by Praxiteles in the "Servilian gardens" (Natural History, xxxvi. 4), which obviously belonged to the gens, showing that Flora was of special importance for the Servilii.

The reverse reuses a common theme on Servilii's denarii: the duels of Marcus Servilius Pulex Geminus, Consul in 202, who was famous for his 23 victories in single combats (Plutarch, Aemilius Paullus, 31). The scene was depicted with variations on RRC 264 (horseback duel), RRC 327 (duel on foot), and RRC 370 (rider charging). It is also possible that RRC 239 shows another duel on horse, but disguised as the Dioscuri riding apart. The fact that our moneyer used this theme links him to the other direct descendants of Servilius Pulex Geminus, thus supporting Crawford's theory that he was a grandchild of Gaius Servilius, Praetor in 102.

* "Flora and the Sybil", in Ten Years of the Agnes Kirsopp Lake Michels Lectures at Bryn Mawr College, edited by Suzanne B. Faris, Lesley E. Lundeen, Bryn Mawr, 2006, pp. 58-70.
3 commentsJoss
43-Henry-I.jpg
43. Henry I.33 viewsPenny, 1122-1124; Sandwich mint.
Obverse: +HENRICVS REX / Crowned bust, facing, holding sceptre.
Reverse: + VL N: SANǷI / Quatrefoil with star in center, pellets on limbs, and four lis around.
1.32 gm., 20 mm. North #870; Seaby #1275.

The moneyer's name can not be read. At Sandwich there were three moneyers who had a VL near the front of their names: Wulfric, Wulfwart, and Wulfstan.
1 commentsCallimachus
44-Stephen.jpg
44. Stephen.36 viewsPenny, Colchester mint.
Obverse: FNE / Crowned bust, holding sceptre.
Reverse: D . ON : COL / Cross moline with a fleur in each angle.
1.13 gm., 17 mm.
North #873; Seaby #1278

The only moneyer at Colchester with a name ending in a D is Edward.
1 commentsCallimachus
45-Henry-II.jpg
45. Henry II.28 viewsPenny, 1180-1189; London mint.
Obverse: HENRICVS . REX / Crowned bust, facing, with sceptre at left.
Reverse: +PIERES . ON . LVND / Short cross voided, with quatrefoil in each angle.
Moneyer: Pieres.
1.44 gm., 21 mm. North #963; Seaby #1344.

Classification from North Vol. 1, p. 163-64, and Seaby 1994 p. 87:
- Class 1: Narrow face, five pearls to crown, five curls to right and two to left.
- b : Round C and E. Seaby also mentions "a stop before REX on most coins."


1 commentsCallimachus
46-Richard-I.jpg
46. Richard I.19 viewsPenny, London mint.
Obverse: HENRICVS REX / Crowned bust, facing, with sceptre at left.
Reverse: +STIVENE . ON . LVN / Short cross voided, with quatrefoil in each angle.
Moneyer: Stivene.
1.36 gm., 19 mm.
North #968; Seaby #1348A (old #1348).

Classification from North, Vol.1, p. 163-64, 170, Addendum; and Seaby 1994:
- The moneyer Stivene coined types 2 - 4b.
- Types 2 and 3 can be eliminated because the beard consists of small curls.
- Type 4 has beard consisting of pellets (as does this coin).
- Type 4b has a much coarser portrait and letters; the pellets in the crown run into one line.

North (1963) assigns type 4 to John, but later works (Seaby 1994, for example) assign 4a-4b to Richard. It appears that Stivene coined only for Richard. The difficulty in attribution stems from the fact that both Richard and John kept the name of their father (Henry II) on their coins.

Callimachus
465-2b_Considia.jpg
465/2b. Considia - denarius (46 BC)9 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 46 BC)
O/ Laureate head of Apollo right; A behind; no border.
R/ Curule chair, garlanded, on which lies wreath; C CONSIDI above; PAETI in exergue.
3.6g
Crawford 465/2b (93 obverse dies/103 reverse dies, two varieties)
- Rollin & Feuardent, 1903, Collection Charvet de Beauvais, lot 265 (together with 3 other Considia). Sold for Fr.19 with lots 264 and 266.

* Gaius Considius Paetus:

Like the other two moneyers for 46 BC (Titus Carisius and Manius Cordius Rufus), Paetus belonged to a small gens. The Considii are indeed unattested before the 1st century, apart from a Tribune of the Plebs in 476. The gens came to prominence in the 50s, when two of its members became Praetors: Gaius Considius Longus between 58-52, and Marcus Considius Nonianus between 54-50.

Like his colleagues, Paetus was doubtlessly a supporter of Caesar. The curule chair on the reverse alludes to Caesar's right to sit on a curule chair between the Consuls in the Senate (Cassius Dio, xliii. 14). There is therefore a chance that he was the same person as the Gaius Considius mentioned in the Pseudo-Caesar's 'De Bello Africo' (§89) as the son of the Praetor of 54-50 -- a supporter of Pompey who died after Thapsus -- nonetheless absolved by Caesar after the war. This theory fits well with Caesar's policy of generously granting pardon to his former enemies, and was accepted by Mommsen, following Borghesi (cf. Mommsen, 1860, p. 657). However, Crawford did not mention this possibility.
Joss
47-John.jpg
47. John20 viewsPenny, London mint.
Obverse: HENRICVS REX / Crowned bust, facing, with sceptre at left.
Reverse: +ILGER . ON . LVND / Short cross voided, with quatrefoil in each angle.
Moneyer: Ilger.
1.46 gm., 18 mm.
North #970; Seaby #1351.

Classification from North Vol. 1, p. 163-64:
- Type 5 had oval eyes, two curls on each side enclosing a pellet, and five pearls on crown.
- Type 5a or 5b has a small X.
- Type 5b has a cross pattee as a mint mark on the reverse, and a normal S.

The difficulty in attribution stems from the fact that both Richard and John kept the name of their father (Henry II) on their coins.

Callimachus
48-Henry-III.jpg
48. Henry III18 viewsPenny, ca 1251-1272; London mint.
Obverse: HENRICVS REX III / Crowned bust, facing, sceptre in right hand.
Reverse: HENRI ON LVNDE / Long cross voided, with three pellets in each angle.
Moneyer: Henri.
1.49 gm., 18 mm.
North #992; Sear #1368.

Classification from North, Vol. 1, p. 166-68:
- Type 4 and 5 are with sceptre.
- Type 5 has legend starting at left above sceptre.
- Types 5a and 5b have new crown (fig.3) and round eyes.
- Type 5b has wedge tail on R.

Callimachus
50_OK_OWLS.jpg
50 Parliament of Owls13 viewsFrom c 164 BC to 82 BC, The Athenian New Style silver coinage of tetradrachms.
Includes 3 imitations and 1 pseudo-Athenian New Style coin of Marcus Lucullus treasurer and moneyer of L C Sulla. How can anyone say they are not interesting beats me.
cicerokid
Lepidus.jpg
62 BC L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus 57 viewsPAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA

Veiled and diad. head of Concordia right

Rev. Togate figure of L. Aemilius Paullus standing left touching trophy to left of which stand King Perseus of Macedon and his two sons as captives
TER above, PAVLLVS in ex.

Rome 62 BC

Sear 366

This moneyer was the elder brother of the triumvir M. Aemillius Lepidus

Sold!
Titus Pullo
Lepidus~0.jpg
62 BC L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus97 viewsPAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA

Veiled and diad. head of Concordia right

Rev. Togate figure of L. Aemilius Paullus standing left touching trophy to left of which stand King Perseus of Macedon and his two sons as captives
TER above, PAVLLVS in ex.

Rome 62 BC

Sear 366

3.80g

Holed in antiquity

Ex-Canada Coins


This moneyer was the elder brother of the triumvir M. Aemillius Lepidus
2 commentsJay GT4
Cassius.jpg
63 BC L. Cassius Longinus59 viewsVeiled and diad. head of Vesta left, two-handled cup behind, control letter "A" before

LONGIN III V
Togate citizen standing left depositing ballot inscribed V in voting box

Rome 63 BC
3.75 g

Sear 364, RRC 413/1, RSC Cassia 10

Ex Roberto Pedoni


On the obverse below the chin of Vesta is a control letter. The only letters employed on this issue are L, C, A, S, S (inverted) and I. If you collect enough coins of this moneyer, you can spell the moneyer's name in full: L. CASSI
4 commentsJay GT4
SERVILLIA.jpg
82-80 BC C. Servilius Vatia Restoration 219 viewsLaureate head of Apollo right; lituus and B behind, mark of value below chin (XVI monogram)

Battle between two mounted horsemen, the one on the left armed with a sword, the other with spear, his shield inscribed M
C SERVEIL


Restored Issue 82-80 BC.
Original being of C. Servilius 127 BC

3.48g

Crawford 370/1b; Sydenham 720; Servilia 7
Scarce

ex-Canadian Coin

This is the Wildwinds example!

David Sear's Millennial addition comments:

"This type represents a remarkable revival of the issues of the monetary triumvirate which had held office approximately 45 years earlier though with the substitution of Apollo for the Roma head on the obverse. As well as being complimentary to several of Sulla's most prominent supporters Crawford suggests that their true purpose was to enable Sulla to issue a civil coinage without appointing a new triumvirate of moneyers for 82 BC or, alternatively, to celebrate the restoration of the Republic in 80."
5 commentsJay GT4
20190130_111551.jpg
90 BC Q. TITUS14 viewsOvb: Baccus Rev: Pegasus Moneyer: Q. TITUS 90 B.C. social wars period NGC VFRob P
Darth_Vader.jpg
A long time ago in a galaxy far far away...37 viewsA NEW HOARD

The coin was allegedly found on the desert planet Tatooine among the ruins of Mos Eisley inside a ruined structure that appears to have been a cantina. Also inside was found the skeletal remains of a humanoid who scientists have named “Greedo” and appears to have been shot first, perhaps by a smuggler or some other scoundrel.

The obverse of the coin is a portrait of a helmeted head facing. Archeologists have named him “Darth Vader”, who at one time may have been a ruler or a “Lord” of some kind.

The reverse has the words “STAR WARS”, with the moneyer's mark below, which appears to be some sort of advertisement or propaganda and might suggest that the people of this particular “Empire” were a war like society...
2 commentsWill J
A_Postumius_Albinus~0.jpg
A. Postumius A.f. S.n. Albinus - AR serratus denarius9 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
¹²81 BC
draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder, bucranium above
togate figure standing left before flaming altar, holding sprinkler over sacrificial bull, all on stone platform
A·POST_·A·F__S·N·(AL)BIN
¹Crawford 372/1, SRCV I 296, Sydenham 745, RSC I Postumia 7
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,7g
ex Gitbud and Naumann

According story described by Livy: in Sabina a cattle of admirable size and beauty was born. Animal was sacrificed and his skull (bucranium) was placed in temple of Diana where it commemorate this wonder. The event was considered to be a prophetic sign that town whose citizen sacrifice the animal will rule. Before battle at Regillius Lake Roman citizen (Postumius' ancestor) took the cattle and sacrificed it in the temple of Diana on Aventine.
Johny SYSEL
A_Postumius_Albinus_Hispan.jpg
A. Postumius A.f. S.n. Albinus - AR serratus denarius10 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
¹²81 BC
veiled head of Hispania right
HISPAN
togate figure standing left, extending hand toward legionary eagle right; fasces with axe right
A· // (AL)BIN // N·S·
POST·A·F
¹Crawford 372/2, Sydenham 746, RSC I Postumia 8, BMCRR I Rome 2839, SRCV I 297
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Solidus

Refers to the praetorship of L. Postumius Albinus over Spain and his successful expeditions against the Vaccaei and Lusitani, and the levying of troops for this campaign.
Johny SYSEL
0068.jpg
A. Postumius Albinus. Denarius42 viewsRRC 372/2
81 BC

Obverse: HISPAN, Veiled head of Hispania r
Reverse: ·S·N – ALBIN Togate figure standing l., raising hand; to l., legionary eagle and to r., fasces with axe.

Issued when Rome had won the supremacy in Italy but was still fighting the last of the Marians in Spain.

....and so the magistrate has been iddentified as the praetor Lucius Postumius Albinus who had gone to further Spain in 180 and had his term prorogued into 179. He fought two major battles with the Vaccaei, killing a reported 35,000. (....) If the magistrate on the coin is the victorious praetor, his century old triumph over the Lusitanians was especially relevant in 81, for ir was among the Lusitanians where Sertorius found the greatest support. (Harlan)

The moneyer is assumed to be a grandson of the consul of 110 and a son of the moneyer of 96 (Crawford)
--
Ex Numismatica Ars Classica, Auction 78; Lot 635, 26 - 27 May 2014
3 commentsNorbert
A_Spuri.jpg
A. Spurilius - AR denarius8 viewsRome
²142 BC
¹139 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
X
Luna in biga right holding goad and reins
A·SP(VR)I
ROMA
¹Crawford 230/1, SRCV I 107, Sydenham 448, RSC I Spurilia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,4g
ex Aurea

*moneyer's name also could be Spurius or Spurinna
Johny SYSEL
Cnut_HT_Aeth_Eor.jpg
A.D. 1016-1035 - Cnut - Helemt Type Penny82 viewsObv:- CNVT R-EX ANG, Helmeted bust left holding sceptre
Rev:- AEDELRINE MO EOR, Short cross voided, limbs united at base by two circles, in centre a pellet; in each angle a broken annulet enclosing a pellet
Minted in York (EOR) by moneyer Aethelwine (AEDELRINE) A.D. 1024-1030
Reference:- North 787
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Cnut_QF_Cnit_Camb.jpg
A.D. 1016-1035 - Cnut - Quatrefoil Penny44 viewsObv:- CNVT REX ANGLORVM, Crowned bust left within quatrefoil
Rev:- CNIHT MO GRAI, Quatrefoil with pellet at apex of each cusp, long cross voided, each limb terminating in three crescents
Minted in Cambridge (GRAI) by moneyer Cnit (CNIHT) A.D. 1017-1023
Reference:- North 781
maridvnvm
Cnut_SC_Farth_Eor.jpg
A.D. 1016-1035 - Cnut - Short Cross Penny35 viewsObv:- CNVT RECX, Diademed bust left holding sceptre
Rev:- FERDEIN ON EOR, Short cross voided; in centre, a circle enclosing a pellet
Minted in York (EOR by moneyer Farthein (FERDEIN) A.D. 1029-1035/6
Reference:- North 790
maridvnvm
Cnut_SC_Lifinc_Linc.jpg
A.D. 1016-1035 - Cnut - Short Cross Penny41 viewsObv:- CNVT REX, Diademed bust left holding sceptre
Rev:- LIFINC ON LINCO, Short cross voided; in centre, a circle enclosing a pellet
Minted in Lincoln (LINCO by moneyer Lifinc (LIFINC) A.D. 1029-1035/6
Reference:- North 790
maridvnvm
513ForumNaso.jpg
AE 216 views Bronze AE 21, c. 241 - 50 BCE Panormus (Palermo) mint, (4.595g, maximum diameter 20.9mm, die axis 315o)
magistrate (L. Axius?) Naso
o: laureate head of Zeus left
r: warrior standing left, sword in extended right, spear vertical behind in left, grounded shield behind leaning on spear, NAS/O left
very rare magistrate

per Forum notes: NASO named on this coin could be Lucius Axius L. f. Naso, who was a moneyer in Rome, c. 73 - 70 B.C. Two inscriptions discovered at Cordoba dedicated to a Lucio Axio Luci filio Polia tribu Nasoni, indicate his honors. He was first decemvir stlitibus iudicandis, then tribunus militum pro legato, then quaestor. Or, this NASO could be completely unrelated.
Calciati I p. 351, 125 (one specimen); HGC 2 1071 (C)
PURCHASED FROM FORUM ANCIENT COINS
PMah
Aethelred_II.jpg
Aethelred II - Canterbury, England184 viewsAethelred II (968-1016). King of England 978-1013 and 1014-1016. AR (20 mm, 1.62 g) penny of long cross type struck at Canterbury; moneyer Leofric.
Obverse: ÆTDELRÆD REX ANGLO.
Reverse: LEOFRIC M O CÆNT.
References: North 774; Sear 1151.
5 commentsjbc
Varimundus_ab.jpg
Anglo-Saxon Early Transitional Type - Varimundus Type B285 viewsAnglo-Saxon transitional silver coin by thrymsa moneyer Varimundus, AR (1.22 g, 12 mm) minted circa 675-685. Obverse: diademed bust right holding sceptre. Reverse: Cross within double ring, cross TMVSNVMVCO. S. 774.

This coin type was minted in both pale gold (containing < 40% gold) and silver and represents the transition from gold thrymsas to silver sceattas in Anglo-Saxon Britain c.650-685. The gold content of the present coin remains to be determined.
1 commentsJan (jbc)
Screenshot_2017-04-05_09_31_19.png
Anglo-Saxon, King Aethelred II of Northumbria, AE Styca, 2nd Reign. Moneyer: Eanred. UK Metal Detecting find. 5 viewsYork 843-850 A.D. 0.96 - 13.2mm, Axis 12h.

Obv: +EDILRED REX - Legend around a cross with four pellets in centre.

Rev: +EANRED - Legend around a cross with four pellets in centre.

Spink 868.
Christian Scarlioli
RRPostumiusMed~0.jpg
ANIMALS/PINK FLOYD, Track 2, Dogs.47 viewsRoman Republic
moneyer L. Caesius, 74 BC, Rome.
AR denarius, 18.74 mm, 3.6 gm
Obv: bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder
Rev: hound running right, spear below; C. POSTVMI, TA in exergue
Ref: Crawford 394/1a

Composite picture of the collection:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-104363

Interactive presentation:
http://prezi.com/q7mw1k1zur65/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share


2 commentsTIF
RRCaesiusLarge.jpg
ANIMALS/PINK FLOYD, Track 2. Dogs.43 viewsRoman Republic, Moneyer L. Caesius, 112-111 BC
AR denarius, 3.92 gm
Obv: Vejovis facing left, from behind; holding thunderbolt; monogram AP.
Rev: Two Lares Praestites seated, facing left, holding spears, dog between; bust of Vulcan above; legend LA-RE.
Ref: Crawford 298/1. Sydenham 564. RSC Caesia 1.

Composite picture of the collection:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-104363

Interactive presentation:
http://prezi.com/q7mw1k1zur65/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share


2 commentsTIF
RRVeturiusMED.jpg
ANIMALS/PINK FLOYD, Track 3. Pigs (Three Different Ones)27 viewsRoman Republic
moneyer Ti. Veturius, 137 BC, Rome
AR denarius, 3.85 gm
Obv: helmeted bust of Mars right
Rev: youth kneeling left, holding pig; at either side, two soldiers standing holding spear and touching pig with swords. ROMA above.
Ref: Crawford 234/1. Sydenham 527. RSC Veturia 1.

Composite picture of the collection:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-104363

Interactive presentation:
http://prezi.com/q7mw1k1zur65/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share


TIF
roma combined.JPG
Annonymous Issue under Furius Purpurio71 viewsAR 18 mm 3.6g 169-158 BC
OBV :: Helmeted head of Roma right with cross behind
REV :: Roma riding biga. Murex shell above, PVR below horses
EX :: ROMA
purchased 09/2007

Discovered , thanks to Steve Minnoch , that the coin has a " code" on it or a type of anagram..this was apparently common in that era

the PVR below the horses combined with the murex shell wich was used for purple die , Purpura = (purple) gives the name of the moneyer. in this case Purpurio so ...PVR + PURPURA = Purpurio, sort of a pun for a lack of a better word, but still very interesting
Johnny
Sydenham_519_19mm,_4_40_grams_113_B_C__Cr_79_1.jpg
Anonymous Wheel Cr.79/164 viewsCrawford 79/1 Wheel (209-8BC) Sicily?
Denarius Serratus
Ob: helmeted head of Roma right, behind X
Rev: Dioscuri riding right with lances, below wheel, in exergue ROMA; line border

BMCRR II 308 (217-197BC)

Sydenham 519 (113BC) Narbo

Iridescent highlights, 4.4gr.

Grueber: The wheel maybe a symbol of the moneyer rather than of a mint, although it does occur on aes grave of Campania and central Italy, and the early coins of Luceria and Tartentum. This is the earliest occurrence of the serratus on republican denarii and the only anonymous. Only serratus attributed to a mint other than Rome by Count de Salis.

Sydenham classifies this serratus with Porcia 8 at the colony of Narbo. The serrated edge may have been suggested by the Gaulish custom of using serrated rings or wheels as currency. Tacitus stated that the Gaulish tribes showed a marked preference for coins that were serrati bigatique (Germania 5) Sydenham wrote an article entitled “Origin of the Roman Serrati” NC 1935 209 ff.

Crawford writes that Mattingly’s view that serrati were Marian coins was demolished by Sydenham’s article, but his view that they were struck at non-Italian mints for Trans-alpine circulation does not hold either. Grueber’s view that they are probably merely decorative best remaining theory. Crawford Vol 2 p. 581

Tacitus Germania 5 pecuniam probant veterem et diu notam, serratos bigatosque. They approve the old and long known money, those that are serrated and biga depicting.
3 commentsPetrus Elmsley
0042-q0.jpg
Anonymus Denarius 121 viewsRRC 152/1c
189 - 180 b.c.
Long peaked visor.
With a lock of hair over the left shoulder of Roma and short, straight tails of the horses.
Other variants of RRC 152 are with monogram SX.Q. and attributed to moneyer Sextus Quintilius

Bought from Busso Peus Auction #392 in 2007 as RRC 53

2 commentsNorbert
aodobert.jpg
Aodobert29 viewsMerovingian inscribed denier
Monarch: unknown (?Audebert)
Moneyer: Frederic
Mint: unknown
O: AodoBERT
R: FREdIRI

Merovingian deniers present a number of difficulties in identification. Inscribed Merovingian deniers are quite rare, and are often illegible or nonsensical. This is certainly legible, but not quite clear. The name 'Aodobert' is not the name of a king, but could possibly be a moneyer or a religious figure. St. Aubert (Audbert) is the traditional founder of the bishopric of Cambray (Cambrai).

The reverse seems to depict "+FREdIRI". Unclear if this is a moneyer

Ex- Comptoir Général Financier
Nap
Illyria-Apollonia-Drachm.jpg
Apollonia, Illyria, Autonomous AR Drachm. ca (229-30 BC)17 viewsAncient Greek, Apollonia, Illyria, Autonomous AR Drachm. ca (229-30 BC), Agias (Moneyer), Epikadou (Magistrate), 3.3g, 18mm

Obverse: AΓIAΣ, Cow standing left suckling calf.

Reverse: AΠOΛ ƐΠI KA ΔOY, Legend around double stellate pattern. A control mark outside of first circle border.

Reverse: BMC 15-16 (pending)
Gil-galad
satecow.jpg
Apollonia, Illyria, Greece, (200 - 80 B.C.)69 viewsAR Drachm
Ariston (Moneyer), Ainea (Magistrate),
O: APIΣTΩN (moneyer), cow left, head turned, suckling calf right.
R: AI/NE/A Curved, double-stellate pattern, no center device line, petal rays, seven dots, line border
3.2g
17.5mm
3 commentsMat
Appius_Claudius_Pulcher_(111-110_BCE)_denarius_(AR).png
Appius Claudius Pulcher, T. Manlius Mancius, and Q. Urbinius (moneyers, 111-110 BCE) denarius (AR)108 viewsObv.: Helemeted head of Roma right Rev.: Victory in triga right, one horse looking back Exergue: T . MA . AP . CL . Q . VR Diameter: 18,25 mm Weight: 3,85 g Crawford 211/1a

Bigas, trigas and quadrigas are a common sight on the reverse of Republican denarii.
Nick.vdw
740_299_triga.JPG
Appius Claudius, T. Manlius, Q. Urbinius - AR denarius5 viewsRome
²109 BC
¹111-110 BC
helmeted head of Roma right; circle in triangle behind
victory in triga right holding reins
T·(MAL)·A·P CL·Q·(VR)
¹Crawford 299/1b; Sydenham 570a; Mallia 2; BM 1843,0116.505
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Lucernae

Names of three moneyers are still mystery, Appius Clausius, T. Mallius, and Q. Urbanus are other possibilities.

Joint coinage of three monetal triumvirs. Triga is found only on the denaries of the Naevia family except coins of these three moneyers. Triga commemorates three of the persons who were monetal triumvirs in the second century BC. Cavedoni suggests that the triangle on the obverse may symbolize the same individuals. In this case the circle within that figure may represent a coin?
Johny SYSEL
Augustus_RIC_359~0.jpg
ARCH, Augustus, RIC 359200 viewsAugustus 27 B.C.-14 A.D. Moneyer L. Vinicius. Rome Mint. 16 B.C. (3.72g, 18.8m, 5h). Obv: Anepigraphic, bare head right. Rev: L Vinicivs in ex., Triumphal arch inscribed SPQR IMP CAE in two lines sur. by Quadriga bearing Augustus, r. holding laurel-branch, l. scepter; smaller arch on sides w archer on l. and slinger on r. RIC I 359 (R2). RSC 544.

This coin depicts Augustus’ triple arch, perhaps the first in Rome. Beginning as a double arch to commemorate his victory at Actium, the third arch was probably added to commemorate the return of the lost standards from Parthia. For a scarce type, this example is well centered and has good details on the reverse including complete legends.
1 commentsLucas H
CeolnothBiarnred1.jpg
Archbishop of Canterbury, Ceolnoth111 viewsStruck c.865-868AD Kent, Canterbury mint. AR Penny 1.20g Ceolnoth Group III. Floriated Cross type. Obv tonsured bust facing, breaking inner circle 'ARCHIEP- CEOLNOD'; Rev 'BIARNRED MONETA' (Moneyer Beornraed) around, in inner circle a floriated cross. S.895? (Group III) N.247.

There are 58 recorded coins of Ceolnoth at the SCBI/EMC but only 3 coins of this moneyer for him. He also struck 6 more recorded coins for Alfred, Edward the Elder and some Danish imitative Alfred coins from East Anglia. This actual type is not listed in the corpus. However, a fragment at the British Museum, see BNJ28 CE Blunt 'A new coin of Ceolnoth' and JJ North plate III/9, is likely the same. Infact, I believe these coins are of the same dies and moneyer. Blunt & North describe 'LD' in the fragmented moneyer legend though it is likely 'ED' with the top half of the 'E' missing at the break. The Floriated Cross design is also found on coins of Aethelberht for the moneyers Dudda and Oshere but only 4 on database (N.621). In superb condition, a single find from the Driffield area in Yorkshire. This coin is potentially the only complete specimum and should be considered a great rarity. It is now recorded in the 2011 'The Coinage of Southern England' by Rory Naismith, Volume 1 Plate 65 C218.2b.

Gareth Williams at the British Museum kindly commented:

'I agree with your reading of the coin, and think that it is probably from the same dies as our fragment 1947, 14-4, 6, as you suggest, although it's difficult to be absolutely certain - the angle of the D on the reverse in particular looks slightly different, but that may just be the lighting on the photograph'

Rory Naismith from the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge is studying the period for his PhD dissertation. He kindly commented as below:

'The Ceolnoth in particular is quite spectacular: not only is it, as you say, the only known whole floreate cross penny of Ceolnoth, but it is also a stunning coin of considerable historical importance. There is some reason to believe that it was found as part of a small hoard comprising at least three floreate cross pennies, the other two both being of Aethelberht by the moneyer Dudda. One is unfortunately only a small fragment, but the other is beautifully preserved. As the only known hoard of floreate cross coins, this is understandably a find of some significance, although it is odd to find it deposited so far north. A trawl through the BM and as many other catalogues and find records as I could find turned up only a total of nineteen floreate cross pennies, including yours, struck by seven moneyers. It was probably a lot larger than this meagre record seems to suggest: were it not for the large Dorking hoard of 1817 the preceding Inscribed Cross phase would be almost as little-known, and many moneyers who produced this type reappeared in the Lunettes coinage, so they may well have continued over the intervening period as well'.

The initial coinage of Group III has as the reverse motif a cross crosslet with pellets in the angles [coin 1, illustrated above]. Those of Ceolnoth are of good style and feature a neater tonsured bust of the archbishop possibly wearing his pallium. Those of Aethelwulf for the same period, Phase II at Canterbury, tend to have a rather crude right facing bust with thick lettering in the legend - although a few are of better style. Not all of Aethelwulf's coins of this type have pellets in the angles of the cross crosslet. This type was struck until c.852, when it was replaced by a coinage that was to become standard at Canterbury throughout the remainder of Aethelwulf's reign and the majority of the reign of his son Aethelberht. The Inscribed Cross coinage, struck only by Ceolnoth and the two aforementioned kings, have an identical reverse with a large voided cross that contains the moneyers name within and in the angles. Comparitively large numbers of these coins survive and they have been the subject of much study with regard to dating, reduced silver content and so on. Toward the end of his reign, c.854, Aethelberht minted a new coinage mirrored by Ceolnoth, the extremely rare Floriate Cross issue. These coins as would be expected have a large floriated cross on the reverse and had a very limited striking - perhaps as little as a year. Less than ten examples survive today for the king and archbishop. Illustrated below is the only known complete example of the Floriate Cross type of archbishop Ceolnoth.


