Classical Numismatics Discussion Members' Gallery
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register.

Members' Gallery Home | Member Collections | Last Added | Last Comments | Most Viewed | Top Rated | My Favorities | Search Galleries
Search results - "Messana"
messanaTD.jpg
AR Tetradrachm of Messana, Sicily 461-445 BC24 viewsOBVERSE: seated charioteer holding reins of slow biga of mules to right. Nike flying above crowning mules with wreath. Olive leaf in Exergue
REVERSE: Hare springing right with legend MESSAN I ON with 'C' above the hare.
The charioteer theme on the obverse was introduced by the Tyrant Anaxilas in 480 BC to celebrate his victory in the races at the Olymics of either 480 or 484 BC. Anaxilas died in 475 BC but his sons succeeded him until they were expelled in 461, at which time the winged Nike was added to the obverse. The earliest of the Nike/charioteer types had A, B, C or D above the hare and the old style Greek S in the legends (not visible on this coin)
A bit rough but within my price range! The coin has an elegant design and illustrates the homely subjects that caught the eye of the Greeks and which they rendered so beautifully on their coins

Weight 17.5 gms, Diameter 25-27 mm
daverino
HN_Italy_2497.jpg
Bruttium, Rhegion, 415-387 B.C., Drachm 26 views14mm, 3.89 grams
Reference: Sear 502; B.M.C.1.38
Lion's scalp facing.
PHΓINON, Laureate head of Apollo right, olive-sprig behind.

"Dionysios I, after concluding a peace with the Carthaginians, went about securing his power in the island of Sicily. His troops, however, rebelled against him and sought help from, among others, the city of Rhegion (Diod. Sic. 14.8.2). In the ensuing campaigns, Dionyios I proceeded to enslave the citizens of Naxos and Katane, with whom the Rhegians shared a common history and identity (Diod. Sic. 14.40.1). This association was a source of anger and fear for the inhabitants of Rhegion. The Syracusan exiles living there also encouraged the Rhegians to go to war with Syracuse (Diod. Sic. 14.40.3). The overarching strategy of Dionysios I included extending his power into Italy by using Rhegion as a stepping stone to the rest of the peninsula. In 387 BC, after a siege that lasted eleven months, the Rhegians, on the brink of starvation, surrendered to Dionysus. Indeed, we are told that by the end of the siege, a medimnos of wheat cost about five minai (Diod. Sic. 14.111.2). Strabo remarks that, following Dionysios' capture of the city, the Syracusan “destroyed the illustrious city” (Strabo 6.1.6).

The next decade or so of the history of Rhegion is unclear, but sometime during his reign, Dionysios II, who succeeded his father in 367 BC, rebuilt the city, giving it the new name of Phoibia (Strabo 6.1.6). Herzfelder argues that this issue was struck by Dionysios II of Syracuse after he rebuilt the city, and dates it to the period that Dionysios II is thought to have lived in the city. Due to civil strife at Syracuse, Dionysios II was forced to garrison Region, but was ejected from the city by two of his rivals circa 351 BC (Diod. Sic. 16.45.9).

The coin types of Rhegion, founded as a colony of Chalcis, are related to its founding mythology. Some of the earliest tetradrachms of the city, from the mid-5th century BC, depict a lion’s head on the obverse, and a seated figure on the reverse. J.P. Six (in NC 1898, pp. 281-5) identified the figure as Iokastos, the oikistes (founder) of Rhegion (Diod. Sic. 5.8.1; Callimachus fr. 202). Head (in HN), suggested Aristaios, son of Apollo. Iokastos was one of six sons of Aiolos, ruler of the Aeolian Islands. All of the sons of Aiolos secured their own realms in Italy and Sicily, with Iokastos taking the region around Rhegion. Aristaios, born in Libya, discovered the silphium plant, and was the patron of beekeepers (mentioned by Virgil), shepherds, vintners, and olive growers. He also protected Dionysos as a child, and was the lover of Eurydike. The replacement of the seated figure type with the head of Apollo circa 420 BC also suggests the figure could be Aristaios. An anecdote from the first-century BC geographer Strabo (6.1.6 and 6.1.9), which connects Rhegion’s founding to the orders of the Delphic Oracle and Apollo, as the reason for the advent of the new type could be simply serendipitous.

