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Search results - "MAXIM"
TIBERIUS-4.jpg
37 viewsTIBERIUS - As - 35/36 AD - Mint of Rome
Obv.: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII
Laureate head left
Rev.: PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXXVII S C
Winged caduceus
g. 10,7 mm. 25,8
Cohen 22, RIC 59, Sear RCV 1771
Maxentius
MAXIMIN1-1.jpg
33 viewsMaximinus I - Denarius - 235/236 AD.
Ob.: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG; Laureate and draped bust right
Rev.: PROVIDENTIA AVG; providentia standing left, holds cornucopia and wand pointed at globe at foot.
gs. 2,7 mm. 19,9
Cohen 77, RIC 13
Maxentius
MAXIMIN1-3.jpg
62 viewsMaximinus I - Sestertius - 236/238
Ob.: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM; Laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev.: SALVS AVGVSTI S C; Salus seated left, feeding from patera a serpent arising from altar.
gs. 18,6 mm 34
Cohen 92, RIC IV 85
1 commentsMaxentius
Maximian-4.jpg
29 viewsMAXIMIANVS - Potin Tetradrachm - Year 3 - 289/290 AD
Ob.: Α Κ Μ Α ΟΥΑ ΜΑΞΙΜΙΑΝΟC CEB; laureate & draped bust right
Rev.: L Γ; Nike walking right holds wreath and palm
gs. 6,4 mm. 19,9
Milne 4818
Maxentius
MAXIMIN2-1.jpg
57 viewsMAXIMINVS II - Follis - Mint of Carthago - 305-306 AD.
Obv.:GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right
Rev.: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing left holding fruits in both hands, I in left field, Δ in ex.
Gs. 3,9 mm 29,4
RIC VI 40b, Cohen 150.
2 commentsMaxentius
GALERIUS-2.jpg
34 viewsGALERIVS - Silvered AE Follis - 297-298 AD. - Heraclea mint
Obv.: GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, laureate head right
Rev.: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera & cornucopia, HTΓ in ex.
Gs. 10,5 mm. 27,5
Cohen 78, RIC 20b
Maxentius
MAXIMIAN-5.jpg
74 viewsMAXIMIAN AE3 (Half-follis). 317-318 AD- Posthumous issue struck under Constantine I. - Mint of Siscia
Obv.: DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP, laureate veiled bust right
Rev.: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM, Emperor seated left on curule chair, raising hand & holding scepter, SIS in ex.
Gs. 1,7 mm. 17,1
RIC 41 (R3), Cohen 495

1 commentsMaxentius
MaximianIoviConservat.jpg
33 viewsmarandnumiz
Maximianus_1.JPG
29 viewsMaximianus, AD 285-295, AE Antoninianus, Antioch Mint Jon the Lecturer
MAXIMINUS_I_-_AS,_Rev__SALUS_FEEDING_SNAKE.jpg
63 viewsMaximinus I AE Dupondius,Maximinus I AE Dupondius. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right / SALVS AVGVSTI S-C, Salus seated left, feeding out of patera a snake rising from altar. RIC 86, Cohen 94, BMC 178 sold :o(

3 commentsAntonivs Protti
Pseudo_Rhodian.jpg
93 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Perseus, 179 - 168 B.C., Pseudo-Rhodian Coinage; Silver drachm, Ashton Pseudo-Rhodian Mainland pp. 29 - 30, Larissa Hoard p. 241 (N. Greece), SNG Keckman 793 - 795 (Thessaly), SNG Cop suppl. 358 (Peraea Rodia), EF, rose toning on luster, uncertain Thessaly mint, weight 2.675g, maximum diameter 16.8mm, die axis 180o, magistrate Hermias, c. 171 - 170 B.C.; obverse head of Helios facing slightly right; reverse ERMIAS (magistrate), rose, with bud right, I - W flanking stem

Ex: Forum (coin and picture)
6 commentspaul1888
Bayern_König_Maximilian_II__Joseph_Kreuzer_1861_Eiche_Kranz_München.jpg
17 viewsKönigreich Bayern

Maximilian II. Joseph, 1848 - 1864

Kreuzer 1861, München

Vs: Gekröntes Wappen.

Rs: Wertangabe und Jahr im Eichenkranz.

Erhaltung: Fleckig, sehr schön.

Durchmesser: 14 mm

Gewicht: 0,9 g Billon _390
Antonivs Protti
maximinus_I_ric_IVb_19.jpg
18 viewsMAXIMINUS I
Denarius. 238 A.D.
22.3mm, 3.3 grams

OBV: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate draped bust right.
REV: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left with branch & sceptre.
RIC-IVb -19
ziggy9
maximusprincCrow.jpg
103 viewsMaximus Crowvs
Maximus (Caesar, 235/6-238). AR Denarius Rome mint, 236-7.
O: MAXIMVS CAES GERM; Rvssell Crowvs Bareheaded and draped bust right
R: PRINC IVVENTVTIS; Maximus standing left, holding baton and spear; two signa to right
- RIC IV ?
8 commentsNemonater
Philip_I_antelope_right_VI_june_22_2018.jpg
25 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC IV 22 (R2), RSC IV 188, SRCV III 8959 var. (antelope left), Hunter III 48 var. (same), Choice aEF, excellent centering on a broad flan, excellent portrait, light toning, some luster, strike slightly soft/flat, some die wear, 6th officina, Rome mint, weight 4.402g, maximum diameter 23.8mm, die axis 0o, 248 A.D.; obverse IMP PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse SAECVLARES AVGG, antelope walking right, VI in exergue; very rare with antelope right (only two on Coin Archives and one sold for $700!; ex Beast Coins; Ex Forum coin and picture1 commentspaul1888
Maximinus_II_a_jpg.png
23 viewsMaximinus II Æ Follis. Nicomedia, struck circa AD 311.
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right
/ HERCVLI VICTORI, Hercules standing right, leaning on club; * and B in left field; SMN in exergue.
RIC VI 68.

21mm, 3.92.
1 commentspaul1888
rjb_01_07_09.jpg
"Boulogne" (VI) 14b43 viewsMaximianus I 286-305 AD
AE Follis
Obv: IMP C MAXIMIANVS PF AVG
Laureate bust right
Rev: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI
Genius standing left
-/-//-
Uncertain continental mint (Boulogne?) operating around the time of the British invasion
RIC (VI) Lyon 14b
mauseus
Tiberius_Pontif_Maxim.jpg
3 Tiberius Denarius29 viewsTIBERIUS
AR Denarius (3.5 g)
Lugdunum mint, struck 18-35 AD

TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS - Laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM; Livia, as Pax, seated r., holding olive branch & long scepter; ornate chair legs

RIC 30; BMCRE 48; RSC 16a.
Cleaning scratches. Discussed and authenticated on FORVM ancient coins board
RI0051
Sosius
Vindex_denarius.jpg
6.75 Revolt of Vindex61 viewsRevolt Against Nero, Gaius Iulius Vindex, Governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, c. Late 67 - May 68 A.D.

Struck by Gaius Iulius Vindex, the Roman governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, who rebelled against Nero's tax policy and declared allegiance to Galba, the governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, as the new emperor. Vindex was defeated and killed in battle near Vesontio (modern Besançon), but the military continued to support Galba. On 9 June 68, deserted by the Praetorian Guard, Nero stabbed himself in the throat.

Silver denarius, Unpublished, civil war restitution of Augustus, gF, porosity, marks, uncertain (Lugdunum?) mint, weight 3.167g, maximum diameter 19.0mm, die axis 180o, c. late 67 - May 68 A.D.; obverse CAESAR, bare head of Augustus right; reverse AVGVSTVS, young bull walking right, head turned facing; ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 6, lot 321; only two examples known to Forum

Purchased from FORVM
2 commentsSosius
rjb_2009_09_04.jpg
Maximianus I44 viewsMaximianus I
Ticinum Mint
MAXIMIANVS AVG
Laureate bust right
VTILITAS PVBLICA
Utilitas standing facing, head left
-/-//T
RIC (VI) Ticinum 27b
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_2009_09_13.jpg
Maximianus I44 viewsMaximianus
Siscia mint
MAXIMIANVS AVG
Laureate bust right
GENIO POPVLI ROMANI
Genius standing left with patera and cornucopia
-/-//SIS
RIC (VI) Siscia 169b
2 commentsmauseus
max207c.jpg
Maximinus II RIC 207c Siscia23 views
Maximinus II follis, 311 CE
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate bust right.
Reverse: GENIO AV-GVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on headn naked but for chlamys over shoulder, holding patera and cornucopia.
SIS in ex. Siscia mint. 25.3 mm., 6.9 g.
NORMAN K
63430q00.jpg
10 Vespasian and Titus29 viewsVespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Antioch, Syria

Silver tetradrachm, Prieur 113, McAlee 336, RPC II 1947, Wruck 86, aVF, Antioch mint, weight 13.89g, maximum diameter 24.3mm, die axis 0o, 70 - 71 A.D.; obverse ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤ ΚΑΙΣΑ ΟΥΕΣΠΑΣΙΑΝΟΥ, laureate bust right; reverse ETOYC Γ IEPOY (Holy Year 3), eagle standing left on club, wings spread, palm frond left; ex CNG auction 149, lot 286; ex Garth R. Drewry Collection, ex Harmer Rooke (26-28 March 1973), lot 488 (part of).

Struck to pay Titus' legions during and after the First Jewish Revolt. RPC notes c. 320 different dies indicate 6,500,000 Syrian tetradrachms might have been minted. This was the quantity Titus would have needed to pay his four legions. Hoard evidence finds many of these types in Judaea confirming they were used to pay the legions.

Purchased from FORVM!
RI0002
Sosius
Vespasian_RSC_387.jpg
10 Vespasian Denarius, 73 AD11 viewsVESPASIAN
AR Denarius. 73 AD

O: IMP CAES VESP AVG CENS, laureate head right

R: PONTIF MAXIM, Vespasian seated right, holding scepter & branch.

RSC 387, BMC 98, Sear 2305; Fine
Ex-Littleton Coin Co.
RI0065
Sosius
Trajan_Den.jpg
14 Trajan16 viewsTrajan
Silver denarius, Rome mint
weight 3.150g, maximum diameter 19.3mm, die axis 180o
112 - 114 A.D.
IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate and draped bust right / S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Felicitas standing left, caduceus in right, cornucopia in left; uneven toning
RIC II 271, RSC II 404, BMCRE III 424, Fine
Purchased from FORVM
RI0115
Sosius
Maximian_RIC_Aquileia_29b_tflip.jpg
2 Maximian43 viewsMAXIMIANUS
AE1 Follis. 300 AD
IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right / SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales & cornucopia, AQP in ex.
RIC Aquileia 29b
Sosius
rjb_car_fratrescf198.jpg
202cf191 viewsCarausius 287-93AD
Antoninianus
Obv "CARAVSIVS ET FRATRES SVI"
Jugate busts of Diocletian, Maximianus and Carausius left, Carausius holding spear over shoulder
Rev "COMES AVGGG"
Victory walking left holding wreath and branch
Camulodunum mint
S/P//C
RIC - (cf 202-3)
An interesting variant of the bust type with the spear, compare with the jugate Carausius in the “Best of Type” gallery.
2 commentsmauseus
Maximinus_I_RIC_12.jpg
31 Maximinus I13 viewsMAXIMINUS I
AR denarius. 235-6 AD

O: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right, seen from behind

R: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left with branch & sceptre.

RSC 31a, RIC 12, Sear 8310

Ex Harlan J. Berk
Sosius
Maximinus_I_RIC_16.jpg
31 Maximinus I24 viewsMAXIMINUS I
AR Denarius. 235-6 AD
(19mm. 3.53g)

IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped bust right / VICTORIA AVG, Victory running right.

RSC 99, RIC 16

Ex Artifact Man (vCoins)
Sosius
Max_Thrax_Sestertius.jpg
31 Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - Late May 238 A.D.39 viewsOrichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 43, Cohen 10, VF, 23.158g, 32.3mm, 30o, Rome mint, 235 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FIDES MILITVM S C, Fides standing half-left, military standard in each hand; well centered, nice patina, flan crack, typical squared flan

Purchased from FORVM
1 commentsSosius
Maximus_AE25_Deultum.jpg
31.5 Maximus15 viewsAE25 of Deultum
Sosius
001590_l.jpg
32 Gordian I Africanus34 viewsGORDIAN I AFRICANUS
AE Sestertius, Rome Mint
27-29 mm, 17.75 g
March 19 to April 9, 238 A.D.
IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind / VICTORIA AVGG, S-C, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm.
RIC IV, 2, p. 161, 12. Very rare. Good portrait and fully readable name. Very fine.
Ex-Auctiones

Gordian I, an 80-year-old senator, was proclaimed as emperor during a revolt in Africa but commited suicide after his son and co-ruler Gordianus II was defeated by Maximinus' legate. Their rule only lasted for 20 days, hence the rarity of their coins.
Sosius
Pupienus_RIC_10b.jpg
35 Pupienus Denarius35 viewsPUPIENUS
AR Antoninanus. 238 AD

O: IMP CAES PVPIEN MAXIMVS AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right

R: CARITAS MVTVA AVGG, clasped hands.

RSC 3, RIC 10b, Sear 8520

Ex Artifact Man Ancient Coins (vCoins)
1 commentsSosius
Galerius_RIC_Heraclea_59a.jpg
4 Galerius30 viewsGALERIUS
AE Follis, Heraclea, 311 AD
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS PF AVG / GENIO IMP-E-RATORIS, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia, star in l. field, crescent in r. field, HT epsilon in ex.
RIC VI Heraclea 59a Scarce
Sosius
Galerius_RIC_VI_Nicomedia_54a_66a.jpg
4 Galerius38 viewsGALERIUS
AE Folles, Nicomedia Mint, 307-308 / 310-311

IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, bust l. / GENIO AV-GVSTI CM[H], Genius standing left holding patera and, cornucopiae, SMN delta in ex

RIC VI Nicomedia 54a/66a (identical)

Sosius
Galerius_RIC_VI_Antioch_53b.jpg
4 Galerius25 viewsGALERIUS
AE Follis, Antioch, 299-300 A.D.

GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, bust l. / GENIO POPV-LI ROMANI, Genius standing left left, holding patera and cornucopia, epsilon in r. filed, ANT in ex

RIC VI Antioch 53b
Sosius
Galerius_RIC_Alexandria_79v_hwflip.jpg
4 Galerius45 viewsGALERIUS
AE Folles, Alexandria, 308 AD

IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, bust l. / GENIO IMPE-RATORIS Genius standing left, holding cornucopia and patera, X in l. field, A over K in r. field, ALE in ex.

RIC VI Alexandria 79v (reverse legend break). VF, die break/chip at 12:00 on reverse.
1 commentsSosius
Galerius_RIC_VII_Heraclea_18b_hwflip.jpg
4 Galerius33 viewsGALERIUS
Silvered Follis, Heraclea, 297-298 AD

GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, head l. / GENIO POPV-L-I ROMANI, Genius standing l., holding patera and cornucopiae, HT epsilon in ex.

RIC VI Heraclea 20b
Sosius
Maximinus_II_RIC_VI_Antioch_164b.jpg
6 Maximinus II21 viewsMAXIMINUS II
AE Follis, Antioch, 312 AD

IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG, Laureate bust r. / GENIO-AVGVSTI, Genius stading left, holding head of Sol and cornucopia, star in l. field, epsilon I in right field, ANT in ex.

RIC VI Antioch 164b
Sosius
Maximian_Civic_Antioch.jpg
6 Maximinus II44 viewsANTIOCH
Semi-autonomous issue under Maximinus II, ca. 310 AD

GENIO ANTOCHENI - Genius of Antioch seated, facing; Orontes swimming below / APOLLONI SANCTO, Apollo standing left, holding patera and lyre.

'The last civic coinages and the religious policy of Maximinus Daza', J. van Heesch. c.310 (Antioch).
Sosius
RIC_VI_Nicomedia_55.jpg
6 Maximinus II25 viewsMAXIMINUS II
AE Follis, Nicomedia, 307-308 AD

GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, bust l. / GENIO CA-ESARIS CM[H], Genius with patera and cornucopia, SMN gamma in ex.

RIC VI Nicomedia 55
Sosius
Clodius_Albinus_2_RIC_11.jpg
Clodius Albinus Denarius RIC 11, RSC 61, BMC 43 88 viewsD CL SEPT ALBIN CAES, bare head right / ROMAE AETERNAE, Roma seated left on shield, holding palladium & spear.
Maximum Diameter: 17.7 mm
Weight: 3.20 g
3 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
Commodus_2_RIC_15.jpg
Commodus Denarius A.D. 181 RIC 15, RSC 805 40 viewsM COMMODVS ANTONINVS AVG, laureate head right / TR P VI IMP IIII COS III PP, Felicitas standing front with caduceus & sceptre.
Maximum Diameter: 17.9 mm
Weight: 2.58 g
1 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
rjb_2017_03_02.jpg
Galerius13 viewsGalerius
Trier Mint
MAXIMIANVS NC
Laureate head right
VO/TIS/X/SIC/XX
Wreath
RIC (VI) Trier - (cf 570-1); Zschucke 3.4
mauseus
gm16b.jpg
Galerius Maximian RIC 16b, Heraclea9 viewsGalerius, AE radiate fraction, Heraclea, 295-296 CE.
Obverse: GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Reverse: CONCORDIA MIL ITVM, Emperor, standing right, receiving victory on globe from Jupiter who is standing left, holding scepter. H gamma in lower center
Heracles mint 21 mm., 2.3 g.
NORMAN K
magnus26a.jpg
Magnus Maximus, RIC VIII 26a Arles, 383-388 CE.17 viewsMagnus Maximus AE2
Obverse: D N MAG MAXIMVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: REPARATIO REIPB, Emperor standing left, raising kneeling woman.
PCOM in ex. Arles mint, 21.9 mm, 4.4 g.
NORMAN K
GI_146d_img.jpg
Maximianus Herculius, Billon tetradrachm, Alexandria, Year 1, Eirene13 viewsObv:– A K M OYA MAXIMIANOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– None, Eirene, standing left, holding live branch and transverse sceptre.
Minted in Alexandria (L | A). A.D. 285-286
Reference:– Milne 4778. Emmett 4113(1) R1. Curtis 2064. BMC 2553. Dattari 5859
maridvnvm
maxmin.jpg
Maximianus I, RIC 292 Lugdunum16 viewsMAXIMIANUS HERCULIUS, 286-305
Obverse: IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG Radiate, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: COMES - AVGG / C Minerva, wearing long dress, mantle and helmet, standing facing, head turned left., holding shield with her left hand, lance with her right hand.
RIC 292, 23.9 mm., 3.2 g.
NORMAN K
maxmem.jpg
Maximianus, AE4 Memorial 22 views
Maximianus 317-318 CE.
Obverse: DIVO MAXIMIANO OPTIMO IMP, veiled & laureate, bust right.
Reverse: REQVIES OPTIM-ORVM MERITORVM, Emperor sitting left on curule chair, raising right hand, holding scepter.
TSR ??? in ex. Uncertain mint, 16.4 mm., .8 g.
NORMAN K
maximianusegypt~1.jpg
Maximianus, Roman Provincial Egypt 15 viewsMaximianus Billion tetradrachm 285-310 CE.
Obverse: MAXIMIANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed head right.
Reverse: Nike flying left, wreath in right hand, palm over shoulder jn left.
S/L (YEAR 6) left, star right. Alexandria mint.
20.6 mm., 7.5 g., Alexandria 2577
NORMAN K
sia_059~0.JPG
Maximinus I Thrax AE Sestertius, Pax, 235-238 A.D.89 viewsRef Maximinus I Thrax AE Sestertius, 235-238 A.D.
Maximinus I Thrax Æ Sestertius. MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped bust right / PAX AVGVSTI S-C, Pax standing left with branch and scepter. Cohen 38, RIC 81, BMC 148. Rome mint.
29.8mm, 19.34gr. Green Patina.
Antonio Protti
mar67.jpg
Maximinus I, RIC 67 / BMC 13 viewsMaximinus, AE sestertius, struck early in his reign.
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG. Laureate and draped bust right, similar to that of Severus Alexander.
Reverse: VICTORIA AVG. Victory advancing right, holding wreath, S C at sides.
24.8 g, 31 mm diam.
NORMAN K
max207x.JPG
Maximinus II RIC 171B Siscia17 viewsMaximinus II quarter follis, 305-306 CE
Obverse: MAXIMINVS NOBC, laureate bust right.
Reverse: GENIO POP_VLI ROMANI , Genius standing left, modius on headn naked but for chlamys over shoulder, holding patera and cornucopia.
SIS in ex. Siscia mint. 19.1 mm., 2.0 g.
NORMAN K
MAX207C2.jpg
Maximinus II RIC 207C Siscia15 viewsMaximinus II follis, 311 CE
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG, laureate bust right.
Reverse: GENIO AV-GVSTI , Genius standing left, modius on headn naked but for chlamys over shoulder, holding patera and cornucopia.
SIS in ex. Siscia mint. 25,4 mm., 6.0 g.
NORMAN K
ZomboDroid_16092019093042.jpg
Maximinus II, as Caesar, 305-309. AE Follis. 27mm // 7,36g. Heraclea, 305-306.8 viewsObv.GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES Laureate head of Maximinus II to right.

Rev. GENIO CAESARIS/ HTD Genius, nude but for chlamys over his left shoulder, standing front, head to left, holding patera, from which liquor flows, in his right hand and a cornucopiae with his left
Canaan
Probus.jpg
Probus Billon Tetradrachm Aug 29 A.D. 277 - Aug 28 A.D. 278, cf. Dattari 5545; Milne 4557; Curtis 1890; Geissen 3134; Kampmann-Ganschow 112.15; BMC Alexandria p. 314, 242326 viewsA K M AVP ΠPOBOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / Tyche standing left, modius on head, rudder on globe in right, cornucopia in left, LΓ (?, year 3) above left. Alexandria mint.
Maximum Diameter: 19.7 mm
Weight: 7.58 g
2 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
Roman_Imperial_RIC164b.jpg
Roman Imperial: Maximinus II Daia (310-313) BI Follis, Antioch (RIC-164b)26 viewsObv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG; Laureate head right
Rev: GENIO AVGVSTI; Genius standing facing, holding head of Sol in right, cornucopia in left. ✶ / S in fields, ANT in exergue

SpongeBob
rjb_2009_09_06.jpg
Time of Maximinus II10 viewsAnonymous
Antioch mint
IOVI CONSERVATORI
Jupiter seated left
VICTORIA AVGG
Victory walking left holding wreath
-/E//SMA
van Heesch 2
mauseus
rjb_2009_09_05.jpg
Time of Maximinus II18 viewsAnonymous
Antioch mint
GENIO ANTIOCHENI
Antioch seated facing, Orontes swimming below
APOLLONI SANCTO
Apollo standing left holding patera and lyre
-/A//SMA
van Heesch 3
mauseus
005n.jpg
Δ and Six-pointed star291 viewsCILICIA. Ninica-Claudiopolis. Maximinus I. Æ 28. A.D. 235-238. Obv: IMPCSIVLVERMAXIMINVS. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; 2 countermarks: (1) before face, (2) on bust. Rev: NIN-C-CLAV. Colonist ploughing behind two oxen, in background vexillum. Ref: BMC 8. Axis: 360°. Weight: 9.86 g. CM (1): Δ containing dot, all within circle; circular punch, 6 mm. Howgego 669 (49 pcs). Not likely to be a denominational countermark. CM (2): Six-pointed star, incuse, 6 mm from point to point. Howgego 451 (45 pcs). Collection Automan.Automan
170.jpg
Δ containing dot215 viewsCILICIA. Ninica-Claudiopolis. Maximinus I. Æ 23. A.D. 235-238. Obv: (IMP)MAXIMINVΓPI. Laureate head right; Countermark on neck. Rev: NI-NI-CL-Ω-ΩΔ. Two vexilla. Ref: BMC -. Axis: 180°. Weight: 6.92 g.CM: Δ containing dot, all within circle; circular punch, 6 mm. Howgego 669 (49 pcs). Collection Automan.Automan
168.jpg
Δ, 6-pointed star and Nike188 viewsCILICIA. Ninica-Claudiopolis. Maximinus I. Æ 28. A.D. 235-238. Obv: (...MA)XIMINVΓP(A)UTΛ or similar. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; 4 countermarks: (1) before face, (2) on shoulder; (3) before chest, (4) behind neck. Rev: (C)-OLN-(I)NI-CLAUΔ. Colonist ploughing behind two oxen, in background vexillum, star before colonist. Ref: BMC 8 (var. obv. leg.). Axis: 210°. Weight: 10.70 g. CM(1): Six-pointed star, incuse, 6 mm from point to point. Howgego 451 (45 pcs). CM(2): Δ containing dot, all within circle; circular punch, 6 mm. . Howgego 669 (49 pcs). Note: Not likely to be a denominational countermark. CM(3-4): Nike right, in oval punch, c. 5 x 8 mm (not certain!). Howgego 262 (34 pcs). Note:The sequence of application appears to have been (1) Δ in circle (669), (2) six-pointed star (451), and (3) Nike (262). Collection Automan.Automan
013n~0.jpg
Δ, six-pointed star, eagle and Nike (6 cmks!)204 viewsCILICIA. Ninica-Claudiopolis. Maximinus I. Æ 27. A.D. 235-238. Obv: OIMPCSIVLVERMAXIMINVS. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; 6 countermarks: (1) to right, before bust, (2) on lower part of bust, (3) on neck, (4) behind and on back of head, (5) on upper part of head, (6) before head. Rev: NINIC-OL-CLA-UΔI, OPOLI in ex. Tetrastyle temple containing emperor, standing left, holding patera and spear. Ref: BMC 10; Sear GIC 3548 (same dies). Axis: 360°. Weight: 9.12 g. CM(1): Δ containing dot, all within circle; circular punch, 6 mm. Howgego 669 (49 pcs). Note: Not likely to be a denominational countermark. CM(2): Six-pointed star, incuse, 6 mm from point to point. Howgego 451 (45 pcs). CM(3): Eagle standing right with head left, in shaped punch, c. 4 x 7 mm. Howgego 338 (11 pcs). CM(4): Nike right, in oval punch, c. 5 x 8 mm. Howgego 262 (34 pcs). CM(5): Similar to CM(4). CM(6): Similar to CM(4). Note: The sequence of application appears to have been 669-451-262-338. Automan
00005x00.jpg
24 viewsROME
PB Tessera (19mm, 3.15 g, 12 h)
Togate priest standing left, holding patera
Modius with three grain ears, A C flanking
Rostowzew 1571 var. (size, no modius)

AC may stand for “Antoninus Caesar”, thereby making the togate figure the emperor in the guise of Pontifex Maximus. The presence of a modius also suggests a relation to the annona, implying a reading of “Annona Caesaris.”
Ardatirion
00025x00~1.jpg
12 viewsROME
PB Tessera (20mm, 2.94 g, 6h)
Victory standing right, holding wreath and palm frond
M
Rostowzew 1956 var. (no letters on obv.). "IVLIA" and "VICTOR" in India ink on obverse, "FARSALI/IA" and "MAXIMA" on reverse

Ex Classical Numismatic Group 55 (13 September 2000), lot 1201 (part of)
Ardatirion
00021x00~0.jpg
39 viewsTiberius. AD 14-37
Æ As (26mm, 9.14 g, 12 h)
Gaul? Imitating Rome mint issue struck AD 21-22
[TI CAESAR DIV]I AVG F AVGVST IMP [VII or VIII]
Bare head right
PONT[IF MAXIM TRIBVN] POTEST XXXIIII
Livia seated right, holding patera and long scepter; SC flanking
Cf. Cohen 19

The authors of RIC I do not recognize this type as being official. Cohen likely saw a similar imitation, assuming it to be an original mint issue.
1 commentsArdatirion
magnus-maximus-silique-virtvs-treves.JPG
RIC.84b Magnus Maximus (siliqua, Virtvs Romanorvm)9 viewsMagnus Maximus, usurpor (383-384), western roman emperor (384-388)
Siliqua: Virtvs Romanorvm (383-388, Trèves mint)

silver 900‰, 18 mm diameter, 2.24 g, die axis: 1 h

A/ D N MAG MAX-IMVS P F AVG; pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
R/ VIRTVS RO-MANORVM / TRPS in exergue; Roma seated left on throne, holding Victory on globe and spear

Die breaking on the cheek
Droger
magnus-maximus-spes-romanorvm.JPG
RIC.29a Magnus Maximus (AE4, Spes Romanorvm)24 viewsMagnus Maximus, usurpor (383-384), western roman emperor (384-388)
Nummus AE4 : Spes Romanorvm (383-388, Arles mint)

bronze, 12 mm diameter, 1.40 g, die axis: 5 h,

A/ D N MAG MAXI-MVS P F AVG; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ SPES RO-MA-NORVM / PCON; open camp-gate with star between its two turrets

RIC.29a
NBD.55515
Ferrando II 1677 (C2)
Droger
magnus-maximus-votvmvltx-LVGS.JPG
RIC.35 Magnus Maximus (AE4, Vot V Mvlt X)11 viewsMagnus Maximus, usurpor (383-384), western roman emperor (384-388)
Nummus AE4 : Vot V Mvlt X (383-388, Lyon mint)

bronze, 14 mm diameter, 1.72 g, die axis: 6 h,

A/ [D N MA]G MAXI-MVS P F AV[G]; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ VOT / V/ MVLT / X / LVCS in exergue; in wreath
Droger
magnus-maximus-reparatio-arles.JPG
RIC.26a1 Magnus Maximus (AE2, Reparatio Reipvb)16 viewsMagnus Maximus, usurpor (383-384), western roman emperor (384-388)
Maiorina pecunia AE2 : Reparatio Reipvb (383-388, Arles mint)

bronze, 23 mm diameter, 4.23 g, die axis: 5 h

A/ D N MAG MAXI-MVS P F AVG; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ REPARATIO-REIPVB / PCON in exergue, C in the field; emperor standing facing left, with right hand raising kneeled turreted woman, and holding Victory on globe in left hand

RIC.IX 26.a.1(C)
Ferrando II 1669 (C4)
Droger
magnus-maximus-reparatio-SCON.JPG
RIC.26a2 Magnus Maximus (AE2, Reparatio Reipvb)10 viewsMagnus Maximus, usurpor (383-384), western roman emperor (384-388)
Maiorina pecunia AE2 : Reparatio Reipvb (383-388, Arles mint)

bronze, 21 mm diameter, 5.04 g, die axis: 1 h

A/ D N MAG MAXI-MVS P F AVG; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ REPARATIO-REIPVB / SCON in exergue, C in the field; emperor standing facing left, with right hand raising kneeled turreted woman, and holding Victory on globe in left hand

RIC.IX 26.a.2(C)
Ferrando II 1670 (C4)
Droger
magnus-maximus-reparatio-lyon.JPG
RIC.32.(6 or 7) Magnus Maximus (AE2, Reparatio Reipvb)17 viewsMagnus Maximus, usurpor (383-384), western roman emperor (384-388)
Maiorina pecunia AE2 : Reparatio Reipvb (383-388, Lyon mint)

bronze, 23 mm diameter, 3.95 g, die axis: 7 h,

A/ D N MAG MAXI-MVS P F AVG; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ REPARATIO-REIPVB / LVG? in exergue, C in the field; emperor standing facing left, with right hand raising kneeled turreted woman, and holding Victory on globe in left hand

RIC.IX 32.(6 ou 7)(S)
Droger
magnus-maximus-reparatio-treves.JPG
RIC.85 Magnus Maximus (AE2, Reparatio Reipvb)14 viewsMagnus Maximus, usurpor (383-384), western roman emperor (384-388)
Maiorina pecunia AE2 : Reparatio Reipvb (383-388, Trèves mint)

bronze, 23 mm diameter, 5.23 g, die axis: 7 h,

A/ D N MAG MAX-IMVS P F AVG; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ REPARATIO-REIPVB / SMTRP; emperor standing facing left, with right hand raising kneeled turreted woman, and holding Victory on globe in left hand

RIC.IX 85.1(S)
Droger
magnus-maximus-victoria.JPG
RIC.33 Magnus Maximus (AE2, Victoria Avg)20 viewsMagnus Maximus, usurpor (383-384), western roman emperor (384-388)
Maiorina pecunia AE2 : Victoria Avgg (383-388, Lyon mint)

bronze, 21 mm diameter, 4.41 g, die axis: 6 h,

A/ D N MAG MAXI-MVS P F AVG; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ VICTOR-IA AVGG / LVGP; emperor standing left, holding victory and standard

RIC.IX 33.1(S)
Droger
vienne-denier.JPG
Vienne archibishopric : denier (Vienne)26 viewsVienne archibishopric, anonymous (1200-1250)

Silver, 0.66 g, diameter 16 mm, die axis 5h

O/ +•S•M•VIENNA•; left bearded and bare head of Saint Maurice
R/ MAXIMA.GALL (dashed L); cross pattée with 4 pellets
1 commentsDroger
rjb_2011_02_02.jpg
"Boulogne" (VI) 17b24 viewsGalerius as Caesar
AE Follis
Obv: C VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB C
Laureate bust right
Rev: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI
Genius standing left
-/-//-
Uncertain continental mint (Boulogne?) operating around the time of the British invasion
RIC (VI) Lyon 17b
mauseus
tiberius_denarius_res_trib.jpg
"Tribute Penny"--TIBERIUS95 views14 - 37 AD
minted 18 - 35 AD
AR Denarius ("Tribute Penny")
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG AVGVSTVS; laureate head right
R: PONTIF MAXIM; Livia as Pax, seated right on throne with ornate legs, holding long scepter and olive branch; single line below
Lugdunum mint
RIC 30, RSC 16a
laney
normal_tiberius_denarius_res_trib~0.jpg
(00040a) LIVIA (with Tiberius)34 views(wife of Augustus; mother of Tiberius; grandmother of Claudius)
b. 58 BC - d. 29 AD
minted 18 - 35 AD
AR Denarius ("Tribute Penny")
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG AVGVSTVS; laureate head right
R: PONTIF MAXIM; Livia as Pax, seated right on throne with ornate legs, holding long scepter and olive branch; single line below
Lugdunum mint
RIC 30, RSC 16a
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helio_jup_temple_res.jpg
(0193) SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS34 views193 - 211 AD
AE 24 mm; 9.36 g
O: Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right;
R: Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus Heliopolitanus, viewed in perspective from above; numerous columns and flight of steps in front
Syria, Heliopolis; cf. SNG Cop 429; SNG München 1031
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max_thrax.jpg
(0235) MAXIMINUS I (THRAX)49 views235 - 238 AD
AE Sestertius 30X32mm 20.55 g
o:MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Laureate draped bust r
R: FIDES MILITVM S-C
Fides standing head left, holding military standard in each hand
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MAXIMINUS_NIKE_THESSALONIKA_RES.jpg
(0235) MAXIMINUS I THRAX40 views235 - 238 AD
AE 25 mm 7.97 g
O: AVGIOVOV- -MAXIMEINOC Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R: Nike standing left, holding palm branch and statue of Kabeiros.
Macedonia, Thessalonika; Varbanov 4502

