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Search results - "Messenia"
Pylus.jpg
Achaea. Messinia, Pylos. Caracalla AE22135 viewsPeloponnesus. Pylos, Messenia. Caracalla. AD 198-217. Æ Assarion 22mm. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Athena standing left, holding phiale and spear.
BCD Peloponnesus 819

Pylos is the home of the mythological argonaut Nestor; King of Pylus.
ancientone
pylos.jpg
Achaea. Messinia, Pylos. Caracalla AE22. Athena40 viewsPeloponnesus. Pylos, Messenia. Caracalla. AD 198-217. Æ Assarion 22mm.
Obv: Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: Athena standing left, holding phiale and spear.
BCD Peloponnesus 819
22mm, 3.7g.
ancientone
PylosTerm.jpg
Achaea. Messinia, Pylos. Caracalla AE22. Terminal figure.86 viewsPeloponnesus. Pylos, Messenia. Caracalla. AD 198-217. Æ Assarion 22mm.
Obv: Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: PYL[IWN] Terminal figure veiled and closely draped, holds in r. end of garment.
ancientone
messene~0.jpg
ACHAIA, Achaean League, Messenia-Messena. Circa 175-168 BC.103 viewsAR Hemidrachm (18mm, 2.46 g).
Laureate head of Zeus right / Monogram; O-OP-N across field, M below; all within wreath tied at bottom.
Agrinion 325d-e; Clerk 304; BCD 722.7, 724; Benner-Messene-23 (same obverse die).

exBeast Coins.
2 commentsCGPCGP
Messenia,_Messene,_Hemidrachm.jpg
Achaian League, Messene, 191-183 BC, AR Hemidrachm7 viewsLaureate head of Zeus left.
Large AX monogram, Ξ-E across fields, ΠAY monogram above and ligate ME below, all within laurel wreath.

HGC 5, 595 (this coin); BCD Peloponnesos 706 (this coin); Agrinion 314 (same obverse die); Clerk 310.

(14 mm, 2.50 g, 1h)
Auctiones GmbH 1, 19 December 2011, 28; ex- BCD Collection: LHS 96, 8-9 May 2006, 706; ex- de Nicola, May 1982.
n.igma
Hosidius_Geta~0.jpg
C. Hosidius C. f. Geta - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²65 BC
¹68 BC
diademed and draped bust of Diana, bow and quiver over shoulder
III VIR / GETA
attacked boar right, spear in shoulder, hound below
C HOSIDI C F
¹Crawford 407/2; Sydenham 903; Kestner 3317; BMCRR I Rome 3389; RSC I Hosidia 1, SRCV I 346
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,6g
ex Marc Walter

"Oineus, king of Kalydon in Aitolia, once had feasted the gods at an harvest festival but forgotten to butcher an animal for Artemis. The goddess was enraged and sent a big boar who wasted the fertile fields of the king. Oineus called for help and from all parts of Greece the heroes came to help him. There were the Curetes from Pleuron, the brothers of Althaia, the wife of Oineus. There were the Dioscurs Kastor and Polydeikes and their Messenian cousins Idas and Lynkeus. Theseus came from Athens, Iphikles, half-brother of Herakles, came from Thebens, Iason, Admetos, Peirithos, Peleus and Eurytion came from Thessalia, Telamon from Salamis, Amphiaraos from Argos, Ankaios and Atalante from Arcadia and much more. Herakles was prevented by his labours. On top of the heroes stood Meleagros, the son of Oineus and Althaia.
The hunt for the Calydonean boar ended very disastrous. Many heroes lost their lifes. Ankaios was the first killed by the boar. Peleus accidentally hit his father-in-law Eurytion with his spear. A second hunter too was killed by the boar.
The big catastrophe happened at the 6th day of the hunt. On this day Atalanta hit the boar with her arrow and Meleagros gave him the deathblow. Then he awarded head and skin of the boar to Atalante. But his uncles, brother of his mother Althaia, didn't tolerate that. They insisted on the rights of their clan. A dispute occured, they snatched the trophies from Atalante and then a fight began in which Meleagros slew his uncles. When Meleagros was born the fates predicted that he will live only as long as the log in the oven. Althaia pulled it out of the fire and hid it in a secret place. When she heard of the death of her brothers she enraged, got the log and threw it in the fire. When it was burnt Meleagros break down dead when he was dissecting the boar." - Jochen's Coins of mythological interest
Johny SYSEL
Calabria_Italy_Taras_on_Dolphin.jpg
Calabria Italy Taras on Dolphin21 viewsTaras, Calabria, Italy, c. 272 - 240 B.C., Silver nomos, Unpublished(?); Vlasto 932 var. (different controls), SNG ANS 1239 var. (same), HN Italy 1044 var. (same), SNG Cop -, BMC Italy -, VF, 6.520g, 19.7mm, die axis 180°,
OBV: Nude warrior wearing crested helmet on horse standing left, holding shield on left arm, horse raising right foreleg, ET (control) before horse, API-ΣTΩN below divided by horse's left foreleg;
REV: Taras on dolphin left, kantharos in extended right hand, trident nearly vertical in left, ΓY (control) behind upper right, TAPAΣ below;

