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Search results - "Justinian"
justinian_M7.JPG
144 viewsFollis, 527-537, Nicomedia, 2nd officina, 29mm, 16.1g, green patina.vercingetorix
coin411.jpg
34 viewsJustinian I AE Pentanummium. Sear #244
Antioch as Theoupolis. Diademed & draped bust right
/ Epsilon with cross for the center line, star to right.
Coin #411
cars100
01141q00.jpg
13 viewsJustinian I, 527-565. 1/2 Siliqua (Silver, 14 mm, 1.31 g, 9 h), Carthage, 534/7-552. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AG Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I to right. Rev. Large monogram; cross above, S below; all within wreath. DOC -. MIB 53. SB 254 ('siliqua'). Darkly toned. Struck on the usual somewhat irregular flan, otherwise, good very fine. Quant.Geek
Justinian_I.JPG
42 viewsJustinian I, AD 527-565, AE Pentanummium, Antioch Mint Jon the Lecturer
Sear-336.jpg
21 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. Æ Decanummium (16mm, 2.75 g). Uncertain mint. Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield / Large six-pointed star within wreath. DOC 368; MIBE 239 (Ravenna); SB 336. VF, dark green patina. An attractive example of this rare issue. Quant.Geek
Sear-328.jpg
10 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. Æ Decanummium (17mm, 3.46 g, 6h). Uncertain mint, possibly Perugia. Dated RY 26 (552/3). Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Large I; cross above, date across field; P. DOC 357; MIBE 101a; SB 328. VF, dark green patina, minor roughness. Rare.


Quant.Geek
Sear-243(1).jpg
12 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. Æ pentanummium (18.01 mm, 2.49 g, 1 h). D N IVSTINI-ANVS AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I right / large Є with crossbar in center, to right, lunate V. SB 243; DOC 270. Quant.Geek
Athalaric_BMC_Ostrogoths_67,_52.jpg
4. Athalaric, in name of Justinian22 viewsATHALARIC
Ostrogoth King of Rome, in name of Justinian
AE 4, Ravenna mint

O: IVSTI..., diademed and cuirassed bust of Justinian I right

R: Monogram of Athalaric in wreath

BMC Ostrogoths p. 67, 52

1 commentsSosius
Justinian_Decanum_Rome_1.jpg
4. Justinian I 18 viewsJUSTINIAN I
AE Decanummium, Rome Mint, 527-565

DN IVSTINIANVS P AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield / Large I, star to left and right, all within wreath

SB308, MIB 228 aF
Sosius
Justinian_SB_308.jpg
4. Justinian I 23 viewsJUSTINIAN I
AE Decanummium, Rome Mint, 527-565

DN IVSTINIANVS P AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield / Large I, star to left and right, all within wreath

SB308, MIB 228 VF/EF
Sosius
justinian_i.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I41 views527 - 565 AD
2nd OFFICINA, STRUCK 527 - 538 AD
AE FOLLIS 30 mm max. 17.89 g
O: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVC, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, with star on shoulder
R: Large M ; star to left, cross above and to right, B below; CON. IN EXE
CONSTANTINOPLE
DOC 28b; MIBE 84; SB 158
laney
justinian_i_follis_8.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I74 views527 - 565 AD
AE FOLLIS 32 mm 17.05 g
O: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, with star on shoulder
R: Large M ; star to left, cross above and to right,CON. IN EXE
laney
BYZ_16_NUMMI.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I25 views527 - 565 AD
(struck 538 - 552)
AE 16 NUMMI 21 mm 7.23 g
O: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I, right
R: Large I surmounted with a cross with star to each side, A at left, SP at right, TES in exergue
Thessalonica
Sear-177, MIBE-169d (scarce version)
laney
half_follis_4.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I41 views527-565 AD
Æ Half Follis 24 mm 7.30 g
O: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust r.
R: Large K; long cross at left;officina mark to right; stars above and below.
Constantinople
Sear 164
laney
half_follis_2_7.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I38 views527-565 AD
Æ Half Follis 20.5 mm 7.20 g
O: [DN IV]STINIANVS PP AVG. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust r.
R: Large K; long cross at left;officina mark to right; stars above and below.
Constantinople
Sear 164
laney
half_follis_1_7.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I39 views527-565 AD
Æ Half Follis 26 mm 7.25 g
O: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust r.
R: Large K; long cross at left;officina mark to right; stars above and below.
Constantinople
Sear 164
laney
BYZ.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I49 views527-565 AD
Æ Half Follis
O: Helmeted and cuirassed facing bust, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
R: Large K, ANNO to left, cross above, XX/VI to right, NI below
Nicomedia
laney
half_follis_6_7.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I45 views527-565 AD
AE HALF FOLLIS 23 mm 5.73 g
O: Helmeted and cuirassed bust of Justinian facing, holding globus cruciger and shield, cross in right field
R: Large K, cross above; A/N/N/O at left; regnal year at right; officina letter below

laney
justinian_i_(3).jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I27 views527 - 565 AD
AE DECANUMMIUM 16.5 mm 4.02 g
O: DIAD DR CUIR BUST R
R: LARGE I, CROSS ON EACH SIDE, NIK IN EXE
NICOMEDIA
SEAR 204
(EB)
laney
justinian_i_decanum_res.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I17 views527 - 565 AD
AE Decanummium (10 Nummi) 14 mm; 3.46 g
O: Draped, cuirassed and diademed bust right
R: Large value mark "I"; ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right
Cyzicus mint
laney
justinian_i_half_follis_b.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I24 views527-565 AD
Æ Half Follis
O: Helmeted and cuirassed facing bust, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
R: Large K, ANNO to left, cross above, XX/VI to right, NI below
Nicomedia
laney
justinian_k_blk.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I14 views527-565 AD
Æ Half Follis 24 mm 7.30 g
O: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust r.
R: Large K; long cross at left;officina mark to right; stars above and below.
Constantinople
Sear 164
laney
justinian_i_blk.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I11 views527-565 AD.
AE Follis 32 mm, 15.20 g
O: Diademed draped bust right
R: Large M between star and cross; cross above, A below
laney
justinian_half_follis_8.jpg
(0527)JUSTINIAN I26 views527 - 565 AD
AE Half Follis 23.5 mm 7.16 g
O: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: Long cross dividing N/I to left OF LARGE K, B TO RIGHT
SEAR SB 202, Nicomedia
laney
003_Justinian_I.JPG
003. Justinian I, 527-565. AE 40 Nummi.56 viewsObv. Helmeted bust of Justinian facing, holding globe surmounted with cross.
Rev. Large M with A underneath, NIK below, ANNO XIII to sides.
Nikomedia Mint, 541.
2 commentsLordBest
Medio Follis Justiniano I SB00165.jpg
03-10 - Justiniano I (01/08/527 - 14/11/565 D.C.) 21 viewsAE Medio Follis 28 x 30 mm 7.1 gr.

Anv: "D.N. IVSTINIANVS PP.AVG." - Busto con yelmo y coraza, portando "Sphaira/globus cruciger/Orbis" (Globo coronado por una cruz) en mano derecha y escudo en izquierda, viendo al frente. A su Izquierda " + " .
Rev: Gran " K ", " + " arriba, " A/N/N/O " a izquierda, " XII " (Año de reinado) a derecha y " Δ " (Letra de Officina) debajo.

Acuñada Año=12, 538/9 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.4ta.)

Referencias: Sear BCTV #165 Pag. 61 - Bellinger D.O. Vol.I #62-75 - B.M.C. #107/12, 115/19 - Tolstoi M.B. #318/36 - Ratto M.B. #539/42, 547 - Morrisson C.M.b.B.N. #82-91 - Hahn M.I.B. #96 (H.Weller)
mdelvalle
16 Nummi Justiniano I SB00177.jpg
03-15 - Justiniano I (01/08/527 - 14/11/565 D.C.) 23 viewsAE 16 nummi 22 x 18 mm 7.3 gr.

Anv: "D.N. IVSTINIANVS PP.AVG." - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: Gran " I ", " A " a izquierda y " SP " a derecha. " * + * " arriba. "TES" en exergo.

Acuñada 527 - 565 D.C.
Ceca: Tessalónica

Referencias: Sear BCTV #177 Pag. 64 - Bellinger D.O. Vol.I #98c - B.M.C. #167/9 - Tolstoi M.B. #487 - Hahn M.I.B. #169d
mdelvalle
16 Nummi Justiniano I SB00178.jpg
03-16 - Justiniano I (01/08/527 - 14/11/565 D.C.) 32 viewsAE 16 nummi 20 x 20 mm 6.7 gr.

Anv: "D.N. IVSTINIANVS PP.AVG." - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: Gran " I ", " A " a izquierda y " SP " a derecha. " Signo Chi-Ro " arriba. "TES" en exergo.

Acuñada 527 - 565 D.C.
Ceca: Tessalónica

Referencias: Sear BCTV #178 Pag. 64 - Bellinger D.O. Vol.I #98d - B.M.C. #171 - Tolstoi M.B. #485 - Morrisson C.M.b.B.N. #9 - Hahn M.I.B. #169c
1 commentsmdelvalle
Decanummium Justiniano I SB00167.jpg
03-25 - Justiniano I (01/08/527 - 14/11/565 D.C.) 26 viewsAE Decanummium (10 nummi) 15 mm 4.6 gr.

Anv: "D.N. IVSTINIANVS PP.AVG." - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: Gran " I ", " + " arriba, " A/N/N/O " a izquierda y " X/X/X " (Año de reinado) a derecha. " CON " en exergo.

Acuñada Año=30, 556/7 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla

Referencias: Sear BCTV #167 Pag. 62 - Bellinger D.O. Vol.I #76-85, 88-95 - B.M.C. #126/32, 135/37 - Tolstoi M.B. #408/16 - Ratto M.B. #552/4, 556/9 - Morrisson C.M.b.B.N. #92/6 - Hahn M.I.B. #99 (I.T.Roper Coll.)
mdelvalle
Decanummium Justiniano I SB00326.jpg
03-27 - Justiniano I (01/08/527 - 14/11/565 D.C.) 32 viewsAE Decanummium (10 nummi) 15 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "D.N. IVSTINIANVS PP.AVG." - Busto con yelmo y coraza, portando "Sphaira" ó "globus cruciger" u "Ordis" (Globo coronado por una cruz) en mano derecha y escudo en izquierda, viendo al frente. A su Izquierda " + ".
Rev: Gran " I ", " A/N/N/O " a izquierda y " XX/XV/II " (Año de reinado) a derecha. " CON " en exergo.

Acuñada Año=37, 563/4 D.C.
Ceca: Ravenna

Referencias: Sear BCTV #326 Pag. 85 - Bellinger D.O. Vol.I #347/55 - B.M.C. #404/9 - Tolstoi M.B. #450/2 - Morrisson C.M.b.B.N. #2/7 - Hahn M.I.B. #229
1 commentsmdelvalle
JustnnSB159.jpg
0527-0565 AD - Justinian I - Sear 159 - Follis48 viewsEmperor: Justinian I (r. 527-565 AD)
Date: 527-565 AD
Condition: Fair
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Bust right; diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: no legend
Large "M"; cross above, crosses to left and right; "E" below.
Exergue: CON (Constantinople mint, fifth officina)

Sear 159
15.64g; 33.26mm; 180°
Pep
Theo1Ae3Ant.jpeg
1505b, Theodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. (Antioch)70 viewsTheodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC 44(b), VF, Antioch, 2.17g, 18.1mm, 180o, 9 Aug 378 - 25 Aug 383 A.D. Obverse: D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: CONCORDIA AVGGG, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, r. foot on prow, globe in l., scepter in r., Q and F at sides, ANTG in ex; scarce.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.



Cleisthenes
Theod1GlrMan.jpg
1505c, Theodosius I, 379 - 395 A.D. (Constantinople)79 viewsTheodosius I (379 - 395 AD) AE3. 388-394 AD, RIC IX 27(a)3, Third Officina. Seventh Period. 20.27 mm. 4.8gm. Near VF with black and earthen patina. Constantinople. Obverse: DN THEODO-SIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right; Reverse: GLORIA-ROMANORVM, Theodosius I standing, facing, holding labarum and globe, CONSB in exergue (scarcer reverse). A Spanish find.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Sear_1296.jpg
18. Justinian II13 viewsJustinian II
First reign, 685-695 AD.
AE Follis. Syracuse mint.

O: no legend, crowned bust facing wearing chlamys, holding akakia in left hand and cross on globe in right hand; upright palm branch to left

R: Large M, TNA-like monogram above (Sear type 38); mintmark SCL.

SB 1296, DOC 55.

Not pretty, but rare.

Thanks to FORVM member Obryzum for helping to ID!
Sosius
IMG_0148.JPG
2. Byzantine - Justinian54 viewsJustinian Follis
Constantinople Mint
527 - 565 AD
Zam
IMG_0152~0.JPG
2.1 Byzantine - Justinian42 viewsJustinian Follis
Constantinople Mint
527 - 565 AD
Zam
coins171.JPG
504. Constantius II Campgate Nicomedia18 viewsNicomedia

Titular see of Bithynia Prima, founded by King Zipoetes. About 264 B.C. his son Nicodemes I dedicated the city anew, gave it his name, made it his capital, and adorned it with magnificent monuments. At his court the vanquished Hannibal sought refuge. When Bithynia became a Roman province Nicomedia remained its capital. Pliny the Younger mentions, in his letters to Trajan, several public edifices of the city — a senate house, an aqueduct which he had built, a forum, the temple of Cybele, etc. He also proposed to join the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmora by a canal which should follow the river Sangarius and empty the waters of the Lake of Sabandja into the Gulf of Astacus. A fire then almost destroyed the town. From Nicomedia perhaps, he wrote to Trajan his famous letter concerning the Christians. Under Marcus Aurelius, Dionysius, Bishop of Corinth, addressed a letter to his community warning them against the Marcionites (Eusebius, "Hist. Eccl.", IV, xxiii). Bishop Evander, who opposed the sect of the Ophites (P.L., LIII, 592), seems to have lived at the same time. Nicomedia was the favorite residence of Diocletian, who built there a palace, a hippodrome, a mint, and an arsenal. In 303 the edict of the tenth persecution caused rivers of blood to flow through the empire, especially in Nicomedia, where the Bishop Anthimus and a great many Christians were martyred. The city was then half Christian, the palace itself being filled with them. In 303, in the vast plain east of Nicomedia, Diocletian renounced the empire in favour of Galerius. In 311 Lucian, a priest of Antioch, delivered a discourse in the presence of the judge before he was executed. Other martyrs of the city are numbered by hundreds. Nicomedia suffered greatly during the fourth century from an invasion of the Goths and from an earthquake (24 Aug., 354), which overthrew all the public and private monuments; fire completed the catastrophe. The city was rebuilt, on a smaller scale. In the reign of Justinian new public buildings were erected, which were destroyed in the following century by the Shah Chosroes. Pope Constantine I visited the city in 711. In 1073 John Comnenus was there proclaimed emperor and shortly afterwards was compelled to abdicate. In 1328 it was captured by the Sultan Orkhan, who restored its ramparts, parts of which are still preserved.

RIC VII Nicomedia 158 R2

ecoli
coin233~0.JPG
504. CONSTANTIUS II GLORIA EXERCITVS Antioch18 viewsAntioch

Under the empire we chiefly hear of the earthquakes which shook Antioch. One, in AD 37, caused the emperor Caligula to send two senators to report on the condition of the city. Another followed in the next reign; and in 115, during Trajan's sojourn in the place with his army of Parthia, the whole site was convulsed, the landscape altered, and the emperor himself forced to take shelter in the circus for several days. He and his successor restored the city; but in 526, after minor shocks, the calamity returned in a terrible form; the octagonal cathedral which had been erected by the emperor Constantius II suffered and thousands of lives were lost, largely those of Christians gathered to a great church assembly. We hear also of especially terrific earthquakes on November 29, 528 and October 31, 588.

At Antioch Germanicus died in AD 19, and his body was burnt in the forum. Titus set up the Cherubim, captured from the Jewish temple, over one of the gates. Commodus had Olympic games celebrated at Antioch, and in 266 the town was suddenly raided by the Persians, who slew many in the theatre. In 387 there was a great sedition caused by a new tax levied by order of Theodosius, and the city was punished by the loss of its metropolitan status. Zeno, who renamed it Theopolis, restored many of its public buildings just before the great earthquake of 526, whose destructive work was completed by the Persian Chosroes twelve years later. Justinian I made an effort to revive it, and Procopius describes his repairing of the walls; but its glory was past.

The chief interest of Antioch under the empire lies in its relation to Christianity. Evangelized perhaps by Peter, according to the tradition upon which the Antiochene patriarchate still rests its claim for primacy (cf. Acts xi.), and certainly by Barnabas and Paul, who here preached his first Christian sermon in a synagogue, its converts were the first to be called Christians

004. CONSTANTIUS II Antioch

RIC VII Antioch 88 C3

From Uncleaned Lot

ecoli
518-578 Justin Justinien Justin II.jpg
518-578 Justin I to Justin II - 12 nummia from Alexandria51 viewsd.m. IVS[...]
I+B , exergue AΛEξ

Difficult to tell wether this coin is of Justin I, Justinian or Justin II.
Ginolerhino
1JustinianI527AD.jpg
527-565 AD, Justinian I20 viewsAe; 25mm; 9.13g

DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe in right hand and
shield and cross in left

Large K, ANNO to left, cross above, XXXI to right, P with angled downstroke below

DO 246; SB 231; MIB 155
Antioch mint, Year 31, April 557- March 558
1 commentsRobin Ayers
2JustinianI527AD.jpg
527-565 AD, Justinian I24 viewsAE Pentanummium; 15mm; 2.26g

DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right

epsilon with + at center, star to right

SB 244, DOC 271
Antioch Mint, April 551- March 556
1 commentsRobin Ayers
3JustinianI527AD.jpg
527-565 AD, Justinian I37 viewsAe Follis; 30mm; 16.15g

DN ISTINI-ANVS PP AVG
Helmeted, draped and cuirassed facing bust, holding globe with cross in right hand, cross in left

Large M, ANNO to the left, cross above, XXXI to right, B below
NIKO in exergue

SB201 (year 31), DOC 137b, MIB 113a
Nicomedia mint
1 commentsRobin Ayers
Justinian-Con-S-163.jpg
96. Justinian I.19 viewsFollis (40 nummia), 541, Constantinople mint.
Obverse: DN IVSTINIANVS P P AVG / Helmeted and cuirassed bust, facing; holding globe and cruciger. Cross at right.
Reverse: Large M, cross above, ANNO XIIII at sides, Γ between legs of M.
Mint mark: CON
22.82 gm., 38 mm.
Sear #163.

The large M is the Greek numeral 40 -- i.e. 40 nummia is the coin's denomination. The smaller Γ is the Greek numeral 3 -- i.e. the 3'rd officina of the mint at Constantinople. ANNO XIIII is Latin for Year 14 -- the 14'th year of Justinian's reign (541 AD).
In 541, things were going bad for the Empire -- trouble with the Goths in Italy, the Bulgars ravaging the Balkans, and the Persians invading from the east. Bubonic plague swept across the eastern Mediterranean in 541, reaching Constantinople in May 542, before going on to Italy and Gaul.
Callimachus
sear_239.jpg
AE decanummium Justinian I SB 23938 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG or similar usually blundered, Helmeted and cuir. bust facing holding gl. cr. and sheild; to r., cross.
Reverse: Large I, cross above, ANNO to left, regnal yr XXXU or UI, THEUP in ex.
Mint: Antioch/Theoupolis
Date 561-563 CE
Sear 239 DO 264-7
19mm 3.91gm
wileyc
sear_125.jpg
AE follis Justin I and Justinian I29 viewsDN IVSTIN E IVSTINIAN PPAV or similar, Diad, dr, and cuir bust of Justin r. sometimes as in this coin with a star on shoulder
Reverse: Large M between star and cross, cross above Officina B and CON in exergue.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 527
Sear 125 DO 10
30mm 14.53gm
wileyc
s_201.jpg
AE follis Justinian I (large) SB 20170 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINANVS PP AVG Hemeted and cuir, bust facing, holding gl. cr, and shield; to r., cross.
Reverse: Large M, between ANNO and regnal year XXXII, Cross above, Pfficina letter "B" below. In exergue NIKO
Date; 558/9 CE
Mint: Nicomedia
Sear: 201 DO 115-39
32MM 17.15GM
wileyc
s_158.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 15830 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diad., dr. and cuir. bust r.
Reverse: LArge M between star and cross, Officina letetr"A" below, in ex., CON
Date; 527-538 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 158 DO 28
30mm 17.51
wileyc
sear_158.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 15842 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diad., dr. and cuir bust r.
Reverse: LArge M between star and cross, cross above, officina letter "delta", CON in ex
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 527-538 CE
Sear 158 DO 58
29mm 13.72gm
wileyc
sb15830mm1458g.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 15825 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Reverse: Large M. star to left, cross above, cross right, officina letter below "gamma"
Date: 527-565 CE
Mints: Constantinople
Sear 158, DOC 28
30mm, 14.58g
wileyc
sb15731mm1768g.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 15820 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Reverse: Large M. star to left, cross above, cross right, officina letter below "gamma"
Date: 527-565 CE
Mints: Constantinople
Sear 158, DOC 28
31mm, 17.68gg
wileyc
sb158_32mm_16_13g.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 15822 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Reverse: Large M. star to left, cross above, cross right, officina letter below "gamma"
Date: 527-565 CE
Mints: Constantinople
Sear 158, DOC 28
32mm, 16.13g
wileyc
sb158,29mm_13_77g.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 15823 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Reverse: Large M. star to left, cross above, cross right, officina letter below "gamma"
Date: 527-565 CE
Mints: Constantinople
Sear 158, DOC 28
29mm, 13.77g
wileyc
sb158_29mm1578g.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 15821 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Reverse: Large M. star to left, cross above, cross right, officina letter below "gamma"
Date: 527-565 CE
Mints: Constantinople
Sear 158, DOC 28
29mm, 15.78g
wileyc
s_160.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 16041 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diad., dr. and cuir. bust r.
Reverse: LArge M between two stars, cross above, Officina letter "A" CON in ex
Date: 527-538 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 160 DO 30
32mm 16.41gm
wileyc
s_163.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 16337 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG (or similar) Helmeted and cuir, bust facing holding gl. cr. and sheild; to r. cross
Reverse: Large M between ANNO and regnal year XUIII (18), cross above, CON in ex, and officina letter "E"
Date: 544/5 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 163 DO 37-61
33mm 17.67gm
wileyc
sear_163.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 16345 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG (or similar) Helmeted and cuir. bust facing, holding gl. cr. and sheild, to r. cross.
Reverse: Large M bewteen ANNO and regnal year XU (15) cross above, officina letter "delta" Con in ex.
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 541/2 CE
Sear 163 DO 37-61
32mm 22.70gm
wileyc
sb16331mm1951g.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 16325 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG (or similar) Helmeted and cuir, bust facing holding gl. cr. and sheild; to r. cross
Reverse: Large M between ANNO and regnal year XUII (17), cross above, CON in ex, and officina letter "B"
Date: 543/4 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 163 DO 37-61
31mm 19.51gm
wileyc
sb163yr19_35mm1666g.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 163 yr 1936 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right XUIIII (19), officina letter below Delta , mintmark CON.
Date: 545/6 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 163 DO 37-61
35mm, 16.66g
wileyc
sear_207_Justinian_I.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 20735 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG ( or similar) Helmeted and cuir. bust facing, holding gl cr. and sheild; to r., cross.
Reverse: Large M between ANNO and regmal year (XXY), beneath officina letter "B" in ex., KYZ
Mint: Cyzicus
Date: 551/2 CE
Sear: 207 DO 164-81
32mm 16.22 gm
wileyc
s_216.jpg
AE follis Justinian I SB 21634 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diad.m dr. and cuir. bust r.
Reverse: LArge M, between two stars, cross above, Officina "gamma" below M, ex +THEUP (o over P) +.
Date: 533-537 CE
Mint: Theoupolis (Antioch)
Sear 216 DO 210
30/33mm 14.16gm
wileyc
sb217.jpg
AE Follis Justinian SB 21728 viewsObv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diad., dr. and cuir. bust r.
Reverse: Large M star to rt and left, cross above, below in greek theta, upsilon, Pi, Omicron, Lambda and S
Date: 537-539 CE
Mint: Antioch
Sear 21, class IV, DO 212
wileyc
sb230,26mm953g.jpg
AE half Follis Justinian I SB 23026 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG helmeted and cuir, bust facing, holding gl. cr. and shield; to r., cross
Reverse: Large K; above cross to L., ANNO to r., XXIII (regnal yr 23). circle above Pi below K.
Mint: Antioch/Theoupolis
Date: 549/50 CE
Sear 230 DO 237-44
26mm 9.53g
wileyc
sb23025mm993g.jpg
AE half Follis Justinian I SB 23023 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG helmeted and cuir, bust facing, holding gl. cr. and shield; to r., cross
Reverse: Large K; above cross to L., ANNO to r., XXIII (regnal yr 23). circle above Pi below K.
Mint: Antioch/Theoupolis
Date: 553/4 CE
Sear 230 DO 237-44
25mm 9.93g
DHC
wileyc
sb28520mm997g.jpg
AE half Follis Justinian I SB 28519 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield
Reverse: Large K, ANNO to left, cross above, (regnal year) XIIII (14) to right.
Mint: Minted in Constantine in Numidia (not Constantinople)
Date: 540/1
Sear 285 DO 313-15
20mm, 9.97g
wileyc
sb163yr1340mm2109g.jpg
AE half follis Justinian I SB 163, yr 1339 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right XIII (13), officina letter below A , mintmark CON.
Date: 539/40 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 163 DO 37-61
40mm, 21.09g
wileyc
sb163yr1636mm1953g.jpg
AE half follis Justinian I SB 163, yr 1345 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right XIII (13), officina letter below A , mintmark CON.
Date: 539/40 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 163 DO 37-61
36mm, 19.53g
1 commentswileyc
sb163_yr26_30mm_1698g.jpg
AE half follis Justinian I SB 163, yr 269 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right XXIGI (28), officina letter below B , mintmark CON.
Date: 552/3 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 163 DO 37-61
30mm, 16.98g
wileyc
sb163yr2831mm1665g.jpg
AE half follis Justinian I SB 163, yr 2829 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right XXIGI (28), officina letter below B , mintmark CON.
Date: 554/5 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 163 DO 37-61
31mm, 16.65g
wileyc
sear_164.jpg
AE half follis Justinian I SB 16416 viewsObverse: DNIVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diad, draped and cuir. bust r.
Reverse: Large K, long cross to L., star above and below, officina delta to r.
Date: 527-538 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 164 DO 33
10.11gm
wileyc
sb17422mm583g.jpg
AE half follis Justinian I SB 17422 viewsObv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Helmeted and cuir. bust facing holding gl. cr. and shield to r., cross
Rev: Large K; cross above, ANNO to left, numerals representing the regnal year to r., (XXXUII) 37
Date: 563/4 CE
Mint: Thessalonica
Sear 174, DO 103-6
22mm, 5.83g
wileyc
sb17422mm605g.jpg
AE half follis Justinian I SB 17420 viewsObv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Helmeted and cuir. bust facing holding gl. cr. and shield to r., cross
Rev: Large K; cross above, ANNO to left, numerals representing the regnal year to r., (XXXUI) 36
Date: 562/3 CE
Mint: Thessalonica
Sear 174, DO 103-6
DHC
22mm, 6.05g
wileyc
sb20226mm927g.jpg
AE half follis Justinian I SB 20222 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG or similar, Diad., draped and curi. bust r.
Reverse: Large K to rt N long cross I, B officina letter to r.
Mint: Nicomedia
Date: 527-565 CE
26mm, 9.27g
Sear 202, DO 112
wileyc
sb264,25mm573g.jpg
AE half Follis Justinian I sb 26416 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG helmeted and cuir, bust facing, holding gl. cr. and shield; to r., cross.
Reverse: Large K; to l., ANNO; to r., numerals representing the regnal yr; cross above, SO beneath, KAR in exergue.
Date: 527-538 CE
Mint: Carthage
Sear 264, DO 294
wileyc
sb226_25mm_726g_.jpg
AE half follis Justinian I SBVC 22618 viewsObv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG or similar, Did., dr. and cur. bust ro r.
Rev: on left Long. cross dividing A-E on left, H-U\\\\P on right side of cross.
large K and on right mintmark "delta"
Mint: Antioch
Date: 527-567 AD
SBVC 226; DO 214
25mm
7.26g
wileyc
sear_165.jpg
AE half-follis Justinian I AE SB 16524 viewsObverse: (Overstruck) DNIVSTINIANVS PP AVG Helmeted and cuir. bust facing holding gl ce. and sheild, to r., cross
Reverse: Large K, cross above, ANNO to l., to r unk regnal yr
Date: 538-565 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 165 DO 62-75
21mm 5.57 gm
wileyc
sb21635mm14_06g.jpg
AE Justinian I, SB 21619 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, or AVGS Diad., draped and cuir. bust facing right.
Reverse: Large M between stars, cross above, B officina, exergue +THEU(circle over P) +.
Mint: Antioch/Theoupolis
Date: 527-567 CE
SB 216
35mm, 14.06g
wileyc
sb216_30mm_1234g.jpg
AE Justinian I, SB 21617 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, or AVGS Diad., draped and cuir. bust facing right.
Reverse: Large M between stars, cross above, B officina, exergue +THEU(circle over P) +.
Mint: Antioch/Theoupolis
Date: 527-567 CE
SB 216
30mm, 12.34g
wileyc
sbc171,14_9mm_146g.jpg
AE Pentanummium Justinian I8 viewsObv: DN IVSTINIANVSPP AVG or similar/incomplete. Did., dr. and cur bust r.
Rev: Large E, B officinae to right
Mint: Constantinople
Date: After reduction of 542-565 CE
SBC 171DO 97a-d
14/9mm 1.46g
wileyc
DSC_s241d.jpg
AE Pentanummium Justinian I SB 24137 viewsObverse: Bust Rt., D.N. IVSTINIANVS PP AVG usually incomplete
Reverse: Large E, Officina letter "Delta" to Rt.
Date 529-539 AD
Mint: Theoupolis (Antioch)
Sear 241 D.O. 268
15mm 2.20 gm
wileyc
DSC_s172.jpg
AE Pentanummium Justinian I SB 17223 viewsObverse: Bust Rt., D.N. IVSTINIANVSPP AV
Reverse: Large E, Officina "cross" to Rt.
Date 543-565 AD
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 172 D.O. 97e.10
13mm 1.27 gm