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max_thrax_denarius_x.jpg
(0235) MAXIMINUS I THRAX14 views235 - 238 AD
Struck 236 AD--2nd emission
Silver denarius, 20.0 mm; 2.909 g
O: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right (no cuirass?), from behind;
R: PAX AVGVSTI (to the peace of the emperor), Pax standing facing, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left
Rome mint; RSC III 31b (no cuirass), RIC IV 12 var. (cuirassed), BMCRE VI 70 var. (same), Hunter III 8 var. (same), SRCV III 8310 var. (same)
(ex FORUM)
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max_thrax_denarius.jpg
(0235) MAXIMINUS THRAX15 views235 AD - 238 AD
AR Denarius 19.5 mm; 2.13 g
Obv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: P M TR P P P, Maximinus standing left, holding spear and raising right hand, two standards at sides.
Rome, RIC 1
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maximus_caesar_b.jpg
(0235) MAXIMUS CAESAR22 views235 - 238 AD
AE27 mm max., 7.33 g
O: G IOV OVHP MAZIMOC KAICA, draped & cuirassed bust right
R: NIKOMEDEWN DIC NEWKORWN, Serapis standing left with raised hand and leaning on sceptre
Bithynia, Nicomedia; Recuiel General 347 v.
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maximian_ii_res.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS32 views286-305, 307-308, and 310 AD
Struck 302 - 303 AD
AE Follis 27 mm 7.67 g
O: IMP C MA MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate bust right
R: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera & cornucopia; G to right; TS in ex
Thessalonica RIC 23b
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MAXIMIANUS_B.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS43 views286-305, 307-308, and 310 AD
Struck 286 - 295 AD
AE SILVERED ANT. 22mm 2.66g
O: IMP C M AVR VAL MAXIMIANVS PF AVG
RAD CUIR BUST R
R: IOV ET HERCV CONSER AVG
JUPITER R HOLDING GLOBE & SCEPTER FACING HERCULES HOLDING VICTORY ON GLOBE, CLUB, LIONSKIN CRESCENT/B BETWEEN
XII IN EXE
ANTIOCH
(J.Ryan)
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maximianus_10_07.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS31 views286-305, 307-308, and 310 AD
AE 20 mm 2.62 g
O: IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG - Radiate bust right, cuirassed.
R: CONCORDIA MILITVM - Jupiter presents Victory on a globe to Maximianus, Gamma between
laney
max_egypt_res.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS29 views286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.
Struck 287/8 AD
Billon potin tetradrachm 18 mm 7.51 g
O: K M A OYA MAXIMIANOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: Homonoia standing left, raising right, double cornucopia in left, L -G (year 3) across fields
Egypt, Alexandria mint
BMC 2561, Curtis 2091 , Milne 4855
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MAXIMIANUS_TEMPLE_RES.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS27 views286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.
Struck 2nd reign; 307 - 308 AD
AE Follis 24 mm 5.14 g
O: IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right
R: CONSERV VRB SVAE, Roma seated within hexastyle temple, head turned left, holding globe in right hand, scepter in left; TT in exe
Ticinum mint
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maximian_concord_e_blk_res.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS25 views286-305, 307-308, and 310 AD
struck ca 293, during 1st reign; pre-reform, Officina 5
AE 21.5 mm 4.85 g
O: IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS AVG radiate draped cuirassed bust right
R: CONCORDIA MILITVM Emperor receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter, E between; XX pellet in exe.
Cyzicus mint
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maximian_genio_2_res.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS15 views286-305, 307-308, and 310 AD
AE Follis 25 mm, 5.14 g
O: D N MAXIMIANO P F AVG laureate cuirassed bust right
R: GENIO POP ROM Genius standing left holding patera and cornucopia; PLN iin exe.
London mint; RIC VI 90
laney
maximianus_concor_res.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS30 views286-305, 307-308, and 310 AD
AE 21.5 mm, 2.66 g (pre-reform)
O: IMP C MA MAXIMIANVS PF AVG radiate draped cuirassed bust right
R: CONCORDIA MILITVM; Maximian holding scepter and receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter who holds scepter
laney
maximian_concordia_g_res.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS17 views286-305, 307-308, and 310 AD
AE 20 mm; 2.62 g
O: IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG radiate cuirassed bust right
R: CONCORDIA MILITVM Jupiter presenting Victory on a globe to Maximianus; gamma between
laney
maximianus_iovi_B_res.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS23 views286-305, 307-308, and 310 AD
Silvered AE Ant. 22 mm, 4.74 g
O: IMP C M AVR VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG;radiate cuirassed bust right
R: IOV ET HERCV CONSER AVGG Jupiter right holding globe and scepter, facing Hercules left, holding Victory on globe, club, and lionskin; crescent over B between; XXI in exe.
Antioch mint
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maximianus_alexandria_b_res.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS--ALEXANDRIA32 views286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D
Struck 294/295 (Year 10)
AE TETRADRACHM 20.5 mm 6.44 g
O: MAXIMI_ANOC CEB Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind
R: Nike flying right, wreath upward in right hand, palm in left over shoulder L / I across fields
ALEXANDRIA, ROMAN PROVINCIAL EGYPT
Emmett 4147; Milne 5181 var; Curtis 2105 var; BMC 2585 var

laney
maximinus_alexandria_a_res.jpg
(0286) MAXIMIANUS--ALEXANDRIA25 views286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.,
Billon tetradrachm 19.5 mm 7.55 g
O: "MAXIMIANO"C C"EB", laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: ENATOY L (year 9), Homonoia standing left, raising right, double cornucopia in left, star in right field
ALEXANDRIA, ROMAN PROVINCIAL EGYPT
Milne 5126; Dattari 5936; BMC Alexandria p. 330, 2567

laney
galerius_genio_imp_0702.jpg
(0293) GALERIUS37 views293 - 305 AD (as Caesar)
305 - 311 AD (as Augustus)
AE Follis 26.5 mm max. 5.20 g
O: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right;
R: GENIO IMP-ERATORIS, Genio standing left holding patera in right, cornucopia in left, K - Γ/P at sides, ALE in ex
Alexandria
laney
galerius_concordia_070210.jpg
(0293) GALERIUS44 viewsGalerius as Caesar (293 - 305 AD; AVG 305 - 311 AD)
Struck ca 296 AD
AE 20 mm 3.18 g, Post-reform Radiate
O: GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
R: CONCORDIA MILITVM, the prince standing right receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter, star over Gamma between
ANT in ex. Antioch
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GALER_GENIO.jpg
(0293) GALERIUS46 views293 - 305 AD (as Caesar)
305 - 311 AD (as Augustus)
AE 23 X 25.5 mm 5.66 g
O: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS PF AVG
LAUR HEAD R
R: GENIO IMPERITORIS, K iN LEFT FIELD, T/K IN RIGHT FIELD
GENIUS STANDING L POURING FROM PATERA AND HOLDING CORNUCOPIA
ALE IN EXE
ALEXANDRIA
(JRyan)

laney
galerius_genio.jpg
(0293) GALERIUS24 views293 - 305 AD (as Caesar)
305 - 311 AD (as Augustus)
struck 297 AD
AE 27.4 mm, 10.53 g
O: GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOBC CAES laureate head right
R: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI Genius standing left holding poatera dn cornucopia, crescent over A at right; ANT in exe.
Antioch mint; RIC 49b
(ex-Forum)
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galerius_res.jpg
(0293) GALERIUS (as Caesar)19 views293 - 305 AD (as Caesar)
305 - 311 AD (as Augustus)
AE 18 X 20 mm 2.18 g
O: GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES radiate draped cuirassed bust right
R: CONCORDIA MILITVM, Emperor receiving Victory from Jupiter
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TIBERIUS_RED.jpg
(03) TIBERIUS36 viewsstruck 35-36 AD
AE As 26.46 mm 9.5 g
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII, Laur head left
R: PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXIIII S C, Winged Caduceus
RIC 44, Sear 1771
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tiberius.jpg
(03) TIBERIUS25 views14 - 37 AD
(struck 22-23 AD)
AE 28 mm 8.85 g
O: __AES DIVI AVG F AVG__
Bare head left
R: __PONTIF MAXIM TRIB__, legend surrounding large SC
ROME RIC 44
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tiberius_denarius_res_c.jpg
(03) TIBERIUS63 views14 - 37 AD
minted 18 - 35 AD
AR Denarius ("Tribute Penny")
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG AVGVSTVS; laureate head right
R: PONTIF MAXIM; Livia as Pax, seated right on throne with ornate legs, holding long scepter and olive branch; single line below
Lugdunum mint
RIC 30, RSC 16a
1 commentslaney
tiberius_cadu_res.jpg
(03) TIBERIUS16 views14 - 37 AD
AE As 27 mm 8.03 g
O: LAUR HEAD L
R: [...MAXIM TRIB...]
WINGED CADUCEUS BETWEEN LARGE S-C
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tiberius_cornu_cad_res2.jpg
(03) TIBERIUS31 views14 - 37 AD
Struck 19 - 20 AD
AE 29.5 mm 14.66 g
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVGVSTI F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right
R: PON MAXIM COS III IMP VII TR POT XXII, crossed cornuacopiae over a winged caduceus
RPC 3869, RIC 90
Syria, Commagene
laney
MAXIMINUS.jpg
(0309) MAXIMINUS II DAIA30 viewsCaesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313 AD.
struck 309 - 313 AD
AE 21.5 mm 4.04 g
O: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
LAUR HEAD R
R: GENIO AVGVSTI
GENIUS STANDING L POURING FROM PATERS, HOLDING CORNUCOPIAE, EAGLE AT FEET, GAMMA IN R FIELD
SMNA IN EXE
NICOMEDIA
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MAXIMINUS_II_GENIO.jpg
(0309) MAXIMINUS II DAIA29 viewsCaesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313 AD.
struck 309 - 313 AD
AE 23 mm 6.41 g
O: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
LAUR HEAD R
R: GENIO IMPERITORIS
GENIUS STANDING L POURING FROM PATERA OVER ALTAR AND HOLDING CORNUCOPIA, STAR IN LEFT FIELD, I IN RIGHT FIELD, ANT IN EXE
ANTIOCH
laney
max_ii_gen_1_res.jpg
(0309) MAXIMINUS II DAIA15 viewsCaesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313 AD.
struck 305-308 AD
AE 23.5 mm 4.86 g
O: GAL VAL MIXIMINVS NOB CAES , Laureate bust right REVERSE: GENIO CAESARIS , Genius standing left holding patera and cornucopiae; SMNA in exe.
Nicomedia mint
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max_ii_gen_2_res.jpg
(0309) MAXIMINUS II DAIA14 viewsCaesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313
struck 308-309 AD
AE 24.5 mm 5.87 g
O: MAXIMINVS FIL AVGG laureate head right
R: GENIO CAESSARIS Genius standing left holding cornucopiae and patera; star in left field; D right field; SMTS in exe.
Thessalonica mint
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max_ii_iovi_res.jpg
(0309) MAXIMINUS II DAIA25 viewsCaesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313
struck 313 AD
AE 12 X 24 mm 3.21 g
O: IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG laureate cuirassed bust right
R: IOVI CONSERVATORI; Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe, eagle to left; A to right; SIS in exe
Siscia mint
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FAUSTA.jpg
(0324) FAUSTA57 views(2nd wife of Constantine I; daughter of Maximian; mother of emperors Constantine II, Constantius II, and Constans)
324 - 326 AD
AE 20.7 mm 2.86 g
O: FLAV MAX FAVSTA AVG
DR BUST R, HAIR WAVED WITH BUN AT TACK, WEARING PEARL NECKLACE
R: SPES REIPVBLICAE
FAUSTA STANDING FACING, LOOKING L, HOLDING INFANTS CONSTANTINE II AND CONSTANTIUS II
SMK DELTA(?) IN EXE
RIC 50 SCARCE
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mag_max_5.jpg
(0383) MAGNUS MAXIMUS37 views383 - 388 AD
AE 22 mm 4.29 g
O: DN MAG MAXIMVS PF AVG
DIAD BUST R
R: REPARATIO REIPVB
EMPEROR STANDING, HEAD L. HOLDING VICTORY ON GLOBE AND RAISING KNEELING FEMALE
LVGP IN EXE
LUGDUNUM
SCARCE
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mag_max_4.jpg
(0383) MAGNUS MAXIMUS28 views383 - 388 AD
AE 24 mm 4.16 g
O: DN MAG MAXIMVS PF AVG
DIAD BUST R
R: REPARATIO REIPVB
EMPEROR STANDING, HEAD L. HOLDING VICTORY ON GLOBE AND RAISING KNEELING FEMALE
PCON IN EXE
ARELATE
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mag_max_3.jpg
(0383) MAGNUS MAXIMUS30 views383 - 388 AD
AE 22 mm 5.07 g
O: DN MAG MAXIMVS P F AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right.
R: VICTORIA AVGG, emperor stading facing, head left, holding Victory & standard
LVGP IN EXE
LUGDUNUM
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mag_max_2.jpg
(0383) MAGNUS MAXIMUS34 views383 - 388 AD
AE 21.5 mm X 25 mm 4.48 g
O DN MAG MAXI[MV]S PF AVG
DIAD DRAPED AND CUIR BUST R
R: REPARATIO REI[PVB]
MAGNUS STANDING L HOLDING VICTORY ON GLOBE AND RAISING KNEELING FEMALE
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mag_max_1.jpg
(0383) MAGNUS MAXIMUS43 viewsMAGNUS MAXIMUS
383 - 388 AD
O: DN MAG MAXIMVS PF AVG
DIAD BUST R
R: REPARATIO REIPVB
EMPEROR STANDING, HEAD L. HOLDING VICTORY ON GLOBE AND RAISING KNEELING FEMALE
SCON IN EXE
ARELATE
RIC 26(a) IX
laney
mag_max_7.jpg
(0383) MAGNUS MAXIMUS54 views383 - 388 AD
AE 21.5 mm 4.28 gO: DN MAG MAXIMVS PF AVG
DIAD BUST R
R: REPARATIO REIPVB
EMPEROR STANDING, HEAD L. HOLDING VICTORY ON GLOBE AND RAISING KNEELING FEMALE
laney
mag_max_6.jpg
(0383) MAGNUS MAXIMUS53 views383 - 388 AD
AE 21 mm 4.62 g
O: DN MAG MAXIMVS PF AVG
DIAD BUST R
R: REPARATIO REIPVB
EMPEROR STANDING, HEAD L. HOLDING VICTORY ON GLOBE AND RAISING KNEELING FEMALE
laney
magnus_maximus_scon_b.jpg
(0383) MAGNUS MAXIMUS11 views383 - 388 AD
AE 22 mm; 6.25 g
O: DN MAG MAXIMVS PF AVG diademed bust right
R: REPARATIO REIPVB Emperor standing head left, holding Victory on globe and raising kneeling female; SCON in exe
Arleate mint; RIC 26(a) IX
laney
mag_max_b.jpg
(0383) MAGNUS MAXIMUS16 views383 - 388 AD
AE 21.5 mm X 25 mm 4.48 g
O DN MAG MAXI[MV]S PF AVG diademed, craped and cuirassed bust right
R: REPARATIO REI[PVB] Magnus staging left holding Victory on globe and raising kneeling female
laney
mag_max_reparatio.jpg
(0383) MAGNUS MAXIMUS9 views383-388 AD
AE 22 mm, 4.81 g
O: D N MAG MAXIMVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right;
R:REPARATIO REIPVB, emperor standing facing, head left, raising turreted woman with right hand, Victory on globe in left hand, Victory crowning him with wreath and holding palm frond
laney
vitellius_denarius_res.jpg
(09) VITELLIUS33 views69 AD
3.110g, maximum diameter 18.8mm
O: A VITELLIVS GERMANICVS IMP, bare head right
R: CONCOR-DIA P R, Concordia enthroned left, patera in right, cornucopia in left
Rome mint; RIC I 66, RSC II 21, BMCRE I 1, BnF III 3 (Scarce)
(ex-Forum)
1 commentslaney
LPisoFrugiDenarius_S235.jpg
(502a) Roman Republic, L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi, 90 B.C.158 viewsSilver denarius, S 235, Calpurnia 11, Crawford 340/1, Syd 663a, VF, rainbow toning, Rome mint, 3.772g, 18.5mm, 180o, 90 B.C. obverse: laureate head of Apollo right, scorpion behind; Reverse naked horseman galloping right holding palm, L PISO FRVGI and control number CXI below; ex-CNA XV 6/5/91, #443. Ex FORVM.


A portion of the following text is a passage taken from the excellent article “The Calpurnii and Roman Family History: An Analysis of the Piso Frugi Coin in the Joel Handshu Collection at the College of Charleston,” by Chance W. Cook:

In the Roman world, particularly prior to the inception of the principate, moneyers were allotted a high degree of latitude to mint their coins as they saw fit. The tres viri monetales, the three men in charge of minting coins, who served one-year terms, often emblazoned their coins with an incredible variety of images and inscriptions reflecting the grandeur, history, and religion of Rome. Yet also prominent are references to personal or familial accomplishments; in this manner coins were also a means by which the tres viri monetales could honor their forbearers. Most obvious from an analysis of the Piso Frugi denarius is the respect and admiration that Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi, who minted the coin, had for his ancestors. For the images he selected for his dies relate directly to the lofty deeds performed by his Calpurnii forbearers in the century prior to his term as moneyer. The Calpurnii were present at many of the watershed events in the late Republic and had long distinguished themselves in serving the state, becoming an influential and well-respected family whose defense of traditional Roman values cannot be doubted.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi, who was moneyer in 90 B.C., depicted Apollo on the obverse and the galloping horseman on the reverse, as does his son Gaius. However, all of L. Piso Frugi’s coins have lettering similar to “L-PISO-FRVGI” on the reverse, quite disparate from his son Gaius’ derivations of “C-PISO-L-F-FRV.”

Moreover, C. Piso Frugi coins are noted as possessing “superior workmanship” to those produced by L. Piso Frugi.

The Frugi cognomen, which became hereditary, was first given to L. Calpurnius Piso, consul in 133 B.C., for his integrity and overall moral virtue. Cicero is noted as saying that frugal men possessed the three cardinal Stoic virtues of bravery, justice, and wisdom; indeed in the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae, a synonym of frugalitas is bonus, generically meaning “good” but also implying virtuous behavior. Gary Forsythe notes that Cicero would sometimes invoke L. Calpurnius Piso’s name at the beginning of speeches as “a paragon of moral rectitude” for his audience.

L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi’s inclusion of the laureled head of Apollo, essentially the same obverse die used by his son Gaius (c. 67 B.C.), was due to his family’s important role in the establishment of the Ludi Apollinares, the Games of Apollo, which were first instituted in 212 B.C. at the height of Hannibal’s invasion of Italy during the Second Punic War. By that time, Hannibal had crushed Roman armies at Cannae, seized Tarentum and was invading Campania.

Games had been used throughout Roman history as a means of allaying the fears
of the populace and distracting them from issues at hand; the Ludi Apollinares were no different. Forsythe follows the traditional interpretation that in 211 B.C., when C. Calpurnius Piso was praetor, he became the chief magistrate in Rome while both consuls were absent and the three other praetors were sent on military expeditions against Hannibal.

At this juncture, he put forth a motion in the Senate to make the Ludi Apollinares a yearly event, which was passed; the Ludi Apollinares did indeed become an important festival, eventually spanning eight days in the later Republic. However, this interpretation is debatable; H.H. Scullard suggests that the games were not made permanent until 208 B.C. after a severe plague prompted the Senate to make them a fixture on the calendar. The Senators believed Apollo would serve as a “healing god” for the people of Rome.

Nonetheless, the Calpurnii obviously believed their ancestor had played an integral role in the establishment of the Ludi Apollinares and thus prominently displayed
the head or bust of Apollo on the obverse of the coins they minted.

The meaning of the galloping horseman found on the reverse of the L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi coin is more complicated. It is possible that this is yet another reference to the Ludi Apollinares. Chariot races in the Circus Maximus were a major component of the games, along with animal hunts and theatrical performances.

A more intriguing possibility is that the horseman is a reference to C. Calpurnius Piso, son of the Calpurnius Piso who is said to have founded the Ludi Apollinares. This C. Calpurnius Piso was given a military command in 186 B.C. to quell a revolt in Spain. He was victorious, restoring order to the province and also gaining significant wealth in the process.

Upon his return to Rome in 184, he was granted a triumph by the Senate and eventually erected an arch on the Capitoline Hill celebrating his victory. Of course
the arch prominently displayed the Calpurnius name. Piso, however, was not an infantry commander; he led the cavalry.

The difficulty in accepting C. Calpurnius Piso’s victory in Spain as the impetus for the galloping horseman image is that not all of C. Piso Frugi’s coins depict the horseman or cavalryman carrying the palm, which is a symbol of victory. One is inclined to believe that the victory palm would be prominent in all of the coins minted by C. Piso Frugi (the son of L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi) if it indeed signified the great triumph of C. Calpurnius Piso in 186 B.C. Yet the palm’s appearance is clearly not a direct reference to military feats of C. Piso Frugi’s day. As noted, it is accepted that his coins were minted in 67 B.C.; in that year, the major victory by Roman forces was Pompey’s swift defeat of the pirates throughout the Mediterranean.

Chrestomathy: Annual Review of Undergraduate Research at the College of Charleston. Volume 1, 2002: pp. 1-10© 2002 by the College of Charleston, Charleston SC 29424, USA.All rights to be retained by the author.
http://www.cofc.edu/chrestomathy/vol1/cook.pdf


There are six (debatably seven) prominent Romans who have been known to posterity as Lucius Calpurnius Piso:

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi: (d. 261 A.D.) a Roman usurper, whose existence is
questionable, based on the unreliable Historia Augusta.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Licinianus: deputy Roman Emperor, 10 January 69 to15 January
69, appointed by Galba.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso: Consul in 27 A.D.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso: Consul in 1 B.C., augur

Lucius Calpurnius Piso: Consul in 15 B.C., pontifex

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus: Consul in 58 B.C. (the uncle of Julius Caesar)

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi: Moneyer in 90 B.C. (our man)


All but one (or two--if you believe in the existence of "Frugi the usurper" ca. 261 A.D.) of these gentlemen lack the Frugi cognomen, indicating they are not from the same direct lineage as our moneyer, though all are Calpurnii.

Calpurnius Piso Frugi's massive issue was intended to support the war against the Marsic Confederation. The type has numerous variations and control marks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucius_Calpurnius_Piso
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/indexfrm.asp?vpar=55&pos=0

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


2 commentsCleisthenes
LonginusDenarius.jpg
(504c) Roman Republic, L. Cassius Longinus, 63 B.C.69 viewsSilver denarius, Crawford 413/1, RSC I Cassia 10, SRCV I 364, aVF, struck with worn dies, Rome mint, weight 3.867g, maximum diameter 20.3mm, die axis 0o, c. 63 B.C. Obverse: veiled bust of Vesta left, kylix behind, L before; Reverse: LONGIN III V, voter standing left, dropping tablet inscribed V into a cista.

The reverse of this Longinus denarius captures a fascinating moment when a Roman citizen casts his ballot. "The abbreviation III V [ir] indentifies Longinus as one of the three annually appointed mintmasters (officially called tres viri aere argento auro flando feriundo). A citizen is seen casting his vote into the urn. On the ballot is the letter 'U', short for uti rogas, a conventional formula indicating assent to a motion. The picture alludes to the law, requested by an ancestor of the mintmaster, which introduced the secret ballot in most proceedings of the popular court" (Meier, Christian. Caesar, a Biography. Berlin: Severin and Siedler, 1982. Plate 6).

The date that this denarius was struck possesses unique significance for another reason. Marcus Tullius Cicero (politician, philosopher, orator, humanist) was elected consul for the year 63 BC -- the first man elected consul who had no consular ancestors in more than 30 years. A "new man," Cicero was not the descendant of a "patrician" family, nor was his family wealthy (although Cicero married "well"). Cicero literally made himself the man he was by the power of the words he spoke and the way in which he spoke them. A witness to and major player during the decline of the Roman Republic, Cicero was murdered in 43 BC by thugs working for Marc Antony. But Cicero proved impossible to efface.

Cicero's words became part of the bed rock of later Roman education. As Peter Heather notes, every educated young man in the late Roman Empire studied "a small number of literary texts under the guidance of an expert in language and literary interpretation, the grammarian. This occupied the individual for seven or more years from about the age of eight, and concentrated on just four authors: Vergil, Cicero, Sallust and Terence" (Heather, Peter. The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History of Rome and the Barbarians. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. 17).


Plutarch: Cicero's Death

But in the meantime the assassins were come with a band of soldiers, Herennius, a centurion, and Popillius, a tribune, whom Cicero had formerly defended when prosecuted for the murder of his father. Finding the doors shut, they broke them open, and Cicero not appearing, and those within saying they knew not where he was, it is stated that a youth, who had been educated by Cicero in the liberal arts and sciences, an emancipated slave of his brother Quintus, Philologus by name, informed the tribune that the litter was on its way to the sea through the close and shady walks. The tribune, taking a few with him, ran to the place where he was to come out. And Cicero, perceiving Herennius running in the walks, commanded his servants to set down the litter; and stroking his chin, as he used to do, with his left hand, he looked steadfastly upon his murderers, his person covered with dust, his beard and hair untrimmed, and his face worn with his troubles. So that the greatest part of those that stood by covered their faces whilst Herennius slew him. And thus was he murdered, stretching forth his neck out of the litter, being now in his sixty-fourth year. Herennius cut off his head, and, by Antony's command, his hands also, by which his Philippics were written; for so Cicero styled those orations he wrote against Antony, and so they are called to this day.

When these members of Cicero were brought to Rome, Antony was holding an assembly for the choice of public officers; and when he heard it, and saw them, he cried out, "Now let there be an end of our proscriptions." He commanded his head and hands to be fastened up over the rostra, where the orators spoke; a sight which the Roman people shuddered to behold, and they believed they saw there, not the face of Cicero, but the image of Antony's own soul. And yet amidst these actions he did justice in one thing, by delivering up Philologus to Pomponia, the wife of Quintus; who, having got his body into her power, besides other grievous punishments, made him cut off his own flesh by pieces, and roast and eat it; for so some writers have related. But Tiro, Cicero's emancipated slave, has not so much as mentioned the treachery of Philologus.

Translation by John Dryden: http://intranet.grundel.nl/thinkquest/moord_cicero_plu.html

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Agrippa_2_RCV_1731.jpg
(Augustus &) Agrippa AE 'half dupondius,' A.D. 10-14 RIC 159-160, RCV 1731, Cohen 8, RPC 525 39 viewsIMP DIVI F P-P, back-to-back heads of Agrippa, in rostral crown, & Augustus, laureate / COL NEM, palm tree curving to left, crocodile right chained below, wreath to left of palm tip with long ties trailing to right. Gaul, Nemausus.
Maximum Diameter: 25.2 mm
Weight: 7.01 g

Cut in half for fractional change.
1 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
rjb_lon_6_17_08_06.jpg
(VI) 6b26 viewsMaximianus I
IMP C MAXIMIANVS PF AVG
Laureate and cuirassed bust right
GENIO POPVLI ROMANI
Genius standing left
RIC (VI) 6b
mauseus
rjb_max_lon_04_06.jpg
(VI) 1538 viewsGalerius
MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES
Laureate and cuirassed bust right
GENIO POPVLI ROMANI
Genius standing left
RIC (VI) 15
mauseus
rjb_lon_06_09.jpg
(VI) 1713 viewsMaximianus I
IMP C MAXIMIANVS PF AVG
Laureate and cuirassed bust right
GENIO POPVLI ROMANI
Genius standing left
RIC (VI) 17
mauseus
rjb_09_07_09.jpg
(VI) 1712 viewsMaximianus I
IMP C MAXIMIANVS PF AVG
Laureate and cuirassed bust right
GENIO POPVLI ROMANI
Genius standing left
RIC (VI) 17
mauseus
rjb_lon1_05_06.jpg
(VI) 17cf imitation26 viewsMaximianus I
IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG
Laureate, cuirassed bust right
GENIO POPVLI ROMANI
Genius standing left
RIC (VI) - (cf17-19) imitation
mauseus
rjb_lond2_01_09.jpg
(VI) 42 imitation19 viewsMaximianus I
IMP C MAXIMIANVS PF AVG
Laureate, cuirassed bust right
GENIO POPVLI ROMANI
Genius standing left
RIC (VI) 42 imitation
mauseus
rjb_lon90_06_06.jpg
(VI) 9015 viewsMaximianus I
DN MAXIMIANO PF S AVG
Laureate, cuirassed bust right
GENIO POP ROM
Genius standing left wearing turreted head-dress
-/-//PLN
RIC (VI) 90
mauseus
rjb_2014_01_07.jpg
(VI) 9119 viewsMaximianus I
DN MAXIMIANO PF S AVG
Laureate, cuirassed bust right
HERCVLI CONSERVATORI
Hercules standing facing, head left holding club and bow
-/-//PLN
RIC (VI) 91
mauseus
rjb_lon_6_209b_08_06.jpg
(VI)209b11 viewsMaximinus II
IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG
Laureate, cuirassed bust right
GENIO POP ROM
Genius standing left
-/star//PLN
RIC (VI) 209b
mauseus
Maximianus.jpg
*SOLD*37 viewsMaximian Follis

Attribution: RIC VI 31b, Ticinum
Date: AD 296-297
Obverse: IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate bust r.
Reverse: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius stg. l., modius on head, naked but for chlamys over l. shoulder, holding patera r. and cornucopiae l., star in l. field, ST in exergue
Size: 26 mm
Weight: 9.94 grams
2 commentsNoah
Maximus_44.jpg
*SOLD*16 viewsMaximus Caesar As

Attribution: RIC IV 10, Cohen 13, rare
Date: AD 236
Obverse: C IVL VERVS MAXIMVS CAES, bare-headed, draped bust as seen from behind (scarcer obverse inscription)
Reverse: PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS, Maximus stg. l. holding baton in r.hand & transverse spear in l., to r. behind, two legionary standards, S C in r. and l. fields
Size: 25 mm
Weight: 9.6 grams
ex-Forvm
Noah
Caesar_AR-Den-plated_CAESAR-elephant-right__Syd-1014_Crawf_443-1_C-49_Gaul-mint_49-48-BC_Q-002_5h_17x20mm_2,26g-s~0.jpg
001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), AR-denarius, Crawf 443-1, Plated (Fouree), Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), #266 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), AR-denarius, Crawf 443-1, Plated (Fouree), Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), #2
avers:-CAESAR in exergue, elephant right, trampling on serpent.
revers:- Simpulum, sprinkler, axe (surmounted by a wolf's head) and priest's hat.
exerg:-/-//CAESAR, diameter: 17-20mm, weight: 2,66g, axes: 5h,
mint: Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), date: 49-48 B.C., ref: Crawford-443/1, Sydneham-1006, RSC-49, BMCRR (Gaul) 27
Q-002
"This is the first coin struck in the name of Julius Caesar. The symbolism on the obverse apparently alludes to the conquest of good over evil, Caesar's victory over the Gauls, while the reverse refers to Caesar's possession of the office of Pontifex Maximus."
1 commentsquadrans
Caesar_AR-Den_CAESAR-elephant-right__Syd-1006_Crawf_443-1_C-49_Gaul-mint_49-48-BC_Q-001_axis-7h_xxmm_x,xxxg-s.jpg
001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 443-1, Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), AR-denarius, #1186 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 443-1, Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), AR-denarius, #1
avers:-CAESAR in exergue, elephant right, trampling on serpent.
revers:- Simpulum, sprinkler, axe (surmounted by a wolf's head) and priest's hat.
exerg:-/-//CAESAR, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,65g, axes: 10h,
mint: Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), date: 49-48 B.C., ref: Crawford-443/1, Sydneham-1006, RSC-49, BMCRR (Gaul) 27
Q-001
"This is the first coin struck in the name of Julius Caesar. The symbolism on the obverse apparently alludes to the conquest of good over evil, Caesar's victory over the Gauls, while the reverse refers to Caesar's possession of the office of Pontifex Maximus."
quadrans
Caesar_AR-Den-plated_CAESAR-elephant-right__Syd-1014_Crawf_443-1_C-49_Gaul-mint_49-48-BC_Q-002_5h_17x20mm_2,26g-s.jpg
001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 443-1, Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), AR-denarius, Plated (Fouree), #2121 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 443-1, Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), AR-denarius, Plated (Fouree), #2
avers:-CAESAR in exergue, elephant right, trampling on serpent.
revers:- Simpulum, sprinkler, axe (surmounted by a wolf's head) and priest's hat.
exerg:-/-//CAESAR, diameter: 17-20mm, weight: 2,66g, axes: 5h,
mint: Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), date: 49-48 B.C., ref: Crawford-443/1, Sydneham-1006, RSC-49, BMCRR (Gaul) 27
Q-002
"This is the first coin struck in the name of Julius Caesar. The symbolism on the obverse apparently alludes to the conquest of good over evil, Caesar's victory over the Gauls, while the reverse refers to Caesar's possession of the office of Pontifex Maximus."
quadrans
IMG_8025.JPG
001. Octavian "Augustus" (41 B.C. - 14 A.D.)39 viewsAv.: IMP CAESAR DIVI F AVGVSTVS IMP XX
Rv.: TRIBVN POT XXXIII PONT MAXIM

AE As Ø27 / 9.3g
RIC 471 Rome, Cohen 226
Juancho
0025.jpg
0025 - Denarius Tiberius 14-37 AC37 viewsObv/TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, Tiberius laureate head r.
Rev/PONTIF MAXIM, female figure (Livia or Pax) seated r., r. holding long vertical sceptre, l. branch, on chair with plain legs above double line.

Ag, 19.0mm, 3.70g
Mint: Lugdunum.
RIC I/26 [C] - RCV 1763 - BMCRE 34 - CBN 16 - RSC 16
ex-Áureo, auction 25 apr 2007, lot 1019
1 commentsdafnis
2CrXTmC384gPtZ9JYce56FzdZ8pRzK.jpg
002d. Julia and Livia, Pergamon, Mysia43 viewsBronze AE 18, RPC I 2359, SNG Cop 467, aF, weight 3.903 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon mint, obverse ΛIBIAN HPAN CAPINOΣ, draped bust of Livia right; reverse IOYΛIAN AΦPO∆ITHN, draped bust of Julia right; ex Forum, ex Malter Galleries

Julia was Augustus' only natural child, the daughter of his second wife Scribonia. She was born the same day that Octavian divorced Scribonia, to marry Livia.

Julia's tragic destiny was to serve as a pawn in her father's dynastic plans. At age two, she was betrothed to Mark Antony's ten-year-old son, but the fathers' hostility ended the engagement. At age 14, she was married to her cousin but he died two years later. In 21 B.C., Julia married Agrippa, nearly 25 years her elder, Augustus' most trusted general and friend. Augustus had been advised, "You have made him so great that he must either become your son-in-law or be slain." Agrippa died suddenly in 12 B.C. and Julia was married in 11 B.C. to Tiberius.

During her marriages to Agrippa and Tiberius Julia took lovers. In 2 B.C., Julia was arrested for adultery and treason. Augustus declared her marriage null and void. He also asserted in public that she had been plotting against his own life. Reluctant to execute her, Augustus had her exiled, with no men in sight, forbidden even to drink wine. Scribonia, Julia's mother, accompanied her into exile. Five years later, she was allowed to move to Rhegium but Augustus never forgave her. When Tiberius became emperor, he cut off her allowance and put her in solitary confinement in one room in her house. Within months she died from malnutrition.
ecoli
maj1709_(5).jpg
003 - Galerius (as Caesar 293-305 AD), Follis - RIC 16451 viewsObv: MAXIMIANVS NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, wearing modius and chlamys, sacrificing from patera on flaming altar and holding cornucopiae.
Minted in Lugdunum (PLC in exe, B in right field) 301-303 AD.
2 commentspierre_p77
004.jpg
003 TIBERIUS 14 viewsEMPEROR:Tiberius
DENOMINATION: Denarius
OBVERSE: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right
REVERSE: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, holding long sceptre & olive branch, seated right on throne with ornate legs, single line below
DATE: Ad 14-37
MINT: Lugdunum
WEIGHT: 3.59 g
RIC: I.30 (C)
Barnaba6
coin222.JPG
003. Tiberius (14 AD - 37 AD)68 viewsTiberius.

Hard and secretive by nature and embittered by the neglect with which his step- father allowed him to be treated, he did not arouse personal enthusiasm, and until recently was described by historians as a bloody tyrant. It is only during the last sixty years that he has been more fairly judged, and at present the opinion begins to prevail that he was a genuine Roman, a ruler faithful to his duties, just, wise, and self-contained. The strong opposition which grew up against him was due to his taciturn and domineering disposition, and to the influence of the prefect of the guard, Ælius Sejanus, who alone possessed his confidence.

Lugdunum mint. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right, holding olive branch & long scepter RSC 16a. Ex Calgary
ecoli
4.jpg
004 Tiberius. AR denarius 3.7gm65 viewsobv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS laur. head r.
rev: PONTIF MAXIM female fig. seated r. holding long vertical scepter.
l. branches, chair legs are ornamental with line below
4 commentshill132
Maximiano.jpg
005 - Maximian (second regin 306-308 AD), half follis - RIC 91b44 viewsObv: DN MAXIMIANO FELICISS, laureate bust right in imperial mantle, right hand rised.
Rev: PROVIDENTIA DEORVM, Providentia standing right, extending right hand to Quies standing left, holding branch in right hand and leaning on sceptre left.
Minted in Alexandria (gamma in mid field. ALE in exe), officina 3, earlier to mid 308 AD (that is before his second abdication at the conference in Carnuntum). Scarce according to RIC.

The coin type is supposed to honor the senior emperors Diocletian and Maximian after their abdication in 305 AD.
pierre_p77
Tiberius_AR-Den_TI-CAESAR-DIVI-AVG-F-AVGVSTVS_PONTIF-MAXIM_RIC-29_C-15_Lugdunum_14-37-AD_Q-007_axis-7h_xxmm_x,xxxg-s.jpg
005 Tiberius (14-37 A.D.), RIC I 029, Lugdunum, AR-denarius, PONTIF MAXIM ,Livia, as Pax, seated right,180 views005 Tiberius (14-37 A.D.), RIC I 029, Lugdunum, AR-denarius, PONTIF MAXIM ,Livia, as Pax, seated right,
avers:- TI-CAESAR-DIVI-AVG-F-AVGVSTVS, Laureate head right.
revers:- PONTIF-MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right.
exerg: -, diameter: mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 14-37 A.D., ref: RIC-29, C-15,
Q-001
quadrans
Tiberius(14-37AD)_AE-Ast_TI-CAESAR-DIVI-AVG-F-AVGVST-IMP-VIII_PONTIF-MAXIM-TRIBVN-POTEST-XXIIII_S-C_RIC-44_BMC-91_C-25_Rome-21-22-AD_Q-001_6h_26mm_9,45ga-s.jpg
005 Tiberius (14-37 A.D.), RIC I 044, Rome, AE-As, PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXIIII, Around large S•C,112 views005 Tiberius (14-37 A.D.), RIC I 044, Rome, AE-As, PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXIIII, Around large S•C,
avers:-TI-CAESAR-DIVI-AVG-F-AVGVST-IMP-VIII, Bare head of Tiberius left.
revers:-PONTIF-MAXIM-TRIBVN-POTEST-XXIIII, Around large S•C.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 26mm, weight: 9,45 g, axes: 6 h,
mint: Rome, date: 21-22 A.D., ref: RIC I 44, BMC-91, C-25,
Q-001
quadrans
Tiberius_AE-As_GVSTVS_PONTIF-MAXIM_RIC-58_C-__14-37-AD_Q-007_axis-0h_24-25mm_1015g-s.jpg
005 Tiberius (14-37 A.D.), RIC I 058, Rome, AE-As, PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXXVII, Rare!!182 views005 Tiberius (14-37 A.D.), RIC I 058, Rome, AE-As, PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXXVII, Rare!!
avers:-TI-CAESAR-DIVI-AVG-F-AVGVST-IMP-VIII, Laureate head of Tiberius left.
revers:-PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXXVII, Rudder standing vertically before large banded globe, small globe at base of rudder to left, S—C at edge of left & right fields, dotted border.
exerg:S/C//--, diameter: 24,5-25,5mm, weight: 10,14 g, axes: 0 h,
mint: Rome, date: 35-36 A.D., ref: RIC I 58,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Caesar_Elephant.jpg
01 01 Julius Caesar 106 viewsJulius Caesar. 49-44 B.C. AR Denarius. Military mint traveling with Caesar in Gaul. c. 49-48 B.C. (3.72g, 19.0m, 4h). Obv: CAESAR in ex., elephant r. trampling serpent. Rev: simpulum, sprinkler, axe surmounted by wolf’s head, and apex. Cr 443/1; Syd. 1006.

This is the first issue in Caesar’s name. The obverse could symbolize the victory of good over evil in general, or the victory of Caesar’s forces over the Pompeians specifically. The reverse clearly refers to Caesar’s status as Pontifex Maximus.
3 commentsLucas H
1-Maximinus-I-RIC-06.jpg
01. Maximinus I / RIC 6.26 viewsDenarius, 238 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM / Laureate bust of Maximinus.
Reverse: P M TR P IIII COS P P / The emperor standing between two standards, holding spear and raising right hand.
2.62 gm., 19.5 mm.
RIC #6; Sear 8314.

