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Search results - "Junior"
constantin_junior_2.jpg
19 viewsConstantine II CaesarGinolerhino
fauii503.jpg
Faustina Junior, Trajanopolis AE 20 14 viewsTrajanopolis. Faustina II AE20. FAVCTEINA CEBAC, draped bust right / TPAIANOPOLEITWN, veiled figure of Hera standing left, holding patera & sceptre, altar at her feet.
Moushmov 5003, 21 mm diam., 8.0 g
NORMAN K
00036x00~0.jpg
33 viewsFaustina Junior . Augusta, AD 147-175
PB Denarius (18mm, 2.76 g, 10 h)
Cast imitation? Copying a Rome mint issue of circa AD 161-175
Draped bust right
Diana Lucifera standing facing, head left, holding transverse torch
Cf. RIC III 674 (Pius)

Iron(?) inclusion in center of reverse
1 commentsArdatirion
3363LG.jpg
003a. Drusus136 viewsDrusus

Tiberius' son, Drusus Caesar, d. 23, called Drusus Junior, served in the provinces Pannonia ( 15) and in Illyricum ( 17? 20). In 22 he was made tribune. Meanwhile, Sejanus, Tiberius' minister, had become jealous of Drusus' power and tried to turn Tiberius against him. Drusus may have been poisoned by Sejanus or by his wife under Sejanus' influence.

As. Sear 2594, restitution issue by Titus. 10.0 g, 26x27 mm. Glossy dark green patina with slight roughness. OBV.: Drusus left, DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N. REV.: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG REST around SC.
1 commentsecoli73
faustina2sestertius.JPG
015. Faustina II AE Sestertius110 viewsAE Sestertius. Rome mint.

Obv. Draped bust right FAVSTINA AVGVSTA

Rev. Cybele seated right, lion at her side MATRI MAGNAE.

RIC1663. aEF/gVF
2 commentsLordBest
RI_052c_img.jpg
052 - Faustina Junior Denarius - RIC 25227 viewsObv:– FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust of Faustina Junior right
Rev:– CERES, Ceres, veiled, seated left on cista, holding grain ears and torch
Minted in Rome, A.D. 175
Reference:– BMCRE (Marcus) 81. RIC 669. RSC 35a

Weight 3.27g. 18.64mm.
maridvnvm
RI_052f_img.jpg
052 - Faustina Junior denarius - RIC 508d (Pius)24 viewsObv:– FAVSTINA AVGVSTA AVG P II F, Draped bust left, hair pulled back and tied in bun behind neck
Rev:– PVDICITIA, Pudicitia, veiled, standing left, sacrificing over altar
Minted in Rome, Undated. A.D. 161-164
Reference:– BMCRE Group V. 1094 (Pius) citing H. M. Treasury (Allerton Bywater Hoard, 1924). RIC III 508d (Pius, Scarce, citing BM)
maridvnvm
RI_052e_img.jpg
052 - Faustina Junior denarius - RIC 669 (Aurelius)18 viewsDenarius
Obv:– FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair pulled back and tied in bun behind neck
Rev:– CERES, Ceres seated left on chest, holding grain ears in extended right hand, short torch cradled in left arm
Minted in Rome, A.D. 161-164
Reference(s) – BMCRE 81 (Aurelius). MIR 18, 2-4b. RIC III 669 (Aurelius)
maridvnvm
RI 052b img.jpg
052 - Faustina Junior Posthumous Denarius - RIC 74738 viewsObv:– DIVA AVG FAVSTINA, Draped bust right
Rev:– CONSECRATIO, Funeral pyre; Faustina II atop, riding biga towards
Minted in Rome. A.D. 176-180
References:– Cohen 77. BMC 698. RIC 747 (Rated scarce).
maridvnvm
Faustina-Jr-RIC-74.jpg
061. Faustina Junior.11 viewsDenarius, 176-180 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA / Bust of Faustina.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO / Peacock.
3.48 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #74.
Callimachus
3290446.jpg
104. Antoninus Pius38 viewsAntoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Sestertius (31mm, 24.70 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 149. Laureate head right / Crossed cornucopias from which a grape bunch flanked by two grain ears hang, surmounted by busts of boy. RIC III 857; Banti 410. Near VF, brown patina, minor surface roughness.

From the Fairfield Collection. Ex Pegasi Auctions 25 (8 November 2011), lot 504.

The infants are thought to be T. Aelius Antoninus and T. Aurelius Antoninus, the twin sons of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior born in AD 149. These were the first male offspring of the couple, offering hope for the establishment of the new dynasty, but both died in infancy.

Ex-CNG Eauction 329 446/150/180
ecoli
Constantius1_silvered_follis.jpg
1304a, Constantius I, May 305 - 25 July 306 A.D.48 viewsSilvered follis, RIC 20a, S 3671, VM 25, gVF, Heraclea mint, 10.144g, 27.7mm, 180o, 297 - 298 A.D. Obverse: FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; Reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over shoulder, cornucopia in left, pouring liquor from patera, HTD in exergue; some silvering, nice portrait, well centered.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Constantius I Chlorus (305-306 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Constantius' Early Life and Marriage

Born March 31st, Emperor Flavius Valerius Constantius may have come into the world ca. 250. His family was from Illyricum. In the army he served as a protector, tribunus, and a praeses Dalmatiarum. During the 270s or the 280s, he became the father of Constantine by Helena, his first spouse. By 288 he was the Praetorian Prefect of the western emperor Maximianus Herculius.

Constantius' Reign as Caesar

On 1 March 293 Diocletian appointed Galerius as his Caesar (junior emperor) in the east and Constantius as the Caesar of Maximianus Herculius. Caesar in the west. Both Caesars had the right of succession. In order to strengthen the dynastic relationship between himself and Herculius., Constantius put aside his wife Helena and married Theodora, the daughter, or perhaps stepdaughter, of Maximianus Herculius.. The union was fruitful and of it there were six issue: Flavius Dalmatius, Julius Constantius, Hannibalianus, Constantia, Anastasia, and Eutropia. To strengthen his bond with Galerius and Diocletian in the east, Constantius allowed Galerius to keep his son Constantine as a hostage for his good behavior.

In the remainder of the time that he was a Caesar, Constantius spent much of his time engaged in military actions in the west. In the summer of 293 Constantius expelled the troops of the usurper Carausius from northern Gaul; after Constantius' attack on Bononia (Boulogne), Carausius was murdered. At the same time he dealt with the unrest of the Germans. In 296 he invaded Britain and put down the revolt of the usurper Allectus. Between 300 and 305 A.D. the Caesar campaigned successfully several times with various German tribes. It is worth noting in passing, that while his colleagues rigidly enforced the "Great Persecution in 303," Constantius limited his action to knocking down a few churches.

Constantius as Augustus and His Untimely Death

On 1 May 305 Diocletian, at Nicomedia, and Maximianus Herculius, at Mediolanum (Milan), divested themselves of the purple, probably because of the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian forced Maximianus to abdicate. They appointed as their successors Constantius and Galerius, with Severus and Maximinus Daia as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Constantius, as had his predecessor, ruled in the west, while Galerius and Daia ruled in the east. Almost as soon as he was appointed Augustus, he crossed to Britain to face incursions by the Picts where he died at York on 25 July 306 with his son (Constantine I, known to history as “The Great”) at his side.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
antpius sest-.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AE sestertius - struck 149 AD34 viewsobv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XII (laureate bust right)
rev: TEMPORVM FELICITAS, COS IIII in exergue, S C across field (crossed cornucopiae from which a grape bunch flanked by two grain ears hang, surmounted by busts of two boys, vis-á -vis)
ref: RIC III 857, Cohen 813 (8frcs), BMC 1825note
23.14gms, 30mm,
Rare

The infants are thought to represent T. Aelius Antoninus and T. Aurelius Antoninus, the twin sons of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior born in 149 AD. These were the first male offspring of the couple, offering hope for the establishment of the new dynasty, but both died in infancy.
The coin is before cleaning.
berserker
drusus as.jpg
14-37 AD - DRUSUS memorial AE As - struck under Tiberius (23 AD)50 viewsobv: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N (bare head left)
rev: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large S-C
ref: RIC I 45 (Tiberius), C.2 (2frcs)
10.14gms, 29mm

Drusus (also called Drusus Junior or Drusus the Younger), the only son of Tiberius, became heir to the throne after the death of Germanicus. One of his famous act connected to the mutiny in Pannonia, what broke out when the death of Augustus (19 August 14) was made known. Drusus left Rome to deal with the mutiny before the session of the Senate on the 17 September, when Tiberius was formally adopted him as princeps. He have reached the military camp in Pannonia in the time for the eclipse of the moon in the early hours of the 27 September wich so daunted the mutineers. He was also governor of Illyricum from 17 to 20 AD. Ancient sources concur that Livilla, his wife poisoned him.
berserker
U809F1JMXNTCBT.jpg
1407a, Constantius II, 337-361 A.D. (Antioch)51 viewsAE4, 337-361 A.D. Antioch, aVF/VF,Obv:– DN CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl and rosette diadem, head right/R: Wreath with VOT XX MVLT XXX, SMANB in exe.RIC VIII Antioch 113,Item ref: RI170b.

AE3, 2.80 grams, 330-333, Heraclea, aVF. Obv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C - Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed. R: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS - Two soldiers looking in at each other and both holding a spear; between them, two standards Exe: SMHB.

Constantius II was born in Illyricum in August AD 317, the son of Constantine the Great and Fausta, and was proclaimed Caesar in AD 323.

In AD 337, at the death of his father Constantine, he acceded to the throne together with his two brothers Constantine II and Constans. But this accession by the three brothers was tainted by the murder of their cousins Dalmatius and Hannibalianus, whom Constantine had also intended as joint heirs. These murders are believed to have been masterminded by Constantius II.

Eventually, Constantius II was left as the sole emperor of the Roman empire. Constantius elevated his cousin, Julian, to the rank of Caesar (junior emperor) and gave him his sister Helena in marriage. Julian was assigned the task of dealing with the Frankish leader, Silvanus, who had proclaimed himself emepror at Colonia Agrippina. Julian's success led his men to declare him Augustus. Julian, while reluctant to take the throne, accepted.

Constantius II, therefore, left the Mesopotamian frontier and marched his troops west, seeking to deal with the usurper. As he reached Cilicia in the winter of AD 361, he was overcome by a sudden fever and died at Mopsucrene. Julian, the Apostate, succeded him as Emperor.