Very Rare variant. EX: Forum Ancient Coins

Taras, the only Spartan colony, was founded in 706 B.C. The founders were Partheniae ("sons of virgins"), sons of unmarried Spartan women and Perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta).
These out-of-wedlock unions were permitted to increase the prospective number of soldiers (only the citizens could be soldiers) during the bloody Messenian wars. Later, however, when they were no longer
needed, their citizenship was retroactively nullified and the sons were obliged to leave Greece forever. Their leader, Phalanthus, consulted the oracle at Delphi and was told to make the harbor of Taranto
their home. They named the city Taras after the son of Poseidon, and of a local nymph, Satyrion. The reverse depicts Taras being saved from a shipwreck by a dolphin sent to him by Poseidon.
This symbol of the ancient Greek city is still the symbol of modern Taranto today.

SRukke
103002.jpg
CALABRIA, Tarentum184 viewsTaranto was founded in 706 BC by Dorian immigrants as the only Spartan colony, and its origin is peculiar: the founders were Partheniae, sons of unmarried Spartan women and perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta); these unions were decreed by the Spartans to increase the number of soldiers (only the citizens of Sparta could become soldiers) during the bloody Messenian Wars, but later they were nullified, and the sons were forced to leave. According to the legend Phalanthus, the Parthenian leader, went to Delphi to consult the oracle and received the puzzling answer that he should found a city where rain fell from a clear sky. After all attempts to capture a suitable place to found a colony failed, he became despondent, convinced that the oracle had told him something that was impossible, and was consoled by his wife. She laid his head in her lap and herself became disconsolate. When Phalanthus felt her tears splash onto his forehead he at last grasped the meaning of the oracle, for his wife's name meant clear sky. The harbour of Taranto in Apulia was nearby and he decided this must be the new home for the exiles. The Partheniae arrived and founded the city, naming it Taras after the son of the Greek sea god, Poseidon, and the local nymph Satyrion. A variation says Taras was founded in 707 BC by some Spartans, who, the sons of free women and enslaved fathers, were born during the Messenian War. According to other sources, Heracles founded the city. Another tradition indicates Taras himself as the founder of the city; the symbol of the Greek city (as well as of the modern city) is Taras riding a dolphin. Taranto increased its power, becoming a commercial power and a sovereign city of Magna Graecia, ruling over the Greek colonies in southern Italy.

In its beginning, Taranto was a monarchy, probably modelled on the one ruling over Sparta; according to Herodotus (iii 136), around 492 BC king Aristophilides ruled over the city. The expansion of Taranto was limited to the coast because of the resistance of the populations of inner Apulia. In 472 BC, Taranto signed an alliance with Rhegion, to counter the Messapii, Peuceti, and Lucanians (see Iapygian-Tarentine Wars), but the joint armies of the Tarentines and Rhegines were defeated near Kailìa (modern Ceglie), in what Herodotus claims to be the greatest slaughter of Greeks in his knowledge, with 3,000 Reggians and uncountable Tarentines killed. In 466 BC, Taranto was again defeated by the Iapyges; according to Aristotle, who praises its government, there were so many aristocrats killed that the democratic party was able to get the power, to remove the monarchy, inaugurate a democracy, and expel the Pythagoreans. Like Sparta, Tarentum was an aristocratic republic, but became democratic when the ancient nobility dwindled.

However, the rise of the democratic party did not weaken the bonds of Taranto and her mother-city Sparta. In fact, Taranto supported the Peloponnesian side against Athens in the Peloponnesian War, refused anchorage and water to Athens in 415 BC, and even sent ships to help the Peloponnesians, after the Athenian disaster in Sicily. On the other side, Athens supported the Messapians, in order to counter Taranto's power.