The cross may have been used to mark the fifth officina instead of repeating the large E.
wileyc
DSC_s172a.jpg
AE Pentanummium Justinian I SB 17223 viewsObverse: Bust Rt., D.N. IVSTINIANVSPP AV
Reverse: Large E, Officina "cross" to Rt.
Date 543-565 AD
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 172 D.O. 97e.10
13mm 1.83 gm

The cross may have been used to mark the fifth officina instead of repeating the large E.
wileyc
sear_172a.jpg
AE Pentanummium Justinian I SB 17233 viewsObverse: Bust Rt., D.N. IVSTINIANVSPP AV
Reverse: Large E, Officina "cross" to Rt.
Date 543-565 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 172 D.O. 97e.10
12/19mm 2.40 gm

The cross may have been used to mark the fifth officina instead of repeating the large E.
wileyc
sear_172.jpg
AE Pentanummium Justinian I SB 17224 viewsObverse: Bust Rt., D.N. IVSTINIANVSPP AV
Reverse: Large E, Officina "cross" to Rt.
Date 543-565 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 172 D.O. 97e.10
12mm 2.04 gm

The cross may have been used to mark the fifth officina instead of repeating the large E.
wileyc
2010-12-12__SB_172.jpg
AE Pentanummium Justinian I SB 17232 viewsObverse: Bust Rt., D.N. IVSTINIANVSPP AV
Reverse: Large E, Officina "cross" to Rt.
Date 543-565 AD
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 172 D.O. 97e.10
11mm 2.05 gm

The cross may have been used to mark the fifth officina instead of repeating the large E.
wileyc
DSC_s241A.jpg
AE Pentanummium Justinian I SB 24134 viewsObverse: Bust Rt., D.N. IVSTINIANVS PP AVG usually incomplete
Reverse: Large E, Officina letter "A" to Rt.
Date 529-539 AD
Mint: Theoupolis (Antioch)
Sear 241 D.O. 268
14mm 2.02 gm
wileyc
s_242.jpg
AE Pentanummium Justinian I SB 24227 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG usually only partially visible, diad., dr and cuir bust r.
Reverse: Large E, without officina letter.
Date: 542 CE
Mint: Theoupolis (Antioch)
Sear: 242, DO 269
15mm 1.99gm
wileyc
DSC_s244.jpg
AE Pentanummium Justinian I SB 24456 viewsObverse: Bust Rt., D.N. IVSTINIANVS PP. AVG
Reverse: Large E with cross in center; to r., star.
Date: 551-560 AD
Mint: Theoupolis (Antioch)
Sear 244 D.O 271
14mm, 2.12gm
1 commentswileyc
sear_244.jpg
AE Pentanummium Justinian I SB 24426 viewsObverse: Bust Rt., D.N. IVSTINIANVS PP. AVG
Reverse: Large E with cross in center; to r., star.
Date: 551-560 AD
Mint: Theoupolis (Antioch)
Sear 244 D.O 271
14mm, 2.19gm
wileyc
sear_248.jpg
AE Six Nummi Justinian I SB 24830 viewsObs: Diad., dr., and cuir Legend usually only partially visible.
Rev: Large S
Mint: Alexandria
Date: 527-565 CE
Sear 248, DO 275
13mm 2.40 gm
wileyc
AncientByzantineEmpire-AV-tremissis-JustinianI-035863.jpg
Ancient Byzantine Empire: gold tremissis of Justinian I, ca. 527-565 AD20 viewslordmarcovan
2350556.jpg
Anonymous12 viewsAnonymous. Time of Justinian I, circa 530. AR Half Siliqua (13mm, 0.96 g, 11h). Constantinople mint. Helmeted and draped bust of Constantinopolis right / Large K. Bendall, Anonymous 8d.TLP
Athalaric.jpg
Athalaric - Ravenna - quarter siliqua29 viewsAthalaric (516-534), Ostrogothic king (526-534). AR quarter siliqua (11 mm, 0.60 g) in the name of Justinian I, minted in Ravenna 527-534. Obverse: diademed bust right, D N IVSTI-NIAN AVC. Reverse: DN/ATHAL/ARICVS/RIX within wreath. Metlich 59.
Jan
B_004_Justinian_I__(527-565_A_D_),_AE-Follis,_D_N_IVSTINI_ANVS_P_P_AVG,_M,_cross_over,_Gamma_below,_l_star,_r_cross,_CON,_SB158,_Constantinop_,_Q-001,_7h,_29,5-32mm,_13,34g-s.jpg
B 004 Justinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0158, +//*/+//Γ/CON, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Constantinopolis,122 viewsB 004 Justinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0158, +//*/+//Γ/CON, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Constantinopolis,
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Large M, Star to left, cross above, and cross to right, officina letter "Γ" below, mintmark CON.
exergue: +//*/+//Γ/CON, diameter: 29,5-32mm, weight: 13,34g, axis: 7h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 0158, p-59,
Q-001
quadrans
B_004_Justinian_I__(527-565_A_D_),_AE-16nummi,_D_N_IVSTINIANVS_P_P_AVG,_Big,_AISP_Chi-Ro_above,_TES,_SB-178,_p-64,_Thessalonica,_Q-001,_6h,_20-23,5mm,_5,94g-s.jpg
B 004 Justinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0178, Chi-Ro/AISP/TES, AE-16-nummi, Thessalonica, 117 viewsB 004 Justinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0178, Chi-Ro/AISP/TES, AE-16-nummi, Thessalonica,
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Large AISP, Chi-Ro above the large I, in exergue, mintmark TES.
exergue: -/-//TES, diameter: 20-23,5mm, weight: 5,94g, axis:6h,
mint: Thessalonica, date: A.D., ref: SB 0178, p-64
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
B_004_Justinian_I__(527-565_A_D_),_AE-Dekanummia,_D_N_IVSTINIANVS_AV(G),_Big_I_l_ANNO,_r_XXXI,_NIK,_SB-205,_p-68,_Nikomedia,_Q-001,_6h,_15,5mm,_2,30g-s.jpg
B 004 Justinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0205, ANNO/XXXI//NIK, AE-Dekanummia, Nikomedia,107 viewsB 004 Justinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0205, ANNO/XXXI//NIK, AE-Dekanummia, Nikomedia,
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS A(VG), Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Large I, "A/N/N/O" to left, cross above, regnal year "X/X/X/I" to right, in exergue, mintmark NIK.
exergue: ANNO/XXXI//NIK, diameter: 15,5mm, weight: 2,3g, axis:6h,
mint: Nikomedia, date: A.D., ref: SB 0205, p-68
Q-001
quadrans
Justinian-527-565-AD_AE-Follis_DN-IVSTINI-ANVS-PP-AVG_M_ANNO_X-X-UI_cross_over-M-Gamma-belowe_CON_SB--p-Constantinopolis_Q-001_axis-7h_31-33mm_14,72g-s.jpg
B 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0163, Γ/CON, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Constantinopolis,109 viewsB 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0163, ANNO/XXUI//Γ/CON, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Constantinopolis,
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right.
reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year "X/X/UI" to right, officina letter "Γ" below, mintmark CON.
exergue: ANNO/XXUI//Γ/CON, diameter: 31,0-33,5mm, weight: 14,71g, axis: 7h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 0163, p-61,
Q-001
quadrans
Iutinianus---Q-001_p-s.jpg
B 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0163, ANNO/X/XUII/II//A/CON, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Constantinopolis,178 viewsB 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0163, ANNO/X/XUII/II//A/CON, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Constantinopolis,
avers: D N IV STINI ANVS P P AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right.
reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year "X/X/UII/II" to right, officina letter "A" below, mintmark CON.
exergue: ANNO/X/XUII/II//A/CON, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 0163, p-61,
Q-001
quadrans
Justinian-527-565-AD_AE-Half-Follis_DN-IVSTINI-ANVS-PP-AVG_K_Cross-Star-Star-A_SB-0164-p-61-Constantinopolis_Q-001_6h_23-25,5mm_8,82gx-s.jpg
B 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0164, -/-//--, AE-Half-Follis, (20 Nummia), Constantinopolis, 69 viewsB 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0164, -/-//--, AE-Half-Follis, (20 Nummia), Constantinopolis,
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right .
reverse: Large K, to left long cross, above and below stars, to right A (officina letter).
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 23-25,5mm, weight: 8,82g, axis: 6h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 0164, p-61
Q-001
quadrans
Justinian-527-565-AD_AE-Follis_DN-IVSTINI-ANVS-PP-AVG_M_ANNO_X-II-I_cross_over-M-A-belowe_NIK_SB-201-p66-Nikomedia_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
B 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0201, ANNO/XIII//A/NIK, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Nikomedia, Year XIII,110 viewsB 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0201, ANNO/XIII//A/NIK, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Nikomedia, Year XIII,
avers: D N IV STINI ANVS P P AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right.
reverse: Large M, "A/N/N/O" to left, cross above, regnal year "X/II/I" to right, officina letter "A" below, mintmark NIK.
exergue: ANNO/XIII//A/NIK, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis:h,
mint: Nikomedia, date: A.D., ref: SB 0201, p-66
Q-001
quadrans
Justinian-527-565-AD_AE-Follis_DN-IVSTINI-ANVS-PP-AVG_M_ANNO_X-II-I_cross_over-M-B-belowe_NIK_SB-201-p66-Nikomedia_Q-001_axis-6h_42mm_20,91g-s.jpg
B 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0201, ANNO/XIII//B/NIK, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Nikomedia, Year XIII,321 viewsB 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0201, ANNO/XIII//B/NIK, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Nikomedia, Year XIII,
avers: D N IV STINI ANVS P P AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right.
reverse: Large M, "A/N/N/O" to left, cross above, regnal year "X/II/I" to right, officina letter "B" below, mintmark NIK.
exergue: ANNO/XIII//B/NIK, diameter: 42mm, weight: 20,91g, axis: 6 h,
mint: Nikomedia, date: A.D., ref: SB 0201, p-66
Q-001
quadrans
Justinian-527-565-AD_AE-Follis_DN-IVSTINI-ANVS-PP-AVG_M_ANNO_X-UI-I_cross_over-M-B-belowe_NIKO_SB--p-Nikomedia_Q-001_axis-h_mm_g-s.jpg
B 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0201, ANNO/XUII//B/NIKO, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Nikomedia, Year XUII,109 viewsB 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0201, ANNO/XUII//B/NIKO, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Nikomedia, Year XUII,
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right.
reverse: Large M, "A/N/N/O" to left, cross above, regnal year "X/UI-I" to right, officina letter "B" below, mintmark NIKO.
exergue: ANNO/XUII//B/NIKO, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Nikomedia, date: A.D., ref: SB-201 , p-67,
Q-001
quadrans
Justinian-527-565-AD_AE-Follis_DN-IVSTINI-ANVS-PP-AVG_M_ANNO_X-II_cross_over-M-A-belowe_NIKO_SB-201var-p66-Nikomedia_Q-001_6h_41-42mm_20,55g-s.jpg
B 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0201var., ANNO/XII//A/NIKO, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Nikomedia, Year XII,129 viewsB 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0201var., ANNO/XII//A/NIKO, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Nikomedia, Year XII,
avers: D N IV STINI ANVS P P AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right.
reverse: Large M, "A/N/N/O" to left, cross above, regnal year "XII" to right, officina letter "A" below, mintmark NIKO.
exergue: ANNO/XII//A/NIKO, diameter: 41-42mm, weight: 20,55g, axis:6h,
mint: Nikomedia, date: A.D., ref: SB 0201var., p-66
Q-001
quadrans
Justinian-527-565-AD_AE-Half-Follis_DN-IVSTINI-ANVS-PP-AVG_K_ANNO_XUI__cross_V-over-Z_SB-208-p69-Cyzicus_Q-001_axis-h_31mm_10_20ga-s.jpg
B 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0208, V/Z, AE-Half-Follis, (20 Nummia), Cyzicus, Year XUI,81 viewsB 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0208, V/Z, AE-Half-Follis, (20 Nummia), Cyzicus, Year XUI,
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right.
reverse: Large K, "A/N/N/O" to left, cross above, regnal year "X-UI" to right, mintmark and officina letter " V over Z," belowe.
exergue: "V over Z", diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Cyzicus, date: A.D., ref: SB-208 , p-67,
Q-001
quadrans
B_004_Iustinianus-I__(527-565_A_D_),_AE-Pentanummium_DN-IVSTINI-ANVS-PP-AVG_Large_E_cross_at_centre_Large_small_gamma_to_r__S_243_Antioch_Q-001_0h_16-17mm_2,58g-s.jpg
B 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0243, -/-//--, AE-Pentanummia, Antioch, Large Є, #1123 viewsB 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0243, -/-//--, AE-Pentanummia, Antioch, Large Є, #1
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right .
reverse: Large Є with cross at centre, large small letter Ϫ to right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,0-17,0mm, weight: 2,58g, axis: 0h,
mint: Antioch, date: A.D., ref: SB 0243, p-75,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Justinian-527-565-AD_AR-half-Siliqua_DN-IVSTINI-ANVS-PP-AVG_Chi-Rho_Star-Star-in_wreath_Ravenna_SB-320-p84_552-564-AD_Q-001_6h_12mm_0,72g-s.jpg
B 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0320, Ravenna, AR-1/2-Siliqua, Chi-Ro on globe, star both side, 254 viewsB 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0320, Ravenna, AR-1/2-Siliqua, Chi-Ro on globe, star both side,
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Monogram (Chi-Ro) on globe, at sides, stars. Around, laurel wreath.
exergue: */*//--, diameter: 12mm, weight: 0,72g, axis:6h,
mint: Ravenna, date: 552-564A.D., ref: SB 0320, p-84,
Q-001
quadrans
Justinian-I__(527-565)_Anonim-0_33-Siliquae-or_scripulum_Constantinopolis_Large-K-Vagi-3051-Bendall-Typ-8c_Q-001_7h_12-13mm_0,65g-s.jpg
B 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), Vagi-3051 ???, Anonymous Issue, AR 1/3 Siliqua or 1 Scripulum, Constantinopolis,211 viewsB 004 Justinianus I. (527-565 A.D.), Vagi-3051 ???, Anonymous Issue, AR 1/3 Siliqua or 1 Scripulum, Constantinopolis,
avers: No legend, Helmeted, cuirassed bust of Constantinopolis right wearing pearl necklace and earring.
reverse: No legend, Large K.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 12-13mm, weight: 0,65g, axis: 7h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: Vagi-3051 ???, Bendall Typ-8c ???,
Q-001
quadrans
Baduila_quarter_siliqua.jpg
Baduila - Ticinum - quarter siliqua48 viewsBaduila (-552), Ostrogothic king (541-552). AR quarter siliqua (11 mm, 0.41 g) minted in Ticinum in the name of Justinian I. Obverse: diademed bust right, (…)NV IIVC. Reverse: D N BADVILA REX in four lines within wreath. Metlich 68.1 commentsJan
Baduila_quarter_siliqua_ab.jpg
Baduila - Ticinum - quarter siliqua76 viewsBaduila (-552), Ostrogothic king (541-552). AR quarter siliqua (10 mm, 0.36 g) in the name of Justinian I, minted in Ticinum. Obverse: bust right with cross-topped diadem, D N IVSTIN-IVS PF AVC. Reverse: Monogram of Baduila, D above, N below, all within wreath. Metlich 67b, r3 (< three coins listed by Metlich).

Ex Inasta Auction 47, lot 421, 2012
1 commentsJan (jbc)
BCC_B20_Justinian_I_Nummus.jpg
BCC B206 viewsByzantine Period
Justinian I 527-565CE
Obv: Diademed (draped, and
cuirassed) bust right,
traces of inscription.
Rev: Large A (one nummus)
AE 8mm 0.68gm. Axis:210
Struck 534-539CE
SB 281 DOC 309 Carthage
Surface find, Caesarea M. 1977.
v-drome
BCC_B23_Justinian_I_Stuarogram.jpg
BCC B233 viewsByzantine Period
Justinian I 527-565CE
Obv: [Helmeted, draped bust
facing, stars flanking].
Rev: Staurogram, below, left
and right: A and w
AE 8mm 0.57gm. axis:345?
SB 342, DOC 308, MIB 208a
Nummus. Carthage Mint
Surface find, Caesarea M. 1977.
v-drome
Justinian_I__AR_Half_Siliqua.jpg
Byzantine , Justinian I. 527-565.36 viewsAR Half Siliqua. Carthage mint , aVF , rare.Sam
justin_ii_thessalon_half-follis_epsilon.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - Justin II35 viewsBYZANTINE EMPIRE - Justin II (565-578 AD) 1/2-Follis. Obv.: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG. Justin left and Sophia right, seated facing on double-throne, both nimbate; Justinian holding cross on globe, Sophia holding sceptre topped by cross. Rev.: "K" -- Anno field left; cross above, V field right, Epsilon below. Thessalonica mint; SB 361, MIB 44.dpaul7
justinian_follis_circle_k.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - Justinian49 viewsBYZANTINE EMPIRE - Justinian (AD 527-565) AE ½ FOLLIS (20 Nummi) Obv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVC - facing bust of Justinian Rev: K with ANNO left, CROSS above and XXX (xxx=30 or AD 557) on the right. Exe: "gamma" or 3rd officina Constantinople mint: AD 557 = SEAR BCV (1987), #165, page 61-62 , 8.03 g.
dpaul7
JUSTINIAN_I_QUARTER_FOLLIS.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - Justinian I36 viewsBYZANTINE EMPIRE - Justinian I (527-565) AE Quarter-Follis (I = 10 Nummi or decanummium) Obv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AV - Diademed bust of Justinian right, draped and cuirassed Rev: Large I. Cross above, ANNO to left, XXXV (AD 562) to right. Exe: CON Constantinople mint. 3.48 g. SB-167.dpaul7
justinian_AISP.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - Justinian I61 viewsBYZANTINE EMPIRE - Justinian I (AD 527-565 ) AE 16 Nummi. Thessalonica mint. Obv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG – Pearl-diademed bust right, draped and cuirassed Rev: A in left field, I in center, SP to right; above: [Theta] EW . Exurge: TES = Thessalonica mint: Sear. Byzantine coins and their values., 186B, 5.44 g. dpaul7
BYZ_JUSTINIAN_CHERON_SM.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - Justinian I - Cherson Mint24 viewsBYZANTINE EMPIRE - Justinian I (548-562 AD) AE Nummi. Cherson mint. Obv.: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right Rev.: VIC-TOR, Justinian standing, holding long cross and globe. SB 197a, DOC 371. 11 mm
dpaul7
BYZ_JUSTINIAN_CHERON_LG.jpg
BYZANTINE EMPIRE - Justinian I - Cherson Mint16 viewsBYZANTINE EMPIRE - Justinian I (548-562 AD) AE Nummi. Cherson mint. Obv.: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right Rev.: VIC-TOR, Justinian standing, holding long cross and globe. SB 197a, DOC 371. 15 mm
dpaul7
justinianus.jpg
Byzantine Empire Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Theoupolis ,Antioch9 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large Є with cross at center
Sear: 242, DO 269
Britanikus
Screenshot_2019-04-11_12_22_21.png
Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, AE Follis13 viewsAntioch 527-565 A.D. 13.25g - 30mm, Axis 4h.

Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG - Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Rev: Large M, star to left, cross above, star to right, officina letter Γ below. Mintmark +THEUP+.

SB 216; Γ; DOC 210.
Christian Scarlioli
Screenshot_2019-04-09_20_30_44.png
Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, AE Follis.10 viewsConstantinople 527-565 A.D. 15.15g - 32.7mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG - Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Rev: Large M. star to left, cross above, cross right, officina A letter below. Mintmark CON.

SB 158; DOC 28.
Christian Scarlioli
Screenshot_2019-01-10_16_00_47.png
Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, AE Half Follis.15 viewsConstantinople Year 15 = 541-542 A.D. 10.54g - 28.1mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG - Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield; cross in right field.

Rev: Large K, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year XU to right, officina letter Ɛ below.

SB 165; DOC 62.
Christian Scarlioli
Screenshot_2019-08-01_13_15_39.png
Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, AE Pentanummium. 8 viewsAntioch 527-565 A.D. 1.69g - 12.5mm, Axis 3h.

Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG - Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Rev: Tyche of Antioch seated left, retrograde Epsilon to left, all within shrine.

SB 240; DOC 205.
scarli
Screenshot_2019-05-26_13_25_18.png
Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, AE Pentanummium. 6 viewsAntioch 527-565 A.D. 1.94g - 15mm, Axis 2h.

Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG - Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Rev: Large C with monogram of Antioch within.

SB 245; DOC 272.
scarli
Screenshot_2019-05-26_13_25_29.png
Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, AE Pentanummium. 6 viewsAntioch 527-565 A.D. 2.17g - 18.7mm, Axis 9h.

Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG - Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Rev: Epsilon with + at centre, star to right.

SB 244; DOC 271.
scarli
Screenshot_2019-04-05_16_43_39.png
Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, AE Pentanummium.6 viewsTheoupolis 542 A.D. 1.88g - 17.5mm, Axis 12h.

Obv: DN IVSTINI[ANVS PP AVG] - Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Rev: Large Є with cross at centre.

DOC 269; MIBE 142; SB 242.
Christian Scarlioli
Sear-133.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justin I & Justinian I (527 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Antioch (Sear 133; DOC 17; MIBE 13)7 viewsObv: +D N IVSTINVS ЄT IVSTINIANVS P P A; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed busts of Justin and Justinian facing
Rev: Tyche of Antioch seated left, head facing; river-god Orontes swimming to right below; Э to left; all within distyle shrine
Quant.Geek
Sear-226.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ 1/2 Follis, Theoupolis/Antioch (Sear-226; DOC 211c; MIBE 134)12 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG; diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I right
Rev: Large K; to left, T-H/Є-Ч/O/P arranged either side of cross; Γ to the right
Quant.Geek
Sear-277(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ 2 Nummi, Carthage (Sear 277; DOC 102; MIBE 190)6 viewsObv: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I to right between two crosses
Rev: Large B
Dim: 10 mm, 0.80 g, 7 h
Quant.Geek
Sear-277.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ 2 Nummi, Carthage (Sear 277; DOC 102; MIBE 190)12 viewsObv: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I to right between two crosses
Rev: Large B
Quant.Geek
Sear-192A.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ 8 Nummi, Thessalonica (Sear 192A; MIBE 173a)6 viewsObv: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I right
Rev: Large H between A and P, lacking cross above H
Quant.Geek
Sear-158.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear 158; DOC 28; MIBE 84) 9 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large M between two stars, cross above; beneath, A; CON in exergue
Quant.Geek
Sear-158(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear 158; DOC 28; MIBE 84) 11 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large M between star and a cross, cross above; beneath, B; CON in exergue
Quant.Geek
Sear-160.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear 160; DOC 30; MIBE 83) 13 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large M between two stars, cross above; beneath, B; CON in exergue
Quant.Geek
Sear-160(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Follis, Constantinople (Sear 160; DOC 30; MIBE 83) 10 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large M between two stars, cross above; beneath, B; CON in exergue
Quant.Geek
Sear-201(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Follis, Nicomedia, RY 15 (Sear 201; DOC 135b; MIBE 113a)26 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M, above, cross; to left A/N/N/O; to right X/Ч;below A; NIKO in exergue
Dim: 41.19 mm, 22.92 g, 6 h
Quant.Geek
Sear-201.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Follis, Nicomedia, RY 22 (Sear 201; DOC 135b; MIBE 113a)57 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M, above, cross; to left A/N/N/O; to right X/X/II;below B; NIKO in exergue
1 commentsSpongeBob
Sear-201(2).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Follis, Nicomedia, RY 29 (Sear 201; DOC 135b; MIBE 113a)10 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M, above, cross; to left A/N/N/O; to right X/X/Ч/II/II;below A; NIKO in exergue
Quant.Geek
Sear-202.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Half Follis, Nicomedia (Sear 202; DOC 112; MIBE 109)10 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large K; to left, large cross dividing N and I; to right B
Quant.Geek
Sear-203(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Half Follis, Nicomedia, RY 16 (Sear 203; DOC 143; MIBE 116b)21 viewsObv: Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large K; staurogram above, date across field; NI in exergue
Quant.Geek
Sear-245(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Antioch (Sear 245; DOC I 272; MIB 163)11 viewsObv: ΛNRTCSΛINΛΓAPC or similar; Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian to right
Rev: Large C containing Sear monogram 2
Dim: 15 mm, 1.89 g, 11 h

Sear Monogram 2

Quant.Geek
Sear-276.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Carthage (Sear 276; DOC 306; MIB 204)8 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIAVS PP AVC; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Justinian to right
Rev: VICTORIA AG; Large Є, CAR in exergue
Dim: 15 mm, 2.57 g, 7 h
Quant.Geek
Sear-170(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Constantinople (Sear 170) 19 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG; Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large Є, B to right
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Sear-170(2).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Constantinople (Sear 170; DOC 96d) 15 viewsObv: Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large Є, Δ to right
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Sear-172.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Constantinople (Sear 172; DOC 97e; MIBE 103b)11 viewsObv: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large Є, cross to right


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MIBE-124.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Cyzicus (Sear 210; DOC 199; MIBE 124)7 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AG; diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I right
Rev: Large Є; in right field, KY
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Sear-242.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Theoupolis (Sear 242; DOC 269; MIBE 142)12 viewsObv: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large Є with cross at center
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Sear-244(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Theoupolis/Antioch (Sear 244; DOC 271; MIBE 161)7 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AG; diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I right
Rev: Large Є with cross; in right field, star
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Sear-244.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Theoupolis/Antioch (Sear-244; DOC 271; MIBE 161)20 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AG; diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I right
Rev: Large Є with cross; in right field, star
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Sear-243.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) AE Pentanummium, Antioch/Theopolis (Sear-243; DOC 270)18 viewsObv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG; pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large Є with crossbar, Greek V/O monogram, symbolizing Theopolis, to right
SpongeBob
image00532.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Pb Imperial Seal (Zacos–Veglery 3a, BZS.1958.106.563)178 viewsObv: Nimbate, beardless bust of Justinian I, facing forward, wearing both a helmet with diadem, trefoil ornament, and pendilia, and a chlamys. A circular inscription beginning at left. Border of dots.