Different theories exist for the lion’s head on the coins of Rhegion. The lion’s head (or mask as it is sometimes described) first appeared on the coinage of Rhegion at the start of the reign of Anaxilas, in about 494 BC. E.S.G. Robinson, in his article “Rhegion, Zankle-Messana and the Samians” (JHS vol. 66, 1946) argues that the lion was a symbol of Apollo. He makes a comparison to the coinage of the nearby city of Kaulonia, “At Kaulonia Apollo’s animal was the deer; if at Rhegion it was the lion, the early appearance and persistence of that type is explained. The lion is a certain, though infrequent, associate of Apollo at all periods.” The link, he suggests, is that the lion was associated with the sun, as was Apollo himself.

The lion’s head could also relate to the exploits of Herakles, who had some significance for the city. The extant sources tell us that Herakles stopped at southern Italy near Rhegion on his return with the cattle of Geryon (Diod. Sic. 4.22.5). It was here that supposedly a bull broke away from the rest of the herd and swam to Sicily (Apollod. 2.5.10). Though but a passing reference in Apollodorus, it is very possible that the Rhegians venerated Herakles. Indeed, Herakles was a very important figure throughout the entire area. Dionysios of Halicarnassus says that “in many other places also in Italy [besides Rome] precincts are dedicated to this god [Herakles] and altars erected to him, both in cities and along highways; and one could scarcely find any place in Italy in which the god is not honoured” (I.40.6). As the skin of the Nemean Lion was one of the main attributes of Herakles, the lion’s head may refer to him through metonymic association."
1 commentsLeo
EB0015_scaled.JPG
EB0015 Biga / Hare21 viewsMessana, SICILY, AR tetradrachm, 478-476 BC.
Obverse: Mule driven biga right, olive leaf in exergue.
Reverse: Hare running right, dot below, legend around.
References: Caltabiano-71 (same reverse die).
Diameter: 26.5mm, Weight: 17.35g.
Ex: Ariagno Collection.
1 commentsEB
bot8.jpg
GREEK, Sicily, Messana AR Tetradrachm321 views(412–408 BC)
Obv.: Charioteer driving mule biga left, two dolphins nose to nose in exergue
Rev.: Hare leaping left over horizontal barley ear, dove flying left above, MESSANION in exergue.
Caltabiano 614 ; SNG ANS 378 ; SNG Copenhagen 404.
4 commentsMinos
Kroton2.jpg
Kroton - AR triobol7 viewsc. 430-420 BC
Pegasos left
Ϙ
tripod with 3 ring handles and legs ending in lion’s paws
ϘPO
HN Italy 2127, SNG Cop 1788
ex Sol

Kroton had the rather curious practice of issuing fractions bearing reverse types taken from the coinage of other cities: such as, among others, the Pegasus of Corinth (complete with the letter koppa below), the hare of Messana and the octopus of Syracuse.
Johny SYSEL
mamertini_horse.jpg
Mamertini horseman10 viewsThe Mamertini, Sicily, c. 220 - 200 B.C. Bronze pentonkion, SNG Cop 446 - 447, aVF, Messana mint, 10.440g, 26.1mm, 0o, obverse laureate head of Ares left; reverse MAMERTINWN, warrior, horse behind, standing left, spear in left, right holding head of horse, P left. ex FORVMPodiceps
mamertini.jpg
Mamertini horseman, MAMERTINOI. Ares/ Horseman7 viewsSICILY, Messana, MAMERTINOI. After 210 B.C. Æ Pentonkion (11,24 g. - 26 mm) Obv: Laureate head of Ares left; sword in scabbard behind. Rev: Nude horseman, holding a spear in his left hand, leading his horse left; Π in left field. Calciati 25. Podiceps
mamert.jpg
Mamertini warrior with spear and shield9 viewsThe Mamertini, Sicily, c. 220 - 200 B.C.
Messana mint. 27 mm, 11.1g
Obverse: laureate head of Zeus right
Reverse: MAMERTINWN, Warrior, with spear and shield, advancing right, P right. ex areich