AlexB
Atilia_1.JPG
Atilia 137 viewsAtilia 1 (155BC)

Denarius
Ob: head of Roma; X behind
Rev: Victory in biga right with whip in right and reigns in left
SA / R underneath; ROMA in exergue

BMCRR I 744 (earring 3 drops)

Sydenham 377

Crawford 199/1a moneyer is perhaps Sex. Atilius (Serranus = Saranus) cos. 136

Northumberland Tablet II 48 “...of the object of this device, or the advantage it may celebrate,
we know nothing.”

Ex: Colosseum Coin Exchange 2007 said to be a deaccession from Vatican; no tags.
Dark toned with iridescent highlights with slight pitting on obv, larger pit over horses’ heads
1 commentsPetrus Elmsley
augclio.jpg
Augclio31 viewsMerovingian inscribed denier
Monarch: unknown
Moneyer: unknown
Mint: unknown
O: +AVGCLIo (retrograde)
R: +PLINCIN (?)

Unknown in references. Not too much to say about this, but I have to say, it sure looks a lot like the inscribed Northumbrian silver sceats/stycas of the late 8th century. Presumably this predates the Northumbrian coins, and perhaps it is the inspiration for that series.

Ex- Comptoir Général Financier
Nap
Augustus~0.jpg
Augustus86 viewsAugustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

Obverse:

Augustus with his bare head right

CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT

CAESAR: Ceasar, emperor
AVGVST: Agustus
PONT MAX: Pontifix Maximus,
TRIBVNIC: Tribunicia, tribunal
POT: POTESTAS, the people

Reverse:

M MAECILIVS TVLLVS III VIR A A A F F

M: Marcus
MAECILLIS: Maelcilius
TVLLVS: Tullus
IIIVIR: Triumviri
AAAFF: Auro, Argento, Aeri, Flando, Feriundo,

S . C, Senatus Consultum

I think the dots were used as centering devices, one see them sometimes on Soldiers/Standards coins although on this coin it is certainly a large dot.

Domination: AS, Copper

Mint: Rome

The Roman Moneyers (or you may prefer the title of Mint Magistrates) were also responsible for the minting of gold, silver and bronze coinage and they reported to the Senate. They were known as the Triumviri Monetales or Triumviri Auro, Argento, Aeri, Flando, Feriundo which is abbreviated as III VIR. A.A.A. F.F. which may be translated as 'Commision (or college) of three men under whom gold, silver and bronze coins were struck'. (Note that the order of the metals varies according to different references.) The title 'III VIR. A.A.A. F.F.' occurs rarely on Republic coins and when it is present it is usually seen in an abbreviated form such as 'III VIR'. It is interesting to note that the full title occurs frequently on the reverses of Augustan Aes

The College of the Three Moneyers was a revived republican tradition. This coin was struck under the supervision of Marcus Salvius Otho, an ancestor of the future emperor Otho. Later, the number of members was increased to four, and their names were not included on the coins.

TRP = This is short for tribunicia potestate - "with the power of the Tribune of the Plebs." The government of Rome was split into the Patricians (who were Senators) and the Plebians. Nine Tribunes of the Plebs were elected by both Plebs and Patricians every year to be in charge of the Plebian assembly. These Tribunes could not be injured because it could be punishable by death. They had veto powers, and they could prevent a law from being passed or an election. An emperor cannot technically rule on the Plebian assembly since he is a Patrician, but by taking the title he could be free from injury. On a coin, if this symbol is followed by a number, it depicts how many times he has been elected Tribune of the Plebs.
John Schou
hands_wt.JPG
Augustus42 views27 B.C. - 14 A.D.
Æ Quadrans, Clasped hands holding caduceus
3.18 gm, 15.5 mm
LAMIA SILVS ANNIVS (moneyers)
III VIR AAAFF
around large SC
RIC I 420; RCV 1693
BMCRE 200 = BMCRR Rome 4617; BN 568-78
Rome mint. Struck 9 B.C.
1 commentsJaimelai
pmaugpegas.jpg
AUGUSTUS39 viewsAR denarius. 19-8 BC. 3,72 grs. 6 h. Bare head right. CAESAR AVGVSTVS / Pegasus walking right. Moneyer P • PETRON • TVRPILIAN • III • VIR.
RIC 297. RSC 491.
benito
pmaugpegas~0.jpg
AUGUSTUS18 viewsAR denarius. 19-8 BC. 3,72 grs. 6 h. Bare head right. CAESAR AVGVSTVS / Pegasus walking right. Moneyer P • PETRON • TVRPILIAN • III • VIR.
RIC 297. RSC 491.
benito
4040468.jpg
Augustus14 viewsAugustus. 27 BC-AD 14. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.33 g, 7h). Rome mint; Q. Rustius, moneyer. Struck 19-18 BC. Jugate, draped busts right of Fortuna Victrix, wearing round helmet, and Fortuna Felix, diademed, set on bar with ram’s head finials / Ornamented altar inscribed FOR RE. RIC I 322; RSC 513. Fine, toned, light porosity, areas of weak strike.
2 commentsecoli
RS001-Roman-AE_as,_Augustus_(ca_7_BC)-012500.JPG
AUGUSTUS (27 BC-14 AD), AE as, struck ca. 7 BC, moneyer M. Salvius Otho139 viewsObverse- CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNEC POT, bare head of Augustus right.
Reverse - M SALVIVS OTHO III VIR AAA F F around large S C.
RIC 431, 27.5mm, 11.4g.
NGC VG (Strike 3/5, Surfaces 4/5), cert. #4094567-002.
Ex-Incitatus Coins, Canada, May 2007, through VCoins store (purchased raw).
Comments: I find it interesting that the moneyer's name on this coin is the same as that of the emperor Otho who ruled 76 years later. I suspect the circa-7 BC moneyer named on this coin was the grandfather of that short-lived 69 AD emperor. This coin was part of my first Roman collection, was sold in 2008, and bought back in August 2011.
3 commentslordmarcovan
RIC_Claudius_on_Augustus_Martini-Pangerl_58.JPG
Augustus (Caius Julius Caesar Octavianus) (27 B.C. – 14 A.D.) and Tiberius (Tiberius Julius Caesar) (14-37 A.D.)29 viewsHowgego 602, Martini-Pangerl 58, on a RIC I (Augustus) ___

Countermark of Tiberius often encountered on coins found in the Moesia region (Bulgaria), on an AE as (25 mm) issued by Augustus in the name of a moneyer. Rome mint.

Obv: [illegible], bare head of Augustus, right.

Rev: [illegible], S—C in field, TI•C•A countermark within a rectangular incuse.

From an uncleaned coin lot.
Stkp
RIC_Augustus_RIC_I_427.JPG
Augustus (Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus) (27 B.C. - 14 A.D.)36 viewsRIC I (Augustus) 427

AE As (26-27 mm.), Rome mint, struck, 7 B.C.

Obv: CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT, bare head right.

Rev: P LVRIVS AGRIPPA III VIR AAA FF, around large S C.

Note: P. Lurius Agrippa was a moneyer, and the reverse legend refers to the board of three moneyers (tres viri auro argento aere flando feriundo).

RIC rarity C

From an uncleaned coin lot.
Stkp
RIC_Augustus_RIC_I_379.JPG
Augustus (Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus) (27 B.C. – 14 A.D.)27 viewsRIC I (Augustus) 379

AE As (28 mm.), Rome mint, struck, 16 B.C.

Obv: CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRINVNIC POTEST, bare head right.

Rev: C GALLIVS LVPERCVS III VIR AAA FF, around large S C.

Note: C. Gallius Lupercus was a moneyer, and the reverse legend refers to the board of three moneyers (tres viri auro argento aere flando feriundo).

RIC rarity C

From an uncleaned coin lot.
1 commentsStkp
Augustus_RIC427.jpg
Augustus - As - RIC 427 (moneyer P. Lurius Agrippa)19 viewsObv: CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT, bare head r.
Rev: P LVRIVS AGRIPPA III VIR A A A F F, round S C
Size: 27 mm
Weight: 8,84 g
Mint: Rome
Date: 7 BC
Ref: RIC I 427; CBN 623
vs1969
Augustus_RIC345.jpg
Augustus - Sestertius - RIC 345 (moneyer L. Licinius Stolo)16 viewsObv: OB CIVIS (in oak-wreath flanked by two laurel-branches) SERVATOS
Rev: P LICINIVS STOLO IIIVIR AAAFF round S C
Size: 34 mm
Weight: 20,5 g
Mint: Rome
Date: 17 BC
Ref: RIC I 345, CBN 302
Rarity: S
vs1969
coin17~0.JPG
Augustus AE Quadrans20 viewsAugustus AE Quadrans. Rome Mint 2BC-12 AD. Moneyer C. Rubellius Blandus. Obverse: III VIR•A•A•A•F•F•, garlanded altar with bowl-shaped top. Reverse: C•RVBELLIVS BLANDVS•, around large S C. RIC I: 467. ecoli
coin16~0.JPG
Augustus AE Quadrans15 viewsAUGUSTUS QUADRANTE. Altar.
Moneyers: Apronius, Galus, Messalla, Sisenna
Emperor 27 B.C. - A.D. 14. AE Quadrante.

Obverse: GALVS SISENNA AAAFF around SC
Reverse: APRONIUS MESSALLA IIIVIR around altar.

Reference: RIC 70, 454 variety.
ecoli
augustus_(2).jpg
Augustus AE Quadrans. 18 viewsAugustus AE Quadrans. Struck 8 BC. Pulcher, Taurus, Regulus, moneyers. Lituus & simpulum / III VIR A A A F F around large S•C.Britanikus
August_1.jpg
Augustus As27 viewsAugustus AE As, ca. 7 BC
Obv: CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT, bare head of Augustus right
Rev: (name of moneyer) M SALVIVS OTHO III VIR AAA FF, legeng around large S C in field

RIC I, 431
Tanit
Augustus.jpg
Augustus As74 viewsAE As, 6 BC. Mint. Rome. Moneyer Volusus Valerius Messalla.
Obv.: CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC P-OT, bare hd. r.
Rev.: VOLVSVS VALER MESSAL IIIVIR A A A F F legend around large SC in field.

RIC 441; C. -; BMC 241; BN 738.
Tanit
augustus506.jpg
Augustus As 34 viewsAUGUSTUS AE as. Moneyer's series, struck 6 BC, by Sextus Nonius Quinctilianus.

CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT, bare head right.

Reverse - SEX NONIVS QVINCTILIAN IIIVIR AAAFF around large SC. Cohen 474, RCV 1687.

Grade G; green patina. Listed here only because it was a near-freebie.
cliff_marsland
avgustAs.jpg
Augustus As12 viewsAugustus AE As. (Aulus Licinius Nerva Silianus, moneyer 6 BC, consul 7 AD).

Obv: CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT, bare head right
Rev: A LICIN NERVA SILIAN IIIVIR AAAFF around large SC.

RIC 437.
Tanit
augustus.jpg
Augustus as Moneyer M. Salvis Otho28 viewsCopper as, Rome mint
Obverse: CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT, Augustus bare head left
Reverse: M SALVIVS OTHO III VIR AAAFF, SC in center

Struck under the supervision of Moneyer Marcus Salvius Otho
2 commentsDk0311USMC
cm6.jpg
Augustus Moneyer issue12 viewsAugustus Moneyer issue - To be identifiedHolding_History
AugustusmoneyerA.jpg
Augustus moneyer series66 viewsCAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT.
Bare head right.

P LVRIVS AGRIPPA IIIVIR AAAFF.
Large S C.

RIC 427.

9.92g

Ex Londinium

Much nicer in hand
1 commentsJay GT4
Augustus_otho.jpg
Augustus moneyer's series AE As39 viewsCAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT

Rev. M SALVIVS OTHO III VIR A A A FF around large SC

Rome 7 BC
Sear 1685
Titus Pullo
Augustus M SALVIVS OTHO RIC 431.jpg
Augustus Moneyer's As RIC 431302 viewsAS, 30mm, 9.73g.

Obverse: CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBUNIC POT, bare head R.

Reverse: M SALVIVS OTHO around large SC.

Rome, 7BCE.

RIC 431, Common.

It could do with some more cleaning on the reverse, to bring out the SC, but I've never had the confidence to do it.
4 commentsRobert_Brenchley
augustus_322.jpg
Augustus RIC I, 322682 viewsAugustus 27 BC - AD 14
AR - Denar, 3.83g, 20mm, Rome 19 BC, by moneyer Q Rustius
obv. Q RVSTIVS - FORTVNA, ANTIAT (in ex., hard to see!)
Busts, draped, jugate, r., of Fortuna Victrix, helmeted, holding patera in l.
hand, and Fortuna Felix, wearing stephane;
both busts rest on bar terminating at each end in a ram' s head
rev. CAESARI . AVGVSTO
A highly ornamented rectangular altar with a bowl on it, inscribed in front
FOR.RE
ex.: EX.S.C.
RIC I, 322; BMCR 2
R2; about VF, toned

FORTVNA ANTIATIS, Fortuna of Antium, one of the most important places of Fortuna worshipping, as two goddesses, sisters, FORTVNA VICTRIX, more male, and FORTVNA FELIX, more female. Or as two aspects of only one goddess?
On the rev. the altar of FORTVNA REDVX, erected by the Senatus for the lucky return of Augustus 19BC with the 53 standards from the Parthians in Rome near the Porta Capuana.
Q Rustius celebrates Augustus and his own hometown Antium.
4 commentsJochen
augustus_322~0.jpg
Augustus RIC I, 32293 viewsAugustus 27 BC - AD 14
AR - Denar, 3.83g, 20mm, Rome 19 BC, by moneyer Q Rustius
obv. Q RVSTIVS - FORTVNAE (AE ligate)
in ex. ANTIAT (hardly to see!)
Busts, draped, jugate, r., of Fortuna Victrix, helmeted, holding patera in l.
hand, and Fortuna Felix, wearing stephane;
both busts rest on bar terminating at each end in a ram' s head
rev. CAESARI . AVGVSTO
A highly ornamented rectangular altar with a bowl on it, inscribed in front
FOR.RE
ex.: EX.S.C.
RIC I, 322; BMCR 2
R2; about VF, toned

FORTVNA ANTIATIS, Fortuna of Antium, one of the most important places of Fortuna worshipping, as two goddesses, sisters, FORTVNA VICTRIX, more male, and FORTVNA FELIX, more female. Or as two aspects of only one goddess?
On the rev. the altar of FORTVNA REDVX, erected by the Senatus for the lucky return of Augustus 19BC with the 53 standards from the Parthians in Rome near the Porta Capuana.
Q Rustius celebrates Augustus and his own hometown Antium.





Jochen
Augustus1.JPG
Augustus With Countermark31 viewsAugustus Moneyer series by PISO
Sear 1681
1 commentsJeromy G
Augustus_Secular_games_17_BC.jpg
Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.99 views Silver denarius, RIC I 340 (R2), RSC I Julius Caesar 6, BnF I 273, BMCRE I 70, SRCV I 1622, VF, scratch on cheek, pitting, 3.572g, 19.8mm, 180o, Rome mint, moneyer M. Sanquinius, 17 B.C.; obverse AVGVST DIVI F LVDOS SAE (Augustus son of the divine [Julius Caesar], [has made the] secular games), Herald standing left, wearing helmet with two feathers and long robe, winged caduceus in right hand, round shield decorated with six-pointed star on his left arm; reverse M SANQVINIVS III VIR, youthful laureate head (the deified Julius Caesar or Genius Saeculari Novi?) right, above, four-rayed comet (sidus Iulium) with tail; ex CNG auction 145 (9 Aug 2006), lot 254. Very rare.

This type was struck to commemorate the Ludi Saeculares, the Secular Games held by Augustus in 17 B.C. to mark the commencement of a new age inaugurated by the divine Julius Caesar and led by his heir Augustus. The reverse portrait is traditionally identified as the head of a youthful divine Julius Caesar, however, it actually resembles Augustus and may be Genius Saeculari Novi, the personification of the new age.

EX; FORVM Ancient Coins.

*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.
Per FORVM ; an EF example of this type recently sold on 26 May 2014 for 20,000 CHF (approximately $25,575) plus fees.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
4 commentsSam
Augustus_Ae_As_by_Otho_jpg.jpg
Augustus, AE As, 7 BC, Rome, M. Salvius Otho as moneyer17 viewsAugustus, AE As, 7 BC, Rome, M. Salvius Otho as moneyer
CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT
Bare head of Augustus right,
M SALVIVS OTHO IIIVIR AAAFF
Legend surrounding large S . C
28mm, RIC I, 431
Antonivs Protti
Augustus_RIC_I_431.jpg
Augustus, AE AS, RIC I 4319 viewsAugustus
27 B.C. – 14 A.D.

Coin: AE As

Obverse: CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNEC POT, Bare headed bust facing right.
Reverse: M SALVIVS OTHO III VIR A A A F F, around S●C

Weight: 3.07 g, Diameter: 25.2 x 25 x 1.2 mm, Die axis: 160°, Mint: Rome, issued in 7 B.C. by the Moneyer, M. Salvius Otho, Reference: RIC I 431

This Monetal Triumvir was the Grandfather of Emperor Otho, and had served the Praetorship.
Masis
Augustus_RIC_I_431_Second_example.jpg
Augustus, AE As, RIC I 431 Second example8 viewsAugustus
27 B.C. – 14 A.D.

Coin: AE As

Obverse: CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNEC POT, Bare headed bust facing right.
Reverse: M SALVIVS OTHO III VIR A A A F F, around S●C

Weight: 7.39 g, Diameter: 25.4 x 24.5 x 2 mm, Die axis: 140°, Mint: Rome, issued in 7 B.C. by the Moneyer, M. Salvius Otho, Reference: RIC I 431

This Monetal Triumvir was the Grandfather of Emperor Otho, and had served the Praetorship.
Masis
Augustus_RIC_I_435.jpg
Augustus, AE As, RIC I 43510 viewsAugustus
27 B.C. – 14 A.D.

Coin: AE As

Obverse: CAESAR·AVGVST·PONT·MAX·TRIBVNIC·POT·, Bare headed bust facing right.
Reverse: M·MAECILIVS·TVLLVS·III·VIR·A·A·A·F·F·, around S●C

Weight: 9.63 g, Diameter: 26.2 x 26.3 x 2 mm, Die axis: 210°, Mint: Rome, issued in 7 B.C. by the Moneyer, Maecilius Tullus, Reference: RIC I 435
Masis
my-augustus.jpg
Augustus, M Salvius Otho, Moneyer15 viewsAugustus AE As. Rome, 7 B.C. CAESAR AVGVST PONT MAX TRIBVNEC POT, Bare head left / M SALVIVS OTHO III VIR AAA F F, Legend around large S C. RIC 432Holding_History
augustus_375_counterrmarked.jpg
Augustus, RIC 375 (countermarked)19 viewsAugustus, 27 BE - AD 14
AE dupondius, 7.50g, 28mm, 0°
struck under moneyer C. Cassius Celer , Rome, 16 BC
obv. [AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTES]
(legend in 3 lines in corona civica)
rev. [C CASSIVS CEL]ER IIIVI[R AAAFF]
around big S - C
ref. RIC I, 375
countermarked:
obv. AVG (MPC 75), TICAE (AE ligate; MPC 90)
rev. CAE (MPC 77), PP (MPC 81)

AVC, TICAE refer to the emperor Tiberius Claudius. The abbreviation AVC is most likely another title of Tiberius and stands not for Augustus Caesar.
MPC = Martini Prangerl Collection
Jochen
augustus_384_Gegenstempel.jpg
Augustus, RIC 384, countermarked14 viewsAugustus, 27 BC - AD 14
AE - Dupondius(?), 6.70g, 24.24mm, 330°
struck under moneyer L. Naevius Surdinus
Rome, 15 BC
obv. at the upper edge oak leafs, beneath remains of a legend, perhaps:
[AVGVS]TVS / [TRIBVNICI] / [POT]ES[T.]
in 3 lines within oak wreath
rev. [L.]SVR[DINVS.IIIVIR A.]A.A[.F.F.] (?)
around big S - C
ref. RIC I, 384; C. 472; BMCR I, 441, pl. 19, 2

2 countermarks on obv.:
2x AVC: Werz 31; MPC 75
AVG(vsti), mid-late Augustean AD 11 - 14
Usually these countermarks can be found only on asses from Lugdunum and Nemausus (Werz). The combination of a Dupondius obv. with a As rev. is indicative of a "barbaric imitation". Then to search for the name of the moneyer is useless.
Jochen
083n.jpg
AVG and TI•CAE 248 viewsBALKAN imitation of Augustus' moneyers' series Æ Dupondius. Æ 23. 1st century A.D. Obv: Blundered legend within oak-wreath; 2 countermarks. Rev: Blundered legend around large S.C, all inverted. Axis: 360°. Weight: 6.82 g. CM(1): AVG (inverted), in rectangular punch, 9 x 5 mm. Cf. Howgego 577. CM(2): TI•CÆ (inverted), in rectangular punch, 4 x 7.5 mm. Cf. Howgego 602. Note: Interestingly, not only the coin is imitative, but also the countermarks, which are inverted version of the commonly encountered TICAE and AVG countermarks. Collection Automan.Automan
greek_unk.jpg
Barbarous imitation of Augustus Moneyer AE46 viewsScotvs Capitis
mint.jpg
Belgium: Brussels mint 191022 viewsBelgium, Brass Medal (30 mm) 1910, Brussels mint. Obv. Mediaeval moneyer. Rev. Modern Moneyer. Podiceps
brutus.jpg
BRVTVS/ AHALA16 viewsMarcus Junius Brutus, as moneyer, AR Denarius. 54 BC. BRVTVS, bare head of L Junius Brutus right / AHALA, bare head of C Servilius Ahala right. Syd 907, Cr433/2, Sear RCV I: 398, RSC Junia 30. Depicts Lucius Junius Brutus and C. Servilius Ahala, two tyrannicides, related to Marcus Junius Brutus from father's and mother's side.1 commentsPodiceps
0027.jpg
C Coelius Caldus, Denar15 viewsRRC 318/1a
104 b.c.

The moneyer is presumably the consul of 94 and the father of the moneyer of RRC 437 in 51 b.c.

Ex HDRauch, 01.10.2004, Lot 261
Described as:
Denar (3,91 g), Rom 104. Av.: Romakopf links. Rv.: Viktoria in Biga steht links, oben Punkt N, unten C.COIL, i.A. CALD. Crawf:318/1, Albert:1122. s.sch.
Norbert
C_Aburius_Gem.jpg
C. Aburius Geminus - AR denarius6 viewsRome
¹²134 BC
helmeted head of Roma right
GEM
(XVI)
Mars in quadriga right holding trophy and reins, shield, spear
C·(AB)(VR)I
ROMA
¹Crawford 244/1, Sydenham 490, BMCRR I Rome 999, RSC I Aburia 1, SRCV I 121
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,92g
ex CNG
ex Aurea numismatika
Johny SYSEL
803_Annius_Luscus_and_Fabius_Hispaniensis.jpg
C. Annius T.f. T.n. Luscus and L. Fabius L.f. Hispaniensis - AR denarius8 views²Transalpine Gaul
¹north Italy
¹²82-81 BC
diademed draped bust of Anna Parenna right; caduceus left, scales right, dagger below
C·ANNI·T·F·T·N_·_PRO·COS·EX·S·C·
Victory in quadriga right, holding palm branch and reins
Q .
L·FABI·L·F·HISP
¹Crawford 366/1a, SRCV I 289, Sydenham 748, RSC I Annia 2
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,7g
ex Gitbud and Naumann

Moneyer apparently used Anna Parenna as a pun to his name Annius. It is the only known depiction of Anna Parenna whose identity is very complicated.

"An older myth tells that Anna Perenna was an old woman from the city of Bollivae in Latium. The myth tells that Anna Perenna brought bread and cakes to the Plebeians who wanted to separate from Rome because of their unequal status as Plebeians in 494 BC and so she saved them from starving. This is why she was popular on the common people and considered as goddes after her death.

A later tradition from the time of the myth of Aeneas made Anna the sister of Dido. After Dido has committed suicide and Carthage was conquered she had to fly. A heavy storm throw her to the coast of Latium at Laurentum where Aeneas was the ruler. Aeneas and his companion went to the beach and he recognized her and took her to his palace. In a dream Anna was warned to be alarmed at the traps that Lavinia, Aeneas' wife, would set for her so she fled from the palace. While she was wandering she met Numicius, the god of a nearby stream who carried her off to his bed. The servants of Aeneas searched for Anna and followed her tracks to the river bank a shape rose from the water and revealed to them that Anna had become a water nymph, whose new name, Perenna, signified eternity. Aeneas' servants in their joy scattered among the fields and passed the day in feasting and festivities, which became established as an annual celebration of the festival of Anna Perenna. There is another opinion too that she committed suicide by drowning in the river Numicius because of her desperation.

In another myth she was an old woman again. Mars was fallen in love to Minerva, sworn virgin. Mars asked Anna Perenna for interceding on his behalf. But instead of this - knowing about the impossibility of his wishes - she dressed herself like Minerva and came to Mars veiled. When he tried to kiss her she lifted her veil, break out in laughter and mocked Mars. Minerva's main festival, the Quinquatrus, was celebrated 4 days after the festival of Anna Perenna so this could be reason of this story." from Jochen's coins of mythological interest.
Johny SYSEL
C_Antesius.jpg
C. Antestius - AR Denarius6 viewsRome
²147 BC
¹146 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet; dog in left field
X
Dioscuri right riding on horses, stars over pilei, each holding spear reins
C·(ANTE)STI
ROMA
¹Crawford 219/01a
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Aureo and Calico

Moneyer's ancestor was supposedly rescued from shipwreck thanks to persistently barking dog. For that reason dog appears on every issue of this moneyer. Moneyer's family came from an ancient town Gabii in Latium.
Johny SYSEL
C_Piso_Frugi.jpg
C. Calpurnius Piso Frugi - AR denarius21 viewsRome
²64 BC
¹c. 61 BC
laureate head of Apollo right
=
naked horseman galloping right, holding palm branch and reins
dagger? in exergue
C·PISO FRVGI
Crawford 408/1b, RSC I Calpurnia 24, Sydenham 851, SRCV I 348
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
¹Forum Ancient coins
3,9g
ex Lanz

Gaius was married to Cicero's daughter, Tullia, in 63 B.C. and he was quaestor in 58 B.C. This type copies an issue of his father, Lucius Piso Frugi, c. 90 B.C. Crawford dates this type to 67 B.C. Sydenham and Grueber date it 64 B.C. Sear notes that hoard evidence indicates a date closer to 60 B.C
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
1335_266_C__Cassius.jpg
C. Cassius - AR denarius4 viewsRome
²130 BC
¹126 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet, urn behind
(XVI)
Libertas in quadriga right, holding pileus and scepter
C·CASSI
ROMA
¹Crawford 266/1, Sydenham 502, BMCRR Rome 1032, RSC I Cassia 1, SRCV I 142
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Künker

Depiction of Libertas, as well as voting urn, refer to the lex Cassia tabellaria from 137 BC. This law legalized secret ballot for court decisionmaking. Vindicta and pileus held by Libertas are symbols of liberty.
Johny SYSEL
0055.jpg
C. Claudius Pulcher, Denarius16 viewsRRC 300/1
110/109 bc.c

A late classical victoria in quadriga type.
This one showed me not to trust too much on the picture in the auction catalogue..
The moneyer is assumed to be the consul of 92.

Ex Dr. Busso Peus Nachf. Auktion 404, lot 2491
Described as:
2491. C. Claudius Pulcher. Denar 110/109 v. Chr. Kopf der Roma / Victoria in Quadriga.
Cr. 300, 1 Syd. 569 3.80 g. Sehr schön
Norbert
C_Saxula.jpg
C. Cluvius Saxula - AE as10 viewsRome
170-158 BC
laureate head of Janus
I
prow of galley right
C·S(AX)
I
ROMA
Crawford 173/1, Sydenham 360, BMCRR Rome 642, SRCV I 698
26,9g
ex Amphora coins

Moneyer's father was probably praetor in 175 BC and praetor peregrinus in 173.
Johny SYSEL
Cloelius_Caldus.jpg
C. Coelius Caldus - AR denarius7 viewsRome
²52 BC
¹51 BC
head of Coelius Caldus (moneyer's grandfather) right; standard inscribed HIS (Hispania) behind, standard in the form of a boar (emblem of of Clunia, Hispania) before
C·COEL·CALDVS
COS
statue of god seated left between two trophies of arms, all on a high lectisternium with front inscribed L·CALDVS / VII·(VIR)·EP(VL) (Lucius Caldus Septemvir Epulo)
C/·/C/A/L/D/V/S on left
I/MP/·/(AV)/·/X (Imperator, Augur, Decemvir) on right
C(ALD)VS III VIR below
¹Crawford 437/2a, Sydenham 894, RSC I Coelia 7, BMCRR II 3837, SRCV I 404
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Aurea

scarce

Coin commemorates three moneyer's ancestors.