Our chief source for Constantius' reign is the great historian Ammianus Marcellinus. He presents a mixed view of that emperor. In some ways a sound administrator and competent general, Constantius is also portrayed as easily influenced by those around him such as his wives, courtiers and the eunuchs of the court (Ammianus 21. 16. 16). Ammianus (21.16.18) also attacks Constantius' great interest in Church affairs--alleging that he bankrupted the courier service with calls for Church councils. Of course, imperial interest in Church affairs was a major policy of his father Constantine and it may be that Constantius was trying to emulate his model (if only with mixed success). Indeed, Constantius II (like his brothers Constantine II and Constans) was raised a Christian. Among his many laws is the famous CTh 16.10.2 of 341 which either prohibited or re-issued his father's prohibition of pagan sacrifices. Sympathetic to Arianism, he spent a great deal of his reign calling Church councils. One of the longest-reigned emperors in Roman history, Constantius is hard for the modern historian to fully understand both due to his own actions and due to the interests of the authors of primary sources for his reign.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University & Robert Frakes, Clarion University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

1 commentsCleisthenes
Cnstntius2b.jpg
1407h, Constantius II, 337-361 A.D. (Heraclea)32 viewsConstantius II 337-361 A.D. AE3, 2.80 grams, 330-333, Heraclea, aVF. Obverse: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C - Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed; Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS - Two soldiers looking in at each other and both holding a spear; between them, two standards; SMHB in exergue.

Constantius II was born in Illyricum in August AD 317, the son of Constantine the Great and Fausta, and was proclaimed Caesar in AD 323.

In AD 337, at the death of his father Constantine, he acceded to the throne together with his two brothers Constantine II and Constans. But this accession by the three brothers was tainted by the murder of their cousins Dalmatius and Hannibalianus, whom Constantine had also intended as joint heirs. These murders are believed to have been masterminded by Constantius II.

Eventually, Constantius II was left as the sole emperor of the Roman empire. Constantius elevated his cousin, Julian, to the rank of Caesar (junior emperor) and gave him his sister Helena in marriage. Julian was assigned the task of dealing with the Frankish leader, Silvanus, who had proclaimed himself emepror at Colonia Agrippina. Julian's success led his men to declare him Augustus. Julian, while reluctant to take the throne, accepted.

Constantius II, therefore, left the Mesopotamian frontier and marched his troops west, seeking to deal with the usurper. As he reached Cilicia in the winter of AD 361, he was overcome by a sudden fever and died at Mopsucrene. Julian, the Apostate, succeded him as Emperor.

Our chief source for Constantius' reign is the great historian Ammianus Marcellinus. He presents a mixed view of that emperor. In some ways a sound administrator and competent general, Constantius is also portrayed as easily influenced by those around him such as his wives, courtiers and the eunuchs of the court (Ammianus 21. 16. 16). Ammianus (21.16.18) also attacks Constantius' great interest in Church affairs--alleging that he bankrupted the courier service with calls for Church councils. Of course, imperial interest in Church affairs was a major policy of his father Constantine and it may be that Constantius was trying to emulate his model (if only with mixed success). Indeed, Constantius II (like his brothers Constantine II and Constans) was raised a Christian. Among his many laws is the famous CTh 16.10.2 of 341 which either prohibited or re-issued his father's prohibition of pagan sacrifices. Sympathetic to Arianism, he spent a great deal of his reign calling Church councils. One of the longest-reigned emperors in Roman history, Constantius is hard for the modern historian to fully understand both due to his own actions and due to the interests of the authors of primary sources for his reign.
By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University & Robert Frakes, Clarion University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Constantius II.jpg
1407r, Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.39 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 272, aVF, 2.203g, 18.1mm, 0o, Rome mint, 352 - 355 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman, RT in ex.

Constantius II was born in Illyricum in August AD 317, the son of Constantine the Great and Fausta, and was proclaimed Caesar in AD 323.

In AD 337, at the death of his father Constantine, he acceded to the throne together with his two brothers Constantine II and Constans. But this accession by the three brothers was tainted by the murder of their cousins Dalmatius and Hannibalianus, whom Constantine had also intended as joint heirs. These murders are believed to have been masterminded by Constantius II.

Eventually, Constantius II was left as the sole emperor of the Roman empire. Constantius elevated Julian to the rank of Caesar (junior emperor) and gave him his sister Helena in marriage. Julian was assigned the task of dealing with the Frankish leader, Silvanus, who had proclaimed himself emepror at Colonia Agrippina. Julian's success lead his men to declare him Augustus. Julian, while reluctant to take the throne, accepted.

Constantius II, therefore left the Mesopotamian frontier and marched his troops west, seeking to deal with the usurper. As he reached Cilicia in the winter of AD 361, he was overcome by a sudden fever and died at Mopsucrene. Julian, the Apostate, succeded him as Emperor.

Our chief source for Constantius' reign is the great historian Ammianus Marcellinus. He presents a mixed view of that emperor. In some ways a sound administrator and competent general, Constantius is also portrayed as easily influenced by those around him such as his wives, courtiers and the eunuchs of the court (Ammianus 21. 16. 16). Ammianus (21.16.18) also attacks Constantius' great interest in Church affairs--alleging that he bankrupted the courier service with calls for Church councils. Of course, imperial interest in Church affairs was a major policy of his father Constantine and it may be that Constantius was trying to emulate his model (if only with mixed success). Indeed, Constantius II (like his brothers Constantine II and Constans) was raised a Christian. Among his many laws is the famous CTh 16.10.2 of 341 which either prohibited or re-issued his father's prohibition of pagan sacrifices. Sympathetic to Arianism, he spent a great deal of his reign calling Church councils. One of the longest-reigned emperors in Roman history, Constantius is hard for the modern historian to fully understand both due to his own actions and due to the interests of the authors of primary sources for his reign.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University & Robert Frakes, Clarion University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.



Cleisthenes
faustinaII as.jpg
145-161 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AE dupondius - struck 145-46 AD45 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: PIETAS / S.C. (Pietas standing left, holding cornucopiae, child -Lucilla?- at her feet left)
ref: RIC III 1402 (Ant.Pius), Cohen 174, BMC 2189
mint: Rome
8.42gms, 26mm

This coin was struck after her wedding with Aurelius Caesar.
berserker
faustina2 RIC497(AntPius).jpg
145-161 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AR denarius - struck 157-161 AD31 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: AVGVSTI P II FIL (Spes, draped, standing left, holding flower & gathering up fold of skirt)
ref: RIC III 497 (AntPius), C.24
3.07gms, 18mm
Scarce
berserker
faustina2 RIC502(AntPius).jpg
145-161 AD - FAUSTINA Junior fouree denarius - struck 153-154 AD33 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVG P II F (draped bust right)
rev: CONCORDIA (Concordia seated left, holding flower & resting left arm on cornucopiae set on globe below seat)
ref: RIC III 502a (Ant.Pius), C.54 (6frcs)
3.45gms, 18mm
berserker
faustinaII sest-RIC1387(AntPius).jpg
145-161 AD - FAUSTINA Junior molded sestertius - struck 145-161 AD 39 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVG P II AVG (draped bust right)
rev: VENVS / S.C. (Venus holding an apple & cornucopiae)
ref: not in RIC, similar to RIC III 1387 (Ant.Pius)
30.86gms, 33mm

The molded roman AE coins usually called 'Limes falsa' coins, because they were produced on the fringes of the Empire. 'Limes falsa' are immitations of bronze denominations like As, Dupondius or Sestertius.
This sestertius was used in Pannonia Inferior (here was found).
berserker
FaustJrMoush2529.jpg
146-175/6 AD - Faustina Jr. - Moushmov 2529 - Concordia Reverse72 viewsEmpress: Faustina Jr. (r. 146-175/6 AD)
Date: 146-175/6 AD
Condition: aFine
Size: AE22

Obverse: ΦAΥCTEINA CEBACTN
Faustina Augusta
Bust right

Reverse: AΔΡIANOΠ - OΛEITΩN
Concordia standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae.

Mint: Hadrianopolis, Thrace
Moushmov 2529
4.80g; 22.5mm; 210°
Pep
FaustJrMoush2984.jpg
146-175/6 AD - Faustina Jr. - Moushmov 2984 - Standing Woman Reverse82 viewsEmpress: Faustina Junior (r. 146-175/6 AD)
Date: 146-175/6 AD
Condition: Fine
Size: AE25

Obverse: ΦAYCTEINA CEBACTH
Faustina Augusta
Bust right

Reverse: AYΓOYCTHC TPAIANHC
Woman with turreted crown standing, holding in right hand patera and in left hand - scepter.
Mint: Augusta Traiana, Thrace

Moushmov 2984
8.76g; 25.9mm; 30°
Pep
lucilla sestertius.jpg
161-169 AD - LUCILLA AE sestertius48 viewsobv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: FECVNDITAS / S.C. (Fecunditas - or Lucilla seated right, nursing child in arms, two children at feet)
ref: RIC III 1736 (M.Aurelius), Cohen 21, BMC 1197
22.42g, 26-28mm
Scarce

Annia Lucilla, daughter of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior, wife of Lucius Verus. She conspired against Commodus, by whom she was exiled to Capreae, where she was put to death (perhaps together Crispina in 183 AD).
berserker
faustinaII dup.jpg
161-176 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AE dupondius or as - struck 161-176 AD43 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA (diademed bust right)
rev: VE-NVS (Venus standing facing, head right, drawing back cloak with right hand over right shoulder and holding apple in extended left hand), S-C across field
ref: reverse RIC III 1770 (Marcus Aurelius)
11.38gms, 26mm
Rare - not in RIC

A nice hybrid Dupondius or orichalcum As with Faustina Junior obverse and Lucilla reverse. Thanks to Rupert for identify.
berserker
faustinaII sest.jpg
161-176 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AE sestertius - struck 161-176 AD26 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA (bust right with circlet of pearls )
rev: IVNO / S.C. (Juno standing left holding patera & scepter, peacock at foot)
ref: RIC III 1645 (M.Aurelius), C.121(8fr.)
21.31gms, 33mm
berserker
faustinaII sest2.jpg
161-176 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AE sestertius - struck 161-176 AD31 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA (draped bust right wearing circlet of pearls)
rev: IVNONI REGINAE (Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera & scepter; peacock standing left at feet, head reverted), S-C in field
ref: RIC III 1651 (M.Aurelius), Cohen 142, BMC 919
22.51gms, 29mm
berserker
faustina2 RIC744(M.Aurelius).jpg
161-176 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AR denarius - struck 176-180 AD27 viewsobv: DIVA FAV-STINA PIA (draped bust right)
rev: CONSEC-RATIO (peacock standing right)
ref: RIC III 744 (M.Aurelius), C.71
3.12gms, 18mm