D N IVSTINI ANVS PP AVG - Dominus noster Iustinianus perpetuus augustus (Our lord Justinian, eternal augustus)

Rev: Winged Victory advancing, wearing a long chiton and holding a victory wreath in each hand. A small cross visible at left and right. No epigraphy. Border of dots.
1 commentsSpongeBob
Sear-175.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ 16 Nummi, Thessalonica (Sear-175; DOC-98a; MIBE-169a; Metcalf 116-33)10 viewsObv: Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large Iς; A to left, P to right; cross above; ; TЄS below
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Sear-178.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ 16 Nummi, Thessalonica (Sear-178; DOC 98d; MIBE 169c; Metcalf, Copper 169-202)13 viewsObv: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large IS; Christogram above, A to left, P to right; TES in exergue
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Sear-239.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Decanummium, Antioch/Theoupolis, RY 37 (Sear 239; DOC I.267; Worth 334-38)15 viewsObv: VΝLΜΟ LLЄΛSLV or similar; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield decorated with horseman motif; cross to right.
Rev: Large I; ANNO - XXXςI across field, cross above; THЄЧP in exergue

The obverse inscription is corrupt in this particular type. See Worth 334-38 for similar inscriptions.
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Sear-167.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Decanummium, Constantinople, RY 14 (Sear 167; DOC 78)5 viewsObv: Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large I; cross above, A/N/N/O X/II/II across fields; CON in exergue
Dim: 22 mm, 5.31 g
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Sear-205.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Decanummium, Nicomedia, RY 32 (Sear 205; DOC 157; MIBE 118)10 viewsObv: DN IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large I; A/N/N/O to left, cross above, X/X/X/II to right; NIK in exergue
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Sear-326a.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Decanummium, Ravenna (Sear-326; MIBE 229a (Rome); Ranieri 393)19 viewsObv: Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield
Rev: Large I; A/N/N/O - XX/XIIII (date) across field; all within wreath
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Sear-326.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Decanummium, Ravenna, RY 36 (Sear-326; DOC I-353; MIBE-229a; Ranieri-395)28 viewsObv: Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield
Rev: Large I flanked by date; all within wreath
SpongeBob
Sear-326(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Decanummium, Ravenna, RY 37 (Sear-326; MIBE 229a (Rome); Ranieri 393)10 views Obv: Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield
Rev: Large I; A/N/N/O - XX/XV/II across field; all within wreath
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Sear-308(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Decanummium, Rome (Sear-308; DOC 331; MIBE 228)15 viewsObv: Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger
Rev: Large I; star to left and right


ex Prue Morgan Fitts Collection; ex Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 355, 15 July 2015, Lot 757
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Sear-308.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Decanummium, Rome (Sear-308; DOC-331; MIBE-228)11 viewsObv: Helmeted and cuirassed bust of Justinian facing, holding globus cruciger
Rev: Large I; stars to left and right
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Sear-269.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Decanummium, RY 13, Carthage (Sear-269; DOC I-297; MIBE-199)8 viewsObv: DNIVSTINI ANVSPP AVG; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large I; cross above, A/N/N/O X/III across field; CAR in exergue
SpongeBob
Sear-163.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Constantinople, RY 13 (Sear 163; DOC 38b; MIBE 95a)27 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M; date across field, cross above, B below; CON in exergue
Dim: 37mm, 22.61 g, 12h

From the Iconodule Collection
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Sear-163(4).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Constantinople, RY 13 (Sear 163; DOC 38b; MIBE 95a)23 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M; date across field, cross above, Δ below; CON in exergue
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Sear-163(3).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Constantinople, RY 15 (Sear 163; DOC 38b; MIBE 95a)17 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M; X/Ч across field, cross above, Є below; CON in exergue

This particular coin is the so-called Plague Coin of Justinian. It depicts a deformed face of Justinian when he was recovering from the plague. See the following reference paper for more information:

Pottier, H., L'empereur Justinien survivant à la peste bubonique (542), Mélanges Cécile Morrisson, Paris, 2010, p. 685-691
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Sear-163(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Constantinople, RY 16 (Sear 163; DOC 38b; MIBE 95a)25 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M; date across field, cross above, A below; CON in exergue

This particular coin is the so-called Plague Coin of Justinian. It depicts a deformed face of Justinian when he was recovering from the plague. See the following reference paper for more information:

Pottier, H., L'empereur Justinien survivant à la peste bubonique (542), Mélanges Cécile Morrisson, Paris, 2010, p. 685-691
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Sear-163(2).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Constantinople, RY 18 (Sear 163; DOC 38b; MIBE 95a)17 views Obv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M; date across field, cross above, B below; CON in exergue
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Sear-199(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Nicomedia (Sear 199; DOC 110; MIBE 105)11 viewsObv: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large M; cross above and flanking, B below; NIKM in exergue
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Sear-199.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Nicomedia (Sear 199; DOC 110; MIBE 105)28 viewsObv: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large M; cross above and flanking, B below; NIKM in exergue
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Sear-220.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Theoupolis, RY 21 (Sear 220; DOC 218e; MIBE 145c)14 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M; date across field, cross above, date across field, cross above, Є below; QHЧΠ in exergue, pellet above Π

From the Iconodule Collection
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Sear-221.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Theoupolis, RY 25 (Sear 221; DOC 221; MIBE 146)12 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M; date across field, cross above, date across field, cross above, B below; τHЧΠ in exergue

From the Iconodule Collection
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Sear-214.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Theoupolis/Antioch (Sear 214; DOC 206a. MIB 130)21 viewsObv: D N IVƧTINI-ANVƧ P P AVS; Justinian enthroned facing, holding long scepter with his right hand and globus cruciger in his left
Rev: Large M between star and crescent; above, cross; below, A; in exergue, +THЄЧP
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Sear-214(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Theoupolis/Antioch (Sear 214; DOC 206b. MIB 130)19 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVS; Justinian enthroned facing, holding long scepter with his right hand and globus cruciger in his left
Rev: Large M between star and crescent; above, cross; below, B; in exergue, +THЄЧP
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Sear-214(2).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Theoupolis/Antioch (Sear 214; DOC 206b; MIB 130)5 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVS; Justinian enthroned facing, holding long scepter with his right hand and globus cruciger in his left
Rev: Large M between star and crescent; above, cross; below, B; in exergue, +THЄЧP
Dim: 34 mm, 17.32 g
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Sear-214(3).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Theoupolis/Antioch (Sear 214; DOC 206dvar; MIB 128)27 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVS; Justinian enthroned facing, holding long scepter with his right hand and globus cruciger in his left
Rev: Large M between stars; above, cross; below, Γ; in exergue, +THЄЧP+
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Sear-165.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Half Follis, Constantinople, RY 12 (Sear-165)85 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG. Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and decorated shield; cross right in field.
Rev: Large K between ANNO - XII, cross above; E below.
2 commentsSpongeBob
Sear-165(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Half Follis, Constantinople, RY 16 (Sear-165)23 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG. Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and decorated shield; cross right in field.
Rev: Large K between ANNO - XЧI, cross above; Λ below.

This particular coin is the so-called Plague Coin of Justinian. It depicts a deformed face of Justinian when he was recovering from the plague. See the following reference paper for more information:

Pottier, H., L'empereur Justinien survivant à la peste bubonique (542), Mélanges Cécile Morrisson, Paris, 2010, p. 685-691
SpongeBob
Sear-203(3).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Half Follis, Nicomedia, RY 16 (Sear 203; DOC 236; MIBE 153)33 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVI; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large K; cross above, A/N/N/O and XЧ in field; CH in exergue
Dim: 30 mm, 10.28 g, 11 h
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Sear-203.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Half Follis, Nicomedia, RY 32 (Sear-203; DOC-154; MIBE-116a)19 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG. Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and decorated shield; cross right in field.
Rev: Large K between ANNO - XXXII, cross above; NI below


SpongeBob
Sear-225(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Half Follis, Theoupolis (Sear-225; DOC 208.4; MIBE 135)1 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVƧ P P AVS; Justinian enthroned facing, holding long scepter with his right hand and globus cruciger in his left
Rev: Large K; to left, cross dividing T H/Є U/O/P; Γ to right
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Sear-225.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Half Follis, Theoupolis (Sear-225; DOC 208; MIBE 135)17 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVS; Justinian enthroned facing, holding long scepter with his right hand and globus cruciger in his left
Rev: Large K; to left, cross dividing T H/Є U/O/P; Γ to right

ex Prue Morgan Fitts Collection; ex Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 354, 1 July 2015, Lot 626
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Sear-225(2).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Half Follis, Theoupolis (Sear-225; DOC 208; MIBE 135)2 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVS; Justinian enthroned facing, holding long scepter with his right hand and globus cruciger in his left
Rev: Large K; to left, cross dividing T H/Є U/O/P; Γ to right
Dim: 28 mm, 9.10 g
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Sear-281.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Nummus, Carthage (Sear 281; DOC 309; MIBE 193)15 viewsObv: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Justinian I to right
Rev: Large A
Dim: 10 mm, 0.53 g, 4 h

This issue was struck shortly after Belisarius defeated Gelimer, the last king of the Vandals, which reunited the African provinces with the Empire.
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Sear-245.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Pentanummium, Antioch (Sear 245; DOC 272; MIBE 163)11 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG (often garbled); Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large C containing Sear Monogram 2

Sear Monogram 2

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Sear-197a.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Pentanummium, Cherson (Sear-197; DOC-108; MIBE-253)20 viewsObv: Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Monogram of Cherson
SpongeBob
Sear-197.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Pentanummium, Cherson (Sear-197; DOC-108; MIBE-253)15 viewsObv: Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Monogram of Cherson
SpongeBob
Sear-170.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Pentanummium, Constantinople (Sear-170)16 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG; Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large Є; B to right
SpongeBob
Sear-240.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Pentanummium, Theoupolis/Antioch (Sear 240; DOC 205; MIBE 140)10 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Justinian I to right
Rev: Tyche of Antioch seated left within shrine; to left, retrograde Є
Dim: 12 mm, 2.10 g, 6 h
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Sear-337.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Pentanummium, Uncertain Mint (Sear 337; DOC 369; MIBE 246)8 viewsObv: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Justinian I to right; around, blundered legend
Rev: Large V within wreath
Dim: 11 mm, 1.12 g, 6 h
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Sear-1438.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian II with Tiberius (705-711) Æ Follis, Syracuse (Sear-1438; MIB-52; Anastasi-360)19 viewsObv: Justinian and Tiberius standing facing, each wearing crown and chlamys, and holding between them a long cross
Rev: Large M; monogram above, stars flanking; SCL
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Sear-1295.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian II, First reign (685-695) Æ Follis, Syracuse (Sear-1295; DOC 54 MIB 65; Anastasi 272)12 viewsObv: Facing half-length bust of Justinian, holding globus cruciger and akakia
Rev: Large M; monogram above; SCL in exergue
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Sear-1262.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian II, First Reign (685-695) Æ Half Follis, Constantinople (Sear 1262; DOC 21; MIB 47)25 viewsObv: Crowned facing bust of Justinian, holding globus cruciger
Rev: Large K; date across field; Γ below
Dim: 26 mm, 4.74g



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Sear-1262~0.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian II, First Reign (685-695) Æ Half Follis, Constantinople, RY2 (Sear 1262; DOC 21; MIB 47)8 viewsObv: Crowned facing bust of Justinian, holding globus cruciger
Rev: Large K; date across field; Γ below
Dim: 31 mm, 4.37 g
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Sear-1436.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian II, Second Reign (705-711 CE) Æ Follis, Syracuse (Sear 1436; DOC II 20; MBBS 62)19 viewsObv: Crowned facing bust, wearing short beard and loros, holding cross potent on three steps and globus cruciger, crown topped with cross
Rev: Large M; monogram above, crosses across fields; SCL in exergue
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Forum_Byzantine_Justinian_Follis_Const.Jpg
Byzantine Justinian Follis20 viewsWilliamBoyd
Justinianus D.jpg
Byzantine Justinian I - Solidus110 viewsJustinian I (AD 527-565). Gold solidus. Constantinople, ca. AD 527-537. D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters right, holding spear over right shoulder, shield on left shoulder / VICTORI-A AVGGG S, angel standing facing, holding long cross in right hand and globus cruciger in left, star in right field, CONOB in exergue.

DO 3f. MIB 5. Sear 137.
1 commentsTanit
Justinian.jpg
Byzantine Justinian I Decanummium88 viewsJustinian I Æ Decanummium. Carthage mint, year 13 (539-40). D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AG, diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right / Large I, surmounted by cross; to left, A/N/N/O; to right, numerals representing the regnal year X/III ; in ex. CAR

Sear 269, DO.297-8, BMC 388-93.
4 commentsTanit
justinian1.jpg
Byzantine Justinian I Half siliqua11 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. AR Half Siliqua (0.54 g). Carthage mint. Struck 533-534.

Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / O-V/T-M in the angles of a cross; all within wreath; CONOS.

Cf. DOC 282; cf. MIBE 52; SB 256.

Extremely rare.
Tanit
Forum_Byzantine_Justinian_Solidus_Const.Jpg
Byzantine Justinian Solidus - Victory18 viewsWilliamBoyd
Byzantium-lead-seal-011-IVSTINIANVS-s.jpg
Byzantine Lead Seal, IVSTINIANVS-I, (527-565 A.D.), Pb Imperial Seal (Zacos–Veglery 3a, BZS.1958.106.563), #01185 viewsByzantine Lead Seal, IVSTINIANVS-I, (527-565 A.D.), Pb Imperial Seal (Zacos–Veglery 3a, BZS.1958.106.563), #01
avers: - D N IVSTINI ANVS PP AVG - (Dominus noster Iustinianus perpetuus augustus (Our lord Justinian, eternal augustus)), Nimbate, beardless bust of Justinian I, facing forward, wearing both a helmet with diadem, trefoil ornament, and pendilia, and a chlamys. A circular inscription beginning at left. Border of dots.
revers:- Winged Victory advancing, wearing a long chiton and holding a victory wreath in each hand. A small byzatian cross visible at left and right. No epigraphy. Border of dots.
diameter: 17-19,5 mm,
weight: 5,49 g,
mint:
date:
ref:Zacos–Veglery 3a, BZS.1958.106.563
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Byzantium-lead-seal-012-IVSTINVS-s.jpg
Byzantine Lead Seal, IVSTINIANVS-I, (527-565 A.D.), Pb Imperial Seal (Zacos–Veglery 3a, BZS.1958.106.563), #02,70 viewsByzantine Lead Seal, IVSTINIANVS-I, (527-565 A.D.), Pb Imperial Seal (Zacos–Veglery 3a, BZS.1958.106.563), #02,
avers: - D N IVSTINI ANVS PP AVG - (Dominus noster Iustinianus perpetuus augustus (Our lord Justinian, eternal augustus)), Nimbate, beardless bust of Justinian I, facing forward, wearing both a helmet with diadem, trefoil ornament, and pendilia, and a chlamys. A circular inscription beginning at left. Border of dots.
revers:- Winged Victory advancing, wearing a long chiton and holding a victory wreath in each hand. A small byzatian cross visible at left and right. No epigraphy. Border of dots.
diameter: 19-22 mm,
weight: 6,48 g,
mint:
date:
ref:Zacos–Veglery 3a, BZS.1958.106.563
Q-002
quadrans
0530-Jtn-K-Con-S7_109.jpg
BYZANTINE, Anonymous Half-Siliqua, Struck at Constantinople (c.530AD), Bendall Type 8c161 viewsObverse: Helmeted and draped bust of Constantinople facing right.
Reverse: Large K in a pearl border.

S. Bendall made an attempt at the classification and chronology of these types. He accepted the general conclusion that the oldest issues, of very fine style, were struck during the inauguration of the new capital of the empire on May 11th, A.D.330. Bendall, having analyzed the changes in style, suggested that some issues were struck on the anniversaries of the founding of Constantinople in A.D.430 and A.D.530, and that other variants might have been issued during the reign of Justinian I to celebrate the reconquest of Italy.

Atelier : Constantinople (Istanbul en Turquie) - Ref : Bendall Type 8c - Sommer 7.109 (Maurice), Tolstoï 28, 612 - Rare
0,80 g / 13-15 mm - Etat presque Extremely Fine
3 commentséRIC_FR
Constantine4.jpg
BYZANTINE, Constantine IV, AV Solidus.113 viewsConstantine IV, Pogonatus, 15 July 668 - 10 July 685 A.D.

Cf. Sear 1153.
Constantine IV ruled jointly with his father, Constans II, from A.D.654 to A.D.668, and then with his brothers, Heraclius and Tiberius, from A.D.659 until A.D. 681.
Constantine IV, Pogonatus should be credited with saving Europe from Muslim conquest when, after besieging Constantinople for four years, the Arabs led by caliph Muawija I were forced to retreat. The use by the Byzantines of the famous "Greek Fire" having made the city impregnable. In A.D.681 Constantine IV deposed his two brothers. Constantine IV was succeeded by his 16 year old son Justinian II in A.D.685.

1 commentsgoldcoin
Justinian_I_half_follis_left_lit~0.jpg
Byzantine, Justinian "retro portrait"127 viewsJustinian I AD527-AD565
Die axis 300 degrees
Theoupolis mint
Paul D3
Justinian_I.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I 59 viewsJustinian I
AE Decanummium
Obv: DNIVSTINIANVSPPAV - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: No legend - Large I: ANNO to left, cross above and XXII to right
Exergue: NIK
Mint: Nicomedia (549-550)
Wt.3.18g
Size: 16 mm
References: SB 205
Jorge C
Justinian_I_16_nummi-.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I20 viewsJustinian I,
16 nummi
4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.
George
JustinianS216.JPG
BYZANTINE, Justinian I 527-565 Antioch144 viewsObv: Bust Right, DNIVSTINI-ANVSPPAVG
Rev: Large M Between Stars, Oficina A, +THEUP+ in exergue
Sear 216
2 commentsLaetvs
JustinianS279.JPG
BYZANTINE, Justinian I 527-565 Carthage65 viewsObv: ...INA... (blundered legend)
Rev: VOT XIIII
Sear 279
8-9 mm and very hard to photograph!
Laetvs
iustinianus_16nummis.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I, 16 Nummis12 viewsFranz-Josef M
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BYZANTINE, JUSTINIAN I, A.D. 527-56522 viewsJUSTINIAN I
A.D. 527-565 Æ Follis, Rev. Large M, between ANNO and XXX, cross above, Β below, CON in exergue, mint of Constantinople. 15.3gm, 31mm. BCV 163 Ratto
jessvc1
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BYZANTINE, JUSTINIAN I, A.D. 527-56511 viewsJUSTINIAN I
A.D. 527-565 Æ Half Follis, Rev. Large K, cross to left, Δ to right, *? above. Mint of Constantinople. 9.3gm, 26mm. BCV 164. F-This coin looks like it was struck over another coin.
jessvc1
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BYZANTINE, JUSTINIAN I, A.D. 527-56519 viewsJUSTINIAN I
A.D. 527-565 Æ Follis, Rev. Large M, between ANNO and XXX, cross above, Γ below, CON in exergue, mint of Constantinople. 15.8gm, 31mm. BCV 163 Ratto 533
jessvc1
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BYZANTINE, JUSTINIAN I, A.D. 527-56519 viewsJUSTINIAN I
A.D. 527-565 Æ 16 Nummi, Rev. AISP, *+* above, TES in exergue, Mint of Thessalonica. 5.7gm, 20mm
jessvc1
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BYZANTINE, Justinian I, AE 20 Nummi 151 viewsCyzicus Mint. Yr.25 (AD 551/2)
AD 527-565
19.13 grams
Obv. D. N. IVSTINIANVS PP . AVG. – Helmeted and cuir. Bust facing, holding gl. Cr. And shield; to r. cross
Rev. Large K; above, cross; to l., A/N/N/O; to r., numerals representing the regnal year; beneath officina letter
Sear #165
Richard M10
111-3-horz~0.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I, AE 37mm Follis166 viewsCyzicus Mint
AD 527-565
19.13 grams
Obv.: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield with horseman motif, cross to right
Rev.: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right, officina letter below, mintmark KYZ.
SB 207
1 commentsRichard M10
iustinianus_decanumm.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I, AE Decanummium20 viewsFranz-Josef M
649_dekanumm_compl.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I, AE Dekanummium15 viewsFranz-Josef M
Bild2010_byzanz_iustinianus_ges.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I, AE Follis22 viewsIustinianus Follis Constantinople year 30 ?Franz-Josef M
iustinianus.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I, AE Follis, Constantinople15 viewsFranz-Josef M
Byzanz_4.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I, AE Half Follis17 viewsdiameter 25.00mm, weight 8.52gFranz-Josef M
iustinian_18ges.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I, AE Half Follis21 viewsFranz-Josef M
Jusinian_i_semi.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I, AV Semissis81 viewsJustinian I AV Semissis. Constantinopolis, AD 527-565. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, Victory seated right, inscribing numerals on shield; star to right, christogram to left.
MIBE 17; Sear 143. 2.17g, 20mm, 6h.
1 commentschance v
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BYZANTINE, Justinian I, AV Solidus, A.D.527-565105 viewsBYZANTINE COINS
Justinian I (527-565)
(D) Solidus (4.39 g), Constantinopolis, 1 Officina, AD 542-565. Bust / Victoria.
Sear 140, 7 MIB, summer 4.3. Clipped minimal, minor scratches.

chance v
justinian_trem.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I, AV Tremissis, A.D.527-56580 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. AV Tremissis (14mm, 1.51 g, 6h). Constantinople mint. Diademed and cuirassed bust right / Angel advancing right, head left, holding wreath and globus cruciger; star to right; CONOB.
DOC 19; MIBE 19; SB 145.
chance v
justin_2_trem.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I, AV Tremissis, AD527-56562 viewsJustinian I AV Tremissis. Constantinople, AD 527-565. DN IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVC, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVCVSTORVM, Victory alighting facing, head left, holding wreath in outstretched right hand and globus cruciger in outstretched left; star in right field; CONOB.
Sear 145. 1.43g, 16mm, 7h.
chance v
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BYZANTINE, Justinian I, Follis, Constantinople20 viewsJustinian

AE 30mm
seaotter
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BYZANTINE, Justinian I, Follis, Nicomedia16 viewsJustinian

AE 30mm
seaotter
Justinian~2.jpg
Byzantine, Justinian I, Æ Decanummium.23 viewsJustinian I Æ Decanummium. Carthage mint, year 13 (539-40). D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AG, diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right / Large I, surmounted by cross; to left, A/N/N/O; to right, numerals representing the regnal year X/III ; in ex. CAR

Sear 269, DO.297-8, BMC 388-93.
Tanit
Justinian-527-565-AD_AE-Follis_DN-IVSTINI-ANVS-PP-AVG_M_cross_over-M-Gamma-belowe-left-star-right-cross_CON_SB--p--Constantinopolis_Q-001_axis-7h_29,5-32mm_13,34g-s~0.jpg
Byzantine, Justinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0158, Γ/CON, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Constantinopolis,133 viewsJustinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0158, Γ/CON, AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), Constantinopolis,
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Large M, Star to left, cross above, and cross to right, officina letter "Γ" below, mintmark CON.
exergue: Γ//CON, diameter: 29,5-32mm, weight: 13,34g, axis: 7h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: A.D., ref: SB 0158, p-59,
Q-001
quadrans
Justinian_I-527-565-AD_AE-16nummi_DN-IVSTINIANVS-PP-AVG_Big-AISP-Chi-Ro-above-I_TES_SB-178-p-64-Thessalonica_Q-001_6h_20-23,5mm_5,94g-s.jpg
Byzantine, Justinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0178, Chi-Ro/AISP/TES, AE-16-nummi, Thessalonica,189 viewsJustinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0178, Chi-Ro/AISP/TES, AE-16-nummi, Thessalonica,
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Large AISP, Chi-Ro above the large I, in exergue, mintmark TES.
exergue: -/-//TES, diameter: 20-23,5mm, weight: 5,94g, axis:6h,
mint: Thessalonica, date: A.D., ref: SB 0178, p-64
Q-001
quadrans
Justinian_I-527-565-AD_AE-Dekanummia_DN-IVSTINIANVS-AV(G)_Big-I-left-ANNO-and-XXXI-right-side_NIK_SB-205-p-68-Nikomedia_Q-001_6h_15,5mm_2,30g-s.jpg
Byzantine, Justinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0205, ANNO/XXXI//NIK, AE-Dekanummia, Nikomedia, 164 viewsJustinian I. (527-565 A.D.), SB 0205, ANNO/XXXI//NIK, AE-Dekanummia, Nikomedia,
avers: D N IVSTINI ANVS A(VG), Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Large I, "A/N/N/O" to left, cross above, regnal year "X/X/X/I" to right, in exergue, mintmark NIK.
exergue: ANNO/XXXI//NIK, diameter: 15,5mm, weight: 2,3g, axis:6h,
mint: Nikomedia, date: A.D., ref: SB 0205, p-68
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
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BYZANTINE, JUSTINIAN II17 viewsJustinian II

ae 15-23 mm
seaotter
Justinianus D~0.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinianus I.672 viewsJustinianus
AU Solidus
Obv: DNIVSTINANVSPPAVI - Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding spear over shoulder and shield.
Rev: VICTORIAAVGGGI Exe: /CONOB - Victory standing facing, holding cross and globus cruciger. 527-538 (Constantinople).
2 commentsTanit
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Carrhae in Mesopotamia, Septimius Severus, AE 24, Lindgren 2557122 viewsCarrhae in Mesopotamia, Septimius Severus, AE 24, 193-211 AD
Av.: CEΠTIMIOC [CE]OY.... , naked (laureate?) bust of Septimius Severus right
Rv.: ..Λ]OY KAPPH ΛKA... , front view of a tetrastyle temple, the temple of the moon god Sin, in the middle a sacred stone on tripod, on top of stone: crescent, standards (with crescents on top) on both sides inside the building; another crescent in the pediment.
Lindgren 2557 ; BMC p. 82, #4

The city and the region played an important role in roman history.

Carrhae / Harran, (Akkadian Harrânu, "intersecting roads"; Latin Carrhae), an ancient city of strategic importance, an important town in northern Mesopotamia, famous for its temple of the moon god Sin, is now nothing more than a village in southeastern Turkey with an archeological site.
In the Bible it is mentioned as one of the towns where Abraham stayed on his voyage from Ur to the promised land. Abraham's family settled there when they left Ur of the Chaldeans (Genesis 11:31-32).
Inscriptions indicate that Harran existed as early as 2000 B.C. In its prime, it controlled the point where the road from Damascus joins the highway between Nineveh and Carchemish. This location gave Harran strategic value from an early date. It is frequently mentioned in Assyrian inscriptions about 1100 BC, under the name Harranu, or "Road" (Akkadian harrānu, 'road, path, journey' ).
During the fall of the Assyrian Empire, Harran became the stronghold of its lasts king, Ashur-uballit II, being besiged and conquered by Nabopolassar of Babylon at 609 BC. Harran became part of Median Empire after the fall of Assyria, and subsequently passed to the Persian Achaemenid dynasty.
The city remained Persian untill in 331 BC when the soldiers of the Macedonian king Alexander the Great entered the city.
After the death of Alexander on 11 June 323 BC, the city was claimed by his successors: Perdiccas, Antigonus Monophthalmus and Eumenes. These visited the city, but eventually, it became part of the Asian kingdom of Seleucos I (Nicator), the Seleucid empire, and capital of a province called Osrhoene (the Greek term for the old name Urhai).
The Seleucids settled Macedonian veterans at Harran. For a century-and-a-half, the town flourished, and it became independent when the Parthian dynasty of Persia occupied Babylonia. The Parthian and Seleucid kings both needed the buffer state of Osrhoene which was part of the larger Parthian empire and had nearby Edessa as its capital. The dynasty of the Arabian Abgarides, technically a vassal of the Parthian "king of kings" ruled Osrhoene for centuries.

Carrhae was the scene of a disastrous defeat of the Roman general Crassus by the Parthians. In 53 BC. Crassus, leading an army of 50.000, conducted a campaign against Parthia. After he captured a few cities on the way, he hurried to cross the Euphrates River with hopes of receiving laurels and the title of “Emperor”. But as he drove his forces over Rakkan towards Harran, Parthian cavalry besieged his forces in a pincers movement. In the ensuing battle, the Roman army was defeated and decimated. The battle of Carrhae was the beginning of a series of border wars with Parthia for many centuries. Numismatic evidence for these wars or the corresponding peace are for instance the "Signis Receptis" issues of Augustus and the “Janum Clusit” issues of Nero.
Later Lucius Verus tried to conquer Osrhoene and initially was successful. But an epidemic made an annexation impossible. However, a victory monument was erected in Ephesus, and Carrhae/Harran is shown as one of the subject towns.
Septimius Severus finally added Osrhoene to his realms in 195. The typical conic domed houses of ancient Harran can be seen on the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Forum Romanum.
Harran was the chief home of the moon-god Sin, whose temple was rebuilt by several kings. Sin was one of the great gods of the Assurian-Babylonian pantheon.
Caracalla gave Harran the status of a colonia (214 AD) and visited the city and the temple of the moon god in April 217. Meanwhile the moon god (and sacred stones) had become a part of the Roman pantheon and the temple a place to deify the roman emperors (as the standards on both sides of the temple indicate).

