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Search results - "Livia"
TIBERIUS-5.jpg
34 viewsTIBERIUS - Provincial AE30 - 18/37 - Utica (Zeugitana)
Obv.: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII
Bare head left
Rev.: C VIBIO MARSO PR COS C CASSIVS FELIX A II VIR
Livia seated left, holding patera and sceptre. D D P P across field (Decreto Decurionvm Permissu Proconsulis)
g. 13,9 mm. 29,5
Sear GIC 302
Maxentius
_DSCCC3710.jpg
18 viewsivus Augustus (died AD 14). Orichalcum dupondius (30mm, 15.45 gm, 6h). Rome, under Claudius, AD 42-50. DIVVS AVGVSTVS, radiate head of the deified Augustus left between S – C /A, Livia seated to left holding grain ears in right hand and long torch wrapped in left arm. RIC (Claudius) 101 (R2). BMCRE (Claudius) 224. Cohen 93. Rare! Boldly struck on a large, heavy flan, from dies of exceptional style. Fantastic portrait and natural chocolate brown patina. Choice Extremely Fine. From The Lexington Collection. Ex UBS 78 (Basel, 9 September 2008), lot 1377. One of the first acts of Claudius, after his accession as emperor, was to propose that the late Livia, wife of Augustus, be deified. The Senate granted this honor in AD AD 42, 13 years after her death, and the appropriate celebrations were made. This attractive coin could be viewed as commemorating the event, depicting the long-deified Augustus along new, with his newly elevated wife. The work of cutting the dies was obviously considered important enough to be given to a master engraver, as both the portrait of Augustus and the graceful image of Livia are of outstanding quality.1 commentsRonald
Livia_prov.jpg
2.5 Livia, Wife of Augustus17 viewsJULIA AUGUSTA (LIVIA)
Cilicia
14-29 AD. Æ 23mm

Draped bust right / Tyche seated right, holding grain ears; river-god swimming right below.

RPC I 4013; SNG Levante 1238; SNG France -.
Rare. Only two specimens cited in RPC.
RI0041
Sosius
47614q00.jpg
3 Tiberius, Utica, Zeugitana, Ex John Quincy Adams Collection30 viewsBronze dupondius, RPC I 739, F, holed, 13.158g, 29.8mm, 90o, Zeugitana, Utica mint, 298 - 30 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG IMP VIII, bare head left; reverse C VIBIO MARSO PRCOS III C SALLVSTIVS IVSTVS II, Livia seated right, scepter in left, patera in extended right, M - M / I - V across fields; with John Quincy Adams Collection tag from the Stack's Sale; scarce
RI0001
Ex John Quincy Adams Collection, 6th President of the United States, and His Descendants, ex Massachusetts Historical Society Collection, ex Stack’s Sale , 5-6 March 1971, lot 763.

Purchased from FORVM
Sosius
Tiberius_and_Livia_RPC_1568.jpg
3 Tiberius and Livia17 viewsTiberius & Livia
AE24 of Thessalonica

Tiberius, Laureate head right / Livia, Head right.

RPC 1568. aF
RI0048
Sosius
Tiberius_Pontif_Maxim.jpg
3 Tiberius Denarius29 viewsTIBERIUS
AR Denarius (3.5 g)
Lugdunum mint, struck 18-35 AD

TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS - Laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM; Livia, as Pax, seated r., holding olive branch & long scepter; ornate chair legs

RIC 30; BMCRE 48; RSC 16a.
Cleaning scratches. Discussed and authenticated on FORVM ancient coins board
RI0051
Sosius
00021x00~0.jpg
39 viewsTiberius. AD 14-37
Æ As (26mm, 9.14 g, 12 h)
Gaul? Imitating Rome mint issue struck AD 21-22
[TI CAESAR DIV]I AVG F AVGVST IMP [VII or VIII]
Bare head right
PONT[IF MAXIM TRIBVN] POTEST XXXIIII
Livia seated right, holding patera and long scepter; SC flanking
Cf. Cohen 19

The authors of RIC I do not recognize this type as being official. Cohen likely saw a similar imitation, assuming it to be an original mint issue.
1 commentsArdatirion
tiberius_denarius_res_trib.jpg
"Tribute Penny"--TIBERIUS95 views14 - 37 AD
minted 18 - 35 AD
AR Denarius ("Tribute Penny")
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG AVGVSTVS; laureate head right
R: PONTIF MAXIM; Livia as Pax, seated right on throne with ornate legs, holding long scepter and olive branch; single line below
Lugdunum mint
RIC 30, RSC 16a
laney
AUGUSTUS_COMMEM_LIVIA~0.jpg
(00040) LIVIA (WITH AUGUSTUS)43 views(wife of Augustus; mother of Tiberius; grandmother of Claudius)
b. 58 BC - d. 29 AD
AUGUSTUS (COMMEMORATIVE, POSTHUMOUS)
UNDER TIBERIUS, 15 - 26 AD
AE 27mm 9.86g
O: RAD HEAD L, STAR ABOVE
R: LIVIA STD R, FEET ON STOOL, HLDG PATERA/ S-C
ROME
laney
normal_tiberius_denarius_res_trib~0.jpg
(00040a) LIVIA (with Tiberius)34 views(wife of Augustus; mother of Tiberius; grandmother of Claudius)
b. 58 BC - d. 29 AD
minted 18 - 35 AD
AR Denarius ("Tribute Penny")
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG AVGVSTVS; laureate head right
R: PONTIF MAXIM; Livia as Pax, seated right on throne with ornate legs, holding long scepter and olive branch; single line below
Lugdunum mint
RIC 30, RSC 16a
laney
tiberius_and_livia_resb~0.jpg
(00040b) LIVIA (with Tiberius)25 viewsb. 58 BC - d. 29 AD
(wife of Augustus; mother of Tiberius; grandmother of Claudius)
struck 14-37 AD
AE 19mm, 8.82 g
O: Laureate head of Tiberius right
R: Veiled and draped bust of Livia r., wearing stephane
Macedonia, Thessalonica; cf RPC 1570
laney
normal_galba_diva_aug_b_res~0.jpg
(00040C) LIVIA (with Galba)25 views(wife of Augustus; mother of Tiberius; grandmother of Claudius; b. 58 BC - d. 29 AD)
struck 68 - 69 AD (posthumous issue)
AR Denarius 3.15 g
O: IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG laureate head right
R: DIVA AVGVSTA Livia standing right, holding patera and scepter
Rome, RIC 186
laney
AUGUSTUS_COMMEM_LIVIA.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS (COMMEMORATIVE, POSTHUMOUS)24 viewsUNDER TIBERIUS, 15 - 26 AD
AE 27mm 9.86g
O: RAD HEAD L, STAR ABOVE
R: LIVIA STD R, FEET ON STOOL, HLDG PATERA/ S-C
ROME
laney
tiberius_denarius_res_c.jpg
(03) TIBERIUS63 views14 - 37 AD
minted 18 - 35 AD
AR Denarius ("Tribute Penny")
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG AVGVSTVS; laureate head right
R: PONTIF MAXIM; Livia as Pax, seated right on throne with ornate legs, holding long scepter and olive branch; single line below
Lugdunum mint
RIC 30, RSC 16a
1 commentslaney
TIBERIUS_FOURREE_RES.jpg
(03) TIBERIUS27 views14 - 37 AD
AR DENARIUS FOUREE (TRIBUTE PENNY) 18 mm 2.82 g
O: LAUREATE HEAD RIGHT
R: LIVIA SEATED RIGHT HOLDING SCEPTER AND BRANCH
ROME
laney
tiberius_and_livia_resb.jpg
(03) TIBERIUS20 views14-37 AD
AE 19mm, 8.82 g
O: Laureate head of Tiberius right
R: Veiled and draped bust of Livia right, wearing stephane
Macedonia, Thessalonica; cf RPC 1570
laney
galba_diva_aug_b_res.jpg
(07) GALBA40 views68 - 69 AD
AR Denarius 3.15 g
O: IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG laureate head right
R: DIVA AVGVSTA Livia standing right, holding patera and scepter
Rome, RIC 186
1 commentslaney
PO_1598_0400_R.jpg
(n.d.) 4 Reales10 viewsn.d. 4 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Philip III (1598 - 1621)
Assayer: R (Baltasar Ramos Leceta; 1605? - 1612)
13.69 grams
Sedwick type: P40
cmcdon0923
PO_1630_0800_T.jpg
(n.d.) 8 Reales6 viewsn.d. 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Philip IV
Assayer: T (Juan Ximez de Tapia; 1629-31)
27.25 grams
Sedwick type: P26
cmcdon0923
Tiberius.jpg
*SOLD*27 viewsTiberius AE 29

Attribution: RPC 738, Zeugitana, Utica
Date: AD 28-29
Obverse: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG IMP VIII, bare head l.
Reverse: C VIBIO MARSO PR COS II SEX TADIVS FAVSTVS IIV, veiled figure of Livia seated r. holding scepter & patera M-M and I-V across fields
Size: 29.3 mm
Weight: 12.38 grams
ex-Forvm
Noah
Galba_-_AE_As_Tarraco_mint.jpg
*SOLD*39 viewsGalba AE As

Attribution: Tarraco mint, Rare
Date: AD 68
Obvese: SER GALBA IMP CAESAR AVG P M TR P P P, laureate head r., globe at point of bust
Reverse: DIVA AVGVSTA, Livia standing l., holding patera & scepter
Noah
liviadupondius.JPG
001. Livia as Salus Dupondius146 viewsLivia, wife of Augustus. AE Dupondius. Rome mint, 22-23AD.
Obv. Draped bust of Livia as Salus, hair in knot behind head SALVS AVGVSTA.
Rev. Large SC, legend around TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG TR POT XXIIII.
BMC 82, RCV 1740. RCV F: £175. VF £450. gVF.
1 commentsLordBest
0025.jpg
0025 - Denarius Tiberius 14-37 AC37 viewsObv/TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, Tiberius laureate head r.
Rev/PONTIF MAXIM, female figure (Livia or Pax) seated r., r. holding long vertical sceptre, l. branch, on chair with plain legs above double line.

Ag, 19.0mm, 3.70g
Mint: Lugdunum.
RIC I/26 [C] - RCV 1763 - BMCRE 34 - CBN 16 - RSC 16
ex-Áureo, auction 25 apr 2007, lot 1019
1 commentsdafnis
0028.jpg
0028 - Denarius Antoninus Pius 158-9 AC19 viewsObv/ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P XXII, Antoninus Pius laureate head r.
Rev/TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST, octastyle temple in which are seated statues of Divus Augustus and Livia.

Ag, 17.0mm, 3.30g
Mint: Rome.
RIC III/290a [S] - RSC 804 - BMCRE 939
ex-Pars Coins (vcoins)
dafnis
coin289.JPG
002b. Livia48 viewsLivia, as history most often knows her, was the wife of Augustus for over fifty years, from 38 BC until his death in AD 14 , an astonishingly long time in view of life expectancy in ancient Rome. Although certainty about their inner lives and proof for what we would consider a loving relationship is necessarily lost to us, we can infer genuine loyalty and mutual respect between the two. They remained married despite the fact that she bore him no child. Livia's position as first lady of the imperial household, her own family connections, her confident personality and her private wealth allowed her to exercise power both through Augustus and on her own, during his lifetime and afterward. All the Julio-Claudian emperors were her direct descendants: Tiberius was her son; Gaius (Caligula), her great-grandson; Claudius, her grandson; Nero, her great-great-grandson.

Tiberius and Livia- Thessalonica, Macedonia/Size: 22.5mm/Reference: RPC 1567
Obverse: TI KAISAR SEBASTOS, bare head of Tiberius right Reverse: QESSALONIKEWN SEBASTOU, draped bust of Livia right.

Ex-Imperial Coins
ecoli
141149.jpg
002c. Gaius and Lucius Caesars65 viewsJulia, daughter of Augustus, who has had no child by Marcellus (she is only sixteen when he dies), is married to Agrippa, a soldier who has long been the emperor's most trusted supporter. They have two sons, Gaius and Lucius, born in 20 and 17 BC. The boys are adopted by the emperor. The intention now, if Augustus dies, is that Agrippa should rule until one of these grandsons is of an age to take control. But Agrippa dies in 12 BC.

Julia has had a total of five children by Agrippa (the two sons adopted by the emperor, two daughters, and another posthumous son, Agrippa Posthumus). She now has one son by Tiberius, but the child dies in infancy.

By 6 BC it is evident that Tiberius is being set aside. Julia refuses to live with him, and her eldest son Gaius (at the age of fourteen) is given a nominal high appointment as consul. Gaius and Lucius Caesar, grandsons and adopted sons of the emperor, are now clearly the family members in line for the succession. But they die young, Lucius Caesar in AD 2 and then Gaius in AD 4.

LYDIA, Magnesia ad Sipylum. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. Æ 19mm (4.93 g). Jugate heads of Augustus and Livia right / Confronted heads of Gaius and Lucius Caesars. RPC 2449. Fair. Rare. Ex-Cng
ecoli
2CrXTmC384gPtZ9JYce56FzdZ8pRzK.jpg
002d. Julia and Livia, Pergamon, Mysia43 viewsBronze AE 18, RPC I 2359, SNG Cop 467, aF, weight 3.903 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon mint, obverse ΛIBIAN HPAN CAPINOΣ, draped bust of Livia right; reverse IOYΛIAN AΦPO∆ITHN, draped bust of Julia right; ex Forum, ex Malter Galleries

Julia was Augustus' only natural child, the daughter of his second wife Scribonia. She was born the same day that Octavian divorced Scribonia, to marry Livia.

Julia's tragic destiny was to serve as a pawn in her father's dynastic plans. At age two, she was betrothed to Mark Antony's ten-year-old son, but the fathers' hostility ended the engagement. At age 14, she was married to her cousin but he died two years later. In 21 B.C., Julia married Agrippa, nearly 25 years her elder, Augustus' most trusted general and friend. Augustus had been advised, "You have made him so great that he must either become your son-in-law or be slain." Agrippa died suddenly in 12 B.C. and Julia was married in 11 B.C. to Tiberius.

During her marriages to Agrippa and Tiberius Julia took lovers. In 2 B.C., Julia was arrested for adultery and treason. Augustus declared her marriage null and void. He also asserted in public that she had been plotting against his own life. Reluctant to execute her, Augustus had her exiled, with no men in sight, forbidden even to drink wine. Scribonia, Julia's mother, accompanied her into exile. Five years later, she was allowed to move to Rhegium but Augustus never forgave her. When Tiberius became emperor, he cut off her allowance and put her in solitary confinement in one room in her house. Within months she died from malnutrition.
ecoli
3.jpg
003 Livia. AE dupondus 14gm44 viewsnew RIC I 47 var. with rev. PM
obv: SALVS AVGVSTA bust r.
rev: .TI.CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG P.M.TR.POT.XXIIII. large SC in middle
"wife of Augustus & mother of Tiberius"
2 commentshill132
004.jpg
003 TIBERIUS 14 viewsEMPEROR:Tiberius
DENOMINATION: Denarius
OBVERSE: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right
REVERSE: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, holding long sceptre & olive branch, seated right on throne with ornate legs, single line below
DATE: Ad 14-37
MINT: Lugdunum
WEIGHT: 3.59 g
RIC: I.30 (C)
Barnaba6
coin222.JPG
003. Tiberius (14 AD - 37 AD)68 viewsTiberius.

Hard and secretive by nature and embittered by the neglect with which his step- father allowed him to be treated, he did not arouse personal enthusiasm, and until recently was described by historians as a bloody tyrant. It is only during the last sixty years that he has been more fairly judged, and at present the opinion begins to prevail that he was a genuine Roman, a ruler faithful to his duties, just, wise, and self-contained. The strong opposition which grew up against him was due to his taciturn and domineering disposition, and to the influence of the prefect of the guard, Ælius Sejanus, who alone possessed his confidence.

Lugdunum mint. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right, holding olive branch & long scepter RSC 16a. Ex Calgary
ecoli
Tiberius_AR-Den_TI-CAESAR-DIVI-AVG-F-AVGVSTVS_PONTIF-MAXIM_RIC-29_C-15_Lugdunum_14-37-AD_Q-007_axis-7h_xxmm_x,xxxg-s.jpg
005 Tiberius (14-37 A.D.), RIC I 029, Lugdunum, AR-denarius, PONTIF MAXIM ,Livia, as Pax, seated right,180 views005 Tiberius (14-37 A.D.), RIC I 029, Lugdunum, AR-denarius, PONTIF MAXIM ,Livia, as Pax, seated right,
avers:- TI-CAESAR-DIVI-AVG-F-AVGVSTVS, Laureate head right.
revers:- PONTIF-MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right.
exerg: -, diameter: mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 14-37 A.D., ref: RIC-29, C-15,
Q-001
quadrans
Personajes_Imperiales_1.jpg
01 - Personalities of the Empire86 viewsPompey, Brutus, Julius Caesar, Marc Antony, Augustus, Livia, Caius & Lucius, Agrippa, Nero Claudius Drusus, Germanicus, Agrippina Sr., Tiberius, Drusus and Antonia1 commentsmdelvalle
Tiberius.jpg
02 Tiberius44 viewsTiberius. 14-37 AD. AR Denarius. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right; plain legs to chair. BMCRE 34; RSC 16. Weight, 3.78 g. Die Axis, 6hr.

mix_val
Mac_Escudo_Coronado__Potosi__2_R.jpg
02 - 06 - Virreynato FELIPE II (1556-1598) 113 views"Macuquina del Escudo Coronado"

2 Reales de Plata
27x25 mm

Anv: PHILIPPVS · D · G · HISPANIARVM alrededor del escudo de armas coronado, entre ceca P sobre ensayador R en campo izq. y valor II en campo der.
.
Rev: ET · INDIARVM · REX · alrededor del cuartelado de castillos y leones dentro de orla de ocho lóbulos.

Acuñada: 1572-1576
Ensayador: R - Alonso Rincón
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias:
mdelvalle
Tiberius-RIC-3.jpg
021. Tiberius.23 viewsDenarius, ca 16 - 37 AD, Lugdunum mint.
Obverse: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS / Laureate bust of Tiberius.
Reverse: PONTIF MAXIM / Livia seated, as Pax, holding branch and sceptre.
3.56 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #3; Sear #1763.

Because this is the denarius that was in circulation at the time of Jesus, this coin is often called the "Tribute Penny" -- a name which is derived from the Authorized (King James) Version of the Bible where the word denarius was translated as penny.
Callimachus
Galba-RIC-95.jpg
029. Galba.18 viewsDenarius, 68-69 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG / Laureate bust of Galba.
Reverse: DIVA AVGVSTA / Livia standing, holding patera and sceptre.
3.44 gm., 17 mm.
RIC #4, Sear #2102 var.

The DIVA AVGVSTA on the reverse of this coin is Livia. She was the second wife of Augustus, and the mother of Tiberius. She had a falling out with her son, and became the patroness of the young Galba. When she died, she left him a fortune in her will - certainly a reason to remember her on a coin several decades later.
Callimachus
Mac_Plus_Ultra__Potosi__1_R_1704_Y.jpg
03 - 04 - Virreynato FELIPE V (1700-1746) 80 views"Macuquina con PLVS VLTRA y Columnas sobre ondas de Mar"

1 Real de Plata Ley 917
20x18 mm

Anv: PHILIPPVS V D G HISPANIARVM REX (Felipe V por la gracia de Dios rey de las Españas) la leyenda, al tratarse de una macuquina, no es visible, alrededor de la cruz de Jerusalén con castillos y leones, con I (valor) encima, P (ceca) en campo izq., Y (Ensayador) en campo der. y 704 (fecha) debajo.
Rev: POTOSI EL PERV 1704 La leyenda, al tratarse de una macuquina, no es visible, alrededor de las 2 columnas y entre ellas en 3 líneas valor I entre P (marca de la ceca) e Y (ensayador), 2ª línea PLVS VLTRA, 3ª línea 704 entre Y (ensayador) y P (ceca).

Acuñada: 1704
Ensayador: Y - Diego de Ybarbouro
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Maravedis.net #B-042-4
mdelvalle
Mac_Plus_Ultra__Potosi__2_R_1745.jpg
03 - 06 - Virreynato FELIPE V (1700-1746) 88 views"Macuquina con PLVS VLTRA y Columnas sobre ondas de Mar"

2 Reales de Plata Ley 917
22x25 mm

Anv: PHILIPPVS V D G HISPANIARVM REX (Felipe V por la gracia de Dios rey de las Españas) la leyenda, al tratarse de una macuquina, no es visible, alrededor de la cruz de Jerusalén con castillos y leones, con 2 (valor) encima, P (ceca) en campo izq., Q (Ensayador) en campo der. y 745 (fecha) debajo.
Rev: POTOSI AÑO 1745 EL PERV La leyenda, al tratarse de una macuquina, no es visible, alrededor de las 2 columnas y entre ellas en 3 líneas valor 2 entre P (marca de la ceca) e Q (ensayador), 2ª línea PLVS VLTRA, 3ª línea 745 entre Q (ensayador) y P (ceca).

Acuñada: 1745
Ensayador: Q - Luis de Quintanilla
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC KM#29a Pag.112 - Maravedis.net #B-055-52
mdelvalle
03_Tiberius,_RIC_I_30.jpg
03 02 Tiberius RIC 30152 viewsTiberius. 14-37 A.D. AR Denarius. Lugdunum (Lyon) Mint. 3.78 g., 19 mm. Obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right. Rev: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax, seated right, holding scepter and olive branch. Feet on footstool. Ornate chair legs. One line below throne. RIC I 30, RSC 16a.

The well known "tribute penny." When brought a coin as requested, Jesus asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible.
8 commentsLucas H
Ant_Pius_Ar-Den_ANTONINVS-AVG-PIVS-PP_TEMPLVM-DIV-AVG-REST_COS-IIII_RIC-143_C-809_Roma_145-161-AD_Q-002_axis-6h_16,5-18,5mm_2,75g-s.jpg
035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0143c, Rome, AR-Denarius, TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST, COS-IIII, Temple, Rare!,157 views035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0143c, Rome, AR-Denarius, TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST, COS-IIII, Temple, Rare!,
avers:- ANTONINVS-AVG-PIVS-P-P, Laureate head right
revers:- TEMPLVM-DIV-AVG-REST, Octastyle temple, in which are seated figures of Divus Augustus & Livia, COS-IIII inexergo.
exerg: -/-//COS-IIII, diameter: 16,5-18,5 mm, weight: 2,75g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 145-161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-143c var., p-44, C-809,
Q-001
quadrans
Ant_Pius_Ar-Den_ANTONINVS-AVG-PIVS-PP-TRP-XXII_TEMPLVM-DIV-AVG-REST_COS-IIII_RIC-290a_C-804_Q-001_axis-h_18mm_3,21g-s.jpg
035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0290a, Rome, AR-Denarius, TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST, COS-IIII, Temple, Scarce!,261 views035 Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), RIC III 0290a, Rome, AR-Denarius, TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST, COS-IIII, Temple, Scarce!,
avers:- ANTONINVS-AVG-PIVS-P-P-TR-P-XXII, Laureate head right
revers:- TEMPLVM-DIV-AVG-REST, Octastyle temple, in which are seated figures of Divus Augustus & Livia, COS-IIII inexergo.
exe: -/-//COS-IIII, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,21g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 159 A.D., ref: RIC-III-290a, C-804,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Mac_Plus_Ultra__Potosi__2_R_1767.jpg
04 - 06 - Virreynato CARLOS III (1759-1788) 70 views"Macuquina con PLVS VLTRA y Columnas sobre ondas de Mar"

2 Reales de Plata Ley 917
20x22 mm

Anv: CAROLUS III D G HISPANIARVM REX (Carlos III por la gracia de Dios rey de las Españas) la leyenda, al tratarse de una macuquina, no es visible, alrededor de la cruz de Jerusalén con castillos y leones, con 2 (valor) encima, P (ceca) en campo izq., V (Ensayador) en campo der. y 767 (fecha) debajo.
Rev: POTOSI 1767 EL PERV La leyenda, al tratarse de una macuquina, no es visible, alrededor de las 2 columnas y entre ellas en 3 líneas valor 2 entre P (marca de la ceca) e V (ensayador), 2ª línea PLVS VLTRA, 3ª línea 767 entre V (ensayador) y P (ceca).