History: Faustina junior accompanied her husband, Aurelius on his journey to the east in 175, and died at Halala, a village at the foot of the Taurus Mountains.
berserker
faustina2 RIC745(M.Aurelius).jpg
161-176 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AR denarius - struck 176-180 AD27 viewsobv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA (draped bust right)
rev: CONSECRATIO (throne with scepter across it, peacock below & standing right)
ref: RIC III 745 (M.Aurelius), RSC 73 (3frcs) , BMC 723
2.10gms, 18mm
Scarcer type
berserker
faustinaII RIC1706.jpg
161-176 AD - FAUSTINA Junior sestertius - struck 176-180 AD25 viewsobv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA (draped bust right)
rev: CONSECRATIO (large altar decorated with palms), S-C in field
ref: RIC III 1706 (M.Aurelius), Cohen 76 (10frcs), BMC 1579
21.31gms, 29mm
Scarce
berserker
rjb_2009_10_01.jpg
161a18 viewsFaustina junior
AE sestertius
Obv "FAVSTINA AVGVSTA"
Diademed and draped bust right
Rev "FECVNDITAS SC"
Fecunditas standing right holding staff and child
Rome mint
RIC 1638
mauseus
rjb_fjun2_08_06.jpg
161a16 viewsFaustina Junior
AE 22 mm
Ephesus in Ionia
Rev Nike walking left
mauseus
rjb_fjun1_08_06.jpg
161a19 viewsFaustina junior
AR denarius
Obv "FAVSTINA AVGVSTA"
Diademed and draped bust right
Rev "IVNONI REGINAE"
Juno seated left, peacock at feet
Rome mint
RIC 698
mauseus
rjb_2011_09_05.jpg
161a51 viewsFaustina junior
AE as
Obv "FAVSTINA AVGVSTA"
Diademed and draped bust right
Rev "LAETITIA SC"
Laetitia standing left holding staff and wreath
Rome mint
RIC 1656
2 commentsmauseus
rjb_2014_08_02_ric686.jpg
161a23 viewsFaustina junior
AR denarius
Obv "FAVSTINA AVGVSTA"
Draped bust right
Rev "HILARITAS"
Hilaritas standing left holding branch and cornucopia
Rome mint
RIC 686
mauseus
rjb_2017_07_s20a.jpg
161a8 viewsFaustina II (“Junior”)
Sestertius
Rome mint
Obv: FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL
Draped bust left
Rev: VENVS SC
Venus standing left holding apple and sceptre
BMC 2185 note, citing Hess, Lucerne, 15 Feb. 1934, lot 698 (same obv. die, different rev. die).
Strack 1322, citing Hess Lucerne 211, 9 May 1932, lot 1014, which is the same coin as the one in their 1934 sale cited by BMC.
1 commentsmauseus
FaustinaJR.jpg
17a Faustina Junior RIC 49612 viewsFaustina Junior. Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D. AR Denarius. Struck under Antoninus Pius. Wife of Marcus Aurelius (2.77g; 17.41mm) Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right. Rev: AVGVSTI PII FIL, Concordia standing left holding patera and cornucopia.
RIC 496; RSC 21
Paddy
17s-Constantine-II-Her-020.jpg
17s. Constantine II: Heraclea.23 viewsAE3, 317, Heraclea mint.
Obverse: D N FL CL CONSTANTINVS NOB C / Laureate bust of Constantine II, facing left, hilding globe, sceptre, and mappa.
Reverse: PROVIDENTIAE CAESS / Campgate with three turrets.
Mint mark: MHTE
3.03 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #20; PBCC #951; Sear #17140.

This coin has many small flecks of silver across it surfaces which are apparently all that is left of the original silvering. The very small bust is characteristic of the mints at Heraclea, Cyzicus, and Nicomedia where it was used from time to time with the junior caesars.
Callimachus
George_5_H_Penny_1912.JPG
1912 "H" GEORGE V "Large head" AE Penny7 viewsObverse: GEORGIVS V DEI GRA:BRITT:OMN:REX FID:DEF:IND:IMP: . Bare head of George V facing left.
Reverse: ONE PENNY. Britannia seated facing right, right hand resting on shield, left hand holding trident; 1912 and small "H" (for Heaton) in exergue.
SPINK: 4052
SCARCE

George V's portrait was designed by Bertram Mackennal (1863 - 1931), this is marked by a small "BM" on the King's neck.

The Heaton Mint in Birmingham was founded in 1850 by Ralph Heaton Junior using second-hand equipment purchased from Matthew Boulton's old Soho Mint. Ralph Heaton pioneered the modern mill striking of bronze coins, and in 1860 he was contracted by the Royal Mint to assist it in striking Britain's new bronze penny, half-penny and farthing issues. The Birmingham Mint continued striking these bronze issues for the Royal Mint off and on until the 1880s.
In 1912, the Royal Mint once again subcontracted the Birmingham Mint to strike enough British pennies to meet the demand, and those pennies carry a small 'H' (for Heaton) mintmark to the left of the date on the reverse. During the First World War, the Birmingham Mint was employed in other aspects of metalwork, producing brass and copper tubing for bullets and artillery rounds, but was again contracted to strike more Heaton pennies in 1918 and 1919.
*Alex
AgrippinaObol.jpg
1aq Agrippina junior31 viewsMarried Claudius 49 AD

Diobol of Alexandria

Draped bust right, wreathed with corn, hair bound in plait behind, AGRIPPEINA CЄBACTH
Draped bust of Euthenia right, wreathed with corn, holding ears of corn, ЄYQH-NIA across fields, L-IB below

Milne 124

Agrippina the Younger, Julia Agrippina, or Agrippinilla (Little Agrippina) after 50 AD known as Julia Augusta Agrippina (c16 AD –59) was sister of Caligula, niece and fourth wife of Claudius and the mother of Nero. In 28, Tiberius arranged for Agrippina to marry her paternal second cousin Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus. Their only son was named Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, after Domitius’s recently deceased father. This child would become the Emperor Nero. In 39, Agrippina and her sister Livilla, with their maternal cousin, Drusilla’s widower, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, were involved in a failed plot to murder Caligula, and make Lepidus emperor. Lepidus was executed. Agrippina and Livilla were exiled by their brother to the Pontine Islands.

Suetonius says, "But it was Agrippina the Younger, his brother Germanicus’s daughter, who ensnared him, assisted by a niece’s privilege of exchanging kisses and endearments. At the next Senate meeting, he primed a group of Senators to propose that he ought to marry Agrippina, as it was in the public interest, and that such marriages between uncle and niece should from then on be regarded as lawful, and no longer incestuous. He married her (AD 49) with barely a day’s delay, but only one freedman and one leading centurion married their respective nieces, to follow suit. Claudius himself, with Agrippina, attended the centurion’s wedding."

The Euthenia reverse reminds one of "euthanasia." which is what some suspect she did to Claudius to elevate her son Nero to the purple.
Blindado
FaustinaIIAsJuno.jpg
1bk Faustina Junior147 viewsWife of Marcus Aurelius. 131-176

As
Draped bust, left, FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL
Juno seated left holding the three graces and scepter, peacock at feet, IVNO SC

The daughter of Antoninus Pius, wife of Aurelius, and mother of Commodus, Faustina had a box seat to witness the end of the Golden Age. She bore Aurelius at least 13 children and accompanied him on his military campaigns, yet years later had her reputation impuned for alleged adultery.

The reverse is RIC 1400, for which only right-facing busts are listed.

From Curtis Clay: "This is a rev. type that used to be very rare, even with bust right, but quite a few specimens have emerged from Bulgaria since the fall of the Iron Curtain.

I had a specimen with bust left myself, acquired from Baldwin's c. 1970, which is now in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

A VF specimen with bust left, from the same dies as yours, was in CNG E54, 4 Dec. 2002, 145 = CNG 57, 4 April 2001, 1292.

Still an interesting and scarce reverse type, and rare with bust left, a variety that is hard to find on any Roman coin of Faustina II !" Thank you, Curtis!
Blindado
LucillaSestVenus.jpg
1bm Lucilla164 viewsWife of Lucius Verus, executed 182 AD

Sestertius
Draped bust, right, LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Venus standing facing left holding apple, drawing out robe, VENUS

RIC 1767

Daughter of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior, she married Lucius Verus in 164.

According to Herodian: For the present, however, the memory of his father and his respect for his advisers held Commodus in check. But then a disastrous stroke of ill fortune completely altered his previously mild, moderate disposition. It happened this way. The oldest of the emperor's sisters was Lucilla. She had formerly been married to Lucius Verus Caesar. . . . But after Lucius died, Lucilla, who retained all the privileges of her imperial position, was married by her father to Pompeianus.

Commodus, too, allowed his sister to retain the imperial honors; she continued to occupy the imperial seat at the theaters, and the sacred fire was carried before her. But when Commodus married Crispina, custom demanded that the front seat at the theater be assigned to the empress. Lucilla found this difficult to endure, and felt that any honor paid to the empress was an insult to her; but since she was well aware that her husband Pompeianus was devoted to Commodus, she told him nothing about her plans to seize control of the empire. Instead, she tested the sentiments of a wealthy young nobleman, Quadratus, with whom she was rumored to be sleeping in secret. Complaining constantly about this matter of imperial precedence, she soon persuaded the young man to set in motion a plot which brought destruction upon himself and the entire senate.

Quadratus, in selecting confederates among the prominent senators, prevailed upon Quintianus, a bold and reckless young senator, to conceal a dagger beneath his robe and, watching for a suitable time and place, to stab Commodus; as for the rest, he assured Quintianus that he would set matters straight by bribes.

But the assassin, standing in the entrance to the amphitheater (it was dark there and he hoped to escape detection), drew his dagger and shouted at Commodus that he had been sent by the Senate to kill him. Quintianus wasted time making his little speech and waving his dagger; as a result, he was seized by the emperor's bodyguards before he could strike, and died for his stupidity in revealing the plot prematurely.

This was the initial reason for the young emperor's hatred of the Senate. He took Quintianus' words to heart and, ever mindful of what his attacker had said, now considered the entire Senate his collective enemy.

This incident also gave Perennis sufficient excuse for taking action, for he was always advising the emperor to eliminate and destroy the prominent men. By confiscating their property, Perennis easily made himself the richest man of his time. After the attempt at assassination had been thoroughly investigated by the prefect, Commodus without mercy put to death his sister, all those actually involved in the plot, and any who were under the slightest suspicion as well.
3 commentsBlindado
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309. Gallienus33 viewsOne of the key characteristics of the Crisis of the Third Century was the inability of the Emperors to maintain their hold on the Imperium for any marked length of time. An exception to this rule was the reign of the Emperor Gallienus. The fact that Gallienus served as junior Emperor with his father, Valerian, from 253 to 260 may have had something to do with his successes. Father and son each wielded his authority over a smaller area, thus allowing for more flexible control and imperial presence. Another, more probable reason, lay in Gallienus's success in convincing Rome that he was the best man for the job. However, Gallienus had to handle many rebellions of the so-called "Gallienus usurpers".