Caracalla was murdered while he was on his way from Temple to the palace. If this had been arranged by Macrinus - the prefect of the Praetorian guard who was to be the new emperor – is not quite clear. On the eighth of April, the emperor and his courtiers made a brief trip to the world famous temple of the moon god. When Caracalla halted to perform natural functions, he was assassinated by one of his bodyguards, Julius Martialis, who had a private grudge against the ruler, because he had not been given the post of centurion.

In 296 AD Roman control was again interrupted when nearby Carrhae the emperor Galerius was defeated by the king Narses / the Sasanid dynasty of Persia. The Roman emperor Julianus Apostata sacrificed to the moon god in 363 AD, at the beginning of his ill-fated campaign against the Sassanid Persians. The region continued to be a battle zone between the Romans and Sassanids. It remained Roman (or Byzantine) until 639, when the city finally was captured by the Muslim armies.

At that time, the cult of Sin still existed. After the arrival of the Islam, the adherents of other religions probably went to live in the marshes of the lower Tigris and Euphrates, and are still known as Mandaeans.
The ancient city walls surrounding Harran, 4 kilometer long and 3 kilometer wide, have been repaired throughout the ages (a.o. by the Byzantine emperor Justinian in the sixth century), and large parts are still standing. The position of no less than 187 towers has been identified. Of the six gates (Aleppo gate, Anatolian, Arslanli, Mosul, Baghdad, and Rakka gate), only the first one has remained.

A citadel was built in the 14th century in place of the Temple of Sin. This lies in the south-west quarter of the ancient town. Its ruin can still be visited.

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
Costantine2.jpg
Constantine II 337-340 A.D.34 views
Metal: Bronze
Diam: 16 mm.
Weight: 1.6 gr.

OBV: Constantine II, Elder son of Constantine The Great :Diademed and cuirassed bust facing Right
OBV-LEGEND: CONSTANTINVSIVNNOBC
Marks-OBV: None

REV: Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing one standard between them.
REV-LEGEND : GLOR IAEXER ITUS
Marks-REV: In Exergue: SMNA also Alignment shifted 180 (Obv and Rev. are upside down one to aother)

Source : N/A
Age: 337-340 A.D.
Mint: Nicomedia *
*Nicomedia Nicomedia (Greek: Νικομήδεια, modern İzmit in Turkey) was founded by Nicomedes I of Bithynia at the head of the Gulf of Astacus which opens to the Propontis. The city was founded in 712 BC and, in early Antiquity, was called Astacus or Olbia. After being destroyed, it was rebuilt by Nicomedes I in 264 BC under the name of Nicomedia, and has ever since been one of the most important cities in northwestern Asia Minor. Hannibal came to Nicomedia in his final years and committed suicide in nearby Libyssa (Diliskelesi, Gebze). The historian Arrian was born there. Nicomedia was the metropolis of Bithynia under the Roman Empire, and Diocletian made it the eastern capital city of the Roman Empire in 286 when he introduced the Tetrarchy system. Nicomedia remained as the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Roman Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis (Üsküdar) in 324. Constantine mainly resided in Nicomedia as his interim capital city for the next six years, until in 330 he declared the nearby Byzantium as Nova Roma, which eventually became known as Constantinople (present-day Istanbul). Constantine died in a royal villa at the vicinity of Nicomedia in 337. Owing to its position at the convergence of the Asiatic roads leading to the new capital, Nicomedia retained its importance even after the foundation of Constantinople.[1]

However, a major earthquake on 24 August 358 caused extensive devastation to Nicomedia and was followed by a fire which completed the catastrophe. Nicomedia was rebuilt, but on a smaller scale.[2] In the sixth century under Emperor Justinian the city was extended with new public buildings. Situated on the roads leading to the capital, the city remained a major military center, playing an important role in the Byzantine campaigns against the Caliphate.[3]

From the 840s on, Nicomedia was the capital of the thema of the Optimatoi. By that time, most of the old, seawards city had been abandoned and is described by the Arab geographer Ibn Khurdadhbeh as lying in ruins. The settlement had obviously been restricted to the hilltop citadel.[3] In the 1080s, the city served as the main military base for Alexios I Komnenos in his campaigns against the Seljuk Turks, and the First and Second Crusades both encamped there. The city was held by the Latin Empire between 1204 and ca. 1240, when it was recovered by John III Vatatzes. It remained in Byzantine control for a further century, but following the Byzantine defeat at the Battle of Bapheus in 1302, it was threatened by the rising Ottoman beylik. The city was twice blockaded by the Ottomans (in 1304 and 1330) before finally succumbing in 1337.[3]



Ref : Ric VII 189
Michel C2
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Constantinople CONSS66 viewsConstantine had altogether more ambitious plans. Having restored the unity of the empire, now overseeing the progress of major governmental reforms and sponsoring the consolidation of the Christian church, Constantine was well aware that Rome had become an unsatisfactory capital for several reasons. Located in central Italy, Rome lay too far from the eastern imperial frontiers, and hence also from the legions and the Imperial courts. Moreover, Rome offered an undesirable playground for disaffected politicians; it also suffered regularly from flooding and from malaria.

It seemed impossible to many that the capital could be moved. Nevertheless, Constantine identified the site of Byzantium as the correct place: a city where an emperor could sit, readily defended, with easy access to the Danube or the Euphrates frontiers, his court supplied from the rich gardens and sophisticated workshops of Roman Asia, his treasuries filled by the wealthiest provinces of the empire.

Constantine laid out the expanded city, dividing it into 14 regions, and ornamenting it with great public works worthy of a great imperial city. Yet initially Constantinople did not have all the dignities of Rome, possessing a proconsul, rather than a prefect of the city. Furthermore, it had no praetors, tribunes or quaestors. Although Constantinople did have senators, they held the title clarus, not clarissimus, like those of Rome. Constantinople also lacked the panoply of other administrative offices regulating the food supply, police, statues, temples, sewers, aqueducts or other public works. The new program of building was carried out in great haste: columns, marbles, doors and tiles were taken wholesale from the temples of the empire and moved to the new city. Similarly, many of the greatest works of Greek and Roman art were soon to be seen in its squares and streets. The emperor stimulated private building by promising householders gifts of land from the imperial estates in Asiana and Pontica, and on 18 May 332 he announced that, as in Rome, free distributions of food would be made to citizens. At the time the amount is said to have been 80,000 rations a day, doled out from 117 distribution points around the city.

Constantinople was a Greek Orthodox Christian city, lying in the most Christianised part of the Empire. Justinian ordered the pagan temples of Byzantium to be deconstructed, and erected the splendid Church of the Holy Wisdom, Sancta Sophia (also known as Hagia Sophia in Greek), as the centrepiece of his Christian capital. He oversaw also the building of the Church of the Holy Apostles, and that of Hagia Irene.

Constantine laid out anew the square at the middle of old Byzantium, naming it the Augusteum. Sancta Sophia lay on the north side of the Augusteum. The new senate-house (or Curia) was housed in a basilica on the east side. On the south side of the great square was erected the Great Palace of the emperor with its imposing entrance, the Chalke, and its ceremonial suite known as the Palace of Daphne. Located immediately nearby was the vast Hippodrome for chariot-races, seating over 80,000 spectators, and the Baths of Zeuxippus (both originally built in the time of Septimius Severus). At the entrance at the western end of the Augusteum was the Milion, a vaulted monument from which distances were measured across the Eastern Empire.

From the Augusteum a great street, the Mese, led, lined with colonnades. As it descended the First Hill of the city and climbed the Second Hill, it passed on the left the Praetorium or law-court. Then it passed through the oval Forum of Constantine where there was a second senate-house, then on and through the Forum of Taurus and then the Forum of Bous, and finally up the Sixth Hill and through to the Golden Gate on the Propontis. The Mese would be seven Roman miles long to the Golden Gate of the Walls of Theodosius.

Constantine erected a high column in the middle of the Forum, on the Second Hill, with a statue of himself at the top, crowned with a halo of seven rays and looking towards the rising sun.

RIC VII Constantinople 61 C1
ecoli
Justinian.jpg
D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG29 viewsFlavius Petrus Sabbatius Iustinianus Augustus
Φλάβιος Πέτρος Σαββάτιος Ἰουστινιανός
Bohemian
EB0953_scaled.JPG
EB0953 Justinian I / Large M5 viewsJustinian I, 527-565, AE Follis, Constantinople, Year 12 = 538-539 AD.
Obverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield with horseman motif, cross to right.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year XII to right, B below, mintmark CON.
References: SB 163, DOC 37-61 (132 known combinations).
Diameter: 39.5mm, Weight: 22.51g.
EB
EB0954_scaled.JPG
EB0954 Justinian I / Large M2 viewsJustinian I, 527-565, AE Follis, Nicomedia, Year 30 = 556-557 AD.
Obverse: [DN IVSTINI]ANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield with horseman motif, cross to right.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year XXX to right, officina letter B below, mintmark NIKO.
References: SB 201, MIB I 113a.
Diameter: 32.5mm, Weight: 16.565g.
EB
EB0955_scaled.JPG
EB0955 Justinian I / Large K4 viewsJustinian I, 527-565, AE Half-Follis, Thessalonica.
Obverse: [DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG], helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield; cross in right field.
Reverse: Large K, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right, mintmark TES.
References: SB 174, MIB 180.
Diameter: 22mm, Weight: 5.664g.
EB
EB0956_scaled.JPG
EB0956 Justinian I / Large Epsilon10 viewsJustinian I, 527-565, AE Pentanummium, Antioch.
Obverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: Large epsilon with + at centre, V over O to right.
References: SB 243, DOC 270.
Diameter: 16.5mm, Weight: 2.196g.
EB
EB0957b_scaled.JPG
EB0957 Justinian I / Cross8 viewsJustinian I. 527-565 AD, AE 10.
Obverse: Diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: Large cross within wreath.
References: S. 310.
Diameter: 10mm, Weight: 0.542g.
EB
EB0978_scaled.JPG
EB0978 Heraclius / Large M7 viewsHeraclius, AE Follis. Sicilian mint.
Obverse: Struck on Constantinople folles of Anastasius, Justin I and Justinian I, countermarked by the bust of Heraclius, crowned, draped and cuirassed facing within circular stamp, PTh monogram at top right.
Reverse: Large M, star to left, cross above, crescent to right; mintmark large SCL in circular stamp below.
References: SB 882, DOC 241.
Diameter: 35mm, Weight: 12.524g.
EB
EB0990_scaled.JPG
EB0990 Christ / Justinian II7 viewsJustinian II. first reign, 685-695 AD. AR Hexagram. Constantinople.
Obverse: IhS CRISTUS REX REG[NANTIUM], facing bust of Christ, raising hand in benediction and holding Gospels; cross behind head.
Reverse: [D IVSTINI ANU S SERU CHRIST], Justinian standing facing, wearing crown and loros, holding cross potent on two steps and akakia.
References: SB 1259 var. (mintmark CONOP).
Diameter: 23.5mm, Weight: 4.617g.
EB
mauriciu_M2.JPG
Follis35 viewsFollis, 591-592, Constantinople, 4th officina, "Maltese" cross above M, overstruck on a prevoius Justinian I follis, year 16 (?) 542-543; the flan was cut to accomodate the weight standard of the 590's; 11.55g, 31mm, dark green patina, as struck.vercingetorix
Justinien 3.jpg
Follis of Justinian42 viewsMinted in Theoupolis (Antioch).
Ginolerhino
Justinien 539.jpg
Follis of Justinian42 viewsMinted in Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) in 539-40.
Ginolerhino
Justinien 538.jpg
Follis of Justinian41 viewsMinted in Constantinople in 538-9.
Ginolerhino
gelimer.jpg
gelimer181 viewsGelimer, (530-534 AD)

Obverse: KART HAGO - Soldier facing, holding spear in left hand r.
Reverse: Horse's head, with bridle, facing left, XXI in exergue
Mint : Carthage
Date : 530-534 AD
Reference : MIB I-23, MEC-45
Grade : VF
Weight : 6.74g
Denom: Nummi
Metal : Bronze

Comments: The last king of the Vandals in Africa, who lost his kingdom to General Belisarius who was sent to Africa in 533 by Justinian the Great to return Africa to the Roman empire and avenge the imprisonment and execution of Huneric, a Romanized Vandal king who had been overthrown by Gelimer. 22.9 mm. From the Garth R. Drewry Collection. Ex Stack's 3-5 May 1984, lot 183 Ex:Stack's 05/84, Lot 1832 ex CNG 67, Lot: 1830.
3 commentsBolayi
Demo-80.jpg
Gepids: Uncertain King (454-552) AR Quarter Siliqua, Sirmium (MEC-1; Demo-80; Stefan-2; COI, p. 43, Fig. 22; Gennari-111b)14 viewsObv: D N VƧ(M over W)VISTΛIWS P P Λ[VC], pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: (star) IИMVIT + IROИVΛ, Theoderic monogram

Imitation of a Ravenna mint Quarter Siliqua of Theoderic in the name of Justinian I

Quant.Geek
Justinien 1.jpg
Half-follis of Justinian49 viewsMinted in Theoupolis (Antioch)
1 commentsGinolerhino
Justinien 2.jpg
Half-follis of Justinian31 viewsMinted in Theoupolis (Antioch) in 550-1.
Ginolerhino
Heraclius.jpg
Heraclius23 viewsHeraclius and Heraclius Constantine follis, probably regnal year 4, from Constantinople, officina 5, overstruck over a follis of Justinian, regnal year 15 or later.Tanit
Iustinianus_I_(527-565)_16_nummi_(AE).png
Iustinianus I (527-565) 16 nummi (AE)74 viewsObv.: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG (Draped bust of emperor) Rev.: I central, A S P in field Exergue: TES Diameter: 22 mm Weight: 6,51 g SB 175

Though Justinian is often hailed as the greatest of the Byzantine emperors, his Gothic Wars as well as lavish building projects in Ravenna and Constantinople proved to be a very costly affair. The empire was as good as bankrupt when Justinian passed away. The hexagonal shape of the coin is typical for this type.
Nick.vdw
Iustinianus_I_(527-565)_decanummium_(AE).png
Iustinianus I (527-565) decanummium (AE)17 viewsObv.: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG (Emperor with cuirass and pearled diadem) Rev.: I central, cross above I Field: date (27th year of Justinian's reign) Exergue: CON Diameter: 20 mm Weight: 2,6 g SB 167

One of the first coins I ever purchased.
Nick.vdw
Justinian-527-565-AD_AE-Follis_DN-IVSTINI-ANVS-PP-AVG_M_cross_over-M-Gamma-belowe-left-star-right-cross_CON_SB--p--Constantinopolis_Q-001_axis-7h_29,5-32mm_13,34g-s.jpg
Iustinianus-I. (527-565 A.D.), AE-Follis, (40 Nummia), SB 0158, Constantinopolis,66 viewsquadrans
sb125_v2.jpg
Justin I and Justinian I AE follis Constantinople Sear 125 19 viewsTask_Force
a46.jpg
Justin I and Justinian I AE half follis Constantinople Sear 126 A13 viewsTask_Force
unkfollis27mm1462pir.jpg
Justin I or Justinian I AE follis11 viewsObverse:DNIVS..... Diad., dr., and cuir.
Reverse: Large M between two stars cross above unk Officina, unk exergue
Mint:unk
27mm 14.67gm
wileyc
M.jpg
Justinian22 viewsJustinian - minted in year 539 in constantinople. 40mm Alexios
518-527 Justin I.jpg
Justinian - quarter-follis from Constantine in Numidia41 viewsIllegible legend, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
+I+ , exergue : CON (Constantine)

Sear 286 (thank you, Dirk)
1 commentsGinolerhino
sb314.jpg
Justinian AR 250 nummi Ravenna Sear 31414 viewsTask_Force
justinianus_I.JPG
Justinian decanummium79 views1/4 follis, 527-538, Constantinople, 19mm, 3.6g.vercingetorix
coins299.JPG
Justinian I25 viewsOBV: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Rev: Large M, * to right, Cross top, Roma mint mark

check
ecoli
Justinian 2+.jpg
Justinian I27 viewsFollis,
Constantinople mint, officina B (?),
y. 532-537,
ref. MIB I, 84.
Tanit
Byzantine.jpg
Justinian I35 viewsAE follis. Justinian the Great , Carthage Mint, D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG Facing, cuirassed bust, cross to right, holding globe with cross. / Large M, ANNO XIII at sides, + above, S below, CAR in exergue.
Sear 261
Scarce
Tanit
BYZ D 1.jpg
Justinian I67 viewsAE follis. Justinian the Great , Carthage Mint, D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG Facing, cuirassed bust, cross to right, holding globe with cross. / Large M, ANNO XIIII at sides, + above, S below, CAR in exergue.
Sear 261

1 commentsTanit
Justinian I D.jpg
Justinian I45 viewsAE follis. Justinian the Great , Carthage Mint, D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG Facing, cuirassed bust, cross to right, holding globe with cross. / Large M, ANNO XIII at sides, + above, S below, CAR in exergue.
Sear 261
Scarce
Tanit
01100-Justinian1.JPG
Justinian I32 viewsJustinian I Follis
38.5 mm 23.17 gm
Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, globus cruciger in right, shield on left, cross right
Large M, cross above, ANNO left, regnal year Xu right, B (= officina 2) below, CON in ex;
1 commentsJohn Campbell
byzantineL_copy.jpg
Justinian I33 viewsAE Follis, Justinian I, ca. AD 527, Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG; Rev: M with star left, cross right and above, Alpha officina, CON in ex., aEF. SB 158.Molinari
byzantineK_copy.jpg
Justinian I30 viewsAE Follis, Justinian I, ca. AD 527, Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG; Rev: M with star left, cross right and above, Delta officina, CON in ex., EF. Similar to SB 158.Molinari
byzantineM_copy.jpg
Justinian I34 viewsAE Follis, Justinian I, ca. AD 527, Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG; Rev: M with cross on both sides, cross above, Epsilon officina, CON in ex., gVF. SB 159 var.Molinari
byzantineG_copy.jpg
Justinian I22 viewsAE Follis, Justinian I, ca. AD 527, Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG; Rev: M with star right, cross above, illegible left of M and in ex., Gamma officina, aVF.Molinari
byzantineI_copy.jpg
Justinian I36 viewsAE Follis, Justinian I, ca. AD 527, Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG; Rev: M with star on both sides, cross above, Gamma officina, THEYo/p with cross on each side in ex., gVF. SB 216.Molinari
byzantineH_copy.jpg
Justinian I29 viewsAE Follis, Justinian I, ca. AD 527, Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG; Rev: M with star on both sides, cross above, Gamma officina, THEYo/p with cross on each side in ex., gVF. SB 216.Molinari
byzantineF_copy.jpg
Justinian I47 viewsAE Follis, Justinian I, ca. AD 527, Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG; Rev: M with star left, cross right and above, unclear officina, NIKM in ex., gVF. SB 198, DOC 109.Molinari
byzantineR_copy.jpg
Justinian I54 viewsAE Follis, Justinian I, ca. AD 527, Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG; Rev: M with cross on both sides, cross above, Beta officina, NIKH in ex., EF. SB 199.1 commentsMolinari
giustiniano_I_solido.jpg
Justinian I57 viewssolidus1 commentsantvwala
JUSTINN1-1-BYZANT.jpg
Justinian I34 viewsAU Tremissis
Constantinople mint, 527-565 A.D.
15mm, 1.47g
BCV-145

Obverse:
DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed head right, draped.

Reverse:
VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM
* in right field
CONOB
Victory advancing left, holding wreath and globus crusigar.
rubadub
0_002.JPG
Justinian I35 viewsJustinian I AE Follis. Constantinople mint. D N IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust r. / Large M between star and cross; above, cross; beneath, officina letter; CON in ex.


Sear Byzantine Coins and their Values # sb0158
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
byzantineN_copy.jpg
Justinian I27 viewsAE Follis, Justinian I, ca. AD 527, Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG; Rev: M with star left, cross right and above, Alpha officina, CON in ex., aVF. SB 158.Molinari
3320400.jpg
Justinian I24 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. AV Solidus (20mm, 4.39 g, 6h). Constantinople mint, 7th officina. Struck 545-565. Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield / Angel standing facing, holding holding long staff surmounted by staurogram and globus cruciger; star to right; Z//CONOB. DOC 9g; MIBE 7; SB 140. graffiti on reverse.

From the Iconodule Collection.
TLP
Justinian_I.jpg
Justinian I9 viewsJUSTINIAN I, Decanummium, Antioch, 527 - 565 AD, 21mm, 3.78g, SB 239
OBV: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and long sceptre, cross to right
REV: I; ANNO to left; cross above; regnal year to right, THEUP in exergue
SRukke
justinianI.jpg
Justinian I12 viewsFollis

527 - 565 CE

Obverse:DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: Large M, start to left and right, cross above A below.

Weight: 16.2g
Length: 31,5mm

Mintmark: CON (Constantinople)
Pericles J2
JustinianI.jpg
Justinian I5 viewsarash p
justfol.jpg
Justinian I (527 - 565 A.D.)44 viewsÆ Follis
O: DN ISTINI-ANVS PP AVG Helmeted and cuirassed bust of Justinian facing, holding globus cruciger and a shield.
R: Large M, cross above, ANNO left, regnal year XXXI right, G ( = officina 3 ) below, THEUP in ex.
Theoupolis - Antiochia 
18.64g
32mm
SB 220
2 commentsMat
22_Justinian.jpg
Justinian I (527 - 565)15 viewsAE 40 Nummi, 538, 539, Constantinople, 42.5mm, 23.28g, 180°, MIBE 95a; SB 163.
Obv: D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield with figure on horseback; cross to right
Rev: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, XII to right, B below; CON in ex.
Marti Vltori
just1.jpg
Justinian I (527-565 A.D.)52 viewsÆ 1/2 Follis
O: DN IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG, Diademed draped and cuirassed bust right.
R: Large K, cross to left, star above and below, officinia gamma to right.
22mm
9.9g
Constantinople mint
SB 164; Doc 33
1 commentsMat
Giustiniano.jpg
Justinian I (527-565)34 viewsSolidus
Constantinople
antvwala
byzantineP_copy.jpg
Justinian I (?)45 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. Æ Follis (30mm, 17.08 g, 6h). Nicomedia mint, 2nd officina. Struck AD 527-538. Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Large M flanked by two crosses; cross above; B officina, NIKM in ex.. DOC 110; SB 199.

Gifted.
Molinari
00077.jpg
Justinian I (Sears Byzantine 244, Coin #77)11 viewsSears Byzantine 244, AE Pentanummium, Antioch, 527-565 AD.
Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Rev: Large E with cross at center, star to right.
Size: 14.4mm 2.24gm
MaynardGee
Justinian_1b.jpg
Justinian I * 527-539-565 AD113 views
Justinian I, Æ Follis

Obv: Emperor Justinian I, facing, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust, holding globus-cruciger in raised right hand, shield covering heart and left shoulder, cross in right field. Legend, D N IVSTINI [ANV]S PP AVI
Rev: Large M in center, cross above, ε below; (A)NNO in left field, XX (Regnal year 20) in right field.

Exergue: CON

Mint: Constantinople
Struck: 546-547 AD.

Size: 31.89 x 32.49 mm.
Weight: 19.11 gms.
Die axis: 180°

Condition: As shown. Surprisingly to me, the present photograph is remarkably faithful to the appearance of the coin in hand. Overall, a lovely dark-olive patina covering both sides, and all details where present are quite strong & distinct.

Refs:*
MIB 95a
DOC 45e
BMC 80; Tolstoi 131
Ref: SEAR BCV, #163, page 60
2 commentsTiathena
Justinian_Carthage.jpg
Justinian I - Carthage15 viewsJustinian I (527-565). Æ nummus (8 mm, 0.60 g), Carthage mint c. 534-565. Obverse: diademed bust facing, flanked by two stars. Reverse: Christogram with flanking alpha and omega. DOC 374; MIB 208.Jan
Justinian_ab.jpg
Justinian I - Rome101 viewsJustinian I (527-565). Æ denarius (9 mm, 0.63 g), Rome mint c. 537-546. Obverse: (I)VSTINI-ANVS, diademed bust right. Reverse: Latin version of Justinian's monogram within wreath. Undescribed, similar to MIBE 94 (Rome); Sear 340 (uncertain mint).

I have not found an earlier description of this monogram. It is similar to MIBE 94, which has the same form except that the S is placed below instead of above. The monogram is also similar to those of Athalaric and Theodahad on 2½ nummi minted in Rome 526-536. This type of "A" in the monogram is not found on coins from Ravenna. The byzantine army lead by Belisarius entered Rome in December 536 unopposed by the Ostrogoths. Rome was later besieged and occupied by Baduila in 546 and again reoccupied by Belisarius in 547. In addition, the frontal bust was introduced on Italian copper coins in the late 540s. These facts combined suggest that this coin was minted in Rome during the period from about 537 to 546. Hahn suggests that MIBE 94 belongs to the mid-540s.
Jan (jbc)
Justinian_10_nummi_Rome_ab.jpg
Justinian I - Rome48 viewsJustinian I (527-565). Æ 10 nummi (17 mm, 3.79 g), Rome mint. Obverse: DN IVSTINI-ANVS AVG, diademed bust right. Reverse: Large I between two stars, all in wreath. SB 207, MIB 227.
1 commentsJan (jbc)
BYZ D 3.jpg
Justinian I - Solidus89 viewsJustinian I (AD 527-565). Gold solidus. Constantinople, ca. AD 527-537. D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters right, holding spear over right shoulder, shield on left shoulder / VICTORI-A AVGGG T, angel standing facing, holding long cross in right hand and globus cruciger in left, star in right field, CONOB in exergue.

DO 3f. MIB 5. Sear 137.
Tanit
BYZ D 2.jpg
Justinian I - Solidus77 viewsJustinian I (AD 527-565). Gold solidus. Constantinople, ca. AD 527-537. D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters right, holding spear over right shoulder, shield on left shoulder / VICTORI-A AVGGG B, angel standing facing, holding long cross in right hand and globus cruciger in left, star in right field, CONOB in exergue.

DO 3f. MIB 5. Sear 137.
Tanit
justinian+.jpg
Justinian I - Solidus79 viewsJustinian I (AD 527-565). Gold solidus. Constantinople, ca. AD 527-537. D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust three-quarters right, holding spear over right shoulder, shield on left shoulder / VICTORI-A AVGGG S, angel standing facing, holding long cross in right hand and globus cruciger in left, star in right field, CONOB in exergue.