This coin dates from January 1 to March 19, 238, at which time Gordian I was proclaimed emperor and the mint at Rome stopped coining for Maximinus. It was not until June 24, however, that he was murdered by his soldiers.
1 commentsCallimachus
536Hadrian_RIC551a.jpg
0150 Hadrian Sestertius Roma 118 AD Fortuna52 viewsReference.
RIC III, 150; RIC II, 551a; Banti 414; Strack 515

Bust A4

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate bare bust with drapery

Rev. PONT MAX TR POT COS II S C FORT RED (S-C in ex.)
Fortuna, draped, seated left on low seat, holding rudder on ground in right hand and cornucopiae in left.

26.04 gr
33 mm
h

Note. Matt Smith
Legend: reads PONT(ifex) MAX(imus) TR(ibunicia) POT(estate) COS [II], or “Pontifex Maximus, Tribunicia Potestas [i.e. endowed with power of tribune], Consul for the second time.
okidoki
1397Hadrian_RIC_III150.jpg
0150 Hadrian Sestertius Roma 118 AD Fortuna seated9 viewsReference.
RIC III, 150; Strack 515; RIC II, 551a; Banti 416

Bust A4 with Aegis

Obv. IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG
Laureate bare bust with Aegis

Rev. PONT MAX TR POT COS II S C FORT RED (S-C in ex.)
Fortuna, draped, seated left on low seat, holding rudder on ground in right hand and cornucopiae in left.

25.10 gr
33 mm
6h

Note.
Legend: reads PONT(ifex) MAX(imus) TR(ibunicia) POT(estate) COS [II], or “Pontifex Maximus, Tribunicia Potestas
[i.e. endowed with power of tribune], Consul for the second time.
okidoki
0194.jpg
0194 - Nummus Maximian 307 AC49 viewsObv/ DN MAXIMIANO PFS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust of M. r.
Rev/ GENIO POP ROM, Genius of the Roman People standing l., holding patera and cornucopia; in ex., PLN.

AE, 7.09g
Mint: Londinium.
RIC VI/90 [C2].
ex-Emporium Hamburg, auction 72, lot 819.
dafnis
Tiberius.jpg
02 Tiberius44 viewsTiberius. 14-37 AD. AR Denarius. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right; plain legs to chair. BMCRE 34; RSC 16. Weight, 3.78 g. Die Axis, 6hr.

mix_val
Augustus_RIC_220.jpg
02 Augustus RIC I 022047 viewsAugustus 27 B.C.-14 A.D. AR Denarius. Lugdunum Mint 13-14 A.D. (3.57g, 19.5, 0 h). Obv: [CAESAR AVGVSTVS] DVI F PATER PATRRIAE, laureate head r. REV: [PONTIF] MAXIM, Liva as Pax seated r. on low-backed chair, vertical scepter in r., branch in left. RIC I 220 (R2), RSC 223.

Worn and on an irregular flan, I still wanted this example because of the reverse. Minted in his last year as emperor, this was Augustus’ precursor to Tiberius’ “tribute penny.” While this was one of many types during Augustus’ reign, it was one very few types for Tiberius.
1 commentsLucas H
Tribute_pennyBlack.jpg
02 Tiberius RIC 2639 viewsTiberius 14-37 AD. AR Denarius. Lugdunum Mint. 14-37 AD. Obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head facing right. Rev: PONTIF MAXIM, female figure seated right, holding sceptre and branch.
RIC 26; BMC 34; RSC 16.

Ex: Ancient Delights
Paddy
02-Claudius-II-The-26.jpg
02. Claudius II: Thessalonica fractional.19 viewsAE3 fractional (half follis?), 317-18, Thessalonica mint.
Obverse: DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP / Veiled bust of Claudius II, Gothicus.
Reverse: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM / Emperor seated on curule chair, raising right hand and holding sceptre.
Mint mark:: . TS . Γ .
1.35 gm., 16 mm.
RIC #26; PBCC #906; Sear #16399.

Around the years 317 - 318, Constantine issued commemorative coins honoring three deified emperors: Claudius II Gothicus, Constantius I, and Maximian. It is not real clear when these coins were issued, but RIC assigns them to the years 317-18 saying there is evidence they were issued near or at the end of the Sol coinage. They are small AE3 in size (16 mm), but on flans that are much thinner and weigh significantly less than other coins of the period. Therefore they are generally regarded as fractionals. They were minted at Treveri, Arelate, Rome, Aquileia, Siscia, and Thessalonica.

Why these three emperors? Constantine claimed Claudius II Gothicus was one of his ancestors (probably not true). Constantius I was Constantine's father, and Maximian was the father of Constantine's wife, Fausta.

Callimachus
tb2971.JPG
020 Tiberius 33 viewsTiberius Æ As. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII?, bare head left / PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXI[III?] around large SC. Randygeki(h2)
t3070.JPG
020 Tiberius 39 viewsTiberius Æ As. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII, Laureate head left / PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXXVII, S-C across field, Winged caduceus. RIC 59, Cohen 22, BMC 120Randygeki(h2)
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-CENS_PONTIF-MAXIM_RIC-546_RICnew-77_C-387_Rome_73-AD_Q-001_axis-1h_18-18,5mm_3,16g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0546, RIC (1962) 065, Rome, AR-Denarius, PONTIF MAXIM, Emperor seated right, 303 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0546, RIC (1962) 065, Rome, AR-Denarius, PONTIF MAXIM, Emperor seated right,
avers:- IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-CENS, Laureate head right.
revers:- PONTIF-MAXIM, Vespasian seated right, holding scepter and branch.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18-18,5 mm, weight: 3,16 g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 73 A.D., ref: RIC 0546, RIC (1962) 065, p-21, S-, C-387, BMC 98,
Q-001
quadrans
Tiberius-RIC-3.jpg
021. Tiberius.23 viewsDenarius, ca 16 - 37 AD, Lugdunum mint.
Obverse: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS / Laureate bust of Tiberius.
Reverse: PONTIF MAXIM / Livia seated, as Pax, holding branch and sceptre.
3.56 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #3; Sear #1763.

Because this is the denarius that was in circulation at the time of Jesus, this coin is often called the "Tribute Penny" -- a name which is derived from the Authorized (King James) Version of the Bible where the word denarius was translated as penny.
Callimachus
031.jpg
025 MAXIMINUS I TRAX9 viewsEMPEROR: Maximinus I Trax
DENOMINATION: Denarius
OBVERSE: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust rt.
REVERSE: PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left with baton over a globe & cornucopiae
DATE: 235-238 AD
MINT: Roma
WEIGHT: 3.29
RIC: 20
Barnaba6
03_Tiberius,_RIC_I_30.jpg
03 02 Tiberius RIC 30153 viewsTiberius. 14-37 A.D. AR Denarius. Lugdunum (Lyon) Mint. 3.78 g., 19 mm. Obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right. Rev: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax, seated right, holding scepter and olive branch. Feet on footstool. Ornate chair legs. One line below throne. RIC I 30, RSC 16a.

The well known "tribute penny." When brought a coin as requested, Jesus asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible.
8 commentsLucas H
014_(1).JPG
03 Constantius II93 viewsConstantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.
Bronze AE 3, condition: VF, red desert patina, mint: Antioch, weight: 2.393g, maximum diameter: 15.2mm, die axis: 0o, date struck: 355 - 361 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, soldier spearing Horseman,hair in braids, bearded, reaching back towards soldier, AN Epsilon in ex RIC 187A
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
03-Constantius-The-25.jpg
03. Constantius I: Thessalonica fractional.21 viewsAE3 fractional (half follis?), 317-18, Thessalonica mint.
Obverse: DIVO CONSTANTIO PIO PRINCIPI / Veiled bust of Constantius I.
Reverse: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM / Emperor seated on curule chair, raising right hand and holding sceptre.
Mint mark: . T . SB .
1.78 gm., 16 mm.
RIC #25; PBCC #908; Sear unlisted.

Around the years 317 - 318, Constantine issued commemorative coins honoring three deified emperors: Claudius II Gothicus, Constantius I, and Maximian. It is not real clear when these coins were issued, but RIC assigns them to the years 317-18 saying there is evidence they were issued near or at the end of the Sol coinage. They are small AE3 in size (16 mm), but on flans that are much thinner and weigh significantly less than other coins of the period. Therefore they are generally regarded as fractionals. They were minted at Treveri, Arelate, Rome, Aquileia, Siscia, and Thessalonica.

Why these three emperors? Constantine claimed Claudius II Gothicus was one of his ancestors (probably not true). Constantius I was Constantine's father, and Maximian was the father of Constantine's wife, Fausta.

Callimachus
tiberiuscombhoriz.jpg
03. TIBERIUS20 views14 - 37 AD
struck 35-36 AD
AE As 26.46 mm 9.5 g
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII, Laur head left
R: PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXIIII S C, Winged Caduceus
RIC 44, Sear 1771
laney
RI_030n_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Denarius - RIC 06536 viewsObv:– IMP CAESAR VESP AVG CENS, Laureate head right
Rev:– PONTIF MAXIM, Vespasian seated right, holding sceptre and branch.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 73
Reference:– BMC 98. RIC II 65. RSC 387.

Weight 3.21g. 20.15mm.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Maximian_unlist.jpg
032 - Maximian (286-305 AD), Antoninianus - RIC 404, 407 (hybrid unlisted in RIC)44 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMIANUS AVG, radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding globe.
Rev: PAX AVGG, Minerva standing left, leaning on shield, holding olive branch and spear.
Minted in Lugdunum (C in exe, * in left field) 292-294 AD.

This coin is a hybrid between RIC 404 (as above but without the * and C(?)) and 407 (with * and C) and not listed in RIC. However Bastien lists this coin (vol 7, nr 488) with five examples cited. Not a very pretty coin but somehow interesting anyway as it turned out. Thanks to Jochen and maridvnvm of the FORUM´s classical numismatics discussion board for the info.

[Sold]
2 commentspierre_p77
Vitelius-RIC-20.jpg
033. Vitellius.9 viewsDenarius, July - Dec. 69 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TRP / Laureate bust of Vitellius.
Reverse: PONT MAXIM / Vesta seated, holding patera and sceptre.
3.42 gm., 17 mm.
RIC #20; Sear #3300.
Callimachus
RIC_26_Denario_Tiberio.jpg
04-01- TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)34 viewsAR Denario 20 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos apoyadas en una plataforma (doble-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_26_Denario_Tiberio_1.jpg
04-02 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)24 viewsAR Denario 19x18 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos apoyadas en una plataforma (doble-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_28_Denario_Forrado_Tiberio.jpg
04-05 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)26 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA,
Denario Forrado 18.5 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.
Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #28 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #45 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8b Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_28_Denario_Tiberio.jpg
04-06 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)26 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas en una plataforma (triple-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #28 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #45 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8b Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario_Tiberius_RIC_30_2_Fourree.jpg
04-09 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)45 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA,
Denario Forrado 19x18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.
Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.
Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #30 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol. I #42 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8a Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_30_Denario_Forrado_Tiberio.jpg
04-09 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)21 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA,
Denario Forrado 19x18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.
Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.
Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #30 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol. I #42 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8a Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario Tiberio RIC 26.jpg
04-10 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)108 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Acuñada 14 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #5 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1
1 commentsmdelvalle
Denario_Tiberio_RIC_26_anterior.jpg
04-10 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)69 viewsAnv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos apoyadas en una plataforma (doble-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario_Tiberio_RIC_26_1.jpg
04-11 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)70 viewsAR Denario 19x18 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos apoyadas en una plataforma (doble-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario_Tiberio_RIC_29_2.jpg
04-12 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)86 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas en una plataforma (triple-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #28 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #45 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8b Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_30_Denario_Tiberio.jpg
04-12 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)22 viewsAR Denario 18x16 mm 3.6 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda, Livia descansa sus pies sobre una pequeña plataforma.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #30 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #48 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8c Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16a Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario_Tiberio_RIC_30_1.jpg
04-14 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)91 viewsAR Denario 18x16 mm 3.6 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda, Livia descansa sus pies sobre una pequeña plataforma.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #30 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #48 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8c Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16a Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
1 commentsmdelvalle
RIC_33_AS_Tiberio.jpg
04-20 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)15 viewsAE AS 27 mm 9.0 gr.

Anv: "CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS IMP VII" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XVII" - Livia ? sedente en trono a derecha, portando Cetro largo vertical en mano izq. y Patera en su mano der. extendida. "S C " en los campos.

Acuñada 15-16 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: R3

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #33 Pag.96 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1769 var. (Busto) Pag.348 - BMCRE #65 Pag.128 - Cohen Vol.1 (Tiberio) #17 Pag.191 - DVM #15 var. (Busto) Pag.76 - CBN II #39 Pag.44
mdelvalle
04-Maximianus-Sis-41.jpg
04. Maximian: Siscia fractional.43 viewsAE3 fractional (half follis?), 317-18, Siscia mint.
Obverse: DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP / Veiled bust of Maximian.
Reverse: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM / Emperor seated on curule chair, raising right hand and holding sceptre.
Mint mark: SIS
1.61 gm., 15mm.
RIC #41; PBCC #838; Sear #16412.

Around the years 317 - 318, Constantine issued commemorative coins honoring three deified emperors: Claudius II Gothicus, Constantius I, and Maximian. It is not real clear when these coins were issued, but RIC assigns them to the years 317-18 saying there is evidence they were issued near or at the end of the Sol coinage. They are small AE3 in size (16 mm), but on flans that are much thinner and weigh significantly less than other coins of the period. Therefore they are generally regarded as fractionals. They were minted at Treveri, Arelate, Rome, Aquileia, Siscia, and Thessalonica.

Why these three emperors? Constantine claimed Claudius II Gothicus was one of his ancestors (probably not true). Constantius I was Constantine's father, and Maximian was the father of Constantine's wife, Fausta.

Callimachus
ClaudI97or113.jpg
041-054 AD - Claudius - RIC I 097 or 113 - Libertas Reverse47 viewsEmperor: Claudius (r. 41-54 AD)
Date: 41-54 AD
Condition: Fair
Denomination: As

Obverse: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP (P P?)
Tiberius Claudius Caesar Emperor Pontifex Maximus Tribunicia Potestas Imperator (Pater Patriae?)
Bare head left

Reverse: LIBERTAS AVGVSTA
S - C to left and right
The Emperor restores liberty.
Libertas, draped, standing facing, head right, right holding pileus, left extended.

Rome mint
RIC I Claudius 97 or 113; VM 16
6.38g; 29.3mm; 210°
1 commentsPep
Miksa_AR-Den_K-B_U-766a_C3-94_H-992_1566_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
045 Miksa., (Maximilian of Habsburg), King of Hungary, (1564-1576 A.D.), AR-Denarius, U-766a, 1566, Madonna and child, #01115 views045 Miksa., (Maximilian of Habsburg), King of Hungary, (1564-1576 A.D.), AR-Denarius, U-766a, 1566, Madonna and child, #01
avers:- •MAX•II•D•G•E•RO•I•S•AV•G•HV•B•R•, Hungarian shield, four-part shield with Hungarian arms (Árpádian stripes, patriarchal cross, Dalmatian leopard heads, Bohemian lion). Central shield are Austrian shield. The year 1566 on the top of the shield.
revers:- PATRONA•-rozette-•VNGARIE, Crowned Madonna sits with child on her right arm. K-B crossed the field.
diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint mark: K-B, mint: Körmöczbánya, date: 1566 A.D.,
ref: Unger-766a, CNH-3-94, Huszár-992,
Q-001
quadrans
Personajes_Imperiales_5.jpg
05 - Personalities of the Empire51 viewsDiadumenian, Elagabalus, Julia Maesa, Julia Soaemias, Aquilia Severa, Annia Faustina, Severus Alexander, Julia Mamaea, Orbiana, Maximinus I, Paulina, Maximus and Gordian Imdelvalle
Personajes_Imperiales_5~0.jpg
05 - Personalities of the Empire63 viewsDiadumenian, Elagabalus, Julia Maesa, Julia Soaemias, Aquilia Severa, Annia Faustina, Severus Alexander, Julia Mamaea, Orbiana, Maximinus I, Paulina, Maximus and Gordian I1 commentsmdelvalle
5-Pupienus-RIC-10b.jpg
05. Pupienus / RIC 10b.12 viewsAntoninianus, June - July, 238 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP CAES PVPIEN MAXIMVS AVG / Radiate bust of Pupienus.
Reverse: CARITAS MVTVA AVGG / Two clasped right hands.
4.76 gm., 21 mm.
RIC #10b; Sear #8520.
Callimachus
12.jpg
057a MAXIMIANUS16 views EMPEROR: Maximianus
DENOMINATION: Antoninianus
OBVERSE: IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG. Helmeted, cuirassed bust right
REVERSE VIRTVTI AVGG. Hercule standing right, strangling the Nemean lion
EXERGUE: -/-//-
MINT: Lugdunum
WEIGHT:
RIC: 454
Barnaba6
RI_062a_img.jpg
062 - Pescennius Niger denarius - RIC -. cf. RIC IV 70d24 viewsObv:– IMP CAE PESCEN NIGER IVST A, laureate head right
Rev:– ROMAE AETERNAE, Roma in military attire seated left on cuirass, no shield at side or feet, Victory offering wreath in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand
Minted in Antioch. Apr 193 - May 194 A.D
Reference:– Unpublished in primary references, cf. RIC IV 70d, RSC III 62b, BMCRE V p. 80 note, SRCV II 6121, Hunter III -,

Scratches and scrapes, small edge test cut, hard edge bump on reverse resulting in crack on obverse, slightly off center cutting off parts of legends

2.690g, maximum diameter 17.1mm, die axis 15o

Numerous varieties of Pescennius Niger denarii with Roma Aeternae reverses are published in the standard references, but none describe Roma as seated on a cuirass. A few have been seen with dealers though.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
62a.jpg
062a Maximinus I Thrax. AR denarius10 viewsobv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG laur. drp. bust r.
rev: PM TR P PP emperor in military dress std. l., two standards
leaning l. on spear and raising
hill132
62b.jpg
062b Maximinus I Thrax. AE sestertius11 viewsobv: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG laur. drp. bust r.
rev: FIDES MILITVS fides std. facing head l. standard in each hand
fld: SC
hill132
63.jpg
063 Maximus. AR denarius13 viewsobv: IVL VERVS MAXIMVS CAES drp. bust r.
rev: PIETAS AVG jug between lituus and knife to l. simpulum
and sprinkler to r.
hill132
Maximinus-I_axis-6h_18-19mm_3,07g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 003, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P II COS P P, Emperor standing front, #1100 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 003, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P II COS P P, Emperor standing front, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: P M TR P II COS P P, Emperor standing front, head left, between two standards, raising right hand and holding long scepter.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 3,07g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 03, p-, C 55,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_P-M-TR-P-II-COS-P-P_RIC-IV-3_C-55_Rome-235-AD_002_Q-002_7h_18,5-19mm_2,83g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 003, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P II COS P P, Emperor standing front, #266 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 003, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P II COS P P, Emperor standing front, #2
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: P M TR P II COS P P, Emperor standing front, head left, between two standards, raising right hand and holding long scepter.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19mm, weight: 2,83g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 03, p-, C 55,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC_7A,_RSC_7a,_001_Q-001_0h_18,5-19,5mm_2,86g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, #183 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19,5mm, weight: 2,86g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 7A, p-, RSC 7a,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC_7A,_RSC_7a,_Q-002_7h_19,5-20,5mm_2,55g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, #265 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, #2
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 2,55g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 7A, p-, RSC 7a,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC_7A,_RSC_7a,_001_Q-003_6h_18-20mm_2,00ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, #371 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, #3
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-20,0mm, weight: 2,00g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 7A, p-, RSC 7a,
Q-003
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC_7A,_RSC_7a(anc-barb-imitation-fouree)_Q-003_6h_18,5-19mm_2,66ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007Ai, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!! #476 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007Ai, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, ancient Barbar imitation, fouree !!! #4
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers: FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 2,55g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 7Ai, p-, RSC 7ai, ancient Barbar imitation, fouree !!!
Q-004
1 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_LIBERALITAS-AVG_RIC_10,_RSC_19,_BMC_45_Q-001_5h_18,5-19,5mm_2,09g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 010, Rome, AR-Denarius, LIBERALITAS AVG, Liberalitas standing left, #169 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 010, Rome, AR-Denarius, LIBERALITAS AVG, Liberalitas standing left, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: LIBERALITAS AVG, Liberalitas standing left, holding coin counter and cornucopia.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19,5mm, weight: 2,09g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 10, p-, RSC 19, BMC 45,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PAX-A-VGVSTI_RIC_12,_RSC_31a,_BMC_68_001_Q-001_7h_19,5-20,5mm_3,63g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #182 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: PAX A VGVSTI, Pax standing left, with branch and scepter
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 3,63g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 12, p-, RSC 31a, BMC 68,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PAX-AVGVSTI_RIC_12,_RSC_31a,_BMC_68_Q-002_6h_19,5-20mm_3,10ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #265 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #2
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: PAX A VGVSTI, Pax standing left, with branch and scepter
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5-20,0mm, weight: 3,10g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 12, p-, RSC 31a, BMC 68,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PAX-AVGVSTI_RIC_12,_RSC_31a,_BMC_68_Q-003_7h_18,5-20,5mm_3,33g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #370 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #3
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: PAX A VGVSTI, Pax standing left, with branch and scepter
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-20,5mm, weight: 3,33g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 12, p-, RSC 31a, BMC 68,
Q-003
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PAX-AVGVSTI_RIC_12,_RSC_31a,_BMC_68_Q-004_1h_18,5-21mm_2,98g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #468 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #4
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: PAX A VGVSTI, Pax standing left, with branch and scepter
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-21,0mm, weight: 2,98g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 12, p-, RSC 31a, BMC 68,
Q-004
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PAX-AVGVSTI_RIC_12,_RSC_31a,_BMC_68_Q-005_1h_19mm_3,60ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #567 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 012, Rome, AR-Denarius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #5
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: PAX A VGVSTI, Pax standing left, with branch and scepter
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,0mm, weight: 3,60g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 12, p-, RSC 31a, BMC 68,
Q-005
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PROVIDENTIA-AVG_RIC_13,_RSC_77,_BMC_15_Q-001_0h_19,5-20mm_2,99g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 013, Rome, AR-Denarius, PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, #165 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 013, Rome, AR-Denarius, PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, early portrait resembling Severus Alexander.
reverse: PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, with cornucopia and wand pointed at the globe at the foot.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5-20,0mm, weight: 2,99g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 235-236 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 13, p-141,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PROVIDENTIA-AVG_RIC-IV-II-13d_p-141_Q-001_axis-6h_20mm_2,65g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 013d, Rome, AR-Denarius, PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, #1263 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 013d, Rome, AR-Denarius, PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, early portrait resembling Severus Alexander.
reverse: PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, holding the wand over globe and cornucopia.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 20mm, weight: 2,65g, axis:6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235-236 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 13d, p-141,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_SALVS-AVGVSTI_RIC_14,_RSC_85a,_BMC_99_Q-001_6h_19,5-21mm_2,12ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #165 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding on patera a serpent rising from altar.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5-21,0mm, weight: 2,12g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 14, p-, RSC 85a, BMC 99,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_SALVS-AVGVSTI_RIC_14,_RSC_85a,_BMC_99_Q-002_5h_19,5mm_3,15g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #268 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #2
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding on patera a serpent rising from altar.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5mm, weight: 3,15g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 14, p-, RSC 85a, BMC 99,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_SALVS-AVGVSTI_RIC_14,_RSC_85a,_BMC_99_Q-003_6h_19,5-20,5mm_2,98g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #374 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #3
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding on patera a serpent rising from altar.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 2,98g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 14, p-, RSC 85a, BMC 99,
Q-003
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_SALVS-AVGVSTI_RIC_14,_RSC_85a,_BMC_99_Q-004_6h_19,5mm_3,05g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #469 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 014, Rome, AR-Denarius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #4
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding on patera a serpent rising from altar.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5mm, weight: 3,05g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 14, p-, RSC 85a, BMC 99,
Q-004
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_VICTORIA-AVG_RIC-IV-16_C-99_Rome-235-6-AD_001_Q-001_axis-6h_20mm_3,19g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 016, Rome, AR-Denarius, VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing right, #1459 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 016, Rome, AR-Denarius, VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing right, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 20mm, weight: 3,19g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235-236 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 16, p-, C 99,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_VICTORIA-AVG_RIC-IV-16_C-99_Rome-235-6-AD_Q-002_6h_18,5-20mm_2,53g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 016, Rome, AR-Denarius, VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing right, #2123 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 016, Rome, AR-Denarius, VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing right, #2
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-20,0mm, weight: 2,53g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 235-236 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 16, p-, C 99,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM_P-M-TR-P-IIII-COS-P-P_S-C_RIC-IV-40_C-71_Rome-236-8-AD_Q-001_0h_29-30mm_19,40g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 040, Rome, AE-Sestertius, P M TR P IIII COS P P, Maximinus standing left, #184 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 040, Rome, AE-Sestertius, P M TR P IIII COS P P, Maximinus standing left, #1
avers: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: P M TR P IIII COS P P, Maximinus standing left, right hand raised, holding the spear in left; two standards behind to the left, one right.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 29-30mm, weight: 19,40g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 40, p-, C 71, BMC 221,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_S-C_RIC_43,_Cohen_13,__Rome-236-8-AD_001_Q-001_0h_29,5mm_19,2ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 043, Rome, AE-Sestertius, FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, #166 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 043, Rome, AE-Sestertius, FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, standard in each hand.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 29,5mm, weight: 19,2g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 44, p-, C 13, BMC 263,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_PAX-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC_58,_Cohen_34,__Rome-235-6-AD_001_Q-001_11h_28,5-31mm_15,68ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 058, Rome, AE-Sestertius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #170 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 058, Rome, AE-Sestertius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, with an olive branch.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 28,5-31mm, weight: 15,68g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 58, p-, C 34, BMCRE 7,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_SALVS-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC_64,_Cohen_88,__Rome-236-8-AD_001_Q-001_0h_28-32mm_19,03ga-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 064, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #162 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 064, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding on patera a serpent rising from altar.
exergue: -/-//SC, diameter: 28,0-32,0mm, weight: 19,03g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 64, p-, C 88, BMCRE 100,
Q-001
quadrans
065_Maximinus_I,_RIC_II_081,_AE-Sest,_MAXIMINVS_PIVS_AVG_GERM,_PAX_AVGVSTI,_S-C,_Cohen_38,_BMC_148,_Rome,_236-8,_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_29,5-30mm,_23,83g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 081, Rome, AE-Sestertius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #1110 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 081, Rome, AE-Sestertius, PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, #1
avers: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left with branch and scepter, S-C on each side.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 29,5-30,0mm, weight: 23,83g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 81, p-, C 38, BMC 148,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM_SALVS-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-IV-85_C-92_Rome-236-8-AD_001_Q-001_axis-1h_29-31mm_17,97g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 085, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #1136 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 085, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #1
avers: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate, draped bust right.
reverse: SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising from altar.
exergue: -/-//SC, diameter: 29,0-31,0mm, weight: 17,97g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 85, p-, C 92,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM_SALVS-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-IV-85_C-92_Rome-236-8-AD_Q-002_0h_29-30,5mm_24,15g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 085, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #269 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 085, Rome, AE-Sestertius, SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, #2
avers: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate, draped bust right.
reverse: SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising from altar.
exergue: -/-//SC, diameter: 29,0-30,5mm, weight: 24,15g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 85, p-, C 92,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximinus-I_AE-Sest_MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM_VICTORIA-GERMANICA_S-C_RIC_90,_Cohen_109,_BMC_191_Rome-236-8-AD_001_Q-001_0h_29-30mm_18,08g-s.jpg
065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 090, Rome, AE-Sestertius, VICTORIA GERMANICA, Victory standing left, #169 views065 Maximinus I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 090, Rome, AE-Sestertius, VICTORIA GERMANICA, Victory standing left, #1
avers: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
reverse: VICTORIA GERMANICA, Victory standing left with wreath and palm, captive seated before.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 29,0-30,0mm, weight: 18,08g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 236-238 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 90, p-, C 109, BMC 191,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC_7A,_RSC_7a(anc-barb-imitation-fouree)_Q-003_6h_18,5-19mm_2,66ga-s~0.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!! #369 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!! #3
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
exerg: , diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 2,55g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: (RIC-IV-II-7A, p-, RSC-7a,) ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!!
Q-003
quadrans
Maximinus-I_IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC_7A,_RSC_7a(anc-barb-imitation-fouree)_Q-003_6h_18,5-19mm_2,66ga-s~1.jpg
065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!! #366 views065 Maximinus-I. Thrax, (235-238 A.D.), RIC IV-II 007A, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!! #3
avers:- IMP-MAXIMINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate, draped bust right, seen from behind.
revers:- FIDES-MILITVM, Fides standing left, a standard in each hand.
exerg: , diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 2,55g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 235 A.D., ref: (RIC-IV-II-7A, p-, RSC-7a,) ancient barbar imitation, fouree !!!
Q-003
quadrans
66.jpg
066 Pupienus. AR Antoninianus31 viewsobv: IMP CAES PVPIEN MAXIMVS AVG radiat, drp. bust r.
rev: PATRES SENATVS clasped hands
1 commentshill132
067_Maximus,_(235-238_A_D__as_Caesar),_AE-Sest_,_MAXIMVS_CAES_GERM,_PRINCIPI_IVVENTVTIS,_S-C,_Rome,_BMCRE_213_,_RIC_13_,_235-38_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_29-30mm,_18,73g-s.jpg
067 Maximus (235-238 A.D. as Caesar), RIC IV 13, AE-Sestertius, Roma, PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS, Caesar standing left in military attire, #170 views067 Maximus (235-238 A.D. as Caesar), RIC IV 13, AE-Sestertius, Roma, PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS, Caesar standing left in military attire, #1
avers: MAXIMVS CAES GERM, Bare, draped bust right.
reverse: PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS, Caesar standing left in military attire, holding short scepter and transverse spear, two standards behind.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 29,0-30,0mm, weight: 18,73g, axis: 0h,
mint: Roma, date: 235-238 AD., ref: RIC IV 13, BMCRE 213, Cohen 14, BMC 213, RCTV 8411,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
067_Maximus_(235-238_A_D_),_AE-19,_Nikaia_in_Bithynia,__#915;_IOV_OVH_MAXIMOC_K,__#925;__#921;_#922;__#913;_#921;__#917;__#937;N,_Howgego_65,_Q-001,_1h,_18,5mm,_3,67g-s.jpg
067p Maximus (235-238 A.D.), Bithynia, Nikaia, Howgego 65, AE-19, Ν ΙΚ ΑΙ Ε /ΩN, Between and beneath three standards,66 views067p Maximus (235-238 A.D.), Bithynia, Nikaia, Howgego 65, AE-19, Ν ΙΚ ΑΙ Ε /ΩN, Between and beneath three standards,
avers: Γ IOV OVH MAXIMOC K, Bare, draped, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Ν ΙΚ ΑΙ Ε /ΩN, Between and beneath three standards.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5mm, weight: 3,67g, axis: 1h,
mint: Bithynia, Nikaia, date: 235-38 AD., ref: Howgego 65, BMC Bithynia Not in!
Q-001
quadrans
067_Maximus,_(235-238_A_D__as_Caesar),_AE-22_Nicaea_in_Bithynia,_G-IOY-OYH-MAXIMINOS-K_NIKAIEWN_235-38-AD_001_Q-001_6h_22mm_6,68g-s~0.jpg
067p Maximus (235-238 A.D.), Bithynia, Nikaia, RecGen 676, AE-22, ΝΙΚΑΙΕΩN, Homonoia (Concordia) standing left,65 views067p Maximus (235-238 A.D.), Bithynia, Nikaia, RecGen 676, AE-22, ΝΙΚΑΙΕΩN, Homonoia (Concordia) standing left,
avers: Γ IOV OVH MAXIMOC K, Bare, draped, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: ΝΙΚ ΑΙ ΕΩN, Homonoia (Concordia) standing left, holding patera and cornucopia.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22mm, weight: 6,68g, axis: 6h,
mint: Bithynia, Nikaia, date: 235-38 AD., ref: RecGen 676,
Q-001
quadrans
067_Maximus_AE-23_C-IVL-VER-MAXIMVS-CAES_COL-F-L-PAC-DE-VLT_Deultum-Thrace_Mushmov-3660_Jurukova-228_235-237-AD_Q-001_1h_23mm_6,79g-s~0.jpg
067p Maximus (235-238 A.D.), Thrace, Deultum, Mushmov-3660, AE-23, COL F L PAC DEVLT, River god reclining left,66 views067p Maximus (235-238 A.D.), Thrace, Deultum, Mushmov-3660, AE-23, COL F L PAC DEVLT, River god reclining left,
avers: C IVL VER MAXIMVS CAES, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: COL F L PAC DE VLT, River god reclining left, holding reed and cornucopia, resting on an urn from which waters flow.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 23 mm, weight:6,79g, axis:1h,
mint: Thrace, Deultum, date: 235-237 A.D., ref: Mushmov 3660, Jurukova 228,
Q-001
quadrans
Commodus-RIC-192.jpg
069. Commodus.16 viewsDenarius, 189 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: M COMM ANT P FEL AVG BRIT / Laureate bust of Commodus.
Reverse: OPTIME MAXIME C V P P / Jupiter standing, holding thunderbolt and spear.
3.37 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #192; Sear #5664.

Jupiter was called optimus for his beneficence, and maximus for his power. These were also qualities Commodus attributed to himself. This coin and a similar brass coin also of Commodus, represent the only time the inscription OPTIME MAXIME appear on Roman coinage.
Callimachus
Philippus-I__IMP-C-M-IVL-PHILIPPVS-PF-AVG-P-M_PAX-FVND-ATA-CVM-PERSIS_RIC-069_C-113_Antioch_244-AD_Q-001_21mm_3_95g-s.jpg
074 Philippus I. (244-249 A.D.), RIC IV-III 0069, Antioch, AR-Antoninianus, PAX FVNDATA CVM PERSIS, Pax standing facing, Scarce, #166 views074 Philippus I. (244-249 A.D.), RIC IV-III 0069, Antioch, AR-Antoninianus, PAX FVNDATA CVM PERSIS, Pax standing facing, Scarce, #1
avers:- IMP C M IVL PHILIPPVS P F AVG P M, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- PAX FVNDATA CVM PERSIS, Pax standing facing, head left, holding olive-branch and transverse sceptre
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 21mm, weight: 3,95g, axis: h,
mint: Antioch, date: 244 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-III-069, p-76, C-113,
Q-001
History: The reverse legend on this coin "peace established with Persia" makes reference to one of Philip's first acts as emperor - the peace treaty with the Sasanian king Shapur I. Also, the P M used in the obverse legend refers to 'Persicus Maximus' as opposed to 'Pontifex Maximus.'
quadrans
aquileia1.jpg
075 Magnus Maximus. AE423 viewsobv: DN MAG MA_XIMVS PF AVG pearl dia. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: SPES RO_MA_NORVM campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMAQS
1 commentshill132
aquileia2.jpg
076 Magnus maximus. AE415 viewsobv: DN MAG MA_XIMVS PF AVG pearl dia. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: SPES RO_MA NORVM campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMAQP
hill132
arelate1.jpg
078 Magnus maximus. AE420 viewsobv: DN MAG MAXI_NVS PF AVG pearl dia. drp. uir. bust r.
rev: SPES RO_MA NORVM campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SCON
hill132
arelate2.jpg
079 Magnus Maximus AE416 viewsobv: DN MAG MAXI_MVS PF AVG pearl dia. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: SPES RO_MA_NORVM campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SCON
hill132
08_Vitellius_RIC_107Black.jpg
08 Vitellius RIC 10782 viewsVitellius 69 AD. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. Late April-20 December 69 A.D. (3,3 gr, 18 mm) Obv: A VITELLIVS GERM IMP TR P, Laureate head right. Rev: PONT MAXIM, Vesta seated right with patera and sceptre.

RIC 107; RSC 72; BMC 34.