Acuñada: 1767
Ensayador: V - José de Vargas y Flores
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC KM#43 Pag.112 - Maravedis.net #B-302-8
mdelvalle
D717sm.jpg
04 Diva Julia Titi RIC 76035 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.33g
Rome mint, 92-94 AD (Domitian)
Obv: DIVAE IVLIAE AVG DIVI TITI F above; S P Q R in exergue; Carpentum drawn r. by two mules
Rev: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XVI CENS PER P P; S C, large, in centre
RIC 760 (R). BMC 471. BNC 502.
Acquired from Ken Dorney, January 2020. Ex Agora Auctions Sale 84, 4 September 2019, lot 187. Ex CNG E314, 6 November 2013, lot 364.

Titus' daughter Julia Titi was granted the title Augusta sometime in 80 or 81 during his reign. After Titus' death she lived with her uncle Domitian at the imperial residence. In 90 or 91 AD she died and was deified by Domitian, this was commemorated on the coinage. The ancient sources are quick to malign her reputation in the name of smearing Domitian. It is said she had an ongoing affair with Domitian and became pregnant. She then was forced by Domitian to abort the baby and died during the attempted abortion sometime in 90 or 91. The Flavian historian Brian Jones has called the supposed affair between Domitian and his niece Julia (some ten or eleven years his junior) and the subsequent forced abortion which killed her as "implausible" and "nonsense". Further he wrote "Scholars seem not to have stressed one of the most significant factors in assessing the rumour's accuracy - Martial's epigram 6.3, written not long after Julia's death and deification. In it, he expresses the hope that Domitian will produce a son, implies that the baby's name will be Julius (6.3.1) and states that (the now deified) Julia will be able to watch over him (6.3.5). Martial was neither a hero or a fool. Had there been the slightest hint of an affair between emperor and niece, he would hardly have written those lines; had Julia's recent death been caused by an abortion forced on her by Domitian, would Martial have so far neglected the bounds of 'safe criticism' and common sense as to humiliate Domitia publicly, urging her to become pregnant, to give the child a name reminiscent of her husband's mistress and finally to remember that same mistress, now dead and deified (thanks to her husband), would be able to protect the child?" No doubt, the Diva coins testify that Domitian felt great affection towards his niece, however, there is no evidence that they had an illicit love affair. The incestuous rumour was spread after Domitian's death.

This sestertius struck for Diva Julia Titi between 92 and 94 copies an early carpentum and mules type struck under Tiberius for Diva Livia and another under Titus struck for her grandmother Domitilla. It is the second issue of this type struck under Domitian and is slightly rarer than the earlier one produced in 90-91. In the early empire the carpentum was granted to ladies of the imperial house by the Senate as an imperial honour. It was frequently used to convey an image of the deceased Divae and to symbolise the event on the coinage. The style of the Diva Julia Titi sestertii are so similar to those of the earlier Memoriae Domitilla sestertii that the RIC authors speculate a few of the older Domitilla dies were recut for Julia's issues (p. 317, note). It's astonishing to think that the mint still had access to dies that were nearly a decade old and were able to re-use them for a new issue!

Dark brassy tone with some minor pitting.
5 commentsDavid Atherton
RIC_26_Denario_Tiberio.jpg
04-01- TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)34 viewsAR Denario 20 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos apoyadas en una plataforma (doble-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_26_Denario_Tiberio_1.jpg
04-02 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)24 viewsAR Denario 19x18 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos apoyadas en una plataforma (doble-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_28_Denario_Forrado_Tiberio.jpg
04-05 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)26 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA,
Denario Forrado 18.5 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.
Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #28 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #45 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8b Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_28_Denario_Tiberio.jpg
04-06 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)26 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas en una plataforma (triple-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #28 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #45 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8b Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario_Tiberius_RIC_30_2_Fourree.jpg
04-09 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)45 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA,
Denario Forrado 19x18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.
Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.
Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #30 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol. I #42 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8a Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_30_Denario_Forrado_Tiberio.jpg
04-09 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)21 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA,
Denario Forrado 19x18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.
Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.
Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #30 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol. I #42 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8a Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario Tiberio RIC 26.jpg
04-10 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)108 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Acuñada 14 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #5 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1
1 commentsmdelvalle
Denario_Tiberio_RIC_26_anterior.jpg
04-10 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)69 viewsAnv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos apoyadas en una plataforma (doble-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario_Tiberio_RIC_26_1.jpg
04-11 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)70 viewsAR Denario 19x18 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos apoyadas en una plataforma (doble-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario_Tiberio_RIC_29_2.jpg
04-12 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)86 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas en una plataforma (triple-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #28 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #45 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8b Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_30_Denario_Tiberio.jpg
04-12 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)22 viewsAR Denario 18x16 mm 3.6 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda, Livia descansa sus pies sobre una pequeña plataforma.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #30 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #48 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8c Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16a Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario_Tiberio_RIC_30_1.jpg
04-14 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)91 viewsAR Denario 18x16 mm 3.6 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda, Livia descansa sus pies sobre una pequeña plataforma.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #30 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #48 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8c Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16a Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
1 commentsmdelvalle
RIC_33_AS_Tiberio.jpg
04-20 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)15 viewsAE AS 27 mm 9.0 gr.

Anv: "CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS IMP VII" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XVII" - Livia ? sedente en trono a derecha, portando Cetro largo vertical en mano izq. y Patera en su mano der. extendida. "S C " en los campos.

Acuñada 15-16 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: R3

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #33 Pag.96 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1769 var. (Busto) Pag.348 - BMCRE #65 Pag.128 - Cohen Vol.1 (Tiberio) #17 Pag.191 - DVM #15 var. (Busto) Pag.76 - CBN II #39 Pag.44
mdelvalle
cd3961.JPG
042 Nero Claudius Drusus26 viewsNero Claudius Drusus AE Sestertius. NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP, bare head left / TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Claudius, togate, seated left on curule chair, holding branch; arms lying around; SC in ex.




"When, three months after her marriage to Augustus, Livia gave birth to Decimus (later Nero) Drusus - the father of the future Emperor Claudius - people naturally suspected that he was the product of adultry with his stepfather."
Randygeki(h2)
RI 048a img.jpg
048 - Antoninus Pius denarius - RIC 290a63 viewsObv:– ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, laureate head facing right
Rev:– TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST / COS III, Octastyle Temple of Divus Augustus, with cult images of Augustus and Livia inside
Mint – Rome
Date Minted – A.D. 158-159
Reference RIC 290a
maridvnvm
Livia_Pergamon_R694.jpg
058 BC - AD 026 - LIVIA DRVSILLA8 viewsLivia

Livia Drusilla was the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus throughout his reign, as well as his adviser.


for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
Galba_RIC_I_189.jpg
07 Galba RIC I 18937 viewsGalba April 3-Jan. 15, 69 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint 69 A.D. (3.15g, 18.9m, 6h). Obv: [I]MP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG, laureate and draped bust right. Rev: [DI]VA AVGVSTA, Livia standing left, holding patera and scepter. RIC I 189, RSC 55a. ACCG IV, 59.

Upon Nero’s death, Galba was governor of Hispania Terraconensis, and marched to Rome. His short reign was ended by his murder in a plot hatched by Otho and the Praetorians. Many of his economic measures had been unpopular, including his refusal to “bribe” the Praetorians upon his ascension.
1 commentsLucas H
Columnaria_Carlos_III__1_2_real_1770.jpg
10 - 04 - Virreynato CARLOS III (1759-1788) 101 viewsPieza columnaria o de "Mundos y Mares"

1/2 Real de Plata ley 917
16 mm

Anv: CAR·III·D·G·HISP·ET·IND·R (Carlos III por la gracia de Dios rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones y escusón de los Borbones.
Rev: VTRAQUE VNUM ·PTS monograma POTOSI (ceca) ·1770·JR· (JR = ensayador ) (uno y otro son uno, refiriéndose a la unión de los 2 mundos el conocido y el nuevo, América) alrededor de 2 bolas coronadas que representan al nuevo y viejo mundo entre 2 columnas con las leyendas PLVS VLTRA

Acuñada: 1770
Ensayador: JR - José de Vargas y Flores y Raimundo de Iturriaga
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC C#9 Pag.179 - Maravedis.net #B-272-4
mdelvalle
Columnaria_Carlos_III__1_real_1770.jpg
10 - 06 - Virreynato CARLOS III (1759-1788) 71 viewsPieza columnaria o de "Mundos y Mares"

1 Real de Plata ley 917
21 mm

Anv: CAR·III·D·G·HISP·ET·IND·R (Carlos III por la gracia de Dios rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones y escusón de los Borbones, entre R y valor I.
Rev: VTRAQUE VNUM ·PTS monograma POTOSI (ceca) ·1770·JR· (JR = ensayador ) (uno y otro son uno, refiriéndose a la unión de los 2 mundos el conocido y el nuevo, América) alrededor de 2 bolas coronadas que representan al nuevo y viejo mundo entre 2 columnas con las leyendas PLVS VLTRA

Acuñada: 1770
Ensayador: JR - José de Vargas y Flores y Raimundo de Iturriaga
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC C#10 Pag.180 - Maravedis.net #B-290-4
mdelvalle
Columnaria_Carlos_III__2_reales_1770.jpg
10 - 08 - Virreynato CARLOS III (1759-1788) 92 viewsPieza columnaria o de "Mundos y Mares"

2 Reales de Plata ley 917
28 mm

Anv: CAR·III·D·G·HISP·ET·IND·R (Carlos III por la gracia de Dios rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones y escusón de los Borbones, entre R y valor 2.
Rev: VTRAQUE VNUM ·PTS monograma POTOSI (ceca) ·1770·JR· (JR = ensayador ) (uno y otro son uno, refiriéndose a la unión de los 2 mundos el conocido y el nuevo, América) alrededor de 2 bolas coronadas que representan al nuevo y viejo mundo entre 2 columnas con las leyendas PLVS VLTRA

Acuñada: 1770
Ensayador: JR - José de Vargas y Flores y Raimundo de Iturriaga
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC C#11 Pag.180 - Maravedis.net #B-306-4
mdelvalle
De_Busto_Carlos_III_1_2_real_1773.jpg
12 - 04 - Virreynato CARLOS III (1759-1788) 105 views"Piezas con el Busto de los Monarcas Españoles"

1/2 Real de Plata Ley 903
17 mm

Anv: ·CAROLUS·III·DEI·GRATIA·1773· (Carlos III por la gracia de Dios) alrededor de un busto del rey a derechas.
Rev: ·HISPAN·ET·IND·REX·PTSmonograma POTOSÍ(ceca) J·R· (Ensayador) (rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones con escusón de los Borbones entre dos columnas con las leyendas PLUS ULTRA.

Acuñada: 1773
Ensayador: J R - José de Vargas y Flores y Raimundo de Iturriaga.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC C#14 Pag.179 - Maravedis.net #B-281-1
mdelvalle
De_Busto_Carlos_III_1_real_1776.jpg
12 - 06- Virreynato CARLOS III (1759-1788)95 views"Piezas con el Busto de los Monarcas Españoles"

1 Real de Plata Ley 903
20 mm

Anv: ·CAROLUS·III·DEI·GRATIA·1776· (Carlos III por la gracia de Dios) alrededor de un busto del rey a derechas.
Rev: ·HISPAN·ET·IND·REX·PTSmonograma POTOSÍ(ceca)·1R· (Valor) P·R· (Ensayador) (rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones con escusón de los Borbones entre dos columnas con las leyendas PLUS ULTRA.

Acuñada: 1776
Ensayador: PR- Pedro Narciso de Mazondo y Raimundo de Iturriaga.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC C#15 Pag.180 - Maravedis.net #B-298-5
mdelvalle
De_Busto_Carlos_III_4_reales_1784.jpg
12 - 08 - Virreynato CARLOS III (1759-1788) 88 views"Piezas con el Busto de los Monarcas Españoles"

2 Reales de Plata Ley 917
28 mm

Anv: ·CAROLUS·III·DEI·GRATIA·1784· (Carlos III por la gracia de Dios) alrededor de un busto del rey a derechas.
Rev: ·HISPAN·ET·IND·REX·PTSmonograma POTOSÍ(ceca)·2R· (Valor) P·R· (Ensayador) (rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones con escusón de los Borbones entre dos columnas con las leyendas PLUS ULTRA.

Acuñada: 1784
Ensayador: PR- Pedro Narciso de Mazondo y Raimundo de Iturriaga.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC C#16 Pag.180 - Maravedis.net #B-313-13
mdelvalle
De_Busto_Carlos_III_8_reales_1788.jpg
12 - 12 - Virreynato CARLOS III (1759-1788) 135 views"Piezas con el Busto de los Monarcas Españoles"

8 Reales de Plata Ley 896
40 mm

Anv: ·CAROLUS·III·DEI·GRATIA·1788· (Carlos III por la gracia de Dios) alrededor de un busto del rey a derechas.
Rev: ·HISPAN·ET·IND·REX·PTSmonograma POTOSÍ(ceca)·8R· (Valor) P·R· (Ensayador) (rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones con escusón de los Borbones entre dos columnas con las leyendas PLUS ULTRA.

Acuñada: 1788
Ensayador: PR- Pedro Narciso de Mazondo y Raimundo de Iturriaga.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC KM#55 Pag.115 - Maravedis.net #B-344-17
mdelvalle
antpius_RIC143d.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AR denarius - struck 158-159 AD64 viewsobv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP (laureate head right)
rev: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST COS IIII (octastyle temple [8 columns] in which the statues of Augustus and Livia reside)
ref: RIC III 143D (R), Cohen 809 (8frcs)
3.01 gms, 18mm,
Rare

History: The Temple of Divus Augustus was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia. It is known from Roman coinage that the temple was originally built to an Ionic hexastyle design (see my Caligula sestertius). During the reign of Domitian the Temple of Divus Augustus was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt and rededicated in 89/90 with a shrine to his favourite deity, Minerva. The temple was redesigned as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus.
It was restored again in the late 150s by Antoninus Pius, who was perhaps motivated by a desire to be publicly associated with the first emperor. The exact date of the restoration is not known, but the restored temple was an octostyle design with Corinthian capitals and two statues - presumably of Augustus and Livia - in the cella. The pediment displayed a relief featuring Augustus and was topped by a quadriga. Two figures stood on the eaves of the roof, that on the left representing Romulus and the one on the right depicting Aeneas leading his family out of Troy, alluding to Rome's origin-myth. The steps of the temple were flanked by two statues of Victory.
1 commentsberserker
De_Busto_Carlos_IV_1_4_real_1808.jpg
14 - 02 - Virreynato CARLOS IV (1788 -1806) 110 views"Cuartillo"
1/4 de Real de Plata Ley 903
13 mm

Anv: Castillo con 1808(fecha) debajo, PTSmonograma POTOSÍ(ceca)en campo izq. y 1/4 (Valor) en campo der.

Rev: Anepigrafa León rampante a izquierda.

Acuñada: 1808
Ensayador: Pedro Narciso de Mazondo.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC(1801-1900) KM#82 Pag.95 - Maravedis.net #B-418
mdelvalle
De_Busto_Carlos_IV_1_2_real_1798.jpg
14 - 04 - Virreynato CARLOS IV (1788 -1806) 108 views"Piezas con el Busto de los Monarcas Españoles"

1/2 Real de Plata Ley 903
17 mm

Anv: ·CAROLUS·IIII·DEI·GRATIA·1798· (Carlos IIII por la gracia de Dios) alrededor de un busto del rey a derechas.
Rev: ·HISPAN·ET·IND·R·PTS monograma POTOSÍ (ceca) ·P·P· (Ensayador) (rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones con escusón de los Borbones entre dos columnas con las leyendas PLUS ULTRA.

Acuñada: 1798
Ensayador: P P - Pedro de Mazondo y Pedro de Albizu.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC C#33 Pag.179 - Maravedis.net #B-421/6
mdelvalle
De_Busto_Carlos_IV_1_real_1790.jpg
14 - 06 - Virreynato CARLOS IV (1788 - 1808) 102 views"Piezas con el Busto de los Monarcas Españoles"

1 Real de Plata Ley 903
21 mm

Anv: ·CAROLUS·IV·DEI·GRATIA·1790· (Carlos IV por la gracia de Dios) alrededor de un busto del rey a derechas.
Rev: ·HISPAN·ET·IND·R·PTS monograma POTOSÍ (ceca) ·1R· (Valor) y ·P·R· (Ensayador) (rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones con escusón de los Borbones entre dos columnas con las leyendas PLUS ULTRA.

Acuñada: 1790
Ensayador: P R - Pedro de Mazondo y Raimundo de Yturriaga.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC (1701-1800) KM#50 Pag.114 - Maravedis.net #B-429/34
mdelvalle
De_Busto_Carlos_IIII_2_reales_1808.jpg
14 - 08 - Virreynato CARLOS IV (1788 - 1808) 144 views"Piezas con el Busto de los Monarcas Españoles"

2 Reales de Plata Ley 896
27 mm

Anv: ·CAROLUS·IIII·DEI·GRATIA·1808· (Carlos IV por la gracia de Dios) alrededor de un busto del rey a derechas.
Rev: ·HISPAN·ET·IND·REX·PTS monograma POTOSÍ (ceca) ·2R· (Valor) y ·P·J· (Ensayador) (rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones con escusón de los Borbones entre dos columnas con las leyendas PLUS ULTRA.

Acuñada: 1808
Ensayador: P J - Pedro de Mazondo y Juan Palomo Sierra.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC (1801-1900) KM#70 Pag.95 - Maravedis.net #B-437/42
mdelvalle
tiberius_RIC28.jpg
14-37 AD - TIBERIUS AR denarius - struck 14-37 AD53 viewsobv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS (laureate head right)
rev: PONTIF MAXIM (Livia (as Pax) seated right, holding olive-branch and inverted spear; ornate legs to chair)
ref: RIC I 28, RSC 16b (2frcs)
mint: Lugdunum
3,57gms, 18mm

The story of the Tribute Penny may be the best-known Biblical reference to a coin. Tiberius reigned during the ministry of Jesus and it is logical that his silver denarius was the coin used by Christ ("Give unto Caesar that which is Caesar's and give unto the Lord that which is the Lord's"). Although the inscription refers to Tiberius' position as Pontifex Maximus and there are no overt references to Livia, many scholars feel that users of the coins would have associated the figure with Livia and that this association was probably intended by Tiberius. An obligatory issue for collectors.
1 commentsberserker
De_Busto_Fernando_VII_1_2_real_1817.jpg
16 - 04 - Virreynato FERNANDO VII (1808-1833)70 views"Piezas con el Busto de los Monarcas Españoles"

1/2 Real de Plata Ley 896
16 mm

Anv: ·FERDIN·VII·DEI·GRATIA·1817· (Fernando VII por la gracia de Dios) alrededor de un busto del rey a derechas.
Rev: ·HISPAN·ET·IND·R·PTS monograma POTOSÍ (ceca) ·P·J· (Ensayador) (rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones con escusón de los Borbones entre dos columnas con las leyendas PLUS ULTRA.

Acuñada: 1817
Ensayador: P J - Pedro de Mazondo y Juan Palomo Sierra.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC (1801-1900) KM#90 Pag.95
mdelvalle
De_Busto_Fernando_VII_1_2_real_1817_1.jpg
16 - 05 - Virreynato FERNANDO VII (1808-1833)48 views"Piezas con el Busto de los Monarcas Españoles"

1/2 Real de Plata Ley 896
16 mm

Anv: ·FERDIN·VII·DEI·GRATIA·1817· (Fernando VII por la gracia de Dios) alrededor de un busto del rey a derechas.
Rev: ·HISPAN·ET·IND·R·PTS monograma POTOSÍ (ceca) ·P·J· (Ensayador) (rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones con escusón de los Borbones entre dos columnas con las leyendas PLUS ULTRA.

Acuñada: 1817
Ensayador: P J - Pedro de Mazondo y Juan Palomo Sierra.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC (1801-1900) KM#90 Pag.95
mdelvalle
De_Busto_Fernando_VII_1_real_1823.jpg
16 - 08 - Virreynato FERNANDO VII (1808-1833)76 views"Piezas con el Busto de los Monarcas Españoles"

1 Real de Plata Ley 896
20 mm

Anv: ·FERDIN·VII·DEI·GRATIA·1823· (Fernando VII por la gracia de Dios) alrededor de un busto del rey a derechas.
Rev: ·HISPAN·ET·IND·R·PTS monograma POTOSÍ (ceca), ·2R· (valor), ·P·J· (Ensayador) (rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones con escusón de los Borbones entre dos columnas con las leyendas PLUS ULTRA.

Acuñada: 1823
Ensayador: P J - Pedro de Mazondo y Juan Palomo Sierra.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC (1801-1900) KM#87 Pag.95
mdelvalle
De_Busto_Fernando_VII_4_reales_1825.jpg
16 - 12 - Virreynato FERNANDO VII (1808-1833)74 views"Piezas con el Busto de los Monarcas Españoles"

4 Reales de Plata Ley 896
34 mm

Anv: ·FERDIN·VII·DEI·GRATIA·1825· (Fernando VII por la gracia de Dios) alrededor de un busto del rey a derechas.
Rev: ·HISPAN·ET·IND·REX·PTS monograma POTOSÍ (ceca), ·4R· (valor), ·J·L· (Ensayador) (rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones con escusón de los Borbones entre dos columnas con las leyendas PLUS ULTRA.

Acuñada: 1825
Ensayador: J L- Juan Palomo Sierra y Luis Lopez.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC (1801-1900) KM#88 Pag.96
mdelvalle
De_Busto_Fernando_VII_8_reales_1825.jpg
16 - 12 - Virreynato FERNANDO VII (1808-1833)105 views"Piezas con el Busto de los Monarcas Españoles"

8 Reales de Plata Ley 896
38 mm

Anv: ·FERDIN·VII·DEI·GRATIA·1825· (Fernando VII por la gracia de Dios) alrededor de un busto del rey a derechas.
Rev: ·HISPAN·ET·IND·REX·PTS monograma POTOSÍ (ceca), ·8R· (valor), ·J·L· (Ensayador) (rey de las Españas y las Indias) alrededor de un escudo coronado de castillos y leones con escusón de los Borbones entre dos columnas con las leyendas PLUS ULTRA.