The first, moneyer's grandfather C. Coelius Caldus, was consul in 94 BC. In 107 BC, he was elected tribune of the plebs and passed a lex tabellaria, requiring a secret ballot to determine the verdict in cases of high treason. He was a praetor in 100 or 99 BC, and proconsul of Hispania Citerior the following year. This is represented by standard on the obverse along with emblem of the conquered town Clunia. He was also moneyer in 104 BC.

The second, L. Coelius Caldus, was member of septemviri epulones who prepared lectisternium - propitiatory ceremony, consisting of a meal offered to gods and goddesses (depicted on the reverse). He was responsible for sacrificial feast (epulare sacrificium) during Plebeian games (Ludi Plebeii) in Rome.

The third, C. Coelius Caldus, was augur, member of decemviri sacris faciundis, and governor who gained the title Imperator. The trophies on the reverse commemorates his military campains.
Johny SYSEL
Caldus.jpg
C. Coelius Caldus - AR denarius3 viewsRome
²101 BC
¹104 BC
helmet head of Roma left
Victory in biga left
CALD
G
¹Crawford 318/1b, RSC I Coelia 3, Sydenham 582a, SRCV I 196 var.
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Naumann

Moneyer was consul in 94 BC. In 107 BC, he was elected tribune of the plebs and passed a lex tabellaria, which ordained that in the courts of justice the votes should be given by means of tables in cases of high treason. He was a praetor in 100 or 99 BC, and proconsul of Hispania Citerior the following year. This is represented by standard on the obverse along with emblem of the conquered town Clunia.
Johny SYSEL
C_Considius_Nonianus.jpg
C. Considius Nonianus - AR denarius8 viewsRome
²c. 60 BC
¹56 BC
laureate draped bust of Venus Erycina right, wearing stephane
C·CONSIDI·NONIANI__S·C
tetrastyle temple of Venus Erycina on the top of mount Eryx, Porta Collina (place of Sulla's great victory)*
ERVC
¹Crawford 424/1, Sydenham 888, RSC I Considia 1b
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,6g
ex Lucernae

scarce

*The temple of Venus Erycina on the top of mountain in the west of Sicily should had been founded by Aeneas and historian Polybios described it as the greatest and most splendid of all sacred places of Sicily. Venus Erycina was patroness of sex and protector of prostitutes.

Chosen designe of coin indicates moneyer's loyalty to Pompey who competed for Venus' favour with Caesar. Pompey claimed he inherited Venus' favour from Sulla who worshipped this goddes. According Harlan temple is only structure in the background whereas in the foreground there is Colline Gate, place of Sulla's famous victory. Roman temple of Venus Erycina stood at Quirinal near Colline Gate.
Johny SYSEL
Fabius~0.jpg
C. Fabius C. f. Hadrianus - AR denarius6 viewsRome
²97 BC
¹102 BC
veiled turreted bust of Cybele right
·
Λ
Victory in biga right, holding goad and reins; heron right
C·FABI·C·F
¹Crawford 322/1a, RSC I Fabia 15, Sydenham 589, SRCV I 200 var.; RR1 1585, p.222; Ghey, Leins & Crawford 2010 322.1.7
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
ex Naumann

Heron on the reverse refers to the foundation of colonia Ardea in 442 BC when M. Fabius Vibulianus was consul. This is supported by turreted Cybele on the obverse. Moneyer was praetor in 84 BC.
Johny SYSEL
C_Fonteius.jpg
C. Fonteius struck - AR Denarius9 viewsRome
²112 BC
¹114-113 BC
laureate Janiform heads of Dioscuri
T _ (XVI)
war galley left, acrostolium, ram and deck house at prow, three sailors and five oars amidships; deck house, gubernator, rudder, and apluster at stern
C·FO(NT)
ROMA
¹Crawford 290/1, SRCV I 167, RSC I Fonteia 1, Sydenham 555
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Aureo and Calico

"The janiform head has been identified as the Dioscuri, because the Fonteia gens came from Tusculum, the religious center of the cult of Castor and Pollux. The reverse depicts the arrival by sea of Telegonus' the son of Odysseus and Circe, and the mythological founder of Tusculum." ForumAncientCoins note Moneyer probably served as legate in 91 BC at the beginning of Civil war and was killed by rebels in Asculum
Johny SYSEL
C_Fundanius.jpg
C. Fundanius - AR denarius12 viewsRome
²98 BC
¹101 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
· C
Gaius Marius with his son as rider riding in triumphal quadriga right. Gaius Marius holds staff and laurel branch, rider holds laurel branch and reins.
Q
C·FVNDAN
¹Crawford 326/1, SRCV I 204, Sydenham 583, RSC I Fundania 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
ex Aureo & Calicó

Moneyer depicts triumph of Gaius Marius after the victory over Cimbri, Ambrones and Teutons in the battle of Aquae Sextiae in 102 BC and in the battle of Vercelli in 101 BC. This is the first Roman issue depicting living person. Moneyer struck these coins as Questor.
Johny SYSEL
Hosidius_Geta~0.jpg
C. Hosidius C. f. Geta - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²65 BC
¹68 BC
diademed and draped bust of Diana, bow and quiver over shoulder
III VIR / GETA
attacked boar right, spear in shoulder, hound below
C HOSIDI C F
¹Crawford 407/2; Sydenham 903; Kestner 3317; BMCRR I Rome 3389; RSC I Hosidia 1, SRCV I 346
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,6g
ex Marc Walter

"Oineus, king of Kalydon in Aitolia, once had feasted the gods at an harvest festival but forgotten to butcher an animal for Artemis. The goddess was enraged and sent a big boar who wasted the fertile fields of the king. Oineus called for help and from all parts of Greece the heroes came to help him. There were the Curetes from Pleuron, the brothers of Althaia, the wife of Oineus. There were the Dioscurs Kastor and Polydeikes and their Messenian cousins Idas and Lynkeus. Theseus came from Athens, Iphikles, half-brother of Herakles, came from Thebens, Iason, Admetos, Peirithos, Peleus and Eurytion came from Thessalia, Telamon from Salamis, Amphiaraos from Argos, Ankaios and Atalante from Arcadia and much more. Herakles was prevented by his labours. On top of the heroes stood Meleagros, the son of Oineus and Althaia.
The hunt for the Calydonean boar ended very disastrous. Many heroes lost their lifes. Ankaios was the first killed by the boar. Peleus accidentally hit his father-in-law Eurytion with his spear. A second hunter too was killed by the boar.
The big catastrophe happened at the 6th day of the hunt. On this day Atalanta hit the boar with her arrow and Meleagros gave him the deathblow. Then he awarded head and skin of the boar to Atalante. But his uncles, brother of his mother Althaia, didn't tolerate that. They insisted on the rights of their clan. A dispute occured, they snatched the trophies from Atalante and then a fight began in which Meleagros slew his uncles. When Meleagros was born the fates predicted that he will live only as long as the log in the oven. Althaia pulled it out of the fire and hid it in a secret place. When she heard of the death of her brothers she enraged, got the log and threw it in the fire. When it was burnt Meleagros break down dead when he was dissecting the boar." - Jochen's Coins of mythological interest
Johny SYSEL
C_Junius.jpg
C. Junius C.f. - AR denarius5 viewsRome
²before 150 BC
¹149 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
X
Dioscuri on horses riding right holding spears reins; stars over their pilei
C·IVNI·C·F
ROMA
¹Crawford 210/01
²Mark Passehl Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
Licinius_Macer.jpg
C. Licinius L.f. Macer - AR denarius22 viewsRome
¹²84 BC
diademed bust of Vejovis left, from behind, hurling thunderbolt
Minerva in quadriga right holding javelin and reins, shield
C·LICINIUS·L·F / MACER
¹Crawford 354/1, SRCV I 274, RSC I Licinia 16, Sydenham 732
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,66g

Moneyer was an official and annalist of ancient Rome. He became tribune in 73 BC and praetor in 68, but in 66 Cicero succeeded in convicting him of bribery and extortion, upon which Macer committed suicide.
He wrote a history of Rome, in 16 books which is now lost. Livy casts doubt on Macer's reliability, suggesting that he misrepresented events in order to glorify the Licinii, but notes that he quotes original sources, such as the Linen Rolls. (wikipedia)
Johny SYSEL
C__Licinius_Lf_Macer.jpg
C. Licinius Lf Macer Republican Denarius38 viewsC. Licinius Lf Macer, Silver denarius, Rome, 84 BC, 3.891g, 20.8mm, die axis 180o, SRCV I 274, RSC I Licinia 16, Crawford 354/1, Sydenham 732
OBV: diademed and cloaked bust of Apollo (or Vejovis) left, from behind, brandishing thunderbolt in right
REV: Minerva in quadriga right, spear in right, shield and reigns in left, C•LICINIVS•L•F / MACER in ex

EX: Forum Ancient coins

This moneyer wrote a history of Rome in sixteen volumes, of which only fragments exist today.
He served as praetor in 68 B.C. but committed suicide several years later after he was accused of extortion.
Romanorvm
Licinius_Macer_Apollo-Athena.jpg
C. Licinius Macer, Apollo-Vejovis * Minerva, Roman Republic, moneyer, AR Denarius Serratus85 views"Rome is a state on the move, and growing stronger every day."

Obv: Diademed bust of Apollo-Vejovis, left; viewed from behind, brandishing thunderbolt, cloak over left shoulder.
No Legend.
Rev: Minerva driving a quadriga right, holding spear and shield. No Legend.

Exergue: C LICINIVS L[F] MACER

Mint: Rome
Struck: 84 BC.

Size: 21.4 mm.
Weight: 3.89 grams
Die axis: 180 degs.

Condition: Lovely, bright luster; minimal tarnish.

Refs:*
M. Crawford Vol. I, p. 370, 354/1, Vol. II, Pl. XLVI, 17
D. Sear I, p. 123, 274
Licinia 16
Sydenham, 732
RSC 16

Tiathena
Marius_Capito.jpg
C. Marius C.f. Capito - AR denarius serratus5 views²Praeneste
¹Rome
²82 BC
¹81 BC
draped bust of Ceres with corn wreath right
controlmark to the right: running horse
CAPIT.CXXXV
ploughman conducting yoke of two oxen
CXXXV
C·MARI·C·F / S·C
¹Crawford 378/1c, SRCV I 300, Sydenham 744b, RSC I Maria 9
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,06g
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
776_C__Minucius_Augurinus.jpg
C. Minucius C.f. Augurinus - AR denarius6 viewsRome
²134 BC
¹135 BC
helmeted head of Roma right
ROMA
X
Ionic column surmounted by statue; at base, two stalks of grain; on left, L. Minucius Augurinus standing right,
holding patera, foot on modius; on right, M. Minucius Faesus standing left, holding lituus.
C·A_VG
¹Crawford 242/1, SRCV I 119, Sydenham 463, RSC I Minucia 3,
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,7g
ex Aurea Numismatika

Reverse depicts a commemorative bronze column - Columna Minucia which was erected in front of the gate, Porta Trigemina, in memory of L. Minucius Augurinus who as Praefectus Annonae supplied Rome with grain during famine in 439 BC. On the right there is Marcus Minucius Faestus who was elected Augur as the first plebeian in 300 BC.
Johny SYSEL
1301_382_Naevius.JPG
C. Naevius Balbus - AR serrate denarius11 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
¹²79 BC
diademed head of Venus right
S·C
Victory right in triga holding reins
XXXIII
C·N(AE)·B(AL)B
¹Crawford 382/1b, SRCV I 309, RSC I Naevia 6, Sydenham 769b, BMCRR Rome 2937 var. (XXXIIII)
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Naumann
ex Forum Ancient Coins
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
naev_Balbus_denarius.jpg
C. Naevius Balbus Denarius55 viewsAR Serrate Denarius: 18mm, 3.85 grams, Die axis: 6h
Moneyer: C. Naevius Balbus, circa 79 BCE


Obverse: Diademed head of Venus to right, H below chin, SC behind neck.

Reverse: Victory in triga to right, C.NAE BALB monogram in exergue.

Mint: Rome

Notes:
- The purpose of the serrated edge on 1st century BCE denarii is not agreed upon. One hypothesis in that it was an attempt to thwart clipping; another to prove that the coin did not contain a copper core.
- The ancestor of C. Naeveius Balbus, also of the same name, wrote the earliest known Latin epic poem. It was a versed history of the first Punic War, 264 to 241 BCE.
- 79 BCE was the year Sulla resigned his dictatorship and returned to his country estate. He died a year later.

Ex Classical Numismatics Group (CNG), 2005
3 commentsPharsalos
179.jpg
C. Naevius Balbus Denarius Serratus - Victory Riding in Triga (Crawf. 382/1b)38 viewsAR Denarius Serratus
Rome, 79 BC
4.06g

Obv: Diademed head of Venus (R) wearing earrings and necklace, behind S.C - "Senatus Consulto"

Rev: Victory in prancing triga (R); above, TXV and in exergue, C·NAE·BALB

Virtually as struck and Fleur de Coin.

Sydenham 769b. RBW 1410. Crawford 382/1b.

ex. Elvira Clain Stefanelli (1914-2001) collection, curator of the National Numismatics Collection at the Smithsonian

Minted under Sulla's rule, the coin honours Venus, who Sulla is known to have worshipped. Behind her portrait is the abbreviation S∙C - “Senatus Consulto”, a rarity on silver coinage, indicating it was minted by special permission of the Senate.
The incredibly struck reverse shows the winged goddess Victory holding the reins to a rarely depicted "triga", or three-horse chariot, prancing delightfully across the coin. Note the exquisite and playful rendering of the horses, even showing the details of their harnesses.
Some believe the triga may allude to Sulla’s three major victories in Greece, Numidia and most notably in Asia Minor against Mithradates VI. Below can be seen the wonderfully ligatured name of the moneyer, C(aius) NAE(vius) BALB(us). This may be the same Balbus mentioned in Plutarch's dramatic description of the Battle of Colline Gate (29) "Balbus, sent forward by Sulla, rode at full speed with 700 horsemen. He paused just long enough to let the sweat of the horses dry off, then quickly bridled them again & attacked.."
1 commentsKained but Able
C_Norbanus~0.jpg
C. Norbanus - AR denarius9 views²Sicily or Bruttium
¹Rome
²84 BC
¹83 BC
diademed head of Venus right, wearing single drop earring and pearl necklace
CLIII
C·NORBANVS
grain ear, fasces and caduceus
¹Crawford 357/1b, RSC I Norbana 2, Sydenham 739, BMCRR I Rome 2810, SRCV I 278
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Aurea

Moneyer's family came from Volscian town Norba.
Reverse commemorates activity of elder C. Norbanus, moneyer's father, during the Social War, when he raised troops, organized a fleet, and provisioned the town of Rhegium. He, as a consul, led popular forces and was defeated by Sulla in 83 BC.
Johny SYSEL
Numitorius.jpg
C. Numitorius - AE quadrans6 viewsRome
²c. 136 BC
¹133 BC
head of Hercules right wearing lion skin, club below
●●●
prow of galley right
●●●
C·NVMITRI
ROMA
¹Crawford 246/4a
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
2,2g
ex Roma Numismatics
Johny SYSEL
C__Plutius.jpg
C. Plautius C.f. - AR denarius7 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
²124 BC
¹121 BC
helmet head of Roma right
X
Dioscuri riding on horses right, holding spear
C·PLVTI
ROMA
¹Crawford 278/1, SRCV I 153, Sydenham 410, RSC I Plautia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Savoca
Johny SYSEL
C__Poblicius_Malleolus.jpg
C. Poblicius Malleolus - AR denarius6 viewsRome
²92 BC
¹96 BC
helmeted head of Mars right, hammer above
(XVI)
warrior standing half left, foot on cuirass, holding spear; trophy left, grasshopper on prow right
C·M(AL)
¹Crawford 335/3d; Sydenham 615a; Poblicia 6
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Aureo & Calicó
Johny SYSEL
malleolus_Poblicia01.jpg
C. Poblicius Malleolus, Crawford 282/349 viewsC. Poblicius Malleolus, gens Poblicia
AR - denarius serratus, 19.5mm, 3.8g
Narbo 118 BC (Crawford)
obv. C.MA - L - L - E.C.F
Head of Roma, with decorated and winged helmet, r.
X behind
rev. Nude Gallic warrior (Bituitus?), driving biga r., hurling spear and holding shield and carnyx.
below L.LIC.CN.DOM.
Crawford 282/3; Sydenham 524; RCV 158; Poblicia 1
about VF

Lucius Licinius Crassus, & Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus
The reverse commemorates the victory of L. Licinius Crassus and Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus over the Allobroges and their ally Bituitus, king of the Averni. It is one of the very few issues of the Roman Republic struck outside of Rome, this issue was struck in the newly founded city of Narbo in Gaul. These coins, minted by a number of moneyers at this time (and bearing their names) were important in establishing the republican chronology.
Jochen
1373_380-1_Poblicius.jpg
C. Poblicius Q.f. - AR serrate denarius19 views²Praeneste
¹Rome
¹²80 BC
draped bust of Roma right wearing Phrygian helmet with side feathers
ROMA
P
naked Hercules left strangling Nemean lion; bow with arrows in quiver left, club below
C·POBLICI·Q·F
P
¹Crawford 380/1, SRCV I 308, Sydenham 768, RSC I Poblicia 9
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Künker
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
0075.jpg
C. Porcius Cato, Denarius11 viewsRRC 274/1
123 bc

Av: Helmeted head of Roma r.; behind, X
Rv: Victory in fast biga r.; below horses, C·CATO and in exergue, ROMA

The moneyer might possibly be the grandson of cato the elder and consul of 114 (according to Grüber)

Ex NAC auction 83, lot 298; Leu 17, 1977
Norbert
0040.jpg
C. Postumis, Denarius22 viewsRRC 394/1a
74 b.c.

The moneyer C. Postumius is identified as being named in Ciceros 'pro Murena' as prosecutor of Murena and candidate for praetorship in 62.
Hound and spear on the back belong to the Diana on the obverse. And the Diana again is copied from other Postumius issues of the past.
(Crawford)

Ex Busso Peus auct 388/289 no 905
1 commentsNorbert
1443_C_Postumius.jpg
C. Postumius - AR denarius3 viewsRome
²73 BC
¹74 BC
draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver over shoulder
hound bounding right, hunting spear below
C·POSTVMI / (TA)
¹Crawford 394/1a, RSC I Postumia 9, Sydenham 785, SRCV I 330
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Jesus Vico
Johny SYSEL
C_Renius~0.jpg
C. Renius - AR denarius11 viewsRome
²144 BC
¹138 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
X
Juno Caprotina in biga of goats right holding whip, scepter and reins
C·RENI
ROMA
¹Crawford 231/1, SRCV I 108, Sydenham 432, RSC I Renia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex London Coin Galleries

Reverse refers to Lanuvium where moneyer's family came from and where the sanctuary of Juno was situated.
Johny SYSEL
1460_C_Servilius.jpg
C. Servilius - AR denarius10 viewsRome
¹²126 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet; lituus left
(XVI)
ROMA
Marcus Servilius Pulex Geminus, consul 202 BC, left fighting a duel on horse, holding spear and shield inscribed with M. Other horseman riding left holding sword and shield
C·SER(VE)IL
Crawford 264/1, SRCV I I 140, Sydenham 483a, RSC I Servilia 6
¹²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Martí Hervera / Soler y Llach
Johny SYSEL
1441_C_Servilius_Mf.jpg
C. Servilius M.f. - AR denarius4 viewsRome
²137 BC
¹136 BC
helmet head of Roma right
wreath left
(XVI) ROMA
the Dioscuri riding in opposite directions, heads turned confronting, each with star above his head and holding a spear
C·SERVEILI·M·F
¹Crawford 239/1, Sydenham 525, RSC I Servilia 1, BMCRR Italy 540, SRCV I 116
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Jesus Vico

It's the first issue with ROMA on obverse also Dioscuri are riding unconventionally from each other.
Johny SYSEL
C__Servilius_M_f_.jpg
C. Servilius M.f. - fouré denarius8 viewsRome - unofficial mint
²137 BC (date of official issue)
¹136 BC (date of official issue)
helmet head of Roma right
wreath left
(XVI) ROMA
the Dioscuri riding in opposite directions, heads turned confronting, each with star above his head and holding a spear
C·SERVEILI·M·F
official issue - ¹Crawford 239/1, Sydenham 525, RSC I Servilia 1, BMCRR Italy 540, SRCV I 116
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
2,6g

It's the first issue with ROMA on obverse also Dioscuri are riding unconventionally from each other.
Johny SYSEL
0072.jpg
C. Servilius Vatia, Denar15 viewsC. Servilius Vatia, Denar

RRC 264/1
127 bc

AV: Helmeted head of Roma, r. lituus behind, * before
RV:Battle on horseback, C Serviel in exergue

"The reverse type of of the denarius probably refers to the propensity for single combat of the moneyer's ancestor M. Servilius Pulex Geminus, Cos 202"(Crawford)

"..He is said to have received wounds in twenty-three single combats and to have been victorious in all. (Plutarch,Paulus Aemilius, xxxi.)"(Grüber)

--
Ex Gorny & Mosch, Auction 247, Los 268
Norbert
Sulpicius~0.jpg
C. Sulpicius C.f. (Galba) - AR denarius serratus11 views³moneyer probably not belonged to the patrician Galba family but to a Plebeian branch
³Sardinia or Massalia region
¹Rome
²103 BC
¹106 BC
2 jugate laureate heads of Dii Penates Publici left
D · P · P
Two soldiers (or Dii Penas Publici) standing facing each other, holding spears and pointing at sow which lies between them
C
C·SV(LP)ICI·C·F
¹Crawford 312/1, RSC I Sulpicia 1, SRCV I 189, Sydenham 572
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
³Mark Passehl
3,96g
ex Aurea numismatika

The Sulpicii came from Lavinium and both sides of coin are related to it.

Di Penates Publici were taken from Troy together with Palladium by Aeneas. When Aeneas fled from Troy Helenus, a son of Priamos, has predicted Aeneas, that he would built a new city where a white sow would cast 30 piglets. Aeneas prepared to sacrifice a pregnant white sow he has brought in his ship for this purpose, but the sow escaped and fled 24 stadiums in the inland, layed down under an oak-tree (or ilex-tree) and casted 30 white piglets. Because of that Aeneas knew that this prophecy too became true and he should built a city here. He sacrificed the 30 piglets and erected a shrine at this place. The new city he called Lavinium referring to Lavinia, daughter of king Latinus. The 30 piglets represented 30 years only after which his successors became the real owners of the new land.

At the same time story of white sow predicts foundation of another town:
River god Tiber speak to Aeneas in a dream:
"....
A sow beneath an oak shall lie along,
All white herself, and white her thirty young.
When thirty rolling years have run their race,
Thy son Ascanius, on this empty space,
Shall build a royal town, of lasting fame,
Which from this omen shall receive the name.
..."
Alba Longa was founded just 30 years after Lavinium and so the prophecy was fulfilled here too. The name Alba Longa is said to be derived from the white sow (meaning the long white). So Lavinium was the mothertown of Alba Longa and finely of Rome itself. On the Forum of Lavinium stood a bronze statue of the sow, its body was conserved by the priests in pickle.
(Jochen's coins of mythological interests)
Johny SYSEL
C__Valerius_C_f__Flaccus.jpg
C. Valerius C.f. Flaccus - AR Denarius10 viewsRome
²144 BC
¹140 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
X
Victory in biga right, holding whip and reins
FLAC
C·(VAL)·C·F
ROMA
¹Crawford 228/2, SRCV I 104, Sydenham 440, RSC I Valeria 7
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
ex Aureo and Calico

Moneyer struck coins both with XVI (Cr. 228/1) and X (Cr. 228/2). He was probably grandson of C. Valerius Flaccus praetor in 183 BC and father of C. Valerius Flaccus consul in 93 BC.
Johny SYSEL
C__Vibius_Pansa_C_f.jpg
C. Vibius C.f. C.n. Pansa Caetronianus - AR denarius14 viewsRome
48 BC
mask of Pan right
PANSA
radiate Jupiter Axurus seated left, holding patera and long scepter
IOVIS·AXVR·_C·VIBIVS·C·F·C·N
Crawford 449/1a; SRCV I 420; Sydenham 947; RSC I Vibia 18; Sear CRI 20
3,9g
ex Roma Numismatics

Coin depicts radiated beardless Jupiter Axurus who seems to be simmilar to the Apollo, Sol or Syrian Jupiter Heliopolitanus. His temple complex from the first century BC stood on the cliff above town Terracina which gave to the world the word terrace.

Moneyer was adoptive son of C Vibius C.f. Pansa. He became tribune in 51 BC and supported Caesar. In 43 BC he and Aulus Hirtius were sent with two senate armies to attack Marc Antony. Their armies won the battle of Forum Gallorum near Mutina but Hirtius died in the battle and Pansa was mortally wounded so Octavian Caesar became commander of the whole army.
Johny SYSEL
Vibius_Pansa~0.jpg
C. Vibius Pansa - AR denarius5 viewsRome
²89 BC
¹90 BC
laureate head of Apollo right
PANSA
Minerva in quadriga right holding trophy and reins, spear
C·VIBIVS·C·F
¹Crawford 342/5b, RSC I Vibia 2d, Sydenham 684, SRCV I 242
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,96g

Issue probably celebrates the first victory in Social war.
Johny SYSEL
210-1-Blk.jpg
C.IVNI.C.F - Denarius, Crawford 210/129 viewsDenomination: Denarius
Era: c. 149 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma r. with peaked visor; “X” behind; Border of dots
Reverse: Victory in biga, C.IVNI.C.F below horses, ROMA in framed border in exergue.

Mint: Rome
Weight: 3.56 gm.
Reference: Crawford 210/1
Provenance: NAC 73, Lot 52, 18-NOV-2013.

Comments:
Moneyer probably C. Iunius C.f., Not otherwise known.
Well centered and complete with very nice old toning. AEF.
2 commentsSteve B5
201-1-CNG-Apr-2012.jpg
C.SCR - Denarius, Crawford 201/115 viewsDenomination: Denarius
Era: c. 154 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma r. with peaked visor; “X” behind; Border of dots
Reverse: C.SCR - Dioscuri riding r. C.SCR below. ROMA in raised letters in and framed border

Mint: Rome
Weight: 4.30 gm.
Reference: Crawford 201/1
Provenance: CNG eSale 277, Lot 173, 11-APR-2012.

Comments:
Crawford suggests the moneyer is C. Scribonius, Praef. Socium 181 BC.
Lovely example, graded at least GVF.
1 commentsSteve B5
228-2-Jencek-Jan-2010-3_80g.jpg
C.VAL.C.F - Denarius, Crawford 228/2 - X mark of value21 viewsDenomination: Denarius
Era: c. 140 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma R, X mark of value behind.

Reverse: Victory in biga. FLAC above, C.VAL.C.F below. ROMA in a two line frame exergue.

Mint: Rome
Weight: 3.80 gm.
Reference: Crawford 238/2
Provenance: John Jencek, Private Purchase, 23-Jan-2010

Comments:
C. Valerius Flaccus. This is the only moneyer who coined with both the X mark of value and also, the XVI mark of value. Sydenham (period IV, series 17-18) suggests the X coins to possibly be earlier and places Valarius first in the sequence of moneyers who minted coins with XVI. Grueber in BMCRR (Vol I, p. 124-125) goes further and suggests that Valerius may have held the office of moneyer two different times in close succession and separates the coins with X and XVI to different groups. Crawford in RRC places Valerius last of these moneyers.

Jencek graded this coin AEF. It is really lovely with little wear, round and well centered. Victory is slightly weak, otherwise fully struck.
1 commentsSteve B5
Semis_130BC_Q_Caecillius_Metellus_cr__256_2_6_03g.jpg
Caecilia 23?33 viewsCaecilia 23? (130BC) moneyer Q. Caecilius Metellus cos 123 BC Rome

Semis

Ob: Laureate head of Saturn right; behind S
Rev: Prow right above Q ∙ MET (TE ligature), right S, in exergue ROMA

BMCRR I 1059

Sydenham 510

Crawford: 256/2a Q. METE

There is some confusion concerning which Q. Caecilius Metellus was the moneyer. Sydenham states that this difficulty arises from the fact that during this period (125-100 BC) the Metelli were at the height of their power and therefore would have multiple junior family members beginning the cursum honorum at the mint. There are a large number of variant legends.