Ex: Gitbud & Naumann
1 commentsPaddy
RI_080g_img.jpg
080 - Maximiminus Thrax, Denarius - RIC 00520 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– P M TR P II COS P P, Emperor standing left, holding standard and sceptre; standard behind
Minted in Rome. A.D. 237
Reference:– Cohen 10. RIC 5. RSC 64.
maridvnvm
RI_080h_img.jpg
080 - Maximiminus Thrax, Denarius - RIC 02117 viewsObv:– MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising from altar
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– RIC 21. RSC 91
maridvnvm
RI_080e_img.jpg
080 - Maximiminus Thrax, Denarius - RIC 02329 viewsObv:– MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VICTORIA GERM, Victory standing left holding wreath and palm; captive at feet
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– BMC 186. RIC 23. RSC 107.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_080f_img.jpg
080 - Maximiminus Thrax, Sestertius - RIC 04315 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FIDES MILITVM S-C, Fides standing left, standard in each hand
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– RIC 43

Weight 23.22g. 32.33mm.
maridvnvm
RI 080a img.jpg
080 - Maximinus denarius - RIC 00161 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– P M TR P P P, Maximinus standing left between two standards, holding scepter and raising right hand in salute
Minted in Rome, April - Dec A.D. 235
Reference:– RIC 1, RSC 46
maridvnvm
RI 080c img.jpg
080 - Maximinus denarius - RIC 01342 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate draped cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing facing head left, holding wand over globe and cornucopiae
Minted in Rome, March A.D. 235 – January A.D. 236
Reference:– Van Meter 9, RIC 13, RSC 77a
maridvnvm
RI 080b img.jpg
080 - Maximinus denarius - RIC 01663 viewsObverse – Laureate head right
Reverse – Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm
Obverse Legend – IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
Reverse Legend – VICTORIA AVG
Minted in Rome, March A.D. 235 – January A.D. 236
References:- Van Meter 11, RIC 16, RSC 99
maridvnvm
RI_080d_img.jpg
080 - Maximinus Thrax - RIC 8654 viewsDupondius
Obv:– IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate draped cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SALVS AVGVSTI, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising from altar
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– RIC 86
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_080i_img.jpg
080 - Maximinus Thrax denarius - RIC 02033 viewsObv:– MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left with baton over a globe & cornucopiae
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– RIC 20.
maridvnvm
Personajes_Imperiales_9.jpg
09 - Personalities of the Empire54 viewsSaturninus, Carus, Carinus, Urbica, Nigrinianus, Numerianus, Diocletian, Maximian, Carausius, Allectus, Constantius I, Theodora, Galerius and Galeria Valeriamdelvalle
Personajes_Imperiales_9~0.jpg
09 - Personalities of the Empire34 viewsCarinus, Magnia Urbica, Nigrinianus, Numerianus, Diocletian, Maximian, Carausius, Allectus, Constantius I, Theodora, Galerius, Galeria Valeria, Severus II and Maxentiusmdelvalle
IMG_3719~0.jpg
090. Maximinus I Thrax (235-238 A.D.)24 viewsAv.: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG
Rv.: SALVS AVGVSTI / S-C

AE Sestertius Ø28-30 / 19.8g
RIC IV 64 Rome
Juancho
IMG_4759.JPG
092. Maximus Caesar (235-238 A.D.)21 viewsAv.: MAXIMVS CAES GERM
Rv.: PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS / S-C

AE Sestertius Ø30 / 17.7g
RIC IV 13 Rome, Cohen 14
Juancho
Soloi_Stater_Amazon.jpg
0a Amazon Stater21 viewsSilver Stater 20mm Struck circa 440-410 B.C.
Soloi in Cilicia

Amazon kneeling left, holding bow, quiver on left hip
ΣOΛEΩN, Grape cluster on vine; A-Θ to either side of stalk, monogram to lower right

Sear 5602 var.; Casabonne Type 3; SNG France 135; SNG Levante

This coin depicts an amazon in historically accurate garb. Unfortunately, the bow is corroded away on this piece, but it is pointed toward her. She wears the Scythian hat, which also has a bit along the top corroded away. The quiver on her hip is an accurate portrayal of the gorytos (quiver), which was nearly two feet long, fashioned of leather, and often decorated. Fortunately, there is redundancy in this image, and a second bow is shown as in its place in the gorytos, which had separate chambers for arrows and the bow, where the archer stored it while not in use. The amazon has just finished stringing her bow and is adjusting the top hook to make sure the strings and limbs are properly aligned. She has strung the bow using her leg to hold one limb in place so she can use both hands to string the weapon. Her recurve bow was made of horn (ibex, elk, ox) wrapped with horse hair, birch bark, or sinew (deer, elk, ox) and glue (animal or fish) wrapped around a wood core. The bow was about 30 inches long. Arrow heads from grave sites come in bone, wood, iron, and bronze with two or three flanges; the shafts were made of reed or wood (willow, birch, poplar) and fletched with feathers. Poisoned arrows were sometimes painted to resemble vipers. A Scythian archer could probably fire 15-20 arrows per minute with accuracy to 200 feet and range to 500-600 feet. Distance archery with modern reconstructions suggests a maximum unaimed flight distance of 1,600 feet. (Mayor 209ff)

Soloi was founded about 700 B.C.and came under Persian rule. According to Diodorus, when the amazons were engaging in conquest in Asia Minor, the Cilicians accepted them willingly and retained their independence. Soloi may be named after Solois, a companion of Theseus, who married the amazon Antiope. The amazon on the coin may well be Antiope. (Mayor, 264-265)
Blindado
Cornelia51QuinVict.jpg
0aa Defeat of Hannibal on Sicily, 222 BC11 viewsCn. Lentulus, moneyer
90-85 BC

Quinarius

Laureled head of Jupiter, right
Victory crowning trophy, CN LENT in ex

Seaby, Cornelia 51

Possibly a reference to this event: [Q. Fabius Maximus, afterwards called Cunctator] broke up his camp at Suessula and decided to begin by an attack on Arpi. . . . Now at last the enemy was roused; there was a lull in the storm and daylight was approaching. Hannibal's garrison in the city amounted to about 5000 men, and the citizens themselves had raised a force of 3000. These the Carthaginians put in front to meet the enemy, that there might be no attempt at treachery in their rear. The fighting began in the dark in the narrow streets, the Romans having occupied not only the streets near the gate but the houses also, that they might not be assailed from the roofs. Gradually as it grew light some of the citizen troops and some of the Romans recognised one another, and entered into conversation. The Roman soldiers asked what it was that the Arpinians wanted, what wrong had Rome done them, what good service had Carthage rendered them that they, Italians-bred and born, should fight against their old friends the Romans on behalf of foreigners and barbarians, and wish to make Italy a tributary province of Africa. The people of Arpi urged in their excuse that they knew nothing of what was going on, they had in fact been sold by their leaders to the Carthaginians, they had been victimised and enslaved by a small oligarchy. When a beginning had been once made the conversations became more and more general; at last the praetor of Arpi was conducted by his friends to the consul, and after they had given each other mutual assurances, surrounded by the troops under their standards, the citizens suddenly turned against the Carthaginians and fought for the Romans. A body of Spaniards also, numbering something less than a thousand, transferred their services to the consul upon the sole condition that the Carthaginian garrison should be allowed to depart uninjured. The gates were opened for them and they were dismissed, according to the stipulation, in perfect safety, and went to Hannibal at Salapia. Thus Arpi was restored to the Romans without the loss of a single life, except in the case of one man who had long ago been a traitor and had recently deserted. The Spaniards were ordered to receive double rations, and the republic availed itself on very many occasions of their courage and fidelity.

Livy, History of Rome, 24.46-47
Blindado
Personajes_Imperiales_10.jpg
10 - Personalities of the Empire46 viewsSeverus II, Maxentius, Romulus, Constantine I, Helena, Fausta, Alexander, Licinius I, Constantia, Maximinus II, Valerius Valens, Licinius II, Crispus and Martinianusmdelvalle
Personajes_Imperiales_10~0.jpg
10 - Personalities of the Empire43 viewsRomulus, Constantine I, Helena, Fausta, Licinius I, Constantia, Maximinus II, Licinius II, Crispus, Constantine II, Delmatius, Hanibalianus, Constans and Constantius II.

mdelvalle
10-Maximianus-Lon-RIC-6b.jpg
10. Maximianus.20 viewsFollis, ca 298-300 AD, London mint (group II).
Obverse: IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG / Laureate and curiassed bust of Maximian.
Reverse: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI / Genius standing, holding patera and cornucopiae.
Mint mark: (none)
9.63 gm., 27 mm.
RIC #6b; Sear unlisted.
Callimachus
TrajSe51.JPG
102 AD: Triumph of Trajan in the first Dacian war and dedication of triumphal arch to Jupiter Optimus Maximus 341 viewsorichalcum sestertius (20.83g, 33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 103-104.
IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P laureate head of Trajan facing right.
S·P·Q·R·OPTIMO PRINCIPI [r.b.,] S C [in ex.] monumental richly decorated triumphal arch; in the panel above pediment inscribed IOM (= Iovi Optimo Maximo)(nearly invisible on this specimen)
RIC 572 [R]; BMC 844; Cohen 547; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 100:18
Ex CNG eAuct. 266; ex Deyo Collection
1 commentsCharles S
3100378.jpg
102. Trajan. AD 98-11731 viewsTrajan. AD 98-117. Æ Sestertius (34mm, 25.52 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck circa AD 103-104. Laureate and draped bust right / Front of the Temple of Jupiter: monumental votive arch/gateway; on the sides, from top to bottom, are the following reliefs: biga driven by Victory, aegis, Gigantomachy, arms, and she-wolf suckling twins; the second tier surmounted by a trophy and giant to either side, gateway spandrels with Victories, pediment with Jupiter between two seated figures, panel above pediment inscribed IOM (= Iovi Optimo Maximo), the whole surmounted by six-horse chariot driven by Jupiter and flanked by Victories. RIC II 572-3 var. (bust type); Woytek 187f; Banti 280. Fair, brown patina, some green, areas of minor porosity and cleaning scratches. Rare. Banti cites only one example with this bust type.

EX-CNG eAuction 310 lot 378 190/150
ecoli
image~1.jpg
108. Didius Julianus60 views193 A.D. - The Year of Five Emperors. On 1 January, the Senate selected Pertinax, against his will, to succeed the late Commodus as Emperor. The Praetorian Guard assassinated him on 28 March and auctioned the throne to the highest bidder, Didius Julianus, who offered 300 million sesterces. Outraged by the Praetorians, legions in Illyricum select Septimius Severus as emperor; in Britannia the legions select their governor Clodius Albinus, and in Syria the legions select their governor Pescennius Niger. On 1 June Septimius Severus entered the capital, put Julianus put to death and replaced the Praetorian Guard with his own troops. Clodius Albinus allied with Severus and accepted the title of Caesar. Pescennius Niger was defeated, killed and his head displayed in Rome.


SH67895. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC VI 14, BMCRE V 20, Cohen 3, Cayon III 1, SRCV II 6075, aF, weight 19.437 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, obverse IMP CAES M DID SEVER IVLIAN AVG, laureate head right; reverse CONCORD MILIT, S - C, Concordia Militum standing half left, flanked by legionary eagle before in right and standard behind in left.

Ex-FORVM


1 commentsecoli
Personajes_Imperiales_11.jpg
11 - Personalities of the Empire51 views
Magnentius, Decentius, Vetranius, Constantius Gallo, Julian II, Jovian, Valentinianus I, Valens, Procopius, Gratianus, Valentinianus II, Theodosius I, Aelia Flacilla and Magnus Maximus
mdelvalle
11-Galerius-Lon-RIC-15.jpg
11. Galerius.21 viewsFollis, ca 298-300 AD, London mint (group II).
Obverse: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES / Laureate and curiassed bust of Galerius.
Reverse: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI / Genius standing, holding patera and cornucopiae.
Mint mark: (none)
10.65gm., 26mm.
RIC #15; Sear #14344.
Callimachus
110a.jpg
110a Maximianus Herculius. AE antoninianus21 viewsobv: IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG rad. cuir. bust r.
rev: SALVS AVGG Salus std. r. feeding serpent
ex: T
hill132
110b.jpg
110b Maximianus Herculius. AE follis24 viewsobv: IMP C MA MAXIMIANVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO POPV_L_I ROMANI Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: K(epsilon)
hill132
110c.jpg
110c Maximinus Herculius. AE follis24 viewsobv: IMP C MA MAXIMIANVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO POPV_L_I ROMANI Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: HTA
hill132
110d.jpg
110d Maximianus Herculius. AE follis27 viewsobv: IMP C MA MAXIMIANVS PF AVG laur. head r
rev: GENIO POPV_L_I ROMANI genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: SMNB
hill132
110e.jpg
110e Maximianvs Herculius. AE follis16 viewsobv: IMP C MA MAXIMIANVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO POPV_LI ROMANI Genius std. l. holding patera an cornucopiae
ex: K(delta)
hill132
110f.jpg
110f Maximianus Herculius. AE follis16 viewsobv: IMP C CAL VAL MAXIMIANVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO IMPE_RATORIS Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: -S/K-P//ALE
hill132
110g.jpg
110g Maximianus Herculius. AE follis17 viewsobv: IP C MA MAXIMIANVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO POPV_LI ROMI Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: K(epsilon)
hill132
110h.jpg
110h Maximianus Herculius. AE follis26 viewsobv: IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: SACRA MONETA VCC ET CAESS NOSTR Moneta l. holding scales and cornucopiae
ex: -V/AQP
hill132
110i_new.jpg
110i Maximianus Herculius. billion tetradrachm16 viewsobv: laur. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: Homonia std. l. raising r. hand and holding double cornucopiae
fld: L-r (date)
hill132
111a.jpg
111a Galerius Maximianus. AE follis 9.1gm29 viewsobv: CAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES laur; head r.
rev: GENIO POPV_LI ROMANI Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: -S/ANT*
hill132
111b.jpg
111b Galerius Maximianus. AE radiate fraction22 viewsobv: GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES rad. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: CONCORDIA MI_LITVM Galerius std. r. receiving victory on globe from Jupiter
fld: KA
hill132
111c.jpg
111c Galerius Maximianus. AE follis 9.2gm25 viewsobv: CAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES laur. head r.
rev: GENIO POPV_L_I ROMANI Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: HTA
hill132
111d.jpg
111d Galerius Maximianus. AE follis 48 viewsobv: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES laur. head r.
rev: SACRA MONETA VCC ET CAESS NOSTR Moneta holding scales ad cornucopiae
ex:*-A/SIS
hill132
113a.jpg
113a Galerius. AE follis 6.9gm22 viewsobv: GAL MAXIMIANVS PF AVG laur head r.
rev: GENIO A_VGVSTI Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: A//MKV
hill132
113b.jpg
113b Galerius. AE follis 6.2gm26 viewsobv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO IMP_ERATORIS Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: -r/K-P//ALE
hill132
116a.jpg
116a Maximinus II. AE follis 5.6gm35 viewsobv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO A_VGVSTI Genius l. holding patera and cornucopiae, eagle at feet
ex: -(delta)//SMHT
2 commentshill132
116b.jpg
116b Maximinus II. AE follis 6.0gm23 viewsobv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO IMP_ERATORIS Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: -(delta)/K-P//ALE
1 commentshill132
116c.jpg
116c Maximinus II. AE follis 6.6gm23 viewsobv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO AV_GVSTI CNH Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: SMN(EPSALON)
1 commentshill132
116d.jpg
116d Maximinus II. AE follis 5.0gm24 viewsobv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG laur. head r.
rev: GENIO A_VGVSTI Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: -A//SMN
hill132
116e.jpg
116e Maximinu II. AE follis 19 viewsobv: IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG laur. drp. bust r. as seen from behind
rev: GENIO POP ROM Genius std. l. holding patera and cornucopiae
ex: T-F//PTR
hill132
Filius.jpg
119 BC M. Furius L. f. Philus79 viewsM FOVRI L F
Laur. head of Janus

ROMA to right PHILI in ex (PHI in monogram)
Roma standing left crowning trophy with carnyx and shield on each side, star above Roma

Rome 119 BC

3.89g

Crawford 281/1; Sydenham 529; BMC 555

Commemorates the victories over the Allobroges and the Arverni in Gaul in 121 BC by CN Domitius Ahenobarbus and Q. Fabius Maximus only a few years earlier


Ex-Baranowsky Roma
4 commentsJay GT4
Diocletianus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-C-VAL-DIOCLETIANVS-AVG_VICTORIA-AVGG_A_XXI_Siscia-RIC-V-II-279-p-249-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_22-23mm_4,09ga-s.jpg
119 Diocletianus (284-305 A.D.), Siscia, RIC V-II 279, AE-Antoninianus, A//XXI, VICTORIA AVG G, Diocletian and Maximianus standing facing each other, #191 views119 Diocletianus (284-305 A.D.), Siscia, RIC V-II 279, AE-Antoninianus, A//XXI, VICTORIA AVG G, Diocletian and Maximianus standing facing each other, #1
avers:- IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- VICTORIA AVG G, Diocletian and Maximianus standing facing each other, one holds Victory on a globe and the other a transverse sceptre, A between them.
exerg: A//XXI, diameter: 22-23 mm, weight: 4,09 g, axes: 6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 292 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 279, p-247, C-479,
Q-001
quadrans
12-Constantius-I-Lon-RIC-14a.jpg
12. Constantius I.35 viewsFollis, ca 298-300 AD, London mint (group II).
Obverse: FL VAL CONSTANTINVS NOB C / Laureate and curiassed bust of Constantius I.
Reverse: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI / Genius standing, holding patera and cornucopiae.
Mint mark: (none)
9.71gm., 27 mm.
RIC # 14a; Sear #14034 (this coin !).

Although RIC lists these last four coins (Diocletian, Maximian, Galerius, and Constantius I) with other coins minted in London, a careful reading of the introduction to the mint of London (vol. VI, p. 113-122) shows the editors of RIC had serious reservations about this attribution.

The unmarked folles -- ie without a mint mark in the exergue -- can be divided into three groups. After many years of careful study, group I has been attributed to Lugdunum (Lyon, France), and groups II and III to Britain.

Of group II, RIC says (p. 115), " It is possible that the unmarked II coins were produced in Britain either from a travelling mint, or even from the "C" (Camulodunum?) mint of Carausius and Allectus, with which there are perhaps some stylistic affinities: the period of issue would fall from c. 298 onwards, perhaps until c. 300 or later."

Of group III, RIC says (p. 115), " The unmarked III coins are in everyway more sophisticated in style, and it may well be that they were produced at London, though lack of signature would be difficult to account for: probably it is best to class them as a British series which, for reasons unknown to us, was struck elsewhere. Their date is between 300 and 305."
Callimachus
120_Maximianus-Herculeus,_Antioch,_RIC_V-II_621,_AE-Silvered-Ant,_IMP_C_M_A_MAXIMIANVS_P_F_AVG,_CONCORDIA_MIL_ITVM,_H_XXI,_p-294,_293-AD,_Q-001,_1h,_21,0-22,3mm,_4,08g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Antioch, RIC V-II 621, AE-Ant., H//XXI, CONCORDIA MILITVM, Emperor, and Jupiter, #1115 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Antioch, RIC V-II 621, AE-Ant., H//XXI, CONCORDIA MILITVM, Emperor, and Jupiter, #1
avers:- IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust right.
revers:- CONCORDIA MILITVM, Jupiter presents Victory on a globe to Maximianus, H between.
exerg: H//XXI, diameter: 21,0-22,3mm, weight: 4,08g, axes: 1h,
mint: Antioch, date:293 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-621, p-294,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Silvered-Ant_IMP-C-M-A-MAXIMIANVS-AVG_CONCORDIA-MILITVM_Delta_XXI-dot_RIC-V-II-607_p-289_Heraclea-292-95-AD_Q-001_h_mm_ga-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Heraclea, RIC V-II 607, AE-Ant., Δ//XXI•, CONCORDIA MILITVM, Emperor, and Jupiter, #176 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Heraclea, RIC V-II 607, AE-Ant., Δ//XXI•, CONCORDIA MILITVM, Emperor, and Jupiter, #1
avers:- IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- CONCORDIA MI LITVM, Jupiter presents Victory on a globe to Maximianus.
exerg: Δ//XXI•, diameter: 21,5mm, weight: 3,81g, axes: 0h,
mint: Heraclea, date:292-295 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-607, p-289,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus_Q-008_h_mm_g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 399, AE-Ant., -/-//B, PAX AVG G, Pax standing left, #166 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 399, AE-Ant., -/-//B, PAX AVG G, Pax standing left, #1
avers:- IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- PAX AVG G, Pax standing left, holding Victory on globe and scepter.
exerg: -/-//B, diameter: 23mm, weight: 3,91g, axes: 0h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 290-294 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 399,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus_Q-007_h_mm_g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 399, AE-Ant., -/-//B, PAX AVG G, Pax standing left, #272 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 399, AE-Ant., -/-//B, PAX AVG G, Pax standing left, #2
avers:- IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- PAX AVG G, Pax standing left, holding Victory on globe and scepter.
exerg: -/-//B, diameter: 21,5-22mm, weight: 3,43g, axes: 0h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 290-294 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 399,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_VIRTVTI-AVGG_-_RIC-V-II-454-p272_C-652_Lugdunum_289-AD_Scarce_Q-001_6h_21,5-23,5mm_3,47g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 454, AE-Ant., -/-//--, VIRTVTI AVG G, Hercules standing right, #1188 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 454, AE-Ant., -/-//--, VIRTVTI AVG G, Hercules standing right, #1
avers:- IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- VIRTVTI AVG G, Hercules standing right, wrestling the Nemean lion; club to left.
exergo: -/-//--, diameter: 21,5-23,5mm, weight: 3,47g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 289 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-454, p-272,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AR-Argenteus_MAXIMI-ANVS-AVG_VIRTVS-MILITVM_Epsilon_Q-001_0h_17-17,5mm_2,63g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Rome, RIC V-II 040b, AR-Argenteus, -/-//Є, VIRTVS MILITVM, Four Tetrarchs, #199 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Rome, RIC V-II 040b, AR-Argenteus, -/-//Є, VIRTVS MILITVM, Four Tetrarchs, #1
avers: MAXIMI ANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: VIRTVS MILITVM, The Four Tetrarchs sacrificing over altar, City gate in the background. 295-297 (Rome).
exergue: -/-//Є, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 2,66g, axes:0h,
mint: Rome, date: 295-297 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 040b, C-622g,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus_Q004_h_mm_g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Rome, RIC V-II 506, AE-Ant., -/-//XXIZ, IOVI CONSERVAT AVG G, Jupiter standing left, #183 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Rome, RIC V-II 506, AE-Ant., -/-//XXIZ, IOVI CONSERVAT AVG G, Jupiter standing left, #1
avers:- IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- IOVI CONSERVAT AVG G, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
exerg: -/-//XXIZ, diameter: 20-22mm, weight: 3,03g, axes: 6h,
mint:Rome , date: 285-286 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-506, C-355,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Silvered-Ant_IMP-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_PRIMIS-Xdot-MVLTIS-XX_XXI-Z_RIC-V-II-Not_in__p-_Rome-AD_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Rome, RIC V-II Not in !!!, AE-Ant., -/-//XXIZ, PRIMIS X•MVLTIS XX, Jupiter standing left, Extremely Rare! #1100 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Rome, RIC V-II Not in !!!, AE-Ant., -/-//XXIZ, PRIMIS X•MVLTIS XX, Jupiter standing left, Extremely Rare! #1
avers:- IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding scepter surmounted by an eagle. (8,H).
revers:- PRIMIS X•MVLTIS XX, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
exerg: -/-//XXIZ, diameter: 2,20mm, weight: 3,21g, axes: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-V-II- Not in !!!, p-,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
120_Maximianus-Herculeus,_Heraclea,_RIC_V-II_575b,_AE-Silvered-Ant,_IMP_C_M_A_MAXIMIANVS_P_F_AVG,_CLEMENTIA_T_EMP,_B_XXI,_p-286,_287-AD,_Q-001_6h_21,0-22,5mm_4,07g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 575, AE-Ant., B//XXI, CLEMENTIA TEMP, Maximian and Jupiter,139 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 575, AE-Ant., B//XXI, CLEMENTIA TEMP, Maximian and Jupiter,
avers: IMP C M A VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped, bust right.
reverse: CLEMENTIA T EMP, Emperor standing left receiving Victory on globe from soldier, B in lower centre.
exergue: B//XXI, diameter: 21,0-22,5mm, weight: 4,07g, axis: 6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 287 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 575A, p-286,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_CONSERVATOR-AVG-G_Gamma_XXIdotLambdaIdot_RIC-V-II-581var-p290_C-70var_Siscia_289-90-AD_Q-001_6h_22,5-23,5mm_3,99g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., Γ/-/XXI•ΛI•, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #170 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., Γ/-/XXI•ΛI•, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #1
avers: IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: CONSERVATOR-AVG-G, Maximian standing right on left, holding scepter, facing Hercules on right, resting hand on club; both sacrificing over altar.
exergue: Γ/-/XXI•ΛI•, diameter: 21,5-23,5mm, weight: 3,72g, axis: 11h,
mint: Siscia, date: 289-290 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 581var, p-290,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_CONSERVATOR-AVG-G_Gamma_dotXXIdotLambdaIdot_RIC-V-II-581var-p290_C-70var_Siscia_289-90-AD_Q-001_6h_23,5mm_3,36g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/Γ/•XXI•ΛI•, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #1210 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/Γ/•XXI•ΛI•, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #1
avers: IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Radiate, bust right, drapery on far shoulder.
reverse: CONSERVATOR-AVG-G, Maximian standing right on left, holding scepter, facing Hercules on right, resting hand on club; both sacrificing over altar.
exergue: -/Γ/•XXI•ΛI•, diameter: 23,5mm, weight: 3,36g, axis:6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 289-290 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-581var, p-290,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-A_VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_CONSERVATOR-AVGG_B-XXI-KOY_RIC-V-II-580-p287_C-71_Siscia_289-90-AD_Q-001_11h_22,5mm_4,36g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/-//BXXIKOY, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #190 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/-//BXXIKOY, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #1
avers: IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Radiate, cuirassed, bust right.
reverse: CONSERVATOR-AVG-G, Maximian standing right on left, holding scepter, facing Hercules on right, resting hand on club; both sacrificing over altar.
exergue: -/-//BXXIKOY, diameter: 22,5mm, weight: 4,36g, axis: 11h,
mint: Siscia, date: 289-290 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-581var, p-290,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_CONSERVATOR-AVG-G_XXIGammadotLambdaIdot_RIC-V-II-581var-p290_C-70var_Siscia_289-90-AD_Q-001_0h_22,5mm_3,11g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/-/XXIΓ•ΛI•, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #195 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/-/XXIΓ•ΛI•, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #1
avers: IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: CONSERVATOR-AVG-G, Maximian standing right on left, holding scepter, facing Hercules on right, resting hand on club; both sacrificing over altar.
exergue: -/-/XXIΓ•ΛI•, diameter: 22,5mm, weight: 3,11g, axis: 0h,
mint: Siscia, date: 289-290 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-581var, p-290,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_CONSERVATOR-AVG-G_XXIAdotHPdot_RIC-V-II-581var-p290_C-70var_Siscia_289-90-AD_Q-001_5h_22-23,5mm_3,12g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/-/XXIA•HP•, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #166 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/-/XXIA•HP•, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #1
avers: IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: CONSERVATOR-AVG-G, Maximian standing right on left, holding scepter, facing Hercules on right, resting hand on club; both sacrificing over altar.
exergue: -/-/XXIA•HP•, diameter: 22-23,5mm, weight: 3,12g, axis: 5h,
mint: Siscia, date: 289-290 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-581var, p-290,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-A_VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_CONSERVATOR-AVGG_B_XXI-KOY_RIC-V-II-580-p287_C-71_Siscia_289-90-AD_Q-001_6h_22-23mm_2,98g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/-/XXIBKOY, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #161 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/-/XXIBKOY, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #1
avers: IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Radiate, cuirassed, bust right.
reverse: CONSERVATOR-AVG-G, Maximian standing right on left, holding scepter, facing Hercules on right, resting hand on club; both sacrificing over altar.
exergue: -/-/XXIBKOY, diameter: 22-23mm, weight: 2,98g, axis: 6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 289-290 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-581var, p-290,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_CONSERVATOR-AVG-G_XXIBdotKOYdot_RIC-V-II-581var-p290_C-70var_Siscia_289-90-AD_Q-001_11h_21,5-23,5mm_3,72g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/-/XXIB•KOY•, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #1107 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/-/XXIB•KOY•, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #1
avers: IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Radiate, cuirassed, bust right.
reverse: CONSERVATOR-AVG-G, Maximian standing right on left, holding scepter, facing Hercules on right, resting hand on club; both sacrificing over altar.
exergue: -/-/XXIB•KOY•, diameter: 21,5-23,5mm, weight: 3,72g, axis: 11h,
mint: Siscia, date: 289-290 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-581var, p-290,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-A_VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_CONSERVATOR-AVGG_B_XXI-KOY_RIC-V-II-580-p287_C-71_Siscia_289-90-AD_Q-001_6h_22-22,5mm_3,63gs.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/B/XXIKOY, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #167 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., -/B/XXIKOY, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #1
avers: IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Radiate, cuirassed, bust right.
reverse: CONSERVATOR-AVG-G, Maximian standing right on left, holding scepter, facing Hercules on right, resting hand on club; both sacrificing over altar.
exergue: -/B/XXIKOY, diameter: 22-22,5mm, weight: 3,63g, axis: 6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 289-290 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-581var, p-290,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_CONSERVATOR-AVG-G_A_XXIHP_RIC-V-II-581var-p290_C-70var_Siscia_289-90-AD_Q-001_7h_22-22,5mm_3,34gs.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., A/-/XXIHP, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #166 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., A/-/XXIHP, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules, #1
avers: IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Radiate, bust right.
reverse: CONSERVATOR-AVG-G, Maximian standing right on left, holding scepter, facing Hercules on right, resting hand on club; both sacrificing over altar.
exergue: A/-/XXIHP, diameter: 22-22,5mm, weight: 3,34g, axis: 7h,
mint: Siscia, date: 289-290 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-581var, p-290,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_CONSERVATOR-AVG-G_A_dotXXIHPdot_RIC-V-II-581var-p290_C-70var_Siscia_289-90-AD_Q-001_7h_22,5-23mm_3,62g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., A/-/•XXIHP•, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules,86 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 581var, AE-Ant., A/-/•XXIHP•, CONSERVATOR AVG G, Maximian and Hercules,
avers: IMP-C-M-A-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Radiate, bust right.
reverse: CONSERVATOR-AVG-G, Maximian standing right on left, holding scepter, facing Hercules on right, resting hand on club; both sacrificing over altar.
exergue: A/-/•XXIHP•, diameter: 21,5-23,5mm, weight: 3,72g, axis: 11h,
mint: Siscia, date: 289-290 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-581var, p-290,
Q-001
quadrans
120_Maximianus-Herculeus,_Siscia,_RIC_V-II_591,_AE-Silvered-Ant,_IMP_C_M_A_VAL_MAXIMIANVS_P_F_AVG,_VIRTVS_AVGVSTORVM,_A_-,_XXI,_293-AD,_Q-001,_6h,_20,5-22,5mm,_3,45g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 591, AE-Ant., A/-/XXI, VIRTVS AVGVSTORVM, Hercules standing right, #145 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II 591, AE-Ant., A/-/XXI, VIRTVS AVGVSTORVM, Hercules standing right, #1
avers: IMP C M A VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: VIRTVS AVGVSTORVM, Hercules standing right, leaning on the club, holding lion's skin and bow.
exergue: A/-/XXI, diameter: 20,5-22,55mm, weight: 3,45g, axis:6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 289-290 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 591,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-_IMP-MAXIMIANVS-P-AVG_IOVI-CONSERVATORI_RIC-V-II--p_C-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_16mm_1,42g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II Not in, AE-Quinarius, -/-//--, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, Extremly Rare!99 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II Not in, AE-Quinarius, -/-//--, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, Extremly Rare!
avers:- IMP MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- IOVI CONS ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 16mm, weight: 1,42g, axes: 6h,
mint: Siscia , date: 285-286 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-Not in, C-Not in,
Q-001