Acuñada: 1825
Ensayador: J L- Juan Palomo Sierra y Luis Lopez.
Ceca: Potosí - Hoy ubicada en Bolivia

Referencias: Krause SCWC (1801-1900) KM#84 Pag.96
mdelvalle
tiberius tribute penny.jpg
16 - 37 A.D. Tiberius - Ric 30 "Tribute Penny"156 viewsSilver denarius, Lugdunum mint, 3.494g, 18.8mm, 225o, 16 - 37 A.D.;
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right;
PONTIF MAXIM, Livia seated right holding scepter and branch, legs on chair ornamented, feet on footstool; nicely centered
RIC 30, RSC 16a, S 1763, VF

Jesus, referring to a "penny" asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible.
2 commentsjimwho523
PO_1620_0800_T.jpg
1620 8 Reales5 views1620 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Philip III
Assayer: T (Juan Ximenez de Tapia; 1618 - 1621)
26.64 grams
Sedwick type: P21
cmcdon0923
PO_1658_0400_E_.jpg
1658 4 Reales16 views1658 4 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Philip IV
Assayer: E (Antonio de Ergueta)
13.42 grams
Sedwick type: P15
cmcdon0923
PO_1661_0800_E.jpg
1661 8 Reales10 views1661 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Philip IV
Assayer: E (Antonio de Ergueta)
21.43 grams
Sedwick type: P37a
cmcdon0923
PO-1663_0100_E.jpg
1663 1 Real11 views1663 1 Real
Potosi, Bolivia
King Philip IV
Assayer: E (Antonio de Ergueta)
2.72 grams
Sedwick type: P37a
cmcdon0923
PO_1666_0800_E.jpg
1666 8 Reales12 views1666 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Charles II
Assayer: E (Antonio de Ergueta)
24.75 grams
Sedwick type: P37a
cmcdon0923
PO_1667_0800_E.jpg
1667 8 Reales9 views1667 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Carlos II
Assayer: E (Antonio de Ergueta)
25.72 grams
Sedwick type: P37a
cmcdon0923
PO_1671_0800_E.jpg
1671/0 8 Reales9 views1671/0 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Carlos II
Assayer: E (Antonio de Ergueta)
27.69 grams
Sedwick type: P37b
The date under the cross clearly shows the 1/0 overdate
cmcdon0923
PO_1675_0800_E.jpg
1675 8 Reales6 views1675 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Carlos II
Assayer: E (Antonio de Ergueta)
27.32 grams
Sedwick type: P37b
cmcdon0923
PO_1681_0800_V.jpg
1681 8 Reales7 views1681 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Carlos II
Assayer: V (Pedo de Villar)
27.94 grams
Sedwick type: P39
cmcdon0923
PO_1687_0800_VR.jpg
1687 8 Reales14 views1687 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Carlos II
Assayer: VR (Pedro de Villar)
27.92 grams
Sedwick type: P40
cmcdon0923
PO_1691_0200_VR.jpg
1691 2 Reales11 views1691 2 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Carlos II
Assayer: VR (Pedro de Villar)
6.40 grams
Sedwick type: P40
cmcdon0923
PO_1694_0800_VR.jpg
1694 8 Reales14 views1694 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Carlos II
Assayer: VR (Pedro de Villar)
26.59 grams
Sedwick type: P40
cmcdon0923
PO_1695_0800_VR.jpg
1695 8 Reales14 views1695 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Carlos II
Assayer: VR (Pedro de Villar)
27.64 grams
Sedwick type: P40
cmcdon0923
PO_1697_0800_VR.jpg
1697 8 Reales10 views1697 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Carlos II
Assayer: VR (Pedro de Villar)
25.93 grams
Sedwick type: P40
cmcdon0923
PO_1698_0400_F.jpg
1698 4 Reales10 views1698 4 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Carlos II
Assayer: F (Tomas Fernandez de Ocana)
13.21 grams
Sedwick type: P42
cmcdon0923
PO_1699_0800_F.jpg
1699 8 Reales26 views1699 8 Reales
Potosi, Bolivia
King Carlos II
Assayer: F (Tomas Fernandez de Ocana)
24.00 grams
Sedwick type: P42
1 commentscmcdon0923
spanish-reales_1775_1788_1789_01_obv_01.JPG
1775 Potosi, 1788 Mexico City, 1779 Lima - 2 Reales - obverse80 views1775 Potosi, Bolivia - Two Reales
1788 Mexico City - Two Reales
1779 Lima, Peru - Two Reales
rexesq
spanish-reales_1775_1788_1789_01_rev_01.JPG
1775 Potosi, 1788 Mexico City, 1779 Lima - 2 Reales - reverse88 views1775 Potosi, Bolivia - Two Reales
1788 Mexico City - Two Reales
1779 Lima, Peru - Two Reales
rexesq
George_III_Bank_of_England_Dollar_1804.JPG
1804 GEORGE III AR BANK OF ENGLAND DOLLAR 48 viewsObverse: GEORGIUS III DEI GRATIA REX. Laureate and draped bust of George III facing right.
Reverse: BANK OF ENGLAND 1804. Britannia, seated left, holding a branch and spear, her left arm resting on a shield which in turn rests on a cornucopia, a beehive is in the background to the left; all within a garter inscribed FIVE SHILLINGS DOLLAR. The garter is surmounted by a castellated "crown" of five circular stone turrets.
On this coin there are enough traces of the host coin discernible on the reverse, near the edge between 'BANK' and 'OF', and on the obverse below the bust to make an accurate identification of the undertype possible. It was overstruck on a Spanish Colonial 8 Reales minted at Potosi in Bolivia which bore the date 1806.
Spink 3768; Obverse die A, Reverse die 2
Diameter: 41mm | Weight: 26.7gms | Die Axis: 11
SPINK: 3768

This portrait of George III was designed by Conrad Heinrich Kuchler (c.1740 - 1810), this is marked by C. H. K. in raised letters on the truncation at the king's shoulder. The reverse, which was also designed by Kuchler has the raised initial K in the triangular space between the shield, cornucopia, and Britannia's dress. Kuchler moved to Birmingham in 1795 and designed many of the coins and medals which were struck at Matthew Boulton's SOHO mint.

Note on George III Bank of England Silver Dollars
Although George III reigned for sixty years from 1760 to 1820, the only crowns issued were in the last three years of his reign, apart from these Bank of England dollars issued as an emergency measure.
There had been a persistent shortage of silver coins throughout most of George's reign, and the Bank of England attempted to alleviate this by counter-marking Spanish colonial 8-Reale pieces (the “pieces of eight” of pirate legend) with a punch bearing the head of George III. When this counter-mark was enthusiastically counterfeited, the bank resorted to counter-stamping the entire coin. Most survivors were struck on Mexican or Peruvian 8-Reale pieces, though a few have been found to be struck on issues from Spain proper. Although these Bank of England dollars are all dated 1804, they were issued every year until 1811, and occasionally the dates of Spanish 8 Reales minted after 1804 can be discerned on them. In 1811, to take account of the increase in the value of silver, the Bank of England dollar coins were revalued at 5s6d and they stayed at this value until they were withdrawn from circulation in 1817, by which time a massive silver re-coinage was being undertaken.
2 comments*Alex
PC_0002.JPG
19th Century framed uniface plaster cast dupondius of Livia25 viewsObv:- SALVS AVGVSTA, Draped bust of Livia-Salus r., hair knotted behind
Rev:- TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG P M TR POT XXIIII, round S C.
References (for original coin) :- Cohen 5. RIC 47

Famed uniface plaster cast from 19th century.
Originally mounted on velvet and one would assume in a display case. Traces of velvet still attached to underside of frame.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
AugustusDenApollo.jpg
1ai Augustus25 views27 BC-14 AD

Denarius
Laureate head left, AVGVSTVS DIVI F
Apollo stg. Right, IMP XII

Van Meter notes that after about 15 BC, Augustus moved the production of gold and silver to Lugdunum and underscored the end of the moneyer issues by using "IMP" on the reverse.

RIC 180

Suetonius summarized Augusts' life in these words: He lost his father at the age of five (58BC). At twelve he delivered a funeral oration in honour of his grandmother Julia, Julius Caesar’s sister (51BC). At sixteen, having assumed the toga, he was decorated by Caesar during the African triumph (46BC) even though he had been too young to fight. When Caesar went to conquer Pompey’s sons in Spain (in 46BC), Augustus followed, despite still being weak from severe illness, and despite being shipwrecked on the way, with a minimal escort, over roads menaced by the enemy, so endearing himself greatly to Caesar, who quickly formed a high opinion of Augustus’ character, beyond merely his energetic pursuit of the journey.
After recovering the Spanish provinces, Caesar planned an expedition against the Dacians, to be followed by an attack on Parthia, and sent Augustus ahead (in 45BC) to Apollonia in Illyria, where he spent his time studying. When news came of Caesar’s assassination (in 44BC), and that the will named him as the main heir, Augustus considered seeking protection from the legions quartered there. However he decided it would be rash and premature, and chose to return to Rome, and enter on his inheritance, despite the doubts expressed by his mother, and strong opposition from his stepfather, the ex-consul Marcius Philippus.

Augustus went on to levy armies and rule the State; firstly for a twelve-year period (from 43BC to 30BC), initially with Mark Antony and Lepidus and then (from 33BC) with Antony alone; and later by himself for a further forty-four years (to his death in AD14).

In his youth he was betrothed to Servilia, the daughter of Publius Servilius Vatia Isauricus, but on his reconciliation with Mark Antony following their first dispute, the troops begged them to become allied by some tie of kinship, and he married (in 43BC) Claudia, Antony’s stepdaughter, born to Fulvia and Publius Clodius Pulcher, even though Claudia was barely of marriageable age. However he quarrelled with Fulvia, and divorced Claudia before the marriage had been consummated.

Not long afterwards (in 40BC), he married Scribonia, whose previous husbands had been ex-consuls, and to one of whom she had borne a child. He divorced her also ‘tired’, he wrote, ‘of her shrewish ways,’ and immediately took Livia Drusilla from her husband Tiberius Nero though she was pregnant at the time (38BC), loving and esteeming her alone to the end.
Blindado
LiviaAE23Tyche.jpg
1aj Livia17 viewsDied 29 AD

AE23 of Cilicia, Augusta
23–24 AD

ΙΟΥΛΙΑ [Σ]ΕΒΑΣΤΗ, Portrait, right
ΑΥΓΟΥCTA—NW—N, Tyche std., river god Saros at feet

This is one of my favorite pieces because I picked it up for a couple of bucks from a market stall in an Aegean country.

RPC I 4013-4014
Same design as RPC 4009v, but larger

According to Suetonius, "The last words [Augustus] spoke were to his wife: ‘Livia, keep the memory of our marriage alive, and farewell!’ and died the very moment he was kissing her."
Blindado
CaligulaAsVesta.jpg
1ao Caligula31 views37-41

As
Bare head, left, C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT
Vesta std, VESTA SC

RIC 38

The son of Germanicus, modern research suggests, was not as bad a ruler as history generally supposes, but the winners write the history, and Caligula had the dubious honor of being the first loser to die in the purple at the hand of assassins.

Suetonius recorded: Gaius Caesar (Caligula) was born on the 31st of August AD12, in the consulship of his father, Germanicus, and Gaius Fonteius Capito. The sources disagree as to his place of birth. Gnaeus Lentulus Gaetulicus claims it was Tibur (Tivoli), Pliny the Elder, says it was among the Treveri in the village of Ambitarvium, above Confluentes (the site of Koblenz) at the junction of the Moselle and Rhine. . . . His surname Caligula (‘Little Boot’) was bestowed on him affectionately by the troops because he was brought up amongst them, dressed in soldier’s gear.

Caligula accompanied his father, Germanicus, to Syria (in AD 19). On his return, he lived with his mother, Agrippina the Elder until she was exiled (in 29 AD), and then with his great-grandmother Livia. When Livia died (in 29 AD), he gave her eulogy from the rostra even though he was not of age. He was then cared for by his grandmother Antonia the Younger, until at the age of eighteen Tiberius summoned him to Capreae (Capri, in AD 31). On that day he assumed his gown of manhood and shaved off his first beard, but without the ceremony that had attended his brothers’ coming of age.

On Capraea, though every trick was tried to lure him, or force him, into making complaints against Tiberius, he ignored all provocation, . . . behaving so obsequiously to his adoptive grandfather, Tiberius, and the entire household, that the quip made regarding him was well borne out, that there was never a better slave or a worse master.

Even in those days, his cruel and vicious character was beyond his control, and he was an eager spectator of torture and executions meted out in punishment. At night, disguised in wig and long robe, he abandoned himself to gluttony and adulterous behaviour. He was passionately devoted it seems to the theatrical arts, to dancing and singing, a taste in him which Tiberius willingly fostered, in the hope of civilizing his savage propensities.

And came near to assuming a royal diadem at once, turning the semblance of a principate into an absolute monarchy. Indeed, advised by this that he outranked princes and kings, he began thereafter to claim divine power, sending to Greece for the most sacred or beautiful statues of the gods, including the Jupiter of Olympia, so that the heads could be exchanged for his own. He then extended the Palace as far as the Forum, making the Temple of Castor and Pollux its vestibule, and would often present himself to the populace there, standing between the statues of the divine brothers, to be worshipped by whoever appeared, some hailing him as ‘Jupiter Latiaris’. He also set up a special shrine to himself as god, with priests, the choicest sacrificial victims, and a life-sized golden statue of himself, which was dressed each day in clothes of identical design to those he chose to wear.

He habitually committed incest with each of his three sisters, seating them in turn below him at large banquets while his wife reclined above. . . . His preferred method of execution was by the infliction of many slight wounds, and his order, issued as a matter of routine, became notorious: ‘Cut him so he knows he is dying.’
Blindado
ClaudiusAsLibertas.jpg
1ap Claudius29 views41-54

As
Bare head, left, TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP
Libertas, LIBERTAS AVGVSTA SC

RIC 97

According to Suetonius: Claudius was born at Lugdunum (Lyon) on the 1st of August 10BC in the consulship of Iullus Antonius and Fabius Africanus, on the day when the very first altar to Augustus was dedicated there, the child being given the name Tiberius Claudius Drusus. When his elder brother Germanicus was adopted into the Julian family (in 4 AD), he added the name Germanicus also. He lost his father when still an infant (in 9 BC), and throughout his childhood and youth was severely afflicted by various stubborn ailments so that his mind and body lacked vigour, and even when he attained his majority he was not considered capable of a public or private career.

Nevertheless, he applied himself to liberal studies from his earliest youth, and often published examples of his proficiency in each area, though even so he was excluded from public office and failed to inspire any brighter hopes for his future. His mother Antonia the Younger often condemned him as an unfinished freak of Nature, and when accusing someone of stupidity would say: ‘He’s a bigger fool than my son Claudius.’ His grandmother Augusta (Livia) always treated him with utter contempt, and rarely even spoke to him, admonishing him, when she chose to do so, in brief harsh missives, or via her messengers. When his sister Livilla heard the prophecy that he would be Emperor some day, she prayed openly and loudly that Rome might be spared so cruel and unmerited a fate.

Having spent the larger part of his life in such circumstances, he became emperor at the age of fifty (in AD41) by a remarkable stroke of fate. Caligula’s assassins had dispersed the crowd on the pretext that the Emperor wished for solitude, and Claudius, shut out with the rest, retired to a room called the Hermaeum, but shortly afterwards, terrified by news of the murder, crept off to a nearby balcony and hid behind the door-curtains. A Guard, who was wandering about the Palace at random, spotting a pair of feet beneath the curtain where Claudius was cowering, dragged the man out to identify him, and as Claudius fell to the ground in fear, recognised him, and acclaimed him Emperor.

Eutropius summarizes: His reign was of no striking character; he acted, in many respects, with gentleness and moderation, in some with cruelty and folly. He made war upon Britain, which no Roman since Julius Caesar had visited; and, having reduced it through the agency of Cnaeus Sentius and Aulus Plautius, illustrious and noble men, he celebrated a magnificent triumph. Certain islands also, called the Orcades, situated in the ocean, beyond Britain, he added to the Roman empire, and gave his son the name of Britannicus. . . . He lived to the age of sixty-four, and reigned fourteen years; and after his death was consecrated3 and deified.

This was the first "good" coin I ever bought and therefore marks the begiining of an addiction.
Blindado
ClaudiusMessalinaAE20.jpg
1ap_2 Messalina36 viewsThird wife of Claudius, married in 38 (?)

AE 20, Knossos mint

Bare head of Claudius left, CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS

Draped bust of Messalina right, VALERIA MESSALINA [CAPITONE CYTHERONTE IIVIR] or [CYTHERO CAPITONE] (end of legend off flan)

According to Suetonius: [Claudius] was betrothed twice at an early age: to Aemilia Lepida, great-granddaughter of Augustus, and to Livia Medullina, who also had the surname of Camilla and was descended from the ancient family of Camillus the dictator. He put away the former before their marriage, because her parents had offended Augustus; the latter was taken ill and died on the very day which had been set for the wedding. He then married Plautia Urgulanilla, whose father had been honoured with a triumph, and later Aelia Paetina, daughter of an ex-consul. He divorced both these, Paetina for trivial offences, but Urgulanilla because of scandalous lewdness and the suspicion of murder. Then he married Valeria Messalina, daughter of his cousin Messala Barbatus. But when he learned that besides other shameful and wicked deeds she had actually married Gaius Silius, and that a formal contract had been signed in the presence of witnesses, he put her to death and declared before the assembled praetorian guard that inasmuch as his marriages did not turn out well, he would remain a widower, and if he did not keep his word, he would not refuse death at their hands. . . . [He later married Agrippina Jr.]

He had children by three of his wives: by Urgulanilla, Drusus and Claudia; by Paetina, Antonia; by Messalina, Octavia and a son, at first called Germanicus and later Britannicus. . . .

But it is beyond all belief, that at the marriage which Messalina had contracted with her paramour Silius he signed the contract for the dowry with his own hand, being induced to do so on the ground that the marriage was a feigned one, designed to avert and turn upon another a danger which was inferred from certain portents to threaten the emperor himself. . . .

He was so terror-stricken by unfounded reports of conspiracies that he had tried to abdicate. When, as I have mentioned before, a man with a dagger was caught near him as he was sacrificing, he summoned the senate in haste by criers and loudly and tearfully bewailed his lot, saying that there was no safety for him anywhere; and for a long time he would not appear in public. His ardent love for Messalina too was cooled, not so much by her unseemly and insulting conduct, as through fear of danger, since he believed that her paramour Silius aspired to the throne. . . .

Appius Silanus met his downfall. When Messalina and Narcissus had put their heads together to destroy him, they agreed on their parts and the latter rushed into his patron's bed-chamber before daybreak in pretended consternation, declaring that he had dreamed that Appius had made an attack on the emperor. Then Messalina, with assumed surprise, declared that she had had the same dream for several successive nights. A little later, as had been arranged, Appius, who had received orders the day before to come at that time, was reported to be forcing his way in, and as if were proof positive of the truth of the dream, his immediate accusation and death were ordered. . . .


1 commentsBlindado
GalbaDenVictory.jpg
1at Galba31 views68-69

Denarius

Laureate head, right, SER GALBA IMP CAESAR AVG P M TR P
Victory standing on globe, VICTORIA PR

RIC 111

Suetonius recorded: Servius Galba, the future emperor was born on the 24th of December, 3BC, in the consulship of Marcus Valerius Messala and Gnaeus Lentulus, at a hillside mansion near Terracina, on the left of the road to Fundi (Fondi). He was formally adopted by his stepmother Livia Ocellina, and took the name Livius and the surname Ocella, also changing his forename to Lucius, until he became Emperor.

It is common knowledge that when calling on Augustus to pay his respects, with other boys of his age, the Emperor pinched his cheek, and said in Greek: ‘You too will have a taste of power, my child.’ And when Tiberius heard the prophecy that Galba would be emperor in old age, he commented: ‘Well let him be, it’s no concern of mine.’

Galba achieved office before the usual age and as praetor (in 20AD), controlling the games at the Floralia, he was the first to introduce a display of tightrope-walking elephants. He next governed Aquitania, for almost a year, and not long afterwards held the consulship for six months (in 33AD). When Caligula was assassinated (in 41AD), Galba chose neutrality though many urged him to seize the opportunity for power. Claudius expressed his gratitude by including him among his intimate friends, and Galba was shown such consideration that the expedition to Britain was delayed to allow him to recover from a sudden but minor indisposition. Later he was proconsul in Africa for two years (44/45AD), being singled out, and so avoiding the usual lottery, to restore order in the province, which was riven by internecine rivalry and an indigenous revolt. He re-established peace, by the exercise of ruthless discipline, and the display of justice even in the most trifling matters. . . .

But when word from the City arrived that Nero was dead and that the people had sworn allegiance to him, he set aside the title of governor and assumed that of Caesar. He then began his march to Rome in a general’s cloak, with a dagger, hanging from his neck, at his chest, and did not resume the toga until his main rivals had been eliminated, namely the commander of the Praetorian Guard in Rome, Nymphidius Sabinus, and the commanders in Germany and Africa, Fonteius Capito and Clodius Macer. . . . His prestige and popularity were greater while winning power than wielding it, though he showed evidence of being a more than capable ruler, loved less, unfortunately, for his good qualities than he was hated for his bad ones.

He was even warned of the danger of imminent assassination, the day before his death, by a soothsayer, as he offered the morning sacrifice. Shortly afterwards he learnt that Otho had secured the Guards camp, and when his staff advised him to carry the day by his presence and prestige, by going there immediately, he opted instead to stay put, but gather a strong bodyguard of legionaries from their billets around the City. He did however don a linen corselet, though saying that frankly it would serve little against so many weapons. False reports, put about by the conspirators to lure him into appearing in public, deceived a few of his close supporters, who rashly told him the rebellion was over, the plotters overthrown, and that the rest of the troops were on their way to congratulate him and carry out his orders. So he went to meet them, with such confidence, that when a soldier boasted of killing Otho, he snapped out: ‘On whose authority?’ before hastening on to the Forum. The cavalrymen who had been ordered to find and kill him, who were spurring through the streets scattering the crowds of civilians, now caught sight of him in the distance and halted an instant before galloping towards him and cutting him down, while his staff ran for their lives.
Blindado
trib_p5_TN.jpg
2. Tiberius Denarius "Tribute Penny"114 viewsDenarius, Lugdunum Mint
AD 16 to 37
Obv. TICAESARDIVI AVGFAVGVSTVS
Rev. PONTIF MAXIM; female figure, possibly Livia, holding scepter and branch
1 commentsZam
BOTLAUREL_2018.JPG
201876 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
CLICK ON A COIN FOR ITS DETAILS



*Alex
caligula_RIC36-R.jpg
37-41 AD - CALIGULA AE sestertius - struck 37-38 AD80 viewsobv: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS P M TR POT (Pietas, veiled, seated left and holding patera, left elbow resting on small statue of Spes), PIETAS in exergue
rev: DIVO-AVG (Gaius sacrificing before garlanded hexastyle temple; one attendant leading bull to altar, the other holding a patera), S-C across field
ref: RIC I 36 (R), BMCRE 41, Cohen 9 (15frcs)
27.38gms, 33mm
Very rare

This issue commemorates Gaius Caligula's dedication of the Temple of the Divus Augustus and the young emperor's sense of pietas. The PIETAS beneath the figure of the emperor drives home the point that he is fulfilling his duty by dedicating the temple to his great-grandfather. Construction of the Temple of the Divus Augustus began under Tiberius and, perhaps, under the direction of Livia herself, in the general area behind the Basilica Julia (though the actual site remains unknown), and was subsequently dedicated by Caligula.
2 commentsberserker
Nero Claudius Drusus sest - R.jpg
41-54 AD - NERO CLAUDIUS DRUSUS AE Sestertius - struck under Claudius (42-43 AD)38 viewsobv: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP (bare head of Drusus left)
rev: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P (Claudius, togate, holding laurel branch and roll, seated left on curule chair set on globe, resting both feet on cuirass on ground, several shields, spears, and a helmet are also scattered around him, a sword rests against the globe beneath the curule chair), S-C in ex.
ref: RIC I 109 [Claudius], Cohen 8 (10 frcs), BMCRE 208
26.36gms, 34mm, orichalcum
Rare

Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus, son of Livia, brother of Tiberius and father of Claudius was the governor of Gaul in 13 BC, initiated a series of successful campaigns against the Germans. Died in a fall from his horse in 9 BC.
berserker
Scipio.jpg
47-46 BC Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio68 viewsQ METEL SCIPIO IMP
head of Africa right, laur. and clad in elephant's skin, corn-ear before, plough below

EPPIVS LEG F C

Naked Hercules standing facing right, hand on hip resting on club set on rock

North Africa
47-46 BC

Sear 1380/1

Born Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica. He was adopted by his uncle by marriage and father's second cousin Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius. He married Aemilia Lepida, daughter of Mamercus Aemilius Lepidus Livianus (son of the Censor Marcus Livius Drusus and wife Cornelia Scipio and adopted by Mamercus Aemilius Lepidus) and wife Claudia (sister of Appius Claudius Pulcher (Senior)), and was the father in law of Pompey the Great, married to his daughter Cornelia Metella, called Quinta Pompeia for being his fifth wife.