Podiceps
mamertinoi_eagle.jpg
Mamertinoi, Sicily, Messana, Young Zeus/ Eagle5 viewsMamertinoi, Sicily, Messana, 288-278 B.C., AE Unit 3.54g. Calciati-15/3. Obv: Laureate head of young Zeus l. Rev: Eagle l. on thunderbolt. Scarce. Ex H.J.BerkPodiceps
Sicily_Messana_SNG-ANS4_367-378_gf.jpg
Messana8 viewsSicily, Messana. 412-408 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.8 gm). Biga of mules driven l. by nymph Messana, Nike overhead with wreath & taenia. Ex: two dolphins meeting. / Hare bounding l., grain ear below, dove above. Ex: ΜΕΣΣΑΝΙΩΝ. VF. Pegasi 127 #53. ex-William N. Rudman Coll., Triton V #1193 (this coin). SNG ANS 4 #367/378. Same dies: SNG Cop 1 #405; Caltabiano series XV 623 (D223/R249); Nantueil 303; Triton XX #62. Same obv. die: HGC 3 #801; ACNAC Davis 40; Kraay-Hirmer pl. 19 #61; Pozzi 492; Rizzo pl. XXVII, 7; SNG Fitzwilliam 1081; SNG Lockett 831. SNG Munchen 660; NAC 33 #78 & 52 #45. cf. Boeringer SNR 57 p. 136f. 1 commentsAnaximander
Sicily_Messana_SNG-ANS4_318_gf.jpg
Messana8 viewsSicily, Messana. Tyranny of Anaxilas. 480-462/1 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.07 gm). Biga of mules r. with seated charioteer; laurel leaf in ex. / Hare bounding r. MESSENION (SS not retrograde). gVF. Pegasi V #63. SNG ANS 4 #318 (same rev. die); Caltabiano 1993 Series IIb #77 (D41/R40); ACNAC Dewing #640 (same dies); Randazzo 105-106 (same dies); HGC 2 #779. cf. SNG Cop 1 #389-390 (SS not retrograde); Same dies: CNG EA 301 #3; CBG.fr M43 #385760; Roma Num. E2 #33. 1 commentsAnaximander
Sicily_Messana_SNG-ANS4_314_gf.jpg
Messana7 viewsSicily, Messana. 480-462/1 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.14 gm). Biga of mules r. with seated charioteer; laurel leaf in ex. / Hare bounding r., pellet below. ΜΕSSΕ-N-ΙΩN (both sigmas and nus retrograde). VF. Pegasi V #63. SNG ANS 4 #314; Caltabiano 1993 Series IIb 52 similar to (D28/R22 or R38); Dewing 641 (same obv. die)/636. HGC 3 #779 (same obv. die). SNG Fitzwilliam 1067. Cf SNG Cop 1 #390 (no pellet); Bement 405 (SS not retrograde); Randazzo 105-106 (same). 1 commentsAnaximander
HGC_874_Tetras_MESSANA_Sicilia.jpg
MESSANA (Los Mamertini) - Sicilia - Italia14 viewsBajo dominación de Los Mamertinos
AE Tetras 18 mm 3,45 gr.