In 260, Valerian was taken prisoner by Sapor, King of Persia while trying to negotiate a peace settlement. Although aware that his father had been taken alive (the only Emperor to have suffered this fate), Gallienus did not make public Valerian's death until a year later. His decision hinged on the fact that Romans believed that their fate rose and fell with the fate of the Emperor, which in turn depended upon his demonstrating the proper amount of piety (Latin pietas) to the gods and maintaining their favor. A defeated Emperor would surely have meant that the gods had forsaken Valerian and, by extension, Gallienus.

Gallienus's chief method of reinforcing his position is seen in the coinage produced during his reign (see Roman currency). The coinage provides clear evidence of a successful propaganda campaign. Gallienus took pains to make sure that he was regularly represented as victorious, merciful, and pious. The people who used these coins on a daily basis saw these messages and, with little evidence to the contrary, remained supportive of their Emperor.

There were, however, those who knew better. During Gallienus' reign, there was constant fighting on the western fringes of the Empire. As early as 258, Gallienus had lost control over a large part of Gaul, where another general, Postumus, had declared his own realm (typically known today as the Gallic Empire). As Gallienus' influence waned, another general came to the fore. In time-honored tradition, Claudius II Gothicus gained the loyalty of the army and succeeded Gallienus to the Imperium.

In the months leading up to his mysterious death in September of 268, Gallienus was ironically orchestrating the greatest achievements of his reign. An invasion of Goths into the province of Pannonia was leading to disaster and even threatening Rome, while at the same time, the Alamanni were raising havoc in the northern part of Italy. Gallienus halted the Allamanic progress by defeating them in battle in April of 268, then turned north and won several victories over the Goths. That fall, he turned on the Goths once again, and in September, either he or Claudius, his leading general, led the Roman army to victory (although the cavalry commander Aurelian was the real victor) at the Battle of Naissus.

At some time following this battle, Gallienus was murdered during the siege of usurper Aureolus in Mediolanum; many theories abound that Claudius and Aurelian conspired to have the emperor killed. Be that as it may, Claudius spared the lives of Gallienus' family — Gallienus' wife, Iulia Cornelia Salonina, had given him three sons: Valerianus (who died in 258), Saloninus (died in 260 after becoming co-emperor), and Egnatius Marinianus — and had the emperor deified.

Gallienus Antoninianus - Minerva
OBVERSE: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right
REVERSE: MINERVA AVG, Minerva standing right with spear and shield.
23mm - 3.7 grams
ecoli
RIC_438_Denario_Antonino_Pio.jpg
31-08a - ANTONINO PIO (138 - 161 D.C)20 viewsAcuñación realizada por Marco Aurelio y Lucio Vero en honor de Antonino Pío Divo.
Ar denario 19 mm 3.1 gr.

Anv: "DIVUS ANTONINVS” – Cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha, con ropajes en su hombro izquierdo.
Rev: "CONSECRATIO" – Crematorium piramidal de 4 pisos, con la base enguirnaldada, la puerta en segundo nivel, el ápice coronado por una cuadriga vista de frente.
El Crematorium construido por Antonino Pio ya había aparecido dos décadas antes en la acuñación póstuma de su esposa, Faustina Senior. Sus restos se han descubierto cerca de la Plaza Montecitorio, el oeste del corso, en Regio IX. La estructura similar mostrada en el 169 D.C. y 176 D.C. en la acuñación de Divo Lucio Vero y Diva Faustina Junior puede representar este mismo edificio, aunque más probablemente parece que estos reversos representarían el Crematorium de Marco Aurelio que aparecería más tarde en su propia acuñación póstuma emitida por Commodo (Sear).

Ceca: Roma - Italia
Acuñada: 161 D.C.
Rareza: Común

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #438 Pag.247 - DVM #135 Pag.141 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5193 Pag.335 – BMCRE IV #60/3 Pag.394 –RSC Vol. II #164ª Pag.171 - Cohen Vol.II #164 var. Pag.288 – MIR Vol.18 #27
mdelvalle
Denario_Antonino_Pio_RIC_438.jpg
31-09 – ANTONINO PIO (138 – 161 D.C)70 viewsAcuñación realizada por Marco Aurelio y Lucio Vero en honor de Antonino Pío Divo.
Ar denario 19 mm 3.1 gr.

Anv: "DIVUS ANTONINVS” – Cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha, con ropajes en su hombro izquierdo.
Rev: "CONSECRATIO" – Crematorium piramidal de 4 pisos, con la base enguirnaldada, la puerta en segundo nivel, el ápice coronado por una cuadriga vista de frente.
El Crematorium construido por Antonino Pio ya había aparecido dos décadas antes en la acuñación póstuma de su esposa, Faustina Senior. Sus restos se han descubierto cerca de la Plaza Montecitorio, el oeste del corso, en Regio IX. La estructura similar mostrada en el 169 D.C. y 176 D.C. en la acuñación de Divo Lucio Vero y Diva Faustina Junior puede representar este mismo edificio, aunque más probablemente parece que estos reversos representarían el Crematorium de Marco Aurelio que aparecería más tarde en su propia acuñación póstuma emitida por Commodo (Sear).

Ceca: Roma - Italia
Acuñada: 161 D.C.
Rareza: Común

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #438 Pag.247 - DVM #135 Pag.141 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5193 Pag.335 – BMCRE Vol.4 #60 –RSC Vol. II #164ª Pag.171 - Cohen Vol.II #164 var. Pag.288 – MIR Vol.18 #27
1 commentsmdelvalle
coin254.JPG
313. Tetricus I27 viewsCaius Pius Esuvius Tetricus was emperor of the Gallic Empire from 270/271 to 273, following the murder of Victorinus. Tetricus, who ruled with his son, Tetricus II, was the last of the Gallic Emperors.

Tetricus was born to a noble family and held the administrative rank of praeses provinciae (provincial governor) of Aquitania at the time of Victorinus' death. Victorinus' mother, Victoria, paid the army heavily to declare Tetricus emperor near Burdigalia (Bordeaux, France), which was approved in Gaul and Britain. Following his appointment, Tetricus repelled Germanic tribes that took advantage of the confusion following the death of Victorinus to invade.

Tetricus installed his capital at Augusta Treverorum (present Trier, Germany, near the vital Rhine border, hence later seat of a Tetrarch) and appointed his son, Tetricus II, Caesar, i.e. junior emperor (273). Tetricus made no attempts to expand the Gallic Empire, other than southward, regaining Aquitania (which had rejoined the Roman empire during the reign of Claudius Gothicus).

In 273, Emperor Aurelian set out to reconquer the western Roman empire, following his victories in the east. Tetricus took his army southward from Trier to meet Aurelian, who was advancing into northern Gaul. The decisive battle took place near Châlons-sur-Marne, where Tetricus and his son surrendered to Aurelian.

According to literary sources, after being displayed as trophies at Aurelian's triumph in Rome, the lives of Tetricus and his son were spared by Aurelian and Tetricus was even given the title of corrector Lucaniae et Bruttiorum, that is governor of a region of Italia. Tetricus died at an unknown date living in Italy; he is listed as one of Rome's Thirty Tyrants in the Historia Augusta.
ecoli
ConIIVIIConst138.jpg
316-337 AD - Constantine II as Caesar - RIC VII Constantinople 138 - GLORIA EXERCITVS30 viewsCaesar: Constantine II (Caes. 316-337 AD)
Date: 336-337 AD
Condition: Fair/Fine
Size: AE4

Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
Constantine Junior Noble Caesar
Bust right; laureate and cuirassed

Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
Glory of the Army.
Two soldiers standing and facing one another, spear in outer hand, inner hand on shield resting on ground, one standard between them.
Exergue: CONS? (Constantinople mint, unknown officina)

RIC VII Constantinople 138; VM 46
1.13g; 15.8mm; 15°
Pep
ConIIVIICyz52.jpg
316-337 AD - Constantine II as Caesar - RIC VII Cyzicus 052 - PROVIDENTIAE CAESS22 viewsCaesar: Constantine II (Caes: 316-337 AD)
Date: 327-328 AD
Condition: Fine
Size: AE3

Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
Constantine Junior Noble Caesar
Bust left; laureate, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: PROVIDEN-TIAE CAESS
The Caesars have foresight.
Camp gate, two turrets, no doors, star above, nine stone layers.

"●" in left field
Exergue: SMKΔ (Cyzicus mint, fourth officina)

RIC VII Cyzicus 52; VM 38
3.15g; 19.3mm; 0°
Pep
ConIIVIISis220_2.jpg
316-337 AD - Constantine II as Caesar - RIC VII Siscia 220 - GLORIA EXERCITVS - 2nd Example32 viewsCaesar: Constantine II (Caes. 316-337 AD)
Date: 330-333 AD
Condition: Fine
Size: AE3

Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
Constantine Junior Noble Caesar
Bust right; laureate and cuirassed

Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
Glory of the Army.
Two soldiers standing and facing one another, spear in outer hand, inner hand on shield resting on ground, two standards between them.
Exergue: ESIS (Siscia mint, fifth officina)

RIC VII Siscia 220; VM 45
1.77g; 18.6mm; 195°
Pep
ConIIVIIThes128.jpg
316-337 AD - Constantine II as Caesar - RIC VII Thessalonica 128 - CAESARVM NOSTRORVM31 viewsCaesar: Constantine II (Caes. 316-337 AD)
Date: 324 AD
Condition: Fair
Size: AE3

Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
Constantine Junior Noble Caesar
Bust left; laureate, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM
Laurel wreath enclosing VOT / X.
The Prince of our people offers vows so that he may serve for a prosperous ten years.
Exergue: TSBVI (Thessalonica mint, second officina)

RIC VII Thessalonica 128; VM 32
2.66g; 18.9mm; 345°
Pep
coin398.JPG
322. Numerian30 viewsMarcus Aurelius Numerius Numerianus was the younger son of the later emperor Carus, born in about AD 253.
Numerian and his elder brother Carinus were raised to the rank of Caesar in AD 282, soon after their father became emperor.

In AD 282 Numerian accompanied his father to the Danube to defeat the Sarmatians and the Quadi.
Then in December AD 282 or January AD 283 Carus took Numerian with him on his expedition against the Persians to re-conquer Mesopotamia. Meanwhile Carinus stayed in Rome to rule the west.

When Carus died, Numerian succeeded him, thereby becoming joint emperor with his brother Carinus who had been granted the rank of Augustus shortly before Carus' death.

At first, immediately after his father's death, Numerian sought to continue the Persian campaign.
Apparently this was much favoured by Arrius Aper, the prefect of the praetorians and suspect in Carus' death. Conditions for war were favourable. The Persian side was still thought to be weak. But Numerian's initial efforts were not followed by success.
Numerian was to all effect appeared more of an intellectual than a man of war. He wrote poetry, some of which won him critical acclaim in his day.
This lack of ruthless military talent might well have been the reason why Carinus alone had been promoted Augustus, while Numerian remained Caeasar (junior emperor).
And so, after these initial setbacks, Numerian decided it unwise to continue the war.
He sought instead to return back to Rome and the army was not displeased to pull back into Syria were it spent the winter of AD 283.
Thereafter the army set out on its march back west through Asia Minor (Turkey).
Numerian fell ill near Nicomedia, suffering from an eye disease, which he might have caught while still on campaign in Mesopotamia with his father. The illness was explained with severe exhaustion (Today it is believed this was a serious eye infection. This left him partly blind and he had to be carried in a litter.