He was Tribune in 59 BC and became Consul with Pompey the Great in 52 BC. During Caesar's civil war, he served the party of Pompey and fought against Caesar and Marcus Antonius. In 49 BC he was sent as Proconsul to Syria and the following year he took part in the Battle of Pharsalus, where he commanded the center of the Republican battleline. After Pharsalus he fled to Africa were he commanded an army with Cato the Younger, losing in the Battle of Thapsus. After the defeat he tried to escape but was cornered by the fleet of Publius Sittius when he wrecked the ship as he tried to escape to the Iberian Peninsula, to continue to fight from there. He committed suicide by stabbing himself so he would not fall at the hands of his enemies.

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
galba denar.jpg
68-69 AD - GALBA AR denarius - struck July 68- Jan. 69 AD56 viewsobv: IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG (laureate head right)
rev: DIVA AVGVSTA (A woman dressed in the stola and long robe, holding a patera and hasta)
ref: RIC I 186, C.8 (10frcs)
3.20gms, 17,5mm
Rare

Galba, who was grently indebted to Livia (wife of Augustus), on which account he held her memory in gratitude, and caused her image to be struck on his coins.
1 commentsberserker
AugustusAE19Sardeis.jpg
702a, Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.40 viewsAugustus, 27 BC - 14 AD. AE 19mm (5.98 gm). Lydia, Sardeis. Diodoros Hermophilou. Obverse: head right. Reverse: Zeus Lydios standing facing holding scepter and eagle. RPC I, 489, 2986; SNG von Aulock 3142. aVF. Fine portrait. Ex Tom Vossen.

De Imperatoribus Romanis:
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers

AUGUSTUS (31 B.C. - 14 A.D.)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

In the course of his long and spectacular career, he put an end to the advancing decay of the Republic and established a new basis for Roman government that was to stand for three centuries. This system, termed the "Principate," was far from flawless, but it provided the Roman Empire with a series of rulers who presided over the longest period of unity, peace, and prosperity that Western Europe, the Middle East and the North African seaboard have known in their entire recorded history. Even if the rulers themselves on occasion left much to be desired, the scale of Augustus's achievement in establishing the system cannot be overstated. Aside from the immense importance of Augustus's reign from the broad historical perspective, he himself is an intriguing figure: at once tolerant and implacable, ruthless and forgiving, brazen and tactful. Clearly a man of many facets, he underwent three major political reinventions in his lifetime and negotiated the stormy and dangerous seas of the last phase of the Roman Revolution with skill and foresight. With Augustus established in power and with the Principate firmly rooted, the internal machinations of the imperial household provide a fascinating glimpse into the one issue that painted this otherwise gifted organizer and politician into a corner from which he could find no easy exit: the problem of the succession.

(For a very detailed and interesting account of the Age of Augustus see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/auggie.htm)

Death and Retrospective

In his later years, Augustus withdrew more and more from the public eye, although he continued to transact public business. He was getting older, and old age in ancient times must have been considerably more debilitating than it is today. In any case, Tiberius had been installed as his successor and, by AD 13, was virtually emperor already. In AD 4 he had received grants of both proconsular and tribunician power, which had been renewed as a matter of course whenever they needed to be; in AD 13, Tiberius's imperium had been made co-extensive with that of Augustus. While traveling in Campania, Augustus died peacefully at Nola on 19 August, AD 14. Tiberius, who was en route to Illyricum, hurried to the scene and, depending on the source, arrived too late or spent a day in consultation with the dying princes. The tradition that Livia poisoned her husband is scurrilous in the extreme and most unlikely to be true. Whatever the case about these details, Imperator Caesar Augustus, Son of a God, Father of his Country, the man who had ruled the Roman world alone for almost 45 years, or over half a century if the triumviral period is included, was dead. He was accorded a magnificent funeral, buried in the mausoleum he had built in Rome, and entered the Roman pantheon as Divus Augustus. In his will, he left 1,000 sesterces apiece to the men of the Praetorian guard, 500 to the urban cohorts, and 300 to each of the legionaries. In death, as in life, Augustus acknowledged the true source of his power.

The inscription entitled "The Achievements of the Divine Augustus" (Res Gestae Divi Augustae; usually abbreviated RG) remains a remarkable piece of evidence deriving from Augustus's reign. The fullest copy of it is the bilingual Greek and Latin version carved into the walls of the Temple of Rome and Augustus at Ancyra in Galatia (for this reason the RG used to be commonly referred to as the Monumentum Ancyranum). Other evidence, however, demonstrates that the original was inscribed on two bronze pillars that flanked the entrance to the Mausoleum of Augustus in Rome. The inscription remains the only first-person summary of any Roman emperor's political career and, as such, offers invaluable insights into the Augustan regime's public presentation of itself.

In looking back on the reign of Augustus and its legacy to the Roman world, its longevity ought not to be overlooked as a key factor in its success. People had been born and reached middle age without knowing any form of government other than the Principate. Had Augustus died earlier (in 23 BC, for instance), matters may have turned out very differently. The attrition of the civil wars on the old Republican aristocracy and the longevity of Augustus, therefore, must be seen as major contributing factors in the transformation of the Roman state into a monarchy in these years. Augustus's own experience, his patience, his tact, and his great political acumen also played their part. All of these factors allowed him to put an end to the chaos of the Late Republic and re-establish the Roman state on a firm footing. He directed the future of the empire down many lasting paths, from the existence of a standing professional army stationed at or near the frontiers, to the dynastic principle so often employed in the imperial succession, to the embellishment of the capital at the emperor's expense. Augustus's ultimate legacy, however, was the peace and prosperity the empire was to enjoy for the next two centuries under the system he initiated. His memory was enshrined in the political ethos of the Imperial age as a paradigm of the good emperor; although every emperor adopted his name, Caesar Augustus, only a handful earned genuine comparison with him.

Copyright © 1999, Garrett G. Fagan.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Augustus (the first Roman emperor, in whose reign Jesus Christ was born) is without any doubt one of the most important figures in Roman history.

It is reported that when he was near death, Augustus addressed those in attendance with these words, "If I have played my part well, applaud!"

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr
Cleisthenes
TiberiusTributePennyRICI30RSCII16aSRCV1763.jpg
703a, Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Tribute Penny of Matthew 22:20-2150 viewsSilver denarius, RIC I 30, RSC II 16a, SRCV 1763, gVF, Lugdunum mint, 3.837g, 18.7mm, 90o, 16 - 37 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM, Pax/Livia seated right holding scepter and branch, legs on chair ornamented, feet on footstool; toned. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Tiberius (A.D. 14-37)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

Introduction
The reign of Tiberius (b. 42 B.C., d. A.D. 37, emperor A.D. 14-37) is a particularly important one for the Principate, since it was the first occasion when the powers designed for Augustus alone were exercised by somebody else. In contrast to the approachable and tactful Augustus, Tiberius emerges from the sources as an enigmatic and darkly complex figure, intelligent and cunning, but given to bouts of severe depression and dark moods that had a great impact on his political career as well as his personal relationships.

. . . .

Early life (42-12 B.C.)
Tiberius Claudius Nero was born on 16 November 42 B.C. to Ti. Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla. Both parents were scions of the gens Claudia which had supplied leaders to the Roman Republic for many generations. . . [I]n 39 B.C., his mother Livia divorced Ti. Claudius Nero and married Octavian, thereby making the infant Tiberius the stepson of the future ruler of the Roman world. Forever afterward, Tiberius was to have his name coupled with this man, and always to his detriment.

. . . .

Accession and Early Reign (A.D. 14 - 23)
The accession of Tiberius proved intensely awkward. After Augustus had been buried and deified, and his will read and honored, the Senate convened on 18 September to inaugurate the new reign and officially "confirm" Tiberius as emperor. Such a transfer of power had never happened before, and nobody, including Tiberius, appears to have known what to do. Tacitus's account is the fullest. . . Rather than tactful, he came across to the senators as obdurate and obstructive. He declared that he was too old for the responsibilities of the Principate, said he did not want the job, and asked if he could just take one part of the government for himself. The Senate was confused, not knowing how to read his behavior. Finally, one senator asked pointedly, "Sire, for how long will you allow the State to be without a head?" Tiberius relented and accepted the powers voted to him, although he refused the title "Augustus."

. . . .

Tiberius allowed a trusted advisor to get too close and gain a tremendous influence over him. That advisor was the Praetorian Prefect, L. Aelius Sejanus, who would derail Tiberius's plans for the succession and drive the emperor farther into isolation, depression, and paranoia.

Sejanus (A.D. 23-31)
Sejanus hailed from Volsinii in Etruria. He and his father shared the Praetorian Prefecture until A.D. 15 when the father, L. Seius Strabo, was promoted to be Prefect of Egypt, the pinnacle of an equestrian career under the Principate. Sejanus, now sole Prefect of the Guard, enjoyed powerful connections to senatorial houses and had been a companion to Gaius Caesar on his mission to the East, 1 B.C. - A.D. 4. Through a combination of energetic efficiency, fawning sycophancy, and outward displays of loyalty, he gained the position of Tiberius's closest friend and advisor.

. . . .

[I]n a shocking and unexpected turn of events, [a] letter sent by Tiberius from Capri initially praised Sejanus extensively, and then suddenly denounced him as a traitor and demanded his arrest. Chaos ensued. Senators long allied with Sejanus headed for the exits, the others were confused -- was this a test of their loyalty? What did the emperor want them to do? -- but the Praetorian Guard, the very troops formerly under Sejanus's command but recently and secretly transferred to the command of Q. Sutorius Macro, arrested Sejanus, conveyed him to prison, and shortly afterwards executed him summarily. A witch-hunt followed. . . All around the city, grim scenes were played out, and as late as A.D. 33 a general massacre of all those still in custody took place.

Tiberius himself later claimed that he turned on Sejanus because he had been alerted to Sejanus's plot against Germanicus's family. This explanation has been rejected by most ancient and modern authorities, since Sejanus's demise did nothing to alleviate that family's troubles.

. . . .

The Last Years (A.D. 31-37)
The Sejanus affair appears to have greatly depressed Tiberius. A close friend and confidant had betrayed him; whom could he trust anymore? His withdrawal from public life seemed more complete in the last years. Letters kept him in touch with Rome, but it was the machinery of the Augustan administration that kept the empire running smoothly. Tiberius, if we believe our sources, spent much of his time indulging his perversities on Capri.

. . . .

Tiberius died quietly in a villa at Misenum on 16 March A.D. 37. He was 78 years old. There are some hints in the sources of the hand of Caligula in the deed, but such innuendo can be expected at the death of an emperor, especially when his successor proved so depraved. The level of unpopularity Tiberius had achieved by the time of his death with both the upper and lower classes is revealed by these facts: the Senate refused to vote him divine honors, and mobs filled the streets yelling "To the Tiber with Tiberius!" (in reference to a method of disposal reserved for the corpses of criminals).

Tiberius and the Empire
Three main aspects of Tiberius's impact on the empire deserve special attention: his relative military inertia; his modesty in dealing with offers of divine honors and his fair treatment of provincials; and his use of the Law of Treason (maiestas).

. . . .

Conclusion
. . . Tiberius's reign sporadically descended into tyranny of the worst sort. In the right climate of paranoia and suspicion, widespread denunciation led to the deaths of dozens of Senators and equestrians, as well as numerous members of the imperial house. In this sense, the reign of Tiberius decisively ended the Augustan illusion of "the Republic Restored" and shone some light into the future of the Principate, revealing that which was both promising and terrifying.

[For the entire article please refer to http://www.roman-emperors.org/tiberius.htm]

Copyright © 1997, Garrett G. Fagan. Used by permission.

"Some of the things he did are hard to believe. He had little boys trained as minnows to chase him when he went swimming and to get between his legs and nibble him. He also had babies not weaned from their mother breast suck at his chest and groin . . . "
(Suetonius. The Twelve Caesars. Trans. Robert Graves. London: Penguin Books, 1979. XLIV).

Jesus, referring to a "penny" asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible(Joseph Sermarini).


Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
GalbaAEAs.jpg
707a, Galba, 3 April 68 - 15 January 69 A.D.67 viewsGalba AE As, 68-69 AD; cf. SRC 727, 729ff; 27.85mm, 12g; Rome: Obverse: GALBA IMP CAESAR…, Laureate head right; Reverse: S P Q R OB CIV SER in oak wreath; gF+/F Ex. Ancient Imports.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Galba (68-69 A.D.)

John Donahue
College of William and Mary


Introduction
The evidence for the principate of Galba is unsatisfactory. The sources either concentrate on the personality of the man, thereby failing to offer a balanced account of his policies and a firm chronological base for his actions; or, they focus on the final two weeks of his life at the expense of the earlier part of his reign. As a result, a detailed account of his principate is difficult to write. Even so, Galba is noteworthy because he was neither related to nor adopted by his predecessor Nero. Thus, his accession marked the end of the nearly century-long control of the Principate by the Julio-Claudians. Additionally, Galba's declaration as emperor by his troops abroad set a precedent for the further political upheavals of 68-69. Although these events worked to Galba's favor initially, they soon came back to haunt him, ending his tumultuous rule after only seven months.

Early Life and Rise to Power
Born 24 December 3 BC in Tarracina, a town on the Appian Way, 65 miles south of Rome, Servius Galba was the son of C. Sulpicius Galba and Mummia Achaica. Galba's connection with the noble house of the Servii gave him great prestige and assured his acceptance among the highest levels of Julio-Claudian society. Adopted in his youth by Livia, the mother of the emperor Tiberius, he is said to have owed much of his early advancement to her. Upon her death, Livia made Galba her chief legatee, bequeathing him some 50 million sesterces. Tiberius, Livia's heir, reduced the amount, however, and then never paid it. Galba's marriage proved to be a further source of disappointment, as he outlived both his wife Lepida and their two sons. Nothing else is known of Galba's immediate family, other than that he remained a widower for the rest of his life.

Although the details of Galba's early political career are incomplete, the surviving record is one of an ambitious Roman making his way in the Emperor's service. Suetonius records that as praetor Galba put on a new kind of exhibition for the people - elephants walking on a rope. Later, he served as governor of the province of Aquitania, followed by a six-month term as consul at the beginning of 33. Ironically, as consul he was succeeded by Salvius Otho, whose own son would succeed Galba as emperor. Over the years three more governorships followed - Upper Germany (date unknown), North Africa (45) and Hispania Tarraconensis, the largest of Spain's three provinces (61). He was selected as a proconsul of Africa by the emperor Claudius himself instead of by the usual method of drawing lots. During his two-year tenure in the province he successfully restored internal order and quelled a revolt by the barbarians. As an imperial legate he was a governor in Spain for eight years under Nero, even though he was already in his early sixties when he assumed his duties. The appointment showed that Galba was still considered efficient and loyal. In all of these posts Galba generally displayed an enthusiasm for old-fashioned disciplina, a trait consistent with the traditional characterization of the man as a hard-bitten aristocrat of the old Republican type. Such service did not go unnoticed, as he was honored with triumphal insignia and three priesthoods during his career.

On the basis of his ancestry, family tradition and service to the state Galba was the most distinguished Roman alive (with the exception of the houses of the Julii and Claudii) at the time of Nero's demise in 68. The complex chain of events that would lead him to the Principate later that year began in March with the rebellion of Gaius Iulius Vindex, the governor of Gallia Lugdunensis. Vindex had begun to sound out provincial governors about support for a rebellion perhaps in late 67 or early 68. Galba did not respond but, because of his displeasure with Neronian misgovernment, neither did he inform the emperor of these treasonous solicitations. This, of course, left him dangerously exposed; moreover, he was already aware that Nero, anxious to remove anyone of distinguished birth and noble achievements, had ordered his death. Given these circumstances, Galba likely felt that he had no choice but to rebel.

In April, 68, while still in Spain, Galba "went public," positioning himself as a vir militaris, a military representative of the senate and people of Rome. For the moment, he refused the title of Emperor, but it is clear that the Principate was his goal. To this end, he organized a concilium of advisors in order to make it known that any decisions were not made by him alone but only after consultation with a group. The arrangement was meant to recall the Augustan Age relationship between the emperor and senate in Rome. Even more revealing of his imperial ambitions were legends like LIBERTAS RESTITUTA (Liberty Restored), ROM RENASC (Rome Reborn) and SALUS GENERIS HUMANI (Salvation of Mankind), preserved on his coinage from the period. Such evidence has brought into question the traditional assessment of Galba as nothing more than an ineffectual representative of a bygone antiquus rigor in favor of a more balanced portrait of a traditional constitutionalist eager to publicize the virtues of an Augustan-style Principate.
Events now began to move quickly. In May, 68 Lucius Clodius Macer, legate of the III legio Augusta in Africa, revolted from Nero and cut off the grain supply to Rome. Choosing not to recognize Galba, he called himself propraetor, issued his own coinage, and raised a new legion, the I Macriana liberatrix. Galba later had him executed. At the same time, 68, Lucius Verginius Rufus, legionary commander in Upper Germany, led a combined force of soldiers from Upper and Lower Germany in defeating Vindex at Vesontio in Gallia Lugdunensis. Verginius refused to accept a call to the emperorship by his own troops and by those from the Danube, however, thereby creating at Rome an opportunity for Galba's agents to win over Gaius Nymphidius Sabinus, the corrupt praetorian prefect since 65. Sabinus was able to turn the imperial guard against Nero on the promise that they would be rewarded financially by Galba upon his arrival. That was the end for Nero. Deposed by the senate and abandoned by his supporters, he committed suicide in June. At this point, encouraged to march on Rome by the praetorians and especially by Sabinus, who had his own designs on the throne, Galba hurriedly established broad-based political and financial support and assembled his own legion (subsequently known as the legio VII Gemina). As he departed from Spain, he abandoned the title of governor in favor of "Caesar," apparently in an attempt to lay claim to the entire inheritance of the Julio-Claudian house. Even so, he continued to proceed cautiously, and did not actually adopt the name of Caesar (and with it the emperorship) until sometime after he had left Spain.

The Principate of Galba
Meanwhile, Rome was anything but serene. An unusual force of soldiers, many of whom had been mustered by Nero to crush the attempt of Vindex, remained idle and restless. In addition, there was the matter concerning Nymphidius Sabinus. Intent on being the power behind the throne, Nymphidius had orchestrated a demand from the praetorians that Galba appoint him sole praetorian prefect for life. The senate capitulated to his pretensions and he began to have designs on the throne himself. In an attempt to rattle Galba, Nymphidius then sent messages of alarm to the emperor telling of unrest in both the city and abroad. When Galba ignored these reports, Nymphidius decided to launch a coup by presenting himself to the praetorians. The plan misfired, and the praetorians killed him when he appeared at their camp. Upon learning of the incident, Galba ordered the executions of Nymphidius' followers. To make matters worse, Galba's arrival was preceded by a confrontation with a boisterous band of soldiers who had been formed into a legion by Nero and were now demanding legionary standards and regular quarters. When they persisted, Galba's forces attacked, with the result that many of them were killed.
Thus it was amid carnage and fear that Galba arrived at the capital in October, 68, accompanied by Otho, the governor of Lusitania, who had joined the cause. Once Galba was within Rome, miscalculations and missteps seemed to multiply. First, he relied upon the advice of a corrupt circle of advisors, most notably: Titus Vinius, a general from Spain; Cornelius Laco, praetorian prefect; and his own freedman, Icelus. Second, he zealously attempted to recover some of Nero's more excessive expenditures by seizing the property of many citizens, a measure that seems to have gone too far and to have caused real hardship and resentment. Third, he created further ill-will by disbanding the imperial corps of German bodyguards, effectively abolishing a tradition that originated with Marius and had been endorsed by Augustus. Finally, he seriously alienated the military by refusing cash rewards for both the praetorians and for the soldiers in Upper Germany who had fought against Vindex.

This last act proved to be the beginning of the end for Galba. On 1 January 69 ("The Year of the Four Emperors"), the troops in Upper Germany refused to declare allegiance to him and instead followed the men stationed in Lower Germany in proclaiming their commander, Aulus Vitellius, as the new ruler. In response, Galba adopted Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi Licinianus to show that he was still in charge and that his successor would not be chosen for him. Piso, although an aristocrat, was a man completely without administrative or military experience. The choice meant little to the remote armies, the praetorians or the senate, and it especially angered Otho, who had hoped to succeed Galba. Otho quickly organized a conspiracy among the praetorians with the now-familiar promise of a material reward, and on 15 January 69 they declared him emperor and publicly killed Galba; Piso, dragged from hiding in the temple of Vesta, was also butchered.

Assessment
In sum, Galba had displayed talent and ambition during his lengthy career. He enjoyed distinguished ancestry, moved easily among the Julio-Claudian emperors (with the exception of Nero towards the end of his principate), and had been awarded the highest military and religious honors of ancient Rome. His qualifications for the principate cannot be questioned. Even so, history has been unkind to him. Tacitus characterized Galba as "weak and old," a man "equal to the imperial office, if he had never held it." Modern historians of the Roman world have been no less critical. To be sure, Galba's greatest mistake lay in his general handling of the military. His treatment of the army in Upper Germany was heedless, his policy towards the praetorians short sighted. Given the climate in 68-69, Galba was unrealistic in expecting disciplina without paying the promised rewards. He was also guilty of relying on poor advisors, who shielded him from reality and ultimately allowed Otho's conspiracy to succeed. Additionally, the excessive power of his henchmen brought the regime into disfavor and made Galba himself the principal target of the hatred that his aides had incited. Finally, the appointment of Piso, a young man in no way equal to the challenges placed before him, further underscored the emperor's isolation and lack of judgment. In the end, the instability of the post-Julio-Claudian political landscape offered challenges more formidable than a tired, septuagenarian aristocrat could hope to overcome. Ironically, his regime proved no more successful than the Neronian government he was so eager to replace. Another year of bloodshed would be necessary before the Principate could once again stand firm.

Copyright (C) 1999, John Donahue.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


Cleisthenes
tributepenny.jpg
ancient imitation of a tribute penny22 views17mm, 3.59g
obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS (blundered); laureate head right
rev: PONTIF MAXIM; Livia on throne right, scepter in right, branch in left hand
areich
1000-26-133.jpg
Antoninus Pius13 viewsAntoninus Pius. A.D. 138-161. AR denarius (17.1 mm, 2.80 g, 6 h). Rome mint, Struck A.D. 158-159. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP, laureate head right / TEMPL DIVI AVG REST, COS IIII, seated figures of Divus Augustus and Livia, set on podium, within octastyle temple. RIC 143; BMCRE 549; RSC 799b. VF.ecoli
Augustus_temple_(800x387).jpg
Antoninus Pius 11 viewsAntoninus Pius Sestertius temple of Augustus and Livia
Catalog: Temple of Divus Augustus
weight 28,6gr. | bronze Ø 32mm.
obv. Laureate head right ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P XXII
rev. Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus, containing cult-statues of Augustus
and Livia TEMPLVM DIVI AVG REST COS IIII S C

The Temple of Divus Augustus was a major temple originally built to commemorate the deified first Roman emperor, Augustus. It was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia, on the site of the house that Augustus had inhabited before he entered public life in the mid-1st century BC. The temple′s construction took place during the 1st century AD, having been vowed by the Roman Senate shortly after the death of the emperor in AD 14. It is known from Roman coinage that the temple was originally built to an Ionic hexastyle design. However, its size, physical proportions and exact site are unknown. During the reign of Domitian the Temple of Divus Augustus was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt and rededicated in 89/90 with a shrine to his favourite deity, Minerva. The temple was redesigned as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus. It was restored again in the mid 150s by Antonius Pius, and that was the reason for this coinage. The last known reference to the temple was on 27 May 218 | at some point thereafter it was completely destroyed and its stones were presumably quarried for later buildings. Its remains are not visible and the area in which it lay has never been excavated.