DO 3f. MIB 5. Sear 137.
1 commentsTanit
unk_byzI.jpg
Justinian I 16 nummi44 viewsJustinian I
AE 16 nummi
D N IVSTINIANVS PP AVG - Facing bust of emperor
- A, I denominational mark, SP, IwK abov
Mint: Thessalonika
Scotvs Capitis
Justinian_I_Sear_144.jpg
Justinian I AD527-AD56540 viewsAV Semissis 1.95 grams
Die axis 180 degrees
Sear 144
Constntinople mint
difficult to image, this third try looks the most like the real coin
1 commentsPaul D3
Justinian_decanumium.jpg
Justinian I AD527-AD56514 viewsDie axis 270 degrees
Sear 273
Constantinople mint
Paul D3
Justinian_I_left_lit.jpg
Justinian I AD527-AD56521 viewsAE 33 Follis
Die axis 200 degrees
Sear 158
Constantinople mint
Paul D3
Justinian_I_half_follis_left_lit.jpg
Justinian I AD527-AD56533 viewsDie axis 300 degrees
Theoupolis mint
Sear 226
1 commentsPaul D3
Justinian.jpg
Justinian I AD527-AD56528 viewsDie axis 180 degrees SR 201
Nicamedia mint
Paul D3
lg_AISP_01.jpg
Justinian I AE 16 nummi36 viewsJustinian I
AE 16 nummi 6.77g / 24.5mm / -
DN IVSTINI - ANVS P P AVG - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
- Large IS flanked by A P; Alpha Delta Kappa above, TES in ex.
Mint: Thessalonica (538-552 AD)
References: Sear 181
Scotvs Capitis
a13.jpg
Justinian I AE 6 nummi Alexandria Sear 24812 viewsTask_Force
sb192a.jpg
Justinian I AE 8 nummi Sear 192 a7 viewsTask_Force
Justinian_I.JPG
Justinian I AE Decanummium35 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINI ANVS P P A Diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Reverse: VICTO RIA AG Victory standing facing holding wreath and globus cruciger
Exe: *X8
Mint : Carthage
Date : 548 – 549AD
Reference : SB 271
Grade : EF
Weight : 5.73g
Denom : Nummi
Metal : Bronze
Acquired: 20/04/05
Comments : ex William B. Porter collection, 19 x 21mm
Bolayi
sb167.jpg
Justinian I AE decanummium Constantinople Sear 16710 viewsTask_Force
a47.jpg
Justinian I AE decanummium Constantinople Sear 17021 views1 commentsTask_Force
sb18817mm462g.jpg
Justinian I AE decanummium SB 18849 viewsObv: DN IVSTINIANVS P . A. or similar, Diad., draped and cuir. bust r.,
Rev: Large I ANNO to left, cross above, TES in ex, numerals representing regnal yr to r. XXXUII (37)
Date: 563/4 CE
Mint: Thessalonica
Sear 188, DO 107
17mm, 4.62g
wileyc
sear_205.jpg
Justinian I AE decanummium SB 20568 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG (usually incomplete) Diad., dr. and cuir bust r.
Reverse: Large I, cross above, ANNO to l., to r. numerals representing regnal yr (XXXGI) 37
Date: 563/4 CE
Mint: Nicomedia
Sear 205, DO 155-63
15mm 2.59gm
wileyc
justinian_I_dekanummium.jpg
Justinian I AE Decanummium. Nicomedia10 viewsJustinian I AE Decanummium. Nicomedia mint. DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust r. / Large I surmounted by cross; to l., ANNO; below, monogram; in exergue, NIK; to r., Year XXX; 2,3 g, 14 mm. Sear 205.Podiceps
coin449.jpg
Justinian I AE Follis24 viewsSear Byzantine Coins and their Values # sb0158
Justinian I AE Follis. Constantinople mint. D N IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust r. / Large M between star and cross; above, cross; beneath, officina letter; CON in ex.
Coin #449
cars100
a44.jpg
Justinian I AE Follis Antioch / Theoupolis Sear 21427 viewsTask_Force
a43.jpg
Justinian I AE Follis Antioch/Theoupolis Sear 21625 viewsTask_Force
sb163lgmod39mm2366pir.jpg
Justinian I AE follis, SB 163 large module.8 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG (or similar) Helmeted and cuir, bust facing holding gl. cr. and sheild; to r. cross
Reverse: Large M between ANNO and regnal year XIII (13), cross above, CON in ex, and officina letter "B"
Date: 539/40 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 163 DO 37-61
39mm 23.66gm
wileyc
sb163smmodule30mm1619pir.jpg
Justinian I AE follis, SB 163 small module11 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG (or similar) Helmeted and cuir, bust facing holding gl. cr. and sheild; to r. cross
Reverse: Large M between ANNO and regnal year XXG (26), cross above, CON in ex, and officina letter "Gamma"
Date: 552/3 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 163 DO 37-61
33mm 17.67gm
wileyc
coin406.jpg
Justinian I AE Follis. Constantinople mint. 22 viewsJustinian I AE Follis. Constantinople mint. D N IVS
TINIANVS PP AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed
bust r. / Large M between star and cross; above,
cross; beneath, officina letter; CON in ex. Coin #406
cars100
a45.jpg
Justinian I AE half follis Antioch / Theoupolis Sear 22513 viewsTask_Force
sb225.jpg
Justinian I AE half follis Antioch/Theoupolis Sear 2259 viewsTask_Force
sb208.jpg
Justinian I AE half follis Cyzicus Sear 20823 viewsTask_Force
a53.jpg
Justinian I AE half follis Nicomedia Sear 20327 viewsTask_Force
a76.jpg
Justinian I AE half follis Nicomedia Sear20232 viewsTask_Force
Justinian1_opt.jpg
JUSTINIAN I AE Half Follis SB 0203, Large K23 viewsOBV: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield with horseman motif, cross to right
REV: Large K, ANNO to left, chi-rho above, regnal year XVIIII to right, mintmark NI
10.2g, 25mm

Minted at Nicomedia, 545-6 AD
Legatus
a59.jpg
Justinian I AV solidus Constantinople Sear 14026 viewsTask_Force
justinian_I2.JPG
Justinian I decanummium83 views1/4 follis, 549-550, Constantinople, 19mm, 2.1g.vercingetorix
Justinian_I.jpg
Justinian I Decanummium38 viewsJustinian I Æ Decanummium. Carthage mint. D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG, diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right / Large I, cross above, star & cross flanking; KART.
Decanummium of Carthage, Justinian I, year 14 (540-41).

Sear 269

Tanit
coin414.jpg
Justinian I Decanummium Cyzicus mint 19 viewsJustinian I Decanummium Cyzicus mint KVZ in ex.
D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, diademed, draped
and cuirassed bust right / Large I, cross above, ANNO
to left, XXX sigma I to right, 527-565 AD Coin #414
cars100
sb163yr538_40mm2139g.jpg
Justinian I folles sb1638 viewsObv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding cross on globe and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right, officina letter below, mintmark CON. (132 known combinations).
Mint: Constantinople
Date: regnal yr XII (538/9AD
40mm
21.39g
SB 163 DOC 37-61
SB 163, DOC 37-61.
wileyc
BYZ 9 D.jpg
Justinian I Follis39 viewsJustinian I AE Follis, Constantinople, officinae E. DN IVSTINIANVS P.P.AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / large M, cross above & on either side, CON in ex.

Sear 159.
1 commentsTanit
byzantine 1+.jpg
Justinian I Follis23 viewsJustinianus I, Constantinople 3rd officina( [Greek_Gamma] )Tanit
justinian_M3.JPG
Justinian I follis85 viewsFollis, 557-558, Constantinople, 4th officina, 30mm, 15,1g.vercingetorix
justinian_M4.JPG
Justinian I follis92 viewsFollis, 544-545, Constantinople, 5th officina, 19.4g, 34mm, dark green patina.vercingetorix
justinian_M5.JPG
Justinian I follis78 viewsFollis, 527-532, Constantinople, 1st officina, 32mm, 16.1g, heavy green patina.vercingetorix
justinian_M6.JPG
Justinian I follis81 viewsFollis, 527-532, Constantinople, 3rd officina, 31mm, 14.4g. vercingetorix
justinian_M8.JPG
Justinian I follis66 viewsFollis, 532-537, Constantinople, 1st officina, 30mm, 18.6g, chocolate patina.vercingetorix
justinian_XIII.JPG
Justinian I follis100 viewsFollis, 539-540, Nicomedia, 2nd officina, 21,1g, 45mm, superbe heavy green patina.1 commentsvercingetorix
justinian_M1.JPG
Justinian I follis70 viewsFollis, 527-532, Constantinople, 5th officina, 16.8g, 30mm, light green patina.vercingetorix
justinian_M2.JPG
Justinian I follis64 viewsFollis, 527-532, Constantinople, 5th officina, 16g, 29mm, chocolate patina.vercingetorix
Byz2.jpg
Justinian I Follis24 viewsJustinian I AE Follis of Carthage second workshop. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / large M, star left, crosses above and right, officina letter below, KART in ex.

Sear 259
Tanit
Byz1.jpg
Justinian I Follis29 viewsJustinian I Æ Follis. Carthage mint. D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG, diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right / Large M, cross above, star & cross flanking; KART.

Sear 257. DOC I 283; MIB I 185b-c;
Tanit
BYZ 7 D.jpg
Justinian I Half follis42 viewsJustinian I Æ Half Follis. Carthage mint, dated RY 13 (539/40 AD). D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, diademed, helmeted, & cuirassed facing bust, holding globus cruciger & shield; cross to right / Large K; cross above, ANNO X/VI across field; S/CAR.

DOC I 295. Sear 266.
1 commentsTanit
justinian~0.jpg
Justinian I half follis24 viewsJustinian I half follis, Carthage mint

Sear 263



Tanit
ByzSilver.jpg
Justinian I half siliqua30 viewsSilver half siliqua of Justinian I from Carthage, Sear 256.
V-O/ M-T in angles of cross, CONOS beneath.

Carthage, Sear 256.
Tanit
justinianus_K.JPG
Justinian I half-follis57 viewsHalf-follis, 442-443, Constantinople, 4th officina, 25mm, 9.5g.vercingetorix
justinian_K1.JPG
Justinian I half-follis62 viewsHalf-follis, 564-565, Thessalonica, 21mm, 5.1.vercingetorix
BIZ 31 D.jpg
Justinian I pentanummium33 viewsAE pentanummium, Carthage mint.

Sear 274

Tanit
Byzantine4.jpg
Justinian I pentanummium26 viewsAE pentanummium, Carthage mint.

Sear 274

Tanit
justinian~1.jpg
Justinian I pentanummium25 viewsJustinian I pentanummium
AE pentanummium, Carthage mint.

Sear 274
Tanit
Jusinian_i_semi.jpg
Justinian I semissis19 viewsJustinian I 527-565 AV Semissis. Constantinopolis, D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGGG, Victory seated right, inscribing numerals on shield; star to right, christogram to left. MIBE 17; Sear 143. 2.17g, 20mm, 6h.Chance Vandal
Justinian_I_solidus_002.jpg
Justinian I Solidus173 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVI
Helmeted cuir. bust of Justinian I front, holding cross on globe and shield

VICTORIA AVCCCΘ
Angel standing front, holding cross on globe and long cross surmounted by Christogram, star at right
CONOB in ex.

9th Officina

Constantinople 527-565 AD

4.49g
SEAR 140
EF with amazing lustre
Ex- Wayne C. Phillips Rare Coins

SOLD
6 commentsJay GT4
859428l.jpg
Justinian I solidus20 viewsJustinian I (527-565) (D) Solidus (4.39 g), Constantinople, 1 Officina, AD 542-565. Bust / Victoria.
Sear 140, 7 MIB, summer 4.3. Clipped minimal, minor scratches.
Chance Vandal
justinian_trem.jpg
Justinian I tremissis (1)23 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. AV Tremissis (14mm, 1.51 g, 6h). Constantinople mint. Diademed and cuirassed bust right / Angel advancing right, head left, holding wreath and globus cruciger; star to right; CONOB. DOC 19; MIBE 19; SB 145.Chance Vandal
tremissis.jpg
Justinian I tremissis (2)20 viewsJustinian I 527-565 AV Tremissis. Constantinople. DN IVSTI-NVS P P AVC, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVCVSTORVM, Victory alighting facing, head left, holding wreath in outstretched right hand and globus cruciger in outstretched left; star in right field; CONOB. DOC 13; MIBE 11a; Sear 353. 1.43g, 16mm, 7hChance Vandal
Justinian_Ravenna_4.jpg
Justinian I – Ravenna14 viewsJustinian I (527-565). Æ 10 nummi (16 mm, 3.85 g), minted in Ravenna year 561/562. Obverse: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AV, Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger and shield. Reverse: Large I between ANNO and XX/XV. SB 326.Jan
justinian_tes_SB_126.jpg
Justinian I, 16 Nummi, Thessalonica (SB 176)7 viewsThessalonica mint, 527-565. 26.5x21 mm, 6.28 g, 200º.

Obverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Pearl diadamend, draped and cuirassed bust, looking right.

Reverse: Large I, officina letter to left, dot-cross-dot above, SP to right.

Exergue: TES

References: SB 176, DOC 98B.
Manuel
byz_1_pan.jpg
Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.45 viewsBronze follis, (SBCV 217), weight 13.8g, max. diameter 30.85 mm, 3rd officina, Antioch (Theoupolis) mint, 527 - 538 A.D. Obv. D N IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse large M between two stars, cross above, Γ beneath ( for 3rd officinia), Θ Υ Π O Δ Σ in ex. Olive green patina.

Background Info. courtesy Forvm Ancient Coins;

Joint rule with Justin I (his uncle), 4 April - 1 August 527 A.D.
Justinian I served his uncle, Emperor Justin I, throughout his reign formulating most imperial policy. Recognizing his brilliance, he was rapidly promoted and in the final months of Justin's reign he was made co-emperor. Justinian's sole rule began on 1 August 527 and lasted almost four decades during which he re-conquered much of the empire lost during the preceding century, including North Africa, Italy, and parts of Spain. He is well known for his codification of the legal system. His grand scale building program included St Sophia, which still stands as the centerpiece of modern Istanbul. Unfortunately his ambitious efforts strained the empire's resources and depleted the treasure built by Anastasius. Most of the territory he gained was lost shortly after his death.

In 538, the Persians led by Khosrau I sacked the city of Antioch.

Steve E
coin419.jpg
Justinian I, 527-565 AD 18 viewsJustinian I, 527-565 AD - Obv: DN IVSTINI-ANVS
PP AVC; Diademed, draped, cuirassed right bust
Rev: Large I; cross above; to left A/N/N/O in four lines;
to right, regnal year. Coin #419
cars100
37-2014-11-14_coinsnov20149.jpg
Justinian I, 527-565 AD23 viewsAe 39mm; 21.15g

DN IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG
helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe
and shield, 2nd cross to right

Large M, cross above, L below;
A/N/N/O in left field, X/II/II in right field;
CON in exergue

DOC 39a; holed
Robin Ayers
112-3-horz.jpg
Justinian I, AE 20 Nummi ; Cyzicus Mint. Yr.25 (AD 551/2)18 viewsAD 527-565
19.13 grams
Obv. D. N. IVSTINIANVS PP . AVG. – Helmeted and cuir. Bust facing, holding gl. Cr. And shield; to r. cross
Rev. Large K; above, cross; to l., A/N/N/O; to r., numerals representing the regnal year; beneath officina letter
Sear #165
Purchased on eBay
NGC XF*; Strike 5/5; Surface 4/5
Richard M10
111-3-horz.jpg
Justinian I, AE 37mm Follis. Cyzicus Mint. (At 37mm I assume this qualifies as a "Large" follis.)26 viewsAD 527-565
19.13 grams
Obv.: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield with horseman motif, cross to right
Rev.: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right, officina letter below, mintmark KYZ.
SB 207
Purchased on eBay
NGC XF*; Strike 5/5; Surface 5/5
Richard M10
Justinian.JPG
Justinian I, AE dekanummium, 538 AD, Constantinople23 viewsJustinian I
AE dekanummium - 16mm
Constantinople, 538 AD
DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust r.
Large I, ANNO to l., XXI to r., cross above
CONS in ex.
Sear 167, MIB 199
Ardatirion
sb160_33m1780pir.jpg
Justinian I, AE follis, SB 1607 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diad., dr. and cuir. bust r.
Reverse: LArge M between two stars, cross above, Officina letter "A" CON in ex
Date: 527-538 CE
Mint: Constantinople
Sear 160 DO 30
33mm 17.80gm
wileyc
sb220yr2236mm1859g.jpg
Justinian I, AE Follis, sear 22073 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield with horseman motif, cross to right
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right XXII (22) , sometimes on a star or crescent, officina letter below A , mintmark 9HU o over P
Mint: Antioch
Year 548/9 CE
Sear 220a
36mm, 18.59g
wileyc
AAIDb.png
Justinian I, AE Half-follis 8 viewsJustinian I, 527-565 AD

Constantinople.

24mm., 7.00g.

DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right

Large K, long cross to left, star above, officina letter to right, star below. No mintmark.

References: SB 164, DOC 33.

AAID
RL
index-1~0.png
Justinian I, AE Half-follis, Rome mint.20 viewsObv. DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right, normal sized head and neck.
Rev. Large K, star to left, cross to right, all within wreath.
References: SB 302, DOC 325a.
21mm and 3.74 grams
1 commentsCanaan
justinian-i-pentanummium-merged.jpg
Justinian I, AE Pentanummium, 527-565 AD, Antioch mint27 viewsByzantine Empire, Justinian I, AE Pentanummium, (527-565 AD), Antioch mint, 2.3g, 15mm

Obverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: Epsilon Ɛ with cross at centre, star to right.

Reference: SB 244, DOC 271.

Ex: Aegean Numismatics
Gil-galad
justinianus_I.jpg
Justinian I, AE Pentanummium. Antioch , Theopolis8 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / Large epsilon with + at centre, V over O to right. SB 243, DOC 270. Britanikus
byz.jpg
Justinian I, Bronze half follis. large K25 views4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D. Bronze half follis, SBCV 165, VF, 2nd officina, Constantinople mint, 9.729g, 31.7mm, 180°, 543 - 544 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, globus cruciger in right, shield in left, cross right; reverse large K, cross above, ANNO left, XVII right.ancientone
DSC01653.JPG
Justinian I, Follis 527-538 A.D.11 viewsConstantinople mint

Obverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust rigt
Reverse: Large M between star and cross above,cross and beneath, B. CON is ex.
Dk0311USMC
Justinian_I,_Half_Follis,_large_K,_527-565_AD.JPG
Justinian I, Half Follis, large K, 527-565 AD35 views8.3g / 27mm _500
SB 231 Justinian I, AE Half-Follis. Antioch. DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and long sceptre, cross to right / Large K, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right, mintmark e (or P with angled downstroke). SB 231, MIB 155.
Antonivs Protti
eeeeeeeeeeeeekz_050.jpg
Justinian I, Half Follis, large K, Constantinople, 527-565 AD21 viewsSB 165, DOC 62
5.4g / 22mm _300
Antonivs Protti
xcolumnOR.jpg
Justinian I, SB 32811 viewsPerugia(?) mint, Justinian I, 527-565 A.D. AE Decanummium, 14mm 2.27g, DOC I 357.1; MIB I 101a (uncertain Italian mint); SB 328
O: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
R: Large I; cross above, date across field; P in exergue (mintmark?)

The attribution to Perugia remains conjectural. Hahn attributes it to an uncertain Italian mint (MIB I 101a), active during Justinian's reconquest.
casata137ec
Justinian_I,_SBCV_158.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 15818 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large M, Cross above, stars left, Cross right, B below
CON in ex.
Constantinople
AE follis, 32mm, 17.31g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_159.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 15912 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large M, Crosses above, and to sides, E below
CON in ex.
Constantinople
AE follis, 32mm, 13.72g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_160.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 16014 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large M, Cross above, eight ray stars to sides, Δ below
CON in ex.
Constantinople
AE follis, 30mm, 13.76g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_161.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 16113 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large M, Cross above, stars left with pellet above, Cross on pellet right, Δ below
CON in ex.
Constantinople
AE follis, 34mm, 15.37g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_162.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 16217 views[DN IVSTINI]ANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large M, star left, Cross above, crescent right E below, CON in ex
Constantinople
AE follis, 30mm
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_163(18D).JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 16311 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large M, Cross above, ANNO left, X/U/II right, Δ below
CON in ex.
Constantinople, minted 544-545 AD
AE follis, 34mm, 17.30g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_163(21D).JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 1638 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large M, Cross above, ANNO left, X/X/I right, Δ below
CON in ex.
Constantinople, minted 547-548 AD
AE follis, 34mm, 18.76g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_163(13G).JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 163 9 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large M, Cross above, ANNO left, X/III right, Γ below
CON in ex.
Constantinople, minted 539-540 AD
AE follis, 38.5mm, 16.16g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_163_(17G).JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 163 12 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large M, Cross above, ANNO left, X/U/II right, Γ below
CON in ex.
Constantinople, minted 542-543 AD
AE follis, 35.5mm, 17.39g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_164.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 1648 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large K, long Cross left, Γ right, stars above and below
Constantinople
AE half follis, 24mm, 7.41g
novacystis
Justinian1_Sear_165G.jpg
Justinian I, SBCV 16511 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large K, ANNO left, XX right, Cross above, Γ below
Constantinople
AE half follis, 29mm, 5.15g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_167.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 16710 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large I, Cross above, ANNO left, X/II/II right
Con in ex.
Constantinople
AE 10 nummi, 19mm, 3.18g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV167.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 16711 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large I, Cross above, ANNO left, X/X/X right
CON in ex.
Constantinople
AE 10 nummi, 19mm, 4.41g
novacystis
Jistinian_sear167_y17.jpg
Justinian I, SBCV 16714 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large I, Cross above, ANNO left, X/U/II right
CON in ex.
Constantinople
AE 10 nummi, 22mm, 4.53g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_172.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 17210 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large E, Cross right
Constantinople
AE 5 nummi, 13mm, 1.57g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_174.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 17410 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large K, Cross above, ANNO left, XXX/uII right, TES below
Thessalonica, minted 564-565 AD
AE half follis, 20mm, 4.27g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV174.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 1748 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large K, Cross above, ANNO left, XXX/uIII right, TES below
Thessalonica, minted 565-566 AD
AE half follis, 22mm, 5.68g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_175.jpg
Justinian I, SBCV 1757 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust right
Large IS, + above, A left, P right, TES below
Thessalonica
AE 16 nummi, 22mm, 5.81g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_177.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 17712 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust right
Large IS, *+* above, A left, P right, TES below
Thessalonica
AE 16 nummi, 23mm, 4.92g
Struck on square flan
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_192.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 19217 views[DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG]
Diademed, cuirassed bust right
Large H, *+* above, A left, P right
Thessalonica
AE 8 nummi, 19mm, 3.73g
Struck on square flan
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_198.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 19814 viewsDN IVSTINIAN PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large M, Cross above, star left, Cross right, B below
NIKM in ex.
Nicomedia mint
AE follis, 31mm, 17.25g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_199.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 19914 viewsDN IVSTINIAN PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large M, Cross above, Crosses left and right, B below
NIKM~ in ex.
Nicomedia mint
AE follis, 31mm, 17.31g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_203.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 20310 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large K, Cross above, ANNO left, u/XII/II right, NI below
Nicomedia, minted 564-565 AD
AE half follis, 26mm, 9.31g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_205.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 2059 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large I, Cross above, ANNO left, XXSIII right
NIK in ex.
Minted Nikomedia, 555-556
AE 10 nummi, 16mm, 4.60g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_209.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 2099 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large I, Cross above, ANNO left, X/X/I right
KYZ in ex.
Cyzicus
AE 10 nummi, 13mm, 2.03g

Strongly double struck
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_217.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 21715 views[DN IVSTINI] AN PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large M, Cross above, stars to sides, A below
ΘYΠOΛE in ex.
Theoupolis
AE follis, 32mm, 12.60g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_218.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 21813 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large M, Cross above, ANNO left, XIII right, B below
ΘYΠO in ex.
Theoupolis, minted 539-540 AD
AE follis, 39mm, 19.30g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_231.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 23110 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large K, Cross above, ANNO left, XXX right, p below
Theoupolis, minted 556-557 AD
AE half follis, 29mm, 11.79g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_236.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 23617 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large I, Cross above, ANNO left, X/X/II right
uHuII in ex.
Minted Theoupolis 548-549
AE 10 nummi, 24mm, 4.96g
novacystis
Justinian1_Sear_236.jpg
Justinian I, SBCV 23612 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large I, Cross above, ANNO left, X/X/III right
uHuII in ex.
Minted Theoupolis 549-550
AE 10 nummi, 21.5mm, 3.90g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_237.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 23712 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Helmeted, cuirassed bust facing holding globus cruciger
Large I, Cross above, ANNO left, XXuII right
tHEuP in ex.
Minted Theoupolis 554-555
AE 10 nummi, 22mm, 3.34g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_247.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 247.11 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Laureate bust right
Large IB, Cross between
AΛEZ in ex.
Alexandria
AE 12 nummi, 2.89g
novacystis
Justinian,S257.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 25916 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed bust right
Large M, star left, Cross right, Cross above, Γ below
KART in ex.
AE follis, 29mm, 15.52g
Carthage mint
uneven strike
novacystis
Justinian_II,_SBCV_373.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 37313 viewsDN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Seated, facing figures of Justin and Sophia
Large K, Cross above, ANNO left, X right, NI below
KYZ in ex.
Minted Cyzicus, 574-575
AE half follis, 22mm, 4.48g
novacystis
justinian_16_nummi.jpg
Justinian I, Thessalonica, 16 nummi, SBCV 17510 viewsJustinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D. Bronze 16 nummi, SBCV 175 (or similar), aF, cleaned and rough, Thessalonica mint, 6.154g, 25.0mm, 180o, 527 - 565 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse , large I surmounted by cross? between smaller A and SP, TES in ex. Ex FORVMPodiceps
fc25.jpg
Justinian I. 527-565. AV Solidus (21mm, 4.42 g, 7h). Constantinople mint, 7th officina. Struck 545-565.21 viewsJOE GERANIO COLLECTION Justinian I. 527-565. AV Solidus (21mm, 4.42 g, 7h). Constantinople mint, 7th officina. Struck 545-565. Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield / Angel standing facing, holding long staff terminating in staurogram and globus cruciger; star to right; CONOB. DOC 9g; MIBE 7; SB 140. Good VF, some striking weakness, ding and light graffito (“N”) on reverse.Joe Geranio
byzantI.jpg
Justinian I. 527-565. Æ 10 Nummi – Decanummium . 10 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. Æ 10 Nummi – Decanummium . Constantinople mint. Dated RY 35 (561/2). Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Large I; A/N/N/O to left, cross above, X/XX/U (date) to right; CON. DOC 93; MIBE 99; SB 167. VF, dark green patina with touches of reddish-brown, flan flaw on the obverse. Britanikus
index~1.png
Justinian I. AE follis. 527-565 AD, Constantinople.11 viewsObv. DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev.Large M. star to left, cross above, cross right, officina letter below, mintmark CON.
References: SB 158, DOC 28.
30mm and 17.04 grams
Canaan
20191114eBOf86yIqNi4vEFi_1oymP_large.jpeg
Justinian I. Post-reform follis. AD 527-565. 2 viewsCyzicus mint, 2nd officina. Dated RY 18 (544/5). (22,1g; 37 mm.) Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right / Large M; cross above, date across field; B//KYZ. DOC 170b var. (obv. legend); MIBE 120; SB 207.Russel K
20191114DO0yhWgBlGV9jo8S_QNMDm_large.jpeg
Justinian I. Post-reform follis. AD 527-565. 1 viewsConstantinople mint. Dated RY 12 (538/9). (Æ 23,8g.; 41mm.)
D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVC, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust of Justinian facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; in field to right, cross / ANNO, CON in exegue, XII, large M; above, cross; below officina: Δ .

Sear 163.
Russel K
3980610.jpg
Justinian I. Æ Follis27 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. Æ Follis (36mm, 19.57 g, 7h). Cyzicus mint, 2nd officina. Dated RY 19 (545/6). Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right / Large M; A/N/N/O - X/ЧI/II/I (date) across field, cross above; B//KYZ. DOC 171b.1; MIBE 120a; SB 207. Attractive emerald green patina.

From the Iconodule Collection.
1 commentsCurtis H2
36356_Justinian_I_follis_S163_year_17.jpg
Justinian I; Follis; Constantinople, year 17; Sear 635 viewsByzantine Empire, Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D. Bronze follis, DOC I 42c, SBCV 163, VF, 3rd officina, Constantinople mint, 20.069g, 36.5mm, 180o, 543 - 544 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, globus cruciger in right, shield on left, cross right; reverse, large M, cross above, ANNO left, regnal year X/V/II (year 17) right, “G” (3rd officina) below, CON in ex. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
2730494.jpg
Justinian II15 viewsJustinian II. First reign, 685-695. Æ Half Follis (24mm, 5.21 g, 6h). Constantinople mint, 2nd officina. Crowned facing bust, holding globus cruciger / Large K; [date across field], B below.

Cf. DOC 20; MIB 47; SB 1262.
SkySoldier
11129.jpg
Justinian II Follis Constantionople Year 2 Constantinople54 viewsJustinian II (685-695, 705-711)
1st reign: Sear-1260, Year-2, Officina-A, struck 686-687 at Constantinople, 8.07 grams, 26.6 mm. aVF

Obv: IUSJINIANUS P - Bust of Justinian facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger, a cross in the right field

Rev: Large 'M' between ANNO, Year 2, CON in exergue

Overstruck on earlier issue.