Anv: Cabeza laureada e imberbe del Joven Zeus Hellanos, viendo a izquierda,"ΔIOΣ" frente al busto.
Rev: Águila de pié sobre un trueno a izquierda, con sus alas desplegadas. "MAMEP (en campo derecho) TINΩN" (en campo izquierdo)

Los Mamertini o "Hijos de Marte" eran una banda de mercenarios de la Campania (o samnitas), que alrededor del 289 A.C. se apoderaron de Mesina, luego de haber sido contratados por Agatocles para defenderla.
Los mamertinos dominaron Messana por más de 20 años, convirtiendo este pueblo de agricultores y comerciantes en una base de incursiones de piratas en tierra y mar.
En el 265 A.C., después que Hierón de Siracusa los había derrotado y sitiada Messana, la mamertinos apelaron a Cartago por ayuda y poco después debieron solicitarla ayuda de Roma para librarlos de los cartagineses. Los Mamertinos luego desaparecen de la historia, hasta siglos más tarde cuando los habitantes de Messana fueron llamados Mamertinos.
El "Vino mamertino" de los viñedos de la punta noreste de Sicilia era el favorito de Julio César, quien lo hizo popular al servirlo en una fiesta para celebrar su tercer consulado. (Fuente Fórum Ancient Coins)

Acuñada 288 - 278 A.C.
Ceca: Messana - Sicilia - Italia

Referencias: HGC II #874 (R2) - Calciati I #15 Pag.66 - Särström Serie V, Grupo C #111 ff - BAR issue 9 - BMC Sicily #14 Pag.110 - Carollo Morello #20a
1 commentsmdelvalle
_1aMessanax.JPG
Messana (under the Mamertini)64 views288-278 BC
AE Tetras (16mm, 2.93g)
O: Laureate head of Ares right.
R: Bull butting right; MAMEPTINΩN in ex., spear head below.
HGC 2, 878; Calciati 8; Sarstrom 62; Mini' 11; Sear 1138v (bull left)
Rare
ex M&R Coins

"Even brave sailors fear rock-caved Charybdis,
Who drinks the waves, vomits them out again,
And Skylla with her barking dogs around her
Churning the waves that circle Sicily"
~ Ovid
Enodia
Messana.jpg
Messana tetradrachm190 viewsCirca 425-421 BC.
caltabiano 491(d200/r196)
SNG ANS359 (same die)
Weber 1425 (same die)
Ex CNG 66 (2004)

The encrustation that was sitting on the reverse appeared to be possible to remove, so I gave it a go. Please look at the other image of this coin to compare. I`m very happy with the new look, and the surface was not damaged. Maybe I`m crazy to try something like this, but at least this time I was lucky.
2 commentsJan Terje Rafdal
Messana tetradrachm.jpg
Messana tetradrachm141 viewsThis is the same coin as the one I put out yesterday, but I took a new photo without flash. I think it looks closer to the real thing now. Anyway photographing such tiny things is not easy, and I`m still learning.
Circa 425-421 BC.
caltabiano 491(d200/r196)
SNG ANS359 (same die)
Weber 1425 (same die)
Ex CNG 66 (2004)

The encrustation that was sitting on the reverse appeared to be possible to remove, so I gave it a go. Please look at the other image of this coin to compare. I`m very happy with the new look, and the surface was not damaged. Maybe I`m crazy to try something like this, but at least this time I was lucky.
Jan Terje Rafdal
Zancle_incus_bis.jpg
Messana under Zancle Drachm20 viewsSicile, Messana sous le nom de Zancle, 520-493 av. J.C. AR Drachme 5.44g.
D:/DANKL(E) le port sous la forme d'une faucille. à l'intérieur un dauphin nageant à g.
R:/même type incus.
ref. HGC Sicily 767, Gorini p.33 n°2, SNG Ashmolean museum 1817 (ex Lockett collection, mêmes coins)
Brennos
MessanaSicily.JPG
Messana, Sicily c. 470-466 B.C. AR Tetradrachm30 viewsMessana, Sicily c. 470-466 B.C. AR Tetradrachm (17.07 gm).
Obv: Charioteer, holding kentron and reins, driving slow biga of mules right; in exergue, leaf.
Rev: Hare springing right.
Ref: Cf. Caltabiano 167A (dies D94/R95A, but obv. die not certain) = Randazzo 128. SNG ANS 315.
Good fine.
1 commentsmjabrial
rr_1073_revised_Large.jpg
Sextus Pompey -- Neptune and Naval Trophy95 viewsSextus Pompey, Imperator and Prefect of the Fleet
[Youngest Son of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great)]
Obv: [MAG or MA (ligatured) G]⦁PIVS⦁IMP⦁ITER; Portrait of Neptune facing r., diademed and bearded, trident over l. shoulder. Border of dots.
Rev: [PRAE (AE ligatured) F⦁CLAS⦁ET⦁ORAE (AE ligatured)]⦁MAR (ligatured) IT⦁EX⦁S⦁C⦁; Naval trophy with trident on top and anchor on bottom, prow stem on l. and aplustre on r., at base two representations of Charybdis and two dog heads of Scylla. Border of dots.
Denomination: silver denarius; Mint: Sicily, uncertain location1; Date: summer 42 - summer 39 BC2; Weight: 3.89g; Diameter: 17mm; Die axis: 30º; References, for example: Sear CRI 333; BMCRR v. II Sicily 15, 16, and 17 variant3; Sydenham 1347 variant3; Crawford RRC 511/2a or 2b4.