Cohen 805 | RIC 1004 | BMC 2063 | Sear 4235 R
vf
1 commentsAncient Aussie
2015-01-07_01_08_08-9.jpg
Antoninus Pius 6 views
Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Dupondius (27mm, 10.58 g, 11h). Rome mint. Struck AD 159. Radiate head right / TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST, octastyle temple within which are the seated figures of Divus Augustus and Livia. RIC III 1017. VF, dark brown surfaces with touches of green, some pitting and minor smoothing.


The second Temple of Divus Augustus, commenced under Tiberius and dedicated by Caligula in August AD 37, suffered during the great fire of 80, which began on the Capitoline Hill and spread into the Forum and onto the Palatine. It was possibly restored or rebuilt under Domitian, although it is not mentioned in the Chronographia. It received further restoration under Antoninus Pius in 158. The temple under Antoninus was Corinthian octastyle and contained the seated figures of Divus Augustus and Livia within, generally drawn on the coinage at an elevated level to suggest perspective.
Ancient Aussie
Antoninus_Pius_denar_temple.jpg
Antoninus Pius - AR denarius8 viewsRome
158-159 AD
laureate hwad right
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII
temple of Augustus and Livia
TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST
COS IIII
not in RIC (RIC III Antoninus Pius 272A/1004 var.), BMCRE IV 939, RSC II 804
2,68g

This issue comemorates reconstruction of the temple of Augustus and Livia by Antoninus.
Johny SYSEL
Antoninus_Pius_Denarius_Temple_of_Augustus_.jpg
Antoninus Pius Denarius Temple of Augustus64 viewsObv.
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII
Laureate head right

Rev.
TEMPL DIVI AVG REST
COS IIII
Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus and Livia, statues within
2 commentsancientdave
Antoninus_Pius_Temple_of_Divus_Aug_and_Livia.jpg
Antoninus Pius Temple of Divus Aug and Livia52 viewsAntoninus Pius denarius, RIC III 290a, Rome, 3.197g, 16.8mm, die axis 180o, 158 A.D.;
OBV: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, laureate head right;
REV: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST COS IIII, statues of Divus Augustus and Livia seated in an octastyle temple, two statues in front of the outer columns, statue on pediment, two others and a quadriga on roof;
This interesting type commemorates the restoration of the temple of Divus Augustus and Livia.

EX: Forvm Ancient Coins

SCARCE
1 commentsRomanorvm
AntoSe76-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 755, Sestertius of AD 159 (Temple of Divus Augustus) 43 viewsÆ Sestertius (19.91g, Ø33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: AED DIVI AVG REST (around) COS IIII (below) S C (in field), Octastyle temple with statues of Divus Augustus and Livia inside.
RIC 755 (R); BMC 1652; Cohen 3 (20Fr.); Strack 1174.
ex Jean Elsen (Bruxelles) auction 97; ex coll. A.Senden: L'architecture des monnaies Romaines.
Charles S
AntoSe29-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 1003, Sestertius of AD 158-159 (Temple of Divus Augustus)25 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.4g, Ø32mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 158-159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, laureate head of Antoninus Pius right.
Rev.: TEMPL DIVI AVG REST (round) COS IIII (in ex.) S C (in field), Octastyle temple of with statues of Divus Augustus and Livia. Both statues in the centre, standing on a base, have the right arms raised. There are statues to the left near the foot of the steps and other statues of soldiers on pedestals at each side of the top step. In the roof is a quadriga in the centre, and statues at each corner; further statues in the pediment.
RIC 1003 (S); BMC 2063-66; Cohen 797; Foss (RHC) 132:88a
ex D. Ruskin, Oxford: found in Reigate (Surrey), 1864

Coin issued on the occasion of the restoration of the temple of Divus Ausustus and Diva Augusta (Livia) in AD 158.
Charles S
AntoSe29-4.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 1003A, Sestertius of AD 158-159 (Temple of Divus Augustus) 17 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.4g, Ø32mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 158-159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, laureate head of Antoninus Pius right.
Rev.: TEMPL DIVI AVG REST (around) COS IIII (ex.) S C (field), Octastyle temple of with statues of Divus Augustus and Livia. Both statues in the centre, standing on a base, have the right arms raised. There are statues to the left near the foot of the steps and other statues of soldiers on pedestals at each side of the top step. In the roof is a quadriga in the centre, and statues at each corner; further statues in the pediment.
RIC 1003A (S); BMCRE 2063 var. (rev. legend TEMPLVM DIV); Cohen 797; Strack 1168; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 404 (2 specimens); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4235 var. (different rev. legend); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 132:88a
ex D. Ruskin, Oxford, 1995 ("found in Reigate (Surrey), 1864")

Coin issued on the occasion of the restoration of the temple of Divus Ausustus and Diva Augusta (Livia) in AD 158. he temple was probably situated in the valley between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia. No trace has survived.
Charles S
AntoSe65-2~1.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 1004, Sestertius of AD 159 (Temple of Divus Augustus)47 viewsÆ Sestertius (22.23g, Ø30mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST (around) COS IIII (in ex.) S C (in field), Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus with statues of Divus Augustus and Livia in the centre.
RIC 1004 (S); BMCRE 2063; Cohen 805; Strack 1167; Banti 406.
ex Triton VI (2003)

The second temple of Divus Augustus was restored under Antoninus Pius in 158. The reliefs on the pediment cannot be identified with certainty, but the statuary on the roof can be identified as Augustus in quadriga flanked by Romulus on the left and Aeneas carrying Anchises on the right.
Charles S
AntoSe65-4.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 1004, Sestertius of AD 159 (Temple of Divus Augustus)25 viewsÆ Sestertius (22.23g, Ø30mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST (around) COS IIII (in ex.) S C (in field), Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus with statues of Augustus and Livia. The temple stands on a podium of three steps. Both statues in the centre, standing on a base, have the right arms raised. There are statues to the left near the foot of the steps and other statues of soldiers on pedestals at each side of the top step. The statuary on the roof can be identified as Augustus in quadriga flanked by Romulus on the right and Aeneas carrying Anchises on the left. Unidentified statuary in the pediment.

RIC 1004 (S); BMCRE 2063; Cohen 805; Strack 1167; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 406; Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4235.
ex Triton VI (2003)

The second Temple of Divus Augustus, commenced under Tiberius and dedicated by Caligula in August AD 37, suffered during the great fire of 80 which began on the Capitoline Hill and spread into the Forum and onto the Palatine. It was possibly restored or rebuilt under Domitian, although it is not mentioned in the Chronographia, and it certainly received further restoration under Antoninus Pius in 158. The temple under Antoninus was Corinthian octastyle and contained the seated figures of Divus Augustus and Livia within, generally drawn on the coinage at an elevated level to suggest perspective.
Charles S
AntoDu08-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 1017, Dupondius of AD 159 (Temple of Divus Augustus)44 viewsÆ Dupondius (14.77g, Ø25mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 159 .
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, radiate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST (around), COS IIII (in ex.) S C (in field), Octastyle temple with the statues of Augustus and Livia.
RIC 1017; Cohen 807; Strack 1167
ex Old Roman Coins

This type was issued to celebrate the restoration of the temple of Divus Augustus in AD 158.
This specimen is listed in Wildwinds
Charles S
AntoAs27.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 1021, As of AD 158-15942 viewsÆ As (10.92g, Ø26mm, 7h). Rome mint. Struck AD 158-159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII, laureate head right, draped left shoulder.
Rev.: AEDE DIVI AVG REST (around) COS IIII (in ex.) S C (in field), Octastyle temple with the statues of Divus Augustus and Livia inside; soldiers on pedestal left and right before outer columns; statuary in pediment; on roof, quadriga facing and standing figures on angles.
RIC 1021a (S); BMCRE IV p.355 *; Cohen 12; Strack 1162
ex Jean Elsen (Bruxelles), Auction 97; ex coll. A. Senden: l'architecture des monnaies Romaines

Issued to celebrate the completion of the restauration of the temple of Augustus and Livia
Charles S
Livia_01.jpg
Asia Minor, Kilikia, Augusta, Livia23 viewsLivia, wife of Augustus
Cilicia, Augusta
Æ 18mm
Dated year 6 (AD 26/27)
Obv.: IOYΛIΛ [CE]BACTH , Draped bust right
Rev.: [E]TOYC ς AYΓOY CTANWN, Tyche seated right on rock, holding grain ear, river god Saros at feet.
AE, 18mm, 4.36 g
Ref.: SNG Levante 1241 (this coin), RPC I 4009 (this coin)
ex CNG eAuction 106, lot 180
shanxi
Livia_Julia_R694_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, RPC, Pergamon, Livia, Julia9 viewsLivia & Julia (Wife and Daughter of Augustus)
circa 10-2 BC
Charinos Grammateus, magistrate.
Obv: ΛΙΒΙΑΝ ΗΡΑΝ ΧΑΡΙΝΟΣ. Draped bust of Livia right.
Rev: ΟΥΛΙΑΝ ΑΦΡΟΔΙΤΗΝ. Draped bust of Julia (as Aphrodite) right.
Æ, 18 mm, 3.38 g
Ref.: RPC 2359
shanxi
41286_Livia,_Wife_of_Augustus_and_Mother_of_Tiberius,_Augusta,_Cilicia,_Time_of_Nero.jpg
Augusta, Cilicia, Time of Nero. AE 18, Tyche seated on throne, holding grain, river god Saros4 viewsLivia, Wife of Augustus and Mother of Tiberius, Augusta, Cilicia, Time of Nero. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 4013, SNG Levante 1238, SNG Cop -, aF, porous, Augusta mint, 6.084g, 18.2mm, 0o, 67 - 68 A.D.; obverse “ΣΕΒΑΣΤΗ ΛΙΟΥΙΑ”, draped bust right; reverse “ΑΥΓΟΥΣΤΑΝΩΝ”, Tyche seated on throne, holding grain, river god Saros at feet; rare. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
auli~0.jpg
Augustus and Livia , Colonial Romula (Seville), Minted by Tiberus13 viewsAugustus and Livia, minted by Tiberius, 14 Aug 19 - 16 Mar 37 A.D.
This coin associates Livia with globe and crescent symbols and refers to her as Augusta Genetrix Orbis, Sacred Mother of the World. This extraordinary title was never official and is not used on any other coin type for any empress.
5474. Orichalcum dupondius, RPC I 73, Alverez Burgos 1587, aF, Colonia Romula mint, 25.1g, 33.4mm, 180°, obverse PERM DIVI AVG COL ROM, Augustus radiate head right, star above, thunderbolt right; reverse IVLIA AVGVSTA GENETRIX ORBIS, Livia head left on globe, crescent above;
sold 4-2018
NORMAN K
arici72tibOR.jpg
Augustus As, RIC I 72 (Tiberius)49 viewsRome mint, Divus Augustus As, Struck under Tiberius, circa AD 15-16 AE, 26mm 9.10g, RIC I 72 (Tiberius); BMCRE 151-154 (Tiberius); BN 44-48 (Tiberius); Cohen 244
O: DIVVS AVGV-STVS • PATER •, radiate head of Divus Augustus left; star above; thunderbolt before
R: S C across field, draped female figure (Livia) seated right, feet on stool, holding scepter in left hand and patera in right
casata137ec
auglivprov2OR.jpg
Augustus, with Julia Augusta (Livia), RPC 246631 viewsIonia, Smyrna mint, Augustus, with Julia Augusta (Livia), struck circa 10 B.C. AE, 20mm 4.58g, Leontiskos Hippomedontos, magistrate, RPC 2466; SNG Copenhagen 1334
O: ΣEBAΣTΩI ZMYPNAIOI, Jugate heads right of Augustus, laureate, and Livia, draped
R: ΔIONIΣIOΣ KOΛΛYBAΣ, Aphrodite Stratonicis standing facing, holding scepter and Nike, leaning on column; to right, dove standing left
1 commentscasata137ec
Tiberius_37.jpg
B272 views Tiberius AR Denarius

Attribution: RIC I 30, RSC II 16a, SRCV I 1763, Lugdunum
Date: 19 August, AD 14 – 16 March, AD 37
Obverse: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head r.
Reverse: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated r., holding olive branch & long scepter; ornate legs to chair
Size: 19 mm
Weight: 3.6 grams
* NOTE: chipped piece & metal adhesions from prior mounting of coin as jewelry
(Image of Tiberius courtesy of Bill Storage: Ara Pacis Museum, Rome)

"He was large and strong of frame, and of a stature above the average... He strode along with his neck stiff and bent forward, usually with a stern countenance and for the most part in silence, never or very rarely conversing with his companions... All of these mannerisms of his, which were disagreeable and signs of arrogance, were remarked by Augustus, who often tried to excuse them to the senate and people by declaring that they were natural failings, and not intentional." - Suetonius Life of Tiberius LXVIII

When Augustus died on August 19, AD 14, Tiberius was considered to be the logical successor. The issue, however, was that there had never been a transfer of power by succession, only through seizure of leadership by force. Although Tiberius superficially sought to preserve the idea of the emperor being “First Citizen” to appease the senate, it was abundantly clear who was in control of the empire. Tiberius made a clever move to sequester the support of the legions through a pay increase. The reverse of this coin depicts Livia seated. Being Tiberius’ mother, she campaigned relentlessly to place her son as the natural heir to the position of emperor. Once in control, Tiberius allowed her to keep the title of Augusta, granted to her by Augustus in his will, but refused her the honor of being recognized as “Mother of her Country” or that of lictor. This was an astute political move to limit Livia’s influence. In the long run Tiberius was unable to maintain the demeanor or tact that Augustus possessed, and was seen as a stiff and arrogant tyrant by many. Tiberius spent much of the latter part of his reign at his private retreat on the island of Capri. He fell ill in AD 37 and died March 16 at the age of 77 in his seaside villa at Misenum.
The denarius of Tiberius with Livia as Pax on the reverse is commonly known as the 'Tribute Penny,' the coin to which Jesus referred to when he was discussing paying taxes to the Romans, and said "render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's" (Mark 12:17 & Matthew 22:20-21). Although there are two other reverse types on denarii of Tiberius, they were only issued during the first two years of his reign, while the Pax reverse was employed throughout the remainder, making it the more likely coin referred to. The term 'penny' is from the AD 1611 King James translation of the Bible, and was adopted since the penny was the standard denomination of the time.
6 commentsNoah
gratus_prutah.jpg
BCC j546 viewsJudaea AE Prutah
Valerius Gratus- Tiberius 15-26 C.E.
OBV:Vine leaf with grapes.
above, [IΟΥΛΙΑ] (Livia)
REV:narrow necked amphora
with scroll handles flanked
by date: L Δ (year 4)
16mm. 2.42g. Axis:180
Hendin 643
v-drome
i~0.jpg
Bithynia-Pontus, Tium. Livia AE15. c. AD 14-37 (?)32 viewsObv: Head of Livia r.
Rev: KAYC T - T - IANΩN, winged caduceus; on r., Δ / K.
RPC -; cfr. SNG von Aulock 7175.
Very rare
2 commentsancientone
Bolivia.jpg
Bolivia38 viewsKm188 - 10 Centavos - 1965Daniel F
BOLIVIA 1855 4 SOLES.jpg
BOLIVIA - 1855 4 Soles48 viewsBOLIVIA - 1855 4 Soles, silver. La Paz mint. KM #125.dpaul7
potosi_2_reales_1775.jpg
BOLIVIA - Charles III160 viewsBOLIVIA - Charles III (1759-1788) AR 2 Reales, 1775. Obv.: Bust right; CAROLUS . III . DEI .GRATIA .1775.. Rev: Crowned arms of Spain; . HISPAN . ETIND . REX . PTS . 2R . JR . On reverse, the PTS part of the inscription is printed each letter over the other; POTOSI mintmark. Reference: KM-53.1 commentsdpaul7
1670__real_cob_petosi_piedmont_wreck.jpg
BOLIVIA--REIGN OF CHARLES II OF SPAIN13 views1 Real Silver Cob
1670
Petosi mint
(from wreck of the Piedmont)
laney
thrace_caesarea.jpg
Caesarea (Pantikapaion), Aphrodite/ ΚΑΙ−ΣΑ/ΡΕ−ΩΝ, scepter topped with pomegranate flower, H (year 8)21 viewsCaesarea (Pantikapaion), Thrace, c. 17 - 4 B.C. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 1936, SNG Fitzwilliam 1275, Anokhin 322, BMC Thrace -, SNG Stancomb -, F, Pantikapaion mint, 6.458g, 21.1mm, 0o, 13 - 12 B.C.; obverse draped and veiled bust of Aphrodite right, wearing calathus; reverse “ΚΑΙ−ΣΑ/ΡΕ−ΩΝ”, scepter topped with pomegranate flower, H (year 8) lower right. The veiled bust is sometimes identified as Livia or as Queen Dynamis but RPC I rejects these identifications as unlikely because it would be inappropriate to depict either of them with kalathos on their head. Ex FORVMPodiceps
CALIGULA-1.jpg
Caesonia (?), wife of Caligula, died 41 CE677 viewsÆ (28 mm, 11.17 g) of Carthago Nova, Spain.
Obv: C CAESAR AVG. GERMANIC. IMP. PM. TRP. COS. Laurate head of Caligula, right.
Rev: CN. ATEL. FLAC. CN. POM. FLAC. II VIR. Q.V.I.N.C. Head of Caesonia (as Salus) right, SAL AVG across field.
SGI 419; Heiss 272,35; Cohen 247,1.

Though this coin is reputed to portray Caesonia, this is not likely for its obverse is dated TR P COS = 37 AD, yet Caligula did not marry Caesonia until late 39! RPC 185 calls the lady Salus, but also mentions possible IDs with Antonia or Livia (p. 92).
EmpressCollector
Carthago.jpg
Carthago Tiberius AE As RPC 75520 viewsAE As - Carthago - During the reign of Tiberius - 14-18 AD
Obv: TI CAESAR IMP PP ; Bare head of Tiberius to right
Rev : LA FAVSTVS DC BASSVS IIVIR ; Livia seated to left, holding a patera and a sceptre; in the field PP DD

RPC 755 - SBG 422 - M 328
Tanit
augusta_julia_RPC4014.jpg
Cilicia, Augusta, Julia-Livia, RPC 401433 viewsLivia, wife of Augustus, AD 14-29
AE 19, 5.2g
struck AD 67/8 (year 48), in the time of Nero
obv. IOVLIA - SEBASTH
Bust of Livia, draped, r.; hair bound in small bun in the neck
rev. AYGOYSTA - NW - N DP (year 48)
Tyche, in long garment and wearing mural-crown, std. r. on ornated throne,
holding long grain-ears in both hands; at her feet river-god Saros swimming r.
RPC 4014; cf. SNG Paris 1893; cf. SNG Levante 1238; Karbach 25.1
very rare, about VF

Saros, today Seyhan river in Turkey
Jochen
Diva_Augusta.JPG
Claudius, AE Dupondius, DIVA AVGVSTA, 43-44 AD1 viewsClaudius, AE dupondius, Rome, 43-44 AD.

Obv: DIVVS AVGVSTVS S C, Bust of Augustus left
Rev: DIVA AVGVSTA, Livia seated left holding wheat leaf and poppy in rigth hand and large torch in left.
RIC I 101

Diameter: 29 mm.
Weight: 14.2g.
Jose Polanco
CLAUDU04-1.jpg
Claudius, RIC 101, for Germanicus, Dupondius of AD 41-50 14 viewsÆ Dupondius (16.4g, Ø 31,5mm, 6h). Rome mint, struck AD 41-50.
Obv.: DIVVS AVGVSTVS, head of Augustus facing left between S C.
Rev.: DIVA AVGVSTA, Livia seated left holding corn ears with poppy and a long torch
RIC (Claudius) 101 (R2); Cohen (Octave Auguste) 93; BMCRE 224
Charles S
trib_p.jpg
Denarius, PONTIF (MAXIM)7 viewsTiberius A.D. 14-37. AR Denarius. 3.4g, 17mm. Obv. PONTIF (MAXIM), Livia seated right holding sceptre and branch. RCV 1763, RSC 16aPodiceps
Livia_and_Augustus_Megaglion.JPG
DIVINE AUGUSTUS & LIVIA (by Tiberius). AE34 medallion? of Colonia Romula (Seville), RPC 73. Obverse: PERM. DIVI AVG. COL. ROM. Radiate head of Divus Augustus right; six-rayed star 21 viewsDIVINE AUGUSTUS & LIVIA (by Tiberius). AE34 medallion? of Colonia Romula (Seville), RPC 73. Obverse: PERM. DIVI AVG. COL. ROM. Radiate head of Divus Augustus right; six-rayed star above; thunderbolt before. Reverse: IVLIA AVGVSTA GENETRIX ORBIS. Head of Livia left on globe of the world; crescent moon above. RPC I, 73. SNG Copenhagen 421. F. Scarce. Livia, the mother of the emperor Tiberius, is honored as mother of the world by him on this exceptional coin.Antonivs Protti
AugustusLivia.jpg
Divus Augustus by Tiberius109 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER
Star above head of Augustus , thunderbolt before

SC
Livia seated right, holding patera and sceptre

Rome

15, 16 AD

10.75g

Sear 1788, RIC 72

Dark green/black patina. Great portrait!

Ex-Tater's
5 commentsJay GT4
DYNAMIS.jpg
Dynamis, Queen of the Cimmerian Bosphorus?200 viewsBosphorus/Pontus. Agrippias Caesaria ( Phanagoria). AE 8 nummia (19mm, 4.4 g), late 1st century BC.
Obv: Veiled and draped female bust, right.
Rev: AGRIPPEWN, Prow left, mark of value H in field at right.
RPC 1934-5; BMC 1.

RPC lists three possibilities for the Bust on the obverse: Livia, Aphrodite Urania, and Queen Dynamis. Popular opinion seems to be that the bust is that of Livia.
EmpressCollector
EB0374_scaled.JPG
EB0374 Livia, carpentum21 viewsLivia, AE Sestertius, Struck under Tiberius, AD 22-23.
Obv: SPQR IVLIAE AVGVST in three lines, funeral carpentum drawn right by two mules.
Rev: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST P M TR POT XXIIII around large SC.
References: RIC 51; BMCRE 76; Cohen 6; Sear 1738.
Diameter: 35mm, Weight: heavy.
1 commentsEB
za~0.jpg
GALBA48 viewsAR denarius. 69 AD. Laureate head right. IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG / Livia standing left, holding patera and scepter.DIVA AVGVSTA . RIC 186. RSC 55.
Ex I & L Goldberg.
benito
00galba.jpg
GALBA42 viewsAR denarius. 69 AD. Laureate head right. IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG / Livia standing left, holding patera and scepter.DIVA AVGVSTA . RIC 186. RSC 55.

benito
00galba~2.jpg
GALBA130 viewsGALBA
AR denarius. 69 AD. Laureate head right. IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG / Livia standing left, holding patera and scepter.DIVA AVGVSTA . RIC 186. RSC 55.