Ex: Dr. Michael Metlich Collection

1 commentscliff_marsland
Justinian- M new.jpg
Justinian- M40 viewsObverse:
DN IVSTINI ANVS PP AVG

DN:
IVSTINI:
ANVS:
PP:
AVG: Augustus


Reverse:

M = 40

Domination: Copper, size 23 mm

Mint: Byzantine
John Schou
justinian.jpg
Justinianus (527-565)49 viewsJustinianus, AE follis, Nikomedia mint, 2nd officina,
Obv:D N IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: Large M between two crosses, cross above, B beneath, NIKM in ex
Sear 199
1 commentsblot-sven
justinian2.jpg
Justinianus (527-565)43 viewsJustinianus AE Follis. Antioch mint
Obv: DN IVSTINIANUS PP AVG, diademed cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large M between two stars, cross above +THEUP+ in ex.
Sear 216
blot-sven
justinian3.jpg
Justinianus (527-565)29 viewsJustinianus AE Follis. Antioch Mint.
Obv: DN IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVC Justinian enthroned facing holding long scepter and globus cruciger
Rev: Large M, cross above, star left, cresent right, THEUP in ex.
Sear 214
blot-sven
justinian4.jpg
Justinianus (527-565)36 viewsJustinianus. AE Pentanummium, Antioch mint, 4th officina
Obv: D N IVSTINI_ANVS P P AVG Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large E with cross at center
Sear 241
1 commentsblot-sven
justinian5.jpg
Justinianus (527-565)18 views Justinianus. AE decanummium, Nikomedia mint, Year 35 (561-562)
Obv: Bust right
Rev: ANNO, Large I surmounted by cross, NIK in ex.
Sear 205
blot-sven
justinian7.jpg
Justinianus (527-565)33 viewsJustinianus, AE 16 Nummi. Thessalonica mint
Obv: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AV, with Justinian facing right.
Rev: AISP, TES in ex.
Sear 177
blot-sven
unk_byzI2.jpg
Justinianus I Decanummium27 viewsJustinianus I decanummium from Antioch,
issued ca. 550 A.D., reference MIB 157-160
Scotvs Capitis
justinian1.jpg
Justinianus I Follis28 viewsJustinianus I. (527 - 565 AD) Theoupolis - Antiochia - Antakya
Follis, 557 - 558 AD
33 mm, 17.93g
obv: D N IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield, to right cross
rev: large M, cross above, ANNO left, regnal year XXXI right, G ( = officina 3 ) below, THEUP in ex
ex LANZ
areich
justinian_I_cyzicus_follis.jpg
JUSTINIANUS I, 527-565. Æ Follis, Cyzicus. Sear 2078 viewsJUSTINIANUS I, 527-565. Æ Follis, 19.2g, 36mm. Rev. Large M, ANNO to left, XXIII to right, cross above,Abelow, KYZ in exergue, mint of Cyzicus. Sear BCV 207Podiceps
jsutinian_I_K_antioch.jpg
JUSTINIANUS I, 527-565. Æ Half follis, Antioch. Sear 23011 viewsJUSTINIANUS I, 527-565. Æ Half follis, 9.7g, 26mm. Rev. Large K, between ANNO and XXI, cross above, ΟΠ below, mint of Antioch. Sear BCV 230Podiceps
coin358.JPG
Justinianus I, Constantinople17 viewsJustinianus I, follis, Constantinople, officina B, year 527-537
ecoli
Justinianus_decanummium_b.jpg
Justinianus I. decanummium43 viewsByzantine coinage
562-563 A.D.
Tibsi
AE_Byzantine_Justinianus_Large_Follis.jpg
Justinien le Grand,AE follis, Nikomedia,Superbe66 viewsJustinien le Grand, follis AE. Monnaie Nikomedia,
Obv. DN IVSTINI ANVS PP AVG En face , buste cuirassé, traverser à droite, tenant globe avec la croix.
Rev. Grand M, ANNO gauche, à droite l'année du règne, + ci-dessus, B ci-dessous, NIKO
35,5mm., 19,49g. patine vert fonsé, Superbe
sold

2 commentsAntonivs Protti
justinian6.jpg
Justinus I (518-527)32 viewsJustinus I AE Pentanummium, Constantinople mint
Obv: DNIVSTINVSPAVG - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: Large Chi-Ro
Sear 75
blot-sven
BYZANTINE_FOLLIS_2.JPG
MASSIVE 29-30mm Uncleaned Byzantine Coin - EF++70 viewsEXCEPTIONAL BYZANTINE FOLLIS 29-30mm
COIN HAS A DARK COLOUR WITH THE DESERT PATINA IN BACKGROUND
Justinian I AE Follis. Constantinople mint. D N IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust r. / Large M between star and cross; above, cross; beneath, officina letter "A" CON in ex.
GREAT DETAIL. EXCEPTIONAL COIN, PERFECT UNCLEANED EXAMPLE. 1700


Antonio Protti
Valentinian_I_AE1~1.JPG
Roman, VALENTINIAN I92 viewsFrom an AE1 of Heraclea, struck between A.D.364 and 367.
RIC IX : 2
Extremely Rare

The Colossus of Barletta is a large bronze statue of a Roman Emperor, nearly three times life size currently located in the coastal town of Barletta, Italy. The legs and hands were replaced in the 15th Century, but the 5-metre-high statue is still a powerful reminder of the later days of the Roman Empire.
There are many different versions of the story of this statue, the most popular being that the statue washed up on the shore after a Venetian ship sank returning from the sack of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade, but if that was indeed the case it is not impossible that the statue had been sent to Constantinople much earlier. The identity of the Emperor is uncertain, the most likely subjects appear to be Valentinian I (A.D.364–375), Honorius (A.D.393–423), Theodosius II (A.D.408–450), Marcian (A.D.450–457), Leo I (A.D.457–474) and Justinian I (A.D.527–565). The facial features on my coin seem to me to closely resemble those on the statue, so Valentinian I would be my own personal choice as to the identity of the emperor.
*Alex
LarryW1923.jpg
RZG, Justinian II, second reign, AD 705-711206 viewsGold solidus, 19.61mm, 4.2g, EF
Struck c. 705-708 at Constantinople
ON IhS ChS REX REGNANTIUM, bust of Christ facing, with short curly hair and close beard, cross behind head, wearing tunic over colobium, right hand raised in blessing, holding the book of Gospels before him in left / [D N IVSTINIANVS ET] TIbERIUS PP A-, facing half-length figures of Justinian (on left), and his son Tiberius, each wearing crown and chlamys and holding between them with their right hands cross potent on two steps. RCOA
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Sear 1414; DO 2a
Lawrence Woolslayer
Sear_0125.jpg
Sear 012548 viewsJustin I and Justinian I (joint reign: 4 April 527 – 1 August 527) Follis, weight 16.65g, diameter 32mm. Mint of Constantinople, first officina.

In the hope of assuring a smooth transition of power, in April 527 the emperor Justin I, who was terminally ill, appointed his nephew Justinian as co-emperor. During the brief period until Justin’s death at the beginning of August, coins mentioning both Justin and Justinian and/or carrying both their portraits, were minted at Constantinople, Nicomedia, Cyzicus and Antioch. All these ‘joint reign’ issues are quite scarce.
Abu Galyon
Sear_0125_[2].jpg
Sear 012521 viewsJustin I and Justinian I (joint reign: 4 April 527 – 1 August 527) Follis, weight 15.40g, diameter 29mm. Mint of Constantinople, third officina.Abu Galyon
Sear_126A.jpg
Sear 0126A31 viewsJustin I and Justinian I (joint reign: 4 April 527 – 1 August 527) Half-follis, weight 8.48g, diameter 25mm. Mint of Constantinople, fourth officina. Rare. Abu Galyon
Sear_0133.jpg
Sear 013333 viewsJustin I and Justinian I (joint reign: 4 April 527 – 1 August 527) Pentanummium, weight 2.4g, diameter 12.5mm. Mint of Antioch.

Abu Galyon
Sear_0133_[2].jpg
Sear 013320 viewsJustin I and Justinian I (joint reign: 4 April 527 – 1 August 527) Pentanummium, weight 1.45g, diameter 13mm. Mint of Antioch.Abu Galyon
Sear_0158.jpg
Sear 015825 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 17.6g, diameter 29mm. Mint of Constantinople, officina Δ.
Abu Galyon
Sear_0158_[2].jpg
Sear 015821 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 15.4g, diameter 31mm. Mint of Constantinople, officina A.Abu Galyon
Sear_0159.jpg
Sear 015941 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 15.4g, diameter 33mm. Mint of Constantinople, fifth officina. This is the sub-variety where the obverse legend is split by a cross above the emperor’s head. Abu Galyon
Sear_0159_[2].jpg
Sear 015912 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 15.29g, diameter 32mm. Mint of Constantinople, fifth officina. Abu Galyon
Sear_0161.jpg
Sear 016140 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 16.43g, diameter 31mm. Mint of Constantinople, fourth officina. Abu Galyon
Sear_0162.jpg
Sear 016228 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 15.68g, diameter 30mm. Mint of Constantinople, fifth officina.Abu Galyon
Sear_0162_[2].jpg
Sear 01629 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 17.71g, diameter 30mm. Mint of Constantinople, fifth officina. Obverse: sub-variety with cross above the emperor’s head. Abu Galyon
Sear_0163.jpg
Sear 016340 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 17.55g, diameter 30mm. Mint of Constantinople, struck in 556/7 CE (= regnal year 30). 1 commentsAbu Galyon
Sear_0164.jpg
Sear 016418 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 10.2g, diameter 24x20mm. Mint of Constantinople, third officina. Abu Galyon
Sear_0164_[2].jpg
Sear 016418 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 8.2g, diameter 24 x 22mm. Mint of Constantinople, third officina. Abu Galyon
Sear_0164_[3].jpg
Sear 01647 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 8.92g, diameter 24mm.
Mint of Constantinople, third officina.
This example has a pellet below the long cross.
Abu Galyon
Sear_0165.jpg
Sear 016541 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 11.0g, diameter 28mm. Mint of Constantinople (officina illegible), struck in 541/2 CE (= regnal year 15). Abu Galyon
Sear_0165_[2].jpg
Sear 016512 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 8.71g, diameter 27mm. Mint of Constantinople, fourth officina, struck in 559/60 CE (= regnal year 33). Neither Hahn nor DOC lists the Δ officina for this year. Abu Galyon
Sear_0166.jpg
Sear 016625 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Decanummium, weight 3.96g, diameter 20mm. Mint of Constantinople.Abu Galyon
Sear_0167.jpg
Sear 016727 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Decanummium, weight 3.8g, diameter 16mm. Mint of Constantinople, struck in 561/2 CE (= regnal year 35).
Abu Galyon
Sear_0172.jpg
Sear 017229 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 1.7g, diameter 12.5mm. Mint of Constantinople.Abu Galyon
Sear_0172_[2].jpg
Sear 017214 viewsJustinian I (527 – 656 CE) Pentanummium, weight 2.3g, diameter 14mm. Mint of Constantinople. Abu Galyon
Sear_0175.jpg
Sear 017565 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 5.1g, diameter 24mm. Mint of Thessalonica. 1 commentsAbu Galyon
Sear_0175_[2].jpg
Sear 017532 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 8.06g, diameter 24mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0175_[3].jpg
Sear 017520 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 5.73g, diameter 26mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0176.jpg
Sear 017635 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 6.8g, diameter 22mm. Mint of Thessalonica. Abu Galyon
Sear_0177.jpg
Sear 017752 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 4.7g, diameter 24mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0177_[2].jpg
Sear 017740 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 6.32g, diameter 20mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0177_[3].jpg
Sear 017720 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 5.69g, diameter 20mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0177_[4].jpg
Sear 017715 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 6.67g, diameter 21mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear178.jpg
Sear 017863 viewsJustinian I (527-565 CE) 16-nummi, Thessalonica Mint. Weight 7.0g, diameter 22mm. Abu Galyon
Sear_0178var.jpg
Sear 0178A var35 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 7.85g, diameter 22mm. Mint of Thessalonica. This unusual variant is not listed in Sear’s book, but is mentioned by Hahn (MIBE, type V169e). The mintmark in exergue is TЄSBX. Abu Galyon
Sear_0179.jpg
Sear 017946 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE), 16-nummi, weight 6.75g, diameter 23mm. Mint of ThessalonicaAbu Galyon
Sear_0179_[2].jpg
Sear 017917 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE), 16-nummi, weight 6.49g, diameter 24mm. Mint of ThessalonicaAbu Galyon
Sear_0180.jpg
Sear 018032 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 5.1g, diameter 24mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0180_[2].jpg
Sear 018022 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 5.04g, diameter 20mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0181.jpg
Sear 018131 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 4.3g, diameter 20 mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0182var.jpg
Sear 0182var32 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 5.73g, diameter 21mm. Mint of Thessalonica.

Not the world’s most beautiful coin, but an example of quite a rare variant, defined by the symbols IωCT above the mark of value and first published by S Bendall in a brief note for the June 1993 Numismatic Chronicle. The new edition of MIBE lists it as variety N169i. Stylistically, the condensed form of the A and the thick and neatly seriffed S link the reverse to the varieties Sear 180-182.
Abu Galyon
Sear_0186.jpg
Sear 018637 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 5.0g, diameter 21mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0182.jpg
Sear 0186a36 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 16-nummi, weight 5.1 g, diameter 24 mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0189.jpg
Sear 018936 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 8-nummi, weight 5.08g, diameter 21mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0190.jpg
Sear 019016 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 8-nummi, weight 3.19g, diameter 20mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0191.jpg
Sear 019118 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 8-nummi, weight 3.42g, diameter 20mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0192.jpg
Sear 019247 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 8-nummi, weight 2.19g, diameter 17mm. Mint of Thessalonica.Abu Galyon
Sear_0193.jpg
Sear 019327 viewsJustinian I ( 527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 1.9g, diameter 13mm. Mint uncertain: Grierson suggested Thessalonica, Bellinger listed this type (DOC 97f) under Constantinople, while Hahn attributed it to Carthage. Abu Galyon
Sear_0199.jpg
Sear 019928 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE). Follis, weight 16.2g, diameter 30mm. Mint of Nicomedia, second officina. Note the (blundered) obverse legend on this specimen, which reads: DNVSTAI NVSPPAVC. Abu Galyon
Sear_0201.jpg
Sear 020156 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE). Follis, weight: 19.35g, diameter 35mm. Mint of Nicomedia, first officina, struck in 545/6 CE [= regnal year 19]. Abu Galyon
Sear_0201_[2].jpg
Sear 020138 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 18.9g, diameter 35mm. Mint of Nicomedia, second officina, struck in 548/9 CE [= regnal year 22].Abu Galyon
Sear_0201_[3].jpg
Sear 020115 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 16.41g, diameter 34mm. Mint of Nicomedia, second officina, struck in 557/8 CE [= regnal year 31].Abu Galyon
Sear_0205.jpg
Sear 020540 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Decanummium, weight 3.7g., diameter 15mm. Mint of Nicomedia, struck in 556/7 CE [= regnal year 30] This specimen has a star (instead of the more usual cross) above the large I on the reverse.Abu Galyon
Sear_0207.jpg
Sear 020730 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 19g, diameter 35mm (large module). Mint of Cyzicus, first officina, struck in 549/50 (= regnal year 23). Abu Galyon
Sear_0208.jpg
Sear 020825 viewsJustinian I (527 - 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 8.9 g, diameter 26mm. Mint of Cyzicus, struck in 548/9 CE (= regnal year 22). Abu Galyon
Sear_208var.jpg
Sear 0208var50 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 8.34g, diameter 25mm. Mint of Cyzicus, struck in 555/6 [= regnal year 29]. Unlisted variety with mintmark Z (instead of the usual YZ). Abu Galyon
Sear_0213.jpg
Sear 021345 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 14.8g, diameter 30mm. Mint of Antioch. Officina letter obscure, A or Δ are most likely. Of the text in exergue, only the initial A is barely visible (in the right light). However, the attribution is fairly secure because of the eight-point stars. The Constantinople version of this type (Sear 160) has six-point stars.Abu Galyon
Sear_0213_var_AVGS.jpg
Sear 021353 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 14.85g, diameter 29mm. Mint of Antioch, officina A. This specimen has an unusual obverse legend (found only on this type) ending in …AVGS. 2 commentsAbu Galyon
Sear_0213_(3).jpg
Sear 021334 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 14.8g, diameter 30mm. Mint of Antioch. The officina letter, though faint, appears to be A.Abu Galyon
Sear_0213_[3].jpg
Sear 021316 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 15.78g, diameter 30mm. Mint of Antioch, first officina.Abu Galyon
Sear_0214.jpg
Sear 021448 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 15.9g, diameter 32mm. Mint of Antioch, third officina. Retrograde-D at the start of the obverse inscription.Abu Galyon
Sear_0214_[2].jpg
Sear 021440 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 17.2g, diameter 30mm. Mint of Antioch, fourth officina. Abu Galyon
Sear_0214_[3].jpg
Sear 021413 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 14.8g, diameter 34mm. Mint of Antioch, second officina. Note that the two S’s in the obverse inscription are both blundered. Abu Galyon
Sear_0216.jpg
Sear 021658 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 14.05g, diameter 31mm. Mint of Antioch, officina indistinct (Α or Δ). Abu Galyon
Sear_0217.jpg
Sear 021763 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 13.5g, diameter 30mm. Mint of Antioch, officina probably Γ, but somewhat indistinct. Abu Galyon
Sear_0217_[2].jpg
Sear 021739 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 14.9g, diameter 31mm. Mint of Antioch, third ( Γ ) officina.Abu Galyon
Sear_0217_var.jpg
Sear 0217 var20 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 14.00g, diameter 31mm. Mint of Antioch, first officina. This type is listed only in MIBE where Hahn notes it as a variant of his type 131 [= Sear 0127].

The mintmark ANTOΛS is a nonsense, but it clearly reflects the period (following a second earthquake in November 528) when the city was for a time renamed Theupolis.

One explanation (due to Spaer) is that ANTOΛS arises from an incomplete recutting of an older die marked ANTIX [Sear 0213], to read ΘVΠOΛS [Sear 0217], on which the die-cutter began at the end of the mint signature and broke off in the middle.
Abu Galyon
Sear_0220.jpg
Sear 022030 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 19.72g, diameter 38mm. Mint of Antioch, struck in 548/9 [= regnal year XXII]. Abu Galyon
Sear_0222.jpg
Sear 022227 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 20.1g, diameter 34mm. Mint of Antioch, struck in 557/8 [= regnal year XXXI]. Abu Galyon
Sear_0223.jpg
Sear 022365 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Follis, weight 17.2g, diameter 31mm. Mint of Antioch, third officina, struck in 561/2 CE [= regnal year 35]. Abu Galyon
Sear_0225.jpg
Sear 022547 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 7.6g, diameter 24mm. Mint of Antioch, third officina.Abu Galyon
Sear_0225_[2].jpg
Sear 022529 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 8.57g, diameter 26mm. Mint of Antioch, third officina.Abu Galyon
Sear_0226.jpg
Sear 022615 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 8.28g, diameter 25mm. Mint of Antioch, first officina.Abu Galyon
Sear_0228.jpg
Sear 022820 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 10.68g, diameter 31mm. Mint of Antioch, struck in 539/40 [= regnal year X III]Abu Galyon
Sear_0230.jpg
Sear 023021 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 9.3g, diameter 28mm. Mint of Antioch, struck in 546/7 [= regnal year 20]. Abu Galyon
S0209.jpg
Sear 023647 viewsJustinian I (527 - 565 CE) Decanummium, weight 4.05g, diameter 21mm. Mint of Antioch, struck in 550/1 CE (= regnal year 24). 2 commentsAbu Galyon
Sear_0237.jpg
Sear 023719 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Decanummium, weight 4.2g, diameter 21 mm. Mint of Antioch, struck in 550/1 CE (the regnal year is [X] / X / IIII). Abu Galyon
Sear_0239.jpg
Sear 023915 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Decanummium, weight, 2.8g, diameter 19.mm. Mint of Antioch, struck in 563/4 CE (= regnal year 37). Abu Galyon
Sear_0240.jpg
Sear 024034 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 1.8g, diameter 12mm. Mint of Antioch.Abu Galyon
Sear_0240_[2].jpg
Sear 024024 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 1.83g, diameter 12mm. Mint of Antioch.Abu Galyon
Sear_0240_[3].jpg
Sear 024012 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 1.69g, diameter 13mm. Mint of Antioch.Abu Galyon
Sear_0241.jpg
Sear 024126 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 2.5g, diameter 17mm. Mint of Antioch, officina Δ.Abu Galyon
Sear_0242.jpg
Sear 024238 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 1.75g, diameter 18mm. Mint of Antioch. Unusual break in the obverse legend.Abu Galyon
Sear_0243.jpg
Sear 024332 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 2.55g, diameter 18mm. Mint of Antioch.1 commentsAbu Galyon
Sear_0244.jpg
Sear 024418 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 1.6g, diameter 15mm. Mint of Antioch.Abu Galyon
Sear_0244_[2].jpg
Sear 024420 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 1.34g, diameter 16mm. Mint of Antioch.Abu Galyon
Sear_0245.jpg
Sear 02459 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 1.72g, diameter 17mm. Mint of Antioch.Abu Galyon
Sear_0247.jpg
Sear 024742 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) 12-nummi, weight 4.0g, diameter 18.5mm. Mint of Alexandria. Abu Galyon
Sear_0266.jpg
Sear 026616 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Half-follis, weight 12.07g, diameter 29mm. Mint of Carthage; regnal year somewhat indistinct, but probably X | I I I , i.e. 539-540 CE. The letter S (also, on some related issues, SO) appears where we would expect an officina designation, possibly abbreviating Sola [Grierson] or perhaps Secunda Officina [Wroth]. Abu Galyon
Sear_0269.jpg
Sear 026930 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Decanummium, weight 5.33g, diameter 21mm. Mint of Carthage, struck in 539/40 [= regnal year XIII].Abu Galyon
Sear_0269_[2].jpg
Sear 026911 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Decanummium, weight 5.55g, diameter 19mm. Mint of Carthage, struck in 540/41 [= regnal year XIIII].Abu Galyon
Sear_0274.jpg
Sear 027422 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 2.1g, diameter 15 mm. Mint of Carthage.Abu Galyon
Sear_0274_[2].jpg
Sear 027423 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 2.1g, diameter 14mm. Mint of Carthage.Abu Galyon
Sear_0275.jpg
Sear 027537 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE). Pentanummium, weight 4.3g, diameter 17mm. Mint of Carthage. Abu Galyon
Sear_0278.jpg
Sear 027818 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Nummus, weight 0.9g, diameter 8mm. Mint of Carthage, struck in 539/40 CE [regnal year XIII ]. Abu Galyon
Sear_0278_[1].jpg
Sear 027825 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Nummus, weight 0.84g, diameter 9mm. Mint of Carthage, struck in 539/40 CE [regnal year XIII ].Abu Galyon
Sear_0279.jpg
Sear 027917 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Nummus, weight 0.55g, diameter 9mm. Mint of Carthage, struck in 540/41 CE [regnal year XIIII ].Abu Galyon
Sear_0281.jpg
Sear 028121 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Nummus, weight 0.65g, diameter 9mm. Wroth ( i.e. the old British Museum Vandals, Ostrogoths and Lombards catalogue) attributed this type to Hilderic, but it is most likely a Byzantine imperial issue: from the mint at Carthage (or possibly another North African mint) and struck soon after the end of the Vandalic War in 534. Abu Galyon
Sear_0286.jpg
Sear 028615 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Decanummium, weight 5.24g, diameter 20mm. A very convincing case can be made – based on finds, style, and overstrikes on known coins from Carthage – that this type is a North African issue, either struck in Carthage (so Hahn) or at a hypothetical mint at ‘Constantine in Numidia’ (so Bellinger, explaining the CON mintmark). Abu Galyon
Sear_0337.jpg
Sear 033736 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 1.52g, diameter 13mm. Uncertain Italian or Sicilian mint. Abu Galyon
Sear_0342.jpg
Sear 034217 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Nummus, weight 0.46g, diameter 8 mm. Hahn attributes this type to Carthage while Sear (following DOC) opts for ‘uncertain mint’. Tiny, isn’t it? Abu Galyon
Sear_0342_[2].jpg
Sear 034224 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Nummus, weight 0.76g, diameter 10 mm. Mint of Carthage. 1 commentsAbu Galyon
Sear_0882.jpg
Sear 088241 viewsHeraclius (610 – 641 CE) Countermarked follis, weight 12.4g, diameter 34mm, for use in Sicily. Class 1 countermarks on obverse and reverse imposed on a follis of Justinian from Antioch (Sear 217). The style of the bust – very similar to portraits found on Catanian decanummia from regnal years 9, 10, 11 – suggests that this countermark type dates to circa 620. The host coins for Class 1 countermarks are almost invariably profile bust folles of Anastasius, Justin I and Justinian I, coins which may well have entered Sicily in large numbers with the army of Belisarius in 535 and remained in circulation since. The asymmetric stars, one eight-point and one six-point, make this particular host quite unusual. Abu Galyon
JnnIIDO18a.jpg
Sear 1260 - Follis - 686-687 AD (Year 2) - Constantinople mint - 1st officina50 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 686-687 AD (Year 2)
Condition: aVF/Fine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: Illegible legend
Bust facing, bearded, wearing chlamys and crown with cross on circlet. In right hand, globus cruciger. In field right, cross.

Reverse: Large ""; Above, cross; To left, ///; To right, with cross above and line below; Beneath, .
Exergue:

Constantinople mint, first officina
DO 18a; Sear 1260; MIB 44
9.74g; 33.3mm; 180°

Ex CNG, Ex J. P. Righetti Collection
Pep
JnnIISear1260_X_Gamma.jpg
Sear 1260 - Follis - 694-695 AD (Year 10) - Constantinople mint - 3rd officina (unlisted)95 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 694-695 AD (Year 10)
Condition: Fine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: ]SP
Bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger; in field to right, cross.

Reverse: Large "M"; Above, cross; To left, /N/N/O; To right, X; Beneath, .
Exergue: CON

Constantinople mint, third officina
Sear 1260 (unlisted officina)
3.27g; 19.8mm; 105°
Pep
Sear_1262.jpg
Sear 126227 viewsJustinian II (First reign, 685 – 695 CE) Half-follis, weight 4.29g, diameter 17 – 26mm. Mint of Constantinople, struck in 687/8 (= regnal year 3).Abu Galyon
JnnIISear1262_II_Alpha.jpg
Sear 1262 - Half Follis - 686-687 AD (Year 2) - Constantinople mint - 1st officina25 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 686-687 AD (Year 2)
Condition: VF
Denomination: Half Follis

Obverse: No legend
Bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger; in field to right, cross.

Reverse: Large ""; Above, cross; To left, ///; To right, ; Beneath, .

Constantinople mint, first officina
Sear 1262
2.79g; 23.0mm; 180°
Pep
JnnIISear1262_II_Beta.jpg
Sear 1262 - Half Follis - 686-687 AD (Year 2) - Constantinople mint - 2nd officina38 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 686-687 AD (Year 2)
Condition: aVF
Denomination: Half Follis

Obverse: No legend
Bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger; in field to right, cross.

Reverse: Large ""; Above, cross; To left, ///; To right, ; Beneath, .

Constantinople mint, second officina
Sear 1262
2.68g; 22.5mm; 15°

Overstruck on a DO 88; Sear 1013 (Constans II Follis, Constantinople, 666-668 AD).
Pep
JnnIIDO20c.jpg
Sear 1262 - Half Follis - 686-687 AD (Year 2) - Constantinople mint - 5th officina26 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 686-687 AD (Year 2)
Condition: aVF
Denomination: Half Follis

Obverse: No legend
Bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger; in field to right, cross.

Reverse: Large ""; Above, cross; To left, ///; To right, ; Beneath, .

Constantinople mint, fifth officina
DO 20c; Sear 1262
3.74g; 22.2mm; 330°
Pep
JnnIISear1262_III_Gamma.jpg
Sear 1262 - Half Follis - 687-688 AD (Year 3) - Constantinople mint - 3rd officina35 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 687-688 AD (Year 3)
Condition: VF
Denomination: Half Follis

Obverse: No legend
Bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger; in field to right, cross.

Reverse: Large ""; Above, cross; To left, ///; To right, ; Beneath, .

Constantinople mint, third officina
Sear 1262
3.71g; 25.2mm; 15°
1 commentsPep
JnnIISear1262_UIIII_Epsilon.jpg
Sear 1262 - Half Follis - 693-694 AD (Year 9) - Constantinople mint - 5th officina31 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 693-694 AD (Year 9)
Condition: Fine
Denomination: Half Follis

Obverse: No legend
Bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger; in field to right, cross.