Somewhere at this time it is believed Arrius Aper, Numerian's own father in-law, had him killed. It;s widely believed that Aper hoped that it would be assumed that Numerian had simply succumbed to his illness and that he, the praetorian prefect, would succeed to the throne in his place.
But why he should have kept up the charade that Numerian was still alive remains a mystery. Perhaps he was waiting for he right moment.
For several days the death went unnoticed, the litter being carried along as usual. Soldiers inquired about their emperor's health and were reassured by Aper, that all was well and that Numerian simply was too ill to appear in public.

Eventually though the stench of the corpse became too much. Numerian's death was revealed and the soldiers realized that Rome had lost yet another emperor (AD 284).

Had it been Aper who hoped to fill the vacancy, then it was Diocletian (still known as Diocles at the time), commander of the imperial bodyguard, who emerged the victor. It was Diocletian who was made emperor by the troops after Numerian's death. It was he who sentenced Aper to death and even executed the sentence himself. Therefore it was he who, benefited most from the deaths of Carus and Numerian. And in his role as body guard he held a key position, enabling him to prevent or enable any action against the emperor. Hence it is unlikely that Diocletian did not have anything to do with the murder of Numerian.

Numerian Antoninianus / Numerian with globe and spear

Attribution: RIC 361
Date: 282-283 AD
Obverse: M AVR NVMERIANVS NOB C, radiate bust r.
Reverse: PRINCIPI IVVENTVT, Numerian l. holding globe and spear
Size: 22.39 mm
Weight: 3.5 grams
Description: A nice ant of a scarcer emperor while serving as Caesar
ecoli
Denario_Faustina_II_RIC_702.jpg
34-05 - FAUSTINA HIJA (147 - 176 D.C.)64 viewsAR Denario 18.3 mm 3.24 gr.
Hija de Antonino Pio y Faustina, esposa de Marco Aurelio

Anv: "FAVSTINA AVGVSTA" - Busto con diadema y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "LAETITIA" - Laetitia de pié a der., portando largo cetro inclinado en mano der. y corona de laureles en izq.

Acuñada 156 - 175 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #702 Pag.270 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5258 Pag.344 - BMCRE #127 - Cohen Vol.III #153 Pag.148 - DVM #152c Pag.224 - MIR #26
mdelvalle
RIC_702_Denario_Faustina_Jr_.jpg
34-05 - FAUSTINA Jr. (147 - 176 D.C.)12 viewsAR Denario 18.3 mm 3.24 gr.
Hija de Antonino Pio y Faustina, esposa de Marco Aurelio

Anv: "FAVSTINA AVGVSTA" - Busto con diadema y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "LAETITIA" - Laetitia de pié a der., portando largo cetro inclinado en mano der. y corona de laureles en izq.

Acuñada 156 - 175 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #702 Pag.270 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5258 Pag.344 - BMCRE IV #127 Pag.402 (Plate 55 #16) - Cohen Vol.III #153 Pag.148 - DVM #152c Pag.224 - MIR #26
mdelvalle
AS o Dupondio FAUSTINA II RIC 1405a.jpg
34-12 - FAUSTINA HIJA (147 - 176 D.C.)46 viewsAE Dupondio 25 mm 12.6 gr.
Hija de Antonino Pio y Faustina, esposa de Marco Aurelio

Anv: "FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL" - Busto con rodete viendo a derecha.
Rev: "S C" - Diana de pié a izquierda portando una flecha en la mano derecha y descansando su cuerpo sobre la izquierda apoyada sobre su arco.

Acuñada 154 - 156 D.C.
Emisión realizada por su padre Antonino Pio
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Antonino Pio) #1405a Pag.194 - Sear RCTV Vol.II (Antonino Pio) #4733 Pag.286 - BMCRE #2191 - Cohen Vol.III #207 Pag.153 - DVM #52a Pag.154
mdelvalle
RIC_1405a_Dupondio_Faustina_Jr.jpg
34-12 - FAUSTINA HIJA (147 - 176 D.C.)10 viewsAE Dupondio 25 mm 12.6 gr.
Hija de Antonino Pio y Faustina, esposa de Marco Aurelio

Anv: "FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL" - Busto con rodete viendo a derecha.
Rev: "S C" - Diana de pié a izquierda portando una flecha en la mano derecha y descansando su cuerpo sobre la izquierda apoyada sobre su arco.

Acuñada 154 - 156 D.C.
Emisión realizada por su padre Antonino Pio
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Antonino Pio) #1405a Pag.194 - Sear RCTV Vol.II (Antonino Pio) #4733 Pag.286 - BMCRE IV #2191 Pag.380 - Cohen Vol.III #207 Pag.153 - DVM #52a Pag.154
mdelvalle
coin220.JPG
405. CONSTANTIUS I, as Caesar53 viewsBorn March 31st, Emperor Flavius Valerius Constantius may have come into the world ca. 250. His family was from Illyricum. In the army he served as a protector, tribunus, and a praeses Dalmatiarum. During the 270s or the 280s, he became the father of Constantine by Helena, his first spouse. By 288 he was the Praetorian Prefect of the western emperor Maximianus Herculius.

On 1 March 293 Diocletian appointed Galerius as his Caesar (junior emperor) in the east and Constantius as the Caesar of Maximianus Herculius. Caesar in the west. Both Caesars had the right of succession. In order to strengthen the dynastic relationship between himself and Herculius., Constantius put aside his wife Helena and married Theodora, the daughter, or perhaps stepdaughter, of Maximianus Herculius. The union was fruitful and of it there were six issue: Flavius Dalmatius, Julius Constantius, Hannibalianus, Constantia, Anastasia, and Eutropia. To strengthen his bond with Galerius and Diocletian in the east, Constantius allowed Galerius to keep his son Constantine as a hostage for his good behavior.

In the remainder of the time that he was a Caesar, Constantius spent much of his time engaged in military actions in the west. In the summer of 293 Constantius expelled the troops of the usurper Carausius from northern Gaul; after Constantius' attack on Bononia (Boulogne), Carausius was murdered. At the same time he dealt with the unrest of the Germans. In 296 he invaded Britain and put down the revolt of the usurper Allectus. Between 300 and 305 A.D. the Caesar campaigned successfully several times with various German tribes. It is worth noting in passing, that while his colleagues rigidly enforced the "Great Persecution in 303," Constantius limited his action to knocking down a few churches.

On 1 May 305 Diocletian, at Nicomedia, and Maximianus Herculius, at Mediolanum (Milan), divested themselves of the purple, probably because of the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian forced Maximianus to abdicate. They appointed as their successors Constantius and Galerius, with Severus and Maximinus Daia as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Constantius, as had his predecessor, ruled in the west, while Galerius and Daia ruled in the east. Almost as soon as he was appointed Augustus, he crossed to Britain to face incursions by the Picts where he died at York on 25 July 306 with his son at his side.


CONSTANTIUS I, as Caesar. 293-305 AD. Æ Follis (9.24 gm). Lugdunum mint. Struck 301-303 AD. CONSTANTIVS NO[B CAE]S, laureate and draped bust right, holding spear over right shoulder and shield at left / [GENIO POPV]LI ROMANI; altar-B/PLC. RIC VI 136a. VF, brown patina, some silvering. Ex CNG
1 commentsecoli
claudius_AE18_RPC2624.jpg
41-54 AD - CLAUDIUS & AGRIPPINA Junior AE18 of Ephesos - struck 49-50 AD37 viewsobv: Jugate laureate heads of Claudius and draped bust of Agrippina II, right
rev: EFE / KOYCI-NIOC / TO-D (stag standing right) (D = episcopus for the fourth time)
ref: BMC 205, RPC 2624, SNG Cop.373
mint: Ephesos
6.49 gms, 18 mm
Very rare - original green patina

Julia Agrippina (Agrippina the Younger) was the 4th wife of the emperor Claudius. She was murdered by her son, Nero, in 59 A.D.
1 commentsberserker
Faustina_II_1.jpg
AE Sestertius, RIC 3, p.345, 1638 - Faustina II, Fecunditas 31 viewsFaustina II,
Sestertius
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev.: FECVNDITAS / S – C, Fecunditas standing right, holding scepter in right hand, infant in left hand
26.2g, 30.7mm
Ref.: BMC 905, Cohen 100, RIC 1638
shanxi
Faustina_II_60.jpg
AE Sestertius, RIC 3, p.346, 1663 - Faustina II, Cybele12 viewsFaustina II
Sestertius, AD 161-175
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Rev.: MATRI MAGNAE / S - C, Cybele, holding drum, seated right between two lions.
AE, 26.24g, 32 mm
Ref.: RIC 1663
Ex Lanz Numismatik
Ex Künker
Ex Collection Pudill
shanxi
Faustina_II_61.jpg
AE Sestertius, RIC 3, p.347, 1673 - Faustina II, children16 viewsFaustina II
Sestertius, AD 161-175
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Rev.: TEMPOR FELIC, Faustina standing left, holding two infants, between four girls at her feet. In field, S – C.
AE, 28.05g, 33.4 mm
Ref.: RIC 1673
Ex Forvm Ancient Coins Shop
shanxi
agrippina_jr.jpg
Agrippina Jr; Obol, Agrippina as Demeter/ kalathos55 viewsAgrippina Junior, Augusta 50 - March 59 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt. Bronze obol, Dattari 179; Milne 127; BMC Alexandria p. 14, 111 var (year 12); Geissen -; SNG France -, Emmett 105 (R4), Fair/Poor, Alexandria mint, 4.907g, 23.7mm, 52 - 53 A.D.; obverse “AGRIPPINA” C“EBA”C“TH”, bust of Agrippina right, as Demeter, wreathed with grain; reverse, kalathos (modius) containing stalks of grain and poppy heads bound with flower wreath, flanked on each side by a flaming torch bound with fillet, L I“G” (year 13) in ex; rare. Ex FORVMPodiceps
00921-Phrygia.JPG
Agrippina Junior36 viewsAgrippina Junior
17 mm 2.46 gm
O: Draped bust of Agrippina Junior right
R: Draped bust of Artemis right
Provincial of Phrygia, Cadi
1 commentsKoffy
CLAUDIUS-2~0.jpg
Agrippina the Younger, sister of Caligula, wife of Claudius, mother of Nero. Augusta, 50-59 CE.272 viewsBosporos, under King Kotys I with Claudius & Agrippina Jr. 50-54 AD.
Æ 12 nummia or Assarion (25 mm, 9.30 gm).
Obv: TI KLAUDIOU KAICAROC, Laureate head of Claudius right, IB below.
Rev: IOULIAN AGRIPPINAN CEBACTHN, Head of Agrippina Junior left, hair weaved and tied at back of head to make a loop ponytail; BAK (monogram of Kotys I) before.
SGI 5438; RPC 1925; BMC 13.52,7; Anokhin Bosporus 348; Vagi 670; SNG Vol IX, 971; SNG Copenhagen 31; W.Wroth p. XI, 14.
EmpressCollector
FAUSTINA_II_ALTAR.JPG
ALTAR, Faustina Junior135 viewsAR denarius of Rome, struck A.D.176-180 under Marcus Aurelius.
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA. Draped bust of Faustina Junior facing right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO. Monumental altar enclosure with closed doors.
Diameter: 19mm
RIC III : 746
*Alex
1-Pq3EL2XdbJ9QF5pkPxE6f89ZTY4gn7.jpg
ANTONINUS PIUS. 138-161 AD. Æ Sestertius15 viewsANTONINUS PIUS. 138-161 AD. Æ Sestertius (33mm, 26.75 g.)
Struck 159/160 AD.
Obverse..ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXIII, laureate head right
Rev. PIETATI AVG COS IIII SC, Pietas standing left holding globe, Faustina Junior as Pietas standing left, between Faustina Minima, Lucilla & holding baby Fadilla.
RIC III 1031
Paul R3
Agrippina_Junior_02_Artemis.jpg
Artemis, Lydia, Hierocaesarea, Artemis, stag5 viewsLydia. Hierocaesaraea
Rev.: IЄPOKAICAPЄωN ЄΠI KAΠITωNOC, Artemis standing right, holding bow, stag standing right.
Æ, 18.1mm, 4.43g