He showed marked respect to Livia Augusta, to whose favor he owed great influence during her lifetime and by whose last will he almost became a rich man; for he had the largest bequest among her legatees, one of fifty million sesterces. But because the sum was designated in figures and not written out in words, Tiberius, who was her heir, reduced the bequest to five hundred thousand, and Galba never received even that. Suetonius 5.2
With this coin Galba wished to demonstrate continuity with the Julio-Claudian dinasty that had ruled for the last century, through his close friendship with Livia.



benito
Galba~0.jpg
Galba96 viewsIMP SER GALBA AVG
Laureate head right

DIVA AVGVSTA
Livia standing left holding patera and sceptre

Rome, November 68 AD-January 69AD

RIC 150, BMC 5, RSC 52a

2.94g

Rare with this short obverse legend

Ex-Incitatus
5 commentsJay GT4
RS034-Roman-AE_as,_Galba_(ca_68-69_AD)-019700.JPG
GALBA (68-69 AD), AE as, DIVA AVGVSTA, Spanish (Tarraco?) mint, ca. 68 AD55 viewsObverse- SER GALBA IMP CAESAR AVG P M TR P P P, laureate head right.
Reverse- DIVA AVGVSTA, female figure (Livia?) standing left, holding patera and sceptre.
RIC 67, 28 mm, 11.6 g.
Ex-"king_radio" (eBay), UK, February, 2012.
Comments: Galba can be moderately tough. A lot of his coins (at least the ones within my budget) are pretty miserable looking. I thought this one was pretty decent for the price (which worked out to just a hair over $200 with the exchange rate). I liked it for the clear portrait and name. The almost black patina is not bad at all. The British seller was very friendly and easy to deal with- we ended up swapping several chatty emails.
2 commentslordmarcovan
Galba_RIC_189.jpg
Galba Denarius A.D. 69 RIC 189, RSC 55a, BMC 631 viewsIMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG, laureate and draped bust right / DIVA AVGVSTA, Livia standing left, holding patera & vertical sceptre.
Maximum Diameter: 17.0 mm
Weight: 2.82 g
1 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
Tiberius-Denar-Livia.jpg
II-TIBERIUS-a - 002 Denar- RIC I/2639 viewsAv) TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureate head right

Rv) PONTIF MAXIM
Female figure (Livia?) seated right, holding vertical sceptre and in other hand branch

Weight:3,6g; Ø: 18 mm; reference:: RIC I/26 struck at LUGDUNUM
sulcipius
51C76C64-5344-4E97-BC10-49162E5560AA.jpeg
Ionia, Ephesus; Augustus 6 viewsIONIA, Ephesus. Augustus, with Livia. 27 BC-14 AD. Æ 22mm (7.53 gm). Asklas and Euphron, magistrates. Jugate heads of Augustus and Livia right / Stag of Artemis right; bowcase above. RPC I 2591; SNG Copenhagen 360.ecoli
klazomenai_augustus_RPC2496.jpg
Ionia, Klazomenai, Augustus, RPC 249634 viewsAugustus, 27 BC - AD 14
AE 16, 4.39g
obv. KLAZOM - KTISTHS
Head of Augustus, laureate, r.
rev. QEA - LIBIA
Head of Livia, r.
RPC 2496
Rare, about VF

Jochen
ita.jpg
Italian States-Tassarolo, Filippo Spinola (1616 - 1688 A.D.)62 viewsAR Luigino
O: LIV • MA • PRI • SP • COM • T • SOVV • DOM; Draped bust of Livia Centurioni right.
R: D N S • ADIVTOR •-• ET • REDEM • MEVS; Crowned coat of arms, rosette above, T below, 16 | 66 across fields.
22mm
2.27g
KM 52.1
2 commentsMat
IMG_7388_comp.jpg
Italy, Rome, The Painted Garden of Livia30 viewsThe painted garden of Livia Augusta was located at her country residence in Prima Porta, 15km north along the Via Flaminia. It was decorating the walls of a windowless underground room which was probably used as a summer room.

The painted garden runs along the four walls depicting plants and trees in different periods of time with overlapping flowering and mature fruits. Plant species depicted include: umbrella pine, oak, red fir, quince, pomegranate, myrtle, oleander, date palm, strawberry, laurel, viburnum, holm oak, boxwood, cypress, ivy, acanthus, rose, poppy, chrysanthemum, chamomile, fern, violet, and iris. Birds are present almost everywhere.

In 1950 the frescoes were detached from the villa and transferred to the Museo Nazionale Romano di Palazzo Massimo, close to Stazione Termini, and located at the third floor.

Sergio Orata
JUD_Pontias_Pilate_Hendon_648.JPG
Judaea. Pontius Pilate (26-36 A.D.), prefect under Tiberius18 viewsHendin 648, TJC 331, AJC II, Supp. V, 21

AE Prutah, 16-17 mm., dated Year 16 of Tiberius = 29 A.D.

Obv: Three bound ears of barley, the outer two ears droop, surrounded by IOYLIA KAICAP[OC].

Rev: Simpulum (libation ladel ) surrounded by [TIBEPIOY KAICAP]OC, and dated LI digamma.

The obverse legend refers to Julia Livia, mother of Tiberius.
Stkp
IMG_9300.JPG
Kingdom of Thrace, Rhoemetalces I/Augustus and Livia11 viewsKINGS of THRACE. Rhoemetalces I, with Augustus. 11 BC-AD 12. Æ Jugate heads of Rhoemetalces, diademed, and Pythodoris right; before, diminutive bust of Kotys IV right / Jugate heads of Augustus, laureate, and Livia right. RPC I 1710; Youroukova 188-93.ecoli
1542171609434651265871.jpg
Koinon, Thessaly31 viewsPseudo-autonomous
41-54 AD (Time of Claudius)
AE Assarion (17.5mm, 4.18g)
Amtigonos (Strategos)
O: Draped bust of Livia right; ΘEΣΣ-AΛΩN around.
R: Hekate advancing right, holding torch in each hand; monogram to right, ΣTPATHΓANTIΓON-OY around.
RPC I, 1438; BCD Thessaly II, 928
ex Frank Kovacs; ex Mark Breitsprecher
1 commentsEnodia
00912-Livia.JPG
Livia31 viewsLivia
21 mm 4.72 gm
O: Draped bust right
R: Tyche of Augusta seated right on throne decorated with tendrils, holding grain ears; at feet, river-god Sarus swimming right; HM (date) in legend
Provincial of Cilicia, Augusta
4 commentsKoffy
Livia_def.jpg
Livia8 viewsLivia
Augusta, Cilicia.
3.7 g, 17,60 mm.
Obv. No legend, draped bust right.
Rev. AYΓOYΣTANΩN, star above capricorn right with globe between forelegs.
RPC I 4007.
Marsman
0038-310.jpg
Livia (+ AD 29), Dupondius - *60 viewsRome mint, AD 22-23 under the reign of Tiberius
SALVS AVGVSTA, draped bust of Salus (Livia) right
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG P M TR POT XXIIII, around large S C
13.90 g, 27 mm,.
Ref : RCV # 1740 (450), Cohen # 5 (6), RIC I, 47.
Ex Auctiones.GmbH
3 commentsPotator II
livia.jpg
Livia (30 B.C. - 29 A.D)51 viewsIONIA, Ephesos
Æ 16
Magistrate, Aristeas Asklepiades
O: Draped bust of Livia right, hair in a bun.
R: EFE GRAMMATEUS ARISTEAS ASKLHPI-ADHS in five lines across fields and in exergue, Stag standing right.
3.8g
16mm
RPC I 2576; SNG Cop 367

Rare
2 commentsMat
71021q00[1]~0.jpg
Livia - Julia Augusta - Augustus 14-29 CE122 viewsGB71021. Bronze AE 16, Karbach Augusta 19,6; RPC I 4007; SNG BnF 1891; SNG Cop 69; SNGvA 5531 - 5532, F, Cilicia, Augusta mint, weight 3.549g, maximum diameter 15.9mm, die axis 0o, 20 - 29 A.D; obverse draped bust right; reverse capricorn left, holding globe, six-rayed star above, AYΓOYCTA/NΩN below;
sold 4-2018
1 commentsNORMAN K
1337_Livia_Oea~0.jpg
Livia - Oea, Syrtica8 viewsAE as
22/23-29 AD
draped bust right, grain ear behind, peacock right
helmeted bust of Minerva left wearing aegis
WY'T in neophoenician script
MAA 35; Müller 35; SNG Copenhagen 34; RPC I 833
9,5g 24mm
ex Naville Numismatics
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
livia.jpg
Livia AE 23, possibly unpublished9 viewsLivia, Wife of Augustus and Mother of Tiberius. Bronze AE 23, RPC I -, possibly unpublished, aVG, uncertain mint, 13.109g, 23.3mm, 45o, struck by Tiberius, c. 19 - 29 A.D.; obverse draped female bust right; reverse, altar? ex FORVMPodiceps
livia.jpg
Livia AE dupondius23 viewsLivia AE dupondius. Restoration issue under Titus, 80-81 A.D. Veiled and diademed bust of Livia as Pietas right, PIETAS below / IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG RESTIT around SC. RIC 222, RCV 2588

Ex. Artemid Aste, Jean Baptiste Collection
Holding_History
IVSTITIA_Stamped_a-removebg.png
LIVIA AE Dupondius28 viewsOBVERSE: IVSTITIA, draped bust of Livia as Justitia right, wearing stephane
REVERSE: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG REST, around large SC
Restoration issue under Titus.
Rome, AD 80-81
9.9g, 27mm
Cohen 9, RIC II 424 (Titus), BMC 289 (Titus), Komnick 15
Modern stamp, 7 over 36 on obverse
1 commentsLegatus
auli.jpg
Livia and Augustus, Colonial Romula (Seville), Minted by Tiberus12 viewsAugustus and Livia, minted by Tiberius, 14 Aug 19 - 16 Mar 37 A.D.
This coin associates Livia with globe and crescent symbols and refers to her as Augusta Genetrix Orbis, Sacred Mother of the World. This extraordinary title was never official and is not used on any other coin type for any empress.
5474. Orichalcum dupondius, RPC I 73, Alverez Burgos 1587, aF, Colonia Romula mint, 25.1g, 33.4mm, 180°, obverse PERM DIVI AVG COL ROM, Augustus radiate head right, star above, thunderbolt right; reverse IVLIA AVGVSTA GENETRIX ORBIS, Livia head left on globe, crescent above;
NORMAN K
B-livia_julia_01_1.jpg
Livia and Julia Provincial Bronze 31 viewsObv: OMONOIA EYETHRIA - Two draped female busts (Livia and Julia as Homonoia and Eueteria?) side by side to the right.
Rev: TO / MI - TW / N - Cornucopia.
Mint: Tomis, Moesia Inferior
Material: AE
Cat #: RPC 1823
oa
T & L.JPG
Livia and Tiberius29 viewsObv. Tiberius
Rev. Livia
Size: 27 mm.
Minted: Minted in Augusta, Cilicia.
Attribution: The coin lists as a variant of S.322.
Other: countermark ? Military standard
Marjan E
Livia_as_Salus_Dupondius.jpg
Livia as Salus Dupondius104 viewsObv.
SALVS AVGVSTA
Bust of Livia as Salus right

Rev.
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG P M TR POT XXIIII
Large SC surrounded by Tiberius' titles

Minted by Tiberius A.D. 22-23

6 commentsancientdave
Livia_IVSTITIA.jpg
Livia Dupondius91 viewsIVSTITIA
Diad. and draped bust of Livia as Justitia right

TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG P M TR POT XXIIII around large SC

Rome 22-23AD

12.61g

Sear 1739

Countermark on reverse NCAP?:
There are several interpretations of what this, the most interesting of all Julio-Caludian ctmk., means. The two most likely are:
1. Nero Ceasar Augustus Populi Romani
2. Nero Caesar Augustus Probavit
In the first instance it is a congiarium or public dole given by Nero to the people of Rome. In the second, it is a revalidation of the earlier coins of ones predecessors still in circulation.
Possible is also a later use, eg. by Nerva, or that no emperors name was part of the countermark, Countermark Martini Pangerl Collection 1; 20; 60 depending on subtype
2 commentsTitus Pullo
Livia_40.jpg
Livia Dupondius (UNIFACE PLASTER CAST)42 viewsAE dupondius issued by Drusus under Tiberius
Obv:- Diademed, draped, and veiled bust of a woman (Livia?), right, PIETAS in exe.
A.D. 23

UNIFACE PLASTER CAST
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Livia_IVSTITIA~0.jpg
Livia dupondius with Nero Countermark119 viewsIVSTITIA
Diad. and draped bust of Livia as Justitia right

TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG P M TR POT XXIIII around large SC

Rome 22-23AD

Sear 1739

Countermark on reverse NCAP:
There are several interpretations of what this, the most interesting of all Julio-Caludian ctmk., means. The two most likely are:
1. Nero Ceasar Augustus Populi Romani
2. Nero Caesar Augustus Probavit
In the first instance it is a congiarium or public dole given by Nero to the people of Rome. In the second, it is a revalidation of the earlier coins of ones predecessors still in circulation.
Possible is also a later use, eg. by Nerva, or that no emperors name was part of the countermark, Countermark Martini Pangerl Collection 1; 20; 60 depending on subtype
Titus Pullo
livia_(tiberius)46var.jpg
Livia RIC I, (Tiberius) 46 var. 46 viewsLivia, died AD 29, wife of Augustus
AE - Dupondius, 13.59g, 27mm
struck under Tiberius, Rome, AD 14-37
obv. Bust of Livia as Iustitia, draped, r., wearing stephane decorated with floral element; hair bound in knot
on back
rev. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG PM TR POT XXIIII (beginning upper r.)
in field big SC
ref. RIC I, Tiberius 46 var. (legend without PM); C.4 var. (legend without F AVG); BMCR (Tiberius) 79, pl. 24, 1
Scarce, about VF

These dupondii were made of Bronze. It is discussed which side is obv. or rev.
Jochen
livia_(Tiberius)47_countermark_NCAPR.jpg
Livia, RIC I (Tiberius) 47 countermarked with NCAPR75 viewsLivia, died AD 29, wife of Augustus
AE - Dupondius, 12.69g, 28.8mm, 180°
struck under Tiberius, Rome, AD 21-22
obv. Bust of Livia as Salus, draped, r.; hair bound in knot on back
rev. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG TR POT XXIIII (beginning upper r.)
in field big SC
upper left c/m NCAPR in rectangular incus
ref. RIC I, Tiberius 47; BMCR (Tiberius) 82
c/m Pangerl 60a; Werz 139
Scarce, about VF
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

NACPR mostly is explained as "Nero Caesar Augustus Populo Romano". Excavations of the Meta Sudans and at the north-eastern slope of the Palatine Hill indicate that this countermark was distributed to the people during Nero's congiarium AD 57.
4 commentsJochen
Lividu05.jpg
Livia, wife of Augustus, 58/59 BC - 29 AD.141 viewsOrichalcum dupondius (12.9g, 30mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck under Tiberius, AD 21-22.
SALVS AVGVSTA, bare headed draped bust of Livia as Salus, facing right
TI CAESAR·DIVI AVG F AVG PM TR POT XXIIII around large S C
RIC (Tiberius) 47 [scarce]; Cohen 5
Charles S
AUG-1.jpg
Livia, wife of Augustus. Augusta 14-29 CE.185 viewsSpain, Hispalis. Æ (31mm, 21.48 g).
Minted in Colonia Romula (modern Seville) under Tiberius.
Obv: PERM DIVI AVG COL ROM, Radiate head of Augustus right; thunderbolt before, star above.
Rev: IVLIA AVGVSTA GENETRIX ORBIS, Head of Livia left; globe beneath, crescent above.
RPC 73; SGI 189; Heiss 393,2; Cohen 169,3; Alvarez Burgos 1587.

This coin associates Livia with globe and crescent symbols and refers to her as Augusta Genetrix Orbis, Sacred Mother of the World. This extraordinary title was never official and is not used on any other coin type for any empress.
EmpressCollector
LIVIA-1.jpg
Livilla??, Wife of Drusus, c. 13 BC-AD 31.690 viewsÆ Dupondius under Tiberius (28 mm, 14.23 gm). Struck circa 22/3 AD.
Obv: PIETAS, veiled, diademed and draped bust of Livilla as Pietas right.
Rev: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVGVSTI F TR POT ITER around large S C.
RIC I 43 (Tiberius); BMCRE 98; BN 74; Cohen 1; Sear 1741; Vagi 477.

The identity of this female portrait remains controversial, and has been identified as Livia (RIC, Sear), Livilla (Vagi) and Vipsania (Jasper Burns).
4 commentsEmpressCollector
eumenia_livia_SNGcop392.jpg
Phrygia, Eumeneia, Livia SNG Copenhagen 39219 viewsLivia AD 14-29, mother of Tiberius
AE 14 mm, 3.32g
struck under magistrate Kleon Agapetos
obv. CEB
bust of Livia, draped, l.
rev. KLEWN / AGAPH / TOC / EUMENE / WN ( in 5 lines)
in laurel wreath
SNG Copenhagen 392; RPC I, 509, 3148
very rare, about VF, olive-green patina

Obv. shows Livia Drusilla, mother of Tiberius. She had a strong, but not welcomed influence on Tiberius. When she died AD 29, he didn't came to Rome for her funeral.
Jochen
8_reales_Charles_II_Potosi_1690.jpg
POST MEDIEVAL, Bolivia, Charles II of Spain, AR 8 reales58 views- 8 reales, Charles II, 1690, Potosi, Bolivie, (Argent)Roger D2
4_reales_Bolivie_Philippe_II.jpg
POST MEDIEVAL, Bolivia, Philippe II of Spain, Four Reales28 views- 4 réales, Philippe II, Potosi (Bolivie), 1555-1598 (Argent) bgaut
Tiberius_01.jpg
RIC 1, p.095, 30 - Tiberius, Livia as Pax16 viewsTiberius
AR Denarius, AD 18-35
Obv.: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head of Tiberius right
Rev.: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax, holding scepter and olive branch, seated right on chair, feet on footstool, ornate chair legs
Ag, 3.64g, 17.5x19.2mm
Ref.: RIC² 30, Kankelfitz 3a, RIC 30, RSC 16a
Ex Malter Galleries
shanxi
11-aug-capricorn.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE -- Time of Augustus51 viewsROMAN EMPIRE -- Time of Augustus (?), Æ17, Cyprus Mint (?) Die axis is 12:00, if the star is oriented above on both sides. Obv.: Capricorn on a globe, star before. Rev.: Scorpion, with a star above it. Reference: RPC 3916.

LOTS OF ARGUMENTS on where this coin come from... I believe CYPRUS. The obverse with star before the Capricorn is similar to the reverse of Augustan denarii (RIC 542). The Capricorn was the birth-sign of Augustus,
and the other coins found under the same mosaic suggest a date of about this time. Scorpions were and are native to Cyprus and Southeastern Europe. The Scorpion on the coin, is probably a second birth-sign, Scorpio. Livia was born January 30th, which makes her an Aquarius. The exact date of Caius Caesar's birth in 20 BC is known to between August 14th and September 13th (Likely Virgo, perhaps Leo). But, Tiberius was born on November 16th, 42 BC. He was a Scorpio. Perhaps, the coin connects to the dynastic relationship celebrated on larger double portrait dupondii. The 17 mm diameter and 2.68 gram average weight of the sixteen examples of this coin in RPC is about equal to the quadrans of Rome. SOME people say it is a TESSERA.... However, one of the leading experts in the field says DEFINITELY NOT!
dpaul7
AntoSe65-2.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Antoninus Pius, sestertius, RIC 100467 viewsOrichalcum sestertius (22.23g,30mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 159.
ANTONINVS AVG [-] PIVS P P TR P XXII laureate head right
TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST [around] COS IIII [in ex.] S C [in field] Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus with statues of Augustus and Livia
ex Triton VI (2003)
The second temple of Divus Augustus, was restored under Antoninus Pius in 158. The reliefs on the pediment cannot be identifed with certainty, but the statuary on the roof can be identified as Augustus in quadriga flanked by Romulus on the left and Aeneas carrying Anchises on the right.
2 commentsCharles S
cR4DY3jbbFW86ZeRQoM7dJ5C99zCHm.jpg
Roman Empire, Divus Augustus Died 14AD, As9 views11.08g
Radiate head of Augustus left, thunderbolt to left "DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER"
Livia seated right holding a patera and scepter "S C"
RIC I 72
Stuck under Tiberius 14-37 AD
Antonivs Protti
00galba~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Galba95 viewsAR denarius. 69 AD. Laureate head right. IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG / Livia standing left, holding patera and scepter.DIVA AVGVSTA . RIC 186. RSC 55.
1 commentsbenito
bpJ1C1Livia.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Livia, Scarce, 21-22 AD.57 viewsObv: SALVS AVGVSTA
Draped bust of Salus, right, hair in knot behind.
Rev: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG P M TR POT XXIIII S C
Large S C within legend.
Dupondius 12.8 gm 29 mm Mint: Rome RIC 47
Comment: Issued by Tiberius
Massanutten
bpJ1E2NeroClaudDrus2.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Nero Claudius Drusus, Provincial Imitation117 viewsObv: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP
Bare head, left.
Rev: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP
Either Claudius or Drusus holding branch and seated, left, on curule chair amid an assortment of arms.
Sestertius 15 gm 32.7 mm (RIC 93)
Comment: The official issue was minted by Claudius in 41-42. Drusus was a son of Livia and the younger brother of Tiberius; husband of Antonia (daughter of Marc Antony); father of Germanicus, Claudius and Lavilla. Died of injuries sustained from a horse fall while on campaign in Germany.
Massanutten
Tiberius.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Tiberius AR Denarius "Tribute Penny"38 viewsLugdunum mint. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia (as Pax) seated right, holding olive-branch and inverted spear; ornate legs to chair. RSC 16b. RIC 28.1 commentsMike Deigan
Tiberius-moeda1.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Tiberius Claudius Nero 14 BC - 37 AD.9 viewsAE As of Tiberius Claudius Nero 14 BC - 37 AD.

Minted at Rome 15/16 AD.

Weight: 13.7g
Ø: 28*25mm

Obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VII - Tiberius left.

Rev: PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XVII SC - Livia seated right, holding a patera and a scepter.