In 432 BC, after several years of war, Taranto signed a peace treaty with the Greek colony of Thurii; both cities contributed to the foundation of the colony of Heraclea, which rapidly fell under Taranto's control. In 367 BC Carthage and the Etruscans signed a pact to counter Taranto's power in southern Italy.

Under the rule of its greatest statesman, strategist and army commander-in-chief, the philosopher and mathematician Archytas, Taranto reached its peak power and wealth; it was the most important city of the Magna Graecia, the main commercial port of southern Italy, it produced and exported goods to and from motherland Greece and it had the biggest army and the largest fleet in southern Italy. However, with the death of Archytas in 347 BC, the city started a slow, but ineluctable decline; the first sign of the city's decreased power was its inability to field an army, since the Tarentines preferred to use their large wealth to hire mercenaries, rather than leave their lucrative trades.

In 343 BC Taranto appealed for aid against the barbarians to its mother city Sparta, in the face of aggression by the Brutian League. In 342 BC, Archidamus III, king of Sparta, arrived in Italy with an army and a fleet to fight the Lucanians and their allies. In 338 BC, during the Battle of Manduria, the Spartan and Tarentine armies were defeated in front of the walls of Manduria (nowadays in province of Taranto), and Archidamus was killed.

In 333 BC, still troubled by their Italic neighbours, the Tarentines called the Epirotic king Alexander Molossus to fight the Bruttii, Samnites, and Lucanians, but he was later (331 BC) defeated and killed in the battle of Pandosia (near Cosenza). In 320 BC, a peace treaty was signed between Taranto and the Samnites. In 304 BC, Taranto was attacked by the Lucanians and asked for the help of Agathocles tyrant of Syracuse, king of Sicily. Agathocles arrived in southern Italy and took control of Bruttium (present-day Calabria), but was later called back to Syracuse. In 303 BC-302 BC Cleonymus of Sparta established an alliance with Taranto against the Lucanians, and fought against them.

Arnold J. Toynbee, a classical scholar who taught at Oxford and other prestigious English universities and who did original and definitive work on Sparta (e.g. The Journal of Hellenic Studies, vol. xxxiii 1913 p. 246-275) seemed to have some doubts about Tarentum (Taranto) being of Spartan origin.

In his book The Study of History vol. iii p. 52 he wrote: "...Tarentum, which claimed a Spartan origin; but, even if this claim was in accordance with historical fact..." The tentative phrasing seems to imply that the evidence is neither conclusive or even establishes a high degree of probability of the truth that Tarentum (Taranto) was a Spartan colony.

CALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 302-281 BC. AR Drachm (17mm, 2.91 gm). Helmeted head of Athena right, helmet decorated with Skylla hurling a stone / Owl standing right head facing, on olive branch; Vlasto 1058; SNG ANS 1312; HN Italy 1015. VF.

Ex-Cng eAuction 103 Lot 2 190/150
2 commentsecoli
211114_l.jpg
Calabria. Tarentum. Nomos (Circa 302-280 BC)27 viewsAR Nomos

21 mm, 7.78 g

Obv: Youth, holding shield, on horse rearing left; ΣΛ to right, ΦΙΛΩΝ below.
Rev: TAPAΣ.
Phalanthos, holding crowning Nike, riding dolphin left; waves below.

Vlasto 684-5; HN Italy 964.

In Greek mythology, Phalanthos (Φάλανθος) is a divine hero, the leader of the Spartan Partheniae and the founder of Taranto. In Ancient Greece, the Partheniae or Parthenians were a lower ranking Spartiate population which, according to tradition, left Laconia to go to Magna Graecia and founded Taras, modern Taranto, in the current region of Apulia, in southern Italy. In Greek mythology, Phalanthos is a divine hero, and the leader of the Spartan Partheniae.

At least three distinct traditions carry the origins of the Parthenians. The oldest is that of Antiochus of Syracuse, according to which the Spartiates, during the first Messenian war (end of the 8th century BC), had rejected like cowards those who had not fought, along with their descendants:

"Antiochus says that, during the Messenian war, those Lacedemonians which did not take part with the mission shall be declared as slaves and called Helots; as for the children born during the mission, we shall call them Parthenians and deny them of all legal rights."