for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
Faustina_minor_as,_FECVNDITAS.JPG
As, FECVNDITAS S-C, RIC 163929 viewsFaustina Junior, As, 24mm, 10.15g. Obverse: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA; draped bust right. Reverse: FECVNDITAS S-C; Fecunditas standing right holding scepter and child. RIC 1639, Cohen 101, BMC 980. Sear RCV II: 5295. ex areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
faustina_II.jpg
As, MATRI MAGNAE S C, Cybele & lions11 viewsFAUSTINA JUNIOR Æ As. Rev. MATRI MAGNAE S C, Cybele holding drum seated right between two lions. RIC (M. Aur)1664Podiceps
salus.jpg
As, SALVTI AVGVSTAE; Salus; RIC 167112 viewsFaustina Junior, AE as Rome 170-71
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA; Diad., dr. bust r. SALVTI AVGVSTAE; In ex: SC; Salus std.l., feeding snake coiled roundaltar. RIC 1671; 8.75g; 24.4mm; VF. ex Gert Boersema

Podiceps
Agrippina_Junior_02.jpg
Asia Minor, Lydia, Hierocaesarea, Agrippina Junior, Artemis right, stag 26 viewsLydia. Hierocaesaraea
Agrippina Junior (Augusta, 50-59)
Bronze, AE 18
Obv.: AΓPIΠΠINAN ΘЄAN CЄBACTHN, draped bust right, hair in long plait down back of neck and looped at end
Rev: IЄPOKAICAPЄωN ЄΠI KAΠITωNOC, Artemis standing right, holding bow, stag standing right.
Æ, 18.1mm, 4.43g
Ref.: RPC I 2388, SNG von Aulock 2959
1 commentsshanxi
Agrippina_Junior_01.jpg
Asia Minor, Lydia, Hierocaesarea, Agrippina Junior, Artemis, stag19 viewsLydia. Hierocaesaraea
Agrippina Junior (Augusta, 50-59)
Bronze, AE 19
Obv.: AΓPIΠΠINAN ΘЄAN CЄBACTHN, draped bust right, hair in long plait down back of neck and looped at end, long loosely curled lock down side of neck;
Rev.: IЄPOKAICAPЄΩN ЄΠI KAΠITΩNOC, Artemis Persica standing facing, wearing long chiton, with right hand
drawing arrow from quiver on right shoulder, left hand on hip, stag at her side on left
AE, 5.93g, maximum diameter 18.8mm, die axis 0o
Ref.: RPC I 2387; BMC Lydia p. 106, 22
Ex Pecunem, Gitbud & Naumann auction 34 (2 Aug 2015), lot 664
Ex Forvm Ancient Coins Shop (2016)
shanxi
Faustina_II_50.jpg
Asia Minor, Lydia, Hierocaesarea, Faustina II, Artemis, Perseus17 viewsLydia, Hierocaesarea
Faustina II
Mènodôros the Second, strategos
Obv.: ΦAVCTEINA CEBACTH, draped bust of Faustina left.
Rev.: [EΠI CTPA M]HNOΔ[ΩPOY B.], [IЄ]POKAI[CAPЄΩN] in exerque; nude hero (Perseus) standing right, seen from the back, Artemis standing left, holding bow, having quiver at shoulder; both clasping hands over lighted altar
AE, 38.14g, 36mm
Ref.: RPC IV.2 11395 (temporary) - This Coin
shanxi
Crispus.jpg
Bronze coin of Crispus14 viewsA bronze coin of Crispus minted between 321-322 AD in London.

Obverse: Crispus as a young Caesar (junior emperor) wearing a crested helmet and full armor, with the inscription CRISPVS NOBIL C = "Crispus, Most Noble Caesar".

Reverse: an altar, drawn with the ancients' best attempt at perspective, with a globe on top. The altar is inscribed VOTIS XX = "Vows for 20 years' rule", and the inscription around the edge of the coin is BEATA TRANQVILLITAS = "Beautiful Tranquility".

Attribution: RIC 7 London 230
chuy1530
Semis_130BC_Q_Caecillius_Metellus_cr__256_2_6_03g.jpg
Caecilia 23?33 viewsCaecilia 23? (130BC) moneyer Q. Caecilius Metellus cos 123 BC Rome

Semis

Ob: Laureate head of Saturn right; behind S
Rev: Prow right above Q ∙ MET (TE ligature), right S, in exergue ROMA

BMCRR I 1059

Sydenham 510

Crawford: 256/2a Q. METE

There is some confusion concerning which Q. Caecilius Metellus was the moneyer. Sydenham states that this difficulty arises from the fact that during this period (125-100 BC) the Metelli were at the height of their power and therefore would have multiple junior family members beginning the cursum honorum at the mint. There are a large number of variant legends.


Nice green patina, 6.03gr.
1 commentsPetrus Elmsley
0046.jpg
CAMPGATE, Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.99 viewsType:
Ruler / Years: Constantine II 337 - 340 A.D.
Denomination: AE 3
Metal Type: Bronze
Size / Weight: 2.024g, 19.2mm

Orientation: 180 deg.

Condition:

Obverse Description: laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left

Obverse Legend: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C

Reverse Description: campgate with four turrets and open gates, S - F at sides

Reverse Legend: VIRTVS CAESS

Exergue: TCONST

Attributes: RIC 322

Notes: Constantine II was the son of Constantine I, the eldest with his second wife, Fausta. He was born in Arles (which was renamed Constantia in his honor in 328, explaining the CON mintmarks for Arles) and was made Caesar before he was a year old in 316 A.D. Upon his father`s death, Constantine II inherited the Western part of the empire. After quarrelling with his brother Constans, he invaded his territory, only to be killed in an ambush near Aquileia. His coins often include "IVN" in the legend, an abbreviation for junior.

Scott M
irenopolisMarcusFaustina.jpg
Cilicia, Irenopolis. Marcus Aurelius & Faustina II AE2849 viewsMarcus Aurelius, with Faustina Junior, 161-169 AD. AE28.
Dated CY 119 (AD 170/1).
Obv: Laureate head of Aurelius right.
Rev: Draped bust of Faustina right; Θ-IP (date)
ancientone
AGRJSE01-2.jpg
Claudius, RIC 103, for Agrippina Junior, Sestertius of AD 50-5433 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25,70g, Ø 34mm, 6h, Thracien mint, AD 50-54
Obv.: AGRIPPINA AVG GERMANICI F CAESARIS AVG, Agrippina Jr. draped bust right, hair in long plait.
Rev.: no legend, Carpentum left, drawn by two mules.
RIC (Claudius) 103 (R3); BMC p.195*; Cohen unlisted; RCV 1910
Ex Boule (Paris), Mail Bid Auction 107, Oct. 2015
Charles S
AGRJSE02.jpg
Claudius, RIC 103, for Agrippina Junior, Sestertius of AD 50-5499 viewsÆ Sestertius (27,0g, Ø 33mm, 6h). Thracien mint. Struck AD 50-54 (under Claudius).
Obv.: AGRIPPINA·AVG·GERMANICI·F·CAESARIS·AVG, Agrippina Jr. draped bust right, hair in long plait.
Rev.: no legend, Carpentum left, drawn by two mules, the cover supported by standing figures at each corner and with ornamented side.
RIC Claudius 103 (R3); BMC p195*; Cohen unlisted
Ex Cayón Subastas, speed auction 32, Feb. 2016; ex Ex Cayón, Dec. 2006.
8 commentsCharles S
CLBC-16_3.jpg
Coinage of Uncertain Rulers (1204-1261) BI Trachy, Thessalonica? (CLBC 16.3)18 viewsObv: Full-length figure of Virgin nimbate, orans, wearing tunic and maphorion; holds beardless, nimbate head of Christ on breast
Rev: Full-length figure of senior ruler on left, with short rounded beard, and of junior ruler on right, beardless, holding between them patriarchal cross on long shaft. Both rulers wear stemma, divitision, collar-piece, and jeweled loros of simplified type, and hold scepters
Quant.Geek
PC200070_comp_sm.jpg
Comparison of two ases of the same type: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL 19 viewsLeft: Ӕ, 22.5-24+mm, 9.56g, die axis 11h
Right: Ӕ, 23-24mm, 9.15g, die axis 11h

FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half

Seems RIC 1389a, Faustina Minor issue by Antoninus Pius, minted in Rome, possible minting dates 145-146 or 156-161.

For more details about Faustina Minor see http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-151025
Yurii P
ConstantineII.jpg
Constantine II27 viewsConstantine II as Caesar 317-337 ad
sone of Constantine the great
AE3
obv. Constantine II right, diademed and draped
CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C (junior noble caesar)
rev. millitary camp gate w/ 2 turrets
PROVIDENTIAE CAESS (for thought of the 2 caesars)
SMKD (sacra, moneta kyzikus delta)
randy h2
constantin_junior_3.jpg
Constantine II Caesar - Antioch6 viewsGinolerhino
constantin_junior_1.jpg
Constantine II Caesar - Cyzicus5 viewsGinolerhino
Constantine II- BEATA TRANQVILLITAS new.jpg
Constantine II- Beata Tranqvillitas70 viewsConstantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D

Obverse:
Laureate and cuirassed bust right

CONSTANTINVS IVN NC

CONSTANTINVS: Constantine

IVN: Junior

N C: Noble Ceasar

Reverse:
BEATA TRANQVILLITAS

BEATA: Divine

TRANQVILLITAS: Peace

Showing: BEATA TRANQVILLITAS, altar inscribe VO/TIS / XX surmounted by globe, three stars above, C left, R right

Domination: Bronze, AE 3, size 20 mm
Mint: PLC, Lugdunum .Oficina ???