Notes:

Obverse legend: MAG[NUS]⦁PIVS⦁IMP[ERATOR]⦁ITER[UM]
Reverse legend: PRAEF[ECTUS]⦁CLAS[SIS]⦁ET⦁ORAE⦁MARIT[IMAE]⦁EX⦁S[ENATUS]⦁C[ONSULTO]

1Sear CRI, Crawford RRC, Sydenham, and DeRose Evans (1987) all place the minting of this coin type in Sicily, but they do not reference a possible location. Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily suggests Messana.
2This is the date range argued for in Estiot 2006 (p. 145). Estiot recommends returning to Crawford’s proposal of 42 - 40 BC. Crawford RRC, p. 521 suggests the period in 42 BC after Sextus Pompey defeated Q. Salvidienus Rufus. Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily, p.562 proposes 38 - 36 BC and Sydenham, p. 210 adopts the same datation. DeRose Evans (1987), p. 129 offers a time between late summer 36 and September 36 BC.
3Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily 15, 16, and 17 and Sydenham 1347 only list a reverse legend containing MAR (ligatured) I but the coin here is MAR (ligatured) IT.
4It is impossible to see the full obverse legend, so it cannot be determined if MA is ligatured or not. The reverse legend is clearly the first variety of 2a or 2b, a variety not found on 2c.

Provenance: from the collection of W. F. Stoecklin, Amriswil, Switzerland; acquired from Hess AG in Luzern, from the Ernst Haeberlin collection, Cahn & Hess, Frankfurt, July 17, 1933, lot 2889.

Photo credits: Shanna Schmidt Numismatics

Sources

Crawford, Michael H. Roman Republican Coinage v. I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001 reprint with the 1982 corrections.
DeRose Evans, Jane. "The Sicilian Coinage of Sextus Pompeius (Crawford 511)" in Museum Notes (American Numismatic Society), vol. 32 (1987): 97 - 157.
Estiot, Sylviane. “Sex. Pompée, La Sicile et La Monnaie: Problèmes de Datation.” In Aere Perennivs, en hommage á Hubert Zehnacker édité par Jacqueline Champeaux et Martine Chassignet. Paris: L’Université Paris - Sorbonne, 2006.
Grueber, H. A. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum v. II. London: 1910.
Sear, David R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. London: Spink, 1998.
Sydenham, Edward A. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. New York: Arno Press, 1975, rev. ed.
7 commentsTracy Aiello
Sextus_Pompey_Scylla.jpg
Sextus Pompey -- Pharos and Scylla71 viewsSextus Pompey, Imperator and Prefect of the Fleet
[Youngest Son of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great)]
Obv: MAG⦁PIVS⦁IMP⦁ITER; Pharos of Messana, Neptune on top standing r. with r. hand on a trident and l. hand on a rudder, resting l. foot on prow. Galley sailing l., aquila atop a tripod placed in prow and a scepter tied with a fillet in stern. Border of dots.
Rev: PRAEF⦁ORAE⦁MARIT⦁ET⦁CLAS⦁S⦁C [AEs and MAR ligatured]; Scylla attacking l. wielding a rudder in both hands, the torso of a nude woman with two fishtails and the foreparts of three dogs as the lower body. Border of dots.
Denomination: silver denarius; Mint: Sicily, uncertain location1; Date: summer 42 - summer 39 BC2; Weight: 3.566g; Diameter: 19.8mm; Die axis: 225º; References, for example: BMCRR v. II Sicily 20 variant3, Sydenham 1349 variant3; Crawford RRC 511/4d; Sear CRI 335b.