F/F

Ref: Sear Mil 1769 - RIC 34
Jorge C
TiberiusLivia~1.jpg
Roman Empire, Tiberius Denarius152 viewsTiberius denarius Group 4, c. 18 - 35 A.D. Lugdunum mint, 17.5mm., 3.79g.
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS; One of the ribbons of Tiberius' laurel wreath falls over his neck.
R: PONTIF MAXIM; No base under the throne (just the single exergual line), Pax usually holds scepter (or rarely a reversed spear), her feet rest on a low footstool.
- RIC 30
3 commentsNemonater
0040-210.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, TIBERIUS Denarius, RIC 26158 viewsLyon mint, after 15-16 AD
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGUSTUS, Laureate head of Tiberius right
PONTIF MAXIM, Woman seated right on a throne (Livia ?) and holding sceptre
3.71 gr
Ref : RIC # 30, RCV #1763, Cohen #16
3 commentsPotator II
TIBERIUS_FOURR%C9E_DENARIUS_45~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Tiberius Fourree Denarius42 viewsROMAN EMPIRE, Tiberius Fourree Denarius
PONTIF MAXIM - Livia, as Pax, holding branch and sceptre, seated right; plain legs to chair with double line below.
Lugdunum (Lyon) mint (18-35AD); 2.80g / 19mm / 360
Group 4, c. 18 - 35 A.D.
Obverse: Tiberius is depicted as an older man. One of the ribbons of Tiberius' laurel wreath falls over his neck.
Reverse: No base under the throne (just the single exergual line), Pax usually holds scepter (or rarely a reversed spear), her feet rest on a low footstool.
Aureus: Giard Lyon, Group 4, 149; RIC I 29 (R); BMCRE I 46; Calico 305b (S.1); Cohen 15; SRCV I 1760 - Rare
Denarius: Giard Lyon, Group 4, 150; RIC I 30 (C); BMCRE I 48; RSC II 16a; SRCV I 1763 - Common (approximately half of all Tiberius denarii are this type)
Joe Sermarini
30618q00.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Gold aureus18 viewsSH30618. Gold aureus, Giard Lyon, group 5, 151; RIC I 29 (R); BMCRE I 47; Calico 305c (S.3); Cohen 15; SRCV I 1760, gVF, attractive red tone, weight 7.709 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 135o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 36 - 37 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, laurel wreath ties fall in small undulations (waves); reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with decorated legs, a single line below, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, feet on footstool; Ex-Bosco Reale Hoard, Pompeii 1898; rareJoe Sermarini
37558q00.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Gold aureus15 viewsSH37558. Gold aureus, Giard Lyon, group 1, 143; RIC I 25 (R2); BMCRE I 30; SRCV I 1760; Calico 305d (S.1); Cohen 15; SRCV I 1760, Choice VF, weight 7.677 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 45o, Lugdunum (Lyon) mint, early 'plain' fine style, c. 15 - 18 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with plain legs set on base, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, no footstool; a beautiful coin; rare (R2)Joe Sermarini
010.jpg
Roman Empire, Tiberius, AD 14 - 37.84 viewsTiberius, AD 14 - 37.
AR Denarius, Lugdunum mint, AD 14-37.
Obv. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right.
Rev. PONTIF MAXIM, female figure (Livia?) seated right, right holding long inverted vertical spear, left branch, on chair with ornamented legs above triple line.
RIC 28 (I, 95); RSC 16b (II, 1).
3,66g, 17mm.
Provenance: Gorny and Mosch, Auction 152, lot 1996.
apyatygin
tib_aureus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Tiberius, Aureus50 viewsTiberius AV Aureus.
Lyons mint, 14-37 AD.
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head of Tiberius right
/ PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax seated right, holding branch and sceptre; plain legs to chair.
BMC 30, Cohen 15.
1 commentsanthivs
Tiberius-Aureus-Livia.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, TIBERIUS, AV Aureus, RIC I: 2599 viewsObverse: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS Laureate head right.
Reverse: PONTIF MAXIM Female figure (Livia?) seated right, holding transverse long scepter, in other hand branch.
Weight: 7,78g; Ø: 20mm;
Reference: RIC I/25; struck at LUGDUNUM
2 commentssulcipius
bpJ1G1Tiberius.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Tiberius, Denarius, A.D.14-3767 viewsObv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureate head, right.
Rev: PONTIF MAXIM
Seated female (Livia?) right, holding sceptre and branch.
Denarius 3.1 gm 18.5 mm RIC 26
ex-Berk
Comment: Commonly associated with the Tribute Penny from the New Testament.
Massanutten
Tiberius~0.jpg
Roman, Tiberius AR Denarius112 viewsAttribution: RIC I 30, RSC II 16a, SRCV I 1763, Lugdunum
Date: 19 August, AD 14 – 16 March, AD 37
Obverse: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head r.
Reverse: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated r., holding olive branch & long scepter; ornate legs to chair
Size: 19 mm
Weight: 3.6 grams
* NOTE: chipped piece & metal adhesions from prior mounting of coin as jewelry
2 commentsNoah
sardes_tiberius_livia.jpg
Sardes, Lydia. AE 18.2, Tiberius with Tyche of Sardes/ Livia seated8 viewsTiberius, Sardes, Lydia; Æ 4.48g, 18.2mm. ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΣ ΚΑΙΣΑΡΕΩΝ ΣΑΡΔΙΑΝΩΝ, Togate figure of emperor raising kneeling figure of Tyche of Sardis/ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΗ ΙΟΥΛΙΟΣ ΚΛΕΩΝ ΚΑΙ ΜΕΜΝΩΝLivia seated r., with sceptre and ear of corn. RPC 2991. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
83308q00_Tiberius_Sardis,_Lydia.jpg
Sardes, Lydia. Tiberius with Tyche of Sardes/ Livia seated; AE1922 viewsTiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Sardis, Lydia. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 2991, SNG Cop 515, SNG München 505, Sardis mint, 4.945g, 19.6mm, 0o, obverse “ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΣ ΚΑΙΣΑΡΕΩΝ ΣΑΡΔΙΑΝΩΝ”, Tiberius, togate, standing left, raising kneeling Tyche of Sardis; reverse “ΣΕΒΑΣΤΗ ΙΟΥΛΙΟΣ ΚΛΕΩΝ ΚΑΙ ΜΕΜΝΩΝ”, Livia seated right, long scepter vertical in right, ears of grain in left. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
smyrna_augustus___Livia.jpg
Smyrna, Ionia. AE 19.1; busts of Augustus and Livia/ Aphrodite Stratonikis and dove31 viewsAugustus and Livia, Smyrna, Ionia. AE 19.1mm, 5.89g. ΣΕΒΑΣΤΩΙ ΖΜΥΡΝΑΙΟΙ, Jugate laureate head of Augustus and draped bust of Livia r. / ΛΕΟΝΤΙΣΚΟΣ ΙΠΠΟΜΕΔΟΝΤΟΣ, Aphrodite Stratonikis standing, holding sceptre and Nike, and leaning on column; to r., dove. RPC 2466. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
smyrna_tiberius___livia.jpg
Smyrna, Ionia. AE 21.2; busts of Senate and Livia/ Temple5 viewsLivia. Smyrna, Ionia. Hieronymos, Petronius procos. AD 29 – 35. AE 21.2mm, 5.12g. ΣΕΒΑΣΤΗ ΣΥΝΚΛΗΤΟΣ/Υ ΖΜΥΡΝΑΙΩΝ ΙΕΡΩΝΥΜΟΣ, draped busts of Senate and Livia, facing each another. / ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΣ ΤΙΒΕΡΙΟΣ ΕΠΙ ΠΕΤΡΩΝΙΟΥTemple with four columns enclosing statue of emperor as pontifex. RPC 2469. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
Augustus_Livia_Colonia_Romula.jpg
SPAIN - AUGUSTUS, Colonia Romula - (Sevilla) Ae Dupondius 35 mm / 29.92 gr.20 viewsDivus Augustus and Livia AE33 of Romula, Spain. Struck under Tiberius, 14-37 AD. PERM DIVI AVG COL ROM, radiate head of Augustus right, thunderbolt before / IVLIA AVGVSTA GENETRIX ORBIS, head of Livia left on globe, star above. RPC 73, Villaronga 1060. Sear'88 #551 _80.00eAntonivs Protti
COLONIA_REMULA,__AUGUSTUS_E_LIVIA.jpg
Spain - Colonia Romula (Sevilla) Ae Dupondius, 4 viewsAugustus and Livia, minted by Tiberius
Obverse: PERM DIVI AVG COL ROM radiate bust of deified Augustus right, star above, thunderbolt before
Reverse: head of Liva left on globe, crescent above.
32 mm / 19.44 gr.
Antonivs Protti
0_026.JPG
Spanish Cob 1 real (Santa Maria de La Consolacion)43 viewsSpanish Cob 1 real, recovered from the Santa Maria de La Consolacion

"She was heavily loaded with silver coins intended for Panama. Soon after leaving port she was pursued by two pirate ships commanded by the famous pirate Bartholomew Sharpe. To save the treasure from the pirates, the Spanish captain ran the ship aground on the rocks of Isle de Muerto (Island of Death), Ecuador in July of 1681. The Spanish then burned the ship, depriving the pirates of the valuable treasure. Enraged, the pirates landed and slaughtered 140 Spanish survivors."

"The Spanish treasure ship Santa Maria de la Consolocion left Callao, Chile in 1681, bound for Panama, where her precious cargo that was to be transported across the isthmus and then shipped onto Spain. Because of a delay in getting its silver coins from the mint in Potosi, Bolivia, she was forced to sail alone, after the rest of the South Sea Armada had departed. The lone galleon was soon attacked by a fleet of six British pirate ships. The captain attempted to defend his precious cargo by landing his ship on a small island named Isla de Muerto (Island of the Dead) in the Bay of Guayaquil, Ecuador. The vessel accidentally hit a reef and began to sink. To prevent the treasure from falling into the hands of the pirates, the captain set the ship afire. The pirates, furious that the ship had been burned, captured and beheaded the estimated 350 passengers and crew of the ship. Neither the pirates, nor the returning Spaniards were able to recover the treasure from the shark infested waters. "
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
HerodCaesaria.jpg
Star, 6 rays167 viewsJudaea, Herod Philip, Tetrarch, 4 B.C. - 34 A.D., issue for Tiberius and Livia
8809. Bronze AE 20, Hendin 530; RPC 4951; AJC II 245, 6a, aF, Caesarea Paneas mint, 7.98g, 20.3mm, 0o, c. 30 - 31 A.D.; obverse SEBASTWN, jugate heads of laureate Tiberius and Livia, star countermark; reverse FILIPPOU TETRARCOU, tetrastyle temple on high platform with round design (shield?) in center; very rare; $600.00
Meshore notes the same countermark on one of his examples (6a). In addition to being the first Jewish ruler to put his own portrait on his coinage, Philip was the first Jewish ruler to put Roman imperial portraits on his coinage.
whitetd49
Antoninus_Pius_Templum.JPG
Struck A.D.158 - 159. ANTONINUS PIUS. AR Denarius of Rome12 viewsObverse: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII. Laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Reverse: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST. Octastyle temple with standing statues of Victory before the two outer columns and seated figures of Divus Augustus and Diva Livia within; in exergue, COS IIII.
RIC III : 290a | C: 804 | BMC: 939
Rough surfaces

The Temple of Divus Augustus was originally built to commemorate the deified first emperor, Augustus. It was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia, on the site of the house that Augustus had lived in before he entered public life.
The temple's construction took place during the 1st century AD, having been vowed by the Roman Senate shortly after the death of Augustus in A.D.14. It was not, however, finally completed until after the death of Tiberius in A.D.37 and was dedicated by Tiberius' successor, Caligula at the end of August that year.
During the reign of Domitian the temple was destroyed by fire but it was rebuilt and rededicated in A.D.89-90 as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus. It also incorporated a shrine to Domitian's favourite deity, Minerva.
The temple was restored again by Antonius Pius, who was possibly motivated by a desire to be publicly associated with the first emperor. The exact date of the restoration is not known, but the restored temple is shown on coins of A.D.158 onwards, like the one above.
The temple is depicted as an octostyle design with Corinthian capitals and two statues - presumably of Augustus and Livia - in the cella. The pediment displayed a relief featuring Augustus and was topped by a quadriga. Two figures stood on the eaves of the roof, that on the left representing Romulus and the one on the right depicting Aeneas leading his family out of Troy, alluding to Rome's mythical origins. The steps of the temple were flanked by two statues of Victory.
The last known reference to the temple was in A.D.248, at some point after that it was completely destroyed and its stones were presumably quarried for later buildings. Today it's remains are no longer visible and the area in which it sat has never been excavated.
*Alex
imtiation_Tiberius.jpg
Struck Imitation of Tiberius, 1st century AD, dated 21-22 AD24 viewsStruck Imitation of the 1st century, dated 21-22 AD
Livia seated as, 27mm
bare head r.
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VII (or VIII)
Livia seated r., holding patera and long sceptre
PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXXIIII
cf. Cohen 19

The authors of RIC I do not recognize this type as being official. Cohen likely saw a similar imitation, assuming it to be an original mint issue. Extremely rare.
Ardatirion
oea.jpg
Syrtica, Oea53 viewsObverse: Bust of Livia r
Reverse: Bust of Minerva l Bust of Athena left, wearing crested
Corinthian helmet and aegis; Punic legend before
Mint : Oea
Date : After 22 AD
Reference : RPC-835, SNG Copenhagen 33
Grade : VG
Weight : 9.69g
Denom: AE 25
Metal : Bronze
Acquired: 08/10/04

Comments : Oea nominally remained part of Carthage's dominions until the end of the Third Punic War in 146 BC, and then became part of the Roman Republic, although from about 200 BC onward it was for all intents and purposes an independent city. It remained as such until the reign of the Roman emperor Tiberius, when Oea, Leptis Magna and the surrounding area were formally incorporated into the empire as part of the province of Africa.
Bolayi
AntoSe65-2~0.jpg
TEMPLE, ANTONINUS PIUS, Temple of Divus Augustus143 viewsOrichalcum sestertius (22.23,30mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 159.
ANTONINVS AVG [-] PIVS P P TR P XXII laureate head right
TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST [/] COS IIII [in ex.] [/] S C Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus with statues of Augustus and Livia
ex Triton VI (2003)
The second temple of Divus Augustus, was restored under Antoninus Pius in 158. The reliefs on the pediment cannot be identifed with certainty, but the statuary on the roof can be identified as Augustus in quadriga flanked by Romulus on the left and Aeneas carrying Anchises on the right.
Charles S
tiberius___livia.jpg
Thessalonika; Tiberius & Livia portraits, AE 229 viewsTiberius, 14-37 A.D. Leaded bronze AE 22, RPC I 1568, VF/F, Thessalonica mint, weight 9.547g, maximum diameter 24.4mm, die axis 180o, obverse ΤΙ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΣ, laureate head right; reverse ΣΕΒΑΣΤΗ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ, diademed bust of Livia right; nice portrait of Tiberius, attractive green patina, reverse a little rough; Ex FORVMPodiceps
t.jpg
Tiberius16 viewsAD 14-37. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.58 g). Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Laureate head right / Livia (as Pax) seated right, holding scepter and olive-branch; ornate chair legs. RIC I 30; BMCRE 30; RSC 16a.1 commentsTLP
Tiberius_Tribute_penny.jpg
Tiberius96 viewsTiberius, denarius.
RIC 30, RSC 13a.
struck in Lugdunum, 36-37 AD.
3.7 gr. 19mm.
Obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right.
Rev: PONTIF MAXIM, female figure (Livia?) seated right on chair with ornamented legs holding sceptre and branch, feet rest on footstool.
This type is commonly known as the 'Tribute Penny,' the coin to which Jesus referred to when he was discussing paying taxes to the Romans, and said "render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's" (Mark 12:17).

It took me some time to find a tribute penny this nice.
2 commentsMarsman
00cgtiberius2.jpg
TIBERIUS82 viewsAR denarius. Lugdunum. 36-37 AD. 3.80 g. 1h. ( Group 6). Laureate head right. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTUS / Livia ,as Pax, seated right, feet on footstool, holding scepter and branch; ornate legs, one line below. PONTIF MAXIM.
RIC I 30. RSC 16a.
2 commentsbenito
00cgtiberius2~0.jpg
TIBERIUS34 viewsAR denarius. Lugdunum. 36-37 AD. 3.80 g. 1h. ( Group 6). Laureate head right. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTUS / Livia ,as Pax, seated right, feet on footstool, holding scepter and branch; ornate legs, one line below. PONTIF MAXIM.
RIC I 30. RSC 16a.
CNG 88. Lot 1218. CNG 50.Lot 1426.
1 commentsbenito
fouree_tribute_penny.jpg
Tiberius20 viewsFourée Denarius, Unknown mint, imitating Lyon, AD 14-37
Obv.: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, Laureate bust right.
Rev.: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia or Pax seated right.
Reference: RIC I Tiberius 28 (p. 95)
Notes: A fourée tribute penny.
1 commentsJohn Anthony
00015-Tiberius.jpg
Tiberius16 viewsTiberius Denarius
19 mm 3.82 gm
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureate head right
R:PONTIF MAXIM
Livia seated right holding scepter and branch, throne legs ornamented, footstool below feet, single line below
Koffy
4320288.jpg
Tiberius 5 viewsTiberius. AD 14-37. AV Aureus (18mm, 7.46 g, 3h). “Tribute Penny” type. Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Group 4, AD 18-35. Laureate head right / Livia (as Pax) seated right on chair, holding scepter in right hand and olive branch in left; plain chair legs, double line below. RIC I 29; Calicó 305b; BMCRE 46-47. Fair.

Ex Classical Numismatic Group EAuction 180 (23 January 2008), lot 139.
arash p
RS012-Roman-AR_denarius,_Tiberius_(ca_14-37_AD)-026000.JPG
TIBERIUS (14-37 AD), AR denarius, "Tribute Penny"51 viewsObverse- TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right.
Reverse- PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax, seated right on throne with ornate legs, single line below, holding long scepter and olive branch.
RIC 30, 18 mm, 3.77 g.
NGC Ch F (Strike 4/5, Surface 3/5), cert. #4095350-002.
Ex-Michael Swoveland (aka "Aethelred") through private deal on Collectors Universe, January 2011. Purchased raw.
Comments: For Tiberius, one simply HAS to have the "Tribute Penny" of Biblical mention (Mark 12:15), right? Everybody knows these were circulating during the life, ministry, and crucifixion of Christ, so they're eternally popular and historically important. The Tribute penny from my original collection in 2007 came from Michael Swoveland, and by coincidence, when it came time to find another, I bought this one from him as well. It is of similar grade with my first one, though I like the toning on this one a bit better. Both were around the same price.
2 commentslordmarcovan
tiberio_PONTIF_MAXIM_TRIBVN_POTEST_XVII_as_Ric33.jpg
Tiberius - as7 viewsPONTIFMAXIMTRIBVNPOTESTXVII, Livia
Ric 33
antvwala
Tiberius.jpg
Tiberius - RIC-3052 viewsTiberius. A.D. 14-37. AR denarius (17 mm, 3.64 g, 12 h). Lugdunum, A.D. 16-37. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head of Tiberius right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right on chair with ornate legs, holding scepter and olive branch, feet resting on footstool. RIC 30; RSC 16a.1 commentsBud Stewart
tiberius.jpg
Tiberius 14-37 AD.62 viewsObverse- TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right.
Reverse- PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right, holding olive-branch and long vertical sceptre; ornate legs to chair.
Lugdunum mint, 18mm, 3.5g.
b70
Tiberius.jpg
Tiberius AD 14-371 viewsTiberius, Livia sitting. AE As Rome, 15-16 AD, 10.4gm, RIC 34.Ancient Aussie
tiberius.JPG
Tiberius Ae As16 viewsTiberius AE As. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VII, bare head left /
PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XVII S-C, Livia seated right holding patera & sceptre.
Britanikus
Ab8mmCJ6B7dFTR2z6gW9D3cZdkK5MS.jpg
TIBERIUS AE as. LIVIA seated right, large SC. Rome mint, 15-16 AD.18 viewsTIBERIUS AE as. Struck at Rome, 15-16 AD. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VII, bare head right. Reverse - PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XVII, Livia seated right, between large S C. RIC 33. 28mm, 10.6g.Antonivs Protti
RPC724.jpg
Tiberius AE22 RPC 72461 viewsAE 22 of UTICA in Zeugitana.
Obv: TI CAE DIVI AVG F AVG IMP VII ; Bare head of Tiberius l.
REv: M MVN IVL VTICEN P P D P ; Livia, veiled, holding patera and scepter, seated r.

RPC 724.
2 commentsTanit
Tiberius_Livia.jpg
Tiberius and Livia - Thessalonica10 views14-29 AD
laureate head of Tiberius right
TI·KAIΣAP ΣE_BAΣTOΣ
bust of Livia right
ΘEΣΣAΛONI_KEΩN ΣEBAΣTH
RPC I 1568
10,11g 21mm
Johny SYSEL
tribute.jpg
Tiberius AR Denarius20 viewsOBV: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
laureate head right
REV: PONTIF MAXIM
Livia (as Pax) seated right, holding olive-branch and inverted spear; chair legs ornamented, triple line below
Date: 14~37 A.D. Lugdunum Mint
RIC I 28, Lyon 146, RSC 16b
18.0mm, 3.72g, 10h
miffy
Tiberius_6.jpg
TIBERIUS AR Denarius14 viewsOBVERSE: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG AVGVSTVS, laureate head right
REVERSE: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, holding long sceptre & olive branch, seated right on throne with ornate legs, single line below
Lugdunum 14-37 AD
3.75g, 19mm
RIC 30, RSC 16a, BMC 48

Legatus
Tiberius_Denarius_Good.jpg
Tiberius Caesar Denarius7 viewsOBV: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureate head of Tiberius Caesar, right.
REV: PONTIF MAXIM
Livia, as PAX seated right, holding long
verticle sceptre and olive branch.
SM.1763, RIC I 30. Lyon150; RSC 16a; BMCRE 48-60.
AD 14 - 37 3.12gm 18.5mm
goldenancients
Tiberius_denarius_Indian.jpg
Tiberius denarius81 viewsTI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureate head of Tiberius right

PONTIF MAXIM
Livia seated right holding scepter and branch, legs on char ornamented, feet on footstool

Minted in India
Sear 1763, RIC 26

ex-Forum
Part of a hoard of nearly 200 Tiberius and Augustus denarii found in India produced and used for local trade. Some were struck, some cast. This specimen was cast

SOLD!
Titus Pullo
Tiberius_Denarius03.jpg
Tiberius Denarius22 viewsOBV: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureate head of Tiberius Caesar, right.
REV: PONTIF MAXIM
Livia, as PAX seated right, holding long
verticle sceptre and olive branch.
Ornate legs to chair.

RCV.1763, RIC I 30. Lyon150; RSC 16a; BMCRE 48-60.BN28-31
A.D. 14 - 37
3.45gm 18mm
goldenancients
Tiberius_denarius.jpg
Tiberius Denarius108 viewsTI. CAESAR DIVI AVG. F. AVGVSTVS, his laureate head right. Reverse. PONTIF. MAXIM, Livia as Pax, seated right, holding olive branch and long scepter, legs of chair ornate, feet on footstool.

Quite and attractive fouree of nice style.
2 commentsPhiloromaos
Tiberius_Fouree.jpg
Tiberius Denarius Fouree20 viewsTI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right, holding olive-branch and long vertical sceptre; ornate legs to chair.
Maximum Diameter: 17.5 mm
Weight: 3.0 g
1 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
fouree.jpg
Tiberius Denarius Fourree21 viewsTiberius. 14-37 AD. AR Denarius. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right; plain legs to chair. BMCRE 34; RSC 16
Tanit
Tiberius_Livia.jpg
Tiberius denarius from Lvgdvnvm67 viewsSilver denarius. Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint. c. 15 - 18 A.D.
3.826g and 18.8mm.
Obverse : TI CAESAR DIVI F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right.
Reverse : PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with plain legs set on base, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, no footstool;
Giard Lyon group 1, 144; RIC I 26 (C); BMCRE I 34; SRCV I 1762; RSC II 16; SRCV I 1763.

Type is really very common but This coin is not by all means.