The uneasy peace that followed was celebrated on coins with the legend BEATA TRANQVILLITAS ("The blessed tranquillity"), subsequently abbreviated to BEAT TRANQLITAS, showing an altar inscribed VOTIS XX. Above the altar is a globe, signifying that the whole world was at peace, but not for long. An invading force of Sarmatians under their king Rausimondus were defeated in the province of Pannonia and celebrated on coins of Constantine with SARMATIA DEVICTA ("Sarmatia conquered"). At the same time the two Caesars, Crispus and Constantine Junior celebrated their Quinquennalia on coins with a laurel wreath enclosing the words VOT X and legend CAESARVM NOSATRORVM ("our Caesars"). The vows were suscepta, five years completed and looking forward to the tenth anniversary. A second war against the Visigoths occupied most of AD 323, before Constantine embarked on his final showdown with Licinius, ending with the defeat of Licinius at Chrysopolis in AD 323. Licinius survived until AD 325, when he was executed by Constantine.
1 commentsJohn Schou
Constantine II CampGate 1.jpg
Constantine II- CampGate83 viewsConstantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Obverse:
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right

CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C

CONSTANTINVS: Constantine
IVN: Junior
NOB: Noble
C: Caesar

Reverse
PROVIDENTIAE CAESS

PROVIDENTIAE: The foresight of our
CAESS: Emperors

Campgate with two turrets, 6 layers stones, star above,


Domination: Copper AE 3, 18- 19 mm

Mint: SMHΔ (Fourth Officina)in ex; Heraclea, mint year 325-326, RIC 77 p.551.
1 commentsJohn Schou
constantine_II_Gloria_Exercitus_two_standards.JPG
Constantine II- Gloria Exercitus59 viewsConstantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Obverse :
Laureate and cuirassed bust right

CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C

CONSTANTINVS: Constantine
IVN: Junior
NOB: Noble
C: Caesar

Reverse:
GLORIA EXERCITVS, the glory of the army

GLORIA: Glory
EXERCITVS: Army


Two soldiers holding spears and flanking two standards

Domination: Bronze AE 3, 17 mm

Mint: Siscia εSIS (ε= epsilon 5. Th Officina, SIS= Siscia
John S
Constantin_II_GLORIA_EXERCITVS.jpg
Constantine II- GLORIA EXERCITVS93 viewsConstantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Obverse :
Laureate and cuirassed bust right

CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C

CONSTANTINVS: Constantine
IVN: Junior
NOB: Noble
C: Caesar

Reverse:
GLORIA EXERCITVS, the glory of the army

GLORIA: Glory
EXERCITVS: Army


Two soldiers holding spears and flanking two standards

Domination: Bronze AE 3, size 17 mm

Mint: SMHB, Heraclea Β (B= Beta, 2nd Officina)

I can't find officinae B from RIC so it could be unlisted in RIC. It should be in RIC VII 117 Heraclea.
John S
Constantine_II_GLORIA_EXERCITVS_2.jpg
Constantine II- GLORIA EXERCITVS70 viewsConstantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Obverse :
Laureate and cuirassed bust right

CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C

CONSTANTINVS: Constantine
IVN: Junior
NOB: Noble
C: Caesar

Reverse:
GLORIA EXERCITVS, the glory of the army

GLORIA: Glory
EXERCITVS: Army


Two soldiers each holding spear and shield and flanking one standard with Chi-Rho

Domination: Bronze AE 3, size 17 mm

Mint: PLG Prima Lugdunum (Prima= 1st Oficina). Minted before 340 AD. Ref. Lyons VIII Lyons 6. Rarity: Common (C).
John S
Constantine II CampGate better new.jpg
Constantine II- Providentiae Caess-Campgate, Cyzikus53 viewsConstantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Obverse:
Laureate and cuirassed bust left

CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C

CONSTANTINVS: Constantine

IVN: Junior

NOB: Noble

C: Caes

Reverse:

PROVIDENTIAE: Dedicated to the foresight of our Caes.

CAESS: 2 Caes

Showing: Campgate with two turrets, star above, 6 layers stones in the turrets.

Domination: AE 4, Bronze, size 18 mm

Mint: SMK E, SMK (Cyzikus) E (Epsilon,ε= 5)
John Schou
Constantine II- VOT V.jpg
Constantine II- VOT V56 viewsConstantine II , 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Obverse:
Laureate bust right.

CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C

CONSTANTINVS: Constantine
IYN: Junior
NOB: Noble
C: Caesar


Reverse:
CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, our emperor

CAESARVM: Emperor
NOSTRORVM: Our
VOT V in wreath, Vows of the five years


Domination: Bronze AE 3, size 19 mm

Exe: The most common of them would be from Siscia, RIC VII Siscia 163, with ASIS* through to ESIS* in exe. RIC 163

In the Id- section there was a small funny discussion about Constantine being nude, and here is the final answer:

The conventional usage had better be kept, and is as Robert says. Sculpture shows that from the mid-1st century onward, a 'head' showing the naked shoulders (or after c. 100 the pectorals as well), is the 'short' equivalent to a nude or semi-nude (half-draped) statue: i.e., it is at least vaguely divinized. Often, both on the coins and on the sculptures, there was a bit of drapery on one shoulder, which would be the 'short' version of semi-nude. The point is that real, live Romans didn't go around that way; they even wore a tunic under the toga, and we know what they thought about bare feet!
But Head to r. is shorter than Heroic Bust to r. (which many wouldn't understand, anyhow) in listing coins. In discussing a coinage, of course, one may need to discuss some in terms of divinizing or heroizing, but in lists the 'Head' usage is established, more than established; besides, for the Republic it is accurate: family portraits were just heads with little more than the neck.
Pat L.
John Schou
Constantine The Great- Beata Tranqvillitas.jpg
Constantine The Great- Beata Tranqvillitas62 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Obverse:
Laurete and cuirassed bust right

CONSTANTINVS AVG

CONSTANTINVS: Constantine
AVG: Augustus

Reverse:

BEATA TRANQVILLITAS

BEATA: Divine

TRANQVILLITAS: Peace

Showing: BEATA TRANQVILLITAS, altar inscribe VO/TIS / XX surmounted by globe, three stars above, C left, R right

Domination: Copper, AE 3, size 18-19 mm

Mint: PLC, Lugdunum. RIC VII 131, R4, minted 321.Oficina ???

The uneasy peace that followed was celebrated on coins with the legend BEATA TRANQVILLITAS ("The blessed tranquillity"), subsequently abbreviated to BEAT TRANQLITAS, showing an altar inscribed VOTIS XX. Above the altar is a globe, signifying that the whole world was at peace, but not for long. An invading force of Sarmatians under their king Rausimondus were defeated in the province of Pannonia and celebrated on coins of Constantine with SARMATIA DEVICTA ("Sarmatia conquered"). At the same time the two Caesars, Crispus and Constantine Junior celebrated their Quinquennalia on coins with a laurel wreath enclosing the words VOT X and legend CAESARVM NOSATRORVM ("our Caesars"). The vows were suscepta, five years completed and looking forward to the tenth anniversary. A second war against the Visigoths occupied most of AD 323, before Constantine embarked on his final showdown with Licinius, ending with the defeat of Licinius at Chrysopolis in AD 323.
John Schou
0650-310np_noir.jpg
Constantinus II, AE3110 viewsTrier mint, 2nd officina ?
FL CL CONSTANTINVS IVN N C, draped and cuirassed bust right
PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS, Constantine Junior standing right, holding globe and spear, F in left field, T in right field, BTR at exergue
3.12 gr
Ref : Cohen # 143
1 commentsPotator II
coin12_quart.jpg
CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C (the 2nd) / GLORIA EXERCITVS AE3 follis (317-337 A.D.) 23 viewsCONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, cuirassed bust right / GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers facing each other, holding spears and shields, with one standard between them, devices on banners not very clear, but probably dots or "o". Mintmark: Epsilon SIS in exergue.

AE3, 18-19mm, 1.65g, die axis 2 (turned medal alignment), material: bronze/copper-based alloy

IVN = IVNIOR = Junior, NOB C = Nobilitas Caesar, Gloria Exercitus (noun + genitive) "The Glory of the Army", officina Epsilon (workshop #5), SIScia mint (now Sisak, Croatia).

Siscia mint combined with two standards and IVN NOB C variety points to only two types, RIC VII Siscia 220 and RIC VII Siscia 236, both of Constantine II, with possible officinas A, delta, gamma and epsilon. So even though the name is not very clear and theoretically the officina letter may be B rather than E, we can be sure that it is Constantine and that officina is E. Type 236 should have dots before and after the
mintmark, and it doesn't seem the case here, so this must be RIC VII Siscia 220, officina epsilon. Minting dates according to some sources: 330-335 AD.

Flavius Claudius Constantinus Augustus, born January/February 316, was the elder son if Constantine the Great and his second wife Fausta. Constantine II was born in Arles (south of modern France) and raised a Christian. On 1 March 317, he was made Caesar. A child general: in 323, at the age of seven, he took part in his father's campaign against the Sarmatians. At age ten, he became commander of Gaul, following the death of Crispus. An inscription dating to 330 records the title of Alamannicus, so it is probable that his generals won a victory over the Alamanni. His military career continued when Constantine I made him field commander during the 332 campaign against the Goths.

Following the death of his father in 337, Constantine II initially became augustus jointly with his brothers Constantius II and Constans, with the Empire divided between them and their cousins, the Caesars Dalmatius and Hannibalianus. This arrangement barely survived Constantine I’s death, as his sons arranged the slaughter of most of the rest of the family by the army. As a result, the three brothers gathered together in Pannonia and there, on 9 September 337, divided the Roman world between themselves. Constantine, proclaimed Augustus by the troops received Gaul, Britannia and Hispania. He was soon involved in the struggle between factions rupturing the unity of the Christian Church. The Western portion of the Empire, under the influence of the Popes in Rome, favored Catholicism (Nicean Orthodoxy) over Arianism, and through their intercession they convinced Constantine to free Athanasius, allowing him to return to Alexandria. This action aggravated Constantius II, who was a committed supporter of Arianism.