Notes:

Obverse legend: MAG[NUS]⦁PIVS⦁IMP[ERATOR]⦁ITER[UM]
Reverse legend: PRAEF[ECTUS]⦁ORAE⦁MARIT[IMAE]⦁ET⦁CLAS[SIS]⦁S[ENATUS]⦁C[ONSULTO]

1Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily, p.557 and Sear CRI, p. 203 suggest Messana as a possible mint location. DeRose Evans (1987), p. 124 hesitatingly suggests Mitylene (on the island of Lesbos).

2This is the date range suggested by Estiot 2006, p. 145, as she recommends going back to Crawford’s proposal of 42 - 40 BC. Crawford RRC, p. 521 suggests the period in 42 BC after Sextus Pompey defeated Q. Salvidienus Rufus. Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily, p.556 proposes 38 - 36 BC. Sydenham, p.211 follows Grueber. DeRose Evans (1987), p. 129 submits 35 BC.

3Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily 20 and Sydenham 1349 list MAR (ligatured) I but the coin here is clearly MAR (ligatured) IT. Neither Grueber nor Sydenham record MAR (ligatured) IT as part of this reverse legend for this coin type. Crawford and Sear do.

Photo credits: Forum Ancient Coins

Sources

Crawford, Michael H. Roman Republican Coinage v. I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001 reprint with the 1982 corrections.
DeRose Evans, Jane. "The Sicilian Coinage of Sextus Pompeius (Crawford 511)" in Museum Notes (American Numismatic Society), vol. 32 (1987): 97 - 157.
Estiot, Sylviane. “Sex. Pompée, La Sicile et La Monnaie: Problèmes de Datation.” In Aere Perennivs, en hommage á Hubert Zehnacker, édité par Jacqueline Champeaux et Martine Chassignet. Paris: L’Université Paris - Sorbonne, 2006.
Grueber, H. A. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum v. II. London: 1910.
Sear, David R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. London: Spink, 1998.
Sydenham, Edward A. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. New York: Arno Press, 1975, rev. ed.
7 commentsTracy Aiello
SICILY_MESSANA.jpg
SICILY, MESSANA30 views SICILY, MESSANA
THE MAMERTINI
AFTER 210 BC
AE PENTONKION 25.5 mm 9.25 g
OBV: LAUR HEAD OF APOLLO R, LYRE BEHIND
REV: MAMERTINWN
NUDE WARRIER, EXCEPT FOR CHLAMYS, HOLDING SHORT SWORE AND SPEAR, SHIELD ON GROUND,
P IN R FIELD
SICILY, MESSANA
SNG COP 450; BMC 37
laney
318_Greek.JPG
Sicily, Hemilitron, Messana, 412-408 BC, AE Sicilië11 viewsReference. rare
Caltabiano 656; SNG ANS 390

Obv. ΠΕΛΩΡΙΑΣ
Head of nimph Peloria left, around two dolphins,

Rev. ΜΕΣΣΑΝΙΩΝ
Trident flanked by hare at left. and shell at right.