"The quinar of maximianus you last showed is also of Siscia mint.
Your coin is the 2nd known.
Paris has another coin in outstanding condition with the same set of dies.
Companions coins for Diocletian also exist. One of them is published and illustrated in Cathy King's publication on Roman Quinarii > Siscia 2 a ( Zagreb collection ) with the same reverse die as your coin !
All these quinarii from Siscia with larger busts ( in my opinion datation around 288-9 AD ) are very rare." by Helveticus, Thank you Helveticus
quadrans
Maximianus_AE-__RIC-_-AD_Q-001_h_mm_ga-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VII 041, AE-Follis, -/-//SIS, REQVIES OPTOMORVM MERITORVM, Maximian seated left, #1108 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VII 041, AE-Follis, -/-//SIS, REQVIES OPTOMORVM MERITORVM, Maximian seated left, #1
avers: DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP, Laureate and veiled head right, (DMa-F1).
reverse: REQVIES OPTOMORVM MERITORVM, Maximian seated left, raising the hand and holding scepter.
exergue: -/-//SIS, diameter: 16mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Siscia, date: 317-18 A.D., ref: RIC VII 41, Rare!
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Follis_DIVO-MAXIMIANO-SEN-FORT-IMP(DMa-F1)_REQVIES-OPTOM-ORVM-MERITORVM_SIS_R3-RIC-VII-41var-p429_Siscia_317-318-AD_Q-001_6h_16mm_1,13g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VII 041, AE-Follis, -/-//SIS, REQVIES OPTOMORVM MERITORVM, Maximian seated left, #288 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VII 041, AE-Follis, -/-//SIS, REQVIES OPTOMORVM MERITORVM, Maximian seated left, #2
avers: DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP, Laureate and veiled head right, (DMa-F1).
reverse: REQVIES OPTOMORVM MERITORVM, Maximian seated left, raising the hand and holding scepter.
exergue: -/-//SIS, diameter: 16mm, weight: 11,13g, axis: 6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 317-18 A.D., ref: RIC VII 41, Rare!
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
120_Maximianus-Herculeus,_Siscia,_RIC_VII_041,_AE-Half-follis,_DIVO_MAXIMIANO_SEN_FORT_IMP,_REQVIES_OPTIMO_RVM_MERITORVM,_SISI,_317-8_AD,_Q-001,_7h,_15,3-16,5mm,_1,56g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VII 041, AE-Follis, -/-//SIS, REQVIES OPTOMORVM MERITORVM, Maximian seated left, #359 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VII 041, AE-Follis, -/-//SIS, REQVIES OPTOMORVM MERITORVM, Maximian seated left, #3
avers: DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP, Laureate and veiled head right, (DMa-F1).
reverse: REQVIES OPTOMORVM MERITORVM, Maximian seated left, raising the hand and holding scepter.
exergue: -/-//SIS, diameter: 15,3-16,5mm, weight: 1,56g, axis: 7h,
mint: Siscia, date: 317-18 A.D., ref: RIC VII 41, Rare!
Q-003
1 commentsquadrans
Maximianus_Q-009_h_mm_g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC V-II 549, AE-Ant., -/-//QXXIT, HERCVLI CONSERVAT, Hercules standing left, #176 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC V-II 549, AE-Ant., -/-//QXXIT, HERCVLI CONSERVAT, Hercules standing left, #1
avers:- IMP C M VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.,
revers:- HERCVLI CONSERVAT, Hercules standing left, resting the hand on the club and holding a bow with lion skin.
exerg: -/-//QXXIT, diameter: 21,5-23mm, weight: 3,62g, axes: 6h,
mint: Ticinum, date: 290 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 549, p-283, C-242
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus_Q-006_h_mm_g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC V-II 559, AE-Ant., -/-//PXXIT, IOVI CONSERVAT, Jupiter standing left, #174 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC V-II 559, AE-Ant., -/-//PXXIT, IOVI CONSERVAT, Jupiter standing left, #1
avers:- IMP C M A VAL MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- IOVI CONSERVAT, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
exerg: -/-//PXXIT, diameter: 20,5-23mm, weight: 3,43g, axes: 0h,
mint: Ticinum, date: 288 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 599,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-A_VAL-MAXIMIANVS-AVG(4)_IOVI-CONSERVAT(C)_S-XXI-T_RIC-V-II-559-p284_C-332_Ticinum_288-AD_Q-001_6h_19-21mm_3,08g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC V-II 559, AE-Ant., -/-//SXXIT, IOVI CONSERVAT, Jupiter standing left, #180 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC V-II 559, AE-Ant., -/-//SXXIT, IOVI CONSERVAT, Jupiter standing left, #1
avers:- IMP C M A VAL MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- IOVI CONSERVAT, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
exergo: -/-//SXXIT, diameter: 19-21mm, weight: 3,08g, axis: 6h,
mint: Ticinum, date: 288-89 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-559, p-284, C-332,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG-(_)_IOVI-CONSERVAT-(F)_TXXIT_RIC-V-II-560var-p-284_C-332_Ticinum_290-AD_Q-001_5h_20-23,5mm_3,22ga-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC V-II 560var., AE-Ant., -/-//TXXIT, IOVI CONSERVAT, Jupiter standing left, eagle, #1133 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC V-II 560var., AE-Ant., -/-//TXXIT, IOVI CONSERVAT, Jupiter standing left, eagle, #1
avers:- IMP C M VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- IOVI CONSERVAT, Jupiter standing left, head right, holding thunderbolt and spear, two standards behind, eagle at feet left.
exergo: -/-//TXXIT, diameter: 20-23,5mm, weight: 3,22g, axis: 5h,
mint: Ticinum, date: 290 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-560var ???, p-284,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-AVG_VIRTVS-AVGG_XXI-AT_RIC-V-II-565-p-285_C-_-AD_Q-001_6h_21,5-22,5mm_3,82g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC V-II 565, AE-Ant., -/-//XXIAT, VIRTVS AVG G, Hercules, and Victory, Scarce, #195 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC V-II 565, AE-Ant., -/-//XXIAT, VIRTVS AVG G, Hercules, and Victory, Scarce, #1
avers:- IMP C M VAL MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.,
revers:- VIRTVS AVG G, Hercules standing right, Victory left turning right.
exerg: -/-//XXIAT, diameter: 21,5-22,5mm, weight: 3,82g, axes: 6h,
mint: Ticinum, date: 292 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 565, p-285, Scarce!,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus_AE-Ant_Q-005_h_mm_g-s.jpg
120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, RIC VI 046b, AE-Ant., B//ALE, CONCORDIA MILITVVM, Emperor and Jupiter,89 views120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, RIC VI 046b, AE-Ant., B//ALE, CONCORDIA MILITVVM, Emperor, and Jupiter,
avers: IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: CONCORDIA MI LITVM, Prince standing right on left, receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter to right, holding scepter.
exergue: B//ALE, diameter: 21,5-22mm, weight: 3,20g, axes: 6h,
mint: Alexandria, date: , ref: RIC VI 046b, ,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Maximianus_Q0x1_h_mm_g-s.jpg
120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Aquileia, RIC VI 076a, AE-Follis, -/-/AQP, FIDES MILITVM AVG G ET CAES S N N, Fides standing, #172 views120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Aquileia, RIC VI 076a, AE-Follis, -/-/AQP, FIDES MILITVM AVG G ET CAES S N N, Fides standing, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: FIDES MILITVM AVG G ET CAES S N N, Fides standing holding standard in each hand.
exergue: -/-/AQP, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Aquileia, date: 2nd reign, 306-307 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-076a, p-467, C-123,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus_Q-005_h_mm_g-s.jpg
120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 108b, AE-Follis, -/Γ//SIS, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, #173 views120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 108b, AE-Follis, -/Γ//SIS, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: GENIO POP VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia, Γ in the right field.
exergue: -/Γ//SIS, diameter: 28mm, weight: 10,02g, axis: 6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 299 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-108b, p-467,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Quarter-Follis_IMP-C-M-A-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_GENIO-POP-VLI-ROMANI_SIS_RIC-VI-146-p-471-2a-A-R2-_Siscia_305-AD__Q-001_0h_19mm_2,34g-s.jpg
120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 146, AE-Quarter-Follis, -/-//SIS, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, R2!!, #170 views120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 146, AE-Quarter-Follis, -/-//SIS, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, R2!!, #1
avers: IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: GENIO POP VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia.
exergue: -/-//SIS, diameter: 19mm, weight: 2,34g, axis: 0h,
mint: Siscia, date: 305 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-146, p-471, R2!,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-Quarter-Follis_IMP-C-M-A-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_GENIO-POP-VLI-ROMANI_SIS_RIC-VI-146-p-471-2a-A-R2-_Siscia_305-AD__Q-002_0h_19mm_2,xxg-s.jpg
120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 146, AE-Quarter-Follis, -/-//SIS, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, R2!!, #272 views120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 146, AE-Quarter-Follis, -/-//SIS, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, R2!!, #2
avers: IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: GENIO POP VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia.
exergue: -/-//SIS, diameter: 19mm, weight: 2,34g, axis: 0h,
mint: Siscia, date: 305 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-146, p-471, R2!,
Q-002
quadrans
Maximianus-Herculius_AE-Follis_IMP-C-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG(2a,A)_GENIO-POPVLI-ROMANI_Star_PTdot_RIC-VI-33b_Ticinum_p-284_298-9AD_Q-001_0h_27,5-28mm_8,57g-s.jpg
120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VI 33b, AE-Follis, */-//PT•, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, #1105 views120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VI 33b, AE-Follis, */-//PT•, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, #1
avers: IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: GENIO POPV LI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia, * in the left field.
exergue: */-//PT•, diameter: 27,5-28mm, weight: 8,57g, axis: 0h,
mint: Ticinum, date: 298-299 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-33b, p-284,
Q-001
quadrans
120_Maximianus_Herculeus_(285-286_Caesar,_286-305,_307-308___310_A_D__Augustus),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-,_D-6008,_Alexdr,eagle_l,L-E,_Q-001_0h_17,5-18mm_7,91g-s.jpg
120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-, D-6008, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/E//--, Eagle left, #166 views120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-, D-6008, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/E//--, Eagle left, #1
avers:- A K M OVA MAΞIMIANOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- L - E (year 5), Eagle standing left, looking back, wreath in beak, star above left.
exerg: L/E//--, diameter: 17,5-18mm, weight: 7,91g, axes: 0h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 289-290 A.D., L-E, Year 5., ref: Geissen-, Dattari-6008, Kapmann-Ganschow-120.43-p-353,
Q-001
quadrans
120_Maximianus_Herculeus_(285-286_Caesar,_286-305,_307-308___310_A_D__Augustus),_Bi-Tetradr_G-3286,D-5875,Alexdr_Elpis_l_L-B,_Q-001_0h_18-20mm_8,17g-s.jpg
120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3286, D-5875, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/B//--, Elpis left, #181 views120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3286, D-5875, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/B//--, Elpis left, #1
avers:- A K M OVA MAΞIMIANOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- L-B, Elpis (Hope) advancing left, holding a flower and raising the hem of the skirt.
exerg: L/B//--, diameter: 18-20mm, weight: 8,17g, axes:0 h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 286-287 A.D.,L-B year 2., ref: Geissen-3286, Dattari-5875, Kapmann-Ganschow-120.17-p-352,
Q-001
quadrans
120_Maximianus_Herculeus_(285-286_Caesar,_286-305,_307-308___310_A_D__Augustus),_Bi-Tetradr_,_G-3298,D-6006-07,Alexdr_,eagle-l_,L-_,_Q-001_2h_18-19mm_7,95g-s.jpg
120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3298, D-6006-07, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/Δ//--, Eagle left, #165 views120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3298, D-6006-07, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/Δ//--, Eagle left, #1
avers:- A K M OVA MAΞIMIANOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- L - Δ (year 4), standing left, looking back, wreath in beak, star above left.
exerg: L/Δ//--, diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 7,95g, axes: 2h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 288-289 A.D., L-Δ, Year 4., ref: Geissen-3298, Dattari-6006-07, Kapmann-Ganschow-120.31-p-352,
Q-001
quadrans
120_Maximianus_Herculeus_(285-286_Caesar,_286-305,_307-308___310_A_D__Augustus),_Bi-Tetradr_G-3307,D-5989-91,Alexdr_Tyche_l_L-E,_Q-001_0h_18mm_6,485g-s.jpg
120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3307, D-5989-91, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/E//--, Tyche left, #166 views120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3307, D-5989-91, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/E//--, Tyche left, #1
avers:- A K M OVA MAΞIMIANOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- L-E across the field, Tyche standing left holding rudder and cornucopia, star to left.
exerg: L/E//--, diameter: 18mm, weight:6,48 g, axes: 0h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 289-290 A.D., Year 5 L-E., ref: Geissen-3307, Dattari-5989-91, Kapmann-Ganschow-120.46-p-353,
Q-001
quadrans
120_Maximianus_Herculeus_(285-286_Caesar,_286-305,_307-308___310_A_D__Augustus),_Bi-Tetradr_G-3324,D-5967,5969,Alexdr_-Nike,L-Z,_Q-001_11h_19,5mm_8,70g-s.jpg
120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3324, D-5967,5969, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/Z//--, Nike advancing right, #167 views120p Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Alexandria, G-3324, D-5967,5969, Bi-Tetradrachm, L/Z//--, Nike advancing right, #1
avers:- MAΞIMIANOC CEB, Laureate head right.
revers:- Nike advancing right holding wreath and palm branch, L-Z across the field.
exe: L/Z//--, diameter: 22mm, weight: 9,07g, axis: 5h,
mint:Alexandria, date:290-291 A.D., L-Z Year 7., ref: Geissen-3324, Dattari-5967, 5969, Kapmann-Ganschow-120.64-p-354,
Q-001
quadrans
Galerius_AE-Follis_IMP-C-GAL-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG_VIRTVS-EX-ERCITVS_I_ANTdot_RIC-VI-92i-p-628_308-AD-Antioch_Sc-Q-001_0h_23,5-24,5mm_6,74g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Antioch, RIC VI 092i, -/I//ANT•, AE-Follis, VIRTVS-EXERCITVS, Mars advancing right, Scarce, 128 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Antioch, RIC VI 092i, -/I//ANT•, AE-Follis, VIRTVS-EXERCITVS, Mars advancing right, Scarce,
avers: IMP-C-GAL-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers: VIRTVS-EX-ERCITVS, Mars advancing right, holding spear and and shield, and trophy over shoulder.
exergo: -/I//ANT•, diameter: 23,5-24,5mm, weight: 6,74g, axis: 0h,
mint: Antioch, date: 308 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-92, p-628, Scarce,
Q-001
quadrans
Galerius_AE-Silvered-Follis_MAXIMIANVS-NOB-CAES_GENIO-POPV-LI-ROMANI_AQ-__RIC-VI-24b-p-314_3rd-off__C-_Aquilea-296-AD__Q-001_axis-6h_27mm_10,41g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Aquilea, RIC VI 024b, AE-Follis, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, #1316 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Aquilea, RIC VI 024b, AE-Follis, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, #1
avers:- MAXIMIANVS-NOB-CAES, Laureate head right.
revers:- GENIO-POPV-LI-ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia.
exergo: AQ Γ, diameter: 27mm, weight: 10,41g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, 3rd.off., date: 296 A.D., ref: RICVI-24b, p-314,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Maximianus_Q0x1-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Aquilea, RIC VI 060b, AE-Follis, FIDES-MILITVM-AVGG-ET-CAESS-NN, Fides standing left, #1289 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Aquilea, RIC VI 060b, AE-Follis, FIDES-MILITVM-AVGG-ET-CAESS-NN, Fides standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- FIDES-MILITVM-AVGG-ET-CAESS-NN, Fides standing left, holding a standard in each hand.
exergo: AQ P, diameter: 28-30mm, weight: 10,15g, axis: 6h,
mint: Aquilea, 1st.off., date: 305-06 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-60b, p-319,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximianus_AE-Follis_IMP-MAXIMIANVSP-F-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM-AVGG-ET-CAESS-NN_AQ-P_RIC-VI-61b_2a-C_s_Aquilea_305-06-AD__Q-001_axis-6h_27-30mm_10,15g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Aquilea, RIC VI 061b, AE-Follis, FIDES-MILITVM-AVGG-ET-CAESS-NN, Fides standing left, #188 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Aquilea, RIC VI 061b, AE-Follis, FIDES-MILITVM-AVGG-ET-CAESS-NN, Fides standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMIANVS-P-F-AVG, Helmeted, laureate bust left, holding spear over shoulder and shield.
revers:- FIDES-MILITVM-AVGG-ET-CAESS-NN, Fides standing left, holding a standard in each hand.
exergo: AQ P, diameter: 27-30mm, weight: 10,15g, axis: 6h,
mint: Aquilea, 1st.off., date: 305-06 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-61b, p-319,
Q-001
quadrans
Galerius_AE-Follis_GAL-MAXIMIANVS-NOB-CAESS_GENIO-AVGG-ET-CAESARVM-NN_KA_RIC-VI-11b_p-580_297-9-AD-Cyzicus_Q-001_6h_27,5mm_9,82g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Cyzicus, RIC VI 011b, AE-Follis, GENIO AVGG ET CAESARVM NN, Genius standing left, #1291 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Cyzicus, RIC VI 011b, AE-Follis, GENIO AVGG ET CAESARVM NN, Genius standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMIANVS-PF-AVG, Laureate head right (large head type).
revers:- GENIO-AVGG-ET-CAESARVM-NN, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder (falls low), holding patera from which liquid flows and cornucopiae.
exergo: -/-//KA, diameter: 27,5mm, weight: 9,82g, axis: 6h,
mint: Cyzicus, date: 297-299 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-11b,
Q-001
quadrans
Galerius_AE-Follis_GAL-MAXIMIANVS-NOB-CAESS_GENIO-AVGG-ET-CAESARVM-NN_KA_RIC-VI-11b_p-580_297-9-AD-Cyzicus_Q-002_0h_27,4-27,8mm_10,54g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Cyzicus, RIC VI 011b, AE-Follis, GENIO AVGG ET CAESARVM NN, Genius standing left, #2138 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Cyzicus, RIC VI 011b, AE-Follis, GENIO AVGG ET CAESARVM NN, Genius standing left, #2
avers:- IMP-MAXIMIANVS-PF-AVG, Laureate head right (large head type).
revers:- GENIO-AVGG-ET-CAESARVM-NN, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder (falls low), holding patera from which liquid flows and cornucopiae.
exergo: -/-//KA, diameter: 27,4-27,9mm, weight: 10,54g, axis: 0h,
mint: Cyzicus, date: 297-299 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-11b,
Q-002
quadrans
Galerius_AE-Follis_GAL-MAXIMIANVS-PF-AVG_VIRTVTI-EXERCITVS_B_MKV_RIC-VI-47a-p-_308-9-AD-Cyzicus_Q-001_6h_24,5-25,5mm_6,71g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Cyzicus, RIC VI 047a, AE-Follis, VIRTVTI-EXERCITVS, Mars advancing right,204 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Cyzicus, RIC VI 047a, AE-Follis, VIRTVTI-EXERCITVS, Mars advancing right,
avers: GAL-MAXIMIANVS-PF-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers: VIRTVTI-EXERCITVS, Mars advancing right, holding spear and shield, and trophy over shoulder.
exergo: B/-//MKV, diameter: 24,5-25,5mm, weight: 6,71g, axis: 6h,
mint: Cyzicus, date: 308-309 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-47a, p-,
Q-001
quadrans
Galerius_Ar-Argenteus_MAXIMIANVS-CAES_VIRTVS-MILITVM_Gamma_Rome_RIC-42b_C-_295-297-AD__Q-001_16-17,5mm_3,16g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Rome, RIC VI 042b, AR-Argenteus, -/-//Γ, VIRTVS MILITVM, #1111 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Rome, RIC VI 042b, AR-Argenteus, -/-//Γ, VIRTVS MILITVM, #1
avers: MAXIMIANVS CAES, Laureate head right.
reverse: VIRTVS MILITVM, The Four Tetrarchs sacrificing over the tripod, City gate in the background.
exergue: -/-//Γ, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 3,16g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, 3rd.off., date: 295-97 A.D., ref: RIC VI 042b,
Q-001
quadrans
Galerius_AE-Follis_GAL-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-NOB-C_GENIO-POP-VLI-ROMANI_S-A_RIC-VI-81b_Siscia-310-311-AD__Q-001_1h_28-29mm_9,74g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 081bvar., S/A//--, AE-Follis, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, #1148 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 081bvar., S/A//--, AE-Follis, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, #1
avers:- GAL-VAL-MAXIMIANVS-NOB-C, Laureate head right.
revers:- GENIO-POP-VLI-ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera and cornucopiae. S-A across fields. No mintmark. .
exergo: S/A//--, diameter: 28-29mm, weight: 9,74g, axis: 1h,
mint: Siscia, date: 294 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-81b var (unlisted reverse break)
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Galerius_AE-Follis_IMP-MAXIMIANVS-PF-AVG_GENIO-AVGVSTI_crescent-stigma_SIS_RIC-207c-6th-off_C-_Siscia-310-311-AD__Q-001_24-25mm_6,35g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 207c, AE-Follis, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, #1118 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 207c, AE-Follis, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-MAXIMIANVS-PF-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- GENIO-AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia, crescent left field, stigma right field.
exergo: SIS, diameter: 24-25mm, weight: 6,35g, axis: h,
mint: Siscia, date: 310-311 A.D., ref: RIC-207c-6th-officina,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Galerius_AE-Follis_DIVO-GAL-VAL-MAXIMIANO_FORTI-FORTINAE_A_SIS_RIC-VI-221-p-482_Siscia-311-AD-Scarce_Q-002_11h_24,5mm_6,50g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 221, AE-Follis, FORTI FORTVNAE, Fortuna standing left by wheel, Scarce! #174 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 221, AE-Follis, FORTI FORTVNAE, Fortuna standing left by wheel, Scarce! #1
avers:- DIVO-GAL-VAL-MAXIMIANO, Veiled head right.
revers:- FORTI-FOR-TVNAE, Fortuna standing left by wheel, right holding rudder on globe, left cornucopiae.
exergo: -/A//SIS, diameter: 24,5mm, weight: 6,50g, axis: 11h,
mint: Siscia, date: 311 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-221, p-482, Scarce!
Q-001
quadrans
Galerius_AE-Follis_DIVO-GAL-VAL-MAXIMIANO_FORTI-FORTINAE_B-over_Mu_SIS_RIC-VI-224-p-483_Siscia-312-AD-Scarce_Q-001_6h_24-26mm_4,68ga-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 224, AE-Follis, FORTI FORT(I)NAE, legend error FORTVNAE!!!,Fortuna standing left by wheel, Rare! #174 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 224, AE-Follis, FORTI FORT(I)NAE, legend error FORTVNAE!!!,Fortuna standing left by wheel, Rare! #1
avers:- DIVO-GAL-VAL-MAXIMIANO, Veiled head right.
revers:- FORTI-FOR-T(I)NAE, legend error FOR-TVNAE!!!, Fortuna standing left by wheel, right holding rudder on globe, left cornucopiae.
exergo: -/B/μ//SIS, diameter: 24-26mm, weight: 4,68g, axis: 6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 312 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-224, p-483, Rare!
Q-001
quadrans
Galerius_AE-Follis_GAL-MAXIMIANVS-PF-AVG_GENIO-A-VGVSTI_star-Gamma_dotSMdotTSdot_RIC-VI-30a-p-514_308-10-AD-Thessa_Q-001_axis-0h_23-24,5mm_5,43g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Thessalonica, RIC VI 30a, AE-Follis, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, #1229 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Thessalonica, RIC VI 30a, AE-Follis, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, #1
avers:- GAL-MAXIMIANVS-PF-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- GENIO-A-VGVSTI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia.
exerg: */Γ//•SM•TS•, diameter: 23-24,5mm, weight: 5,43g, axes: 0h,
mint: Thessalonica, date: 308-310 A.D., ref: RIC VI 30a, p-514,
Q-001
quadrans
Galerius_AR-Argenteus_MAXIMIANVS-CAESAR_VIRTVS-MILITVM_Ticinium_RIC-15b_RSC-220a_294-AD_Q-001_6h_18,5mm_2,68g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VI 015b, AR-Argenteus, -/-//--, VIRTVS MILITVM, The Four Tetrarchs sacrificing over the tripod,323 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VI 015b, AR-Argenteus, -/-//--, VIRTVS MILITVM, The Four Tetrarchs sacrificing over the tripod,
avers: MAXIMIANVS CAESAR, Laureate head right.
reverse: VIRTVS MILITVM, The Four Tetrarchs sacrificing over the tripod, City gate in the background, with six turrets.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5mm, weight: 2,68g, axis: 6h,
mint: Ticinum, 3rd.off., date: 294 A.D., ref: RIC VI 015b, RSC-220a,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Galerius_AE-Follis_IMP-C-MAXIMIANVS-PF-AVG_FIDES-M-I-LITVM_dot-in-left-field_PT_RIC-VI-55b-p-288_Ticinum-305-AD_Q-001_axis-11h_26-26,5mm_9,33g-s.jpg
122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VI 055b, AE-Follis, FIDES MILITVM, Fides seating left, #1292 views122 Galerius Maximianus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-311 A.D. Augustus), Ticinum, RIC VI 055b, AE-Follis, FIDES MILITVM, Fides seating left, #1
avers:- IMP-C-MAXIMIANVS-PF-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- FIDES-M-I-LITVM, Fides seating left, holding standard in each hand.
exergo: -/•//P T, diameter: 26-26,5mm, weight: 9,33g, axis: 11h,
mint: Ticinum, date: 305 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-55b, p-288,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-II_AE-Follis_IMP-C-GAL-VAL-MAXIMINVS-P-F-AVG_GENIO-AVGVSTI_star-H_ANT_RIC-VI-164b-p-643_Antiochia_312-AD_Q-001_axis-0h_21mm_5,35g-s.jpg
128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Antioch, RIC VI 164b, AE-1, */H//ANT, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left,266 views128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Antioch, RIC VI 164b, AE-1, */H//ANT, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left,
avers:- IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, holding head of Sol and cornucopia.
exergo: */H//ANT, diameter: 21mm, weight: 5,35g, axis: 0h,
mint: Antioch, date: 312 A.D., ref: RIC VI 164b, p-643,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-II_AE-Follis_IMP-MAXIMINVS-P-F-AVG_GENIO-AVGVSTI_AQS_RIC-VI-130-p-327_Aquilea_312-3AD_Q-001_7h_21,5-22,0mm_4,14g-s.jpg
128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Aquilea, RIC VI 130, -/-//AQS, AE-1, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left,126 views128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Aquilea, RIC VI 130, -/-//AQS, AE-1, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left,
avers:- IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, sacrificing over tripod altar from patera, holding cornucopiae.
exergo: -/-//AQS, diameter: 21,5-22,0mm, weight: 4,14g, axis: 7h,
mint: Aquilea, date: 312-313 A.D., ref: RIC VI 130, p-327,
Q-001
quadrans
Maximinus-II_AE-Quarter-Follis_GAL-VAL-MAXIMINVS-NOB-C_GENIO-POPV-LI-ROMANI_SIS_RIC-VI-170b-p475-4b-A-R_Siscia_305-6_AD_Q-001_axis-0h_19mm_2,34g-s.jpg
128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 170b, AE-Quarter-Follis, -/-//SIS, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, R!,131 views128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 170b, AE-Quarter-Follis, -/-//SIS, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, R!,
avers:- GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, Laureate head right.
revers:- GENIO POPV LI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia.
exergo: -/-//SIS, diameter: 18mm, weight: 2,47g, axis: 0h,
mint: Siscia, date: 305-06 A.D., ref: RIC VI 170b, p-475, R!,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-II_AE-Follis_GA-VAL-MAXIMINVS-NOB-C_PERPETV-ITASAVGG_VI_SIS-A_RIC-VI-184b-Not-in-This-off-A_p-476_Siscia_305-07-AD_Q-001_0h_27,5mm_9,25ga-s.jpg
128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 184b, AE-1, -/VI//SISA, PERPETVITAS AVG G, Roma, helmeted, seated left on shield, Not in RIC this Officina, Rare !!!101 views128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC VI 184b, AE-1, -/VI//SISA, PERPETVITAS AVG G, Roma, helmeted, seated left on shield, Not in RIC this Officina, Rare !!!
avers:- GA VAL MAXIMINVS NOB C, Laureate head right.
revers:- PERPETV ITAS AVG G, Roma, helmeted, seated left on shield, right hand holding Victory on globe, left leaning on spear or sceptre.
exergo: -/VI//SISA, diameter: 27,5mm, weight: 9,25g, axis: 0h,
mint: Siscia, date: 305-307 A.D., ref: RIC VI 184b, p-476,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Maximinus-II__AE-Follis_MAXIMINVS-PF-AVG_IOVI-CONSE-RVATORI_wreath-B_dotSMdotTSdot_RIC-VI-50a-p-518_312-AD-Thessa_Q-001_axis-0h_23,5-24,5mm_4,15g-s.jpg
128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Thessalonica, RIC VI 050a, AE-1, wreath/B//•SM•TS•, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left,208 views128 Maximinus II. "Daia" (305-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 310-313 A.D. Augustus), Thessalonica, RIC VI 050a, AE-1, wreath/B//•SM•TS•, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left,
avers:- MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- IOVI CONSE RVATORI, Jupiter standing left,
exerg: wreath/B//•SM•TS•, diameter: mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Thessalonica, date:312 A.D., ref: RIC VI 50a, p-518,
Q-001
quadrans
12g-Constantine-Her-075.jpg
12g. Constantine: Heraclea follis.37 viewsFollis, 313 - 314, Heraclea mint.
Obverse: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG / Laureate bust of Constantine.
Reverse: IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG / Jupiter standing, chlamys over left shoulder, holding Victory on globe, leaning on sceptre. Eagle with wreath in its beak at his feet. E in right field.
Mint mark: SMHT
3.95 gm., 22 mm.
RIC #75 (vol VI) and #5 (vol VII); Sear #15958.

This coin seems to be listed twice in RIC: #75 in Volume VI, and #5 in Volume VII.

RIC Volume VI (page 541) assigns this coin to the year 313, just before Maximinus (Daza) occupied the city of Heraclea for a month or so, during which he issued his own different coinage.

RIC Volume VII (page 542) assigns the coin to the period of time just after Maximinus withdrew from Heraclea and into the year 314. Page 533 says the coinage from before Maximinus' occupation continued after his withdrawal "with exactly the same reverse as before the occupation."

I can not tell the difference between these two listings and have to conclude they are the same coin. Either way, it is a nice coin from turbulent times in the history of Heraclea. The original silvering is still under that patina.
Callimachus
14-Gordian-III-RIC-116.jpg
13. Gordian III / RIC 116.25 viewsDenarius, 240 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG / Laureate bust of Gordian.
Reverse: VIRTVTI AVGVSTI / Hercules standing, resting right hand on hip and left hand club set on rock; lion-skin beside club.
3.58 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #116; Sear #8684.

The chronology of the denarii coinage of Gordian III has been poorly understood because Roman Imperial Coinage (RIC) has it mixed up in its listings. For example, it will tell you that 5 denarii (Diana, Pietas, Salus, Securitas, and Venus) were issued in the summer of 241 to commemorate the marriage of Gordian and Tranquillina. Recent thinking tells another entirely different story. The following summary is based on a posting by Curtis Clay, November 25, 2011, on the Forum Ancient Coins Classical Numismatics Discussion Board.
Although antoniniani were issued for a while under Caracalla and Elagabalus, the denarius was the standard silver denomination throughout the reigns of Severus Alexander, Maximinus Thrax, and into the first part of the joint reign of Balbinus & Pupienus. (This, by the way, is when the PIETAS AVGG denarius of Gordian as Caesar was issued.) Sometime during the short reign of Balbinus & Pupienus, the antoninianus supplanted the denarius as the standard silver denomination. When Gordian III became emperor (July 238), his administration continued to follow the then current practice of issuing only antoniniani.

Early in 240, Gordian apparently decided to revert back to the traditional coinage of the Empire and began to issue only denarii. The denarii issued at this time were the following:

P M TR P III COS P P / Horseman
DIANA LVCIFERA
PIETAS AVGVSTI
SALVS AVGVSTI
SECVRITAS PVBLICA
VENVS VICTRIX

No antoniniani exist with these reverse types.

The next issue of denarii was issued in the summer of 240 after Gordian became COS II, and consists of these types:

P M TR P III COS II P P / Emperor standing
P M TR P III COS II P P / Apollo seated
AETERNITATI AVG
IOVIS STATOR
LAETITIA AVG N
VIRTVTI AVGVSTI

Within a short time, however, it was decided to go back to having the antoninianus as the standard silver denomination. Antoniniani were issued again, at first with the same reverse types as the second issue of denarii. That is why these reverse types exist on denarii and antoniniani even though they were not issued at the same time.

So the period the mint issued denarii rather than antoniniani as the standard silver denomination lasted from about March through August, 240. This was the last time denarii were issued for general circulation. The antoninianus lasted until Diocletian’s coinage reform of 295, after which Roman coinage was so vastly different that there was no question of returning to the denarius.

The 13 denarii of Gordian III are presented in this album in this order:
Gordian III as Caesar denarius - 1 coin.
First issue of denarii - 6 coins.
Second issue of denarii - 6 coins.
Callimachus
DiocleAnt.jpg
1301a, Diocletian, 284-305 A.D. (Antioch)98 viewsDIOCLETIAN (284 – 305 AD) AE Antoninianus, 293-95 AD, RIC V 322, Cohen 34. 20.70 mm/3.1 gm, aVF, Antioch. Obverse: IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Radiate bust right, draped & cuirassed; Reverse: CONCORDIA MILITVM, Jupiter presents Victory on a globe to Diocletian, I/XXI. Early Diocletian with dusty earthen green patina.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Diocletian ( 284-305 A.D.)

Ralph W. Mathisen
University of South Carolina


Summary and Introduction
The Emperor Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (A.D. 284-305) put an end to the disastrous phase of Roman history known as the "Military Anarchy" or the "Imperial Crisis" (235-284). He established an obvious military despotism and was responsible for laying the groundwork for the second phase of the Roman Empire, which is known variously as the "Dominate," the "Tetrarchy," the "Later Roman Empire," or the "Byzantine Empire." His reforms ensured the continuity of the Roman Empire in the east for more than a thousand years.

Diocletian's Early Life and Reign
Diocletian was born ca. 236/237 on the Dalmatian coast, perhaps at Salona. He was of very humble birth, and was originally named Diocles. He would have received little education beyond an elementary literacy and he was apparently deeply imbued with religious piety He had a wife Prisca and a daughter Valeria, both of whom reputedly were Christians. During Diocletian's early life, the Roman empire was in the midst of turmoil. In the early years of the third century, emperors increasingly insecure on their thrones had granted inflationary pay raises to the soldiers. The only meaningful income the soldiers now received was in the form of gold donatives granted by newly acclaimed emperors. Beginning in 235, armies throughout the empire began to set up their generals as rival emperors. The resultant civil wars opened up the empire to invasion in both the north, by the Franks, Alamanni, and Goths, and the east, by the Sassanid Persians. Another reason for the unrest in the army was the great gap between the social background of the common soldiers and the officer corps.

Diocletian sought his fortune in the army. He showed himself to be a shrewd, able, and ambitious individual. He is first attested as "Duke of Moesia" (an area on the banks of the lower Danube River), with responsibility for border defense. He was a prudent and methodical officer, a seeker of victory rather than glory. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube proclaimed the praetorian prefect Carus as emperor. Diocletian found favor under the new emperor, and was promoted to Count of the Domestics, the commander of the cavalry arm of the imperial bodyguard. In 283 he was granted the honor of a consulate.

In 284, in the midst of a campaign against the Persians, Carus was killed, struck by a bolt of lightning which one writer noted might have been forged in a legionary armory. This left the empire in the hands of his two young sons, Numerian in the east and Carinus in the west. Soon thereafter, Numerian died under mysterious circumstances near Nicomedia, and Diocletian was acclaimed emperor in his place. At this time he changed his name from Diocles to Diocletian. In 285 Carinus was killed in a battle near Belgrade, and Diocletian gained control of the entire empire.

Diocletian's Administrative and Military Reforms
As emperor, Diocletian was faced with many problems. His most immediate concerns were to bring the mutinous and increasingly barbarized Roman armies back under control and to make the frontiers once again secure from invasion. His long-term goals were to restore effective government and economic prosperity to the empire. Diocletian concluded that stern measures were necessary if these problems were to be solved. He felt that it was the responsibility of the imperial government to take whatever steps were necessary, no matter how harsh or innovative, to bring the empire back under control.

Diocletian was able to bring the army back under control by making several changes. He subdivided the roughly fifty existing provinces into approximately one hundred. The provinces also were apportioned among twelve "dioceses," each under a "vicar," and later also among four "prefectures," each under a "praetorian prefect." As a result, the imperial bureaucracy became increasingly bloated. He institutionalized the policy of separating civil and military careers. He divided the army itself into so-called "border troops," actually an ineffective citizen militia, and "palace troops," the real field army, which often was led by the emperor in person.

Following the precedent of Aurelian (A.D.270-275), Diocletian transformed the emperorship into an out-and-out oriental monarchy. Access to him became restricted; he now was addressed not as First Citizen (Princeps) or the soldierly general (Imperator), but as Lord and Master (Dominus Noster) . Those in audience were required to prostrate themselves on the ground before him.

Diocletian also concluded that the empire was too large and complex to be ruled by only a single emperor. Therefore, in order to provide an imperial presence throughout the empire, he introduced the "Tetrarchy," or "Rule by Four." In 285, he named his lieutenant Maximianus "Caesar," and assigned him the western half of the empire. This practice began the process which would culminate with the de facto split of the empire in 395. Both Diocletian and Maximianus adopted divine attributes. Diocletian was identified with Jupiter and Maximianus with Hercules. In 286, Diocletian promoted Maximianus to the rank of Augustus, "Senior Emperor," and in 293 he appointed two new Caesars, Constantius (the father of Constantine I ), who was given Gaul and Britain in the west, and Galerius, who was assigned the Balkans in the east.

By instituting his Tetrarchy, Diocletian also hoped to solve another problem. In the Augustan Principate, there had been no constitutional method for choosing new emperors. According to Diocletian's plan, the successor of each Augustus would be the respective Caesar, who then would name a new Caesar. Initially, the Tetrarchy operated smoothly and effectively.

Once the army was under control, Diocletian could turn his attention to other problems. The borders were restored and strengthened. In the early years of his reign, Diocletian and his subordinates were able to defeat foreign enemies such as Alamanni, Sarmatians, Saracens, Franks, and Persians, and to put down rebellions in Britain and Egypt. The easter frontier was actually expanded.

.
Diocletian's Economic Reforms
Another problem was the economy, which was in an especially sorry state. The coinage had become so debased as to be virtually worthless. Diocletian's attempt to reissue good gold and silver coins failed because there simply was not enough gold and silver available to restore confidence in the currency. A "Maximum Price Edict" issued in 301, intended to curb inflation, served only to drive goods onto the black market. Diocletian finally accepted the ruin of the money economy and revised the tax system so that it was based on payments in kind . The soldiers too came to be paid in kind.

In order to assure the long term survival of the empire, Diocletian identified certain occupations which he felt would have to be performed. These were known as the "compulsory services." They included such occupations as soldiers, bakers, members of town councils, and tenant farmers. These functions became hereditary, and those engaging in them were inhibited from changing their careers. The repetitious nature of these laws, however, suggests that they were not widely obeyed. Diocletian also expanded the policy of third-century emperors of restricting the entry of senators into high-ranking governmental posts, especially military ones.

Diocletian attempted to use the state religion as a unifying element. Encouraged by the Caesar Galerius, Diocletian in 303 issued a series of four increasingly harsh decrees designed to compel Christians to take part in the imperial cult, the traditional means by which allegiance was pledged to the empire. This began the so-called "Great Persecution."

Diocletian's Resignation and Death
On 1 May 305, wearied by his twenty years in office, and determined to implement his method for the imperial succession, Diocletian abdicated. He compelled his co-regent Maximianus to do the same. Constantius and Galerius then became the new Augusti, and two new Caesars were selected, Maximinus (305-313) in the east and Severus (305- 307) in the west. Diocletian then retired to his palace at Split on the Croatian coast. In 308 he declined an offer to resume the purple, and the aged ex-emperor died at Split on 3 December 316.

Copyright (C) 1996, Ralph W. Mathisen, University of South Carolina
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

1 commentsCleisthenes
DicletianConcordCyz.jpg
1301b, Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 March 305 A.D.62 viewsDiocletian. RIC V Part II Cyzicus 256 var. Not listed with pellet in exegrue
Item ref: RI141f. VF. Minted in Cyzicus (B in centre field, XXI dot in exegrue)Obverse:- IMP CC VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Reverse:- CONCORDIA MILITVM, Diocletian standing right, holding parazonium, receiving Victory from Jupiter standing left with scepter.
A post reform radiate of Diocletian. Ex Maridvnvm.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Diocletian ( 284-305 A.D.)

Ralph W. Mathisen
University of South Carolina


Summary and Introduction
The Emperor Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (A.D. 284-305) put an end to the disastrous phase of Roman history known as the "Military Anarchy" or the "Imperial Crisis" (235-284). He established an obvious military despotism and was responsible for laying the groundwork for the second phase of the Roman Empire, which is known variously as the "Dominate," the "Tetrarchy," the "Later Roman Empire," or the "Byzantine Empire." His reforms ensured the continuity of the Roman Empire in the east for more than a thousand years.

Diocletian's Early Life and Reign
Diocletian was born ca. 236/237 on the Dalmatian coast, perhaps at Salona. He was of very humble birth, and was originally named Diocles. He would have received little education beyond an elementary literacy and he was apparently deeply imbued with religious piety He had a wife Prisca and a daughter Valeria, both of whom reputedly were Christians. During Diocletian's early life, the Roman empire was in the midst of turmoil. In the early years of the third century, emperors increasingly insecure on their thrones had granted inflationary pay raises to the soldiers. The only meaningful income the soldiers now received was in the form of gold donatives granted by newly acclaimed emperors. Beginning in 235, armies throughout the empire began to set up their generals as rival emperors. The resultant civil wars opened up the empire to invasion in both the north, by the Franks, Alamanni, and Goths, and the east, by the Sassanid Persians. Another reason for the unrest in the army was the great gap between the social background of the common soldiers and the officer corps.

Diocletian sought his fortune in the army. He showed himself to be a shrewd, able, and ambitious individual. He is first attested as "Duke of Moesia" (an area on the banks of the lower Danube River), with responsibility for border defense. He was a prudent and methodical officer, a seeker of victory rather than glory. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube proclaimed the praetorian prefect Carus as emperor. Diocletian found favor under the new emperor, and was promoted to Count of the Domestics, the commander of the cavalry arm of the imperial bodyguard. In 283 he was granted the honor of a consulate.

In 284, in the midst of a campaign against the Persians, Carus was killed, struck by a bolt of lightning which one writer noted might have been forged in a legionary armory. This left the empire in the hands of his two young sons, Numerian in the east and Carinus in the west. Soon thereafter, Numerian died under mysterious circumstances near Nicomedia, and Diocletian was acclaimed emperor in his place. At this time he changed his name from Diocles to Diocletian. In 285 Carinus was killed in a battle near Belgrade, and Diocletian gained control of the entire empire.

Diocletian's Administrative and Military Reforms
As emperor, Diocletian was faced with many problems. His most immediate concerns were to bring the mutinous and increasingly barbarized Roman armies back under control and to make the frontiers once again secure from invasion. His long-term goals were to restore effective government and economic prosperity to the empire. Diocletian concluded that stern measures were necessary if these problems were to be solved. He felt that it was the responsibility of the imperial government to take whatever steps were necessary, no matter how harsh or innovative, to bring the empire back under control.

Diocletian was able to bring the army back under control by making several changes. He subdivided the roughly fifty existing provinces into approximately one hundred. The provinces also were apportioned among twelve "dioceses," each under a "vicar," and later also among four "prefectures," each under a "praetorian prefect." As a result, the imperial bureaucracy became increasingly bloated. He institutionalized the policy of separating civil and military careers. He divided the army itself into so-called "border troops," actually an ineffective citizen militia, and "palace troops," the real field army, which often was led by the emperor in person.

Following the precedent of Aurelian (A.D.270-275), Diocletian transformed the emperorship into an out-and-out oriental monarchy. Access to him became restricted; he now was addressed not as First Citizen (Princeps) or the soldierly general (Imperator), but as Lord and Master (Dominus Noster) . Those in audience were required to prostrate themselves on the ground before him.

Diocletian also concluded that the empire was too large and complex to be ruled by only a single emperor. Therefore, in order to provide an imperial presence throughout the empire, he introduced the "Tetrarchy," or "Rule by Four." In 285, he named his lieutenant Maximianus "Caesar," and assigned him the western half of the empire. This practice began the process which would culminate with the de facto split of the empire in 395. Both Diocletian and Maximianus adopted divine attributes. Diocletian was identified with Jupiter and Maximianus with Hercules. In 286, Diocletian promoted Maximianus to the rank of Augustus, "Senior Emperor," and in 293 he appointed two new Caesars, Constantius (the father of Constantine I ), who was given Gaul and Britain in the west, and Galerius, who was assigned the Balkans in the east.

By instituting his Tetrarchy, Diocletian also hoped to solve another problem. In the Augustan Principate, there had been no constitutional method for choosing new emperors. According to Diocletian's plan, the successor of each Augustus would be the respective Caesar, who then would name a new Caesar. Initially, the Tetrarchy operated smoothly and effectively.

Once the army was under control, Diocletian could turn his attention to other problems. The borders were restored and strengthened. In the early years of his reign, Diocletian and his subordinates were able to defeat foreign enemies such as Alamanni, Sarmatians, Saracens, Franks, and Persians, and to put down rebellions in Britain and Egypt. The easter frontier was actually expanded.

.
Diocletian's Economic Reforms
Another problem was the economy, which was in an especially sorry state. The coinage had become so debased as to be virtually worthless. Diocletian's attempt to reissue good gold and silver coins failed because there simply was not enough gold and silver available to restore confidence in the currency. A "Maximum Price Edict" issued in 301, intended to curb inflation, served only to drive goods onto the black market. Diocletian finally accepted the ruin of the money economy and revised the tax system so that it was based on payments in kind . The soldiers too came to be paid in kind.

In order to assure the long term survival of the empire, Diocletian identified certain occupations which he felt would have to be performed. These were known as the "compulsory services." They included such occupations as soldiers, bakers, members of town councils, and tenant farmers. These functions became hereditary, and those engaging in them were inhibited from changing their careers. The repetitious nature of these laws, however, suggests that they were not widely obeyed. Diocletian also expanded the policy of third-century emperors of restricting the entry of senators into high-ranking governmental posts, especially military ones.