Nice green patina, 6.03gr.
1 commentsPetrus Elmsley
AncientRomanEmpire-AR-denarius-JuliusCaesar-046800.jpg
Caesar93 viewsRoman Imperatorial
Gaius Julius Caesar
(Reign as Dictator and/or Consul of the Roman Republic 49-44 BC)
(b. 100 BC, d. 44 BC)


Obverse: DICT.IN PERPETVO CAESAR, Wreathed and veiled head of Caesar facing right

Reverse: C MARIDIANVS, Venus holding Victory, resting elbow on shield set on globe, facing left



Silver Denarius
Minted in Rome February-March, 44 BC



Translations:

Imperatorial=The Imperatorial period extends from the outbreak of civil war between Julius Caesar and Pompey in January 49 B.C. and ends early 27 B.C. when Caesar's adopted heir Octavian was given the title "Augustus" by the Senate, effectively making him the sole ruler of the entire Roman territory. 

DICT.IN PERPETVO CAESAR=Dictator for Life Julius Caesar

C MARIDIANVS=Moneyer Caius Cossutius Maridianus

References:
Crawford 480/15
RSC 42

1 commentsSphinx357
Caesar_Lf.jpg
Caesar: Grandfather of Mark Antony 132 viewsCAESAR
Head of young Mars left wearing a crested helmet

Rev.
L IVLI L F
Venus Genetrix in Biga left drawn by two cupids, before them a lyre

Rome 103 BC

Sear 198

ex-Harlan J. Berk

Lucius Julius Caesar was Mark Antony's grandfather and Gaius Julius Caesar's cousin. He was moneyer in 103 BC and tried in vain to obtain the quaestorship. However he was praetor in 94 and then became the proconsul of Macedonia. Finally he gained the Consulship in 90 BC the same year his younger brother Gaius was aedile.

In 90 BC Lucius Julius Caesar as consul defeated the Samnites and proposed the Lex Julia which offered citizenship to all communities in Italy that were not in revolt. In the following year 89, the Lex Plautia Papiria extended citizenship to those who gave up the fight by a certain date. Lucius Julius Caesar was now made censor along with Publius Licinius Crassus (father of the triumvir). But it was a time of unrest.

In 87 Marius returned to Rome with Cinna and captured the city. Lucius and Gaius were killed during the fighting and according to Livy their heads were exposed on the speakers platform.
1 commentsTitus Pullo
Mamilia_6.JPG
Caius Mamilius C.f. Limetanus61 viewsObv: Draped bust of Mercury facing right, wearing a winged petasus, caduceus over shoulder, control letter "F" behind.

Rev: Ulysses (Odysseus) walking right, holding a staff, his right hand is extended toward his dog, Argos, C MAMIL on left, LIMETAN on right.

Note: The reverse alludes to the moneyer's claim to be a descendent of Telegonus (Ulysses' son) and Circe, hence from Mercury.

Silver Denarius Serratus, Rome mint, 82 BC

3.7 grams, 20.2 mm, 270°

RSC Mamilia 6, S282

Ex: FORVM
3 commentsSPQR Matt
167.jpg
Caius Postumius Denarius - Running Hound (Syd 785a)31 viewsAR Denarius
Rome, 74 BC
3.90g

Obv: Draped bust of Diana (R), bow and quiver over shoulder.

Rev: Hound running (R), spear below, C·POSTVMI

Sydenham 785a Crawford 394/1b.

Rarer variant without T-A monogram below name of moneyer.

Double die-match with BMC Charles A. Hersh denarius.

ex. Elvira Clain Stefanelli (1914-2001) collection, curator of the National Numismatics Collection at the Smithsonian
1 commentsKained but Able
carisia2_denar.jpg
CARISIA 2 denarius - moneyer Titus Carisius - 46 BC34 viewsobv: Diademed and winged bust of Victory right, wearing earring and necklace; jewelled hair pulled into knot, [S. C. behind], banker's mark on face
rev: Victory driving galloping biga right, holding reins and wreath., T CARISI in ex., banker's mark on the top of horses
ref: Cr464/1, Syd986, Sear1324, Albert1437(125eur)
2.86gms, 17mm

A very pleasant type struck during the time Cleopatra was in Rome with Caesar.
berserker
boyd_cassia_6.jpg
Cassia 671 viewsCassius 6 (78BC) moneyer L Cassius Longinus praetor 66

Denarius
Ob: Head of Liber right, wearing ivy-wreath and with thrysus over shoulder, border of dots
Rev: Head of Libera left, wearing vine wreath, behind L ∙ CASSI ∙ Q ∙ F upwards, border of dots

BMCRR I 3152

Sydenham 779

Crawford 386/1

Northumberland Tablet IV 14 “This is held to commemorate the vow which the consul, Spurius Cassius, made in the Latian War, of dedicating a temple to Ceres and her children, Liber (Bacchus) and Libera.”

Describes Liber as “Bacchus corymbifer” chapleted Dionysus (wearing garlands of clusters of ivy-berries (Bacchi Ovid Fast. I.393) OLD

Ex: CNG auction 72 lot 1319 (June 2006); ex: Marc Poncin; ex: Baldwin auction 42 one of two coin lot 141 (26 Sept 2005) ex: William C. Boyd with tag (Spink 1894) toned dark grey

Baldwin graded this coin as a fine, but CNG correctly as VF. Coin much darker than this CNG photo
4 commentsPetrus Elmsley
charibert-1.jpg
Charibert II23 viewsTremissis of Charibert II, king of Aquitaine 629-632
Mint: Banassac
Moneyer: Maximinus
Belfort 697
O: MAXIMIN VS M.
R: CHARIBERTVS REX

Merovingian inscribed tremissis of the short-reigned Charibert II, king of Aquitaine, part of the Merovingian kingdom. Merovingian France was made up of four large districts, which sometimes became kingdoms themselves: Austrasia, Neustria, Burgundy, and Aquitaine. Merovingian royalty frequently divided the large and somewhat unwieldy kingdom between male heirs, and Charibert's half brother Dagobert I received the lion's share. Things went on for a few years, but Charibert probably got greedy, and not content with Aquitaine set his sights on Neustria. This led to conflict with his half-brother, and most likely led to his death by assassination.

Royal coinage inscribed in the names of Merovingian monarchs are very rare. The more common (if you can call them that) ones include coins made in Banassac for Charibert II and Sigebert III. Coins are also known depicting the names of Theodebert, Dagobert, Childebert, and others.

Charibert was not considered a very successful king, and probably only a teenager or young adult at the time of his death. On this coin, his name appears on the reverse, while the moneyer is on the obverse, a possible slight to the monarch. His coinage is a small glimpse of an otherwise highly obscured period in medieval history

Ex- CNG 100 (lot 457), Dr. Lawrence A. Adams, M. Louis Teller
Nap
Claudia_1_CNG_151_lot_172.jpg
Claudia 142 viewsClaudia 1 (110/9 BC) moneyer C. Claudius Pulcher cos. 92

Denarius
Ob: helmeted head of Roma right (helmet decorated with circular device) border of dots
Rev: Victory in biga, holding reigns in both hands; in exergue C. PVLCHER border of dots


BMCRR I 1288 consul with M. Perperua in 92BC. His ancestor of same name celebrated a double triumph for victory over the Istrians and Ligurians in 177BC

Sydenham 569 cf. CIL I p.200 (106BC)

Crawford 300/1

Ex: CNG electronic auction 151 lot 172 3.77gr. ex: Richard Winokur
18mm, 3.77 g
3 commentsPetrus Elmsley
1363_180_Saxula.jpg
Cluvius Saxula - AE as6 viewsRome
170-158 BC
laureate head of Janus
I
prow of galley right
S(AX)
I
ROMA
Crawford 180/1; Sydenham 361; Type as RBW 762
ex Savoca

Moneyer is probaly brother of C. Cluvius Saxula (Cr. 173). Moneyers' father was probably praetor in 175 BC and praetor peregrinus in 173.
Johny SYSEL
Cn__Lentulus_Q.jpg
Cn. Cornelius P.f. Lentulus Marcellinus -AR denarius11 views²Taras or Brundisium
¹Spain
²late 75 BC
¹76-75 BC
diademed bust of Genius Populi Romani right, scepter across shoulder
G·P·R
wreathed scepter, globe, rudder
EX _ S·C
CN·LEN·Q
¹Crawford 393/1a; SRCV I 323; Sydenham 752, RSC I Cornelia 54, Russo RBW 1432
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Roma Numismatics

Moneyer struck this coin as questor of proconsul Pompey when he was sent to support Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius in lenghty war against Sertorius in Spain. Moneyer became consul in 56 BC.
Johny SYSEL
Cn_Domitius~0.jpg
Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus - AR denarius11 viewsRome
²130 BC
¹128 BC
head of Roma right, wearing winged helmet, grain ear left
(XVI)
Victory in biga right holding wreath and reins, man attacking lion with spear below
ROMA
CN·DOM
¹Crawford 261/1; Sydenham 514; Domitia 14; Type as RBW 1056
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex London Coin Galleries

Ahenobarbus became consul in 96 BC. Moneyer could be also Cn. Domitius Calvinus according to Crawford and Sear.
Johny SYSEL
Cn_Gel.jpg
Cn. Gellius - AR denarius10 viewsRome
²142 BC
¹138 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet, all within wreath
X
Mars and Nerio in quadriga right; Mars holding Nerio and shield
CN·GEL
ROMA
¹Crawford 232/1, SRCV 109, RSC I Gellia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Dionysos

Reverse depicts the abduction of Sabin goddes Nerio by Mars.
Moneyer was most probably historian, author of a history of Rome from the earliest epoch extending at least to the year 145 BC.
Johny SYSEL
Gn__Lucretius_Trio.jpg
Cn. Lucretius Trio - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²141 BC
¹136 BC
head of Roma left wearing winged helmet
TRIO
X
Dioscuri riding on horses right, stars over pilei, holding spear and reins
CN·LVCR
ROMA
¹Crawford 237/1a, RSC I Lucretia 1, BMCRR Rome 929, Sydenham 450, SRCV I 114 Lucretia
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
ex Jesus Vico
Johny SYSEL
147-1-Naville-Blk.jpg
CN.DO Monogram - Denarius, Crawford 147/17 viewsDenomination: Denarius
Era: c. 189-180 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma r. with peaked visor; “X” behind; Border of dots
Reverse: Dioscuri riding r. ROMA in raised letters in frame. CN.DO below
Mint: Rome
Weight: 3.23 gm.
Reference: Crawford 147/1
Provenance: Naville sale, 23-FEB-2013.

Comments:
CN.DO monogram issue. This was a very inexpensive coin from Naville on this auction. Still, a nice representative example of of this issue with no problems. The moneyer is believed to be Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus, Cos. 162. Obverse a bit off-center, nice surfaces and toning, VF.
Steve B5
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Cnut37 viewsPenny of Cnut, king of Denmark 1018-1035, England 1016-1035, and Norway 1028-1035
Moneyer: Brunman
Mint: London
S. 1159
O: +CNVT REX A
R: +BRVNMAN ON LV

Ex- Harlan J. Berk
1 commentsNap
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Cr 126/1 AR Denarius Terentius Varro(?)1 viewsA. Terentius Varro (?) uncertain mint circa 206-200 BCE
Helmeted head of Roma r.; behind, X
Dioscuri galloping r.; below, VAR ligate, ROMA in ex.
Terentia 1
19 mm 3.69 gm
No bronze associated with this type. The moneyer is presumed as A. Terentius Varro, Praetor of 184 b.c.e., but the name is only the cognomen, and ligate at that.
Not a beautiful specimen, but a scarce type.
PMah
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Cr 174/1 Æ As Caecilius0 views c. 169-158 b.c.e. Rome mint likely moneyer: A. Caecilius A.f.
Laureate head of Janus; above, I [value]
[A] CAE above, R[OMA] below, prow of galley right; before, I [value]
33 mm 29.35 gm

Ex RBW Collection, from Christie's (17 October 1984), lot 21 (part)

This issue has not been securely dated, and some view the time frame for these issues to be earlier and longer. For this 10-20 year period, only the bronze coins use a ligated, short-form of about 20 moneyers' names, which do not have associated named denarii.
This coin is no beauty, but it is clear enough and quite weighty, with a fine provenance that shows even great collectors had to grab the right coins when available. In this issue, the As is easy to find but the fractions are not.
PMah
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Cr 201/2 Æ As C. Scribonius 6 viewscirca 154 b.c.e. 30 mm, 21.38 gm.
o: Laureate head of Janus; above, mark of value "I"
r: Prow r.; above, C·SCR and before, mark of value. Below, ROMA.
Scribonia 2
Although quite worn, the centering of the reverse is quite good, as sometimes it is difficult to determine the initial of the moneyer's praenomen.
PMah
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Cr 217/1 AR Denarius C. Terentius Lucanus 9 views147 BCE (20mm, 3.75 g, 6h). Rome mint.
o:Helmeted head of Roma right; behind, Victory standing right, holding wreath, above X (mark of value)
r: Dioscuri, each holding spear, riding right C.TER.LV below, ROMA in ex.

Crawford 217/1; Sydenham 425; Terentia 10; RBW 932.
There are numerous types of coins minted by gens Terentia, but this denarius is likely the only one minted by a moneyer of the lesser branch of the Lucani.
PMah
Spurilia_1_Den.jpg
Cr 230/1 - Spurilia 1 Denarius16 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC
AR Denarius (4.0g)
A. Spurilius, Moneyer, 139 BC

Helmeted head of Roma r.; behind, X. / Luna in biga r., holding reins and whip; below, A·SPVRI. In exergue, ROMA.

Spurilia 1. Sydenham 448. Crawford 230/1. aVF, tight flan
RR0031
Sosius
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Cr 249/3 Æ Quadrans P. Maenius M.f. [Antiaticus?]0 views 132 b.c.e. Rome mint
Head of Hercules right, wearing lion skin headdress; three pellets behind
Prow right; P•MAE•ANT•MF (ligate) above, three pellets before, ROMA below
7.95gm 20mm

The exact cognomen of the moneyer is not universally agreed.
PMah
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Cr 252/1 AR Denarius L. Postumius Albinus3 viewsL. Postumius Albinus 131 BCE
Rome mint
Helmeted head of Roma right; apex to left, mark of value below chin / Mars driving galloping quadriga right, holding trophy, shield, and spear. LPOSTA below, ROMA in ex.
19.5mm 3.91 gm
Postumia 1
One of the types without associated bronze. Interesting use of ligate lettering on rev. The apex on the obv. presumably reflects that an ancestor was Flamens Martialis; an ordinary moneyer is probably a bit young for that priesthood. One would have to have considerable self-confidence to wear such a hat, which can be seen on this iteration to be quite tall and spiky, not always seen quite that way.
PMah
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Cr 257/1 - Vargunteia 1 Denarius36 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC
AR Denarius (3.7g)
M Vargunteius, moneyer 130 BC.

M VARG, helmeted head of Roma right, X before / Jupiter in slow quadriga right, ROMA in ex.

Vargunteia 1, Cr257/1, Syd 507.
RR0032
2 commentsSosius
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Cr 259/1 AR Denarius Q. Marcius Q.n. Philippus8 views129 b.c.e ;17 mm, 3.73 gm
o: Helmeted head of Roma right, with star on neck-guard; * mark of value behind
r: Q · P(HI)LIP[VS] below, [ROMA] in ex, Macedonian horseman riding right; Macedonian helmet to left
For those of you who may say "Macedonian helmet????" on reverse, the highly-stylized mark represents such a helmet, perhaps engraved by someone who had never seen a Macedonian helmet, or, as in the case of the moneyer, had heard a description from his grandfather.
PMah
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Cr 262/2 AE Semis Anonymous 10 views128 B.C.E.
AE Semis Anonymous, Rome mint
o: laureate head of Saturn right, S (mark of value) behind
r: galley prow right, elephant head wearing bell facing right above, S (mark of value) right, ROMA below
(7.242g, maximum diameter 22.3mm, die axis 90o,
ex RBW Collection
Forum's Notes:
The elephant head recalls the victory of L. Caecilius Metellus over Hasdrubal at Panormus in 250 B.C. and the capture of Hasdrubal's elephants. The moneyer is perhaps L. Caecilius Metellus Diadematus, Consul 117 B.C., or L. Caecilius Metellus Delmaticus, Consul 119 B.C.
Purchased from Forum Ancient Coins
PMah
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Cr 280/1 AR Denarius M. Tullius 10 viewsM. Tullius. 119 BCE. (18.4mm, 3.91 g, 5h). Rome mint
o: Helmeted head of Roma right, ROMA behind
r: Victory in galloping quadriga rt, palm frond & reins; wreath above; X below; M TVLLI in ex
Crawford 280/1; Sydenham 531; Tullia 1.
Rare moneyer
PMah
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Cr 282/4 AR Denarius L. Pomponius Cn. f.15 viewsL. Pomponius Cn. f. AR Denarius serratus 118 b.c.e.
o: Helmeted head of Roma right; behind, X; around, L. POMPONI CN F.
r: Bituitus in biga right; in ex, L. LIC. CN. DOM.
3.81 gms; 20.00 mm
This coin is much better in hand.
If the attribution of the reverse figure to Bituitus is correct, this coin commemorates the defeat of one of the most incompetent generals ever defeated by Roman valor, who lost over 120,000 troops according to severely outdated sources. The moneyers are splitting the designs -- Pomponius gets the interesting obverse, yet Domitius, whose father(?) was the winning general a few years earlier, chose a very ordinary reverse. Perhaps there is more to the story than meets the eye.
PMah
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Cr 285/1 AR Denarius Cn Domitius Ahenobarbus2 viewsRome mint, 116 or 115 BCE
Helmeted head of Roma r.; behind, X and before, ROMA
Jupiter in prancing quadriga r., holding sceptre and hurling thunderbolt; in exergue, CN DOMI
(Crawford sees sceptre as a laurel-branch.)
20mm 3.78 gm
Domitia 7
There's an interesting numismatic puzzle of the association of this type with a closely-related type of different moneyers, but I do not fully understand it and will skip for now.
I posted this specimen for the awful execution of the reverse, where the engraver competently depicted the horses' heads and tack, but then apparently realized that nearly 2/3 of the die face remained, and, so, panicking, filled in the field with horse-legs with a bizarre variety of joints and proportions -- the Ministry of Silly Horse Walks, 2nd Century BCE.
PMah
Sergia_1_Den_2.jpg
Cr 286/1 - Sergia 1 Denarius32 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC
AR Denarius (3.7g)
M Sergius Silus, Moneyer. 116 BC.

EX S C ROMA *, head of Roma right / Horseman galloping left with sword & severed head held aloft, Q below horses leg, M SERGI below, SILVS in ex.

Sergia 1, Syd 534, Cr286/1. aF, holed.
RR0030
1 commentsSosius
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Cr 299/1b AR Denarius4 viewsAppius Claudius Pulcher, T. Manlius Mancius (?) & Q. Urbinius (??)
Rome mint, 111-110 BCE
Helmeted head of Roma right; quadrangular device behind
Victory driving triga right, T•MA•AP• CL•Q•VR in ex.
3.94 gm, 17 mm
The text above does not do justice to the complexity of the ligature of the legend. This variety of the type leads off with moneyer "MA", presumed, not without contrary views, to be a Manlius or a Mallius; Crawford settles on Maloleius. I retained the seller's interpretation in the header for consistency.
"AP CL", by this time frame, will be a Claudius.
Crawford also cites but disputes an earlier interpretation that "Q. VR" stood for Quaestor Urbinus, rather than an unknown Urbinus. Puzzling that a Claudius would share honors.
No associated bronze types.
This coin nicely colored.

2 commentsPMah
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Cr 311/1 AR Denarius Cornelius Scipio Asiaticus 8 viewsRome (19.2 MM AND 3.86 GRAMS)
OBVERSE – Laureate head of Jupiter left
REVERSE – Jupiter in quadriga right, brandishing thunderbolt, L SCIP ASIAG in ex
Syd 576 Sear 188 Craw 311/1
Cornelia 24

The moneyer is likely the grandson of L Cornelius Scipio, son of Scipio Africanus.
Keeping track of the Scipiones is an annoying task.
PMah
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Cr 335/9 AR Denarius A. Albinus Sp. f. 8 viewsRome, c. 96 BCE
o: Diademed and draped bust of Diana right, bow and quiver on shoulder; below, ROMA
r: Three horsemen galloping left; before, fallen warrior; in exergue, A. ALBINVS S.F.
[This example has AL ligate.]
3.87 gm 18.50 mm
The odd items on the reverse above left of the riders are likely standards, but the left-most one looks almost like a modius! There are a few possible interpretations of the reverse, none of which are particularly stronger than the others, and all relating to the Postumia gens' tendency to get killed in battles important to Rome. Crawford associates the types of three moneyers for the same year.
PMah
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Cr 345/2 - Cn. Cornelius Lentulus Clodianus20 viewsTHE ROMAN REPUBLIC
Cn. Cornelius Lentulus Clodianus, moneyer
AR Quinarius (2.18g), 88 B.C.

Laureate head of Jupiter r. / Victory standing r., crowning trophy; CN LENT in exergue

Babelon Cornelia 51. Sydenham 703. Crawford 345/2. aVF
RR0019
Sosius
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Cr 350/3e AE As Vergilius / Gargilius / Ogulnius 12 viewsc. 86 BC, AE As of moneyers Vergilius, Gargilius & Ogulnius 26 mm, 11.86 grams.
O: Laureate bust of Janus.
R: GAR.OGVL.VER above prow l.
Crawford 350/3e
Ex. RBW Collection
PMah
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Cr 350A/2 "Gargilius, Ogulnius & Vergilius"9 views86 BCE
o: Laureate head of Apollo (Vejovis?) right, thunderbolt below
r: Jupiter in quadriga right, hurling thunderbolt and holding reins
Crawford 350A/2. RSC Anonymous 226.
3.84gg. (4h)
My view is this: Although in many respects this coin is boring and cold, it has an interesting virtue of being anepigraphic in an era of relative verbosity. The obverse is sometimes attributed as "Vejovis" and sometimes as "Apollo Vejovis" and sometimes just "Apollo". Vejovis seems to have been one of the most ancient gods, among the group that the Romans themselves often got confused as to origin-story and attributes. The fragmented sources do not make it much better and his odd name implying something like "un-Jupiter" is no help. (The anti-Jupiter implication --- darkest, weakest, least interested in nymphs -- being somewhat also at odds with the frequent association with Apollo.) Given the relative infrequency of Vejovis on coins, this ambiguity seems to extend to moneyers.
On the other hand, there is no equivalent Roman practice of the modern minting practice of issuing coins in a series simply to sell coins as "collect them all", so we can presume the moneyers expected a meaningful message to be conveyed.
This coin is much better in hand than the photo.
PMah
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Cr 352/1b AR Denarius L. Julius Bursio21 viewsRome, 85 BCE
o: Laureate, winged, and draped bust of Apollo Vejovis right; to left, trident above bow
r: Victory driving galloping quadriga right, holding reins and wreath; EX • A • P in ex.
Sydenham 729; Julia 6; Type as RBW 1348
(18.5mm, 4.04 g, 10h)
From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

I have noted some of my other coins whose types bear a variation on the indication of "from the Public Silver", usually interpreted to mean an issue that required a supplementary grant of authority from the Senate outside the normal annual authorization, as all of the coining metal was "public", including the precious metals from time to time appropriated from the temples of the state religion.

Since this coin is ex McCabe, I will quote his notes on the relative rarity of this type directly:
"The British Museum collection has 115 examples of RRC 352/1a or 352/1c with moneyers name L. IVLI BVRSIO, but just 4 examples with EX A. P. Crawford in RRC, p. 605, says that this issue was struck from money left to the Roman people by Ptolemy Alexander I of Egypt, which probably arrived at Rome in 86 BC. Given the rarity of the EX A. P. issue, perhaps the bequest was modest! "
As with the other 3 coins posted in this group, the coin is much better in hand, although the photos of the silver coins are clearer than the bronze.
1 commentsPMah
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Cr 352/1c - Julia 5a Denarius14 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC
AR Denarius (4.1g)
L Julius Bursio, Moneyer. 85 BC.

Bust of Apollo Vejovis or Genius right, trident & control mark behind / Victory in quadriga right; number above.

Julia 5a, Cr352/1c, Syd 728a-b. VF/F
RR0018
Sosius
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Cr 378/1c - Maria 9 Fouree Denarius20 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC
AR Fouree Denarius (2.9g), 81 BC
C Marius C f Capito, Moneyer.

CAPIT and numeral, bust of Ceres right, wreathed with corn, symbol below chin / Plowman with yoke of oxen plowing l., numeral above, C MARI C Fi below, SC in ex.

Maria 9, Syd 744b, Cr378/1c.
RR0020
Sosius
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Cr 386/1 AR Denarius L. Cassius Q. f. Longinus 30 viewsRome, 78 BCE
o: Head of Liber (or Bacchus) right, wearing ivy wreath; thyrsus over shoulder
r: Head of Liber left, wearing vine wreath; L•CASSI•Q•F behind
Crawford 386/1; RSC Cassia 6.
(3.88g, 14mm, 9h)
An unusual type, with heads on both sides there is some dispute as to the identity of the images. If both are manifestations of Bacchus, then this moneyer apparently really liked to have a good time and wanted his future constituents to know it.
2 commentsPMah
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Cr 387/1 AR Denarius L. Rutilius Flaccus0 viewsRome mint, circa 77 b.c.e.
FLAC Helmeted head of Roma r.
Victory in fast-moving biga r., holding reins and wreath; in ex, L·RVTILI
Rutilia 1

A decent strike suffering from a crowded reverse. Speaking of the reverse, this moneyer, who was a bit of a non-entity, used a generic reverse during a period when his predecessors and successors came up with unique design concepts (or, at least, had good decorators). Compare Crawford 370 through 400 types to this one, and most win, hands-down. Perhaps I am influenced by negative association in American English of the word "Flack" to connote a shameless publicity agent, and any other association is even less of an endorsement.
PMah
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Cr 391/1b AR Denarius C. Egnatius Cn. F. Cn. N. Maxsumus5 views AR Serrate Denarius. Rome, 75 BC. 3.60gm, 19mm, 8h.
o: Diademed and draped bust of Venus, right, with Cupid perched on shoulder; IIII below
r: Libertas in biga left, crowned by flying Victory; behind, pileus; C•EGNATIVS•CN•F CN•N in exergue
This moneyer is postulated by Crawford to be among the populares and referenced by Cicero, Ad Atticum, although I have not yet matched the cite; if so, he presumably gained in importance without leaving a clear record among the top magistracies. The type has one die per control number among a total of 8, this one being IIII, and so is scarcer.
This coin is not a beauty, but is reasonably well-centered for the type and retains serrations.
PMah
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Cr 393/1b AR Denarius Cn. Cornelius Lentulus9 viewsSpain (?) 76-75 BCE 3.62gm. 17 mm.
o: Draped bust of the Genius Populi Romani r., hair tied with band and sceptre over shoulder; above, [G·P·R]
r: Sceptre with wreath, globe and rudder; EX – S·C. Below, [LE]NT [monogram NT] CVR * FL.
Cornelia 55; Sydenham 752a; Crawford 393/1b.
This nice and beautifully toned but not spectacular example of this type illustrates a few of the conundrums that come with it. One is the use of the office title on the reverse, Curator [* = for Denarii] Flandorum, which is uncommon even though, theoretically, the vast majority of the moneyers held a variation on that title -- especially the majority who did not strike Bronze and certainly not Gold. Another, the very tight flan, which cuts off the almost certain "LE" on rev. and part of the L -- tight flans are common, but the main elements of the obverse and reverse design are mostly present, so this flan/blank could be the runt of the mint, although it is a full 17 MM. The "Genius" head could be any lesser male diety, so the loss of the GPR is unfortunate. From Lentulus's perspective, of course, the key element of his full name was obscured. Good thing that there was almost always a Cornelius on the ballot, so, as is known, he moved ahead. The Spanish mint attribution is based in part on the "1a" type, which has "Q" for Quaestor instead of "Curator...", suggesting a non-standard appointment. Andrew McCabe illustrates a nice "1a".
PMah
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Cr 401/1 AR Denarius Mn. Aquillius Mn.f. Mn.n34 viewso: VIRTVS - III VIR Helmeted and draped bust of Virtus to right, with large head
r: MN F MN N / MN AQVIL / SICIL. Mn. Aquilius (Cos. 101) raising fallen Sicily
65 BCE  Denarius Serratus (19 mm, 3.82 g, 6 h), Rome.
Babelon (Aquilia) 2. Crawford 401/1. Sydenham 798. Toned and struck on a broad flan.
This coin is somewhat unintentionally ironic. The moneyer's honored grandfather was accused of fleecing the people of Sicily, when he was governor of the province after the slave revolts. He later managed to antagonize Mithridates VI of Pontus, leading to widespread slaughter of Romans in Asia.
As Wikipedia summarizes the aftermath: "Mithridates defeated Aquillius in 88 near Protostachium. Aquillius was attempting to make his way back to Italy and managed to make it to Lesbos, where he was delivered to Mithridates by the inhabitants of Mytilene. After being taken to the mainland, he was then placed on a donkey and paraded back to Pergamon. On the trip, he was forced to confess his supposed crimes against the peoples of Anatolia. Aquillius's father, the elder Manius Aquillius, was a former Roman governor of Pergamon and was hated for the egregious taxes that he imposed. It was generally thought that Manius Aquillius the younger would follow in the footsteps of his father as a tax profiteer and was hated by some of the local peoples."
Grandpa was thereafter killed by Mithridates by having molten gold poured down his throat.
2 commentsPMah
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Cr 405/2 AR Denarius M. Plaetorius Cestianus6 viewsM. Plaetorius M. f. Cestianus
Rome mint c. 69 BCE
Draped female bust r. (Fortuna?); behind, [control symbol]
M PLAETORI CEST S·C around half-length boy? girl? facing on tablet inscribed SORS.
20mm, 3.49 gm
Plaetoria 10

A fascinating type among this varied issue with four main types of denarii. There are multiple theories as to the unique figure on the reverse, clearly a reference to divination by lots "SORS", but no agreement as to exactly what it signifies. Even on nicely preserved specimens, of which there are not many, the gender of the reverse figure is difficult to say. Crawford cites reason to think it refers to the origin of the moneyer's adoptive gens, expanded greatly by Michael Harlan. To me, given that the moneyership is an electoral stepping-stone, it seems a rather obscure reference; although the "S C" indicates a special issue perhaps unconnected with regular duties. Crawford notes that Cestianus became Praetor c. 64 BCE, so perhaps he was right to trust in luck.
This type is deemed rare and this specimen's condition is not unusual for the type.
1 commentsPMah
Aemilia_10_dealer.jpg
Cr 415/1 - Aemilia 1043 viewsL Aemilius Lepidus Paullus
ROMAN REPUBLIC
AR Denarius, 62 BC (3.7g)
Moneyer: L Aemilius Lepidus Paullus

Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right, PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA around / L Aemilius Paullus standing to right of trophy, Perseus and his two sons captive on the left, PAVLVS in ex.

