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Search results - "Minverva"
Minerva~0.jpg
Claudius Minerva 67 viewsT CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP

Rev. Minerva advancing with spear and shield SC

Rome 42 AD

Sear 1862

Ex-Arcade Coins

SOLD
Titus Pullo
CLAVDIVS Minerva.jpg
Claudius Minverva55 viewsT CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP

Rev. Minerva advancing with spear and shield SC

Rome 42 AD

12.0g

Sear 1862

SOLD
Titus Pullo
D98sm.jpg
Domitian RIC 9897 viewsAR Denarius, 2.84g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 98 (C). BMC 24. RSC 592. BNC 34.

This denarius was struck in the early 82, prior to Domitian's overhaul of the mint later that same year when the fineness of the denarius was increased and the reverse types changed over to new designs. The type of Minverva advancing right was issued for Domitian as Caesar under Titus and continued to be struck for him as Augustus. This reverse design survived the mint reorganisation and became one of the four standard Minerva types used on his denarii from 83 until the end of the reign.

Struck on a tight flan in good early style.

3 commentsDavid Atherton
D169.jpg
Domitian RIC-169113 viewsAR Denarius, 3.44g
Rome mint, 83 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT II COS VIIII DES X P P; Minverva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 169 (R). BMC p. 307 note. RSC 601. BNC 42.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

Domitian was very concerned about the quality of his coinage. In 82 AD he restored the fineness of the denarius to the levels of Augustus, striking them in nearly 100% silver. This coin from 83 was produced soon after the new standard was introduced. The portrait style is somewhere between the earlier veristic style seen in the first few months of the reign and the more elaborate, idealised style the engravers employed from 84 onward. This issue is also significant because it introduces for the first time the four standard Minerva types that would dominate the reverse of the denarius until the end of the reign.

Struck in fine style on a large flan. The scrape on the cheek isn't so noticeable in hand.
7 commentsDavid Atherton
D266a.jpg
Domitian RIC-266196 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P M TR POT IIII IMP VIII COS XI P P; Minverva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 266 (R2). BMC 74. RSC 361a. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection, acquired from Barry Murphy. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection. Ex Berk 158, 26 March 2008, lot 240.

Minted in 85 AD, this very rare coin features a wonderful, thoughtful portrait of the "tyrant". IMHO the portraiture on his denarii reached a high point between 82 and 85 when both the fineness and quality of the denarii were vastly improved. It seems only the best engravers were working for him at this time. Ancient coin collectors should really take note of Domitian because he really did care about his coinage.

Struck on a large flan with full legends.
3 commentsDavid Atherton
D339.jpg
Domitian RIC-33985 viewsAR Denarius, 2.82g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: IMPēVIIII COS XI CENS POT P P; Minverva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 339 (R2). BMC 80. RSC 180a. BNC 83.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2015. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

A denarius which is part of the rare fourth issue of 85. This issue is the first struck after Domitian reduced the fineness of the denarius by 5% to the old Neronian level after having raised it in 82 to the Augustan standard. Despite the reduction in fineness this is a remarkably well crafted series signified by the aegis, which only appeared in issues of special note.

A well executed portrait in fine style. Struck on an oblong flan which does not detract too much from the coin's overall appeal.
4 commentsDavid Atherton
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Domitian RIC-740132 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 92-93 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minverva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 740 (C3). BMC 202. RSC 281. BNC 184.
Acquired from Aegean Coins, August 2011.

A most typical denarius of Domitian's reign featuring one of the four common Minverva reverse types. The reverse is often mistakenly described as "Minerva on prow", although she is actually atop a rostral column (see RIC II p. 244). The fine style and all around high quality of the piece is typical of Domitian denarii owing to his great interest in the coinage.
1 commentsDavid Atherton
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Domitian RIC-76234 viewsAR Denarius, 3.33g
Rome mint, 93-94 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVI CENS P P P; Minverva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 762 (C3). BMC 216. RSC 284. BNC 192.

A fairly large issue struck in the aftermath of the Second Pannonian War. Domitian celebrated only an ovatio upon his return and not a full triumph, perhaps due to unsatisfactory results.

Worn, but in decent style with a minor obverse flan flaw at 12h.
David Atherton
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Domitian RIC-77198 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Rome mint, 95 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minverva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 771 (C2). BMC 223. RSC 289. BNC 201.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, June 2015.

Domitian held the consulship in 95, which dates this denarius between 1 January and 13 September of that year. Brian Jones speculates that during 95/96 Domitian waged a campaign against the Iazyges in the vicinity of Singidunum. This military activity may account for the large issues of denarii struck during the final years of the reign.

A rounded, youthful looking portrait of Domitian is seen here. Interestingly, a mound of hair is perched atop the balding emperor, showcasing flattering and competent craftsmanship by the engraver. Honest wear with good toning.
2 commentsDavid Atherton
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Domitian RIC-79081 viewsAR Denarius, 3.56g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 790 (C2). BMC 235. RSC 290. BNC 209.
Acquired from C. J. Martin, August 2013.

A very crisp denarius which was struck during the last year of Domitian's reign between 14 September 95 to 13 September 96. This was a large issue with many common examples, including all four standard Minerva types, and one which saw the introduction of many new types (the flying Minverva for example). These later coins tend to lack the high quality and craftsmanship of earlier issues.

A very sharp coin in hand.
1 commentsDavid Atherton
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Domitian RIC-841152 viewsAR Cistophorus, 9.81g
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG P M COS VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 841 (C). BMC 251. RSC 23. RPC 864 (8 spec.). BNC 221.
Acquired from Tom Cederlind, February 2013.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. It being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. Domitian completed the structure the following year and it was said no expense was spared. The building Domitian dedicated was a lavish structure, magnificent in appearance featuring Pentelic marble, gold plated doors, and a roof of gilded bronze.

This cistophorus minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor commemorates the new Temple of Jupiter Domitian bestowed on Rome. Curiously, although the building featured six columns, only four are seen here. Statues of the deities Juno, Jupiter (seated) and Minverva can be seen between the columns.

A most wonderful coin in hand.
8 commentsDavid Atherton
RIC_266_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0266 Domitianus51 viewsObv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC, Laureate head right
Rev: P M TR POT IIII IMP VIII COS XI P P, Minverva standing left, with spear
AR/Denarius (19.93 mm 3.43 g 6h) Struck in Rome 85 A D (1sr Issue)
RIC 266 (R2), RSC 361a, BMCRE 74
1 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
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Titus RIC-515212 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P Mē; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC -. RPC 860 (3 spec.). BNC 111.
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton
     
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