Diocletian attempted to use the state religion as a unifying element. Encouraged by the Caesar Galerius, Diocletian in 303 issued a series of four increasingly harsh decrees designed to compel Christians to take part in the imperial cult, the traditional means by which allegiance was pledged to the empire. This began the so-called "Great Persecution."

Diocletian's Resignation and Death
On 1 May 305, wearied by his twenty years in office, and determined to implement his method for the imperial succession, Diocletian abdicated. He compelled his co-regent Maximianus to do the same. Constantius and Galerius then became the new Augusti, and two new Caesars were selected, Maximinus (305-313) in the east and Severus (305- 307) in the west. Diocletian then retired to his palace at Split on the Croatian coast. In 308 he declined an offer to resume the purple, and the aged ex-emperor died at Split on 3 December 316.

Copyright (C) 1996, Ralph W. Mathisen, University of South Carolina
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


Cleisthenes
MaxHercRIC5iiRome.jpg
1302a, Maximian, 285 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.50 viewsMaximianus AE Antoninianus. RIC V Part II 506 Bust Type C. Cohen 355; VF; Minted in Rome A.D. 285-286. Obverse: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right; Rverse: IOVI CONSERVAT AVGG, Jupiter standing left holding thunderbolt & scepter, XXIZ in exergue. Ex maridvnvm.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Maximian, 285-305, 306-308, and 310 A.D.

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Perhaps born ca. 249/250 A.D. in Sirmium in the area of the Balkans, Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus, more commonly known as Maximianus Herculius (Maximian), had been a soldier before he put on the purple. A fellow soldier with the Emperor Diocletian, he had served in the military during the reigns of Aurelian and Probus.

When the Emperor Diocletian determined that the empire was too large for one man to govern on his own, he made Maximian his Caesar in 285/6 and elevated him to the rank of Augustus in perhaps the spring of 286. While Diocletian ruled in the East, Maximian ruled in the West. In 293, in order to maintain and to strengthen the stability of the empire, Diocletian appointed Constantius I Chlorus to serve Maximian as a Caesar in the West, while Galerius did the same job in the East. This arrangement, called the "Tetrarchy", was meant not only to provide a stronger foundation for the two emperors' rule, but also to end any possible fighting over the succession to the throne once the two senior Augusti had left the throne--a problem which had bedeviled the principate since the time of the Emperor Augustus. To cement the relationship between Maximian and his Caesar, Constantius married Maximian's elder daughter Theodora. A decade later, Constantius' son Constantine would marry Maximia's younger daughter Fausta.

On 1 May 305 Diocletian, at Nicomedeia, and Maximian, at Mediolanum, divested themselves of the purple. Their resignations seem largely due to the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian seems to have forced his colleague to abdicate. In any case, Herculius had sworn an oath at the temple of Capitoline Jupiter to carry out the terms of the abdication. Constantius and Galerius were appointed as Augusti, with Maximinus Daia and Severus as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Diocletian's retirement was at Salonae in Dalmatia, while Herculius' retreat was either in Lucania or Campania.

Maximian's retirement, however, was of short duration because, a little more than a year later on 28 October 306, his son Maxentius was proclaimed emperor at Rome. To give his regime an aura of legitimacy, Maximian was forced to affirm his son's acclamation. When Galerius learned of Maxentius' rebellion, he sent Severus against him with an army that had formerly been under his father's command. Maxentius invested his father with the purple again to win over his enemy's troops, a ruse which succeeded. Perhaps to strengthen his own position, in 307 Maximian went to Gaul and married his daughter Fausta to Constantine. When Constantine refused to become embroiled in the civil war between Galerius and Maxentius, Maximian returned to Rome in 308 and attempted to depose his son; however, he did not succeed. When Maximian was unable to convince Diocletian to take up the purple again at a meeting in Carnuntum in late 308, he returned to his son-in-law's side in Gaul.

Although Maximian was treated with all of the respect due a former emperor, he still desired to be more than a figurehead. He decided to seize the purple from Constantine when his son-in-law least expected it. His opportunity came in the summer of 310 when the Franks revolted. When Constantine had taken a small part of his army into enemy territory, Maximian proclaimed himself again emperor and paid the soldiers under his command a donative to secure their loyalty. As soon as Constantine received news about Maximian's revolt in July 310, he went south and reached Arelate before his father-in-law could mount a defense of the city. Although Maximian fled to Massilia, his son-in-law seized the city and took Maximian prisoner. Although he was deprived of the purple, he was granted pardon for his crimes. Unable to endure the humiliation of his defeat, he attempted to have Constantine murdered in his bed. The plot failed because he tried to get his daughter Fausta's help in the matter; she chose to reveal the matter to her husband. Because of this attempt on his son-in-law's life Maximian was dead by the end of July either by his own hand or on the orders of his intended victim.

Eutropia was of Syrian extraction and her marriage to Maximian seems to have been her second. She bore him two children: Maxentius and Fausta. An older daughter, Theodora, may have been a product of her first marriage. Fausta became the wife of Constantine I , while her sister Theodora was the second spouse of his father Constantius I Chlorus . Eutropia apparently survived all her children, with the possible exception of her daughter Fausta who seems to have died in 326. Eutropia is also said to have become a Christian.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Max.jpg
1302b, Maximian, 285-305, 306-308, and 310 A.D., commemorative issued by Constantine the Great (Siscia)59 viewsMaximian, 285-305, 306-308, and 310 A.D., commemorative issued by Constantine the Great. Bronze AE3, RIC 41, VF, Siscia, 1.30g, 16.1mm, 0o, 317-318 A.D. Obverse: DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP, laureate and veiled head right; Reverse: REQVIES OPTIMO-RVM MERITORVM, Emperor seated left on curule chair, raising hand and holding scepter, SIS in exergue; scarce (R3).


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Maximian, 285-305, 306-308, and 310 A.D.

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Perhaps born ca. 249/250 A.D. in Sirmium in the area of the Balkans, Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus, more commonly known as Maximianus Herculius (Maximian), had been a soldier before he put on the purple. A fellow soldier with the Emperor Diocletian, he had served in the military during the reigns of Aurelian and Probus.

When the Emperor Diocletian determined that the empire was too large for one man to govern on his own, he made Maximian his Caesar in 285/6 and elevated him to the rank of Augustus in perhaps the spring of 286. While Diocletian ruled in the East, Maximian ruled in the West. In 293, in order to maintain and to strengthen the stability of the empire, Diocletian appointed Constantius I Chlorus to serve Maximian as a Caesar in the West, while Galerius did the same job in the East. This arrangement, called the "Tetrarchy", was meant not only to provide a stronger foundation for the two emperors' rule, but also to end any possible fighting over the succession to the throne once the two senior Augusti had left the throne--a problem which had bedeviled the principate since the time of the Emperor Augustus. To cement the relationship between Maximian and his Caesar, Constantius married Maximian's elder daughter Theodora. A decade later, Constantius' son Constantine would marry Maximia's younger daughter Fausta.

On 1 May 305 Diocletian, at Nicomedeia, and Maximian, at Mediolanum, divested themselves of the purple. Their resignations seem largely due to the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian seems to have forced his colleague to abdicate. In any case, Herculius had sworn an oath at the temple of Capitoline Jupiter to carry out the terms of the abdication. Constantius and Galerius were appointed as Augusti, with Maximinus Daia and Severus as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Diocletian's retirement was at Salonae in Dalmatia, while Herculius' retreat was either in Lucania or Campania.

Maximian's retirement, however, was of short duration because, a little more than a year later on 28 October 306, his son Maxentius was proclaimed emperor at Rome. To give his regime an aura of legitimacy, Maximian was forced to affirm his son's acclamation. When Galerius learned of Maxentius' rebellion, he sent Severus against him with an army that had formerly been under his father's command. Maxentius invested his father with the purple again to win over his enemy's troops, a ruse which succeeded. Perhaps to strengthen his own position, in 307 Maximian went to Gaul and married his daughter Fausta to Constantine. When Constantine refused to become embroiled in the civil war between Galerius and Maxentius, Maximian returned to Rome in 308 and attempted to depose his son; however, he did not succeed. When Maximian was unable to convince Diocletian to take up the purple again at a meeting in Carnuntum in late 308, he returned to his son-in-law's side in Gaul.

Although Maximian was treated with all of the respect due a former emperor, he still desired to be more than a figurehead. He decided to seize the purple from Constantine when his son-in-law least expected it. His opportunity came in the summer of 310 when the Franks revolted. When Constantine had taken a small part of his army into enemy territory, Maximian proclaimed himself again emperor and paid the soldiers under his command a donative to secure their loyalty. As soon as Constantine received news about Maximian's revolt in July 310, he went south and reached Arelate before his father-in-law could mount a defense of the city. Although Maximian fled to Massilia, his son-in-law seized the city and took Maximian prisoner. Although he was deprived of the purple, he was granted pardon for his crimes. Unable to endure the humiliation of his defeat, he attempted to have Constantine murdered in his bed. The plot failed because he tried to get his daughter Fausta's help in the matter; she chose to reveal the matter to her husband. Because of this attempt on his son-in-law's life Maximian was dead by the end of July either by his own hand or on the orders of his intended victim.

Eutropia was of Syrian extraction and her marriage to Maximian seems to have been her second. She bore him two children: Maxentius and Fausta. An older daughter, Theodora, may have been a product of her first marriage. Fausta became the wife of Constantine I , while her sister Theodora was the second spouse of his father Constantius I Chlorus . Eutropia apparently survived all her children, with the possible exception of her daughter Fausta who seems to have died in 326. Eutropia is also said to have become a Christian.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
GaleriusAugCyz.jpg
1303a, Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D.39 viewsGalerius, RIC VI 59, Cyzicus S, VF, Cyzicus S, 6.4 g, 25.86 mm; 309-310 AD; Obverse: GAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate bust right; Reverse: GENIO A-VGVS[TI], Genius stg. left, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera and cornucopiae. A nice example with sharp detail and nice brown hoard patina. Ex Ancient Imports.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Galerius (305-311 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University


Caius Galerius Valerius Maximianus, more commonly known as Galerius, was from Illyricum; his father, whose name is unknown, was of peasant stock, while his mother, Romula, was from beyond the Danube. Galerius was born in Dacia Ripensis near Sardica. Although the date of his birth is unknown, he was probably born ca. 250 since he served under Aurelian. As a youth Galerius was a shepherd and acquired the nickname Armentarius. Although he seems to have started his military career under Aurelian and Probus, nothing is known about it before his accession as Caesar on 1 March 293. He served as Diocletian's Caesar in the East. Abandoning his first wife, he married Diocletian's daugher, Valeria.

As Caesar he campaigned in Egypt in 294; he seems to have taken to the field against Narses of Persia, and was defeated near Ctesiphon in 295. In 298, after he made inroads into Armenia, he obtained a treaty from the Persians favorable to the Romans. Between 299-305 he overcame the Sarmatians and the Carpi along the Danube. The Great Persecution of the Orthodox Church, which was started in 303 by the Emperor Diocletian, was probably instigated by Galerius. Because of the almost fatal illness that he contracted toward the end of 304, Diocletian, at Nicomedeia, and Maximianus Herculius, at Mediolanum, divested themselves of the purple on 1 May 305. Constantius and Galerius were appointed as Augusti, with Maximinus Daia and Severus as the new Caesars. Constantius and Severus reigned in the West, whereas Galerius' and Daia's realm was the East. Although Constantius was nominally senior Augustus, the real power was in the hands of Galerius because both Caesars were his creatures.

The balance of power shifted at the end of July 306 when Constantius, with his son Constantine at his side, passed away at York in Britain where he was preparing to face incursions by the Picts; his army proclaimed Constantine his successor immediately. As soon as he received the news of the death of Constantius I and the acclamation of Constantine to the purple, Galerius raised Severus to the rank of Augustus to replace his dead colleague in August 306. Making the best of a bad situation, Galerius accepted Constantine as the new Caesar in the West. The situation became more complicated when Maxentius, with his father Maximianus Herculius acquiesing, declared himself princes on 28 October 306. When Galerius learned about the acclamation of the usurper, he dispatched the Emperor Severus to put down the rebellion. Severus took a large field army which had formerly been that of Maximianus and proceeded toward Rome and began to besiege the city, Maxentius, however, and Maximianus, by means of a ruse, convinced Severus to surrender. Later, in 307, Severus was put to death under clouded circumstances. While Severus was fighting in the west, Galerius, during late 306 or early 307, was campaigning against the Sarmatians.

In the early summer of 307 Galerius invaded Italy to avenge Severus's death; he advanced to the south and encamped at Interamna near the Tiber. His attempt to besiege the city was abortive because his army was too small to encompass the city's fortifications. Not trusting his own troops, Galerius withdrew. During its retreat, his army ravaged the Italian countryside as it was returning to its original base. When Maximianus Herculius' attempts to regain the throne between 308 and 310 by pushing his son off his throne or by winning over Constantine to his cause failed, he tried to win Diocletian and Galerius over to his side at Carnuntum in October and November 308; the outcome of the Conference at Carnuntum was that Licinius was appointed Augustus in Severus's place, that Daia and Constantine were denoted filii Augustorum, and that Herculius was completely cut out of the picture. Later, in 310, Herculius died, having been implicated in a plot against his son-in-law. After the Conference at Carnuntum, Galerius returned to Sardica where he died in the opening days of May 311.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University; Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Galerius was Caesar and tetrarch under Maximianus. Although a talented general and administrator, Galerius is better known for his key role in the "Great Persecution" of Christians. He stopped the persecution under condition the Christians pray for his return to health from a serious illness. Galerius died horribly shortly after. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.



Cleisthenes
Constantius1_silvered_follis.jpg
1304a, Constantius I, May 305 - 25 July 306 A.D.52 viewsSilvered follis, RIC 20a, S 3671, VM 25, gVF, Heraclea mint, 10.144g, 27.7mm, 180o, 297 - 298 A.D. Obverse: FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; Reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over shoulder, cornucopia in left, pouring liquor from patera, HTD in exergue; some silvering, nice portrait, well centered.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Constantius I Chlorus (305-306 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Constantius' Early Life and Marriage

Born March 31st, Emperor Flavius Valerius Constantius may have come into the world ca. 250. His family was from Illyricum. In the army he served as a protector, tribunus, and a praeses Dalmatiarum. During the 270s or the 280s, he became the father of Constantine by Helena, his first spouse. By 288 he was the Praetorian Prefect of the western emperor Maximianus Herculius.

Constantius' Reign as Caesar

On 1 March 293 Diocletian appointed Galerius as his Caesar (junior emperor) in the east and Constantius as the Caesar of Maximianus Herculius. Caesar in the west. Both Caesars had the right of succession. In order to strengthen the dynastic relationship between himself and Herculius., Constantius put aside his wife Helena and married Theodora, the daughter, or perhaps stepdaughter, of Maximianus Herculius.. The union was fruitful and of it there were six issue: Flavius Dalmatius, Julius Constantius, Hannibalianus, Constantia, Anastasia, and Eutropia. To strengthen his bond with Galerius and Diocletian in the east, Constantius allowed Galerius to keep his son Constantine as a hostage for his good behavior.

In the remainder of the time that he was a Caesar, Constantius spent much of his time engaged in military actions in the west. In the summer of 293 Constantius expelled the troops of the usurper Carausius from northern Gaul; after Constantius' attack on Bononia (Boulogne), Carausius was murdered. At the same time he dealt with the unrest of the Germans. In 296 he invaded Britain and put down the revolt of the usurper Allectus. Between 300 and 305 A.D. the Caesar campaigned successfully several times with various German tribes. It is worth noting in passing, that while his colleagues rigidly enforced the "Great Persecution in 303," Constantius limited his action to knocking down a few churches.

Constantius as Augustus and His Untimely Death

On 1 May 305 Diocletian, at Nicomedia, and Maximianus Herculius, at Mediolanum (Milan), divested themselves of the purple, probably because of the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian forced Maximianus to abdicate. They appointed as their successors Constantius and Galerius, with Severus and Maximinus Daia as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Constantius, as had his predecessor, ruled in the west, while Galerius and Daia ruled in the east. Almost as soon as he was appointed Augustus, he crossed to Britain to face incursions by the Picts where he died at York on 25 July 306 with his son (Constantine I, known to history as “The Great”) at his side.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
MaxentiusRIC163.jpg
1307a, Maxentius, February 307 - 28 October 312 A.D.68 viewsBronze follis, RIC 163, aEF, Rome mint, 5.712g, 25.6mm, 0o, summer 307 A.D.; obverse MAXENTIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse CONSERVATO-RES VRB SVAE, Roma holding globe and scepter, seated in hexastyle temple, RT in ex; rare. Ex FORVM; Ex Maridvnvm


De Imperatoribus Romanis : An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Maxentius (306-312 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius, more commonly known as Maxentius, was the child of the Emperor Maximianus Herculius and the Syrian, Eutropia; he was born ca. 278 A.D. After Galerius' appointment to the rank of Caesar on 1 March 293, Maxentius married Galerius' daughter Valeria Maximilla, who bore him a son named Romulus and another son whose name is unknown. Due to his haughty nature and bad disposition, Maxentius could seldom agree with his father or his father-in-law; Galerius' and Maximianus Herculius' aversion to Maxentius prevented the young man from becoming a Caesar in 305. Little else is known of Maxentius' private life prior to his accession and, although there is some evidence that it was spent in idleness, he did become a Senator.

On 28 October 306 Maxentius was acclaimed emperor, although he was politically astute enough not to use the title Augustus; like the Emperor Augustus, he called himself princeps. It was not until the summer of 307 that he started using the title Augustus and started offending other claimants to the imperial throne. He was enthroned by the plebs and the Praetorians. At the time of his acclamation Maxentius was at a public villa on the Via Labicana. He strengthened his position with promises of riches for those who helped him obtain his objective. He forced his father Maximianus Herculius to affirm his son's acclamation in order to give his regime a facade of legitimacy. His realm included Italy, Africa, Sardinia, and Corsica. As soon as Galerius learned about the acclamation of Herculius' son, he dispatched the Emperor Severus to quell the rebellion. With the help of his father and Severus' own troops, Maxentius' took his enemy prisoner.

When Severus died, Galerius was determined to avenge his death. In the early summer of 307 the Augustus invaded Italy; he advanced to the south and encamped at Interamna near the Tiber. His attempt to besiege the city was abortive because his army was not large enough to encompass the city's fortifications. Negotiations between Maxentius and Galerius broke down when the emperor discovered that the usurper was trying to win over his troops. Galerius' troops were open to Maxentius' promises because they were fighting a civil war between members of the same family; some of the soldiers went over to the enemy. Not trusting his own troops, Galerius withdrew. During its retreat, Galerius' army ravaged the Italian countryside as it was returning to its original base. If it was not enough that Maxentius had to deal with the havoc created by the ineffectual invasions of Severus and Galerius, he also had to deal with his father's attempts to regain the throne between 308 and 310. When Maximianus Herculius was unable to regain power by pushing his son off his throne, he attempted to win over Constantine to his cause. When this plan failed, he tried to win Diocletian over to his side at Carnuntum in October and November 308. Frustrated at every turn, Herculius returned to his son-in-law Constantine's side in Gaul where he died in 310, having been implicated in a plot against his son-in-law. Maxentius' control of the situation was weakened by the revolt of L. Domitius Alexander in 308. Although the revolt only lasted until the end of 309, it drastically cut the size of the grain supply availble for Rome. Maxentius' rule collapsed when he died on 27 October 312 in an engagement he had with the Emperor Constantine at the Milvian Bridge after the latter had invaded his realm.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
Lcnius1.jpg
1308b, Licinius I, 308 - 324 A.D. (Siscia)62 viewsLicinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D. Bronze follis, RIC 4, F, Siscia, 3.257g, 21.6mm, 0o, 313 - 315 A.D. Obverse: IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; Reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and scepter, eagle with wreath in beak left, E right, SIS in exergue.



De Imperatoribus Romanis : An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Licinius (308-324 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Licinius' Heritage

Valerius Licinianus Licinius, more commonly known as Licinius, may have been born ca. 265. Of peasant origin, his family was from Dacia. A close friend and comrade of arms of the Emperor Galerius, he accompanied him on his Persian expedition in 297. When campaigns by Severus and Galerius in late 306 or early 307 and in the summer of 307, respectively, failed to dislodge Maxentius who, with the luke warm support of his father Maximianus Herculius, was acclaimed princeps on 28 October 306, he was sent by the eastern emperor to Maxentius as an ambassador; the diplomatic mission, however, failed because the usurper refused to submit to the authority of his father-in-law Galerius. At the Conference of Carnuntum which was held in October or November of 308, Licinius was made an Augustus on 11 November 308; his realm included Thrace, Illyricum, and Pannonia.

Licinius' Early Reign

Although Licinius was initially appointed by Galerius to replace Severus to end the revolt of Maxentius , Licinius (perhaps wisely) made no effort to move against the usurper. In fact, his first attested victory was against the Sarmatians probably in the late spring, but no later than the end of June in 310. When the Emperor Galerius died in 311, Licinius met Maximinus Daia at the Bosporus during the early summer of that year; they concluded a treaty and divided Galerius' realm between them. It was little more than a year later that the Emperor Constantine defeated Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge on 28 October 312. After the defeat of the usurper, Constantine and Licinius met at Mediolanum (Milan) where Licinius married the former's sister Constantia; one child was born of this union: Valerius Licinianus Licinius. Licinius had another son, born of a slave woman, whose name is unknown. It appears that both emperors promulgated the so-called Edict of Milan, in which Constantine and Licinius granted Christians the freedom to practice their faith without any interference from the state.

As soon as he seems to have learned about the marital alliance between Licinius and Constantine and the death of Maxentius, who had been his ally, Daia traversed Asia Minor and, in April 313, he crossed the Bosporus and went to Byzantium, which he took from Licinius after an eleven day siege. On 30 April 313 the armies of both emperors clashed on the Campus Ergenus; in the ensuing battle Daia's forces were routed. A last ditch stand by Daia at the Cilician Gates failed; the eastern emperor subsequently died in the area of Tarsus probably in July or August 313. As soon as he arrived in Nicomedeia, Licinius promulgated the Edict of Milan. As soon as he had matters in Nicomedeia straightened out, Licinius campaigned against the Persians in the remaining part of 313 and the opening months of 314.

The First Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine

Once Licinius had defeated Maximinus Daia, the sole rulers of the Roman world were he and Constantine. It is obvious that the marriage of Licinius to Constantia was simply a union of convenience. In any case, there is evidence in the sources that both emperors were looking for an excuse to attack the other. The affair involving Bassianus (the husband of Constantius I's daughter Anastasia ), mentioned in the text of Anonymus Valesianus (5.14ff), may have sparked the falling out between the two emperors. In any case, Constantine' s forces joined battle with those of Licinius at Cibalae in Pannonia on 8 October 314. When the battle was over, Constantine prevailed; his victory, however, was Pyrrhic. Both emperors had been involved in exhausting military campaigns in the previous year and the months leading up to Cibalae and each of their realms had expanded so fast that their manpower reserves must have been stretched to the limit. Both men retreated to their own territory to lick their wounds. It may well be that the two emperors made an agreement, which has left no direct trace in the historical record, which would effectively restore the status quo.

Both emperors were variously engaged in different activities between 315 and 316. In addition to campaigning against the Germans while residing in Augusta Treverorum (Trier) in 315, Constantine dealt with aspects of the Donatist controversy; he also traveled to Rome where he celebrated his Decennalia. Licinius, possibly residing at Sirmium, was probably waging war against the Goths. Although not much else is known about Licinius' activities during this period, it is probable that he spent much of his time preparing for his impending war against Constantine; the latter,who spent the spring and summer of 316 in Augusta Treverorum, was probably doing much the same thing. In any case, by December 316, the western emperor was in Sardica with his army. Sometime between 1 December and 28 February 317, both emperors' armies joined battle on the Campus Ardiensis; as was the case in the previous engagement, Constantine' s forces were victorious. On 1 March 317, both sides agreed to a cessation of hostilities; possibly because of the intervention of his wife Constantia, Licinius was able to keep his throne, although he had to agree to the execution of his colleague Valens, who the eastern emperor had appointed as his colleague before the battle, as well as to cede some of his territory to his brother-in-law.

Licinius and the Christians

Although the historical record is not completely clear, Licinius seems to have campaigned against the Sarmatians in 318. He also appears to have been in Byzantium in the summer of 318 and later in June 323. Beyond these few facts, not much else is known about his residences until mid summer of 324. Although he and Constantine had issued the Edict of Milan in early 313, Licinius turned on the Christians in his realm seemingly in 320. The first law that Licinius issued prevented bishops from communicating with each other and from holding synods to discuss matters of interest to them. The second law prohibited men and women from attending services together and young girls from receiving instruction from their bishop or schools. When this law was issued, he also gave orders that Christians could hold services only outside of city walls. Additionally, he deprived officers in the army of their commissions if they did not sacrifice to the gods. Licinius may have been trying to incite Constantine to attack him. In any case, the growing tension between the two rulers is reflected in the consular Fasti of the period.

The Second Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine and Licinius' Death

War actually broke out in 321 when Constantine pursued some Sarmatians, who had been ravaging some territory in his realm, across the Danube. When he checked a similar invasion of the Goths, who were devastating Thrace, Licinius complained that Constantine had broken the treaty between them. Having assembled a fleet and army at Thessalonica, Constantine advanced toward Adrianople. Licinius engaged the forces of his brother-in-law near the banks of the Hebrus River on 3 July 324 where he was routed; with as many men as he could gather, he headed for his fleet which was in the Hellespont. Those of his soldiers who were not killed or put to flight, surrendered to the enemy. Licinius fled to Byzantium, where he was besieged by Constantine. Licinius' fleet, under the command of the admiral Abantus, was overcome by bad weather and by Constantine' s fleet which was under the command of his son Crispus. Hard pressed in Byzantium, Licinius abandoned the city to his rival and fled to Chalcedon in Bithynia. Leaving Martinianus, his former magister officiorum and now his co-ruler, to impede Constantine' s progress, Licinius regrouped his forces and engaged his enemy at Chrysopolis where he was again routed on 18 September 324. He fled to Nicomedeia which Constantine began to besiege. On the next day Licinius abdicated and was sent to Thessalonica, where he was kept under house arrest. Both Licinius and his associate were put to death by Constantine. Martinianus may have been put to death before the end of 324, whereas Licinius was not put to death until the spring of 325. Rumors circulated that Licinius had been put to death because he attempted another rebellion against Constantine.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
Licin1AEFolJupiAlex.jpg
1308c, Licinius I, 308-324 A.D. (Alexandria)71 viewsLicinius I, 308-324 A.D. AE Follis, 3.60g, VF, 315 A.D., Alexandria. Obverse: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG - Laureate head right; Reverse: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI AVGG - Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on a globe and scepter; exergue: ALE / (wreath) over "B" over "N." Ref: RIC VII, 10 (B = r2) Rare, page 705 - Hunterian Museum, Glasgow, Scotland.


De Imperatoribus Romanis : An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Licinius (308-324 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Licinius' Heritage

Valerius Licinianus Licinius, more commonly known as Licinius, may have been born ca. 265. Of peasant origin, his family was from Dacia. A close friend and comrade of arms of the Emperor Galerius, he accompanied him on his Persian expedition in 297. When campaigns by Severus and Galerius in late 306 or early 307 and in the summer of 307, respectively, failed to dislodge Maxentius who, with the luke warm support of his father Maximianus Herculius, was acclaimed princeps on 28 October 306, he was sent by the eastern emperor to Maxentius as an ambassador; the diplomatic mission, however, failed because the usurper refused to submit to the authority of his father-in-law Galerius. At the Conference of Carnuntum which was held in October or November of 308, Licinius was made an Augustus on 11 November 308; his realm included Thrace, Illyricum, and Pannonia.

Licinius' Early Reign

Although Licinius was initially appointed by Galerius to replace Severus to end the revolt of Maxentius , Licinius (perhaps wisely) made no effort to move against the usurper. In fact, his first attested victory was against the Sarmatians probably in the late spring, but no later than the end of June in 310. When the Emperor Galerius died in 311, Licinius met Maximinus Daia at the Bosporus during the early summer of that year; they concluded a treaty and divided Galerius' realm between them. It was little more than a year later that the Emperor Constantine defeated Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge on 28 October 312. After the defeat of the usurper, Constantine and Licinius met at Mediolanum (Milan) where Licinius married the former's sister Constantia; one child was born of this union: Valerius Licinianus Licinius. Licinius had another son, born of a slave woman, whose name is unknown. It appears that both emperors promulgated the so-called Edict of Milan, in which Constantine and Licinius granted Christians the freedom to practice their faith without any interference from the state.

As soon as he seems to have learned about the marital alliance between Licinius and Constantine and the death of Maxentius, who had been his ally, Daia traversed Asia Minor and, in April 313, he crossed the Bosporus and went to Byzantium, which he took from Licinius after an eleven day siege. On 30 April 313 the armies of both emperors clashed on the Campus Ergenus; in the ensuing battle Daia's forces were routed. A last ditch stand by Daia at the Cilician Gates failed; the eastern emperor subsequently died in the area of Tarsus probably in July or August 313. As soon as he arrived in Nicomedeia, Licinius promulgated the Edict of Milan. As soon as he had matters in Nicomedeia straightened out, Licinius campaigned against the Persians in the remaining part of 313 and the opening months of 314.

The First Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine

Once Licinius had defeated Maximinus Daia, the sole rulers of the Roman world were he and Constantine. It is obvious that the marriage of Licinius to Constantia was simply a union of convenience. In any case, there is evidence in the sources that both emperors were looking for an excuse to attack the other. The affair involving Bassianus (the husband of Constantius I's daughter Anastasia ), mentioned in the text of Anonymus Valesianus (5.14ff), may have sparked the falling out between the two emperors. In any case, Constantine' s forces joined battle with those of Licinius at Cibalae in Pannonia on 8 October 314. When the battle was over, Constantine prevailed; his victory, however, was Pyrrhic. Both emperors had been involved in exhausting military campaigns in the previous year and the months leading up to Cibalae and each of their realms had expanded so fast that their manpower reserves must have been stretched to the limit. Both men retreated to their own territory to lick their wounds. It may well be that the two emperors made an agreement, which has left no direct trace in the historical record, which would effectively restore the status quo.

Both emperors were variously engaged in different activities between 315 and 316. In addition to campaigning against the Germans while residing in Augusta Treverorum (Trier) in 315, Constantine dealt with aspects of the Donatist controversy; he also traveled to Rome where he celebrated his Decennalia. Licinius, possibly residing at Sirmium, was probably waging war against the Goths. Although not much else is known about Licinius' activities during this period, it is probable that he spent much of his time preparing for his impending war against Constantine; the latter,who spent the spring and summer of 316 in Augusta Treverorum, was probably doing much the same thing. In any case, by December 316, the western emperor was in Sardica with his army. Sometime between 1 December and 28 February 317, both emperors' armies joined battle on the Campus Ardiensis; as was the case in the previous engagement, Constantine' s forces were victorious. On 1 March 317, both sides agreed to a cessation of hostilities; possibly because of the intervention of his wife Constantia, Licinius was able to keep his throne, although he had to agree to the execution of his colleague Valens, who the eastern emperor had appointed as his colleague before the battle, as well as to cede some of his territory to his brother-in-law.

Licinius and the Christians

Although the historical record is not completely clear, Licinius seems to have campaigned against the Sarmatians in 318. He also appears to have been in Byzantium in the summer of 318 and later in June 323. Beyond these few facts, not much else is known about his residences until mid summer of 324. Although he and Constantine had issued the Edict of Milan in early 313, Licinius turned on the Christians in his realm seemingly in 320. The first law that Licinius issued prevented bishops from communicating with each other and from holding synods to discuss matters of interest to them. The second law prohibited men and women from attending services together and young girls from receiving instruction from their bishop or schools. When this law was issued, he also gave orders that Christians could hold services only outside of city walls. Additionally, he deprived officers in the army of their commissions if they did not sacrifice to the gods. Licinius may have been trying to incite Constantine to attack him. In any case, the growing tension between the two rulers is reflected in the consular Fasti of the period.

The Second Civil War Between Licinius and Constantine and Licinius' Death

War actually broke out in 321 when Constantine pursued some Sarmatians, who had been ravaging some territory in his realm, across the Danube. When he checked a similar invasion of the Goths, who were devastating Thrace, Licinius complained that Constantine had broken the treaty between them. Having assembled a fleet and army at Thessalonica, Constantine advanced toward Adrianople. Licinius engaged the forces of his brother-in-law near the banks of the Hebrus River on 3 July 324 where he was routed; with as many men as he could gather, he headed for his fleet which was in the Hellespont. Those of his soldiers who were not killed or put to flight, surrendered to the enemy. Licinius fled to Byzantium, where he was besieged by Constantine. Licinius' fleet, under the command of the admiral Abantus, was overcome by bad weather and by Constantine' s fleet which was under the command of his son Crispus. Hard pressed in Byzantium, Licinius abandoned the city to his rival and fled to Chalcedon in Bithynia. Leaving Martinianus, his former magister officiorum and now his co-ruler, to impede Constantine' s progress, Licinius regrouped his forces and engaged his enemy at Chrysopolis where he was again routed on 18 September 324. He fled to Nicomedeia which Constantine began to besiege. On the next day Licinius abdicated and was sent to Thessalonica, where he was kept under house arrest. Both Licinius and his associate were put to death by Constantine. Martinianus may have been put to death before the end of 324, whereas Licinius was not put to death until the spring of 325. Rumors circulated that Licinius had been put to death because he attempted another rebellion against Constantine.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
Denario_Neron_RIC_69.jpg
14 - 16 - NERON (54 - 68 D.C.) 72 viewsAR Denario 3,07 gr.

Anv: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P P - Cabeza laureada a derecha.
Rev: IVPPITER CVSTOS - Júpiter sentado hacia la izq., portando trueno en mano derecha y largo cetro vertical en der..

Esta emisión se realiza para agradecerle a Júpiter El Guardian (CVSTOS), el haber actuado para salvarlo de la famosa Conspiración Pisoniana , según Nerón únicamente la intervención divina de Éste pudo evitar su muerte, nombrándolo de aquí en adelante como protector del Imperio Romano.
La Conspiración Pisoniana: Luego del incendio del centro de Roma acaecido en el 64 D.C., recordemos la imagen de Nerón tocando la lira mientras se quemaba Roma, Nerón comienza la construcción en el sector quemado del Domus Aurea o Casa Dorada, nombre recibido por los azulejos dorados en su fachada; Este y otros excesos del Emperador hacen que se forme una conspiración para derrocarlo y colocar en su lugar a Gaius Calpurnius Piso / Cayo Calpurnio Pisón, político perteneciente a una noble familia romana, contando con el apoyo de senadores y personajes cercanos al Emperador como Petronio, Lucano, Séneca, y Faenio Rufo, comandante de la Guardia Pretoriana. Cuando la conspiración fue descubierta Cayo Calpurnio Pisón optó por quitarse la vida. Esta Conspiración había sido preparada para el 19 de abril de 65 d. C., en el templo del dios Sol (vecino al Circo Máximo). El arma homicida había sido escondida en el templo de Ceres y el autor era un hombre de la clase de los senadores llamado Escevino, la conspiración fracasa cuando un esclavo de este último le cuenta al Emperador de las intenciones de su amo.

Acuñada: 67 - 68 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC I # 69 Pag.154 - Cohen I #122 Pag.200 - DVM #8 Pag.85 - BMC #80
mdelvalle
RIC_69_Denario_Neron.jpg
14-06 - NERON (54 - 68 D.C.) 23 viewsAR Denario 18.6 mm 3,07 gr.

Anv: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P P - Cabeza laureada a derecha.
Rev: IVPPITER CVSTOS - Júpiter sentado hacia la izq., portando trueno en mano derecha y largo cetro vertical en der..

Esta emisión se realiza para agradecerle a Júpiter El Guardian (CVSTOS), el haber actuado para salvarlo de la famosa Conspiración Pisoniana , según Nerón únicamente la intervención divina de Éste pudo evitar su muerte, nombrándolo de aquí en adelante como protector del Imperio Romano.
La Conspiración Pisoniana: Luego del incendio del centro de Roma acaecido en el 64 D.C., recordemos la imagen de Nerón tocando la lira mientras se quemaba Roma, Nerón comienza la construcción en el sector quemado del Domus Aurea o Casa Dorada, nombre recibido por los azulejos dorados en su fachada; Este y otros excesos del Emperador hacen que se forme una conspiración para derrocarlo y colocar en su lugar a Gaius Calpurnius Piso / Cayo Calpurnio Pisón, político perteneciente a una noble familia romana, contando con el apoyo de senadores y personajes cercanos al Emperador como Petronio, Lucano, Séneca, y Faenio Rufo, comandante de la Guardia Pretoriana. Cuando la conspiración fue descubierta Cayo Calpurnio Pisón optó por quitarse la vida. Esta Conspiración había sido preparada para el 19 de abril de 65 d. C., en el templo del dios Sol (vecino al Circo Máximo). El arma homicida había sido escondida en el templo de Ceres y el autor era un hombre de la clase de los senadores llamado Escevino, la conspiración fracasa cuando un esclavo de este último le cuenta al Emperador de las intenciones de su amo.