Cr415/1, Syd 926, Aemilia 10 VF

Ex Imperial Coins
RR0004
3 commentsSosius
432G407Aemilia.jpg
Cr 415/1 AR Denarius L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus10 views62 BCE Rome mint
o: Veiled and diademed head of Concord right, PAVLLVS LEPIDVS- CONCORDIA around
r: L. Aemilius Paullus erecting trophy before three captives, PAVLLVS in ex., TE - R above
Crawford 415/1; Aemilia 10
3.99gg. (6h).
The reverse depicts King Perseus of Macedon and his sons, the non-winners at Paullus' victory at Pydna in 168 BCE, which ended the Macedonian dynasty and was not particularly healthy for the enslaved and looted cities, either.
The moneyer was likely engaged in a bit of counter-adoption, as the great general's agnate family technically died out upon his death.
PMah
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Cr 421/1 AR Denarius M. Nonius Sufenas21 viewscirca 57- 59 b.c.e., 17.5mm., 3.97gms.
o: SVFENAS – S·C Head of Saturn r.; in l. field, harpa and conical stone
r: PR·L·V·P·F Roma seated l. on pile of arms, holding sceptre and sword, crowned by Victory standing behind her; in exergue, SEX·NONI·. Nonia 1.
The reverse inscription expands as : PR[aetor] L[vdos] V[ictoriae] P[rimus] F[ecit]. Interesting back-story crammed into a busy reverse. The moneyer's father (or grandfather) while Praetor, was the First to "Make" the Games of Victory [of Sulla]. The son's willingness to advertise this on his coins was rather aggressive, considering Sulla's reputation was rapidly declining and his father was a mere partisan despite sponsoring one round of games, and he himself no more popular even though he became praetor, somewhat underlined by this being the first and only "Nonia" issue. Presumably he had faith in Pompey, who was the most enduring and successful of the Sullan partisans and seen as the senior in the power-sharing "First Triumvirate". This bet seemingly did not work out well, but the specifics are not available.
3 commentsPMah
Aemilia_8_Dealer_.jpg
Cr 422/1b - Aemilia 851 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC
AR Denarius, 58 BC (3.9g)
Moneyers: M Aemilius Scarus & Pub Plautius Hypsaeus

M SCAVR AED CVR EX S C, Nabatean king Aretas kneeling before camel, REX ARETAS beneath camel / P HVPSAEVS AED CVR CAPTV C HVPSAE COS PREIVER, Jupiter in quadriga right; scorpion to left.

Cr422/1b, Syd 913, Aemilia 8 VF, worn dies

Ex Imperial Coins
RR0005
3 commentsSosius
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Cr 433/2 AR Denarius M. Junius Brutus25 viewsAR Denarius 54 bce Rome 4.09 gm 17.5 mm
o: BRVTVS, downwards behind head of L. Iunius Brutus r, border of dots
r: AHALA, downwards behind head of C. Servilius Ahala r, border of dots
Junia 30; Servilia 17; Sydenham 932

This type has always puzzled me. It clearly depicts the two anti-tyrants in the Junia family tree, L. Junius Brutus and C. Servilius Ahala. (Crawford uses the phrase "tyrannicides", but Brutus did not kill Tarquin and Ahala seems to have sucker-stabbed Maelius in anger.) Young Brutus, or whatever his name was when he was a moneyer, clearly chose to put them on his coins at the time when Pompey's prominence in the state was at its peak; Caesar was in Gaul or Britain, and could not help him. This decision as to coinage, therefore, seems to me extremely unhealthy. Roughly the same number of dies have been identified for both of Brutus's moneyer issues, so it is unlikely that this type is an indiscretion that was quickly withdrawn. So, was Brutus being played or deployed by Pompey against Caesar? Pompey was ostentatiously NOT claiming the dictatorship, so why "warn" him, especially when a "warning" from a 30-ish year old aspiring politician who maybe had held a staff officer's post would not likely impress Pompey, "the teenage butcher"? Worth, I think, exploring a bit.
2 commentsPMah
10149v.jpg
Crawford 319/1, Roman Republic, Q. Thermus M.f., Denarius108 viewsRoman Republic (Rome mint 103 BC.), Q. Thermus M.f..
AR Denarius (3.87 g, 19-20 mm).
Obv.: Head of Mars left, wearing crested and plumed helmet.
Rev.: Q. THERM. M F in exergue, two soldiers vis-à-vis in battle stance, fighting each other with swords, defending with shields; Roman soldier protects fallen comrade between them.
Crawford 319/1 ; Sydenham 592 ; BMCRR Italy 653 ; Minucia 19 .

On this coin, the moneyer probably commemorates his namesake who apparently exhibited great personal bravery when in conflict with the Ligurians. Crawford notes: "The moneyer is presumably to be identified with the Q. Minucius M.f. Ter. on the consilium of Pompeius Strabo at Asculum, perhaps as Legate.
The Ligurians were a people of the northern Appenines who probably represented the Neolithic peoples who were constricted by Gallic and Etruscan pressures. They inhabited the hills from the French Alps and along the Italian Riviera and had kinsmen in Corsica. They engaged in a series of conflicts with the Romans in the 230's but were not really reduced until after the Second Punic War. They were a constant threat to Massilia and other northern cities. In 197, Minucius Rufus marched through their territory. Q. Minucius Thermus, consul in 193 and governor of Liguria from 193 to 190, forced back one of the principal tribes, the Apuani (who had imposed a continuing threat on Pisa), relieved Pisa, and demonstrated across the Auser River.

my ancient coin database
5 commentsArminius
10137v.jpg
Crawford 412/1, Roman Republic, L. Roscius Fabatus, Denarius serratus137 viewsRoman Republic (Rome mint 64 BC.), L. Roscius Fabatus.
AR Denarius (3.82 g, 18-19 mm).
Obv.: L.ROSCI , below head of Juno Sospita to right, wearing goat skin headdress; behind symbol: fountain basin.
Rev.: FABATI (in ex.), maiden standing right, feeding snake coiled erect before her; to left, well-head.
Crawford 412/1 (Symbol pair 102) ; Sydenham 915 ; Babelon Roscia 3 .

Juno Sospita was one of the names of the goddess Juno, emphasizing her role as protector of women, marriage, and childbirth ('Sospita' = 'she who saves'). The cult of Juno Sospita (or 'Sispes') was important in Lanuvium. She wore a goat-skin headdress and carried a spear and a shield.
At Lanuvium, Juno Sospita had a temple which was guarded by a serpent. Every year a maiden would offer cakes to the serpent. If it accepted, this was a sign that the girl was a virgin. Its refusal was an evil omen and a year of sterility was to be feared.
L.Roscius Fabatus was born at Lanuvium and was a "new man" (the first to ennoble his family by entering the Senate). In 55, he held the tribuneship. Roscius was co-author of a measure to further Caesar's plans for agrarian and municipal reform. He was a Caesarian legate in Gaul after 54, where he commanded the 13th legion. In 49, he held the praetorship and was involved as a messenger in the events of that year, which led to the fatal rupture between Caesar and Pompey. In one of his letters, Cicero reported Roscius was killed at the Forum Gallorum in 43 during the war of Mutina.
The coins of this moneyer are the last to exhibit edge serrations as a regular practice. He also utilized a large number of paired die control symbols, one for each side, which represented almost 250 everyday objects. In this, he appears to have taken an earlier moneyer, L.Papius, c. 78, as a model. Curiously, the moneyer's name on the coin is in the genitive, " . . . of Roscius Fabatus", perhaps implying "coinage of Roscius Fabatus."

my ancient coin database
8 commentsArminius
11062v.jpg
Crawford 417/1a, Roman Republic, Rome mint, moneyers L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus and L. Scribonius Libo, 62 BC., AR Denarius.72 viewsRoman Republic, Rome mint, moneyers L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus and L. Scribonius Libo, 62 BC.,
AR Denarius (18-20 mm / 3,72 g),
Obv.: [P]AVLLVS. LEPIDVS - CONCORD head of Concordia r., wearing veil and diadem.
Rev.: PVTEAL SCRIBON / LIBO , Puteal Scribonianum (Scribonian well, the "Puteal Scribonianum" well in the Forum Romanum near the Arch of Fabius), decorated with garland and two lyres, hammer at base.
Crawf. 417/1a ; Syd. 927 ; Bab. / Seaby Aemilia 11 ; Kestner 3422 ; BMC Rome 3383 ; CNR Aemilia 62 .
Rare

A puteal was a classical wellhead, round or sometimes square, set round a well opening to keep people from falling in. Such well heads (putealia) might be of marble, enriched with bas-reliefs. - The puteal is on the reverse of the coin adorned with garlands and two lyres. It is generally stated that there were two putealia in the Roman forum; but C. F. Hermann, who has carefully examined all the passages in the ancient writers relating to this matter (Ind. Lect. Marburg. 1840), comes to the conclusion that there was only one such puteal at Rome. It was in the forum, near the Arcus Fabianus, and was dedicated in very ancient times either on account of the whetstone of the Augur Navius (cf. Liv. I.36), or because the spot had been struck by lightning. It was subsequently repaired and re-dedicated by Scribonius Libo, who had been commanded to examine the state of the sacred places. Libo erected in its neighbourhood a tribunal for the praetor, in consequence of which the place was, of course, frequented by persons who had law-suits, such as money-lenders and the like.

The Puteal Scribonianum (Scribonian Puteal) or Puteal Libonis (Puteal of Libo), building in the Forum at Rome, dedicated or restored by a member of the Libo family, perhaps the praetor of 204 BC, or the tribune of the people in 149 BC. In its vicinity the praetor's tribunal, removed from the comitium in the 2nd century BC, held its sittings, which led to the place becoming the haunt of litigants, money-lenders and business people. According to ancient authorities, the Puteal Libonis was the name given to an erection (or enclosure) on a spot which had been struck by lightning; it was so called from its resemblance to the stone curb or low enclosure round a well (puteus) that was between the temples of Castor and Vesta, near the Porticus Julia and the Arcus Fabiorum (arch of the Fabii), but no remains have been discovered. The idea that an irregular circle of travertine blocks, found near the temple of Castor, formed part of the puteal is now abandoned. See Horace, Sat. ii.6.35, Epp. i.19.8; Cicero, Pro Sestio, 8; for the well-known coin of Lucius Scribonius Libo, representing the puteal of Libo, which rather resembles a cippus (sepulchral monument) or an altar, with laurel wreaths, two lyres and a pair of pincers or tongs below the wreaths (perhaps symbolical of Vulcan as forger of lightning), see C. Hulsen, The Roman Forum (Eng. trans. by J. B. Carter, 1906), p. 150.

L. Scribonius Libo, was the father-in-law of Sextus Pompey, the son of Pompey the Great. On the breaking out of the civil war in 49, he sided with Pompey, and was given command of Etruria. Shortly afterwards he accompanied Pompey to Greece, and was actively engaged in the war that ensued. On the death of Bibulus (48) he had the given command of the Pompeian fleet. In the civil wars following Caesar's death, he followed the fortunes of his son-in-law Sextus Pompey. In 40, Octavian married his sister Scribonia, and this marriage was followed by a peace between the triumvirs and Pompey (39). When the war was renewed in 36, Libo for a time supported Pompey, but, seeing his cause hopeless, he deserted him in the following year. In 34, he was consul with Mark Antony.

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
Crawford_480_4.jpg
crw 480/4 . Julius Caesar. 44 B.C. AR denarius 64 viewsJulius Caesar. Rome mint, moneyer L. Aemilius Buca, lifetime issue c. mid Jan - Feb 44 B.C. ; AR denarius ( fragment ) .
14 mm, 1.26 g.
Obverse: Wreathed head of Julius Caesar right, CAESAR IMP before, P M divided by large crescent with horns up behind .
Reverse: Venus standing left, Victory in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, L AEMILIVS before, BVCA behind .
Crawford 480/4; HCRI 102; Sydenham 1060; RSC 22
Ex Moneta Numismatic Services
3 commentsVladislav D
D__Junius_L_f__Silanus.jpg
D. Junius L.f. Silanus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
¹²91 BC
helmeted head of Roma right
T
Victory in biga galloping right
X
D·SILANVS·L·F / ROMA
¹Crawford 337/3, SRCV I 225, Sydenham 646, RSC I Junia 15
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
D816_(5)sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-81672 viewsAR Denarius, 2.73g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: DOMITIANVS AVG GERM; Head of Domitian, bare, bearded, r.
Rev: Temple, eight columns, seated figure in centre; IMP CAESAR on architrave
RIC 816 (R2). BMC 243. RSC 175. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

Domitian struck a rare undated issue of denarii depicting five different temples. Based on portrait style and the fact that Domitian's moneyers were experimenting with new reverse designs after 94, the issue has been dated to either 95 or 96. Four of the five temples have been identified - Serapis, Cybele, Minerva, and Capitoline Jupiter. The fifth type is an octastyle temple, as seen on the coin above, and its identification remains a mystery. Mattingly conjectured it could be the Temple of Divus Vespasian, P.V. Hill and D. Vagi thought it possibly the Temple of Jupiter Victor, R.H. Darwell-Smith speculated it is the Temple of Jupiter Custos, and M. Tameanko believed it to be the Temple of Divus Augustus. Tameanko makes the strongest case. Earlier renditions of the temple on the coinage under Caligula show it with a hexastyle facade. Domitian restored or rebuilt the temple after the fire of 80. His architect Rabirius may have completely overhauled the building in a more contemporary style producing an octastyle temple. Almost a hundred years later Antoninus Pius restored the temple again and struck a series of coins commemorating the event. His coins indeed depict an octastyle temple very much like the one seen on this denarius and may be proof that under Domitian the temple was rebuilt as an octastyle structure. However, until more evidence comes to light, the identification remains uncertain. Like Domitian's earlier Saecular Games series, the temple denarii were likely struck as a special issue, perhaps reflecting Domitian's new interest as builder. The remarkable bare headed portrait further enhances the issue as something special.

Needless to say it is a fantastically rare piece! Additionally, the eight column type may be the scarcest of the temple group, considering I have located only two other examples in trade over the last 15 years. The other two coins (OldRomanCoins 2002, HJB 145, lot 265) are obverse die matches with mine. Oddly, some specimens (BM 234 for example) lack IMP CAESAR on the architrave.

Worn, with some bumps and scrapes, but well-centred and in good style with plenty of eye appeal.
4 commentsDavid Atherton
028.JPG
Dyrrhachium, Illyria25 views229 - 30 B.C.
Silver drachm
2.81 gm, 17 mm
Obv.: Cow right, head turned, suckling calf left, AKAIOΣ above (moneyer Alkaios?) border of dots, grain/corn ear in exergue
Rev.: ΔYP – magistrate's name - around double stellate pattern within double linear square with straight sides, horizontal single device line, horizontal rays with triple dots
BMC vii Illyria p. 74, 139 var.;
Sear 1899-1901 var.
Jaimelai
Eanred_ab.jpg
Eanred - Kingdom of Northumbria62 viewsEanred, king of Northumbria c. 810-840. Styca in billon (13 mm, 1.14 g) moneyer Daegberct. Obverse: EANRED REX, central cross. Reverse: DAEGBERCT, central cross. Reference: North 186.

Ex MISAB Auction 9, lot 1119.
2 commentsJan (jbc)
EB0339_scaled.JPG
EB0339 Roma / S AFRA, Victory in biga9 viewsDenarius of the Republic. Moneyer S. Afrianus. 154-141 BC.
Obv: Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind.
Rev: Victory in galloping biga right, S AFRA below, ROMA in exergue.
References: Syd. 388; RSC Afrania 1; BMC 670; Sear 85.
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 3.694 grams.
EB
EB0347_scaled.JPG
EB0347 Roma / A·SPVRI, Luna in biga16 viewsA. Spurilius, Moneyer, AR Denarius, 139 BC.
Obv: Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind.
Rev: Luna in biga right, holding reins and whip; below, A·SPVRI. In exergue, ROMA.
References: Syd. 448, Crawford 230/1, RSC Spurilia 1.
Diameter: 18mm, Weight: 3.867 grams.
EB
EB0358_scaled.JPG
EB0358 Mars / Q THERM MF, Two warriors18 viewsQ. Minucius Thermus M.f., moneyer, AR Denarius, 103 B.C.
Obv: Head of Mars left, wearing crested helmet ornamented with plume and annulet.
Rev: Two warriors fighting, each armed with sword and shield; the one on the left protects a fallen comrade, the other wears horned helmet; Q THERM MF (THE and M F ligate) in exergue.
References: Crawford 319/1, Syd. 592, Babelon Minucia 19.
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 3.865 grams.
EB
HENRY III.jpg
ENGLAND - HENRY III94 viewsHENRY III 1216-1272. AR Penny (1.39 gm). Long Cross class 5g, circa 1251-1272. Canterbury mint; Alein, moneyer.
dpaul7
engl_RICHARD_I_.jpg
ENGLAND - Richard I 48 viewsENGLAND - Richard I "The Lionhearted". AR Penny. Moneyer: Henri. Crowned facing bust; HENRICVS REX Rev: Short cross, cruciform pellets in angles; HENRI ON LVND. S-1348c. Type 4b. dpaul7
Henricus-III_star-HENRICVS-REX-IIP_NIC-OLE-ONC-ANT_Canterbury_Mon-Nicole_Seaby-1362_North-988_1180-1189-AD_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
England, Henricus-III., (1216-1272 A.D.), North-988, AR-Penny, Canterbury mint, #1211 viewsEngland, Henricus-III., (1216-1272 A.D.), North-988, AR-Penny, Canterbury mint, #1
Long Cross type, without scepter; portrait class 3c issue. Moneyer, Nicole.
avers: *hENRICVS REX:III', (NR are ligate), Around central beaded circle enclosing a crowned and bearded face frontal.
reverse: NIC OLE ONC ANT, ( ON and AN are ligate), Spaced around arms, long voided cross with pellet center and finials, over central beaded circle, with pellet trefoil in each angle.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18-18,5mm, weight: 1,36g, axis: 2h,
mint: Canterbury, Moneyer: Nicole, date: 1247-1272 A.D., ref: Seaby-1364, North-988,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
MED-England,_HENRY_III_-3.jpg
England, Henry III 1248 - 1250 3 viewsSilver Penny - London

Moneyer - Nicole

NGC Graded AU-55

S-1361A

Purchased from Australia

My cost was $190
Richard M10
England,_John_Lackland,_(1199-1216_AD),_AR-Penny,_HENRICVS_R_EX,_Cross_ABELON_LVN_DE,_London,_Abel,_class-Vc_,_Seaby_1352,_N__971,_1204-9_AD,_Q-001,_4h,_18-19mm,_1,33g-s.jpg
England, John Lackland, (1199-1216 A.D.), Seaby 1352, AR-Penny, London mint, Moneyer: Abel, Short cross, #166 viewsEngland, John Lackland, (1199-1216 A.D.), Seaby 1352, AR-Penny, London mint, Moneyer: Abel, Short cross, #1
Short Cross type, with scepter, Class Vc,
avers: Scepter hENRICVS R• EX, Crowned bust facing, crowned, with a beard, two curls on each side of the head, scepter in right hand.
reverse: ✠ABELON•LVN•DE•, Short cross voided, cross botonnée in each angle.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-19,0mm, weight: 1,33g, axis: 4h,
mint: London mint, Moneyer: Abel, date: c.1204-1209 A.D., ref: Seaby 1352, N. 971,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
England_John_Lackland,_1199-1216_AD_AR-Penny_HENRICVS_REX_Cross-RAVF_ON_LVN_DE__London_mint_CI_5b_-Seaby-1351_AD_Q-001_0h_19,8mm_1,34g-s.jpg
England, John Lackland, (1199-1216 A.D.), Spink 1351, AR-Penny, London mint, Short cross, #1109 viewsEngland, John Lackland, (1199-1216 A.D.), Spink 1351, AR-Penny, London mint, Short cross, #1
Short Cross type, with scepter; Class 5b,
avers: Scepter hENRICVS R•EX, Crowned bust facing, crowned, with beard, two curls on each side of head, sceptre in right hand.
reverse: ✠RAVLF•ON•LVN•DE•, Short cross voided, cross botonnée in each angle.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,8mm, weight: 1,34g, axis: 0h,
mint: London mint, Moneyer: Ralph, date: c.1204-09 A.D., ref: Spink 1351,
Q-001
quadrans
MISC_England_Henry_III.jpg
England. Plantagenet. Henry III (1216-1272)12 viewsNorth 988; Spink 1364

AR penny, voided long cross coinage, Lawrence System class 3c (struck 1248-1250), refined by Churchill and Thompson as class 3d1 (struck 1250) Type L446, London mint, by moneyer Nicholas of St. Albans. 1.38 g., 18.35 mm. max., 0°.

Obv: Initial mark: [Six-pointed star with rounded or angular points (MM4)], hENRICVS REX : III apostrophe (NR ligated; wedge-footed R [R1]; pellet in S), Crowned facing bust with pointed chin, pellets above lower hair curls (PL4), beard of pellets, no scepter.

Rev: NIC-OLE ON L-VND (ON and ND ligated, pellets on Ns in third and fourth quadrants), voided long cross with trefoil of pellets in each angle, eight pellets per quadrant in inner circle.

Note: There were 711 class 3d1 coins issued by Nicholas of St. Albans from the London mint in the Brussels Hoard, spread between 11 Churchill and Thompson types. Type L446 coins were the most common type, represented by 520 coins.
1 commentsStkp
imgonline-com-ua-2to1-9t1WMEb8hJ2FDC.jpg
England. PLANTAGENET. John. 1199-1216. AR Penny. circa 1210-1213.3 viewsLondon mint. . Short Cross type, class VIa1. ; Abel, moneyer. Struck in the name and types of Henry II, ҺЄNRICVS R ЄX, crowned facing bust, holding scepter / + ABЄL · ON · LV(ND)Є, voided cross, with four pellets in angles. SCBI 56 (Mass), 1740A; North 974/1; SCBC 1353.Russel K
00sulla3~1.jpg
Faustus Cornelius Sulla169 viewsAR denarius. 56 BC. 4.05 g, 9h. Head of young Hercules right, wearing lion's skin headdress, paws knotted below his chin; SC above FAVSTVS monogram behind. / Globe surrounded by four wreaths, the larger jewelled and tied with fillet; aplustre and stalk of grain below. Crawford 426/4a. RSC Cornelia 61 .
This coin is one of ten million denarii that the Senate of Rome commissioned for the purchase of wheat in the year 56 BC. All those extra denarii, struck alongside the normal coin issues, bear the letters S.C for "Senatus Consulto" (by decree of the Senate) on their obverse, behind the head of Hercules. The ligated letters FAVS refer to the moneyer, Faustus Cornelius Sulla.

The ear of grain on the reverse illustrates that this denarius was indeed minted in connection with the purchase of wheat. Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, who transacted the business, was the father in law of the moneyer Sulla, and effectually used his son in law's position to advertise himself. Three of the wreaths on the reverse commemorate the three triumphs of Pompey: He was the first Roman to celebrate a triumph on each of the three then-known continents. With this Pompey had made Rome a world power, which is symbolized by the globe in the middle. The fourth wreath, larger than the others, stands for the extraordinary honor that Pompey was bestowed with in 63 BC, when he was allowed to wear a golden headdress when going to the circus or the theater.
1 commentsbenito
00sulla.jpg
Faustus Cornelius Sulla.234 viewsAR denarius. 56 BC. 3,66 grs. Craw 426/1. RSC Cornelia 59.
The moneyer was the son of the famous general and Dictator Lucius Cornelius Sulla (138-78 BC).The reverse of the coin represents the victory of his ancestor in the Jugurthine War. Sulla arranged with his ally Bocchus of Mauretania to have Jugurtha ,King of Numidia,ambushed and captured. On the scene represented, Bocchus offers an olive branch to a seated Sulla, while a bound Jugurtha kneels beside him.
2 commentsbenito
Fonteia_9_CNG149Lot_304.jpg
Fonteia 942 viewsFonteia 9 (85BC) moneyer Mn. Fonteius (brother of Crawford 347?)

Denarius
Ob:Laureate head of Apollo right below fulmen behind MN(ligate) ∙ FONTEI ∙ C ∙ F (NT(ligate) downwards before monogram for Apollo (?), border of dots
Rev: Cupid on goat right above pilei in exergue thyrsus around laurel wreath, border of dots

BMCRR I 2476

Sydenham 724a

Crawford 353/1a

Northumberland Tablet VII 21
obv note “…has been designated Apollo vejovius. But as Ovid alludes to his not having the fulmen till the conflict with the Titans, and as Eckhel produces a copy with EX before AP- and reads it ex argento publico- the meaning is uncertain.”
Rev note: “This has been called Cupid, but there is no attribute of bow or arrow, whence Havercamp is of the opinion that the thyrsus denotes Bacchus, while Eckhel thinks it is the Etruscan Vejovius himself- the goat being a sacrifice peculiar to him.
On the whole the device seems to elude to the native haunts of the moneyer, for the curetes who guarded the little Jupiter were the Dioscuri, whose pilei and myrtle are here seen, and who were worshipped at Tusculum with special honor. Moreover, although the thyrsus is certainly an attribute of Bacchus, the myrtle belongs to the twins, and they may therefore have been considered the Dii Penates of the gens.”

Crawford: Monogram under chin Apollo; reverse is clearly Dionysiac. Grueber and Sydenham believe that the monogram under obverse head is Roma not Apollo. Head also Vejovis with winged genius on reverse.

Ex: CNG ex: Harry Strickhausen (misattributed by CNG; monograph under chin faint, but legible) 19mm, 3.93g
2 commentsPetrus Elmsley
FR_Philip_IV_gros_tournois.png
France (Royal). Philippe IV, le Bel (the Fair) (1285-1314)28 viewsAR Gros Tournois à l’O rond (958‰ fineness). Struck 1285-1290. 3.81 g., 24.76 mm. max. (clipped), 0°

Ciani 206, LaFaurie 218, Duplessy 214, Dhénin 258, Roberts 2461

Obv.: + BNDICTV: SIT: NOmE: DNI: nRI: DEI: IhV. XPI with 3-pellet stops (= Benedictum Sit Nomen Domini Nostri Dei Ihesu Christus = Blessed in the name of our Lord, Jesus Christ) around + PhILIPPVS REX around cross pattée.

Rev.: + TVRONVS CIVIS (= City of Tours) around châtel tournois, surrounded by floral border of twelve embedded lis.