Reverse: Large ""; Above, cross; To left, ///; To right, /; Beneath, .

Constantinople mint, fifth officina
Sear 1262; MIB 47
1.39g; 18.0mm; 30°

Ex Dr. Michael Metlich Collection
Pep
JnnIIDO33.jpg
Sear 1270 - Follis - 687-695 AD - Carthage mint29 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 687-695 AD
Condition: aFine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Emperor standing, bearded (?), wearing chlamys and crown with cross on circlet, holding globus cruciger in right hand; in left, akakia. To left, ; To right,

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
To left, /; To right, ; Beneath, (?)

Carthage mint
DO 33; Sear 1270
3.16g; 22.8mm; 0°

Ex CNG
Pep
JnnIIDO53.jpg
Sear 1294 - Follis - 685-695 AD - Syracuse mint32 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 685-695 AD
Condition: VF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Bust facing, bearded, wearing jeweled robe and crown with cross. In left hand, globus cruciger; in right, akakia.

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
Exergue:

Syracuse mint
DO 53; MIB III 67; Sear 1294
4.320g; 22.2mm; 195°
Pep
JnnIIDO54.jpg
Sear 1295 - Follis - 685-695 AD - Syracuse mint20 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 685-695 AD
Condition: Fine/Fair
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Bust facing, bearded, wearing "blanket-like" chlamys and crown with cross. In right hand, globus cruciger.

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
Exergue:

Syracuse mint
DO 54; Sear 1295
3.77g; 22.0mm; 165°
Pep
JnnIIDO55.jpg
Sear 1296 - Follis - 685-695 AD - Syracuse mint23 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 685-695 AD
Condition: aFine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Bust facing, bearded, wearing chlamys and crown with cross. In right hand, globus cruciger; in left, akakia. In field left, branch; in right, star above branch.

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
Exergue:

Syracuse mint
DO 55; Sear 1296
3.53g; 21.4mm; 15°
Pep
JnnIIDO57.jpg
Sear 1297 (1st Reign) - Follis - 705-706 AD (Indictional Year 4) - Syracuse mint57 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (Second Reign: 705-711 AD)
Date: 705-706 AD (Indictional Year 4)
Condition: aVF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Bust facing, bearded, wearing elaborate cloak and crown with cross. In right hand, globus cruciger; in left, akakia.

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
To left and right, cross; Beneath, .
Exergue: SCL

Syracuse mint
DO 57 (1st reign); Sear 1297 (1st reign); MIB 48b
4.79g; 20.2mm; 180°

Ex Dr. Michael Metlich Collection
Pep
JnnIIDO58.jpg
Sear 1298 - Follis - ca. 686 AD - Syracuse mint20 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: ca. 686 AD
Condition: aFine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Emperor standing, bearded, wearing tightly fastened chlamys and crown with cross. In right hand, globus cruciger.

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
Exergue:

Syracuse mint
DO 58; Sear 1298
4.22g; 24.5mm; 180°
Pep
JnnIIDO59.jpg
Sear 1299 (1st Reign) - Follis - 706-707 AD (Indictional Year 5) - Syracuse mint33 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (Second Reign: 705-711 AD)
Date: 706-707 AD (Indictional Year 5)
Condition: aFine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Emperor standing, bearded, wearing open chlamys and crown with cross. In right hand, long cross; in left, akakia.

Reverse: Large "M"; Above,
To left and right, ; Beneath, .
Exergue: SCL

Syracuse mint
DO 59 (1st reign); Sear 1299 (1st reign); MIB 49
3.97g; 19.7mm; 180°
Pep
JnnIIDO60.jpg
Sear 1300 - Follis - 692-695 AD - Syracuse mint41 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 692-695 AD
Condition: VF/Fine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Emperor standing, bearded, wearing loros and crown with cross. In right hand, long cross potent on two steps; in left, globus cruciger.

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
Beneath, .
Exergue:

Syracuse mint
DO 60; Sear 1300
3.04g; 22.6mm; 180°

Overstruck on a Justinian II Follis from Syracuse, 195°, DO 55; Sear 1296 (Bust with globus cruciger at 210° on reverse, star above branch to right. on obverse at 165°).
1 commentsPep
JnnIIDO61.jpg
Sear 1301 - Follis - 691-692 AD - Syracuse mint27 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 691-692 AD
Condition: aVF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Emperor standing, facing, bearded, wearing helmet (with plume) and military dress. In right hand, spear; in left, globus cruciger. In field right, plant. Reel border.

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
To left, //; To right, //
Exergue:

Syracuse mint
DOC 61; Anastasi 277; Spahr 224; MIB 71 var. (branch to left on obv.); SB 1301 var. (same)
6.71g; 23.5mm; 180°

Ex CNG, Ex D. Alighieri Collection
Pep
JnnIIDO62.jpg
Sear 1302 - Follis - 692-695 AD - Syracuse mint29 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 692-695 AD
Condition: VF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Emperor standing, facing, bearded, wearing helmet (with plume) and military dress. In right hand, spear; in left, globus cruciger.

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
Exergue:

Syracuse mint
DO 62; Sear 1302
5.48g; 24.5mm; 180°
Pep
JnnIIDO63.jpg
Sear 1303 - Follis - 694-695 AD (Indictional Year 8) - Syracuse mint70 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 694-695 AD (Indictional Year 8)
Condition: Fine/aFine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Emperor standing, facing, bearded, wearing helmet (with plume) and elaborate robe, holding in right hand, akakia; in left, globus cruciger. In field left, star above palm; in field right, palm.

Reverse: Large ""; Above, ; To left, //; To right, //
Exergue:

Syracuse mint
DO 63; Sear 1303
2.74g; 27.2mm; 180°
Pep
JnnIIDO64.jpg
Sear 1304 - Follis - 692-693 AD - Syracuse mint72 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 692-693 AD
Condition: VF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Emperor facing, bearded, seated on throne with low arms, wearing chlamys and crown with cross. In right hand, globus cruciger; in left, akakia. In field right, star.

Reverse: Large ""; Above, ; To left and right, palm.
Exergue:

Syracuse mint
DO 64; Sear 1304; MIB 73
4.71g; 27.1mm; 180°

Ex CNG, Ex Kristov Collection
Pep
JnnIIDO72.jpg
Sear 1310 - Follis - 685-687 AD - Ravenna mint72 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (First Reign: 685-695 AD)
Date: 685-687 AD
Condition: aFine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Bust facing, bearded, wearing chlamys and crown (with cross?). In right hand, globus cruciger.

Reverse: Large ""; Above, cross.
Exergue:

Ravenna mint
DO 72; Sear 1310; MIB 78
3.61g; 20.0mm; 180°

Ex Dr. Michael Metlich Collection
Pep
JnnII2ndDO12a.jpg
Sear 1428 - Follis - 705-706 AD (Year 21) - Constantinople mint - 1st officina45 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (Second Reign: 705-711 AD)
Date: 705-706 AD (Year 21)
Condition: aFine/VF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: Illegible legend
To left, bust of Justinian, with short beard, and to right, bust of Tiberius, smaller and beardless, each wearing chlamys and crown with cross. They hold between them patriarchal cross on globe inscribed . At intersections of patriarchal cross, 's.

Reverse: Large ""; Above, cross; To left, ///; To right, //; Beneath, .
Exergue:

Constantinople mint, first officina
DO 12a; Sear 1428
3.73g; 20.3mm; 195°
Pep
JnnIIDO56.jpg
Sear 1435 - Follis - 707-708 AD (Indictional Year 6) - Syracuse mint30 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (Second Reign: 705-711 AD)
Date: 707-708 AD (Indictional Year 6)
Condition: aFine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Bust facing, bearded, wearing chlamys and crown with cross. In right hand, globus cruciger. In field right, large globule.

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
To left and right, star; Beneath, .
Exergue: ( or )

Syracuse mint
DO 56 (1st reign); Sear 1435; MIB 50
2.38g; 23.7mm; 165°
Pep
JnnII2ndSear1436_DO20.jpg
Sear 1436 - Follis - 705-711 AD - Syracuse mint33 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (Second Reign: 705-711 AD)
Date: 705-711 AD
Condition: Fine/Fair
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Bust facing, bearded, wearing loros and crown (with cross?). In right hand, cross potent on base and three steps; in left, globe surmounted by cross.

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
To left and right, cross.
Exergue:

Syracuse mint
Sear 1436; (DO 20 except for patriarchal cross on globe)
1.98g; 24.4mm; 180°
Pep
JnnII2ndDOC20bis.jpg
Sear 1437 - Follis - 705-711 AD - Syracuse mint68 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (Second Reign: 705-711 AD)
Date: 705-711 AD
Condition: Fair
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Busts of Justinian and Tiberius, facing, each wearing chlamys and crown with cross on circlet, and holding between them long cross potent on base.

Reverse: Large "M"; Above,
To left and right, cross.
Exergue: SCL

Syracuse mint
DO 20 bis; Sear 1437
2.303g; 21.5mm; 150°
Pep
JnnII2ndSear1438.jpg
Sear 1438 - Follis - 710 AD - Syracuse mint77 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (Second Reign: 705-711 AD)
Date: 710 AD
Condition: Fine/VF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend
Justinian (on left) and Tiberius (on right) standing, facing, each wearing chlamys and crown, holding a long cross with their right hand, and an akakia in their left hand.

Reverse: Large ""; Above,
To left and right, .
Exergue:

Syracuse mint
Sear 1438; MIB 52; Anastasi 360
2.05g; 17.8mm; 165°

Ex CNG, Ex D. Alighieri Collection
Pep
JnnII2ndDO24.jpg
Sear 1446 - Follis - 705-711 AD - Ravenna mint45 viewsEmperor: Justinian II (Second Reign: 705-711 AD)
Date: 705-711 AD
Condition: Fine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: No legend (?)
To left, bust of Justinian bearded; to right, bust of Tiberius, beardless, each wearing chlamys and crown with cross. They hold between them long cross potent (on globus?).

Reverse: Large ""; Above, cross; To left, ///; To right, // (?)
Exergue:

Ravenna mint
DO 24; Sear 1446
1.16g; 13.4mm; 165°

Ex VAuctions
Pep
Anon_A2_Type_40_6th_Century_undertype.jpg
Sear 181323 viewsAnonymous Class A2 follis, weight 16.62g, diameter 32mm. Type 40 ornamentation.

The undertype (traces visible on both sides) is a sixth century follis of Justin or Justinian. Overstriking is common in Byzantine coinage, but this specimen is quite a curiosity because the time interval between strikes cannot be less than about 450 years.
Abu Galyon
Sear_197a.jpg
Sear 197a30 viewsJustinian I (527 – 565 CE) Pentanummium, weight 1.64g, diameter 14mm . Mint of Cherson.

Sear’s book lists this type among the issues of Justinian I, but the reality is a bit more complex. Both Justin I and Justinian I produced coins of this kind and only on the (very uncommon) specimens where the obverse legend is complete and legible can they be distinguished. Hahn plausibly conjectures that the type was introduced soon after 522, the year when the solidus design was changed to include a standing angel holding a long cross and a globus cruciger. The figure on the reverse here, of course, is imperial rather than angelic. Cherson in this period was a frontier military trading post: its currency circulated only locally in the southern Crimean region and its mint did not employ the standard denominational markings used by other Byzantine mints; however, by weight and size the type is fairly certain to be a pentanummium.
Abu Galyon
HclsDOC241.jpg
Sear 882 - Follis - ca. 620 AD - Sicily mint68 viewsEmperor: Heraclius (r. 610-641 AD)
Date: ca. 620 AD
Condition: EF
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: Countermark
To left, bust of Heraclius facing, with short beard, wearing cuirass, paludamentum, and crown with cross; to right, ; the whole on a circular punch stamped on the head of an earlier emperor ((]NVSPPA[ (Justin I and/or Justinian I)).

Reverse: , within a circular countermark. Struck on exergue of an earlier type.

Sicily mint
DO 241; Sear 882
15.94g; 31.5mm; 210°
2 commentsPep
Septimius_Severus_Demeter_wTorch~0.JPG
Septimius Severus Demeter wTorch16 viewsWildwinds:
Moushmov 1008 Nicopolis ad Istrum. Septimius Severus Æ 18-20 (Assarion). AV KAI CEVHPO, laureate bust right / NIKOPOLIT PPOCICT,
Hera standing left, holding long torch and patera.
Moesia Inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum
Nikopolis ad Istrum was a Roman town founded by the Emperor Trajan after victory over the Dacis tribe. It grew vigorously under the emperors
Constantine I and Justinian I. Destroyed in the 7th century AD by the Slavs
It's Varbanov (engl.) I, 2383, rated R4 (from 10) = from 200 to 500 ex., FWIW
18.2g, 3.01g, Moushmov 1008, H/J 8.14.5.5
This is probably Demeter with torch.

EX: Forvm Ancient Coins
Romanorvm
VALENTINIAN_AE1_SMHA.JPG
Struck A.D.364 - 367. VALENTINIAN I. AE1 of HERACLEA16 viewsObverse: D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Valentinian facing right.
Reverse: RESTITVTOR REIPVBLICAE. Valentinian standing facing, head right, holding standard and Victory; in exergue, SMHA.
Diameter: 26mm | Weight: 6.7gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC IX : 2.
Extremely Rare

The Colossus of Barletta is a large bronze statue of a Roman Emperor, nearly three times life size currently located in the coastal town of Barletta, Italy. The legs and hands were replaced in the 15th Century, but the 5-metre-high statue is still a powerful reminder of the later days of the Roman Empire.
There are many different versions of the story of this statue, the most popular being that the statue washed up on the shore after a Venetian ship sank returning from the sack of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade, but if that was indeed the case it is not impossible that the statue had been sent to Constantinople much earlier. The identity of the Emperor is uncertain, the most likely subjects appear to be Valentinian I (A.D.364–375), Honorius (A.D.393–423), Theodosius II (A.D.408–450), Marcian (A.D.450–457), Leo I (A.D.457–474) and Justinian I (A.D.527–565). The facial features on my coin seem to me to closely resemble those on the statue, so Valentinian I would be my own personal choice as to the identity of the emperor.
*Alex
Arcadius_Horseback_Plumes_CONSA.JPG
Struck A.D.392 - 395. ARCADIUS. AE3 of Constantinopolis12 viewsObverse: D N ARCADIUS P F AVG. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Arcadius facing right.
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM. Arcadius on horseback advancing right, his right hand raised; in exergue, CONSΔ.
RIC IX : 89c
RARE

The statue on the reverse of this coin may be the one mentioned by FORVM member Masis in this thread http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=114678.0 and also here. The differences between the headgear depicted in the 15th century artist's drawing of the statue and the helmet with "feathers" shown on this coin might be due to damage or alterations caused by the ravages of time, given that the statue would already have been almost 1,000 years old when the drawing was made.
*Alex
Athalaric.JPG
SUB-ROMAN, Ostrogoths, Athalaric 526-534 AD, Rome Mint75 viewsObv: Bust of Justinian Right, ...NIAN...
Rev: Monogram of Athalaric in Wreath
Wroth 47-56, p. 66-67
MEC 135
British Museum Catalog of Western and Provincial Byzantine COins #47-48, plate 8, #16-17
Laetvs
PICT2409a.jpg
Turkey, Istanbul (Constantinople) - Yerebatan Saray Cistern191 viewsThe cistern was build in the year 542 under the reign of Justinian. It is positioned near the Hagia Sophia museum. The Gorgo (a female monster with serpents instead of hairs- one view can kill) head belongs to an old unknown monument and was used here in this cistern a second time as a base of a column. The cistern consists of 336 columns. But only 2 gorgo heads can be seen in the cistern. Franz-Josef M
IMG_2658.JPG
Turkey, Istanbul, Monastery of the Mother of God at the Spring52 views7-6-2015
The full name of this ancient complex is "Monastery of the Mother of God at the Spring" but it is often known as "Zoödochos Pege" (Life-giving spring).
The Turkish name of it and the area is "Balıklı" which translates as "place where there are fishes" due to the presence of fish in this spring.
The era of the first Church complex around this spring is given either from the time of Emperor Leo I (457-74 AD) or Justinian I (527-65 AD).
Earthquakes and enemy invasions saw numerous rebuilding of this complex through the centuries.
The last was after the Pogroms of the 1950's.
Masis
DSCF8428.JPG
Turkey, Istanbul, Mosaic Museum54 views9-6-2015
The south-western section of the Great Palace (dated to the reign of Emperor Justinian, 527-65 AD) was excavated in the years 1935-38 and 1951-54 by the University of St. Andrews.
This section comprised a Peristyle courtyard, decorated in Mosaics.
The Austrian Academy of Sciences undertook preservation work on the Mosaics in the years 1983-97.
In the photo above, you can also see the pipes inside the walls that would have water and heating.
Masis
1280px-MisisBrücke.jpg
Turkey, Misis, Roman bridge over the Pyramus39 viewsRoman bridge in Misis-Mopsuestia over the Pyramus. Constantius II built this magnificent bridge over the Pyramus (Malalas, Chronographia, XIII; P.G., XCVII, 488) afterwards it was restored by Justinian (Procopius, De Edificiis, V. 5) and it has been restored again recently. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mopsuestia Joe Sermarini
TheodosiusRIC83b.jpg
[1601a] Theodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. 67 viewsBronze AE 2, RIC 83(b), EF, Constantinople mint, 4.389g, 22.1mm, 180o, 25 Aug 383 - 28 Aug 388 A.D.; Obverse: D N THEODO-SIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: VIRTVS E-XERCITI, Emperor standing right holding standard and globe, foot on captive, cross in left field, CONSA in exergue. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
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[1611a] Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.68 viewsBronze follis, S 201, choice VF, 22.147g, 43.8mm, 180o, 2nd officina, Nikomedia mint, 541 - 542 A.D.; Obverse: D N IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, globus cruciger in right, shield decorated with a horseman brandishing a spear, cross right; Reverse: large M, cross above, ANNO left, Xu (= year 15) right, B below, NIKO in ex; full circle strike on a huge flan. Ex FORVM.



De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Justinian (527-565 A.D.).

James Allan Evans
University of British Columbia

Introduction
The reign of Justinian was a turning-point in Late Antiquity. It is the period when paganism finally lost its long struggle to survive, and when the schism in Christianity between the Monophysite east and the Chalcedonian west became insurmountable. From a military viewpoint, it marked the last time that the Roman Empire could go on the offensive with hope of success. Africa and Italy were recovered, and a foothold was established in Spain. When Justinian died, the frontiers were still intact although the Balkans had been devastated by a series of raids and the Italian economy was in ruins. His extensive building program has left us the most celebrated example of Byzantine ecclesiastical architecture that still survives: Hagia Sophia in modern Istanbul. His reign was a period when classical culture was in sharp decline and yet it had a last flowering, with historians such as Procopius and Agathias working within the tradition inherited from Herodotus and Thucydides, and poets such as Paul the Silentiary who wrote some of the most sensuous poems that the classical tradition has ever produced. The Codex Justinianus, the Institutes and the Digest of Roman jurisprudence, all commissioned by Justinian, are monuments to the past achievements of Roman legal heritage. Justinian's reign sums up the past. It also provides a matrix for the future. In particular, there was the bubonic plague, which appeared in Constantinople in 542, for the first time in Europe, and then travelled round the empire in search of victims, returning to the capital for a new crop in 558. The plague ended a period of economic growth and initiated one of overstrained resources.

The 'Nika' Revolt
The 'Nika' Revolt which broke out in January, 532, in Constantinople, was an outburst of street violence which went far beyond the norms even in a society where a great deal of street violence was accepted. Every city worth notice had its chariot-racing factions which took their names from their racing colors: Reds, Whites, Blues and Greens. These were professional organizations initially responsible for fielding chariot-racing teams in the hippodromes, though by Justinian's time they were in charge of other shows as well. The Blues and the Greens were dominant, but the Reds and Whites attracted some supporters: the emperor Anastasius was a fan of the Reds. The aficionados of the factions were assigned their own blocs of seats in the Hippodrome in Constantinople, opposite the imperial loge, and the Blue and Green "demes" provided an outlet for the energies of the city's young males. G. M. Manojlovic in an influential article originally published in Serbo-Croat in 1904, argued that the "demes" were organized divisions of a city militia, and thus played an important role in the imperial defense structure. His thesis is now generally disregarded and the dominant view is that of Alan Cameron, that demos, whether used in the singular or plural, means simply "people" and the rioting of the "demes", the "fury of the Hippodrome", as Edward Gibbon called it, was hooliganism, which was also Gibbon's view. Efforts to make the Greens into supporters of Monophysitism and the Blues of Orthodoxy founder on lack of evidence. However, in support of Manojlovic's thesis, it must be said that, although we cannot show that the Blue and Green "demes" were an organized city militia, we hear of "Young Greens" both in Constantinople and Alexandria who bore arms, and in 540, when Antioch fell to the Persians, Blue and Green street-fighters continued to defend the city after the regular troops had fled.

Justinian and Theodora were known Blue supporters, and when street violence escalated under Justin I, Procopius claims that they encouraged it. But since Justinian became emperor he had taken a firmer, more even-handed stand. On Saturday, January 10, 532, the city prefect Eudaemon who had arrested some hooligans and found seven guilty of murder, had them hanged outside the city at Sycae, across the Golden Horn, but the scaffold broke and saved two of them from death, a Blue and a Green. Some monks from St. Conon's monastery nearby took the two men to sanctuary at the church of St Lawrence where the prefect set troops to watch. The following Tuesday while the two malefactors were still trapped in the church, the Blues and Greens begged Justinian to show mercy. He ignored the plea and made no reply. The Blues and Green continued their appeals until the twenty-second race (out of twenty-four) when they suddenly united and raised the watchword 'Nika'. Riots started and the court took refuge in the palace. That evening the mob burned the city prefect's praetorium.

Justinian tried to continue the games next day but only provoked more riot and arson. The rioting and destruction continued throughout the week; even the arrival of loyal troops from Thrace failed to restore order. On Sunday before sunrise, Justinian appeared in the Hippodrome where he repented publicly and promised an amnesty. The mob turned hostile, and Justinian retreated. The evening before Justinian had dismissed two nephews of the old emperor Anastasius, Hypatius and Pompey, against their will, from the palace and sent them home, and now the mob found Hypatius and proclaimed him emperor in the Hippodrome. Justinian was now ready to flee, and perhaps would have done so except for Theodora, who did not frighten easily. Instead Justinian decided to strike ruthlessly. Belisarius and Mundo made their separate ways into the Hippodrome where they fell on Hypatius' supporters who were crowded there, and the 'Nika' riot ended with a bloodbath.

A recent study of the riot by Geoffrey Greatrex has made the point that what was unique about it was not the actions of the mob so much as Justinian's attempts to deal with it. His first reaction was to placate: when the mob demanded that three of his ministers must go, the praetorian prefect of the East, John the Cappadocian, the Quaestor of the Sacred Palace Tribonian and the urban prefect Eudaemon, Justinian replaced them immediately. He hesitated when he should have been firm and aggravated the situation. It may well have been Theodora who emboldened him for the final act of repression. Procopius imagines Theodora on the last day engaging in formal debate about what should be done, and misquoting a famous maxim that was once offered the tyrant of Syracuse, Dionysius the Elder "Tyranny is a good shroud." Theodora emends it to "Kingship is a good shroud" and readers of Procopius may have thought wryly that the emendation was unnecessary. The formal debate, and Theodora's great scene, was probably a creation of Procopius' imagination, but a splendid one.

The 'Nika' revolt left Justinian firmly in charge. The mob was cowed and the senatorial opposition that surfaced during the revolt was forced underground. The damage to Constantinople was great, but it cleared the way for Justinian's own building program. Work in his new church of Hagia Sophia to replace the old Hagia Sophia that was destroyed in the rioting, started only forty-five days after the revolt was crushed. The two leaders of the Hippodrome massacre, Mundo and Belisarius, went on to new appointments: Mundo back to Illyricum as magister militum and Belisarius to make his reputation as the conqueror of the Vandals in Africa. The 530s were a decade of confidence and the 'Nika' riot was only a momentary crisis.

(for a detailed account of the reign of Justinian I, see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/justinia.htm)

Last Years
Misfortune crowded into the final years of Justinian's reign. There was another Samaritan revolt in midsummer, 556. Next year, in December, a great earthquake shook Constantinople and in May of the following year, the dome of Justinian's new Hagia Sophia collapsed, and had to be rebuilt with a new design. About the same time, the plague returned to the capital. Then in early 559 a horde of Kutrigur 'Huns' (proto-Bulgars) crossed the frozen Danube and advanced into the Balkans. It split into three columns: one pushed into Greece but got no further than Thermopylae, another advanced into the Gallipoli peninsula but got no further than the Long Wall, which was defended by a young officer from Justinian's native city, while the third, most dangerous spearhead led by the 'Hun' khan, Zabergan himself, made for Constantinople. Faced with this attack and without any forces for defense, Justinian called Belisarius out of retirement, and Belisarius, using a scratch force, the core of which was 300 of his veterans, ambushed the Kutrigur horde and routed it. Once the immediate danger was over, however, Justinian recalled Belisarius and took charge himself. The news that Justinian was reinforcing his Danube fleet made the Kutrigurs anxious and they agreed to a treaty which gave them a subsidy and safe passage back across the river. But as soon as they were north of the Danube, they were attacked by their rivals the Utigurs who were incited by Justinian to relieve them of their booty. The Kutrigurs raided Thrace again in 562, but they and the Utigurs were soon to fall prey to the Avars who swept out of the Asian steppes in the early 560s.

There was discontent in the capital. Street violence was on the increase again. There were bread shortages and water shortages. In late 562, there was a conspiracy which almost succeeded in killing the emperor. The chief conspirator was Marcellus, an argyroprates, a goldsmith and banker, and the conspiracy probably reflected the dissatisfaction of the business community. But Justinian was too old to learn to be frugal. He resorted to forced loans and requisitions and his successor found the treasury deeply in debt.

What remained of the great emperor's achievement? His successor Justin II, out of a combination of necessity and foolhardiness, denied the 'barbarians' the subsidies which had played a major role in Justinian's defense of the frontiers, and, to be fair, which had also been provided by emperors before him. Subsidies had been part of Anastasius' policy as well, but that was before the plague, while the imperial economy was still expanding. The result of Justin II's change of policy was renewed hostility with Persia and a shift of power in the Balkans. In 567 the Avars and Lombards joined forces against the Gepids and destroyed them. But the Lombards distrusted their allies and next year they migrated into Italy where Narses had just been removed from command and recalled, though he disobeyed orders and stayed in Rome until his death. By the end of the century only a third of Italy was in Byzantine hands. On the eastern frontier, Justin alienated the Ghassanid allies and lost the fortress of Daras, a reverse which overwhelmed his frangible sanity. For this Justinian can hardly be blamed. No one can deny his greatness; a recent study by Asterios Gerostergios even lionizes him. But if we look at his reign with the unforgiving eye of hindsight, it appears to be a brilliant effort to stem the tide of history, and in the end, it was more a failure than a moderate success.

Copyright (C) 1998, James Allan Evans. Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

The Church we know today as Hagia Sophia - or Divine Wisdom, its true name - was dedicated by the Emperor Justinian in 537AD. Through many visitudes Justinian's cathedral church of Constantinople still stands, its soring vaults and amazing dome testiments to the human spirit, the engineering talents of its builders and Divine inspiration. In the same fashion that Vespasian's Collesium (the Flavian Amphitheatre) is symbolic of Rome, Justinian's Hagia Sophia is a symbol of Byzantium.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
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[1640aii] Leo VI, the Wise, 6 January 870 - 11 May 912 A.D.54 viewsBronze follis, SBCV 1729, DO 8.6, nice VF, 5.122g, 25.3mm, 180o, Constantinople mint, c. 886 - 912 A.D.; Obverse: LEON bASILVS ROm, bust facing, with short beard, wearing crown and chlamys and holding akakia in left hand; Reverse: + LEON/En QEO bA/SILVS R/OMEOn, legend in four lines. Ex FORVM.

Leo VI "the Wise" or "the Philosopher" (Greek: Λέων ΣΤ΄, Leōn VI), (September 19, 866 – May 11, 912) was Byzantine emperor from 886 to 912 during one of the most brilliant periods of the state's history.

Background
Leo was born to Eudokia Ingerina who was at the time mistress of Emperor Michael III and wife of his Caesar Basil. Which of the two men was his father is uncertain. He was officially acknowledged by Basil as his son, but he apparently regarded Leo as Michael's son and favored his undisputedly biological son Constantine.