Acuñada: 67 - 68 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC I # 69 Pag.154 - Cohen I #122 Pag.200 - DVM #8 Pag.85 - BMC #80 - CBN #239 - Sear RCTV #1943 Pag.384 - RSC II #123 Pag.14
mdelvalle
tiberius as.jpg
14-37 AD - TIBERIUS AE as - struck 22-23 AD39 viewsobv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII (bare head left)
rev: PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXIII around large S.C.
ref: RIC I 44, C.24 (5 frcs), BMC91
9.44gms, 27mm

In 6 AD Tiberius was in Carnuntum military camp. He led at least eight legions (VIII Augusta from Pannonia, XV Apollinaris and XX Valeria Victrix from Illyricum, XXI Rapax from Raetia, XIII Gemina, XIV Gemina and XVI Gallica from Germania Superior and an unknown unit) against king Maroboduus of the Marcomanni in Bohemia (Czechia). At the same time, I Germanica, V Alaudae, XVII, XVIII and XIX, - led by Caius Sentius Saturninus (governor of Germania) -, moved against Maroboduus along the Elbe. Saturninus led his forces across the country of the Chatti, and, cutting his way through the Hercynian forest, joining Tiberius on the north bank of the Danube, and both wanted to make a combined attack within a few leagues from the Marcomannic capital Boviasmum. It was the most grandiose operation that ever conducted by a Roman army, but a rebellion in Illyria obstructed its final execution.
berserker
tiberius_RIC28.jpg
14-37 AD - TIBERIUS AR denarius - struck 14-37 AD53 viewsobv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS (laureate head right)
rev: PONTIF MAXIM (Livia (as Pax) seated right, holding olive-branch and inverted spear; ornate legs to chair)
ref: RIC I 28, RSC 16b (2frcs)
mint: Lugdunum
3,57gms, 18mm

The story of the Tribute Penny may be the best-known Biblical reference to a coin. Tiberius reigned during the ministry of Jesus and it is logical that his silver denarius was the coin used by Christ ("Give unto Caesar that which is Caesar's and give unto the Lord that which is the Lord's"). Although the inscription refers to Tiberius' position as Pontifex Maximus and there are no overt references to Livia, many scholars feel that users of the coins would have associated the figure with Livia and that this association was probably intended by Tiberius. An obligatory issue for collectors.
1 commentsberserker
14-Maximinus-II-Lon-RIC-209b.jpg
14. Maximinus II.14 viewsFollis, 310-312, London mint.
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINUS P F AVG / Laureate bust of Maximinus II.
Reverse: GENIO POP ROM / Genius standing, holding patera and cornucopiae. Star in right field.
Mint mark: PLN
4.69 gm., 21 mm.
RIC #209b; PBCC #40; Sear unlisted.
Callimachus
Julian2VotXConstantinople.jpg
1409a, Julian II "the Philosopher," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.143 viewsJulian II, A.D. 360-363; RIC 167; VF; 2.7g, 20mm; Constantinople mint; Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted & cuirassed bust right, holding spear & shield; Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath; CONSPB in exergue; Attractive green patina. Ex Nemesis.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Julian the Apostate (360-363 A.D.)

Walter E. Roberts, Emory University
Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University

Introduction

The emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus reigned from 360 to 26 June 363, when he was killed fighting against the Persians. Despite his short rule, his emperorship was pivotal in the development of the history of the later Roman empire. This essay is not meant to be a comprehensive look at the various issues central to the reign of Julian and the history of the later empire. Rather, this short work is meant to be a brief history and introduction for the general reader. Julian was the last direct descendent of the Constantinian line to ascend to the purple, and it is one of history's great ironies that he was the last non-Christian emperor. As such, he has been vilified by most Christian sources, beginning with John Chrysostom and Gregory Nazianzus in the later fourth century. This tradition was picked up by the fifth century Eusebian continuators Sozomen, Socrates Scholasticus, and Theodoret and passed on to scholars down through the 20th century. Most contemporary sources, however, paint a much more balanced picture of Julian and his reign. The adoption of Christianity by emperors and society, while still a vital concern, was but one of several issues that concerned Julian.

It is fortunate that extensive writings from Julian himself exist, which help interpret his reign in the light of contemporary evidence. Still extant are some letters, several panegyrics, and a few satires. Other contemporary sources include the soldier Ammianus Marcellinus' history, correspondence between Julian and Libanius of Antioch, several panegyrics, laws from the Theodosian Code, inscriptions, and coinage. These sources show Julian's emphasis on restoration. He saw himself as the restorer of the traditional values of Roman society. Of course much of this was rhetoric, meant to defend Julian against charges that he was a usurper. At the same time this theme of restoration was central to all emperors of the fourth century. Julian thought that he was the one emperor who could regain what was viewed as the lost glory of the Roman empire. To achieve this goal he courted select groups of social elites to get across his message of restoration. This was the way that emperors functioned in the fourth century. By choosing whom to include in the sharing of power, they sought to shape society.

Early Life

Julian was born at Constantinople in 331. His father was Julius Constantius, half-brother of the emperor Constantine through Constantius Chlorus, and his mother was Basilina, Julius' second wife. Julian had two half-brothers via Julius' first marriage. One of these was Gallus, who played a major role in Julian's life. Julian appeared destined for a bright future via his father's connection to the Constantinian house. After many years of tense relations with his three half-brothers, Constantine seemed to have welcomed them into the fold of the imperial family. From 333 to 335, Constantine conferred a series of honors upon his three half-siblings, including appointing Julius Constantius as one of the consuls for 335. Julian's mother was equally distinguished. Ammianus related that she was from a noble family. This is supported by Libanius, who claimed that she was the daughter of Julius Julianus, a Praetorian Prefect under Licinius, who was such a model of administrative virtue that he was pardoned and honored by Constantine.

Despite the fact that his mother died shortly after giving birth to him, Julian experienced an idyllic early childhood. This ended when Constantius II conducted a purge of many of his relatives shortly after Constantine's death in 337, particularly targeting the families of Constantine's half-brothers. ulian and Gallus were spared, probably due to their young age. Julian was put under the care of Mardonius, a Scythian eunuch who had tutored his mother, in 339, and was raised in the Greek philosophical tradition, and probably lived in Nicomedia. Ammianus also supplied the fact that while in Nicomedia, Julian was cared for by the local bishop Eusebius, of whom the future emperor was a distant relation. Julian was educated by some of the most famous names in grammar and rhetoric in the Greek world at that time, including Nicocles and Hecebolius. In 344 Constantius II sent Julian and Gallus to Macellum in Cappadocia, where they remained for six years. In 351, Gallus was made Caesar by Constantius II and Julian was allowed to return to Nicomedia, where he studied under Aedesius, Eusebius, and Chrysanthius, all famed philosophers, and was exposed to the Neo-Platonism that would become such a prominent part of his life. But Julian was most proud of the time he spent studying under Maximus of Ephesus, a noted Neo-Platonic philospher and theurgist. It was Maximus who completed Julian's full-scale conversion to Neo-Platonism. Later, when he was Caesar, Julian told of how he put letters from this philosopher under his pillows so that he would continue to absorb wisdom while he slept, and while campaigning on the Rhine, he sent his speeches to Maximus for approval before letting others hear them. When Gallus was executed in 354 for treason by Constantius II, Julian was summoned to Italy and essentially kept under house arrest at Comum, near Milan, for seven months before Constantius' wife Eusebia convinced the emperor that Julian posed no threat. This allowed Julian to return to Greece and continue his life as a scholar where he studied under the Neo-Platonist Priscus. Julian's life of scholarly pursuit, however, ended abruptly when he was summoned to the imperial court and made Caesar by Constantius II on 6 November 355.

Julian as Caesar

Constantius II realized an essential truth of the empire that had been evident since the time of the Tetrarchy--the empire was too big to be ruled effectively by one man. Julian was pressed into service as Caesar, or subordinate emperor, because an imperial presence was needed in the west, in particular in the Gallic provinces. Julian, due to the emperor's earlier purges, was the only viable candidate of the imperial family left who could act as Caesar. Constantius enjoined Julian with the task of restoring order along the Rhine frontier. A few days after he was made Caesar, Julian was married to Constantius' sister Helena in order to cement the alliance between the two men. On 1 December 355, Julian journeyed north, and in Augusta Taurinorum he learned that Alamannic raiders had destroyed Colonia Agrippina. He then proceeded to Vienne where he spent the winter. At Vienne, he learned that Augustudunum was also under siege, but was being held by a veteran garrison. He made this his first priority, and arrived there on 24 June 356. When he had assured himself that the city was in no immediate danger, he journeyed to Augusta Treverorum via Autessioduram, and from there to Durocortorum where he rendezvoused with his army. Julian had the army stage a series of punitive strikes around the Dieuse region, and then he moved them towards the Argentoratum/Mongontiacum region when word of barbarian incursions reached him.

From there, Julian moved on to Colonia Agrippina, and negotiated a peace with the local barbarian leaders who had assaulted the city. He then wintered at Senonae. He spent the early part of the campaigning season of 357 fighting off besiegers at Senonae, and then conducting operations around Lugdunum and Tres Tabernae. Later that summer, he encountered his watershed moment as a military general. Ammianus went into great detail about Julian's victory over seven rogue Alamannic chieftains near Argentoratum, and Julian himself bragged about it in his later writing. After this battle, the soldiers acclaimed Julian Augustus, but he rejected this title. After mounting a series of follow-up raids into Alamannic territory, he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia, and on the way defeated some Frankish raiders in the Mosa region. Julian considered this campaign one of the major events of his time as Caesar.

Julian began his 358 military campaigns early, hoping to catch the barbarians by surprise. His first target was the Franks in the northern Rhine region. He then proceeded to restore some forts in the Mosa region, but his soldiers threatened to mutiny because they were on short rations and had not been paid their donative since Julian had become Caesar. After he soothed his soldiers, Julian spent the rest of the summer negotiating a peace with various Alamannic leaders in the mid and lower Rhine areas, and retired to winter quarters at Lutetia. In 359, he prepared once again to carry out a series of punitive expeditions against the Alamanni in the Rhine region who were still hostile to the Roman presence. In preparation, the Caesar repopulated seven previously destroyed cities and set them up as supply bases and staging areas. This was done with the help of the people with whom Julian had negotiated a peace the year before. Julian then had a detachment of lightly armed soldiers cross the Rhine near Mogontiacum and conduct a guerilla strike against several chieftains. As a result of these campaigns, Julian was able to negotiate a peace with all but a handful of the Alamannic leaders, and he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia.

Of course, Julian did more than act as a general during his time as Caesar. According to Ammianus, Julian was an able administrator who took steps to correct the injustices of Constantius' appointees. Ammianus related the story of how Julian prevented Florentius, the Praetorian Prefect of Gaul, from raising taxes, and also how Julian actually took over as governor for the province of Belgica Secunda. Hilary, bishop of Poitiers, supported Ammianus' basic assessment of Julian in this regard when he reported that Julian was an able representative of the emperor to the Gallic provincials. There is also epigraphic evidence to support Julian's popularity amongst the provincial elites. An inscription found near Beneventum in Apulia reads:
"To Flavius Claudius Julianus, most noble and sanctified Caesar, from the caring Tocius Maximus, vir clarissimus, for the care of the res publica from Beneventum".

Tocius Maximus, as a vir clarissimus, was at the highest point in the social spectrum and was a leader in his local community. This inscription shows that Julian was successful in establishing a positive image amongst provincial elites while he was Caesar.

Julian Augustus

In early 360, Constantius, driven by jealousy of Julian's success, stripped Julian of many troops and officers, ostensibly because the emperor needed them for his upcoming campaign against the Persians. One of the legions ordered east, the Petulantes, did not want to leave Gaul because the majority of the soldiers in the unit were from this region. As a result they mutinied and hailed Julian as Augustus at Lutetia. Julian refused this acclamation as he had done at Argentoratum earlier, but the soldiers would have none of his denial. They raised him on a shield and adorned him with a neck chain, which had formerly been the possession of the standard-bearer of the Petulantes and symbolized a royal diadem. Julian appeared reluctantly to acquiesce to their wishes, and promised a generous donative. The exact date of his acclamation is unknown, but most scholars put it in February or March. Julian himself supported Ammianus' picture of a jealous Constantius. In his Letter to the Athenians, a document constructed to answer charges that he was a usurper, Julian stated that from the start he, as Caesar, had been meant as a figurehead to the soldiers and provincials. The real power he claimed lay with the generals and officials already present in Gaul. In fact, according to Julian, the generals were charged with watching him as much as the enemy. His account of the actual acclamation closely followed what Ammianus told us, but he stressed even more his reluctance to take power. Julian claimed that he did so only after praying to Zeus for guidance.

Fearing the reaction of Constantius, Julian sent a letter to his fellow emperor justifying the events at Lutetia and trying to arrange a peaceful solution. This letter berated Constantius for forcing the troops in Gaul into an untenable situation. Ammianus stated that Julian's letter blamed Constantius' decision to transfer Gallic legions east as the reason for the soldiers' rebellion. Julian once again asserted that he was an unwilling participant who was only following the desire of the soldiers. In both of these basic accounts Ammianus and Julian are playing upon the theme of restoration. Implicit in their version of Julian's acclamation is the argument that Constantius was unfit to rule. The soldiers were the vehicle of the gods' will. The Letter to the Athenians is full of references to the fact that Julian was assuming the mantle of Augustus at the instigation of the gods. Ammianus summed up this position nicely when he related the story of how, when Julian was agonizing over whether to accept the soldiers' acclamation, he had a dream in which he was visited by the Genius (guardian spirit) of the Roman state. The Genius told Julian that it had often tried to bestow high honors upon Julian but had been rebuffed. Now, the Genius went on to say, was Julian's final chance to take the power that was rightfully his. If the Caesar refused this chance, the Genius would depart forever, and both Julian and the state would rue Julian's rejection. Julian himself wrote a letter to his friend Maximus of Ephesus in November of 361 detailing his thoughts on his proclamation. In this letter, Julian stated that the soldiers proclaimed him Augustus against his will. Julian, however, defended his accession, saying that the gods willed it and that he had treated his enemies with clemency and justice. He went on to say that he led the troops in propitiating the traditional deities, because the gods commanded him to return to the traditional rites, and would reward him if he fulfilled this duty.

During 360 an uneasy peace simmered between the two emperors. Julian spent the 360 campaigning season continuing his efforts to restore order along the Rhine, while Constantius continued operations against the Persians. Julian wintered in Vienne, and celebrated his Quinquennalia. It was at this time that his wife Helena died, and he sent her remains to Rome for a proper burial at his family villa on the Via Nomentana where the body of her sister was entombed. The uneasy peace held through the summer of 361, but Julian concentrated his military operations around harassing the Alamannic chieftain Vadomarius and his allies, who had concluded a peace treaty with Constantius some years earlier. By the end of the summer, Julian decided to put an end to the waiting and gathered his army to march east against Constantius. The empire teetered on the brink of another civil war. Constantius had spent the summer negotiating with the Persians and making preparations for possible military action against his cousin. When he was assured that the Persians would not attack, he summoned his army and sallied forth to meet Julian. As the armies drew inexorably closer to one another, the empire was saved from another bloody civil war when Constantius died unexpectedly of natural causes on 3 November near the town of Mopsucrenae in Cilicia, naming Julian -- the sources say-- as his legitimate successor.

Julian was in Dacia when he learned of his cousin's death. He made his way through Thrace and came to Constantinople on 11 December 361 where Julian honored the emperor with the funeral rites appropriate for a man of his station. Julian immediately set about putting his supporters in positions of power and trimming the imperial bureaucracy, which had become extremely overstaffed during Constantius' reign. Cooks and barbers had increased during the late emperor's reign and Julian expelled them from his court. Ammianus gave a mixed assessment of how the new emperor handled the followers of Constantius. Traditionally, emperors were supposed to show clemency to the supporters of a defeated enemy. Julian, however, gave some men over to death to appease the army. Ammianus used the case of Ursulus, Constantius' comes sacrum largitionum, to illustrate his point. Ursulus had actually tried to acquire money for the Gallic troops when Julian had first been appointed Caesar, but he had also made a disparaging remark about the ineffectiveness of the army after the battle of Amida. The soldiers remembered this, and when Julian became sole Augustus, they demanded Ursulus' head. Julian obliged, much to the disapproval of Ammianus. This seems to be a case of Julian courting the favor of the military leadership, and is indicative of a pattern in which Julian courted the goodwill of various societal elites to legitimize his position as emperor.

Another case in point is the officials who made up the imperial bureaucracy. Many of them were subjected to trial and punishment. To achieve this goal, during the last weeks of December 361 Julian assembled a military tribunal at Chalcedon, empanelling six judges to try the cases. The president of the tribunal was Salutius, just promoted to the rank of Praetorian Prefect; the five other members were Mamertinus, the orator, and four general officers: Jovinus, Agilo, Nevitta, and Arbetio. Relative to the proceedings of the tribunal, Ammianus noted that the judges, " . . . oversaw the cases more vehemently than was right or fair, with the exception of a few . . .." Ammianus' account of Julian's attempt at reform of the imperial bureaucracy is supported by legal evidence from the Theodosian Code. A series of laws sent to Mamertinus, Julian's appointee as Praetorian Prefect in Italy, Illyricum, and Africa, illustrate this point nicely. On 6 June 362, Mamertinus received a law that prohibited provincial governors from bypassing the Vicars when giving their reports to the Prefect. Traditionally, Vicars were given civil authority over a group of provinces, and were in theory meant to serve as a middle step between governors and Prefects. This law suggests that the Vicars were being left out, at least in Illyricum. Julian issued another edict to Mamertinus on 22 February 362 to stop abuse of the public post by governors. According to this law, only Mamertinus could issue post warrants, but the Vicars were given twelve blank warrants to be used as they saw fit, and each governor was given two. Continuing the trend of bureaucratic reform, Julian also imposed penalties on governors who purposefully delayed appeals in court cases they had heard. The emperor also established a new official to weigh solidi used in official government transactions to combat coin clipping.

For Julian, reigning in the abuses of imperial bureaucrats was one step in restoring the prestige of the office of emperor. Because he could not affect all elements of society personally, Julian, like other Neo-Flavian emperors, decided to concentrate on select groups of societal elites as intercessors between himself and the general populace. One of these groups was the imperial bureaucracy. Julian made it very clear that imperial officials were intercessors in a very real sense in a letter to Alypius, Vicar of Britain. In this letter, sent from Gaul sometime before 361, the emperor praises Alypius for his use of "mildness and moderation with courage and force" in his rule of the provincials. Such virtues were characteristic of the emperors, and it was good that Alypius is representing Julian in this way. Julian courted the army because it put him in power. Another group he sought to include in his rule was the traditional Senatorial aristocracy. One of his first appointments as consul was Claudius Mamertinus, a Gallic Senator and rhetorician. Mamertinus' speech in praise of Julian delivered at Constantinople in January of 362 is preserved. In this speech, Claudius presented his consular selection as inaugurating a new golden age and Julian as the restorer of the empire founded by Augustus. The image Mamertinus gave of his own consulate inaugurating a new golden age is not merely formulaic. The comparison of Julian to Augustus has very real, if implicit, relevance to Claudius' situation. Claudius emphasized the imperial period as the true age of renewal. Augustus ushered in a new era with his formation of a partnership between the emperor and the Senate based upon a series of honors and offices bestowed upon the Senate in return for their role as intercessor between emperor and populace. It was this system that Julian was restoring, and the consulate was one concrete example of this bond. To be chosen as a consul by the emperor, who himself had been divinely mandated, was a divine honor. In addition to being named consul, Mamertinus went on to hold several offices under Julian, including the Prefecture of Italy, Illyricum, and Africa. Similarly, inscriptional evidence illustrates a link between municipal elites and Julian during his time as Caesar, something which continued after he became emperor. One concrete example comes from the municipal senate of Aceruntia in Apulia, which established a monument on which Julian is styled as "Repairer of the World."

Julian seems to have given up actual Christian belief before his acclamation as emperor and was a practitioner of more traditional Greco-Roman religious beliefs, in particular, a follower of certain late antique Platonist philosophers who were especially adept at theurgy as was noted earlier. In fact Julian himself spoke of his conversion to Neo-Platonism in a letter to the Alexandrians written in 363. He stated that he had abandoned Christianity when he was twenty years old and been an adherent of the traditional Greco-Roman deities for the twelve years prior to writing this letter.

(For the complete text of this article see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/julian.htm)

Julian’s Persian Campaign

The exact goals Julian had for his ill-fated Persian campaign were never clear. The Sassanid Persians, and before them the Parthians, had been a traditional enemy from the time of the Late Republic, and indeed Constantius had been conducting a war against them before Julian's accession forced the former to forge an uneasy peace. Julian, however, had no concrete reason to reopen hostilities in the east. Socrates Scholasticus attributed Julian's motives to imitation of Alexander the Great, but perhaps the real reason lay in his need to gather the support of the army. Despite his acclamation by the Gallic legions, relations between Julian and the top military officers was uneasy at best. A war against the Persians would have brought prestige and power both to Julian and the army.

Julian set out on his fateful campaign on 5 March 363. Using his trademark strategy of striking quickly and where least expected, he moved his army through Heirapolis and from there speedily across the Euphrates and into the province of Mesopotamia, where he stopped at the town of Batnae. His plan was to eventually return through Armenia and winter in Tarsus. Once in Mesopotamia, Julian was faced with the decision of whether to travel south through the province of Babylonia or cross the Tigris into Assyria, and he eventually decided to move south through Babylonia and turn west into Assyria at a later date. By 27 March, he had the bulk of his army across the Euphrates, and had also arranged a flotilla to guard his supply line along the mighty river. He then left his generals Procopius and Sebastianus to help Arsacius, the king of Armenia and a Roman client, to guard the northern Tigris line. It was also during this time that he received the surrender of many prominent local leaders who had nominally supported the Persians. These men supplied Julian with money and troops for further military action against their former masters. Julian decided to turn south into Babylonia and proceeded along the Euphrates, coming to the fortress of Cercusium at the junction of the Abora and Euphrates Rivers around the first of April, and from there he took his army west to a region called Zaitha near the abandoned town of Dura where they visited the tomb of the emperor Gordian which was in the area. On April 7 he set out from there into the heart of Babylonia and towards Assyria.

Ammianus then stated that Julian and his army crossed into Assyria, which on the face of things appears very confusing. Julian still seems to be operating within the province of Babylonia between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. The confusion is alleviated when one realizes that,for Ammianus, the region of Assyria encompassed the provinces of Babylonia and Assyria. On their march, Julian's forces took the fortress of Anatha, received the surrender and support of several more local princes, and ravaged the countryside of Assyria between the rivers. As the army continued south, they came across the fortresses Thilutha and Achaiachala, but these places were too well defended and Julian decided to leave them alone. Further south were the cities Diacira and Ozogardana, which the Roman forces sacked and burned. Soon, Julian came to Pirisabora and a brief siege ensued, but the city fell and was also looted and destroyed. It was also at this time that the Roman army met its first systematic resistance from the Persians. As the Romans penetrated further south and west, the local inhabitants began to flood their route. Nevertheless, the Roman forces pressed on and came to Maiozamalcha, a sizable city not far from Ctesiphon. After a short siege, this city too fell to Julian. Inexorably, Julian's forces zeroed in on Ctesiphon, but as they drew closer, the Persian resistance grew fiercer, with guerilla raids whittling at Julian's men and supplies. A sizable force of the army was lost and the emperor himself was almost killed taking a fort a few miles from the target city.
Finally, the army approached Ctesiphon following a canal that linked the Tigris and Euphrates. It soon became apparent after a few preliminary skirmishes that a protracted siege would be necessary to take this important city. Many of his generals, however, thought that pursuing this course of action would be foolish. Julian reluctantly agreed, but became enraged by this failure and ordered his fleet to be burned as he decided to march through the province of Assyria. Julian had planned for his army to live off the land, but the Persians employed a scorched-earth policy. When it became apparent that his army would perish (because his supplies were beginning to dwindle) from starvation and the heat if he continued his campaign, and also in the face of superior numbers of the enemy, Julian ordered a retreat on 16 June. As the Roman army retreated, they were constantly harassed by guerilla strikes. It was during one of these raids that Julian got caught up in the fighting and took a spear to his abdomen. Mortally wounded he was carried to his tent, where, after conferring with some of his officers, he died. The date was 26 June 363.

Conclusion

Thus an ignominious end for a man came about who had hoped to restore the glory of the Roman empire during his reign as emperor. Due to his intense hatred of Christianity, the opinion of posterity has not been kind to Julian. The contemporary opinion, however, was overall positive. The evidence shows that Julian was a complex ruler with a definite agenda to use traditional social institutions in order to revive what he saw as a collapsing empire. In the final assessment, he was not so different from any of the other emperors of the fourth century. He was a man grasping desperately to hang on to a Greco-Roman conception of leadership that was undergoing a subtle yet profound change.
Copyright (C) 2002, Walter E. Roberts and Michael DiMaio, Jr. Used by permission.

In reality, Julian worked to promote culture and philosophy in any manifestation. He tried to reduce taxes and the public debts of municipalities; he augmented administrative decentralisation; he promoted a campaign of austerity to reduce public expenditure (setting himself as the example). He reformed the postal service and eliminated the powerful secret police.
by Federico Morando; JULIAN II, The Apostate, http://www.forumancientcoins.com/NumisWiki/view.asp?key=Julian%20II

Flavius Claudius Iulianus was born in 331 or maybe 332 A.D. in Constantinople. He ruled the Western Empire as Caesar from 355 to 360 and was hailed Augustus by his legions in Lutetia (Paris) in 360. Julian was a gifted administrator and military strategist. Famed as the last pagan emperor, his reinstatement of the pagan religion earned him the moniker "the Apostate." As evidenced by his brilliant writing, some of which has survived to the present day, the title "the Philosopher" may have been more appropriate. He died from wounds suffered during the Persian campaign of 363 A.D. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.




2 commentsCleisthenes
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141 - Diocletian - Follis - RIC VI Trier 677a (corr. Cyzicus)70 viewsObv:– D N DIOCLETIANO FELICISSIMO SEN AVG, laureate bust right in imperial mantle, olive branch in right hand, mappa in left
Rev:– PROVIDENTIA DEORVM QVIES AVGG, Providentia standing right, extending right hand to Quies standing left, branch upward in right hand, vertical sceptre in left
Minted in Cyzicus (not Trier) ( S | F / KS //PTR)
Reference:– RIC VI Trier 677a (R) (see notes)
Notes:- This is perhaps one of the most unusual issues in the entire follis series. It is nearly always attributed to Trier (Treveri), but a comparison of portrait styles and an examination of follis hoards reveals that this issue was not struck in Trier but in Cyzicus. Two officinae struck this issue, and the KS in the field between the two figures is actually the mintmark, not the PTR. A look at the coins of Cyzicus (RIC 22-23) shows that the same two officinae struck this issue without the PTR also. The Senior Augustus issues of Diocletian and Maximianus were struck at every mint currently in operation. Apparently, the first coins of this type were prepared at Trier and examples were sent to the various mints for the individual mints to copy. At Cyzicus, the die engravers copied everything, including the Trier mintmark and put their own mintmark in the field. Eventually someone soon realized the mistake and new dies were prepared with the mintmark in its proper location.

Nicely silvered with little / no visible wear.
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141 - Diocletian - RIC VI Alexandria 46a57 viewsObv:– IMP C DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped bust facing right
Rev:– CONCORDIA MILITVM, Diocletian and Maximianus standing facing each other, holding between them globe surmounted by Victory
Minted in Alexandria (B in centre field, ALE in exe.)
References:– RIC VI Alexandria 46a (Common)
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1410a, Jovian, 27 June 363 - 17 February 364 A.D.78 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 179, aVF, Constantinople, 3.126g, 21.6mm, 180o. Obverse: D N IOVIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left; Reverse: VOT V MVLT X within wreath, CONSPG in exergue; scarce.

Flavius Jovianuswas born in 331 at Singidunum, modern Belgrade. His distinguished father, Varronianus, had been a tribune of the legion Ioviani and a comes domesticorum, perhaps under Constantius II, who had retired to private life shortly before Jovian's elevation to the purple. Jovian married a daughter of Lucillianus, perhaps named Charito, and by her produced at least two children.

Jovian himself was a protector domesticus under Constantius II and Julian and, under Julian, primicerius domesticorum. Various Christian sources maintain that Jovian's Christianity led to his deposition by Julian, though most modern scholars dismiss this as ex post facto Christian apologetic. Jovian, recalled to the ranks if he had ever been dismissed, marched with Julian against Sapor in 363, and on 27 June, the day after that emperor's death, was acclaimed Augustus.

Ammianus and Zosimus, among others, detail the difficult straits of the Roman army during its withdrawal from Persian territory, Ammianus from the perspective of a proud soldier confident even in defeat of the superiority of Roman arms, Zosimus, in a much shorter and confused version, concentrating on the predicament of Jovian's troops and on the dire effects to the empire of the peace terms agreed to with Sapor. These terms entailed the cessation to Persia of Roman territory beyond the Tigris -- the cities of Singara and Nisibis, however, to be surrendered on the condition of the safe passage of their inhabitants -- and the guarantee of the neutrality of Rome's ally Arsaces, King of Armenia, in the event of future hostilities between Roman and Persia. Ammianus asserts that in agreeing to these terms Jovian misjudged his tactical strength and wasted an opportunity presented by negotiations with Sapor to move his forces closer to supplies at Corduena, and that Jovian acted on the advise of flatterers to preserve the fighting strength of his forces in the event of an attempt by Julian's relative Procopius to seize the throne. Others present the treaty terms as unavoidable given the Roman predicament.

Jovian appears to have treaded cautiously with regard to religious matters during the early months of his reign. Eunapius says that Jovian continued to honor Maximus and Priscus, the Neoplatonist advisors of Julian, and, upon reaching Tarsus, Jovian performed funeral rites for Julian. Nonetheless, various Christians, most notably Athanasius, took the initiative in an effort to gain Jovian's favor and support. An adherent of the Nicaean creed, Jovian did eventually recall various bishops of homoousian disposition and restore to their followers churches lost under earlier emperors. But in spite of such measures, unity among various Christian sects seems to have been the foremost concern of Jovian, whose ipsissima verba Socrates Scholasticus purports to give: "I abhor contentiousness, but love and honor those hurrying towards unanimity" (Hist. Eccl. 3.25).

Jovian died at the age of thirty-two on 17 February 364 at Dadastana on the boundary of Bithynia and Galatia. The cause of his death was most probably natural and is variously attributed to overeating, the consumption of poisonous mushrooms, or suffocation from fumes of charcoal or of the fresh paint on the room in which he was sleeping. Ammianus' comparison of the circumstances of Jovian's death to those of Scipio Aemilianus suggest the possibility of foul play, as does John of Antioch's reference to a poisoned rather than a poisonous mushroom, while John Chrysostom -- in a highly suspect literary context of consolatio-- asserts outright that the emperor was murdered. Eutropius records that he was enrolled among the gods, inter Divos relatus est. Zonaras says he was buried in the Church of the Holy Apostles and that his wife, Charito, was eventually laid to rest beside him.

Ancient authors agree that Jovian was of modest intellect but imposing physique and disposed to excessive eating and drinking.

By Thomas Banchich, Canisius College
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited By J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
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142 Aelius48 viewsOrichalcum sestertius, RIC II Hadrian 1059, SRCV II 3981, BMCRE III Hadrian 1921, Cohen II 26, aF, Rome mint, weight 25.725g, maximum diameter 31.3mm, die axis 180o, 137 A.D.; obverse L AELIVS CAESAR, bare head right; reverse TR POT COS II, PANNO-NIA and S - C across fields, Pannonia standing facing, head left, holding vexillum in right hand and gathering up drapery in left; scarce; ex forvm5 commentsRandygeki(h2)
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145 Magnus Maximus. AR silique 1.7gm22 viewsobv: DN MAG MAX_IMVS PF AVG pearl dia. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: VIRTUVS RO_MANORVM Roma seated facing, holding globe and reversed spear
ex: TRPS
1 commentshill132
GI 146b img.jpg
146 - Maximian, Billon tetradrachm, Alexandria, Nike, Milne 498526 viewsBillon tetradrachm
Obv:– MAΞIMIANOC CEB, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– None, Nike, advancing right holding wreath and palm. Star in right field.
Minted in Alexandria (L | S).
Reference(s) – Curtis -, BMC -, Milne 4985
1 commentsmaridvnvm
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146 - Maximianu Herculius - RIC VII Sicia 41 10 viewsAE 1/4 Follis
Obv:– DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP, Laureate, veiled head right
Rev:– REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM, Maximianus seated left on a curule chair
Minted in Siscia (//SIS). A.D. 318 – A.D. 319
Reference(s) – RIC VII Sicia 41
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146 - Maximianus - Follis - RIC VI Lugdunum 85 17 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust left, holding club over right shoulder and lion's skin in left hand
Rev:– GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, plain altar beneath.
Minted in Lugdunum (_ | A //PLC). Officina 1. Spring A.D. 300 – A.D. 302
Reference(s) – Bastien 148 (8). RIC VI Lugdunum 85 (Rated S)
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146 - Maximianus - Follis - RIC VI Rome 194b 18 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– CONSERVATO-RES VRB SVAE, Roma seated facing, head left, shield at side, holding globe and sceptre in hexastyle temple with knobs as acroteria
Minted in Rome (//R*S). A.D. 305 to A.D. 306
Reference:– RIC VI Rome 194b (S)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
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146 - Maximianus - Half Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 91a10 viewsHalf follis
Obv:– DN MAXIMIANO FELICIS, Laureate and mantled bust right, holding olive-branch and mappa
Rev:– PROVIDENTIA DEORVM, Providentia standing right, extending hand to Quies standing light, holding branch and leaning on scepter
Minted in Alexandria (Delta //ALE). A.D. 308
Reference:– RIC VI Alexandria 91a
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RI_146do_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II - Bust Type C18 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right (seen from front)
Rev:– IOVI AVGG, Jupiter standing right holding thunderbolt and spear,eagle at feet.
Minted in Lugdunum (//A). Emission 7. Officina 1. Spring A.D. 290 – A.D. 291
Reference(s) – Cohen -. Bastien - (0). RIC V Pt. 2 Lugdunum - Bust Type C. This reverse type not noted in RIC or Bastien for Maximianus Herculius. It is noted in RIC and Bastien for Diocletian (RIC quotes as common, Bastien 300 (1), 301 (1) and 302 (3) would appear to counter this rating)
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146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II - Bust Type F11 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PIETAS AVGG, Pietas standing right, holding patera over altar
Minted in Lugdunum (//B). Emission 7, Officina 2. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
Reference(s) – RIC V pt II -. Cohen -. Voetter -. Bastien 390 (3 examples cited). Would be near RIC 410.
1 commentsMartin Griffiths
RI 146ay img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 346 Bust Type F16 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS • P • F • AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– ABVNDANT AVGG, Abundantia, standing right, empting cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum (Γ in exe). Emission 12 (Second series, short legends), Officina 3. A.D. 294
References:– Cohen 1. RIC V Part 2 346 Bust Type F (Scarce). Bastien Volume VII 661 (2 examples cited).
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RI 146bn img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 348 Bust Type F12 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– AEQVITAS AVGG, Aequitas standing left, holding scales in right hand and cornucopia in left hand
Minted in Lugdunum (B in exe). Emission 7. Officina 1. Spring A.D. 290 – A.D. 291
References:– Cohen 11. RIC V Part 2 348 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 351 (9 examples cited though this example has a reverse legend break not noted in Bastien).
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RI 146ad img~0.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 353 Bust Type F30 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– COMES AVGG, Minerva, standing left, holding spear with left hand on shield
Minted in Lugdunum (C in exe). Emission 8, Officina 3. A.D. 292
References:– RIC V Part 2 353 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 448
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RI 146ap img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 358 Bust Type F27 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FELICIT PVBL, Felicitas standing left, legs grossed, holding caduceus and leaning against column
Minted in Lugdunum (B in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 2. Spring A.D. 290 to A.D. 291
References:– Cohen 95. RIC V Part 2 358 Bust Type F.
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RI 146m img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 365 Bust Type F26 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– HERCVLI INVICTO AVGG, Hercules standing left holding Victory on globe in right and club and lion skin in left
Minted in Lugdunum (S in left field). Emission 5, Officina 2. Autumn A.D. 277 – Autumn A.D. 279
References:– RIC V Part 2 365 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 178.
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RI 146at img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 370 var26 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield
Rev:– HERCVLI INVICTO AVGG, Hercules standing facing, head left, lion-skin over left arm and leaning on club, Victory on globe in right hand
Minted in Lugdunum (S in left field). Emission 5, Officina 2. Autumn A.D. 277 – Autumn A.D. 279
References:– Cohen -. RIC V Part 2 370 var (not listed with this bust type in RIC). Bastien Volume VII 188 (3 3examples cited)
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RI 146bq img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 371 Bust Type C16 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– HERCVLI PACIFERO, Hercules standing left holding branch & club, lion skin over arm.
Minted in Lugdunum (B in left field, SML in exe). Emission 4. Officina 2. start to Summer A.D. 287
References:– Cohen 282. RIC V Part 2 371 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 116 (25 examples cited)
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RI 146bt img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 371 Bust Type C 11 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– HERCVLI PACIFERO, Hercules standing left holding branch & club, lion skin over arm.
Minted in Lugdunum (Δ in left field). Emission 3. Officina 4. Spring A.D. 290 – A.D. 291
References:– Cohen 282. RIC V Part 2 371 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 95 (20 examples cited)
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146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 371 Bust Type C7 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– HERCVLI PACIFERO, Hercules standing left holding branch & club, lion skin over arm.
Minted in Lugdunum (B in left field, SML in exe). Emission 4. Officina 2. start to Summer A.D. 287
References:– Cohen 282. RIC V Part 2 371 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 116 (25 examples cited)
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RI 146bp img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 372 var Bust Type C 7 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– HERCVLI PACIFERO, Hercules standing left holding branch & club, lion skin over arm.
Minted in Lugdunum (Γ in left field). Emission 3. Officina 3. Spring A.D. 290 – A.D. 291
References:– Cohen 280. RIC V Part 2 372 Bust Type C (Not listed with Γ in left field in RIC). Bastien Volume VII 94 (16 examples cited)
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RI 146bm img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 384 Bust Type F17 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, holding victory in right hand and leaning on scepter in left hand, at foot eagle
Minted in Lugdunum (//A). Emission 7. Officina 1. Spring A.D. 290 – A.D. 291
Reference:– Cohen 313. RIC V Pt. 2 384 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII - 331 (9 examples cited).
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RI 146bf img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 386 Bust Type F9 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI AVGG, Jupiter seated left, holding victory on globe in right hand and leaning on scepter in left hand
Minted in Lugdunum (//A). Emission 8. Officina 1. A.D. 292
Reference:– Cohen 323. RIC V Pt. 2 386 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 440 (25 examples cited).
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RI 146ca img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 386 Bust Type F6 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI AVGG, Jupiter seated left, holding victory on globe in right hand and leaning on scepter in left hand
Minted in Lugdunum (//C). Emission 8. Officina 3. A.D. 292
Reference:– Cohen 323. RIC V Pt. 2 386 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 451 (4 examples cited).
maridvnvm
RI 146br img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 388 Bust Type C17 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt in right hand and scepter in left hand.
Minted in Lugdunum (Retrograde C in left field). Emission 2. Officina 3. Spring to Summer A.D. 286
Reference:– Cohen 362. RIC V Pt. 2 Lugdunum 388 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 64 (6 examples cited).
maridvnvm
RI 146bo img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 388 var Bust Type C9 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt in right hand and scepter in left hand.
Minted in Lugdunum (C in left field). Emission 2. Officina 3. Spring to Summer A.D. 286
Reference:– Cohen 362. RIC V Pt. 2 Lugdunum 388 var Bust Type C (Not listed with C in left field in RIC). Bastien Volume VII 60 (9 examples cited).
maridvnvm
RI 146av img a.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 390 Bust Type C (front)19 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear
Rev:– IOVI TVTATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory and scepter, eagle at feet
Minted in Lugdunum (//P). Emission 5, Officina 1. Autumn A.D. 287- Autumn A.D. 289
Reference:– Cohen -. Bastien Volume VII - (unlisted with this bust type in Bastien). RIC V Pt. 2 390
maridvnvm
RI 146au img a.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 390 Bust Type C (rear)17 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear
Rev:– IOVI TVTATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory and scepter, eagle at feet
Minted in Lugdunum (//P). Emission 5, Officina 1. Autumn A.D. 287- Autumn A.D. 289
Reference:– Cohen -. Bastien Volume VII 154 (2 examples cited). RIC V Pt. 2 390
maridvnvm
RI 146bc img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 395 Bust Type F12 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS • P• F • AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AETERN, Pax walking left holding olive-branch and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (A in exe.). Emission 12 (Second series, short legends), Officina 3. A.D. 294
References:– RIC V Part 2 395 Bust Type F (Scarce). Bastien Volume VII 609 (2 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 146ae img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 396 Bust Type F22 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG, Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (S in exe.). Emission 6, Officina 2. Autumn A.D. 289 – Early A.D. 290
References:– RIC V Part 2 396 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 277
maridvnvm
RI 146by img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 396 Bust Type F13 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG, Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (S in exe.). Emission 6, Officina 2. Autumn A.D. 289 – Early A.D. 290
References:– RIC V Part 2 396 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 277
maridvnvm
RI 146ba img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 398 Bust Type C14 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (B in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 2. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 398 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 373 (6 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 146bs img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 398 Bust Type F19 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (C in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 3. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 398 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII - (Not listed in Bastien from this officina)
maridvnvm
RI 146ar img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 398 Bust Type F20 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (B in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 2. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 398 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 374 (15 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 146ai img~0.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 39923 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate bust left in imperial mantle
Rev:– PAX AVGG Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (B in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 2. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 399 (S). Bastien Volume VII 385 (7 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 146p img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 399 Bust Type C27 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (B in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 2. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 399 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 379
maridvnvm
RI 146i img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 399 Bust Type F66 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (B in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 2. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 399 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 380
maridvnvm
RI 146x img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 399 Bust Type F14 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (S in exe.). Emission 6, Officina 2. Autumn A.D. 289 – Early A.D. 290
References:– RIC V Part 2 399 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 285
maridvnvm
RI 146w img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 399 Bust Type H21 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding sceptre surmounted by eagle
Rev:– PAX AVGG Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (B in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 2. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 399 Bust Type H (S). Bastien Volume VII 387
maridvnvm
RI_146dt_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 399 Bust Type H12 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding sceptre surmounted by eagle
Rev:– PAX AVGG Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (B in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 2. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 399 Bust Type H (S). Bastien Volume VII 387
maridvnvm
RI 146aw img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 40420 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, helmeted cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG, Minerva standing left, olive branch upward in right hand, spear in left and resting left hand on shield
Minted in Lugdunum (C in left field, Thunderbolt in exe). Emission 10, Officina 3. 1st March A.D. 293 – 20th November A.D. 293
Reference:– Cohen 427. RIC V Pt. 2 404. Bastien Volume VII 496 (9 examples cited)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 146ax img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 407 Bust Type F13 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG, Pax standing left, olive branch upward in right hand, transverse scepter in left
Minted in Lugdunum (//B). Emission 12, Officina 2. A.D. 294
Reference:– Cohen -. RIC V Pt. 2 407 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 597 (3 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI_146ce_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 408 Bust Type F16 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS • P • F • AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG, Pax standing left, olive branch upward in right hand, scepter in left
Minted in Lugdunum (//A). Emission 12, Officina A. A.D. 294
Reference:– Cohen -. RIC V Pt. 2 408 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 613 (5 examples cited)