Van Hengel (1997) Group 200 (PhILLIPPVS legend with no punctuation marks in PhILLIPVS REX and TVRONVS CIVITAS). Van Hengel initially hesitated over whether this group is imitative, i.e., the work of professional moneyers and struck by a minting authority with the right to mint coins, somewhere. He later (1999) concluded that the group is imitative. The variable letter characteristics of the coin, according to the Van Hengel system, are:
• The first three Ns in the obverse outer legend appear as Hs, which is a later development;
• The M in NOME is open, as per Tyler-Smith letter form 2 var., another late development;
• There is no single pellet stop before XPI;
• The R in PhILLIPVS is a variant letter form not depicted by Tyler-Smith;
• The T on the reverse is a non-specific variant letter form depicted but not numbered by Tyler-Smith;
• The Vs on the reverse are a variant letter form not depicted by Tyler-Smith;
• The N on the reverse is Tyler-Smith variant letter form 2 (retrograde).
2 commentsStkp
Roma_Pur.jpg
Furius Purpurio - AR denarius5 viewsRome
170-158 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
X
Luna in biga right, crescent above head; murex shell above
PVR
ROMA
Furia SRCV I 75, Crawford 187/1, Sydenham 424, RSC I Furius 13
4,3g
ex Aurea

Murex shell, from which Purple dye was made, is pun for moneyer's name. Moneyer apparently was son or grandson of Lucius Furius Purpurio, consul 196 BC.
Johny SYSEL
iulius_caesar_Cr480_13.jpg
G. Iulius Caesar, Crawford 480/1361 viewsGaius Iulius Caesar, 13.6.100-15.3.41 BC, gens Iulia
AR - Denar, 3.83g, 19.7mm, 90°
Rome, Feb.-Mar. 44 BC
moneyer P. Sepullius Macer
obv. Head of Caesar, wreathed and veiled, r.
before CAESAR, behind DICT PERPETVO
rev. r. P SERPVLLVS, l. MACER (both from top to bottom)
Venus Victrix with bare l. breast, stg. l., holding small Victory in xxtended r. hand and resting with raised l. hand on lpng sceptre on which is leaning the shield set on ground
ref. Crawford 480/13; Sydenham 1074; RSC Julius Caesar 39; BMCRR I Rome 4173; SRCV I 1414; Vagi 56; Sear CRI 107d
VF, portrait!, toned, scratches, somewhat excentric
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

From highest historical importance: The 1st portrait of Iulius Caesar and the coin that killed Caesar!

Please, take a look at http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=109646.0
5 commentsJochen
1473_Egnateia.jpg
Gaius Egnatuleius - AR quinarius10 viewsRome
²95 BC
¹97 BC
laureate head of Apollo right
C·EG(NAT)(VL)EI·C·F
Victory left insribing shield on trophy topped with a helmet ornamented with bull horns; carnyx at base of trophy
Q
ROMA
¹Crawford 333/1, Sydenham 588, RSC I Egnatuleia 1, BMCRR I Rome 1076, Russo RBW 1193, SRCV I 213
²Mark Passehl Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Bertolami
Johny SYSEL
Julius_Caesar.jpg
Gaius Julius Caesar207 viewsFebruary-March 44 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.90 g, 5h). Rome mint. P. Sepullius Macer, moneyer. Laureate and veiled head right / Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter; shield at base of scepter. Crawford 480/13; CRI 107d; Sydenham 1074; RSC 39. From the Jörg Müller Collection.

Alföldi arranges Crawford 480 series coins in (44 BC) month order as follows:

RRC 480/1, Buca - January
RRC 480/2, DICT QVART - early February
RRC 480/3/4/5, CAESAR IMP - late February
RRC 480/6/7/8/9/10/11/12/13/14, DICT PERPETVO - early to mid March
RRC 480/17/18, CAESAR IMPER - late March
RRC 480/19/20, PARENS PATRIAE - April
RRC 480/15/16, MARIDIANVS - April
RRC 480/21/22, CLEMENTIAE CAESARIS and Mark Antony - April

"Iconography, historical meaning:

The rev. can be understand easily: The Iulians ascribed their gens back to Aeneas who was the son of Venus (Aphrodite) and Anchises.Venus was the tutelary goddess of the gens Iulia and hence of Caesar. 46 BC Caesar has consecrated together with his new built forum also the temple of Venus Genetrix, the ancestress of his gens. On this denarius with Victory, spear and shield it is rather Venus Victrix.

The portrait on obv. is imposing by its realistic depiction. It was for the first time that a living ruler was pictured on a Roman coin. This too raised suspicion that Caesar - even if he wasn't acclaimed king - would behave as such.

Caesar's portrait attracts attention by the wreath he is wearing. It protrudes notable wide beyond his forehead. Furthermore it is padded and very ragged. This characteristic received too little attention until now. There is every indication that it is not a usual wreath but a corona graminea, a Grass or Blockade crown. This crown was dedicated by the army to that commander who has freed them from an encirclement and saved them from certain death. The crown was composed from flowers and tuft of grass which was plucked at the location of their liberation. This crown was regarded as the highest of all crowns! Pliny (nat. 22, 6) has known only of 8 persons with this honour:
1. Lucius Siccius Dentatus, tribunus plebis 454 BC
2. Publius Decius Mus, 343 BC, 1st Samnite War, dedicated even by 2 armies!
3. Marcus Calpurnius Flamma, 258 BC, at Carmina on Sicily
4. Quintus Fabius Maximus, after the departure of the Carthaginians from Italy, 203 BC
(dedicated by the Senate and the people of Rome, possibly posthumous)
5. Scipio Aemilianus Africanus
6. Gnaeus Petreius Atinas, centurio during the war against the Cimbri
7. Lucius Cornelius Sulla, during the Allied War at Nola 89 BC
8. Quintus Sertorius, 97 BC aa military tribune in Spain under Titu Ddius.
To Caesar and Augustus the crown was dedicated by the Senate!

The veil Caesar is wearing as Pontifex Maximus for lifetime.

DICTATOR PERPETVVS

During Republican times a dictator was designated when the state was in an emergency situation. His position was always temporally limited, yes, sometimes designated only for a single task. In the beginning Caesar too was dictator limited to 1 year and had to be designated again for the next year. Already 46 BC Caesar has been nominated dictator for 10 years but the title had to be renewed each year. So we know of coins with DICT, DICT ITER (= again, for the second time), IC TER (for the third time) and DICT QVART.

Since the proclamation as king has failed the title dictator disappeared from the denarii and were replaced by IMP. But soon behind Caesar's head appeares a star, a crescent, or Victory's spear stands on a star. These celestial signs - and that was understod by all - stand for divinity and should raise Caesar high above all Romans. Incompatible with the idea of a republican constituted Rome.

The point of culmination in this series is the legend DICT PERPETVO of this coin. Now the title of dictator was no more temporally limited but was valid like his office as Pontifex Maximus for all his life and it no more was necessary to confirm the title each year. That actually was a spectacular violation of the Roman constitution! The fact that he appeared at the Lupercalia on February 15. 44 BC in the ancient robe of kings strengthened the suspicion that he was looking for the kingship. In fact he has publicly
refused the royal crown that was offered to him by Marcus Antonius, but his authority to exert power was equal a king even without bearing the title of king. That was the most hateful title of the Roman Republic.

Now he has passed a line that his republican enimies couldn't tolerate any more if they still wanted to be taken seriously. So this coin actually led to his murder by the conspirators. So "The coin that kills Caesar" is by no means an exaggeration.

The planned Parthian War:

Caesar has planned a war against the Parthians. In March 44 BC he wanted to start for a campaign to the east. His assassination inhibited this intention. In science disputed are the goals which Caesar has had in mind with his war. They are reaching from a boundary adjustment, as Mommsen suggested, to world domination like Alexander the Great, as Plutarch is writing: According to him Caesar after the submission of the Parthians would go across Hyrcania at the Caspian Sea, then round the Black Sea via the Caucasus, invade the land of the Scyths, attack Germania and would finally return to Italy through the land of the Celts. In this way he would have conquered the world known to the Ancients and his limits were only the shores of the surrounding Okeanos.

Probably Sueton who was sitting directly at the sources was more realistic. And we know of the campaigns of Marcus Antonius and Augustus who surely have known Caesar's plans and have used them for their own purposes. It's clear that Caesar doesn't want to repeat the errors of Crassus who perished at Carrhae, and has tried to avoid he Parthian cavalry units. Therefore a route through Lesser Armenia is most probable. And there was hope that the Mesopotamian cities would raise against the Parthians. Caesar had gathered an army of 16(!) legions, a huge power that alone by its mere bigness would ensure the victory. Caesar was no gambler, rather a cautious and prudential commander.The famous "veni, vidi, vici" doesn't exist longer. What he actually had in mind we don't know. It's speculative. But there is every indication that it was a reorganisation of the east. And that rather by establishing client-kingdoms than creating new Roman provinces.

Probably the conspirators were afraid of Caesar's Parthian War, because a victory, which was possible or even probable, would have strengthen Caesar's position and has made him practically invulnerable." - Jochen
4 commentsNemonater
Gargonius,_Ogulnius_and_Vergilius.jpg
Gargonius, Ogulnius and Vergilius - AR denarius3 viewsRome
¹²86 BC
laureate head of Apollo* right, thunderbolt below
Jupiter in quadriga right, holding thunderbolt and reins
¹Crawford 350a/2, SRCV I 266, RSC I 226, Sydenham 723
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Naumann
* according other authors obverse could reprsent Vejovis.
Johny SYSEL
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Gens: Caecilia, Q Caecilius Metellus, AR Denarius 13 viewsSpanish Mobile Military Mint 81 B.C. 3.81g - 20mm, Axis 7h.

Obv: Diademed head of Pietas right, stork before.

Rev: IMPER - IMPER below jug and lituus, all in wreath.

Caecilia 44; Crawford 374/2; Sydenham 750.

Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius came from one of the most important and wealthiest families of Rome. Beginning in the 3rd century BC, his family held numerous consulship's, tribunates, censorship's and military commands. His father, Q. Caecilius Metellus Numidicus, was the chief commander in the Jugurthine War in Numidia until Marius displaced him, and was later censor until driven into exile by Marius. The obverse of this coin portrays the goddess Pietas and alludes to the moneyer's cognomen, Pius. The moneyer acquired the honorable title from the people of Rome, whom he had beseeched in order to secure the restoration from exile of his father. The reverse probably refers to an unattested augurate of the moneyer's father, but may also allude to Sulla's holding of the augurate in ca. 82 BC
scarli
Gnaeus_Plancius.jpg
Gnaeus Plancius - AR denarius5 viewsRome
²54 BC
¹55 BC
head of Macedonia or Diana Planciana right wearing causia
CN·PLANCIVS / AED·CVR·S·C
agrimi standing right, bow and quiver left
¹Crawford 432/1, SRCV I 396, Sydenham 932, RSC I Plancia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,1g
ex Aureo & Calicó

The agrimi is the wild goat of Crete. This moneyer used symbols of Macedonia and Crete on his coinage because these were places where he had spent some time during his career. If the obverse depicts Diana Planciana than it commemorates temple of Diana Planciana with statue which was paid by moneyer in 55 BC. The temple stood between Quirinal and Viminal.
Johny SYSEL
Illyria.jpg
Greek - Illyria, Dyrrhachinon7 viewsMetal/Size: AR17; Weight: 3.12 grams; Denomination: Drachm; Mint: Dyrrhachinon, Illyria; Date: 1st-2nd C. BCE; Obverse: Cow standing right, looking back, suckling her calf; name of magistrate above - ΞENΩN (XENON), possibly name of moneyer between eagle and cow. Reverse: Double stellate pattern in square - ΔYP XAIPIΛΛOY. Reference: Sear #1879v.museumguy
xenon1.jpg
GREEK, Illyria, Apollonia, AR Drachm41 viewsIllyria-Dyrrhachium, AR Drachm, Xenon (Moneyer), Filodamou (Magistrate), Class D4
O: XENWN Cow right, calf left, eagle above, hound right in exergue, dot border
R: DUR-FILO_DA_MOU Straight, double-stellate pattern, vertical single device line, tadpole rays, triple dots, line border
Dimensions: 19 mm Weight: 3.35 g
superflex
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Halved Augustan As17 viewsThis is a halved As of Augustus struck under the moneyer P. Lurius Agrippa in 7 BC. The reverse is [P LVRIVS AGRIP]PA IIIVIR AA[AFF] around large SC. It is clear on the reverse that it was struck at least four times with a chisel to cut it and that once cut most of the way through it was twisted to finish the job resulting in the raised edge at the top of the remaining legend.otlichnik
harthacnut.jpg
Harthacnut49 viewsPenny of Harthacnut, king of Denmark 1035-1042 and England 1040-1042
Moneyer: Toci
Mint: Lund
S. 1170, Hbg 28 (var.)
Hauberg 28
O: NARÐECII
R: TOOCI ON LVNDI

Danish coin of Harthacnut, imitating the long cross type of Aethelred II. Harthacnut faces left with a nice head of bushy hair, looking somewhat more like a rooster's comb. In front of him is an extended hand, which seems to be clothed in a gauntlet. The lanky fingers look almost skeletal. The significance of this hand may be related to similar imagery of the 'benediction hand' on other coins of Aethelred II. While a religious symbol, the Vikings of this era were probably Christian only in name, and it is doubtful they understood the meaning. This image only appears on coins of Toci. Toci also struck coins for Cnut the Great, Magnus the Good, and Cnut IV.

Ex- Hafnia coins, Künker Auction 194 (lot 2132)
Nap
CT-Mat-MedievalWafer.jpg
Henry II (1154-1189 A.D.)45 viewsAR Penny
Short Cross coinage, class G or I.
O: ҺЄNRICVS • R ЄX, crowned facing bust, holding scepter.
R: + GOCELM • ON • WINC, voided cross; quatrefoils in angles.
1.03g
20mm
Wincester mint; Gocelm, moneyer, 1180 AD
North 962/1; SCBC 1343A/1343 (obv./rev.).
6 commentsMat
Henry_II_ab.jpg
Henry II - London, England112 viewsHenry II Curtmantle (1133-1189). King of England 1154-1189, House of Plantagenet. AR (20 mm, 1.45 g) short cross penny minted in London by moneyer Reinald.
Obverse: HENRICVS REX.
Reverse: REINALD M O LVN.
Reference: Sear 1344 Class 1b1.
Jan (jbc)
30737.jpg
Henry III7 viewsEngland. Henry III. 1216-1272. AR penny (17.56 mm, .92 g, 1 h). hЄnRICVS x RЄX x AnGLIЄ, Crowned facing bust of Henry III (no beard?), annulets at bottom of hair curls on both sides / Long cross potent divides moneyer's name and city abbreviations; three pellets in each quarter, two sets of three are joined by an annulet between them. aVF, clipped.ecoli
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Hungary Louis I57 viewsHungary. Louis I (Lajos I, in Hun.) (1342-1382). AR denar, .46 g.

Obv: + MOnETA LODOVICI, Saracen head left.
Rev: + REGIS hVnGARIE, Patriarchal cross rising from crown at its base, with random pellets.

Struck 1373-1382 (per Huszár, Pohl & Unger, although Huszar later wrote that the Saracen-head coinage incepted in 1372) in Buda (now Budapest) by an unknown moneyer (per Pohl). Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 5.

The Saracen's head is a pun on the surname of Jacobus Saracenus (Szerechen, in Hun.) and his brother, Johannes, courtiers of Italian descent who were ennobled by Louis. The image of a Saracen's head appeared on their coat of arms. Jacobus became the kammergraf at the Pécs mint in 1352, and the Comes Camerarum Regalium in 1369. He died in the early 1370s, at which time Johannes succeeded him as kammergraf.
oneill6217
HUN_Lajos_I_547_Pohl_89-10.JPG
Huszár 547, Pohl 89-10, Unger 432b, Réthy II 89A 81 viewsHungary. Louis I (Lajos I, in Hun.) (1342-1382). AR denar.

Obv: + MOnETA LODOVICI, Saracen head left.

Rev: + REGIS hVnGARIE, Patriarchal cross with random pellets, L–S (privy mark) in lowest fields.

The type was struck 1373-1382 (per Huszár, Pohl & Unger, although Huszár later wrote that the Saracen-head coinage incepted in 1372). This privy mark was struck at an unidentified mint by an unidentified moneyer (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 3.

The Saracen's head is a pun on the surname of Jacobus Saracenus (Szerechen, in Hun.) and his brother, Johannes, courtiers of Italian descent who were ennobled by Louis. The image of a Saracen's head appeared on their coat of arms. Jacobus became the kammergraf at the Pécs mint in 1352, and the Comes Camerarum Regalium in 1369. He died in the early 1370s, at which time Johannes succeeded him as kammergraf.

Stkp
HUN_Lajos_I_Huszar_547_Pohl_89-2.JPG
Huszár 547, Pohl 89-2, Unger 432e, Réthy II 89A47 viewsLouis I (Lajos I, in Hun.) (1342-1382). AR denar, 14 mm.

Obv: + MOnETA LODOVICI, Saracen head left.

Rev: + REGIS hVnGARIE, Patriarchal cross with random pellets, crown–crown (privy mark) in fields beneath the cross-arms.

The type was struck 1373-1382 (per Huszár, Pohl & Unger, although Huszár later wrote that the Saracen-head coinage incepted in 1372). This privy mark was struck at Buda (now Budapest) by an unidentified moneyer (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 3.

The Saracen's head is a pun on the surname of Jacobus Saracenus (Szerechen, in Hun.) and his brother, Johannes, courtiers of Italian descent who were ennobled by Louis. The image of a Saracen's head appeared on their coat of arms. Jacobus became the kammergraf at the Pécs mint in 1352, and the Comes Camerarum Regalium in 1369. He died in the early 1370s, at which time Johannes succeeded him as kammergraf.
Stkp
HUN_Lajos_I_Huszar_547_Pohl_89-3.JPG
Huszár 547, Pohl 89-3, Unger 432f, Réthy II 89A43 viewsLouis I (Lajos I, in Hun.) (1342-1382). AR denar, 14 mm.

Obv: + MOnETA LODOVICI, Saracen head left.

Rev: + REGIS hVnGARIE, Patriarchal cross with random pellets, lily–lily (privy mark) in fields between cross-arms.

The type was struck 1373-1382 (per Huszár, Pohl & Unger, although Huszár later wrote that the Saracen-head coinage incepted in 1372). This privy mark was probably struck at Kaschau (Kassa in Hungarian, now Košice Slovakia) by an unidentified moneyer (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 3.

The Saracen's head is a pun on the surname of Jacobus Saracenus (Szerechen, in Hun.) and his brother, Johannes, courtiers of Italian descent who were ennobled by Louis. The image of a Saracen's head appeared on their coat of arms. Jacobus became the kammergraf at the Pécs mint in 1352, and the Comes Camerarum Regalium in 1369. He died in the early 1370s, at which time Johannes succeeded him as kammergraf.

Stkp
HUN_Lajos_I_Huszar_547_Pohl_89-4.JPG
Huszár 547, Pohl 89-4, Unger 432g, Réthy II 89A44 viewsLouis I (Lajos I, in Hun.) (1342-1382). AR denar, 14 mm.

Obv: + MOnETA LODOVICI, Saracen head left.

Rev: + REGIS hVnGARIE, Patriarchal cross with random pellets, *–* (privy mark) in fields between cross-arms.

The type was struck 1373-1382 (per Huszár, Pohl & Unger, although Huszár later wrote that the Saracen-head coinage incepted in 1372). This privy mark was probably struck at Nagybánya (now Baia Mare, Romania) by an unidentified moneyer (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 3.

The Saracen's head is a pun on the surname of Jacobus Saracenus (Szerechen, in Hun.) and his brother, Johannes, courtiers of Italian descent who were ennobled by Louis. The image of a Saracen's head appeared on their coat of arms. Jacobus became the kammergraf at the Pécs mint in 1352, and the Comes Camerarum Regalium in 1369. He died in the early 1370s, at which time Johannes succeeded him as kammergraf.

Stkp
HUN_Lajos_I_Huszar_547_Pohl_89-5.JPG
Huszár 547, Pohl 89-5, Unger 432f, Réthy II 89A45 viewsLouis I (Lajos I, in Hun.) (1342-1382). AR denar, 14 mm., .28 gr.

Obv: + MOnETA LODOVICI, Saracen head left.

Rev: + REGIS hVnGARIE, Patriarchal cross with random pellets, lily–lily (privy mark) in fields beneath cross-arms.

The type was struck 1373-1382 (per Huszár, Pohl & Unger, although Huszár later wrote that the Saracen-head coinage incepted in 1372). This privy mark was probably struck at Kassa (now Košice, Slovakia) by an unidentified moneyer (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 3.

The Saracen's head is a pun on the surname of Jacobus Saracenus (Szerechen, in Hun.) and his brother, Johannes, courtiers of Italian descent who were ennobled by Louis. The image of a Saracen's head appeared on their coat of arms. Jacobus became the kammergraf at the Pécs mint in 1352, and the Comes Camerarum Regalium in 1369. He died in the early 1370s, at which time Johannes succeeded him as kammergraf.
Stkp
HUN_Lajos_I_Huszar_547_Pohl_89-9.JPG
Huszár 547, Pohl 89-9, Unger 432d, Réthy II 89A49 viewsLouis I (Lajos I, in Hun.) (1342-1382). AR denar, 14 mm.

Obv: + MOnETA LODOVICI, Saracen head left.

Rev: + REGIS hVnGARIE, Patriarchal cross with random pellets, lily—S (privy mark) in fields beneath cross-arms.

The type was struck 1373-1382 (per Huszár, Pohl & Unger, although Huszár later wrote that the Saracen-head coinage incepted in 1372). This privy mark was struck 1373-1382 at Schmöllnitz (formerly Szomolnok, now Smolnik Slovakia) by an unidentified moneyer (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 3.

The Saracen's head is a pun on the surname of Jacobus Saracenus (Szerechen, in Hun.) and his brother, Johannes, courtiers of Italian descent who were ennobled by Louis. The image of a Saracen's head appeared on their coat of arms. Jacobus became the kammergraf at the Pécs mint in 1352, and the Comes Camerarum Regalium in 1369. He died in the early 1370s, at which time Johannes succeeded him as kammergraf.
Stkp
HUN_Lajos_I_Huszar_548.JPG
Huszár 548, Pohl 90, Unger 433, Réthy II 89B 63 viewsHungary. Louis I (Lajos I, in Hun.) (1342-1382). AR denar, .46 g.

Obv: + MOnETA LODOVICI, Saracen head left.

Rev: + REGIS hVnGARIE, Patriarchal cross rising from crown at its base, with random pellets.

Struck 1373-1382 (per Huszár, Pohl & Unger, although Huszar later wrote that the Saracen-head coinage incepted in 1372) in Buda (now Budapest) by an unknown moneyer (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 5.

The Saracen's head is a pun on the surname of Jacobus Saracenus (Szerechen, in Hun.) and his brother, Johannes, courtiers of Italian descent who were ennobled by Louis. The image of a Saracen's head appeared on their coat of arms. Jacobus became the kammergraf at the Pécs mint in 1352, and the Comes Camerarum Regalium in 1369. He died in the early 1370s, at which time Johannes succeeded him as kammergraf.
Stkp
HUN_Lajos_I_Huszar_549.JPG
Huszár 549, Pohl 91, Unger 438, Réthy II 90 66 viewsHungary. Louis I (Lajos I, in Hun.) (1342-1382). AR obol, .20 g.

Obv: + REGIS LODOVICI, Patriarchal cross.

Rev: Saracen head left.

All catalogs refer to the Saracen-head side of this emission as the reverse, although Pohl displays that side to the left (where the obverse is traditionally displayed) for consistency of presentation.

Struck 1373-1382 (per Huszár, Pohl & Unger, although Huszar later wrote that the Saracen-head coinage incepted in 1372) in an unidentified mint by an unknown moneyer (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 7.

The Saracen's head is a pun on the surname of Jacobus Saracenus (Szerechen, in Hun.) and his brother, Johannes, courtiers of Italian descent who were ennobled by Louis. The image of a Saracen's head appeared on their coat of arms. Jacobus became the kammergraf at the Pécs mint in 1352, and the Comes Camerarum Regalium in 1369. He died in the early 1370s, at which time Johannes succeeded him as kammergraf.
Stkp
HUN_Lajos_I_Huszar_550_background_filled.JPG
Huszár 550 var., Pohl --, Unger 434b var., Réthy II 91 var. 69 viewsHungary. Louis I (Lajos I, in Hun.) (1342-1382). AR denar.

Obv: + MOnETA LODOVICI (counterclockwise and partially retrograde legend), Saracen head right.

Rev: + REGIS hVnGARIE (counterclockwise and partially retrograde legend), Patriarchal cross with random pellets, crown–crown (privy mark) in lowest fields.

Struck in Buda (now Budapest), ca. 1373-1382 (per Huszár & Unger, although Huszár later wrote that the Saracen-head coinage incepted in 1372). Mint and moneyer unknown. Said to possibly be a contemporary counterfeit by Pohl.

Huszár rarity rating 7. This appears to be an uncommon variety of the emission in that the legends on the standard coin are clockwise without retrograde letters. It is neither described nor depicted in any of the catalogs.

The Saracen's head is a pun on the surname of Jacobus Saracenus (Szerechen, in Hun.) and his brother, Johannes, courtiers of Italian descent who were ennobled by Louis. The image of a Saracen's head appeared on their coat of arms. Jacobus became the kammergraf at the Pécs mint in 1352, and the Comes Camerarum Regalium in 1369. He died in the early 1370s, at which time Johannes succeeded him as kammergraf.
Stkp
HUN_Lajos_II_Huszar_846_1525_Pohl_258-24_var.JPG
Huszár 846, Pohl 258-24 var, Unger 675n var., Réthy II 308A, dated 1525 ?149 viewsHungary. Louis II (Lajos II in Hun.) (1516-1526). AR denar, 16 mm.

Obv: 1525 [?], with annulets on either side of date, above four-part shield with Hungarian arms (Árpádian stripes, patriarchal cross, Dalmatian leopard heads, Bohemian lion), Polish eagle in escutcheon, R—D with rosettes above and below on sides of shield.

Rev: Crowned Madonna with infant Jesus to her right, L—R (privy mark) in fields.

The type was struck 1521-1525 (per Huszár & Unger) or 1521-1526 (per Pohl). This privy mark was struck in Kremnitz (formerly Körmöcbánya, Hungary, now Kremnica, Slovakia) under a collective municipal moneyer-mark.

This type was an inflationary currency that was referred to by contemporaries as “moneta nova.” On average, 400 denars, each weighing 0.49 g., were struck form Ofner mark of silver with a fineness of 0,250 (per Huszár). They were officially valued at ½ a denar, but the public did not accept them at this overvalued rate (per Huszár & Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 4. This series of privy marks is not recorded, but is closest to Pohl 258-24, Unger 675n (K-D on obverse and L-R on reverse).
Stkp
GRK_Apollonia_Ceka_115.JPG
Illyria, Apollonia 18 viewsSear 1878, BMC 14, Ceka 115

AR Drachm (16 mm.), struck after 208-48 B.C. (Petrányi relative year -4), Class 2c2b (being the latest period of the coinage).

Obv: Cow standing left, looking back at calf, which it suckles, [TI]MHN (= Timen, the moneyer) above, ΓΚΠΑ; monogram in exergue, all within linear border.

Rev: ΑΠOΛ above square with concave sides containing one separation line and vertically-oriented petal-shaped rays, ΔΑΜΟ-ΦΩΝ-ΤΟΣ (= Demophon, the magistrate); around square in three parts clockwise, all within a linear border.
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Illyria,_Dyrrhachion_Amyntas.png
Illyria, Dyrrhachion11 viewsIllyria, Dyrrhachion as Roman Protectorate. 3rd-2nd century B.C. AR drachm (18.77 mm, 3.36 g, 8 h). Kthtos / Amyntas, struck after 229 B.C. magistrate / moneyer. KTHTOΣ, cow standing right, looking back at calf she suckles; to right, cornucopiae; in exergue, rudder / ΔYP / A / MY[N / TA], legend around the 4 sides of double square containing two stellate patterns . BMC 34; MS 186; Maier 107Rob D
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Illyria, Dyrrhachium30 viewsGR2. Illyria, Dyrrhachium. After 229 BC. Silver drachm

Obverse : Cow with suckling calf,and the moneyers name MENISKOS above the cow's back, with a small eagle above the name.
Reverse : Double star pattern in a square, with an inscription naming the city around.

In 229 BCE, when the Romans seized the city the "-damnos" part of the name was inauspicious to Latin ears, and its name, as it was refounded, became Dyrrhachium. Pausanias (6.x.8) says "the modern Roman city is not the ancient one, being at a short distance from it. The modern city is called Dyrrhachium from its founder." The name Dyrrachion is found on coins of the fifth century BCE; in the Roman period Dyrrachium was more common. However, the city maintained a semi-autonomy and was turned into a Roman colony.

Dyrrachium was the landing place for Roman passengers crossing the Ionian Sea from Brundisium, which made it a fairly busy way-station. Here commenced the Via Egnatia, the Roman military road to Thessalonica that connected Roman Illyria with Macedonia and Thrace. The city itself was part of Macedonia, more specifically Epirus Nova. In 48 BCE Pompey was based at Dyrrachium and beat off an attack by Julius Caesar (see Battle of Dyrrhachium). In 345 BCE the city was levelled by an earthquake and rebuilt on its old foundations. In the 4th century CE, Dyrrachium was made the capital of the Roman province of Epirus nova.

The name "Epidamnos" was still used by the Byzantines, as for example in the 13th-century Synopsis Chronike, referring to contemporary events.

ecoli
GRK_Dyrrhachium.jpg
Illyria, Dyrrhachium (Durrës/Durazzo, Albania)9 viewsSGCV 1899-1901 var., Ceka 278, Meta IV/74

AR Drachm, 3.01 gr., 19.82 mm. max., 0◦; struck 61 B.C., Petrányi Class D4 (struck 92-60 BC).