The Parthenians were therefore the first tresantes ("trembling"), a category which gathers the cowards and thus excludes themselves from the community of the Homoioi, the Peers. Thereafter, Parthenians plotted against the Peers and, discovered, would have been driven out of Sparta, from which they departed for Italy and founded Taras, whose date is traditionally fixed in 706 BC - which archaeology does not deny.

In the second tradition, according to Ephorus (4th century BC), the Spartiates swore during the Messenian War, not to return home as long as they had not attained victory. The war prolonged and Sparta's demography being threatened, the Spartiates let the young Spartans who had not sworn the oath return home. These were ordered to copulate with all the girls available. The children who were born from these unions were named Parthenians. Their mothers, since they were compelled by the state to procreate, were legally considered unmolested and fit to marry once the war was over.

Lastly, a third tradition, made the Parthenians bastards who had resulted from the unions of Spartan women and their slaves, always during the Messenian war. The same tradition is told to explain the origins of Locri, also in Magna Graecia.
Nathan P
newunknown com.JPG
Caracalla Touria, greece57 viewsAE 20 mm 3.8 grams 198-211 AD
OBV :: AVTO MAR ANTONINO. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: (Θ)OVI PI-ATU(Upsidedown U ) N. Athene standing, facing , head turned right. Holding nike in right hand, spear in left hand
(Λ) in left field, A in right field
Minted in Thuria on the Pelononnesus peninsula in Greece

the following is an exerpt from http://www.snible.org/coins/hn/peloponnesus.html#Thuria

Imperial—Severus to Geta. Inscr., ΘΟΥΡΙΑΤΩΝ. Types—Zeus, Athena, Asklepios, &c., all with letters ΛΑ in the field, indicating that Thuria, although geographically situated in Messenia, belonged at this time politically to Laconia (cf. Paus. iv. 31. 1).

This coin, as it stands, is unlisted in RIC, Wildwinds, coinarchives, coincatalog , and roman coins and their values , BMC, and the ANS database online,

link to forum discussion on this coin

http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=43876.0
Johnny
60319LG.jpg
Elis, Olympia192 viewsOlympia (Greek: Ολυμπία Olympí'a or Ολύμπια Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. Both games were held every olympiad (i.e. every four years), the Olympic Games dating back possibly further than 776 BC. In 394 emperor Theodosius I, or possibly his grandson Theodosius II in 435, abolished them because they were reminiscent of paganism.

The sanctuary itself consists of an unordered arrangement of various buildings. To the north of the sanctuary can be found the prytaneion and the Philippeion, as well as the array of treasuries representing the various city states. The metroon lies to the south of these treasuries, with the Echo Stoa to the East. To the south of the sanctuary is the South Stoa and the Bouleuterion, whereas the West side houses the palaistra, the workshop of Pheidias, the Gymnasion and the Leonidaion. Enclosed within the temenos are the temples of Hera and Zeus, the Pelopion and the area of the altar, where the sacrifices were made. The hippodrome and later stadium were also to the East.

Olympia is also known for the gigantic ivory and gold statue of Zeus that used to stand there, sculpted by Pheidias, which was named one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World by Antipater of Sidon. Very close to the temple of Zeus (see photo of ruins below) which housed this statue, the studio of Pheidias was excavated in the 1950s. Evidence found there such as sculptor's tools, corroborates this opinion.

Excavation of the Olympia temple district and its surroundings began with a French expedition in 1829. German archaeologists continued the work in the latter part of the 19th century. The latter group uncovered, intact, the Hermes of Praxiteles statue, among other artifacts. In the middle of the 20th Century, the stadium where the running contests took place was excavated.

The Olympic flame of the modern-day Olympic Games is lit by reflection of sunlight in a parabolic mirror at the restored Olympia stadium and then transported by a torch to the place where the games are held.

When the modern Olympics came to Athens in 2004, the men's and women's shot put competition was held at the restored stadium.

The ancient ruins sits north of the Alfeios River and lies next to Cronius or Kronios hill (the hill of Kronos, or Saturn). Kladeos, a tributary of Alfeios, flows around the area.

The town has a school and a square (plateia). Tourism is popular throughout the late-20th century. The city has a train station and is the easternmost terminus of the line of Olympia-Pyrgos (Ilia). The train station which the freight yard is west of it is about 300 m east of the town centre.

It is linked by GR-74 and the new road was opened in the 1980s, the next stretch N and NE of Olympia will open in around 2005. Distance from Pyrgos is 20 km E(old: 21 km), about 50 km SW of Lampeia, W of Tripoli and Arcadia and 4 km north of Krestena and N of Kyparissia and Messenia. The highway passed north of the ancient ruins.