Very large flan.
Martin Griffiths
RI_146cz_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 408 Bust Type F4 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS • P • F • AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG, Pax standing left, olive branch upward in right hand, scepter in left
Minted in Lugdunum (//A). Emission 12, Officina A. A.D. 294
Reference:– Cohen -. RIC V Pt. 2 408 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 613 (5 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI_146bg_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 408 Bust Type F14 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS • P • F • AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG, Pax standing left, olive branch upward in right hand, scepter in left
Minted in Lugdunum (//A). Emission 12, Officina A. A.D. 294
Reference:– Cohen -. RIC V Pt. 2 408 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 613 (5 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 146s img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 422 Bust Type C16 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SALVS AVGG, Salus standing right, feeding snake from patera
Minted in Lugdunum (C in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 3. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 422 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 409
maridvnvm
RI 146bb img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 422 Bust Type F11 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SALVS AVGG, Salus standing right, feeding snake from patera
Minted in Lugdunum (C in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 3. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 422 Bust Type F. Bastien Volume VII 410 (62 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 146z img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 422 Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding globe38 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding globe
Rev:– SALVS AVGG, Salus standing right, feeding snake from patera
Minted in Lugdunum (C in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 3. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 422 Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding globe (R). Bastien Volume VII 415

Rare bust. Almost completely silvered. Nicely detailed reverse especially on platter.
maridvnvm
RI 146as img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 422 var Bust Type F22 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SALVS AVGG, Salus standing right, feeding snake from patera
Minted in Lugdunum (Retrograde C in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 3. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 422 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 429 (2 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 146bd img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 422 var Bust Type H10 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding eagle tipped sceptre
Rev:– SALVS AVGG, Salus standing right, feeding snake from patera
Minted in Lugdunum (T in exe.). Emission 6, Officina 3. Autumn A.D. 289 to Early A.D. 290
References:– RIC V Part 2 422 Bust Type H. Bastien Volume VII 297 (8 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI_146cc_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 422 var Bust Type H18 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding eagle tipped sceptre
Rev:– SALVS AVGG, Salus standing right, feeding snake from patera
Minted in Lugdunum (C in exe.). Emission 7, Officina 3. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– RIC V Part 2 422 Bust Type H. Bastien Volume VII 416 (22 examples cited)
Martin Griffiths
RI 146aq img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 428 Bust Type F8 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SECVRIT PERP, Securitas standing right, leaning on column with hand raised to head
Minted in Lugdunum (// P). Emission 6, Officina 1. Autumn A.D. 289 – start A.D. 290
Reference(s) – RIC V Pt. 2 428 Bust Type F. Cohen 531. Bastien VII 264 (5 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI_146de_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 43213 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVGG, Jupiter standing right, holding scepter, clasping hand of Hercules standing left holding club and lion’s skin
Minted in Lugdunum (//C). Emission 2, Officina 3. Spring to Summer A.D. 286
Reference:– Cohen 604. Bastien VII 62 (12). RIC V Pt. 2 432
maridvnvm
RI 146be img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 432 Bust Type C13 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVGG, Jupiter standing right, holding scepter, clasping hand of Hercules standing left holding club and lion’s skin
Minted in Lugdunum (D in centre field). Emission 2, Officina 4. Spring – Summer A.D. 286
References:– Cohen 604. RIC V Part 2 432 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 71 (26 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI_146dv_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 437 Bust Type C8 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVGG, Hercules, standing right, leaning on club, with lion’s skin on rock.
Minted in Lugdunum (Retrograde C|_). Emission 5. Officina 4. Autumn A.D. 287 – Autumn A.D. 289
Reference:– Cohen 565 Bastien 65 (2 examples cited). RIC V Pt. 2 Lugdunum 437

Weight 3.93g. 22.64mm. 180 degrees
maridvnvm
RI 146ab img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 437 corr. Bust Type C25 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVGG, Hercules, standing right, with club and lions skin on rock
Minted in Lugdunum (D in left field). Emission 2, Officina 4. Spring – Summer A.D. 286
References:– RIC V Part 2 437 corr. Bust Type C (RIC notes as D in centre field in error). Bastien Volume VII 67
maridvnvm
RI 146bl img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 437 corr. Bust Type C12 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVGG, Hercules, standing right, with club and lions skin on rock
Minted in Lugdunum (D in left field). Emission 2, Officina 4. Spring – Summer A.D. 286
References:– RIC V Part 2 437 corr. Bust Type C (RIC notes as D in centre field in error). Bastien Volume VII 67
maridvnvm
RI 146ao img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 441 Bust Type F20 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVGG, Hercules, standing right, leaning on club, with lion’s skin on rock
Minted in Lugdunum (// C). Emission 8, Officina 3. A.D. 292
Reference(s) – RIC V Pt. 2 441 Bust Type F. Cohen 567. Bastien XI 456
maridvnvm
RI 146al img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 446 var Bust Type F22 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVGG, Soldier standing left holding olive-branch and spear, beside him shield
Minted in Lugdunum (//C). Emission 7, Officina 3. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
Reference:– RIC V Pt 2 Lugdunum 446. Cohen 557. Bastien XI 423 (3 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 146aj img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 447 Bust Type H12 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding sceptre surmounted by eagle
Rev:– VIRTVS AVGG, Soldier standing left holding olive-branch and spear, beside him shield
Minted in Lugdunum (//III). Emission 11, Officina 3. November to End A.D. 293
Reference:– RIC V Pt 2 Lugdunum 447 Bust Type H. Cohen 556. Bastien VII 581 (7 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI_146dd_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 454 Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right13 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVTI AVGG, Hercules, standing right, with club thrown behind him
Minted in Lugdunum (-). Emission 5. Autumn A.D. 287 – Autumn A.D. 289
Reference(s) – Bastien XI 215. RIC V Pt 2 Lugdunum 454 (S)
maridvnvm
RI 146bz img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 458 Bust Type C11 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Radiate, helmeted cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVTI AVGG, Hercules, standing right, with club thrown behind him
Minted in Lugdunum (No marks). Emission 5. Officina 3. Autumn A.D. 287 – Autumn A.D. 289
Reference:– Cohen -. RIC V Pt. 2 458 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 216 (5 examples cited).
maridvnvm
RI 146az img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 458 Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right47 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Radiate, helmeted cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVTI AVGG, Hercules, standing right, with club thrown behind him
Minted in Lugdunum (No marks). Emission 5. Officina 3. Autumn A.D. 287 – Autumn A.D. 289
Reference:– Cohen 647. Bastien Volume VII 218. RIC V Pt. 2 458 (S)
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 146bk img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 460 Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust left21 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust left
Rev:– VIRTVTI AVGG, Hercules, standing right, with club thrown behind him, being crowned by Victory flying right
Minted in Lugdunum (No marks). Emission 5. Officina 3. Autumn A.D. 287 – Autumn A.D. 289
Reference:– RIC V Pt. 2 Lugdunum 460. Bastien 231 (1 example cited)

Fully silvered with very little sign of wear. A very pleasing example in hand. If only I could improve my photography to show how nice the silvering is
maridvnvm
RI 146ac img~0.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 462 Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right23 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVTI AVGG, Hercules, standing right, with club thrown behind him, being crowned by Victory flying right
Minted in Lugdunum (No marks). Emission 5. Officina 3. Autumn A.D. 287 – Autumn A.D. 289
References:– RIC V Part 2 462 Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right (S) . Bastien Volume VII 233
maridvnvm
RI 146am img~0.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 466 Bust Type H19 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding sceptre surmounted by eagle
Rev:– VOTIS X, Emperors standing face to face sacrificing at altar
Minted in Lugdunum (no marks). Emission 10. 3rd Series. 1st March A.D. 293 – 20th November A.D. 293
References:– RIC V Part 2 466 Bust Type H (S). Bastien 528 (2 examples cited)
maridvnvm
RI 146k img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 506 Bust Type C34 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVAT AVGG, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and scepter
Minted in Rome (XXIZ in exe.) A.D. 285-286
References:– RIC V Part II 506 Bust Type C. Cohen 355
maridvnvm
RI 146bj img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 506 Bust Type C 24 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVAT AVGG, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and scepter
Minted in Rome (XXIA in exe.) A.D. 285-286
References:– RIC V Part II 506 Bust Type C. Cohen 355

A flat strike to the centres but otherwise a very nice coin. Virtually fully silvered.
maridvnvm
RI_146bi_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 506 Bust Type C24 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– CONCORDIA AVGG, Two Concordiae holding hands, one holding cornuciopia.
Minted in Lugdunum (//II). Emission 11, Officina 2. 20th November to end A.D. 293
Reference:– Bastien VII 542 (7 examples cited). RIC V Pt. 2 355 Bust Type F
maridvnvm
RI_146dw_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 506 Bust Type C10 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVAT AVGG, Jupiter, standing left, holding thunderbolt and sceptre.
Minted in Rome (//XXIE). A.D. 285-286
Reference(s) – RIC V Pt. 2 506 Bust Type C (C)

3.67 gms, 23.47mm. 180 degrees.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_146du_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 515 Bust Type F7 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVGG, Hercules walking right, trophy over left shoulder, lion's skin draped over left arm, holding club in right hand
Minted in Rome (//XXIS).
Reference:– RIC V Pt. 2 515 Bust Type F.
maridvnvm
RI 146a img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 55944 viewsObv:– IMP C M A VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVAT, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and spear
Minted in Ticinum (TXXIT in exe.)
References:– RIC V Part II 559
maridvnvm
RI 146j img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 559 15 viewsObv:– IMP C M A VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVAT, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and spear
Minted in Ticinum (PXXIT in exe.)
References:– RIC V Part II 559
maridvnvm
RI_146dx_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 561a Bust Type C12 viewsObv:- IMP C M VAL MAXIMIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right (seen from front)
Rev:- IOVI CONSERVAT, Jupiter standing facing, looking right, holding sceptre in right hand and a thunderbolt in left
Minted in Ticinum; B | _ //XXIT.
Reference:- RIC VI-2, 561a
maridvnvm
RI 146d img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC V pt II 59552 viewsObv:– IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– CONCORDIA MILITVM, Maximianus standing right, holding sceptre and receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter standing left, holding long sceptre
Mint in Heraclea (Γ in centre field, .XXI. in exe.) from A.D. 292 - 295
References:– RIC V Part II 595
maridvnvm
RI 146bx img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI London 1738 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in London (No Marks). Spring A.D. 307
Reference:– RIC VI London 17.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 146ah img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI London 23a21 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae
Minted in London (No marks), From A.D. 300
References:– RIC VI London 23a
maridvnvm
RI 146aa img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI London 6b28 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae
Minted in London (No marks), From A.D. 300
References:– RIC VI London 6b

Lots of residial silvering remaining.
maridvnvm
RI 146bw img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI Lugdunum 043 var (B | _ //PL)23 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in Lugdunum (B | _ //PL). A.D. 296
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum - (RIC 43 var officina not listed in RIC). Bastien XI 63 ii (2)
maridvnvm
RI 146r img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI Lugdunum 092b32 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, plain altar beneath
Minted in Lugdunum (B in right field, PLC in exe.), A.D. 301 – 303
References:– RIC VI Lugdunum 92b. Bastien XI 339 (3 examples)
maridvnvm
RI_146af_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI Lugdunum 108b (_|A)17 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Laureate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, plain altar beneath
Minted in Lugdunum (A in right field, PLC in exe.), A.D. 301 – 303
References:– RIC VI Lugdunum 108b . Bastien Volume XI 322
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RI 146q img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI Lugdunum 108b (_|B)25 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Laureate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, plain altar beneath
Minted in Lugdunum (B in right field, PLC in exe.), A.D. 301 – 303
References:– RIC VI Lugdunum 108b . Bastien Volume XI 342
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RI 146bv img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI Lugdunum 20313 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, plain altar beneath
Minted in Lugdunum (_ | N //PLC). Spring A.D. 307
References:– RIC VI Lugdunum 203. Bastien XI 392 (15 examples cited)
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RI 146ag img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI Lugdunum 234 (Senior Augustus)15 viewsObv:– DN MAXIMIANO P F S AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP ROM, Genius standing left, modius on head, loins draped, right hand holding patera, left hand holding cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum (N in right field, PLG in exe). November to December A.D. 307
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 234 (S) Bastien Volume XI 427 (5 examples)
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RI 146u img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI Lugdunum 253 (Senior Augustus)21 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP ROM, Genius standing left, modius on head, loins draped, right hand holding patera, left hand holding cornucopiae, altar to left
Minted in Lugdunum (// PLC). Autumn A.D. 307 to Summer A.D. 308
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 253 (S) Bastien Volume X1 468
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RI 146bu img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI Lugdunum 288 (Senior Augustus) 8 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP ROM, Genius standing left, modius on head, loins draped, right hand holding patera, left hand holding cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum (CI in left field, H over S in right field, PLC in exe).
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 288
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RI_146df_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI Lugdunum 288 (Senior Augustus)24 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP ROM, Genius standing left, modius on head, loins draped, right hand holding patera, left hand holding cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum (CI in left field, H over S in right field, PLC in exe).
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 288
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 146f img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI Serdica 3b34 viewsObv:– IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate bust facing right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae
Minted in Serdica (Δ in right field, •SM•SD• in exe.), A.D. 303 – 305
References:– RIC VI Serdica 3b

Nearly fully silvered.
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RI 146g img.jpg
146 - Maximianus - RIC VI Trier 16589 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Laureate bust facing right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae
Minted in Trier (A in left field, Γ in right field, TR in exe.) A.D. 296 - 297
References:– RIC VI Trier 165 (Rare)

Nearly fully silvered
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_146cn_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius - Antoninianus - RIC V 369 var20 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– HERCVLI INVICTO AVGG, Hercules standing facing, head left, lion-skin over left arm and leaning on club, Victory on globe in right hand
Minted in Lugdunum (S | _). Emission 5, Officina 1. Autumn A.D. 287- Autumn A.D. 289
Reference:– Cohen -. Bastien XI 181 (1 example cited). RIC V Pt. 2 369 var (Not listed with this bust type in RIC).
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RI_146dg_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius - Antoninianus - RIC V 369 var27 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– HERCVLI INVICTO AVGG, Hercules standing facing, head left, lion-skin over left arm and leaning on club, Victory on globe in right hand
Minted in Lugdunum (S | _). Emission 5, Officina 1. Autumn A.D. 287- Autumn A.D. 289
Reference:– Cohen -. Bastien XI 181 (1 example cited). RIC V Pt. 2 369 var (Not listed with this bust type in RIC).
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_146di_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius - Antoninianus - RIC V 388 var39 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt in right hand and scepter in left hand.
Minted in Lugdunum (C|_). Emission 2. Officina 3. Spring to Summer A.D. 286
Reference:– Cohen 362. Bastien 60 (9 examples cited). RIC V Pt. 2 Lugdunum 388 Bust Type C var (C) (Not listed with C in left field in RIC)
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RI_146cj_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius - Antoninianus - RIC V 58018 viewsObv:- IMP C M A VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:- CONSERVATOR AVGG, Emperor & Hercules sacrificing at altar
Minted in Ticinum. -/-/XXIΓ•ΛI
Reference:- RIC 580

Part of the coded HP - KOY - LI series
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146 - Maximianus Herculius - Antoninianus - RIC V Pt 2, 384a13 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI AVGG, Jupiter seated left, holding victory on globe in right hand and leaning on scepter in left hand
Minted in Lugdunum (//A). Emission 7, Officina 1. Sping A.D. 290 - 291
Reference:– Cohen 319. Bastien XI 332 (7). Voetter p. 57. RIC V Pt. 2 384a (Rated R)

IOVI coins are more usually made for Diocletian with Maximian favouring Hercules. A scarcer military bust type. Virtually fully silvered.
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146 - Maximianus Herculius - Antoninianus - RIC V Pt. 2 -. 23 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, helmeted cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVGG, Minerva standing left, olive branch upward in right hand, spear in left and resting left hand on shield
Minted in Lugdunum (//A). Emission 10, second series, Officina 1. 1st March A.D. 293 – 20th November A.D. 293
Reference(s) – Cohen 427. Bastien XI 503 (15). RIC V Pt. 2 -.
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RI_146dk_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 34b 14 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C MA MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left holding patera and cornucopia
Minted in Alexandria (S | E / P //ALE). A.D. 305 to A.D. 306
Reference(s) – RIC VI Alexandria 34b
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146 - Maximianus Herculius - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 54 21 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– IOVI CONS CAES, Jupiter standing left, holding Victoriola in right hand, leaning on sceptre in left, chlamys over left shoulder
Minted in Alexandria (S | D/P //ALE). A.D. 305 to A.D. 306
Reference:– RIC VI Alexandria 54 (S)
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RI_146cl_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius - Follis - RIC VI Cyzicus 23b 35 viewsObv:– D N MAXIMIANO FELICISSIMO SEN AVG, laureate bust right in imperial mantle, olive branch in right hand, mappa in left
Rev:– PROVIDENTIA DEORVM QVIES AVGG, Providentia standing right, extending right hand to Quies standing left, branch upward in right hand, vertical sceptre in left
Minted in Cyzicus (S | F // KD). A.D. 305-306
Reference:- RIC VI Cyzicus 23b (Scarce)

Nice condition and nearly fully silvered.
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RI_146dj_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius - Follis - RIC VI London 17b21 viewsObv:- IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:- GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left holding patera and cornucopia
Minted in London, A.D. 298-300
Reference:- RIC VI London 17b
28mm, 8.3 grams
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RI_146cg_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius - Follis - RIC VI Lugdunum 108b16 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, plain altar beneath
Minted in Lugdunum (_ | B / PLC). A.D. 289
Reference:– Bastien XI 342 ii (61). RIC VI Lugdunum 108b Bust type B

Weight 9.67g. 28.65mm.
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RI_146ch_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius - Follis - RIC VI Lugdunum 23713 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP ROM, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera.
Minted in Lugdunum (_ | N / PLC). A.D. 307 - 310
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 237 (Scarce)
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146 - Maximianus Herculius - Half Follis - RIC VII Rome 11015 viewsObv:– DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP, veiled and laureate head right
Rev:– MEMORIAE AETERNAE, eagle standing right, looking left, wings spread
Minted in Rome (// RT). A.D. 317-318
Reference:– RIC VII Rome110 (R3)

Divo Maximianus half follis issued by Constantine I A.D. 317-318
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146 - Maximianus Herculius - RIC VI Antioch 112c34 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C M AVR VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO IMP-ERATORIS, Genius standing left holding patera and cornucopia
Minted in Antioch (_ | Theta / E //ANT Dot). Early to Later A.D. 309
Reference:– RIC VI Antioch 112c (R) (Citing Oxford; Apparently a rare issue for Maximianus Herculius and only issued from this officina)
 
6.39 gms. 26.19 mm. 0 degrees. Better than the RIC plate coin (reverse only illustrated).
 
From RIC Notes "A very remarkable innovation, peculiar to this issue, is the reappearance of Herculius (with the long legend Imp C M Aur Val Maximianus P F Aug matching those of Galerius and Licinus, and with cuirassed bust) on rare coins with Genio Imperatoris; this is parallelled at the same time (see RIC VI page 656). Expelled from Italy c. April 308, and rejected at the Carnuntum conference in November 308, Herculius had received ample share in the coinage of Constantine's mints, and it seems that Maximinus (now antagonisitc to both Galerius and Licinius) may have been momentarily willing to demontsrate his hostility by including the name of the man who might still play and anti-Galerian part in the west."
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RI_146ak_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius - RIC VI Lugdunum 014b12 viewsAE Follis
Obv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPV-LI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in Lugdunum (None). c. A.D. 296
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 14b. Bastien XI Annex AN3
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146 - Maximianus Herculius - RIC VI Ticinum 57b 16 viewsFollis
Obv:– D N MAXIMIANO FELICISSIMO SEN AVG, laureate bust right in imperial mantle, olive branch in right hand, mappa in left
Rev:– PROVIDENTIA DEORVM QVIES AVGG, Providentia standing right, extending right hand to Quies standing left, branch upward in right hand, vertical sceptre in left
Minted in Ticinum (_ | Dot // TT). A.D. 305-306
Reference:- RIC VI Ticinum 57b (C). Cohen 489

10.64 gms. 27.80 mm. 0 degrees.
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146 - Maximianus Herculius, Antoninianus - RIC 371 Bust Type C 12 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– HERCVLI PACIFERO, Hercules standing left holding branch & club, lion skin over arm
Minted in Lugdunum (D | _). Emission 3, Officina 4. Spring A.D. 290 – A.D. 291
Reference(s) – Cohen 282. Bastien XI 95 (20). RIC V Pt. 2 371 Bust Type C (C)
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146 - Maximianus Herculius, Antoninianus - RIC 40215 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Radiate, draped bust left (seen from rear), holding shield and spear
Rev:– PAX AVGG, Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (//S). Emission 6, Officina 2. Autumn A.D. 289 to start A.D. 290
Reference:– Cohen 455. Bastien 281 (2 all from same obverse die). RIC 402.

Looking through Bastien this bust would only appear to come from a single die for Maximianus Herculius with just two examples cited so it would appear to be quite scarce.
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146 - Maximianus Herculius, Antoninianus - RIC 42214 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding globe in right hand
Rev:– SALVS AVGG, Salus standing right, feeding snake from patera
Minted in Lugdunum (//C). Emission 7, Officina 3. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291 (Bastien)
Reference:– Cohen 523. Bastien 415 (10 example cited). RIC 422 Radiate bust left in imperial mantle and globe (Scarce)
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RI_146ct_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius, Antoninianus - RIC 60713 viewsObv:– IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right (from rear)
Rev:– CONCORDIA MILITVM, Emperor standing facing right holding parazonium receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter facing left holding sceptre
Minted in Cyzicus (E //XXI).
Reference:– RIC V Pt. 2 607
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RI_146cs_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius, Antoninianus - RIC 62217 viewsObv:– IMP C M AVR VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOV ET HERCV CONSER AVGG, Jupiter facing right holding globe and sceptre, facing Hercules facing left, holding Victory on globe, club and lion's skin
Minted in Antioch (A //XXI dot). A.D. 285-295
Reference:– RIC V Pt. 2 622
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RI_146cv_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius, Antoninianus - RIC 62314 viewsObv:– IMP C M AVR VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, holding sceptre, presenting Victory on globe to Emperor, who is standing right, holding sceptre
Minted in Antioch (Z //XXI).
Reference:– RIC V Pt. 2 623
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RI_146cu_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius, Antoninianus - RIC V pt II Cyzicus 607 Bust Type C13 viewsObv:– IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right (from rear)
Rev:– CONCORDIA MILITVM, Emperor standing facing right holding parazonium receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter facing left holding sceptre
Minted in Cyzicus (S //XXI).
Reference:– RIC V Pt. 2 607
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RI_146cw_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius, Antoninianus - RIC V pt II Lugdunum 39917 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX A-VGG, Pax standing left, with Victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Lugdunum (//B). Emission 7, Officina 2. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
References:– Cohen 443. Bastien 381 (7 examples cited). RIC 399

A scarcer military bust.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_146da_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius, Antoninianus - RIC V pt II Lugdunum 4479 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVGG, Soldier standing left holding olive-branch and spear, beside him shield
Minted in Lugdunum (//C). Emission 7, Officina 3. Spring A.D. 290 A.D. 291
Reference:– Cohen 555. Bastien XI 424 (8 examples cited). RIC V Pt 2 Lugdunum 447 (C)
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RI_146dc_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius, Antoninianus - RIC V pt II Lugdunum 466 Bust Type H 10 viewsObv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding sceptre surmounted by eagle
Rev:– VOTIS X, Emperors standing face to face sacrificing at altar
Minted in Lugdunum (-). Emission 10. 3rd Series. 1st March A.D. 293 – 20th November A.D. 293
Reference:– Cohen 671. Bastien XI 528 (2 examples cited). RIC V Pt 2 Lugdunum 466 Bust Type H (S)
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RI_146cy_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius, Follis - RIC VI Lugdunum 253 18 viewsObv:– IMP C VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP ROM, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera.
Minted in Lugdunum (// PLC). A.D. 307 - 310
Reference:– Bastien XI 468 . RIC VI Lugdunum 253 (Scarce)
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RI_146cx_img.jpg
146 - Maximianus Herculius, Follis - RIC VI Trier 721 16 viewsObv:– D N MAXIMIANO P F S AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO PO ROM, Genius standing left, holding patera in right hand, cornucopia in left
Minted in Trier (S-A//PTR). A.D. 307
References:– RIC VI Trier 721
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_148s_img.jpg
148 - Galerius (as Augustus) - Follis - RIC VI Ticinum 55b16 viewsObv:– IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate lead right
Rev:– FIDES MILITVS, Fides seated left, holding standard in each hand
Minted in Ticinum (_ | . // ST). 1st May A.D. 305 - 25th July A.D. 306
Reference:- RIC VI Ticiunum 55b
A pleasing blue-black patina.

Ex-CNG
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_148v_img~0.jpg
148 - Galerius - AE Follis - RIC VI - Lugdunum 167b 12 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust left, holding scepter over right shoulder
Rev:– GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera over altar
Minted in Lugdunum (_ | A / PLC). A.D. 301 - 303
Reference:– RIC VI Lugdunum 167b
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RI_148w_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - AE Follis - RIC VI - Siscia 98b 10 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, Laureate bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in Siscia (_ | B / *SIS). A.D. 296
Reference:– RIC VI Siscia 98b
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GI_148a_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - Alexandria, Eirene13 viewsBillon tetradrachm
Obv:– GAL MAXIMIANOC K, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– None, Eirene, standing left, holding olive branch and sceptre..
Minted in Alexandria (L| B). A.D. 293
Reference(s) – Curtis -, BMC -, Milne 5106. Emmett 4219 (Year 2) Rated R5
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RI_148t_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - Antoninianus - RIC V Pt 2, 692 Bust Type C20 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Radiate, draped and cuiarassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVGG, Virtus standing left, resting right hand on shield and holding spear
Minted in Lugdunum (// B). 12th issue, second series with short titles. A.D. 294
Reference:- Cohen 211. Bastien 657 (11 examples cited). RIC V Pt. 2 692 Bust Type C
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GI_148b_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - Billon Tetradrachm - Milne 524013 viewsBillon tetradrachm
Obv:– MAXIMIANOC K, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– None, Eagle, standing left, head right, holding wreath in beak, Palm in left field..
Minted in Alexandria (L| D). A.D. 295
Reference(s) – Milne 5240
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RI_148y_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 101a20 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right (divergent wreath ties)
Rev:– GENIO IMPERATORIS, Genius standing left holding patera over lighted altar
Minted in Alexandria (K | G / P // ALE). A.D. 310-311
Reference:– RIC VI Alexandria 101a
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RI_148z_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 43 19 viewsFollis
Obv:– GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right
Rev:– IOVI CONS CAES, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Alexandria (S | B / P // ALE). A.D. 304-305
Reference:– RIC VI Alexandria 43
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RI_148aa_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - Follis - RIC VI Alexandria 8223 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right (divergent ties)
Rev:– VIRTVS EXERCITVS, Mars advancing right, in military dress, holding transverse spear, shield and trophy.
Minted in Alexandria (X | S / K // ALE). A.D. 308-310
Reference:– RIC VI Alexandria 82
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RI_148x_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - Follis - RIC VI Antioch 148a 15 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO IMPERATORIS, Genius standing left holding patera over lighted altar
Minted in Antioch (Creascent | B / ANT). A.D. 310-311
Reference:– RIC VI Antioch 148a

Flan flaw on bust.
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RI_148ah_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC V Pt 2 6796 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI AVGG, Jupiter seated left, holding victory on globe in right hand and leaning on scepter in left hand
Minted in Lugdunum (//I). Emission 11, Officina 3. November to End A.D. 293
Reference(s) – Cohen 115. Bastien -. Bastien Suppl I -. Bastien Suppl II 537 Alpha (2 examples cited). RIC 679 Bust Type C (C)

Rated common in RIC but only 2 examples cited in Bastien Supplement II.

3.96 gms, 23.38 mm. 0 degrees
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RI 148n img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC V pt II 678 Bust Type C24 viewsObv:– GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– CONCORDIA AVGG, Two concordia holding hands, each holding cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum (Club in exe.). Emission 10, Officina 2. 1st March to 20th November A.D. 293
References:– RIC V Part 2 678 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 494
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RI 148m img~0.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC V pt II 678 Bust Type C36 viewsObv:– GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– CONCORDIA AVGG, Two concordia holding hands, each holding cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum (B in exe.). Emission 10, Officina 2. 1st March to 20th November A.D. 293
References:– RIC V Part 2 678 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 512
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RI_148ae_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC V pt II 678 Bust Type C6 viewsObv:– GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– CONCORDIA AVGG, Two concordia holding hands, each holding cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum (B in exe.). Emission 10, Officina 2. 1st March to 20th November A.D. 293
References:– RIC V Part 2 678 Bust Type C. Bastien Volume VII 512

Weight 3.81g. 22.64mm. 180 degrees
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RI_148ab_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI Alexandria 015b12 viewsFollis
Obv:– GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right (parallel ties)
Rev:– GENIO POPV-L-I ROMANI, Genius standing left holding patera
Minted in Alexandria (_ | B // ALE). A.D. 294
Reference:– RIC VI Alexandria 15b
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RI_148af_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI Alexandria 107a16 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right (parallel wreath ties (round ends))
Rev:– GENIO IMPERATORIS, Genius standing left holding patera over lighted altar
Minted in Alexandria (K | B / P // ALE). A.D. 310-311
Reference:– RIC VI Alexandria 107a (C)

Weight 7.55g. 26.06mm. 0 degrees
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 148f img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI Alexandria 7551 viewsAE Follis
Obverse Legend – IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate bust right
Reverse Legend – VIRTVS EX-ERCITVS, Mars, advancing right in military dress, right hand holding spear, left hand holding shield and arms over shoulder
Minted in Alexandria (P in left field, Γ over R in right field, ALE in exe.). Mid A.D. 308
Reference:– RIC VI Alexandria 75 (Scarce)
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148 - Galerius - RIC VI Antioch 055b12 viewsFollis
Obv:– GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO POPV-LI ROMANI, Genius standing left holding patera
Minted in Antioch (K | E / V // ANT). A.D. 300-301
Reference:– RIC VI Antioch 55b

Weight 10.44g. 27.01mm. 0 degrees
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148 - Galerius - RIC VI Antioch 11618 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right
Rev:– VIRTVS EX-ERCITVS, Virtus walking right, holding transverse spear in right hand, trophy over left shoulder
Minted in Antioch (_ | O / D // ANT.). A.D. 309
Reference:– RIC VI Antioch 116

7.05 gms, 23.64 mm. 0 degrees
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RI 148l img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI Carthage 39a19 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate bust right
Rev:– SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing facing, head left, in long robe, holding fruits in both hands
Minted in Carthage (I | _ / B). July A.D. 1st May A.D. 305 to 25th July A.D. 306
Ref:– RIC VI Carthage 39a
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RI 148e img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI Cyzicus 05929 viewsObverse Legend – GAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate bust right
Reverse Legend – VIRTVTI E-X-ERCITVS, Mars, advancing right in military dress, right hand holding spear, left hand holding shield and arms over shoulder
Minted in Cyzicus (A | * / MKV). A.D. 309-310
References:– RIC VI Cyzicus 59 (Scarce)
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RI 148b img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI Heraclea 37a85 viewsObv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate bust right
Rev:– GENIO IMPERATORIS, Genius standing left
Minted in Heraclea mint (.HTA.) Group IV between A.D. 308-309
References:– RIC Heraclea 37a (Common)
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RI_148ai_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI London 50 9 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P F IN AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPV-LI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in London (_). Group II - i. May A.D. 305 - Late A.D. 306 or into Early A.D. 307
Reference(s) – Cohen ?. RIC VI London 50 (R, citing Voetter with a footnote stating that confirmation is needed). LMCC (page 126) 4.03.012

Same die pair as LMCC plate coin and BM example (BM B.54, 9.98g, 6h. ex De Salis 1860)

9.77 gms. 29.01 mm diameter. 180 degree die orientation.
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148 - Galerius - RIC VI Lugdunum 017b14 viewsObv:– G VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Laureate, bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPV-LI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera
Minted in Lugdunum (No marks).
References:– RIC VI Lugdunum 17b (Scarce) (RIC has O/L as C VAL in error). Bastien XI Annex AN9
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148 - Galerius - RIC VI Lugdunum 161b26 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS NOB CS, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POP-VLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, loins draped, right hand holding patera, left hand holding cornucopiae, altar to left
Minted in Lugdunum (A in right field, PLC in exe). A.D. 301 - 303
References:– RIC VI Lugdunum 161b (Rare)
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RI 146n img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI Lugdunum 164b34 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Laureate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, plain altar beneath
Minted in Lugdunum (B in right field, PLC in exe.), A.D. 301 – 303
References:– RIC VI Lugdunum 164b
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RI 148q img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI Lugdunum 164b 13 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Laureate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, plain altar beneath
Minted in Lugdunum (A in right field, PLC in exe.), A.D. 301 – 303
References:– RIC VI Lugdunum 164b
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RI_148u_img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI Lugdunum 164b11 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Laureate cuirassed bust right
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, plain altar beneath
Minted in Lugdunum (A in right field, PLC in exe.), A.D. 301 – 303
References:– RIC VI Lugdunum 164b

Uneven strike. Patchy silvering.
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RI 148p img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI Lugdunum 167b21 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust left holding sceptre in right hand
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, plain altar beneath
Minted in Lugdunum (A in right field, PLC in exe.), A.D. 301 – 303
References:– RIC VI Lugdunum 167b
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148 - Galerius - RIC VI Lugdunum 167b reverse enlargement 12 viewsObv:– MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Laureate, cuirassed bust left holding sceptre in right hand
Rev:– GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, plain altar beneath
Minted in Lugdunum (A in right field, PLC in exe.), A.D. 301 – 303
References:– RIC VI Lugdunum 167b
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148 - Galerius - RIC VI Nicomedia 54a49 viewsObv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO AVGVSTI CMH, Genius standing left
Minted in Nicomedia, (SMNΔ in exe.), Group IVbetween December A.D. 308 and May A.D. 310
References:– RIC VI Nicomedia 54a (Common)
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