Obv: Cow standing right, looking back at calf, which it suckles, ΚΤΗΤΟΣ (=Ktitos, the moneyer) and wreath above, tripod to right, [A in exergue], all within beaded border.

Rev: ΔYP (= DYR, for Dyrrhachium) above square with concave sides containing two separation lines and vertically-oriented petal-shaped rays, ΚΛΕΙ-ΤΟΡΙ-ΟΥ (= of Kleitorios, the magistrate), around square in three parts clockwise, all within a linear border.

Apollonia and Dyrrhachium were founded by Corcyra, and produced parallel series of similar coins during the first four centuries B.C. The drachma series was minted from the end of the 3rd century B.C. until the mid-1st century under Roman protectorate, and shows devices adopted from Corcyra: the cow with suckling calf on the obverse and a symmetrical geometrical pattern on the reverse.
Stkp
John_ab.jpg
John - London, England54 viewsJohn Lackland (1166-1216). King of England 1199-1216, House of Plantagenet. AR (19 mm, 1.40 g) short cross penny minted in London by moneyer Ilger.
Obverse: HENRICVS REX.
Reverse: ILGER ON LVNDE.
Reference: Sear 1351 Class 5b2.

Jan (jbc)
bvca.jpg
Julius Caesar53 viewsJulius Caesar. 44 BC. AR Denarius. L. Aemilius Buca, moneyer.
Obverse: CAESAR D[CT PER]PETVO, laureate head right.
Reverse: L BVCA, winged caduceus and fasces in saltire; axe, globe, and clasped hands in angles.
Crawford 480/6; CRI 103; Sydenham 1063; RSC 25. 18mm - 2.90 g.
b70
JC_Elephant.jpg
Julius Caesar175 viewsJulius Caesar. 49-48 BC. AR Denarius (19 mm, 3.66 g). Military mint traveling with Caesar.
O: Elephant right, trampling on serpent
R: Simpulum, sprinkler, axe and priest's hat. - Crawford 443/1; CRI 9; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49.
Variant type recognized by B. Woytek, in cruder style and with the elephant's two front legs and two back legs virtually parallel with each other.

Julius Caesar and his armies assembled on the banks of the Rubicon River on 10 January 49 BC, ready to invade Italy. Since large quantities of denarii were necessary to pay Caesar's military expenses, the mint traveled with them. This issue was ordered, not by a moneyer, as was usual, but by Julius Caesar himself. In all likelihood, this type was used by Caesar's military forces at least until the decisive battle of Pharsalus.

"It is the inscription CAESAR in the exergue that has led to the modern identification of the elephant as Caesar. But the exergue is the traditional place for the moneyer’s name and Caesar is separated from the field by the ground line. When Hirtius minted, he put his own name there. Presumably the Caesarian message remained the same with or without CAESAR inscribed on the coin. So whatever that message was, it had to be using symbols easily recognized by the people he was speaking to.

The main problem with a Good over Evil interpretation is that the snake was not a symbol of evil in the pagan Roman mind. As for the elephant, the most frequent use of the elephant on coinage had been by the Metelli. Of all the families of Rome they had done more to connect their name with the elephant image than any other family line. And Metellus Scipio himself even used the elephant again (without snake, of course) after Caesar minted his coin.

As others have pointed out, the other side of the coin with the implements of the pontifex maximus makes an unmistakable reference to Caesar with or without the name Caesar. But that also got me to thinking. Why did he want to advertise that position? Simply put, the main concern of the Roman state religion was the Salus of the state, hence it was Caesar’s chief concern as Pontifex Maximus. If the Metellan elephant was trampling on the Salus of the state, it was his duty as Pontifex Maximus to protect and restore Salus." - mharlan, http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=88757.0
4 commentsNemonater
JCaesarFatEle.jpg
Julius Caesar158 viewsJulius Caesar. 49-48 BC. AR Denarius (18.07 mm, 3.87 g). Military mint traveling with Caesar.
O: Elephant right, trampling on serpent
R: Emblems of the pontificate - Simpulum, sprinkler, axe and priest's hat.
- Crawford 443/1; Sear (History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators) 9; Sydenham 1006; BMCRR (Gaul) 27; Cohen/RSC 49; Babelon (Voconia) 1; Sear (Roman Coins & Their Values I) 1399.

Julius Caesar and his armies assembled on the banks of the Rubicon River on 10 January 49 BC, ready to invade Italy. Since large quantities of denarii were necessary to pay Caesar's military expenses, the mint traveled with them. This issue was ordered, not by a moneyer, as was usual, but by Julius Caesar himself. In all likelihood, this type was used by Caesar's military forces at least until the decisive battle of Pharsalus.

"It is the inscription CAESAR in the exergue that has led to the modern identification of the elephant as Caesar. But the exergue is the traditional place for the moneyer’s name and Caesar is separated from the field by the ground line. When Hirtius minted, he put his own name there. Presumably the Caesarian message remained the same with or without CAESAR inscribed on the coin. So whatever that message was, it had to be using symbols easily recognized by the people he was speaking to.

The main problem with a Good over Evil interpretation is that the snake was not a symbol of evil in the pagan Roman mind. As for the elephant, the most frequent use of the elephant on coinage had been by the Metelli. Of all the families of Rome they had done more to connect their name with the elephant image than any other family line. And Metellus Scipio himself even used the elephant again (without snake, of course) after Caesar minted his coin.

As others have pointed out, the other side of the coin with the implements of the pontifex maximus makes an unmistakable reference to Caesar with or without the name Caesar. But that also got me to thinking. Why did he want to advertise that position? Simply put, the main concern of the Roman state religion was the Salus of the state, hence it was Caesar’s chief concern as Pontifex Maximus. If the Metellan elephant was trampling on the Salus of the state, it was his duty as Pontifex Maximus to protect and restore Salus." - mharlan, http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=88757.0
5 commentsNemonater
caesar_3.jpg
JULIUS CAESAR (C. CLOVIUS MONEYER)14 viewsJULIUS CAESAR (C. CLOVIUS MONEYER)
Bronze, Dupondius
Obverse: CAESAR · DIC ·TER: Head of Nike right and a star behind.
Reverse: C·CLOVI - PRAEF: Minerva advancing Left holding trophy over shoulder and shield decorated with Medusa, at her feet, snake left
Mint: Mediolanum Italy (?)
Minted: 45 BCE
Dia: 26mm
Wt: 13.03
Notes: Scarce.
Ex Numismatic Tintinna Auction Asta Elettronica 64, Lot 2076; 22 June 2017
Ref: Cr. 476/1b; Sydenham 1025; CRI 62; RPC 601
1 commentsjimbomar
RS000-Roman-AR_denarius,_Julius_Caesar_(ca_44_BC)-046800.JPG
JULIUS CAESAR (d. 44 BC), AR denarius, struck February-March 44 BC, moneyer C. Cossutius Maridianus80 viewsObverse- Wreathed and veiled head of Caesar right, DICT IN PERPETVO behind, CAESAR before.
Reverse- moneyer's name with Venus standing left, holding Victory and resting elbow on shield on globe.

RSC10, 19mm, 3.17g.

NGC VG ("bankers marks", Strike 3/5, Surface 2/5), cert. #4095350-001.
Ex- Imperial Coins & Artifacts, January 2011, through VCoins store (purchased raw).
Comments: This coin might be an "ugly duckling", but it's got a ton of history. When it came time to pursue a Twelve Caesars collection, I knew that nothing but a lifetime portrait issue of Caesar would do for me, though I probably could have had one of those interesting "elephants" or a more attractive "goddess head" design in better condition for less. This time I chose historical significance over eye appeal. This coin would have been struck just before Caesar's assassination on the fateful Ides of March, perhaps in that very month. It wasn't easy finding one within my $500/coin budgetary ceiling at the time, but this one came in under that price... barely.
4 commentslordmarcovan
Screen_Shot_2018-06-09_at_10_02_08_AM.png
Julius Caesar Craw. 480/5b145 viewsJulius Caesar. AR Denarius, 44 BC.
(19.00 mm 3.68 g)
Obv:. Laureate head right; before, CAESAR IMP; behind, star of eight rays.
Rev: P. SEPVLLIVS MACER. Venus standing left, holding Victory and sceptre (resting on star?).
Cr. 480/5b RSC 41 BMC 4165 Syd 1071Sear (2000) 1412
A very elegant portrait. Perfectly struck on broad flan. Areas of flatness and scratch on obverse, otherwise about VF.
Ex: Artemide Asti E-Auction 43 E, June 9, 2018.

This coin features a lifetime portrait of Julius Caesar as dictator. It took me a while to find one that I liked. When these come up for auction there is much competition for them. It is not that they are particularly rare, one can find numerous examples for sale at any given time, it is the fact that these are sought after by many collectors. A lifetime portrait of Julius Caesar is a major purchase (at least for me), and would be the centerpiece of many ancient coin collections.

This particular coin features a portrait of Julius Caesar on the obverse with the legend “Caesar Imp”, meaning Julius Caesar Imperator. At this time “Imperator” did not exactly mean emperor it was more like victorious general. On the reverse we see Venus standing and the name of the moneyer who issued the coin. Venus is important as Julius Caesar claimed he was a descendant of Venus. The moneyer’s name is P. Sepullius Macer. On some other lifetime denarii the obverse legend is “Dict Perpetuo” or dictator for life. For some Romans this was too much to stand for. The Romans had a troubled history with their kings and did not want to return to those times. Some believe that this coin so troubled high ranking Romans that it led to the assassination of Ceasar.

One fascinating aspect of these lifetime denarii is that they were minted before the assassination. This coin in particular was issued near the end of February which means it was minted mere weeks before the death of Julius Caesar on March 15. One of the ideas that attracted me to ancient coins in the first place concerned holding a piece of important history in one’s hand. It can be argued that the life and death of Caesar were very important to history. Holding one of these coins takes us back to an important and fascinating historical period.

As to the coin itself, it is struck on a large flan, the portrait is well centered, the obverse legend is very easy to read, and the reverse is quite pleasing as well with good details preserved. The obverse portrait has a deep scratch across the head. However, given the other qualities of the coin this was easy to overlook.
7 commentsorfew
001.jpg
Julius Caesar Denarius 99 viewsRSC 41, Syd 1071, Cr480/5b; Feb.-Mar. 44 B.C.
3.48 g, 16 mm x 19 mm
P. Sepullius Macer, moneyer
CAESAR IMP, laureate head of Caesar right, star of eight rays behind
P SEPVLLIVS MACER, Venus standing left, holding Victory in right hand, scepter set on star in left.
Lifetime Portrait
3 commentsMark Z
Julius_Caesar_opt.jpg
JULIUS CAESAR Denarius, RSC 34, M METTIVS Moneyer71 viewsOBV: CAESAR IMP, laureate head right, lituus & simpulum behind
REV: M METTIVS, Venus standing left with Victory & scepter, shield resting on globe; control letter G to left
3.81g, 18mm

Minted January-February 44 BC

Coin is plugged and ex-mount
ex Andrew McCabe
1 commentsLegatus
JCElephantII.jpg
Julius Caesar Elephant Denarius59 viewsJulius Caesar. 49-48 BC. AR Denarius. Military mint traveling with Caesar.
O: Elephant right, trampling on serpent
R: Emblems of the pontificate - Simpulum, sprinkler, axe and priest's hat.
- Crawford 443/1; Sear (History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators) 9; Sydenham 1006; BMCRR (Gaul) 27; Cohen/RSC 49; Babelon (Voconia) 1; Sear (Roman Coins & Their Values I) 1399. Ex HJBerk 90th Buy or Bid Sale, 4/17/96, Lot 232, listed as Mint state.

Julius Caesar and his armies assembled on the banks of the Rubicon River on 10 January 49 BC, ready to invade Italy. Since large quantities of denarii were necessary to pay Caesar's military expenses, the mint traveled with them. This issue was ordered, not by a moneyer, as was usual, but by Julius Caesar himself. In all likelihood, this type was used by Caesar's military forces at least until the decisive battle of Pharsalus.

"It is the inscription CAESAR in the exergue that has led to the modern identification of the elephant as Caesar. But the exergue is the traditional place for the moneyer’s name and Caesar is separated from the field by the ground line. When Hirtius minted, he put his own name there. Presumably the Caesarian message remained the same with or without CAESAR inscribed on the coin. So whatever that message was, it had to be using symbols easily recognized by the people he was speaking to.

The main problem with a Good over Evil interpretation is that the snake was not a symbol of evil in the pagan Roman mind. As for the elephant, the most frequent use of the elephant on coinage had been by the Metelli. Of all the families of Rome they had done more to connect their name with the elephant image than any other family line. And Metellus Scipio himself even used the elephant again (without snake, of course) after Caesar minted his coin.

As others have pointed out, the other side of the coin with the implements of the pontifex maximus makes an unmistakable reference to Caesar with or without the name Caesar. But that also got me to thinking. Why did he want to advertise that position? Simply put, the main concern of the Roman state religion was the Salus of the state, hence it was Caesar’s chief concern as Pontifex Maximus. If the Metellan elephant was trampling on the Salus of the state, it was his duty as Pontifex Maximus to protect and restore Salus." - mharlan, http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=88757.0
2 commentsNemonater
Julius_Caesar_Lifetime_Portrait.jpg
Julius Caesar Lifetime Portrait - RSC 4156 viewsObverse: CAESAR IMP, wreathed head of Caesar right, star with eight rays behind
Reverse: P SEPVLLIVS MACER, Venus standing left holding Victory and scepter with a star at base
Minted: Jan – Feb 44 BC, Rome Size: 3.41gm, 18mm
ID: Crawford 480/5b; CRI 106a; Sydenham 1071; RSC 41
Misc: Bankers marks, moneyer P Sevullius Macer
3 commentsickster
Procilia1obre.JPG
Juno (Sospita)222 views* AR Denarius Procilia 1, moneyer L. Procili F.
* Rome 80 BC
* Obv: Laur. head of Jupiter. To l.: S•C.
* Rev: Cult statue of Juno Sospita, stg. r., wearring goatskin and holding shield in l.hand, and hurling spear with r.hand; before snake, behind: L•PROCILI / F downwards.
* 18,5 mm
* Crawford 379/1.
Gert
Aethelred.JPG
Kingdom of Northumbria - Aethelred II (?), AE styca, 841-843/432 viewsAethelred II, Monne moneyer
AE styca
York - 841-843/4 AD
cross in center
+EÐIIRED
cross in center
+MONNE
Spink 868

The second E is mistakenly engraved as a Runic ansuz.
Ardatirion
Redwulf_styca,_York_844_AD.JPG
Kingdom of Northumbria - Redwulf, AE styca, 844 AD, York 65 viewsRedwulf, Cuthbert moneyer
AE styca
York - 844 AD
cross in center
+REDVLF REX
cross in center
+CVÐBEREhT
Spink 867
1 commentsArdatirion
L_CALPURNIUS_PISO.jpg
L CALPURNIUS PISO CAESONINUS & Q SERVILIUS CAEPIO AR Denarius, Crawford 330/1a, Two Quaestors20 viewsOBV: Head of Saturn facing right, harpa and legend PISO behind, CAEPIO and symbol below, Q below chin
REV: AD FRV EMV EX SC, the two quaestors seated left between 2 grain ears
This piece was minted circa 100 BC under the authority of the moneyers L. Calpurnius Piso Caesonius and Q. Servilius Capeio, Quaestors. The obverse depicts the head of Saturn facing right, harpa and legend PISO behind, CAEPIO and symbol below, Q below chin. The reverse features the two Quaestors seated left between corn ears, with legends AD.FRV.EMV./EX.SC. This is an abbreviated form of "Ad Frumentum Emundum, ex Senatus Consulto". This piece was minted specifically for use in conjunction with a law that was passed to allow people to buy corn for "a semis and a triens for a modius". The Senate ordered the quaestors to strike a special issue of coins so that they could fulfil the provisions of the law. A very decent example of this scarcer historical type, issued for an early form of price control!

Minted at Rome, 100BC
Legatus
L_Cassius_Longinus_SRCV_364.jpg
L Cassius Longinus SRCV 36429 viewsL. Cassius Longinus, Silver denarius, Rome, 63 BC, 3.724g, 19mm, 180o, Crawford 413/1, Sydenham 935, RSC I Cassia 10, SRCV 364,
OBV: Veiled bust of Vesta left, kylix behind, C before, reverse LONGIN III V, voter standing left, dropping tablet inscribed V into a cista;
REV: LONGIN III V, voter standing left, dropping tablet inscribed V into a cista

The reverse of this coin commemorates the voting for the Lex Cassia Tabellaria in 137 B.C. The obverse control letters come only from the moneyer's name.

EX: Forum Ancient Coins
Romanorvm
L_Titurius_Lf_Sabinus.JPG
L Titurius Lf Sabinus22 viewsMoneyer: L. Titurius L.f. Sabinus, ROMAN REPUBLIC, AR Denarius, 89 B.C., 17.15mm, 3.7g, Tituria 6, Crawford 344/3, BMC 2330-43, Sydenham 700
OBV: Bare head of King Taitus right, bearded, SABIN behind.
REV: Victory in a biga right, holding wreath, L TITVRI below, fish in exergue.
Romanorvm
Paulus_Lepidus.jpg
L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus - AR denarius13 viewsRome
²67 BC
¹62 BC
Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right
PAVLLVS LEPIDVS_CONCORDIA
L Aemilius Paullus standing to right of trophy, Perseus and his two sons captive on the left
TER
PAVLLVS
¹Crawford 415/1, SRCV I 366, RSC I Aemilia 10, Sydenham 926
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,84g 20-19,5mm

On reverse scene moneyer commemorates his ancestor L. Aemilius Paullus who had defeated Macedonian king Perseus in the battle of Pydna. TER stands for tertius since it was his third triumph.
Moneyer was elected consul in 50 BC and was bribed by Julius Caesar who need his support. Paullus had used money to reconstruction of basilica Aemilia on Roman Forum. Paullus opposed the second triumvirate and his brother Marcus Aemilius Lepidus order his death but he managed to escape and join Brutus. After Brutus' defeat he was pardoned and spend his remaining years at Miletus.
Johny SYSEL
L__Antestius_Gragulus.jpg
L. Antestius Gragulus - AR Denarius5 viewsRome
²138 BC
¹136 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
GRAG_(XVI)
Jupiter in quadriga right, horling thunderbolt and holding scepter and reins
L·A(NTE)S
ROMA
¹Crawford 238/1, Sydenham 451, RSC I Antestia 9, BMCRR Rome 976, SRCV I 115
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Aurelio and Calico

This is the first issue with (XVI) monogram used as denarius value mark.
Johny SYSEL
1336_314_Aurelius_Cotta.jpg
L. Aurelius Cotta - AR serrate denarius8 views³Sardinia or Massalia region
¹Rome
²102 BC
¹105 BC
draped bust of Vulcan right wearing pileus, tongs behind, all within myrtle wreath
(XVI)
X
eagle on thunderbolt right, head left, all within laurel wreath
L·COT
¹Crawford 314/1b, Sydenham 577, RSC I Aurelia 21
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
³Mark Passehl
ex Künker

Head of Vulcan refers to the bronze coins of Lipara island. Lipara was conquered by moneyer's ancestor C. Aurelius Cotta in 252 BC. Moneyer became Tribune of the Plebs in 103 BC and Praetor in 95 BC.
Johny SYSEL
1317_262_Caecilius.JPG
L. Caecilius Metellus Diadematus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²130 BC
¹128 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
(XVI)
Pax in biga right, holding branch, reins and scepter, elephant head below
ROMA
¹Crawford 262/1, RSC I Caecilia 38, Sydenham 496, SRCV I 138
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Gabinet Numizmatyczny D. Marciniak

Head of elephant, emblem of Caecilia family, commemorates victory of L. Caecilius Metellus over Hasdrubal near Panormus in 251 BC. Captured carthaginian elephants were displayed in following triumph.
Johny SYSEL
Piso_Frugi.jpg
L. Calpurnius L.f. L.n. Piso Frugi - AR denarius8 viewsRome
¹²90 BC
laureate head of Apollo right
E / A
Horseman holding palm branch galloping right
L·PISO FRVGI
A
¹Crawford 340/1, RSC I Calpurnia 11, SRCV I 235
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,70g

Issue commemorates Ludi Apollinares which was held by moneyer's ancestor L. Calpurnius Piso in 212 BC for the first time. It's the most extensive republican issue. There is more than 300 variant of this coin.
Johny SYSEL
330,1b_Calpurnius_Piso_Caesoninus,_Servilius_Caepio.jpg
L. Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus and Q. Servilius Caepio - AR denarius6 viewsRome
¹²100 BC
head of Saturn right, harpa behind
PISO_·_CAEPIO·_Q
crescent? below (off flan)
two questors seated left between two stalks of grain
AD·FRV·EMV / EX·S·C
¹Crawford 330/1b, SRCV I 210, Sydenham 603a, RSC I Calpurnia 5a
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,2g
ex Aureo & Calicó

This exceptional type was a joint issue of the Quaestor Urbanus (Caepio) and the Quaestor Ostiensis (Piso), struck to finance discounted grain on the initiative of Saturninus (lex frumentaria de semissibus et trientibus = one semis and one triens for modius). Coins were struck by special decree of the Senate (Ad frumentum emundun, ex senatus consulto) in order to fulfill above-mentioned decree.
Johny SYSEL
Cassius.jpg
L. Cassius Caeicianus Denarius 102 B.C.24 viewsSilver denarius, SRCV 199, Sydenham 594, Crawford 321/1, RSC Cassia 4, aVF, Rome mint, 102 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Ceres left, wreathed in grain, H (control mark) and CÆICIAV behind; reverse two oxen yoked left, plow and O. (control mark) above, L·CASSI in exergue;

The yoke of oxen was used by the Romans as a symbol of colonization. This coin probably refers to a colony established by an ancestor of the moneyer. The control marks on the obverse and reverse are combined in opposite alphabetical order, e.g., A with X, B with V, C with T, down to K with M. -- The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham
Philoromaos
longinus.jpg
L. Cassius Longinus c. 63 B.C.177 viewsSilver denarius, Craw. 413/1, Cassia 10, S 364, VF, 3.855g, 19.7mm, 135o, Rome mint, c. 63 B.C.; obverse veiled bust of Vesta left, kylix behind, reversed S before; reverse LONGIN III V, Male figure left, dropping tablet inscribed V into a cista;

The reverse of this coin commemorates the voting for the Lex Cassia Tabellaria in 137 B.C. The obverse control letters come only from the moneyer's name.
1 commentsb70
L_Cornelius_Lentulus_sextans.jpg
L. Cornelius Lentulus - AE Sextans7 viewsSardinia
211 BC
draped bust of Mercury right wearing winged petasos
●●
prow of galley right, fighting platform with club
ROMA
C
●●
Crawford 63/6, Sydenham 157d, BMCRR Italy 187, SRCV I 1220
4,0g
ex Lanz

If C really stood for L. Cornelius Lentulus praetor of Sardinia, he would be the first moneyer with a name on his coins.
Johny SYSEL
739_311_Scipio_Asiaticus.JPG
L. Cornelius Scipio Asiaticus - AR denarius serratus6 views³Sardinia or Massalia region
¹Rome
²104 BC
¹106 BC
laureate head of Jupiter left
dot over T behind
Jupiter in quadriga right, hurling thunderbolt, holding reins and scepter
L·SCIP·ASIAG
¹Crawford 311/1c, SRCV I 188, RSC I Cornelia 24
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
³Mark Passehl
3,4g
ex Lucernae

Moneyer was the great-grandson of Lucius Cornelius Scipio Asiaticus, consul 190 BC who together with Eumenes II of Pergamum defeated Antiochus III the Great. He belonged to the Marian party in Sulla's first civil war and Sulla's second civil war. He was appointed consul in 83 BC with Gaius Norbanus. In this year Lucius Cornelius Sulla returned to the Italian Peninsula, and advanced against the consuls. He defeated Norbanus in Italy, but seduced the troops of Scipio to desert their general. He was taken prisoner in his camp along with his son Lucius, but was dismissed by Sulla uninjured. He was, however, included in the proscription in the following year, 82 BC, whereupon he fled to Massilia, and passed there the remainder of his life. (wikipedia)
Johny SYSEL
1458_Cossutius_Sabula.jpg
L. Cossutius C.f. Sabula - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²72 BC
¹74 BC
winged head of Medusa left entwined with snakes
SABVLA
Bellerophon on Pegasus right, brandishing spear
XXVII
L·COSSVTI·C·F
¹Crawford 395/1, SRCV I 331, Sydenham 790, RSC I Cossutia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Martí Hervera / Soler y Llach
Johny SYSEL
1302_392_Farculeius.JPG
L. Farsuleius Mensor - AR denarius5 viewsRome
¹²75 BC
diademed and draped bust of Libertas right, pileus behind
S·C__MENSOR
helmeted warrior right in biga holding spear and reins asisting togate citizen into biga
II
L·FARSVLEI
¹Crawford 392/1b; Sydenham 789; Farsuleia 2
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology,
ex Naumann

This issue commemorates a acceptance of lex Iulia de civitate sociis danda, law from 90 BC which guaranteed citizenship to all Italic people who didn't stand up against Rome in social war. For that reason warrior in the chariot is sometimes considered to be Roma.
Johny SYSEL
Flaminius_Chilo.jpg
L. Flaminius Chilo - AR denarius5 viewsRome
²107 BC
¹109-108 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
ROMA
X
Victory in biga right holding wreath and reins
L·FLAMINI
CILO
¹Crawford 302/1, SRCV I 179, RSC I Flaminia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
Johny SYSEL
L_Julius.jpg
L. Julius - AR denarius7 viewsRome
²98 BC
¹101 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet, stalk of grain left
Victory in biga right
L·IVLI
¹Crawford 323/1, Julia SRCV I 201, Sydenham 585, RSC I Julia 3
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Rauch
Johny SYSEL
L_Iulius.jpg
L. Julius - AR denarius12 viewsRome
²146
¹141 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
XVI
Dioscuri riding on horses right holding spears and reins; stars over their heads
L·I(VL)I
ROMA
¹Crawford 224/1, SRCV I 100, Sydenham 443, RSC I Julia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
L__Julius_Bursio.jpg
L. Julius Bursio - AR Denarius6 viewsRome
¹²85 BC
laureate and winged male* head right, trident and poppy stem left
Victory in quadriga right, holding wreath and reins
HV
L·IVLI·BVRSIO
¹Crawford 352/1c, Syd. 728e
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Aureo and Calico

*The strange deity on the obverse combines attributes of Apollo, Mercury and Neptune.
Johny SYSEL
390,1_L__Lucretius_Trio2.jpg
L. Lucretius Trio - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²74 BC
¹76 BC
radiate head of Sol right
crescent moon, 7 stars around - Septem triones (Ursa Major)
TRIO
L·LVCRETI
¹Crawford 390/1, SRCV I 321, Sydenham 783, RSC I Lucretia 2
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
ex Lucernae

Stars on reverse are pun for moneyer's name. Circumpolar stars of Ursa Major were nicknamed Septem triones after oxen (ox - trio) walking in circles during threshing of grain.
Johny SYSEL
Censorius.jpg
L. Marcius Censorinus - AR denarius11 viewsRome
²83 BC
¹82 BC
laureate head of Apollo right
Marsyas standing left, rising hand, holding with wine skin over shoulder; column topped with Victory behind
L·CENSOR
¹Crawford 363/1, SRCV I 281, Sydenham 737, RSC I Marcia 24
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Rauch

The moneyer selected the design to play on his name, Marsyas sounds like Marcius.

Marsyas found Athena's flute. Inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully. Foolishly he challenged Apollo to a musical contest. Apollo won by singing to the music of his lyre. As a just punishment for his presumption, Apollo flayed Marsyas alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and his skin was hung like a wine bag in the cave out of which that river flows. The column depicted on reverse stood on Forum Romanum near praetorian tribunal. It was built by moneyer's ancestor C. Marcius Rutilius Censorius who as the first plebeian became augur in 300 BC and who also became censor as one of the first plebeians.
Johny SYSEL
1478_L_Cens_C_Limet_Crepus.jpg
L. Marcius Censorinus, C. Mamilius C.f. Limetanus and P. Crepusius - AR denarius12 viewsRome
¹83 BC
²82 BC
veiled and draped bust of Venus right
L·CENSORIN
Venus in biga right holding reins and goad
CXVIII
C·LIME(TA)
P·CREPVSI
¹Crawford 360/1b, SRCV I 284, Sydenham 736a, RSC I Marcia 27
²Mark Passehl Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Roma
Johny SYSEL
L__Marcius_Philippus.jpg
L. Marcius Philippus - AR denarius12 viewsRome
¹113 BC
²113-112 BC
helmet, diademed bust of Philip V king of Macedon right with goat's horns
(ROMA)
Φ
equestrian statue right, holding laurel branch, flower below
L·PHILIPPVS
(XVI)
¹Crawford 293/1, SRCV I 170, Sydenham 551, RSC I Marcia 12
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex aurea

Reverse shows equestrian statue of L. Marcius Q. f. Philippus who had concluded a peace treaty with Philip V of Maced in 197 BC.
Moneyer was good speaker and important politician. He was tribune 104 BC, consul 91 BC. He was against granting of citizenship to Roman allies what led to Civil war.