On the night of September 23-September 24, 867, Michael was assassinated by Basil who succeeded him as Emperor Basil I. As the second eldest son of the Emperor, Leo was associated on the throne in 870 and became the direct heir on the death of his older half-brother Constantine in 879. However, he and his father hated each other and Basil almost had Leo blinded as a teenager. On August 29, 886, Basil died in a hunting accident, though he claimed on his deathbed that there was an assassination attempt in which Leo was possibly involved.

Domestic Policy
One of the first actions of Leo VI after his succession was the reburial of Michael III in Constantinople, which may have contributed to the suspicion that he was Michael's son. Seeking political reconciliation, the new emperor secured the support of the officials in the capital, and surrounded himself with bureaucrats like Stylianos Zoutzes and the eunuch Samonas. His attempts to control the great aristocratic families (e.g., the Phokadai and the Doukai) occasionally led to serious conflicts. Leo also attempted to control the church through his appointments to the patriarchate. He dismissed the Patriarch Photios of Constantinople, who had been his tutor, and replaced him with his own 19-year old brother Stephen in December 886. On Stephen's death in 893, Leo replaced him with Zaoutzes' nominee, Antony II Kaleuas, who died in 901. Leo then promoted his own imperial secretary (mystikos) Nicholas, but replaced him with his spiritual father Euthymios in 907.

Leo completed work on the Basilica, the Greek translation and update of the law code issued by Justinian I, which had been started during the reign of Basil.

Foreign Policy
Leo VI was not as successful in battle as Basil had been. In indulging his chief counselor Stylianos Zaoutzes, Leo provoked a war with Simeon I of Bulgaria in 894, but was defeated. Bribing the Magyars to attack the Bulgarians from the north, Leo scored an indirect success in 895. However, deprived of his new allies, he lost the major Battle of Boulgarophygon in 896 and had to make the required commercial concessions and to pay annual tribute.

The Emirate of Sicily took Taormina, the last Byzantine outpost on the island of Sicily, in 902. In 904 the renegade Leo of Tripolis sacked Thessalonica with his Muslim pirates (an event described in The Capture of Thessalonica, by John Kameniates). In 907 Constantinople was attacked by the Kievan Rus' under Oleg of Novgorod, who was seeking favourable trading rights with the empire. Leo paid them off, but they attacked again in 911, and a trade treaty was finally signed. The admiral Himerios, a relative of Leo's last wife, Zoe Karbonopsina scored some successes against the Muslim fleets in 908 and raided Cyprus in 910, but in 912 a fleet of 112 dromons and 75 pamphyloi was soundly defeated in its attempt to conquer Crete.

Fourth Marriage Dispute
Leo VI caused a major scandal with his numerous marriages which failed to produce a legitimate heir to the throne. His first wife, whom Basil had forced him to marry, died in 897, and he married Zoe Zaoutzaina, the daughter of his adviser Stylianos Zaoutzes, though she died as well in 899. Upon this marriage Leo created the title of basileopatōr ("father of the emperor") for his father-in-law.

After Zoe's death a third marriage was technically illegal, but he married again, only to have his third wife die in 901. Instead of marrying a fourth time, which would have been an even greater sin than a third marriage (according to the Patriarch Nicholas Mystikos) Leo took as mistress, Zoe Karbonopsina. He married her only after she had given birth to a son in 905, but incurred the opposition of the patriarch. Replacing Nicholas Mystikos with Euthymios, Leo got his marriage recognized by the church, but opened up a conflict within it and allowed new grounds for papal intervention into Byzantine affairs when he sought and obtained papal consent.

Succession
The future Constantine VII was the illegitimate son born before Leo's uncanonical fourth marriage to Zoe Karbonopsina. To strengthen his son's position as heir, Leo had him crowned as co-emperor on May 15, 908, when he was only two years old. Leo VI died on May 2, 912. He was succeeded by his younger brother Alexander, who had reigned as emperor alongside his father and brother since 879.

Legends
According to Bishop Liutprand of Cremona, and probably inspired by stories about the caliph Harun al-Rashid, Leo would sometimes disguise himself and look for injustice or corruption. On one account, he was even captured by the city guards during one of his investigations. He wanted to know if the city patrol was doing its job appropriately. He was walking alone, disguised, late in the evening without any documentation. He bribed two patrols for 12 nomismata, and moved on. However, the third city patrol arrested him. When a terrified guardian recognized the jailed ruler in the morning, the arresting officer was rewarded for doing his duty, while the other patrols were dismissed and punished severely.

As John Julius Norwich notes in his book A Short History of Byzantium, "He [Leo VI] had proved himself, if not a great Emperor, at any rate an outstandingly good one . . . In his lifetime Leo was genuinely loved by his people, and after his death they had good cause to be grateful" (Norwich, John Julius. A Short History of Byzantium. New York: Vintage Books, 1997. 165).

References
The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, Oxford University Press, 1991.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_VI_the_Wise

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
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[1921a] Sasanian Kingdom. Khusro I. A.D. 531-579. AR drachm. 64 viewsSasanian Kingdom. Khusro I. A.D. 531-579. AR drachm; Göbl I/2; 32 mm, 4.05 g; VF, Nihavand, year 37; Obverse: Crowned bust right; three crescents around single border of dots; Reverse: Fire altar between two attendants.

“The Great King Chosroes I of Persia—known to his subjects as Anushirvan, ‘of Immortal Soul’—had occupied the throne since 531. Of all the great Sassanian Kings, perhaps of all the Persian rulers throughout history, he was the most illustrious and is still the best remembered. As a statesman, he reformed and reorganized every branch of government and completely revised the fiscal system; as a general, he created the first standing army loyal to the King alone and pushed forward his frontiers till they extended from the Black Sea to the Yemen, from the Oxus River to the shores of the Mediterranean; as an intellectual, he had given—even before his accession—an enthusiastic welcome to those pagan Greek scientists and philosophers who had drifted to Persia after Justinian’s closure of the School of Athens in 529. He founded his country’s great medical academy at Gondeshapur, codified the Avesta—the sacred book of Zoroastrianism—compiled the first collection of the myths and legends of his people and introduced from India the game of chess. He was, in short, a worthy match for Justinian, his adversary and rival for over thirty years. The Byzantine Emperor, Justinian I, the Great died in 565 AD; The Sasassinan King, Chosroes I, The Great died in 579 AD” (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, The Early Centuries. London: The Penguin Group, 1990. 228)
Cleisthenes
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[1921b] Sasanian Empire, Khusro I, 531 - 579 A.D.120 viewsSilver drachm, Gobl II/2 MY, aVF, Meshan mint, 4.12g, 29.8mm, 90o, 569 A.D.; Obverse: XUSRO AFZUN, crowned bust right, three crescents outside border; Reverse: MY NWCSYH, fire altar with two attendants. Khusro is also sometimes spelled Xusro, Khusru, or Chosroes. Ex FORVM.

Khosrau I, CHOSROES ANUSHIRVAN ('OF THE IMMORTAL SOUL') ruled from 531–579. He is the most celebrated of the Sassanid rulers. Khosrau I is most famous for his reforms in the aging governing body of Sassanids. In his reforms he introduced a rational system of taxation, based upon a survey of landed possessions, which his father had begun and tried in every way to increase the welfare and the revenues of his empire. Previous great feudal lords fielded their own military equipment, followers and retainers. Khosrau I developed a new force of dehkans or "knights" paid and equipped by the central government and the bureaucracy, tying the army and bureaucracy more closely to the central government than to local lords. (Chosroes I's reforms, visit: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/med/fryehst.html)

Although the Emperor Justinian I (527–565) had paid him a bribe of 440,000 pieces of gold to keep the peace, in 540 Khosrau I broke the "eternal peace" of 532 and invaded Syria, where he sacked the city of Antioch and extorted large sums of money from a number of other cities. Further successes followed: in 541 Lazica defected to the Persian side, and in 542 a major Byzantine offensive in Armenia was defeated at Anglon. A five-year truce agreed in 545 was interrupted in 547 when Lazica again switched sides and eventually expelled its Persian garrison with Byzantine help; the war resumed, but remained confined to Lazica, which was retained by the Byzantines when peace was concluded in 562.

Khosrau I's reign witnessed the rise of the dihqans (literally, village lords), the petty landholding nobility who were the backbone of later Sassanid provincial administration and the tax collection system.[22] Khosrau I was a great builder, embellishing his capital, founding new towns, and constructing new buildings. He rebuilt the canals and restocked the farms destroyed in the wars. He built strong fortifications at the passes and placed subject tribes in carefully chosen towns on the frontiers to act as guardians against invaders. He was tolerant of all religions, though he decreed that Zoroastrianism should be the official state religion, and was not unduly disturbed when one of his sons became a Christian.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sassanid_Empire

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
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[904a] Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.127 viewsAntoninus Pius, AD 138 to 161. Silver denarius. Sear-4053; gVF; Rome;16.4 x 17.9 mm, 3.61 g; issue of AD 138; Obverse : Head of Antoninus Pius right, with IMP T AEL CAES HADRI ANTONINVS around; Reverse : Aequitas standing left, holding scales and a cornucopiae, with AVG PIVS P M TR P COS DES II around. This is an interesting part of the Antoninus Pius series, struck in the first year of his reign, using his adoptive name of Hadrianus, and with the reverse inscription a continuation from the obverse.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Antoninus Pius (A.D. 138-161)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

Introduction
The long reign of the emperor Antoninus Pius is often described as a period of peace and quiet before the storm which followed and plagued his successor, Marcus Aurelius. In addition to the relative peacefulness, this emperor set the tone for a low-keyed imperial administration which differed markedly from those of his two immediate predecessors, Trajan and Hadrian. Antoninus managed to govern the empire capably and yet with such a gentle hand that he earned the respect, acclaim, and love of his subjects.

Early Life
The future emperor was born T. Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus on September 19, A.D. 86 at Lanuvium, an old Latin city southeast of Rome. His father's family had originally migrated to Rome from Nemausus (Nîmes) in Narbonese Gaul, but his paternal grandfather, T. Aurelius Fulvus, had served twice as Roman consul and also as city prefect and his father, Aurelius Fulvus, also held the consulship. The future emperor's mother was Arria Fadilla and her father, Arrius Antoninus, had also been consul twice. Young Antoninus was raised at Lorium, on the via Aurelia, where he later built a palace.

Career Under Hadrian
Very little is known about Antoninus' life before he became emperor. The brief biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae credited to Julius Capitolinus refers to his services as quaestor, praetor, and consul and P. von Rohden's entry in Pauly-Wissowa dates his tenure of these offices to A.D. 112, 117, and 120 respectively. At some point between A.D. 110 and 115, Antoninus married Annia Galeria Faustina, the daughter of M. Annius Verus. Hadrian later appointed Antoninus as one of his consular administrators of Italy and between A.D. 130 and 135 Antoninus served as proconsul of Asia.
Antoninus had achieved a distinguished career under Hadrian. and could have retired from imperial service with great pride, but events in A.D. 138 changed Antoninus' future quite radically. Early in the year, the death of Aelius Verus, whom Hadrian had previously adopted and named Caesar, opened a new path. Hadrian met with the Senate and announced his decision to adopt Antoninus as his son and heir and to share both proconsular and tribunician power with him. After giving this offer careful thought, Antoninus accepted and agreed in return to adopt as his heirs his wife's nephew, M. Antoninus, the future Marcus Aurelius, and L. Verus, the son of Aelius Verus.

Imperial Reign
When Hadrian died in the following summer, Antoninus oversaw the conveyance of his body from Baiae to Rome for interment in the new imperial tomb (now Castel Sant' Angelo). To honor his adoptive father, Antoninus set up a magnificent shield, established a priesthood, and, against serious opposition in the Senate, requested and bargained for senatorial confirmation of Hadrian's deification. Antoninus' devotion to Hadrian's memory is one of the reasons cited for the Senate's bestowal upon the new emperor of the name "pius". After initially refusing the Senate's recognition of Antoninus as "pater patriae", the new emperor accepted the honor with thanks. He declined, however, the Senate's decree authorizing the renaming of the months of September and October after the new emperor and empress. The Senate did honor the new empress with the title of "Augusta". On her death only a few years later in A.D. 141, the Senate deified Faustina and voted her a temple and priestesses. In memory of his wife, Antoninus also instituted an alimentary program, similar to those of his immediate predecessors, which combined loans to Italian farmers with funds, generated by interest on those loans, set aside for the care of orphaned girls. On coins these orphans are designated as puellae Faustinianae.

Antoninus returned all of Italy's share of the aurum coronarium, the money raised in honor of his accession, and one-half of that contributed from the provinces. His economic policy in general was relatively conservative and avoided luxurious waste while supporting public works of practical application. His procurators were told to keep provincial tribute reasonable and they were held accountable for exceeding fixed bounds. The provinces in general prospered under his administration and the use of informers was ended. Julius Capitolinus summarizes the excellence of Antoninus' administration when he says: "With such care did he govern all peoples under him that he looked after all things and all men as if they were his own." In spite of his caution in raising imperial revenues, however, Antoninus provided regular gifts of money to the people and to the soldiers and produced spectacular public games with a great variety of animals on display. The emperor also used his own funds to distribute oil, grain, and wine free in a time of famine and helped relieve the devastation caused in Rome by fire, flood, and a collapse of stands in the Circus Maximus and by fires and earthquakes in the provinces.

Although the reigns of his two immediate predecessors, Trajan and Hadrian, had seen prolific building activity in Rome and throughout the empire, Antoninus chose to be less lavish in his public works projects. He felt an obligation to complete work begun or promised by Hadrian. Antoninus completed the Mausoleum of Hadrian along the Tiber and built the temples of the Divine Hadrian in the Campus Martius and of Faustina in the Forum. He also restored the oldest bridge in Rome, the Pons Sublicius, the Graecostadium, and the Colosseum. He may even have put some finishing touches on the Pantheon because Julius Capitolinus mentions restoration of a templum Agrippae, but the text may be corrupt and the temple of the Divine Augustus, the restoration of which is recorded on some of Antoninus' coins, may be the intended reference here. Outside Rome, Antoninus repaired several roads and renovated ports in Alexandria, Caieta, and Terracina, a bath at Ostia, an aqueduct at Antium, and the temples in his birthplace, Lanuvium.

Although some sources suggest that Antoninus went in person to Egypt and Syria to put down a revolt of peoples along the Red Sea, Julius Capitolinus says that Antoninus made his home in Rome where he could receive messages from all parts of the empire equally quickly . He also states that to avoid burdening the provinces with the expenses of housing an emperor and his associates Antoninus took expeditions out of Rome only to his estates in Campania. If correct, these actions marked a decided break with the visibility of his two predecessors in the provinces and recreated a more Rome- and Italy-centered empire. Wilhelm Weber commented on this policy: "As if, perhaps, in criticism of Hadrian's conception of his task, he sat like a beneficent spider at the centre of his web, power radiating steadily from him to the farthest bounds of the empire and as steadily returning to him again. For the last time in Imperial history the Emperor was wholly one with Rome and its centralization."

During his third consulship (A.D. 140-144), Antoninus issued a series of unusual coins and medallions which featured entirely new or modified religious/mythological images. Jocelyn Toynbee correctly pointed out that these types were issued to prepare for the celebration of Rome's nine hundredth birthday in A.D. 147/148 and she also discussed two images which represent the emperor's reaction against Hadrian's "cosmopolitanism" and his attempt to restore Rome and Italy to a superior position over the provinces. This unusual series, issued especially in bronze, commemorated Rome's connection to her distant roots from Trojans, Latins, and Sabines and honored gods who had protected the city in the past. Themes associated with Aeneas, Romulus, Numa Pompilius, and Augustus by implication tied in Antoninus as successor to these four model Roman leaders. Although the death of Faustina may have motivated Antoninus' display of public piety to some degree on these coins and medallions, the series also set the tone for the games and rituals of the birthday celebration in 147/148, renewed religious values, and restored Rome's proper relationship with protective gods who had brought the city past success both in war and in peace. Another series of coins, the "anonymous quadrantes", combines a portrait of a god or goddess on the obverse with a reverse symbol of an animal associated with the same deity. The absence of an imperial portrait or any inscription aside from the S.C. authorization of the Senate makes it especially difficult to date this series. However, the similarity of the Jupiter and Venus portraits to images of Antoninus and Faustina and other links to Antoninus' coin-types make it probable that several of these types were issued in Antoninus' reign, perhaps again in connection with Rome's birthday celebration in A.D. 147/148.

Although Antoninus' reign was generally peaceful, Capitolinus says that he fought wars, through legates, against the Britons, Moors, Germans, Dacians, and the Alans and suppressed revolts in Achaea, in Egypt, and among the Jews. The war in Britain was fought around A.D. 142 against the Brigantes and led to the construction of the Antonine Wall across the island as a second line of defense north of Hadrian's Wall. In foreign relations, the emperor's authority was respected among peoples bordering on the empire. Antoninus approved the appointment of kings for the Armenians, for the Lazi, and for the Quadi and he successfully prevented a Parthian attack on Armenia by sending the Parthian king a letter of warning.

Antoninus did continue his predecessor's interest in law and his imperial legislation is cited frequently in Justinian's Digest. Several lawyers served in the emperor's consilium and presumably advised him on legal matters. Antoninus' legislation included protections for slaves, freedmen, and for illegitimate children and further defined family and inheritance law, including consideration of a daughter's wishes in marriage arrangements.

In preparation for the succession, Antoninus' daughter Faustina married Marcus Aurelius in A.D. 145 and she soon became Augusta in place of her deceased mother. Marcus Aurelius was associated in imperial powers and he and L. Verus both held the consulship multiple times in preparation for their accession. Antoninus made sure that he would leave the Empire secure and in sound financial condition and his adopted sons inherited a large surplus (reportedly 675 million denarii) in the Treasury .

Antoninus Pius died in March of A.D. 161, after giving the appropriate imperial watchword which so typified his reign, "equanimity". He was soon afterward deified by the Senate. His adopted sons and successors, Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, erected a column of red granite in his honor in the Campus Martius. The marble base for this column, which is preserved in the Vatican, includes a sculpted image of the apotheosis of Antoninus and Faustina. In his Meditations, Marcus Aurelius expressed his enduring love and respect for his adoptive father: "Do all things as a disciple of Antoninus. Think of his constancy in every act rationally undertaken, his invariable equability, his piety, his serenity of countenance, his sweetness of disposition, his contempt for the bubble of fame, and his zeal for getting a true grasp of affairs." In many ways Antoninus Pius was a model emperor who justifiably earned comparison with his own model, Numa Pompilius, and provided the Empire with a period of fortune, religious piety, and security perhaps unmatched in imperial annals.

Copyright (C) 1998, Richard D. Weigel.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.



Cleisthenes
AntoPiusDenar.jpg
[904z] Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.143 viewsAntoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D. Silver denarius, RIC 232, RSC 271, F, Rome, 1.699g, 17.3mm, 0o, 153 - 154 A.D. Obverse: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVII, laureate head right; Reverse: COS IIII, Fortuna standing right, cornucopia in left, long rudder on globe in right.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Antoninus Pius (A.D. 138-161)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

Introduction
The long reign of the emperor Antoninus Pius is often described as a period of peace and quiet before the storm which followed and plagued his successor, Marcus Aurelius. In addition to the relative peacefulness, this emperor set the tone for a low-keyed imperial administration which differed markedly from those of his two immediate predecessors, Trajan and Hadrian. Antoninus managed to govern the empire capably and yet with such a gentle hand that he earned the respect, acclaim, and love of his subjects.

Early Life
The future emperor was born T. Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus on September 19, A.D. 86 at Lanuvium, an old Latin city southeast of Rome. His father's family had originally migrated to Rome from Nemausus (Nîmes) in Narbonese Gaul, but his paternal grandfather, T. Aurelius Fulvus, had served twice as Roman consul and also as city prefect and his father, Aurelius Fulvus, also held the consulship. The future emperor's mother was Arria Fadilla and her father, Arrius Antoninus, had also been consul twice. Young Antoninus was raised at Lorium, on the via Aurelia, where he later built a palace.

Career Under Hadrian
Very little is known about Antoninus' life before he became emperor. The brief biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae credited to Julius Capitolinus refers to his services as quaestor, praetor, and consul and P. von Rohden's entry in Pauly-Wissowa dates his tenure of these offices to A.D. 112, 117, and 120 respectively. At some point between A.D. 110 and 115, Antoninus married Annia Galeria Faustina, the daughter of M. Annius Verus. Hadrian later appointed Antoninus as one of his consular administrators of Italy and between A.D. 130 and 135 Antoninus served as proconsul of Asia.
Antoninus had achieved a distinguished career under Hadrian. and could have retired from imperial service with great pride, but events in A.D. 138 changed Antoninus' future quite radically. Early in the year, the death of Aelius Verus, whom Hadrian had previously adopted and named Caesar, opened a new path. Hadrian met with the Senate and announced his decision to adopt Antoninus as his son and heir and to share both proconsular and tribunician power with him. After giving this offer careful thought, Antoninus accepted and agreed in return to adopt as his heirs his wife's nephew, M. Antoninus, the future Marcus Aurelius, and L. Verus, the son of Aelius Verus.

Imperial Reign
When Hadrian died in the following summer, Antoninus oversaw the conveyance of his body from Baiae to Rome for interment in the new imperial tomb (now Castel Sant' Angelo). To honor his adoptive father, Antoninus set up a magnificent shield, established a priesthood, and, against serious opposition in the Senate, requested and bargained for senatorial confirmation of Hadrian's deification. Antoninus' devotion to Hadrian's memory is one of the reasons cited for the Senate's bestowal upon the new emperor of the name "pius". After initially refusing the Senate's recognition of Antoninus as "pater patriae", the new emperor accepted the honor with thanks. He declined, however, the Senate's decree authorizing the renaming of the months of September and October after the new emperor and empress. The Senate did honor the new empress with the title of "Augusta". On her death only a few years later in A.D. 141, the Senate deified Faustina and voted her a temple and priestesses. In memory of his wife, Antoninus also instituted an alimentary program, similar to those of his immediate predecessors, which combined loans to Italian farmers with funds, generated by interest on those loans, set aside for the care of orphaned girls. On coins these orphans are designated as puellae Faustinianae.

Antoninus returned all of Italy's share of the aurum coronarium, the money raised in honor of his accession, and one-half of that contributed from the provinces. His economic policy in general was relatively conservative and avoided luxurious waste while supporting public works of practical application. His procurators were told to keep provincial tribute reasonable and they were held accountable for exceeding fixed bounds. The provinces in general prospered under his administration and the use of informers was ended. Julius Capitolinus summarizes the excellence of Antoninus' administration when he says: "With such care did he govern all peoples under him that he looked after all things and all men as if they were his own." In spite of his caution in raising imperial revenues, however, Antoninus provided regular gifts of money to the people and to the soldiers and produced spectacular public games with a great variety of animals on display. The emperor also used his own funds to distribute oil, grain, and wine free in a time of famine and helped relieve the devastation caused in Rome by fire, flood, and a collapse of stands in the Circus Maximus and by fires and earthquakes in the provinces.

Although the reigns of his two immediate predecessors, Trajan and Hadrian, had seen prolific building activity in Rome and throughout the empire, Antoninus chose to be less lavish in his public works projects. He felt an obligation to complete work begun or promised by Hadrian. Antoninus completed the Mausoleum of Hadrian along the Tiber and built the temples of the Divine Hadrian in the Campus Martius and of Faustina in the Forum. He also restored the oldest bridge in Rome, the Pons Sublicius, the Graecostadium, and the Colosseum. He may even have put some finishing touches on the Pantheon because Julius Capitolinus mentions restoration of a templum Agrippae, but the text may be corrupt and the temple of the Divine Augustus, the restoration of which is recorded on some of Antoninus' coins, may be the intended reference here. Outside Rome, Antoninus repaired several roads and renovated ports in Alexandria, Caieta, and Terracina, a bath at Ostia, an aqueduct at Antium, and the temples in his birthplace, Lanuvium.

Although some sources suggest that Antoninus went in person to Egypt and Syria to put down a revolt of peoples along the Red Sea, Julius Capitolinus says that Antoninus made his home in Rome where he could receive messages from all parts of the empire equally quickly . He also states that to avoid burdening the provinces with the expenses of housing an emperor and his associates Antoninus took expeditions out of Rome only to his estates in Campania. If correct, these actions marked a decided break with the visibility of his two predecessors in the provinces and recreated a more Rome- and Italy-centered empire. Wilhelm Weber commented on this policy: "As if, perhaps, in criticism of Hadrian's conception of his task, he sat like a beneficent spider at the centre of his web, power radiating steadily from him to the farthest bounds of the empire and as steadily returning to him again. For the last time in Imperial history the Emperor was wholly one with Rome and its centralization."

During his third consulship (A.D. 140-144), Antoninus issued a series of unusual coins and medallions which featured entirely new or modified religious/mythological images. Jocelyn Toynbee correctly pointed out that these types were issued to prepare for the celebration of Rome's nine hundredth birthday in A.D. 147/148 and she also discussed two images which represent the emperor's reaction against Hadrian's "cosmopolitanism" and his attempt to restore Rome and Italy to a superior position over the provinces. This unusual series, issued especially in bronze, commemorated Rome's connection to her distant roots from Trojans, Latins, and Sabines and honored gods who had protected the city in the past. Themes associated with Aeneas, Romulus, Numa Pompilius, and Augustus by implication tied in Antoninus as successor to these four model Roman leaders. Although the death of Faustina may have motivated Antoninus' display of public piety to some degree on these coins and medallions, the series also set the tone for the games and rituals of the birthday celebration in 147/148, renewed religious values, and restored Rome's proper relationship with protective gods who had brought the city past success both in war and in peace. Another series of coins, the "anonymous quadrantes", combines a portrait of a god or goddess on the obverse with a reverse symbol of an animal associated with the same deity. The absence of an imperial portrait or any inscription aside from the S.C. authorization of the Senate makes it especially difficult to date this series. However, the similarity of the Jupiter and Venus portraits to images of Antoninus and Faustina and other links to Antoninus' coin-types make it probable that several of these types were issued in Antoninus' reign, perhaps again in connection with Rome's birthday celebration in A.D. 147/148.

Although Antoninus' reign was generally peaceful, Capitolinus says that he fought wars, through legates, against the Britons, Moors, Germans, Dacians, and the Alans and suppressed revolts in Achaea, in Egypt, and among the Jews. The war in Britain was fought around A.D. 142 against the Brigantes and led to the construction of the Antonine Wall across the island as a second line of defense north of Hadrian's Wall. In foreign relations, the emperor's authority was respected among peoples bordering on the empire. Antoninus approved the appointment of kings for the Armenians, for the Lazi, and for the Quadi and he successfully prevented a Parthian attack on Armenia by sending the Parthian king a letter of warning.

Antoninus did continue his predecessor's interest in law and his imperial legislation is cited frequently in Justinian's Digest. Several lawyers served in the emperor's consilium and presumably advised him on legal matters. Antoninus' legislation included protections for slaves, freedmen, and for illegitimate children and further defined family and inheritance law, including consideration of a daughter's wishes in marriage arrangements.

In preparation for the succession, Antoninus' daughter Faustina married Marcus Aurelius in A.D. 145 and she soon became Augusta in place of her deceased mother. Marcus Aurelius was associated in imperial powers and he and L. Verus both held the consulship multiple times in preparation for their accession. Antoninus made sure that he would leave the Empire secure and in sound financial condition and his adopted sons inherited a large surplus (reportedly 675 million denarii) in the Treasury .

Antoninus Pius died in March of A.D. 161, after giving the appropriate imperial watchword which so typified his reign, "equanimity". He was soon afterward deified by the Senate. His adopted sons and successors, Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, erected a column of red granite in his honor in the Campus Martius. The marble base for this column, which is preserved in the Vatican, includes a sculpted image of the apotheosis of Antoninus and Faustina. In his Meditations, Marcus Aurelius expressed his enduring love and respect for his adoptive father: "Do all things as a disciple of Antoninus. Think of his constancy in every act rationally undertaken, his invariable equability, his piety, his serenity of countenance, his sweetness of disposition, his contempt for the bubble of fame, and his zeal for getting a true grasp of affairs." In many ways Antoninus Pius was a model emperor who justifiably earned comparison with his own model, Numa Pompilius, and provided the Empire with a period of fortune, religious piety, and security perhaps unmatched in imperial annals.

Copyright (C) 1998, Richard D. Weigel.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
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