3.46 gr
15 mm
okidoki
warrior_k.jpg
SICILY, Mamertini9 viewsÆ Pentonkion, 27mm, 10.2g, 6h; Messana, circa 264-241.
Obv.: Laureate head of Zeus right.
Rev.: MAMEPTINΩN Warrior advancing r., holding spear and shield; in r. field, Π.
Reference: SNG Cop 462, Calciati I, 41 / 16-374-101
John Anthony
greek4.jpg
Sicily, Messana Ar Tetradrachm112 views(412–408 BC)
Obv.: Charioteer driving mule biga left, two dolphins nose to nose in exergue
Rev.: Hare leaping left over horizontal barley ear, dove flying left above, MESSANION in exergue.
Caltabiano 614 ; SNG ANS 378 ; SNG Copenhagen 404.
5 commentsMinos
mamOR.jpg
Sicily, Messana mint, Mamertinoi, Calciati I, 108, 4017 viewsSicily, Messana mint, Mamertinoi, c. 220-200 B.C. AE, 25mm 8.76g, SNG ANS 441, Calciati I, 108, 40
O: Laureate head of bearded Zeus r.
R: MAMERTINΩN, nude, helmeted hero advancing r., holding spear in his r. hand, round shield in his l. hand; in field r., mark of value Π
casata137ec
Messana_01.jpg
Sicily, Messana, Hare40 viewsSicily, Messana
Litra (420-413 BC)
Obv: Hare leaping right, below scallop shell.
Rev: MEΣ, Legend within wreath
Ag, 0.66g, 14mm
SNG ANS 349
Ex Pecunem Gitbud&Naumann auction 29
3 commentsshanxi
martsngans456-8.jpg
Sicily, Messana, Mamertinoi, SNG ANS 456-863 viewsMessana, Sicily, Mamertinoi Hemilitron, 289-270 B.C. AE, 23/20mm 6.84g, CNS I p. 112, 47; SNG ANS 456-8
O: Laureate head of Apollo right; lyre (?) behind
R: Nike standing left, holding wreath and palm-branch; six pellets in right field

MAMERTINI or "children of Mars," was the name taken by a band of Campanian (or Samnite) freebooters who about 289 B.C. seized the Greek colony of Messana at the north-east corner of Sicily, after having been hired by Agathocles to defend it (Polyb. 1. 7. 2). - 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica
4 commentscasata137ec
HGC_2-865.jpg
Sicily, Messana: The Mamertinoi (264-241 BCE) Æ Unit (Särström Series III, Group A, 50–61; BAR Issue 5; CNS 7; HGC 2, 865)14 viewsObv: Laureate head of Ares right; arrowhead to left
Rev: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings spread
Quant.Geek
302798_0_zoom.jpg
Sicily. Messana. The Mamertinoi. Ae Quadruple Unit (288-278 BC).24 views27 mm, 19.38 g

Obverse: APEOΣ Laureate head of Ares to right; behind, helmet.

Reverse: MAMEPTINΩN Eagle standing to left on thunderbolt.

Calciati I, 92, 3. SNG ANS 402.

After the tyrant of Syracuse Agathocles died in 289 BC, the majority of his mercenaries became unemployed. Some bands dispersed but the Mamertines attempted to stay in Syracuse. Hailing from Campania (a region in southern Italy), perhaps related to the Samnites, the civilized Greeks did not take kindly to a large armed mob of uncultured barbaroi loitering around the Hellenistic center of Sicily. Barred from settling in Syracuse, these mercenaries headed north until they came across the town of Messana on the north-east tip of Sicily.

The city offered its hospitality to the band of mercenaries and in return the mercenaries slaughtered many of the men and leading figures of the city and claimed it for themselves. The women and possessions were split among the mercenaries as their own. It was at this time that the mercenaries seem to officially proclaim themselves as the Mamertines as they began to mint their own coinage. The name Mamertines means the sons of Mamers, Mamers being an Italic war god with the Latin equivalent of Mars. Soon afterwards, the Italian town of Rhegium suffered a similar fate.

With Messana and its sister city of Rhegium across the strait, the Mamertines held a commanding position in Sicily and the shipping routes that passed through the Strait of Messina. With Messana as a base of operations the Mamertines were able to plunder, pirate, and raid the surrounding countryside with considerable success. Syracuse was unable to react immediately due to its internal political disorder. This left Sicily split between Carthage in the west and disunited Greeks and Mamertines elsewhere.