4 commentslabienus
Tiberius_Denarius_Livia_Seated.jpg
Tiberius Denarius Livia Seated38 viewsObv.
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureate head right

Rev.
PONTIF MAXIM
Livia seated right, holding reversed spear & branch

1 commentsancientdave
Tiberius.jpg
Tiberius Denarius RIC 30 44 viewsTI CAESAR DIVI AVG AVGVSTVS, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right on throne, holding long sceptre and olive branch, chair legs ornamented, single line below.
Maximum Diameter:
Weight: 3.62 g
2 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
Tiberius_3_opt.jpg
TIBERIUS Denarius, RIC 29, Tribute Penny66 viewsOBV: TICAESARDIVIAVGFAVGVSTVS - Laureate head right
REV: PONTIFMAXIM - Livia seated right, holding spear and branch; ornamented chair legs
3.7g, 17mm

Minted at Lugdunum, 18-35 AD
Legatus
Tiberius4_OBV_(2).jpg
TIBERIUS Fouree Denarius, RIC 30, Tribute Penny85 viewsOBV: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG AVGVSTVS, laureate head right
REV: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated r on throne w/ ornate legs, single line, holding long scepter & olive branch
19mm, 2.6g

Minted at Lugdunum, 18-35 AD
Coin is most noticeable as being a Foureé where the reverse plating is worn through and you can see the copper core
Legatus
TiberiusLivia.jpg
Tiberius Group 6102 viewsGroup 6, c. 36 - 37 A.D. Lugdunum mint.
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS; The ribbons of Tiberius' laurel wreath fall more stiffly and usually do not fall over his neck. Tiberius' facial features have become caricatures.
R: PONTIF MAXIM; No base under the throne (just the single exergual line), Pax usually holds scepter (or rarely a reversed spear), her feet rest on a low footstool.

Baptiste Giard divides Tiberius' PONTIF MAXIM coins (aurei and denarii), into six groups, based on what he believes is the evolution of style over time.1 To some extent the portraits also reflect Tiberius' aging over a period of about 22 years. An excellent writeup can be found at http://www.forumancientcoins.com/numiswiki/view.asp?key=tribute%20penny.
2 commentsNemonater
Tiberius_Livia~0.JPG
Tiberius Livia21 viewsTiberius AE As, 9.6g, 27.13g, RIC 34, Cohen 18, BMC 68, RCV (2000) 1769,
OBV: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VII, bare head left
REV: PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XVII S-C, Livia seated right holding patera & scepter

RARE
Romanorvm
TibereDenier.jpg
Tiberius Livia Spear 106 viewsTI CAESAR DIVI - AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureated head right

PONTIF - MAXIM
Livia, as Pax, seated right, holding olive branch and inverted spear

Denarius
C.16, RIC.3

18 mm -- 3,85 g -- axis 90°
3 commentsgb29400
TiberiusLivia~0.jpg
Tiberius Pax Group 4141 viewsTiberius denarius Group 4, c. 18 - 35 A.D. Lugdunum mint, 17.5mm., 3.79g.
O: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS; One of the ribbons of Tiberius' laurel wreath falls over his neck.
R: PONTIF MAXIM; No base under the throne (just the single exergual line), Pax usually holds scepter (or rarely a reversed spear), her feet rest on a low footstool.

Baptiste Giard divides Tiberius' PONTIF MAXIM coins (aurei and denarii), into six groups, based on what he believes is the evolution of style over time.1 To some extent the portraits also reflect Tiberius' aging over a period of about 22 years. An excellent writeup can be found at http://www.forumancientcoins.com/numiswiki/view.asp?key=tribute%20penny.
4 commentsNemonater
tiberius_27.jpg
Tiberius RIC I, 29348 viewsTiberius 14 - 37
AV - Aureus, 7.64g, 19mm
Lugdunum 36/7
obv. TI CAESAR DIVI - AVG F AVGVSTVS
Livia(?) as Ceres/Pax sitting r. on throne with decorated feet,
holding olive-branch in l. hand and sceptre in r.,
2 lines below throne
Ref.: Giard Lyon, Group 3, 147 (Curtis Clay); RIC I, 29; C.15; BMCR 46; SRCV 1760; Calico 305a (S.3)
Rare, good F

The so-called TRIBUTE PENNY in gold!
3 commentsJochen
tiberius_30~0.jpg
Tiberius RIC I, 3038 viewsTiberius AD 14 - 37
AR - Denar, 3.64g, 17mm
Lugdunum, undated
obv. TI CAESAR DIVI - AVG F AVGVSTVS (counterclockwise)
bare head r.
rev. PONTIF - MAXIM (couterclockwise)
Livia(?) as Ceres/Pax seated r. on throne with ornamented legs, r. foot on
footstool, holding olive-branch in left and sceptre in right hand, line under
throne
Ref.: Giard Lyon, Group 4, 150; RIC I, 30; C.16; BMCR 49; SRCV 1763
about VF(?), small flan, toned, portrait!

For the problem with the 'TRIBUTE PENNY' see the article 'No tribute penny!' on Forum's Resources!
Jochen
tiberius_01.jpg
Tiberius Subaerat Denarius16 viewsObv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS - Laureate head right.
Rev: PONTIF MAXIM - Livia seated right, holding reversed spear and branch, legs of chair ornate.
Date: 36 - 37 AD
Mint: Lugdunum
Ref: RIC I 38, RSC II 16b
Note: Rare variant with reversed spear instead of sceptre.
oa
Tiberius_tribute.jpg
Tiberius tribute Penny246 viewsTI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureate head of Tiberius right

PONTIF MAXIM
Livia seated right holding scepter and branch, legs on char ornamented, feet on footstool

Lugdunum after 16 AD

3.64g

Sear 1763, RIC 26

Ex-Calgary coin
5 commentsJay GT4
Tiberiustribute.jpg
Tiberius Tribute Penny166 viewsTI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureate head of Tiberius right

PONTIF MAXIM
Livia seated right holding scepter and branch, legs on char ornamented, feet on footstool

Lugdunum after 16 AD

3.64g

Sear 1763, RIC 26

Ex-Calgary coin
3 commentsJay GT4
Tiberius~0.jpg
Tiberius tribute penny79 viewsTI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureate head of Tiberius right

PONTIF MAXIM
Livia seated right holding scepter and branch, legs on char ornamented, feet on footstool

Lugdunum after 16 AD

3.49g

Sear 1763, RIC 26

Ex-Ebay amarso66

Sold!
5 commentsJay GT4
Tiberius2.jpg
Tiberius tribute penny45 viewsTI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureate head of Tiberius right

PONTIF MAXIM
Livia seated right holding scepter and branch, legs on char ornamented, feet on footstool

Lugdunum after 16 AD

3.14g

Sear 1763, RIC 26

Ex-Numismatica Prados

Sold to Calgary Coin Feb 2019
1 commentsJay GT4
Tiberius_RIC_26.JPG
Tiberius, 14 - 37 AD146 viewsObv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head of Tiberius facing right.

Rev: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia represented as Pax seated right, in chair with plain legs, holding an olive branch and a scepter.

Note: The coin most often associated with the New Testament story of the tribute penny (Matthew 22:15-21).

Appears to have been overstruck on an earlier denarius.

Silver Denarius, Lugdunum Mint, c. 15 - 18 AD (Giard Lyon Group 1)

3.9 grams, 19 mm, 180°

RIC I 26, RSC 16, S1763, VM 8
SPQR Coins
Tiberius_14-37AD.jpg
Tiberius, 14-37 AD21 viewsSilver Denarius Contemporary Imitation of the “Tribute Penny”.
Laureate Head / Livia, as Pax, Seated Holding Sceptre and Olive-Branch.
Crude Style
RIC 30, (3.70 g, 18.0 mm)
1 commentsVacolony
Tributo.JPG
Tiberius, AR Denarius, PONT MAXIM, the Tribute Penny6 viewsTiberius (14 – 37 AD)

AR Denarius, Lugdunum, 22 – 30 AD.

Anv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureated bust right.
Rev: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia seated right on throne with spectre and olive branch.
RIC I 30

Weight: 2,8g.
Diameter: 18mm
Jose Polanco
tiberius_30_indische_Imitation.jpg
Tiberius, cf. RIC 30, Indian Imitation42 viewsTiberius, AD 14-37
AR - denarius, 3.23g, 19.9mm
obv. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS
Laureate head, r.
rev. PONTIF - MAXIM
Livia std. r., holding branch and sceptre, feet on footstool, chair legs ornamented
ref. cf. RIC I, 30; C.16; RSC 16a; BMCR 48
VF
Pedigree:
ex Triton X, 8.1.2007, lot 1559
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

This coin is from a hoard of ca. 175 denarii of Augustus and Tiberius reportly found in the Indus valley in c. AD 1990. These imitations were produced in India and were used side by side with official issues (CNG). Some of them were struck, others cast. This one is cast.
Jochen
0040-210np_noir.jpg
Tiberius, Denarius - *175 viewsDenarius minted in Lyon after 15-16 AD
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGUSTUS, Laureate head of Tiberius right
PONTIF MAXIM, Woman seated right (Livia ?)
3.71 gr
Ref : RIC # 30, RCV #1763, Cohen #16
4 commentsPotator II
tiberius_31.jpg
Tiberius, RIC 31102 viewsTiberius, AD 14-37
AE - As, 11.07g, 27.3mm
Rome, AD 15-16
obv. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VII
Head, r.
rev. Livia, in long garment and veiled, std. l., feet on footstool, holding open r. hand in her lap and
resting with l. hand on long sceptre.
S - C in l. and r. field
RIC I, 31; C.17; BMC 65
VF, glossy brown patina
Pedigree:
ex CNG electronic auction 124, 12.10.2005, lot 273
1 commentsJochen
TibeAs03-2.jpg
Tiberius, RIC 34, As of AD 15-1634 viewsÆ As (10.5g, Ø27mm, 1h). Rome mint. Struck AD 15-16.
Obv.: TI CAESAR·DIVI AVG F AVGVST·IMP·VII, bare head of Tiberius facing left
Rev,: PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN·POTEST·XVII (round) S C (in field), Veiled Livia seated right, feet on stool, holding patera and long sceptre.
RIC 34 [scarce]; Cohen 18
Charles S
LIVIDU02-2.jpg
Tiberius, RIC 43, for Livilla, dupondius of AD 22-23 (Pietas)35 viewsÆ dupondius (12.7g, Ø31mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck under Tiberius, AD 22-23.
PIETAS, veiled bust of Livilla as Pietas, facing right
DRVSVS CAESAR T AVGVSTI F TR POT ITER [around large] S C around large S C
RIC (Tiberius) 43 (scarce); Cohen (Livia) 1

Vagi argues that this is not Livia, wife of Caesar but Livilla, sister of Germanicus, wife of Drusus. This is supported by the fact that the title AVGVSTA is absent on the obverse and the titles of Drusus appear on the reverse. Together with the Drusus as and the twin's heads sestertius these types form the family bronzes of Drusus.
1 commentsCharles S
LIVIDU04-2.jpg
Tiberius, RIC 46, for Antonia or Agrippina, dupondius of AD 22-23 (Justitia)61 viewsÆ dupondius (13.2g, Ø30mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck under Tiberius, AD 22-23.
IVSTITIAE, diademed bust of of Antonia or Agrippina as Justitia, facing right
TI CAESAR DIVI·AVG·F·AVG·P·M·TR·POT·XXIIII around large S·C
RIC (Tiberius) 46 (S); Cohen (Livia) 9
ex G. Henzen (1997)

Vagi argues that this type commemorates the justice achieved on behalf of the murdered Germanicus. Since Germanicus was very popular in Rome, his murder lead to a public outcry in Rome. The portret on this coin is not Livia's (it would have been followed by AVGVSTAE as for the Salus dupondius) but a stylized portret probably referring to Germanicus' mother Antonia or his wife Agrippina Senior.
1 commentsCharles S
Lividu05~0.jpg
Tiberius, RIC 47, for Livia, dupondius of AD 21-22 (Salus)16 viewsÆ dupondius (12.9g, Ø30mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck under Tiberius, AD 21-22.
SALVS AVGVSTA, bare headed draped bust of Livia as Salus, facing right
TI CAESAR·DIVI AVG F AVG PM TR POT XXIIII around large S C
RIC (Tiberius) 47 [scarce]; Cohen 5
Charles S
Livise01-2.jpg
Tiberius, RIC 51, for Livia, sestertius of AD 22-23 (Carpentum)35 viewsÆ sestertius (22.2g, Ø36mm, 9h), Rome mint, struck AD 22-23.
Obv.: S·P·Q·R / IVLIAE / AVGVST in three lines above an ornamented carpentum drawn by two mules advancing right.
Rev.: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST PM TR POT XXIIII· around large S·C .
RIC (Tiberius) 51 (S); Cohen 6; Sear (Roman Coins & their Values I) 1738

Issued after Livia survived a serious ilness in AD 22
Charles S
TIBERIUS-1-ROMAN.jpg
Tiberius, Roman Provincial Thessalonica13 viewsAE20 Provincial
Macedon, Thessalonica mint, 14-37 A.D.
20mm, 9.11g

Obverse:
TI KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ
Bare head right

Reverse:
θEΣΣAΛONIKEΩN ΣEBAΣTH
Draped bust of Livia, right

rubadub
Sardis.jpg
Tiberius. 14-37 A.D.13 viewsLYDIA, Sardis. Tiberius. 14-37 A.D. Æ 17.0~17.5mm. 4.09 g. Julius Kleon and Memnon, magistrates. Obv: ΣEBAΣTOΣ KAIΣA-ΡEΩN ΣA-ΡΔIANΩN, Tiberius standing facing left, raising up a kneeling Tyche of Sardis. Rev: ΣEBAΣTH IOΥΛIOΣ KΛEΩN KAI MEMNΩN, Livia as Demeter seated right, holding sceptre and grain ears. RPC I 2991; BMC Lydia 98; SNG Copenhagen 515. This coin marks the imperial relief efforts directed to Sardis after a devastating earthquake in 17 AD.ddwau
Tiberius_AR_Denarius.jpg
Tiberius. 14-37 AD. AR Denarius. 41 viewsTI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST, laureate head right / PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right; plain legs to chair with double line below (RIC 26). BMCRE 34; RSC 16.
17,5mm.,3,54g. _10805 SOLD
Antonivs Protti
yWH56iaDFc3o7apETf8AnrL2Y4kg9d.jpg
Tiberius. AD 14-37. AR Denarius “Tribute Penny”. 18 mm / 3,57 gr.22 viewsTiberius. AD 14-37. AR Denarius. “Tribute Penny” type. Lugdunum (Lyon) mint.
Obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, Laureate head right; long, parallel ribbons. Rev: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right, holding scepter and olive branch, feet on footstool; ornate chair legs, single line below.
RIC I 30; Lyon 154; RSC 16a.
Antonivs Protti
EM022_AS_Tiberius.JPG
Tiberius: 14 - 37 AD28 viewsAE As; Rome Mint
Struck 15-16 AD
Obv. - bare head right; TI.CAESAR.DIVI.AVG.F.AVGVST.IMP.VII
Rev. - Livia seated right, S C ; PONTIF.MAXIM.TRIBVN.POTEST.XVII
10.40 grams
1 commentscmcdon0923
Titus_PontifMaxim.jpg
Titus / Pontif Maxim Mule106 viewsTitus. As Caesar, AD 69-79. AR Denarius, Rome mint. Struck under Vespasian, AD 73.
O: Laureate head right; T CAES IMP VESP CENS
R: Vespasian seated right on curule chair, feet on footstool, holding scepter and olive branch.
- RIC II 554 (R) (Vespasian); BMC 113; RSC 158. Struck from the same obverse die as the aureus illustrated for Calicó 746.

An interesting mule. When this coin was struck, Titus was only Pontifex not Pontifex Maximus. The same reverse type was also struck for Titus with his correct titles, PONTIF TRI POT.
The reverse type clearly copies the PONTIF MAXIM Livia seated type of Tiberius. Vespasian may have copied this and other earlier aureus and denarius reverse types as restorations, since he was melting down and recoining the originals to take advantage of Nero's debasement of 64 AD. According to CClay, "Use of the SAME dies for both aurei and denarii was the rule up until Titus and continued in some issues until about Hadrian. Thereafter the style and size of the two denominations diverged, though gold and silver QUINARII often continued to be struck from the same dies."
5 commentsNemonater
Tiberius_denarius.jpg
TRIBUTE PENNY - Tiberius Ar Denarius - PONTIF MAXIM7 views18 mm / 3.66 gr. DARK PATINA AS FOUND.
OBVERSE- TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right
REVERSE- PONTIF MAXIM, Livia, as Pax, seated right, holding olive-branch and long vertical sceptre; plain legs to chair
References: RIC I 30. RSC 16A. BMCRE 48. BN 28
Antonivs Protti
livia.jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.34 viewsBust attributed to Livia.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
tiberius.jpg
Utica Tiberius66 viewsZEUGITANA, Utica. Tiberius.14-37 AD. Æ 29mm (10.81 gm, 9h). Vibius Marsus Proconsul, Drusus Quaestor, T.G. Rufus Praetor, 27-28 AD. Bare head left; c/m: uncertain within incuse rectangle / C VIB MARSO PR COS DR CAE Q PR T G RVFVS F C, D-D/P-P across fields, veiled figure of Livia seated right, holding sceptre and patera. RPC I 733; MAA 115b; SNG Copenhagen -. VF, slight scrape, green patina.

From the Garth R. Drewry Collection. Ex. CNG
1 commentsBolayi
J11R-Gratus H-647.jpg
Valerius Gratus procurator under Tiberius, Æ Prutah, 15 – 26 CE52 viewsBronze prutah of Valerius Gratus, procurator under Tiberius, 16 – 26 CE, 2.3g, 18mm.

Obverse: Palm branch with IOV- ΛIA (for Julia Livia) and LIΛ (the date Year 11 = 24 AD) on either side
Reverse: TIB KAI CAP (Tiberius Caesar), three lines in wreath tied at base with an X.

Reference: Hendin 647, AJC II, Supp. V, 19, Treasury of Jewish Coins 329.

Added to collection: November 17, 2005
Daniel Friedman
J11Q-Gratus H-643.jpg
Valerius Gratus under Tiberius, 15–26 CE, Æ Prutah40 viewsBronze prutah of Valerius Gratus, procurator under Tiberius, 16 – 26 CE, 15 mm, 2 gr., struck 17 CE.

Obverse: Vine leaf and small bunch of grapes with IOY ΛIA (for Julia Livia, mother of Tiberius) above.
Reverse: Narrow necked amphora with scroll handles, flanked by date L Δ (year 4) = 17 CE.

Reference: Hendin 643, AJC II, Supp. V, 16, TJC 326, SNG ANS 348-350.

Added to collection: January 28, 2007
Daniel Friedman
Vespasian_RIC_II_702.jpg
Vespasian RIC II 070227 viewsVespasian 69-79 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint 74 A.D. (3.44g, 19.2m, 6h). Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right. REV: PON MAX TRP COS V, Vespasian std. r. on curule chair, with scepter and branch. RIC II 702, BMC 136, RSC 364.

Along with the winged caduceus, this reverse type was one of the most common reverses for the year. Introduced the previous year, it echoes Tiberius’ Livia type. This is example is reasonably centered, maintains full legends on the obverse, and is a solid example of the type.
Lucas H
AusgustusActiumDenarius.jpg
[603a] Octavian, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.49 viewsAR denarius; BMC 461; struck at Lugdunum between 15-13 BC , C 1411, RIC 171a; Date: 17.8 mm, 3.5 grams; F+; Obverse: AVGVSTVS [DI]VI F, Bare head right; Reverse: IMP X, Apollo standing facing, holding plectrum in right hand and lyre in left, ACT in exergue. A decent denarius commemorating The Battle of Actium against Antony in 31 BC. Ex McSorley Westchester Stamp and coin show 1970. Ex Ancient Imports.


De Imperatoribus Romanis:
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers

AUGUSTUS (31 B.C. - 14 A.D.)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

In the course of his long and spectacular career, he put an end to the advancing decay of the Republic and established a new basis for Roman government that was to stand for three centuries. This system, termed the "Principate," was far from flawless, but it provided the Roman Empire with a series of rulers who presided over the longest period of unity, peace, and prosperity that Western Europe, the Middle East and the North African seaboard have known in their entire recorded history. Even if the rulers themselves on occasion left much to be desired, the scale of Augustus's achievement in establishing the system cannot be overstated. Aside from the immense importance of Augustus's reign from the broad historical perspective, he himself is an intriguing figure: at once tolerant and implacable, ruthless and forgiving, brazen and tactful. Clearly a man of many facets, he underwent three major political reinventions in his lifetime and negotiated the stormy and dangerous seas of the last phase of the Roman Revolution with skill and foresight. With Augustus established in power and with the Principate firmly rooted, the internal machinations of the imperial household provide a fascinating glimpse into the one issue that painted this otherwise gifted organizer and politician into a corner from which he could find no easy exit: the problem of the succession.

(For a very detailed and interesting account of the Age of Augustus see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/auggie.htm)

Death and Retrospective

In his later years, Augustus withdrew more and more from the public eye, although he continued to transact public business. He was getting older, and old age in ancient times must have been considerably more debilitating than it is today. In any case, Tiberius had been installed as his successor and, by AD 13, was virtually emperor already. In AD 4 he had received grants of both proconsular and tribunician power, which had been renewed as a matter of course whenever they needed to be; in AD 13, Tiberius's imperium had been made co-extensive with that of Augustus. While traveling in Campania, Augustus died peacefully at Nola on 19 August, AD 14. Tiberius, who was en route to Illyricum, hurried to the scene and, depending on the source, arrived too late or spent a day in consultation with the dying princes. The tradition that Livia poisoned her husband is scurrilous in the extreme and most unlikely to be true. Whatever the case about these details, Imperator Caesar Augustus, Son of a God, Father of his Country, the man who had ruled the Roman world alone for almost 45 years, or over half a century if the triumviral period is included, was dead. He was accorded a magnificent funeral, buried in the mausoleum he had built in Rome, and entered the Roman pantheon as Divus Augustus. In his will, he left 1,000 sesterces apiece to the men of the Praetorian guard, 500 to the urban cohorts, and 300 to each of the legionaries. In death, as in life, Augustus acknowledged the true source of his power.

The inscription entitled "The Achievements of the Divine Augustus" (Res Gestae Divi Augustae; usually abbreviated RG) remains a remarkable piece of evidence deriving from Augustus's reign. The fullest copy of it is the bilingual Greek and Latin version carved into the walls of the Temple of Rome and Augustus at Ancyra in Galatia (for this reason the RG used to be commonly referred to as the Monumentum Ancyranum). Other evidence, however, demonstrates that the original was inscribed on two bronze pillars that flanked the entrance to the Mausoleum of Augustus in Rome. The inscription remains the only first-person summary of any Roman emperor's political career and, as such, offers invaluable insights into the Augustan regime's public presentation of itself.

In looking back on the reign of Augustus and its legacy to the Roman world, its longevity ought not to be overlooked as a key factor in its success. People had been born and reached middle age without knowing any form of government other than the Principate. Had Augustus died earlier (in 23 BC, for instance), matters may have turned out very differently. The attrition of the civil wars on the old Republican aristocracy and the longevity of Augustus, therefore, must be seen as major contributing factors in the transformation of the Roman state into a monarchy in these years. Augustus's own experience, his patience, his tact, and his great political acumen also played their part. All of these factors allowed him to put an end to the chaos of the Late Republic and re-establish the Roman state on a firm footing. He directed the future of the empire down many lasting paths, from the existence of a standing professional army stationed at or near the frontiers, to the dynastic principle so often employed in the imperial succession, to the embellishment of the capital at the emperor's expense. Augustus's ultimate legacy, however, was the peace and prosperity the empire was to enjoy for the next two centuries under the system he initiated. His memory was enshrined in the political ethos of the Imperial age as a paradigm of the good emperor; although every emperor adopted his name, Caesar Augustus, only a handful earned genuine comparison with him.

Copyright © 1999, Garrett G. Fagan.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Augustus (the first Roman emperor, in whose reign Jesus Christ was born) is without any doubt one of the most important figures in Roman history.

It is reported that when he was near death, Augustus addressed those in attendance with these words, "If I have played my part well, applaud!"

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr
Cleisthenes
   
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