A reservoir is located 2 km southwest damming up the Alfeios river and has a road from Olympia and Krestena which in the late-1990s has been closed.

The area is hilly and mountainous, most of the area within Olympia is forested.

Elis, Olympia. After ca. 340/30-late 3rd century B.C. Æ unit (20 mm, 5.99 g). Laureate head of Zeus right / FA above, horse trotting right; [L]U below. BCD 339.3 (this coin). Near VF, dark brown patina.
Ex BCD Collection. Ex-John C Lavender G18
ecoli73
messene.jpg
GREEK, Achaean League, Messenia-Messena. Circa 175-168 BC. 152 viewsAR Hemidrachm (18mm, 2.46 g).
Laureate head of Zeus right / Monogram; O-OP-N across field, M below; all within wreath tied at bottom.
Agrinion 325d-e; Clerk 304; BCD 722.7, 724; Benner-Messene-23 (same obverse die).

exBeast Coins.
1 commentsDino
Messenia,_Messene_AE_Hemiobol~0.jpg
GREEK, Messenia, Messene, ca. 191-183 BC, AE Hemiobol or Hexachalkon (Hoover plate coin - HGC 5, 575) 185 viewsDiademed head of Demeter right. / Zeus Ithomatos standing right, hurling thunderbolt with right hand, eagle perched on left wrist, tripod to right; ME/ΞE in two lines in left field.
HGC 5, 575 (this coin) (S); BCD Peloponnesos 708 (this coin); Grandjean 222a (this coin illustrated); BMC 24 var.
(23 mm, 7.59 g, 1h)
ex-BCD Collection: LHS Numismatics 96 (8 May 2006) Lot 708
3 commentsLloyd T
Messene~0.jpg
Messenia - Messene c. late 2nd century16 viewsPeloponnesos Messenia - Messene. c. late 2nd century. Hemidrachm, Ar 15.1~16.4mm. 2.29 g. OBV: Diademed head of Zeus to left, dotted border. REV: Tripod between ΜΕ/Σ all within laurel wreath. BMC 15. Ex BCD.ddwau
Messenia,_Korone,_AR_Hemidrachm.jpg
Messenia, Korone, ca. 100-50 BC, AR Hemidrachm14 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.
K-OP, grape bunch within ivy wreath.

HGC 5, 556 (R2); Grandjean pl. XXVI, 2; BCD Peloponnesos 780 (same obverse die).

(13 mm, 2.44 g, 5h).
Classical Numismatic Group; ex- BCD Collection (not in LHS sale).
n.igma
85795594-C73A-4EFE-87C5-0077C53FE2C8.jpeg
Messenia, Messene6 views

MESSENIA, Messene. Pseudo-autonomous issue. Time of the later Julio-Claudians, mid first century AD. Æ Hemiobol or Hexichalkon, Veiled and draped bust of Tyche right, wearing mural crown / Zeus Ithomatas standing facing, head right, holding scepter and eagle; wreath to right. Grandjean Série XVI, Em. β, 688b; BCD Peloponnesos 762.
ecoli
Messene.jpg
Messenia, Messene - Achaean League c. 280 - 146 B.C.9 viewsMessenia, Messene - hemidrachm of Achaean League (Silver, 2.42g. 15.4~16mm.), c. 280 - 146 B.C. Obv: Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev: AX monogram, M below, XP above, all within laurel wreath.ddwau
Messenia,_Messene_AR_Hemidrachm_35_BC.jpg
Messenia, Messene, ca. 35 BC, AR Hemidrachm 21 viewsDiademed head of Zeus right.
Tripod ME-Σ monogram, ΠΟ-ΛY-KΛ-HΣ (Polykles magistrate), within wreath.

HGC 5, 572; Grandjean 215a (D132/R182; this coin illustrated on pl. VIII); BCD Peloponnesos 753-755, SNG Copenhagen 507.

(15 mm, 2.31 g, 12h).
Classical Numismatic Group; from the BCD Collection (not in LHS sale); ex- Glendining, 21 June 1972, 211
1 commentsn.igma
messene~1.JPG
Messenia, Messene, 2nd Century BC92 viewsAR Tetrobol (2.34g)
obv: Zeus Laureate right
Tripod in Wreath, ME monogram to left, S to right
BMC 13
ex BCD Collection
Dino
Messene,_AR_Hemidrachm.jpg
Messenia, Messene, ca. 146-90 BC, AR Hemidrachm6 viewsDiademed head of Zeus left.
Tripod between ME- Σ all within wreath.