"... A final intriguing element on the coinage of the Philippi which unites it across half a century and the shift in emphasis from Makedonian to Roman royalty, is the flower which appears in the same place on the reverses of RRC 293 and 425 (beneath the hooves of the horseman and the equestrian statue of Q. Marcius Rex). Crawford (RRC, 308) calls attention to the Roman tradition about the conception of Mars (legendary ancestor of clan Marcia) when Juno was fertilised by a flower. But to accomodate the distinctively Makedonian theme of RRC 293, it might be preferable to see it as a lily and already understood as a generic symbol of royal blood. This notion seems to originate with the shift of the Achaemenid seat of government from Persepolis to Susa (literally, the city or place of the lily), and this flower is found on both Hasmonaean and Seleukid royal coinage in Hellenistic times before eventually finding its way into the Merovingian and eventually the Capetian regalia. ..." Mark K.P. from McCabe's sites.
Johny SYSEL
763_425_Marcius_Philippus.JPG
L. Marcius Philippus - AR denarius6 viewsRome
²57 BC
¹56 BC
diademed head of Ancus Marcius to right, lituus behind
ANCVS
equestrian statue right on 5 archs of aquaduct (Aqua Marcia), flower below
PHILIPPVS
A-Q-V-A-(MAR)
¹Crawford 425/1, SRCV I 382, Sydenham 919, RSC I Marcia 28
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,7g
ex Lucernae

Coin shows moneyer's ancestors. Ancus Marcius on obverse was the fourth legendary king who rulled 642 – 617 BC from who Marcii claimed their origin. On reverse there could be statue of Preator Q. Marcius Rex on aquaduct Aqua Marcia which he repaired in 144-140 BC. It was the longest Roman aquaduct which bringed water to Rome from 91 km far source. Aquaduct was financed from money gained by looting of Carthage and Corinth.
Moneyer became consul in 38 BC. He was half-brother of Octavianus Augustus.
Johny SYSEL
L_Marcius_Philippus_denarius_18x20mm_3_77g.jpg
L. Marcius Philippus denarius40 views18x20mm, 3.77g
obv: ANCVS; diademed head of King Ancus Marcius right, lituus behind
rev: PHILIPPVS; aqueduct (the Aqua Marcia) surmounted by equestrian statue, flower below horse, A Q V A and MAR monogram between arches of aqueduct

The reverse of this coin refers to the construction of the Aqua Marcia in 144 BC. The moneyer was the step-brother of Octavian, the future emperor Augustus.

ex HD Rauch, summer auction 2009, lot 545
1 commentsareich
1472_L__Memmius_Gallus.jpg
L. Memmius Galeria - AR serratus denarius12 viewsTransalpine Gaul or Sardinia
Roma
¹103 BC
²106 BC
laureate head of Saturn left harpa
ROMA
Venus in slow biga right holding scepter and reins; above Cupid flying left, holding wreath
· / Q
L·(ME)MMI
GAL
¹Crawford 313/1c; BMCRR I 1353 (also pellet / Q); Sydenham 574a; RSC I Memmia 2a
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Bertolami
Johny SYSEL
0077.jpg
L. Memmius. Denarius25 viewsRRC 304/1
109 bc

Obverse: Male head r., wearing oak-wreath, below chin *.
Reverse: The Dioscuri standing facing between their horses; each holds spear. In exergue, L·MEMMI.

The moneyer is the brother of C. Memmius, Tribunis Plebis in 111.
The obverse type remains unexplained according to Crawford while Grüber states: "The type of the denarius may have been intended to refer to the origin of the Memmii, who claimed to be descended from Menestheus, the Trojan, one of the companions of Aeneas to Italy"

Ex NAC, Auction 84, Lot 782
1 commentsNorbert
L_Minucius.jpg
L. Minucius - AR denarius24 viewsRome
²132 BC
¹133 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
(XVI)
Jupiter in quadriga right holding thunderbolt, reins and scepter
ROMA
L·MINVCIV*
¹SRCV I 125, Crawford 248/1, Sydenham 470, RSC I Minucia 15
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Dionysos

*It's the only example with another letter behind I visible I've seen.
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
L__Mussidius_Longus.png
L. Mussidius Longus – Mussidia-6b27 viewsMoneyer issues of Imperatorial Rome. L. Mussidius Longus. 42 BC. AR Denarius (17mm, 3.93 g, 9h). Rome mint. Diademed and veiled head of Concordia right / Shrine of Venus Cloacina: circular platform surmounted by two statues of the goddess, each resting a hand on cippus. Crawford 494/42a; CRI 188; Sydenham 1093; Mussidia 6b. 1 commentsBud Stewart
Papius.jpg
L. Papius - AR serratus denarius7 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
²78 BC
¹79 BC
head of Juno Sospita right waering goat skin; bucket behind
Gryphon springing right; jug below
L.PAPI
¹Crawford 384/1 (symbol 11); Sydenham 773; Papia 1; British museum 1902,0206.106
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
ex Solidus

Gens Papia was Samnite origin and family came from Lanuvium.
Johny SYSEL
3350434.jpg
L. Plautius Plancus27 viewsMoneyer issues of Imperatorial Rome. L. Plautius Plancus. 47 BC. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.49 g, 6h). Rome mint. Facing mask of Medusa with disheveled hair; coiled serpents flanking / Victory (or winged Aurora) flying right, head slightly left, holding reins and conducting four rearing horses of the sun. Crawford 453/1a; CRI 29; Sydenham 959; Plautia 15. VF, lightly toned, porous, banker’s mark on obverse. ecoli
453,1c_Plautius_Plancus.jpg
L. Plautius Plancus - AR denarius10 viewsRome
47 BC
facing head Medusa wearing hoop earrings
L·PLAVTIVS
Aurora flying right with head slightly left conducting 4 horses
PLANCVS
Crawford 453/1c, SRCV I 429, Sydenham 959b, RSC I Plautia 14
3,9g
ex Roma Numismatics

This moneyer was adopted into the Plautia gens. Sear suggests that the reverse type may be related to a picture by Nichomachus of Thebes which was placed in the Capitol by L. Munatius Plancus as a part of the celebrations of his Gallic triumph. In his Fasti, Ovid relates the origin of the festival of the lesser Quinquatria Minerva. He states that an aedile exiled Rome’s flute-players to Tibur, and that the moneyer’s adopted ancestor C. Plautius, who was consul that year, smuggled them back into Rome to appease the citizens. The flute-players wore masks to conceal their identities and this became a tradition of the annual festival.
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
Pomponius_Molo2.jpg
L. Pomponius Molo - AR denarius8 viewsRome
²93 BC
¹97 BC
laureate head of Apollo right
L·POMPON_MOLO
Numa Pompilius holding litus, standing right before altar preparing to sacrifice a goat which is being held by a youth
NV(MA)·PO(MP)IL
¹Crawford 334/1, SRCV I 214, RSC I Pomponia 6, Sydenham 607
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,46g
ex Aurea Numismatika
Johny SYSEL
L__Porcius_Licinius.jpg
L. Porcius Licinus - AR serratus denarius6 viewsL. Licinius Crassus and Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus
³issue struck partly in Sardinia and partly in Gallia in two or three different mint locations
¹Narbo
²120-119 BC
¹118 BC
helmet head of Roma right
L·PORCI__LICI (XVI)
naked Gallic warrior riding in biga right, holding spear, reins, shield and carnyx
L·LIC·CN·DOM
¹Crawford 282/5, SRCV I 158, Sydenham 520, RSC I Porcia 8
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
³Mark Passehl
3,9g
ex Gitbud and Naumann

Narbo, the first colony in Gaul, was founded 118-117 BC. L. Licinius Crassus and Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus were officials charged with founding colony (duoviri coloniae deducendae). L. Porcius Licinus was one of 5 officials charged with production of denarii (curatorec denariorum flandorum). Reverse probably commemorates victory of Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus (consul 122 BC) in southern Gaul. He and Q. Fabius Maximus attacked united Gallic tribes of Allobrogi and Averni led by Bituitus at the confluence of Rhone and Isere. Their triumph was celebrated in 120 BC.
Johny SYSEL
L_Procilius.jpg
L. Procilius L.f. - AR denarius8 views²Minturnae?
¹Rome
¹²80 BC
laureate head of Jupiter right
S·C
Juno Sospita standing right, wearing goat skin, holding spear and shield; snake to the right
L.PROCILI / F
¹Crawford 379/1, SRCV I 306, Sydenham 771, RSC I Procilia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
Procilius_Juno.jpg
L. Procilius L.f. - AR serratus denarius10 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
¹²80 BC
head of Juno Sospita right wearing goat skin
S·C
Juno Sospita in biga right holding spear, reins and shield; snake below
L.PROCILI.F
¹Crawford 379/2, SRCV I 307, Sydenham 772, RSC I Procilia 2
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Gitbud and Naumann

Juno Sospita offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. She was often called upon by infertile women to aid in conception. Juno Sospita had a two temples at Rome, but her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. Her statue there, as described by Cicero and as depicted on coinage, wore a goatskin coat with a goat-horned headdress. Her attribute, the serpent, inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not, was destroyed.
Johny SYSEL
Juno_Sospita.JPG
L. Roscius Fabatus. AR Denarius51 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right in goat skin headdress, L ROSCI below, wine decanter(?) below design behind

Maiden feeding serpent, FABATI in exergue, three legged stool behind.

Crawford 412/1. Sydenham 915.

Lucius R. Fabatus was a military officer and politician who began his political career as moneyer in 64BC. He served on Caesar's staff in Gaul and commanded LEG XIII. He later returned to the Senate and served as Procurator in 49BC. He died a Roman's death in combat against Marc Anthony's Legions at the Battle Of Forum Gallorum on 14/15th April 43BC.

ex- Areich, Photo Areich.

3 commentsWill Hooton
4520_4521.jpg
L. Rubrius Dossenius, Denarius13 viewsAR Denarius
L. Rubrics Dossenius
Moneyer: 87 - 86BC
Issued: 87BC
18.5 x 16.5mm 3.70gr 9h
O: DOSSEN; Laureate head of Jupiter, right, scepter over shoulder.
R: Empty triumphal quadriga, right, thunderbolt on side panel, surmounted by small wreath-bearing Victory, left.
Exergue: RVBRI.
RSC Rubria 1; S. 258; BMC 2448; Syd 705.
cody111111 111115055803
7/15/13 4/3/17
The types of this moneyer appear to express hopes of victory against Marius and his faction.
Nicholas Z
348,1_L__Rubrius_Dossenus.jpg
L. Rubrius Dossenus - AR denarius8 viewsRome
¹²87 BC
head of Jupiter right; scepter behind
DOSSEN
Triumphal chariot with thunderbolt as decoration on side panel decorated; Victory flying right above chariot, holding wreath
L.RVBRI
¹Crawford 348/1, SRCV I 258, Sydenham 705, RSC I Rubria 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,95g
ex Helios numismatik
Johny SYSEL
rubrius_dossenus_Cr348_4.jpg
L. Rubrius Dossenus, Crawford 348/426 viewsL. Rubrius Dossenus, gens Rubria (his name only known from coins)
AR - Quinarius, 1.57g, 15.39mm, 0°
obv. Bearded head of Neptun r., trident over l. shoulder
behind DOS-SEN
rev. Victoria, half nude, head thrown back, advancing tiptoed r., holding over l. shoulder palm branch to which
three wreaths are attached; before her girlanded altar with omphalos atop around which snake is coiled.
beneath L.RVBRI
ref. Crawford 348/4; Sydenham 708; Rubria 4
F+, toned, obv. a bit excentric, altar clearly seen

Interesting reverse type, inadequately described in BMCRR, Sydenham, and Crawford. The same altar with
omphalos and snake separates the two faces of Janus on the obverse of an as struck by the same moneyer,
Crawford 348/5, pl. xlvi.
Jochen
L__Rustius.jpg
L. Rustius - AR Denarius11 viewsRome
²74 BC
¹76 BC
helmeted head of young Mars right
S·C _ (XVI)
ram right
L·RVSTI
¹Crawford 389/1, SRCV I 320, Sydenham 782, RSC I Rustia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,7g
ex Busso Peus


Sear identifies the head as Mars, Crawford as Minerva. Head usually appears masculine and the ram seems a better match for Mars (Aries). Babelon notes that the ram makes an appearance on the only other denarius of the Rustia family, that of Q. Rustius as moneyer under Augustus, and it seems possible the ram has some connection with the Rustia family.
Johny SYSEL
Rutilius_Flaccus~0.jpg
L. Rutilius Flaccus - AR denarius7 viewsRome
²76 BC
¹77 BC
helmeted head of Roma right
FLAC
Victory in biga right holding wreath and reins
L·RVTILI
¹Crawford 387/1, SRCV I 318, Sydenham 780a, RSC I Rutilia 1a
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,88g
ex Aurea Numismatika

Moneyer became senator in 72 BC.
Johny SYSEL
416,1a_Scribonius_Libo.jpg
L. Scribonius Libo - AR denarius10 viewsRome
²67 BC
¹62 BC
diademed head of Bonus Eventus right
BON·EVENT / LIBO
Puteal Scriboniarum (Scribonian well) ornamented with garland and two lyres, hammer at base
PVTEAL
SCRIBON
¹Crawford 416/1a, RSC I Scribonia 8a, Sydenham 928, SRCV 367
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,1g
ex Roma Numismatics

The reverse of this coin depicts the Puteal Scriboniarum which L. Scribonius Libo renovated. According to ancient sources, the Puteal Scriboniarum was a bidental, that is, a spot which had been struck by lightning. It took its name from its resemblance to the low enclosure around a well (puteus) that was between the Temple of Castor and Pollux and the Temple of Vesta, near the Porticus Julia and the Arcus Fabiorum (arch of the Fabii). The praetor’s tribunal was convened nearby, having been removed from the comitium in the 2nd century BC. It thus became a place where litigants, money-lenders and business people congregated. Foundations of well were discovered during excavations in 1950. Bonus Eventus, originally the god of success in trade and agriculture who should ensure good harvest, bacame later the god of luck and happy end. He could commemorate recent event - the end of Catilinarian conspiracy.
Johny SYSEL
Sempronius_Pitio_triens.jpg
L. Sempronius Pitio - AE triens9 viewsRome
²149 BC
¹148 BC
head of Minerva right wearing crested helmet
●●●●
prow of galley right
L·SE(MP)
●●●●
ROMA
¹Crawford 216/4
²Mark Passehl Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
6,6g
ex Roma numismatics
ex Andrew McCabe
ex Thersites collection
Johny SYSEL
L_Sempronius_Pitio.jpg
L. Sempronius Pitio - AR denarius8 viewsRome
²149 BC
¹148 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
PITIO
X
Dioscuri right riding on horses, stars over pilei, each holding spear reins
L·SE(MP)
ROMA
¹Crawford 216/1, SRCV I 91, Sydenham 402, RSC I Sempronia 2
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
ex Aureo & Calicó
Johny SYSEL
L_Sulla.jpg
L. Sulla and L. Manlius Torquatus - AR - denarius7 views²Campania
south Italy
²83 BC
¹82 BC
bust of Roma right wearing winged helmet
PRO Q_L MANLI
Sulla right in quadriga holding caduceus and reins, Victory flying right holding wreath
L·SVLLA·IM
¹Crawford 367/5, SRCV I 286, RSC I Manlia 4, Sydenham 757
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Solidus

Reverse depicts Sulla's upcoming triumph which was held on 29-30 Janury 81 BC.
Johny SYSEL
L_Thorius_Balbus.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²102 BC
¹105 BC
head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin headdress
I·S·M·R (Ivno Seispes Mater Regina)
bull charging right
B
L·THORIVS
BALBVS
¹Crawford 316/1, SRCV I 192, Sydenham 598, RSC I Thoria 1 British Museum: R.7899
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Aurea auctions

Juno Sospita (=Savior) was goddes of fertility and protector of women. She was main deity in Lanuvium.
Bull - Taurus - is pun for moneyer's name Thorius.
Moneyer served as legate under Q. Caecilius Metellus in Spain 79 BC. Cicero wrote that he had lived as there was no pleasure in life.
Johny SYSEL
0085.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus. Denarius. 54 viewsL. Thorius Balbus AR Denarius.

RRC 316/1
105 BC. (?)

Av: Head of Juno Sospita in goat skin, ISMR (Juno Sispes Mater Regina) behind
Rv: Bull charging right, C above, THORIVS below, BALBUS in ex.

This moneyer was a native of Lanuvium and Cicero describes him as a man who lived in such a manner that there was not a single pleasure, however refined or rare, that he did not enjoy. Juno was worshipped at this city as the protectress of women, especially in pregnancy. The rushing bull is a type parlant of the moneyer's name.

ex Asta del Titano M3, lot#138
1 commentsNorbert
Titurius_Sabinus~0.jpg
L. Titurius L.f. Sabinus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
¹²89 BC
head of king Titus Tatius right, palm branch right
A·PV / SABIN
two Roman soldiers running left, each bearing a Sabine woman in his arms
L·TITVRI
¹Crawford 344/1c; Sydenham 698b; Tituria 3; RR1 2324, p.297
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,2g
ex Solidus

The reverse shows the famous rape of the Sabine women.

"The Sabines were ancient people of central Italy ... From the earliest days there was a Sabine element in Rome. After foundation of the double kingdom of Romulus and Titus Tatius the Romans were called Quirites too (populus Romanus Quiritium), referring to Cures, the capital of the Sabinians, where Numa Pompilius was originated too. The story of the rape of the Sabine women to supply wives for the womanless followers of Romulus is a legend explaining this fact. Many Roman religious practices are said to have Sabine origins. Rome was involved in numerous wars with the inland Sabines; Horatius is supposed to have defeated them in the 5th cent. BC, and Marcus Curius Dentatus conquered them in 290 BC. The Sabines became Roman citizens 268 BC. The Samnites were possibly a branch of the Sabines. Anyway often the Samnites were confused by the Romans with the Sabinians." - Jochen's Coins of mythological interest
Johny SYSEL
Titurius_Sabinus_Victory.jpg
L. Titurius L.f. Sabinus - AR denarius6 viewsRome
¹²89 BC
head of king Tatius right
SABIN
Victory in biga right holding wreath and reins
L·TITVRI
controlmark in exergue (trophy?)
¹Crawford 344/3, Sydenham 700, RSC I Tituria 6, SRCV I 253; rev. die match - BM 1950,1006.381
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,91g

Titus Tatius was legendary king of Sabine tribe. Sabinus family was Sabine origin and probably also claimed they are descendants of Titus Tatius.
Johny SYSEL
AC45190.jpg
L. Titurius L.f. Sabinus. (89 B.C.)108 viewsAR Denarius
O: Bare head of King Tatius right, SABIN downward behind, TA in monogram before;
R: Two Roman soldiers running left, each bearing a Sabine woman in his arms, L·TITVRI in ex.
Rome
19mm
3.87g
Crawford 344/1a,RSC I Tituria 2, Sydenham 698a, SRCV I 249

Ex. Civitas Galleries

The reverse refers to the rape of the Sabines. This moneyer traced his descent form the Sabines and perhaps from King Tatius himself. -- Roman Silver Coins edited by David R. Sear and Robert Loosley
3 commentsMat
306-1-Jencek.jpg
L. VALERI FLACCI - Denarius, Crawford 306/19 viewsDenomination: Denarius
Era: c. 108-107 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Bust of Victory r., draped; before, voided X mark of value.

Reverse: Mars walking l. holding spear in r. with point downward, trophy over left shoulder (obscured); apex to l., corn ear to r. L VALERI FLACCI in two lines downward

Mint: Rome
Weight: 3.94 gm.
Reference: Crawford 306/1
Provenance: John Jencek, private purchase, 20-Jan-2009

Comments:
Crawford suggests the moneyer is L. Valerius Flaccus, Cos. 100.
The coin is VF, but the reverse is somewhat off-center.
Steve B5
flac.jpg
L. Valerius Flaccus, (108 - 107 B.C.)122 viewsAR Denarius
O: Winged and draped bust of Victory right, X below chin.
R: LVALERI / FLACCI (downwards on left), Mars walking left, spear in right, trophy in left over shoulder, apex left, head of grain behind.
Rome
20.0mm
3.89g
SRCV I 183, Sydenham 565, Crawford 306/1, RSC I Valeria 11

Mars and the apex recall that the moneyer's father held the office of Flamen Martialis. Crawford concludes the office of moneyer may have been consider a career substitute for aedileship and the grain on the reverse advertises the moneyer would have distributed grain had he been elected Aedile. -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
5 commentsMat
204-1-Naville-Blk.jpg
L.SAVF - Denarius, Crawford 204/118 viewsDenomination: Denarius
Era: c. 152 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma r. with peaked visor; “X” behind; Border of dots
Reverse: Victory in Biga.L.SAVF below. ROMA in raised letters in a two line framed border.

Mint: Rome
Weight: 3.97 gm.
Reference: Crawford 204/1
Provenance: Naville 5, 24-Feb-2014. Lot 96

Comments:
Moneyer L. Saufeius, Not otherwise known.
Reverse slightly off-center obscuring the ROMA Legend, otherwise EF.
1 commentsSteve B5
Lycurgus.jpg
Lakedaimon Laconia/Sparta ca. 2nd-1st century B.C.14 viewsLaconia Lakedaemon (Sparta). Ae 21.1~23.1mm. 7.14 gm. hexachalkon. Second-first century BC. Obv: Bearded head of Lycurgus right, wearing taenia. Rev: Λ—A flanking club-caduceus, moneyer's abbreviated name across fields below, all within wreath. Grunauer xvii.ddwau
0062.jpg
Lucius Aemilius Lepidus Paullus, Denarius33 viewsRRC 415/1
62 b.c.

Obverse: Head of Concordia right, L PAUVLLVS LEPIDVS, CONCORDIA
Reverse: Trophy, togate figure (L Aemilius Paullus), the captives - King Perseus of Macedon and his sons; in exergue: PAVLLVS

The moneyer was a supporter of Cicero, the obverse concordia being represenation of the 'concordia ordinum', central to Ciceros politics in 63 (according to Crawford; Grüber gives a different interpretation, assumedly as he puts the coin into 71 b.c.) .

The reservse remembering the (assumed?) ancestor hailed 'imperator' three times.

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica, Auction 73, Lot 153, 18 November 2013
Ex Sotheby’s sale 1-2 December 1976, Eton College, 267.
Norbert
Saturninus_P.jpg
Lucius Appuleius Saturninus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²101 BC
¹104 BC
helmeted head of Roma left
Saturn in quadriga right holding harpa and reins
.
·P
L·SATVRN
¹Crawford 317/3a, SRCV I 193, Sydenham 578, RSC I Appuleia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,66g 19-17mm

According Richard Schaefer it's the first known example of these dies. Dies differ from ·P thus there, most probably, is dot above P although unfortunately off flan.

As quaestor Saturninus superintended the imports of grain at Ostia, but had been removed by the Roman Senate (an unusual proceeding), and replaced by Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, one of the chief members of the Optimates. Standard view is that injustice of his dismissal drove him into the arms of the Populares. In 103 BC he was elected tribune. Marius, on his return to Rome after his victory over the Cimbri, finding himself isolated in the senate, entered into a compact with Saturninus and his ally Gaius Servilius Glaucia, and the three formed a kind of triumvirate, supported by the veterans of Marius and many of the common people. By the aid of bribery and assassination Marius was elected (100 BC) consul for the sixth time, Glaucia praetor, and Saturninus tribune for the second time. Marius, finding himself overshadowed by his colleagues and compromised by their excesses, thought seriously of breaking with them, and Saturninus and Glaucia saw that their only hope of safety lay in their retention of office. Saturninus was elected tribune for the third time for the year beginning December 10, 100, and Glaucia, although at the time praetor and therefore not eligible until after the lapse of 2 years, was a candidate for the consulship. Marcus Antonius Orator was elected without opposition; the other Optimate candidate, Gaius Memmius, who seemed to have the better chance of success, was beaten to death by the hired agents of Saturninus and Glaucia, while the voting was actually going on. This produced a complete revulsion of public feeling. The Senate met on the following day, declared Saturninus and Glaucia public enemies, and called upon Marius to defend the State. Marius had no alternative but to obey. Saturninus, defeated in a pitched battle in the Roman Forum (December 10), took refuge with his followers in the Capitol, where, the water supply having been cut off, they were forced to capitulate. Marius, having assured them that their lives would be spared, removed them to the Curia Hostilia, intending to proceed against them according to law. But the more impetuous members of the aristocratic party climbed onto the roof, stripped off the tiles, and stoned Saturninus and many others to death. Glaucia, who had escaped into a house, was dragged out and killed. (wikipedia)
Johny SYSEL
Saturninus_T~0.jpg
Lucius Appuleius Saturninus - AR denarius18 viewsRome
²101 BC
¹104 BC
helmeted head of Roma left
Saturn in quadriga right holding harpa and reins
·T·
L·SATVRN
¹Crawford 317/3a, SRCV I 193, Sydenham 578, RSC I Appuleia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,44g 19,5-18,5mm

As quaestor Saturninus superintended the imports of grain at Ostia, but had been removed by the Roman Senate (an unusual proceeding), and replaced by Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, one of the chief members of the Optimates. Standard view is that injustice of his dismissal drove him into the arms of the Populares. In 103 BC he was elected tribune. Marius, on his return to Rome after his victory over the Cimbri, finding himself isolated in the senate, entered into a compact with Saturninus and his ally Gaius Servilius Glaucia, and the three formed a kind of triumvirate, supported by the veterans of Marius and many of the common people. By the aid of bribery and assassination Marius was elected (100 BC) consul for the sixth time, Glaucia praetor, and Saturninus tribune for the second time. Marius, finding himself overshadowed by his colleagues and compromised by their excesses, thought seriously of breaking with them, and Saturninus and Glaucia saw that their only hope of safety lay in their retention of office. Saturninus was elected tribune for the third time for the year beginning December 10, 100, and Glaucia, although at the time praetor and therefore not eligible until after the lapse of 2 years, was a candidate for the consulship. Marcus Antonius Orator was elected without opposition; the other Optimate candidate, Gaius Memmius, who seemed to have the better chance of success, was beaten to death by the hired agents of Saturninus and Glaucia, while the voting was actually going on. This produced a complete revulsion of public feeling. The Senate met on the following day, declared Saturninus and Glaucia public enemies, and called upon Marius to defend the State. Marius had no alternative but to obey. Saturninus, defeated in a pitched battle in the Roman Forum (December 10), took refuge with his followers in the Capitol, where, the water supply having been cut off, they were forced to capitulate. Marius, having assured them that their lives would be spared, removed them to the Curia Hostilia, intending to proceed against them according to law. But the more impetuous members of the aristocratic party climbed onto the roof, stripped off the tiles, and stoned Saturninus and many others to death. Glaucia, who had escaped into a house, was dragged out and killed. (wikipedia)
Johny SYSEL
4090LG.jpg
M Aemilius Scarus & Pub Plautius Hypsaeus Denarius 58 bc34 viewsSilver denarius, SRCV 379, Crawford 422/1b; Sydenham 913; RSC Aemilia 8, Rome mint, 58 B.C.; obverse Aretas, King of Nabatea, kneeling beside camel raising olive branch with fillet, M SCAVR / AED CVR above, EX - S C at sides, REX ARETAS in ex; reverse Jupiter in quadriga left, reins in right, hurling thunderbolt with left, scorpion below, P HYPSAEVS / AED CVR above, CAPTV on right, C HYPSAE COS / PREIVER in exergue.

M. Aemilius Scaurus, in 62 B.C., as questor to Pompey, was sent against King Aretas but withdrew when Aretas paid 300 talents. Aemilius was curule aedile when this coin was struck. This was the first time a moneyer publicized an event from his own career on coinage. Later he was praetor and propraetor, lost a campaign for Consul, and successfully defended Cicero. In 52 B.C., he was charged with bribery and went into exile.
Adrian S
Marcia8.JPG
M Marcius Mn f Denarius, 134 BC54 viewsHelmetted head of Roma right, modius behind, XVI in monogram below chin
Victory with whip in biga right
M MARC below, divided by two grain ears
ex. ROMA
The obverse symbol and reverse of this coin refers to the moneyer's father, Mn. Marcius, who as aedile, c. 154 BC, was the first to distribute wheat to the people at one As per modius.

Marcia 8, Cr 245/1, Syd 500
1 commentswhitetd49
M_Aburius.jpg
M. Aburius Geminus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
¹²132 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
GEM
(XVI)
Sol in quadriga right holding whip and reins<