When Hiero II of Syracuse attempted to dislodge the Mamertines in 265, they enlisted the aid of a nearby Carthaginian fleet, whose swift intervention forced Hiero to withdraw. The Mamertines soon regretted the Carthaginian occupation and appealed to Rome for protection, citing their status as Italians. Rome was hesitant to become entangled in a conflict outside of Italy or to come to the aid of the piratical Mamertines. Yet Rome's fear of a Carthaginian stronghold so close to Italy—and greed for plunder in what they assumed would be a short war against Syracuse—outweighed their concerns. The Romans invaded Sicily and marched to the Mamertines' aid.

When the Mamertines learned that the Romans were approaching, they persuaded the Carthaginian general to withdraw his forces from the city. The general, regretting this decision to abandon the city, took the fateful steps of allying with Hiero. The combined Carthaginian and Syracusan forces then besieged Messana. After attempts to negotiate a truce failed, Carthage and Rome began hostilities. Both sides were confident of a quick and decisive victory. Neither side anticipated the horror that was to come: a ferocious, generation-long war that would transform the Roman and Carthaginian empires, upend the balance of power in the western Mediterranean, and set the stage for Hannibal's avenging assault on Italy.
Nathan P
Screenshot_2019-08-17_10_32_41.png
Sicily. The Mamertini, Æ Pentonkion.18 viewsMessana After 210 B.C. 12.91g - 26.1mm, Axis 12h.

Obv: Laureate head of Ares left.

Rev: ΜΑΜΕΡΤΙΝΩΝ / Π - Nude horseman, spear in his left hand, leading his horse left; Π in left field.

SNG ANS 430; Calciati 25; BMC 32.
2 commentsChristian Scarlioli
BMC_610_AE_Tetras_HIERON_II_SIRACUSA.jpg
SIRACUSA - Sicilia - Italia13 viewsHierón II (275-215 A.C.)
AE Tetras 19.1 mm - 6.0 gr

Hieron II fue tirano y Rey de Siracusa, entre el 270-215 A.C.
Su gobierno conllevó 50 años de paz y prosperidad, convirtiéndose en una de las capitales más famosos de la antigüedad. Amplió el teatro y construyó un inmenso altar. La figura literaria Teócrito y el filósofo Arquímedes vivieron bajo su gobierno. Después de luchar contra los Mamertini en Messana, con el tiempo se alió con Roma.

Anv: Cabeza vistiendo diadema de Poseidón, viendo a izquierda.
Rev: Tridente muy ornamentado con delfines en ambos lados. "IOΡΩ / NOΣ", debajo, dividida por el mango del tridente y "ΣΩ debajo a la derecha.

Acuñación: 268 - 218 A.C.
Ceca: Siracusa - Sicilia - Italia

Referencias: B.M.C. (Sicily) #610 Pag. 218 - HGC 2 #1550 - SNG ANS #1004 - SNG Cop #856 - Sear GTV I #1223 Pag.126 - SNG München #1409 - Calciati #197 Pag.398 (R1/21)
mdelvalle
70788q00.jpg
The Mamertini, Sicily, c. 200 - 35 B.C.14 viewsBronze tetras, Calciati I p. 111, 46 Ds 1 - RS 2; SNG ANS 455 - 4555 var. (plectrum vice tripod); SNG Cop 468 var. (same), VF, pale green patina, edge chips, Messana mint, weight 3.640g, maximum diameter 21.7mm, die axis 90o, c. 200 - 35 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; tripod (control symbol) behind; reverse MAMEPTINΩN, Nike standing left, wreath extended in right, palm in left, III (mark of value) in lower left field; ex CNG auction 219 (30 Sep 2009), lot 187; ex D. Alighieri Collectionmjabrial
mamertinoi.jpg
The Mamertinoi 288-270 BC.65 viewsSicily, Messana, The Mamertinoi, Bronze Pentonkion, 288-270 BC.
Obverse- Laureate head of Ares right.
Reverse- Eagle standing left on thunderbolt.
SNG ANS 402; Calciati I, 3, 26.73 mm, 16.9 g.
b70
     
33 files on 1 page(s)