HGC 5, 566; BCD Peloponnesos 728; Grandjean Series X, 98-121; SNG Copenhagen 505.
Intact hoard patina.

(15 mm, 2.23 g, 1h).
John Jencek; ex- BCD Collection (private sale); ex- Burgan 18, December 1984,18.
n.igma
Messenia,_Messene_AE_Hexachalkon_BCD_752_(this_coin).jpg
Messenia, Messene, ca. 40s-30s BC, Æ Hemiobol or Hexachalkon 14 viewsHead of Demeter right wearing diadem.
Zeus Ithomatos standing right, hurling thunderbolt with right hand, eagle with spread wings perched on left wrist; ΔAMIΩN to left with wreath in outermost left field, ME above tripod in right field.

HGC 5, 580; BCD Peloponnesos 752 (this coin); Grandjean 556a (this coin illustrated); BMC 29; SNG Cop 512; Sear 2853.

(22 mm, 6.66 g, 6h).
Forestier & Lambert, December 2007; ex- BCD Collection: LHS Numismatics Auction 96, 8-9 May 2006, 752; ex- P. R. Franke collection.

The image of Zeus Ithomatas is a recurring theme on the civic coinage of Messene; a symbol of the Messenian belief that after four centuries of bondage to their Spartan neighbours that they had the support and assistance of the Zeus to maintain their independence and freedom.
n.igma
8AD0D433-FCB1-456C-8F6E-511EC18EAAFF.jpeg
MESSENIA, Mothone. Geta.8 viewsMESSENIA, Mothone. Geta. As Caesar, AD 198-209. Æ Assarion. Bareheaded, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Tyche standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia. BCD Peloponnesos 812 (same dies); BCD Peloponnesos –; BMC –; SNG Copenhagen –; NCP –.ecoli
newunknown com~0.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Caracalla, Touria, Greece331 viewsAE 20 mm 3.8 grams 198-211 AD
OBV :: AVTO MAR ANTONINO. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: (Θ)OVI PI-ATU(Upsidedown U ) N. Athene standing, facing , head turned right. Holding nike in right hand, spear in left hand
(Λ) in left field, A in right field
Minted in Thuria on the Pelononnesus peninsula in Greece

the following is an exerpt from http://www.snible.org/coins/hn/peloponnesus.html#Thuria

Imperial—Severus to Geta. Inscr., ΘΟΥΡΙΑΤΩΝ. Types—Zeus, Athena, Asklepios, &c., all with letters ΛΑ in the field, indicating that Thuria, although geographically situated in Messenia, belonged at this time politically to Laconia (cf. Paus. iv. 31. 1).

This coin, as it stands, is unlisted in RIC, Wildwinds, coinarchives, coincatalog , and roman coins and their values , BMC, and the ANS database online,

link to forum discussion on this coin

http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=43876.0
1 commentsJohnny
Taras_didrachm.jpg
Taras didrachm77 viewsHorseman riding left, holding shield and bridle.

Taras seated on dolphin left TAPAΣ beneath.

Tarentum, Calabria 390-385 BC

7.40g

Scarce

Vlasto 384, Period III, 380-345 BC (Age of Archytas); ; Fischer-Bossert 428, gives date of 390-380 and corresponds to SNG ANS 901.

Ex-Calgary Coin; Ex-Alberta Coin;

Tarentum, the only Spartan colony ever to be established, was founded in 706 BC by the Partheniae - Spartan children born to unmarried women as a product of Spartan desperation to ensure the survival and continuation of their demographic during the bloody Messenian wars, who were later disowned and expelled by the state - and Perioeci (subjects, but not citizens of Sparta), under the leadership of the Parthenian Phalanthos. According to legend, Phalanthos consulted the oracle at Delphi, and was told that he should found his new city 'where rain fell from a clear sky'. After much searching, and despairing of finding a suitable location for a city, Phalanthos was consoled by his wife Aethra who laid his head in her lap, and as her tears splashed upon his forehead he understood the oracle's words for his wife's name itself meant 'clear sky', and thus he determined to make the nearby harbour the site of their new home, which they named after Taras, the son of Poseidon and the nymph Satyrion.
4 commentsJay GT4
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