Constantine was initially the guardian of his younger brother Constans, whose portion of the empire was Italia, Africa and Illyricum. Constantine soon complained that he had not received the amount of territory that was his due as the eldest son. Annoyed that Constans had received Thrace and Macedonia after the death of Dalmatius, Constantine demanded that Constans hand over the African provinces, to which he agreed in order to maintain a fragile peace. Soon, however, they began quarreling over which parts of the African provinces belonged to Carthage, and thus to Constantine, and which belonged to Italy, and therefore to Constans. Further complications arose when Constans came of age and Constantine, who had grown accustomed to dominating his younger brother, would not relinquish the guardianship. In 340 Constantine marched into Italy at the head of his troops. Constans, at that time in Dacia, detached and sent a select and disciplined body of his Illyrian troops, stating that he would follow them in person with the remainder of his forces. Constantine was engaged in military operations and was killed in an ambush outside Aquileia. Constans then took control of his deceased brother's realm.
Yurii P
Faustina_56.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.093, 496 - Faustina II, Concordia35 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: AVGVSTI PII FIL, Concordia standing left, holding patera and cornucopia
Ag, 3.51g, 17mm
Ref.: RIC 496, RSC 21, CRE-162 [S] this coin
Ex H.D. Rauch, auction 103, lot 375
1 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_13.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.093, 497 - Faustina II, Spes 38 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome mint
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev.: AVGVSTI P II FIL, Spes standing facing, head left, holding flower and raising skirt.
Ag, 3.44g, 16.8mm
Ref.: RIC 497, CRE 217 [S]
1 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_65.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.093, 500b6 - Faustina II, Concordia standing 26 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVG ANTONINI AVG PII FIL, draped bust right, unbroken legend
Rev.: CONCO-RDIA, Concordia standing, head right, holding cornucopia and raising skirt with her right hand
Ag, 17.5mm, 3.08g
Ref.: RIC III 500b6, RSC 44, CRE 163 [S]
Ex cgb
shanxi
Faustina_II_5.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.094, 506b - Faustina II, Laetitia111 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome, AD 147-148
Obv.: FAVSTINAE AVG. PII AVG. FIL. Draped bust right, the hair coiled in the back of the head in a chignon and decorated with string of pearls.
Rev.: LAETITIAE PVBLICAE, Laetitia, draped and diademed, standing left, holding long scepter in her left hand, wreath in her outstretched right hand.
Ag, 2.81g, 18mm
Ref.: Kamp. 38.9, RIC 506b, CRE 195 [S]

for the same type, but bust with stephane click here
4 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_57.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.094, 507b - Faustina II, Pudicitia standing60 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right, pearl diadem.
Rev.: PVDICITIA, Pudicitia standing facing, head left, drawing veil and holding hem of skirt
Ag, 3.12g
Ref.: RIC III 507b, CRE 206 var. (pearl diadem)
Ex collection Hannelore Scheiner
Ex Künker eLive Auction 44, lot 111
4 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_64~1.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.095, 517a - Faustina II, Venus 38 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome, AD 147-150
Obv.: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, Draped bust of Faustina II to right with band of pearls, her hair bound with pearls
Rev.: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple in her right hand and rudder set on dolphin, which coils around it
Ag, 3.52g
Ref.: RIC 517a, CRE 233 [C]
Ex Künker
1 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_8.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.095, 517a var. - Faustina II, Venus64 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome, AD 147-150
Obv.: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, Draped bust of Faustina II to right with band of pearls, her hair bound with pearls
Rev.: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple in her right hand and rudder, no (or very small) dolphin
Ag, 3.71g, 17.50mm
Ref.: RIC 517a var., CRE 233var.
Ex Dionysos Numsimatik
shanxi
Faustina_II_47.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.268, 669 - Faustina II, Ceres seated 24 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: CERES, Ceres, veiled, seated left on cista, holding two corn ears and torch
Ag, 3.21g, 17.3mm
Ref.: RIC 669 (one of two hairstyle variations), CRE 159 [C]

for the same type, with different hairstyle, click here

shanxi
Faustina_II_62.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.268, 669 - Faustina II, Ceres seated 19 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: CERES, Ceres, veiled, seated left on cista, holding two corn ears and torch
Ag, 3.16g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC 669 (one of two hairstyle variations), CRE-I 160 [R]

for the same type, with different hairstyle, click here

shanxi
Faustina_II_63.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.269, 677 - Faustina II, Fecunditas, Child 43 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome, AD 161-175
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, diademed, draped bust right
Rev.: FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right holding scepter in right and infant in left
Ag, 3.47g, 19mm
Ref.: RIC III 677 var. (diademed), CRE 177 [R]
Ex Numismatik Naumann, auction 53, lot 753

For this type I have three other versions in my gallery > click:

bust with band of pearls

bust with bare head

bust with double band of pearls
2 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_16.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.269, 683 - Faustina II, Fortuna27 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denarius
Augusta AD 146 - winter 175/176
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: FORTVNAE MVLIEBRI, Fortuna seated left, holding rudder and cornucopiae. (no globe)
Ag, 3.16g, 18x19.6mm
Ref.: RIC III 683, RSC 107, CRE-I 181 [S] var. (no globe)
shanxi
Faustina_II_6.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.269, 688 var. - Faustina II, Juno standing41 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denarius
Augusta AD 146 - winter 175/176
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, pearl diademed bust right
Rev.: IVNO, Juno, veiled, standing left, patera in right, long scepter in left, peacock at feet
Ag, 3.26g, 16.9x19.4mm
Ref.: RIC III (Marcus Aurelius) 688 var. (hair waved with with band of pearls), CRE 188 [C]


I have two other versions of this type in my gallery:

bust without band of pearls:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-144040

bust without band of pearls, different hairstyle:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-137130
shanxi
Faustina_II_25~0.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.270, 696 - Faustina II, Juno, IVNONI REGINAE 34 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right with circlet of pearls
Rev.: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at her feet, a peacock.
Ag, 3.12g, 17.3mm
Ref.: RIC III 696, CRE 192 [C]
shanxi
Faustina_II_32.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.270, 701 - Faustina II, Laetitia37 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped and diademed bust right
Rev.: LAETITIA dot, Laetitia standing left, holding wreath and scepter.
Ag, 2.98g, 18.3mm
Ref.: RIC III 701, CRE 198 [S]
1 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_46.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.271, 711 - Faustina II, Children 22 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome, AD 161-165
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: SAECVLI FELICIT, draped throne on which are two children: Commodus and Titus Aurelius Fulvus Antoninus, no stars above, no ball between
Ag, 3.16g, 18.3mm
Ref.: RIC 71, CRE 221 [C]

Variation with diadem > click
Variation with diadem and visible silk chemise > click
shanxi
Faustina_II_43.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.271, 714a - Faustina II, Salus seated16 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair tied in bun, circlet of pearls
Rev.: SALVS, Salus seated left, feeding snake twined around altar
Ag, 3.3g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC III 714a, CRE 212 [S]
Ex Münzhandlung Plesa
shanxi
Faustina_II_30.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.272, 737 - Faustina II, Vesta15 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: VESTA, Vesta seated left, holding palladium and sceptre.
Ag, 3.51g, 18.3mm
Ref.: RIC III 737, CRE 242 [S]
shanxi
Faustina_II_41.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.273, 738 - Faustina II, Aeternitas37 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome mint, posthumous AD 176 - 181
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped and veiled bust right
Rev.: AETERNITAS, Aeternitas standing front, head left, arranging veil and holding torch.
Ag, 3.42g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC 738, Kamp. 38.87, CRE-I 156 [R]
1 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_28.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.273, 739 - Faustina II, Aeternitas18 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar, Rome mint, posthumous AD 176 - 181
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right
Rev.: AETERNITAS, Aeternitas standing frontal, arranging veil and holding torch
Ag, 3.20g, 17.8mm
Ref.: RIC III 739, CRE-I 155 [S]
Ex Münzen Ritter
shanxi
Faustina_II_31.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.273, 746 - Faustina II, CONSECRATIO, Altar 21 viewsFaustina II
AR-Denar
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right (hairstyle variation)
Rev.: CONSECRATIO, Altar enclosure with door in front and horns above
Ag, 2.64g, 17.5x18.9mm
Ref.: RIC III 746, CRE 158 [C] var. [minor hairstyle variation]
shanxi
faustina_II_venus.jpg
Denarius; AVGVS(TI PII FI)L, Venus with Victory, RIC III 495a4 viewsFaustina Junior – Denarius (under Antoninus Pius). Rome mint, 157-161 CE. 15x16mm, 2.39g. 
Obverse: Draped bust right. 
FAVSTINA (AVG)VSTA 
Reverse: Venus standing left, resting left hand on a shield set on a helmet, holding up Victory in her right hand. 
AVGVS(TI PII FI)L. Sear RCV (2002) 4700; RIC III 495a. Ex MoremothPodiceps
faustina_nuorx.jpg
Denarius; FECVNDITAS, RIC III 67711 viewsFaustina Junior – Denarius RIC III 677, RSCII 99, BMCRE IV 91, Rome mint, 2.634g, 18.2mm, 180o, 161 - 175 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right holding scepter in right and infant in left, ex FORVM

Podiceps
Faustina_II_2.JPG
Denarius; VENVS, RIC 517a13 viewsFaustina Junior – Denarius
Obv: FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL, draped bust right
Rev: VENVS, Venus standing left with apple and dolphin-entwined rudder.
RIC 517a, RSC 266, BMC 1075
kaitsuburi
FAUSTJR-26~0.jpg
Diana (Artemis) as the moon goddess364 viewsFaustina Junior -- Died 175/6. Wife of Marcus Aurelius. Augusta, AD 147-175/6.
Orichalcum sestertius (30 mm), issued posthumously, Rome mint, AD 176-180.
Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: SIDERIBVS RECEPTA S C, Diva Faustina, as Diana Lucifera, draped, wearing crescent on shoulders behind neck, standing r., holding lighted torch in both hands.
RIC-1715; BMC-1584; Cohen-215.

Diana in her lunar aspect here holds a torch and is shown with a crescent moon on her shoulders. SIDERIBVS RECEPTA = "received by the stars". Diana Lucifera lit the way for the dead to journey to their new home among the heavens, appropriate for a posthumous issue.
EmpressCollector
CollageMaker_20180531_122851719.jpg
Drusus Junior9 viewsAE As, Rome Mint, Struck 22-23 AD.
Obverse: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, bare head left.
Reverse: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large SC.
References: RIC I 45 (Tiberius), BMCRE 99, Cohen 2, RCV 1794
Justin L
EB0693_scaled.JPG
EB0693 Claudius & Agrippina Jr / Stag10 viewsClaudius & Agrippina Junior, Ephesos, Ionia, AE 20, 41-54 AD.
Obverse: Busts of Claudius & Agrippina jugate, facing right.
Reverse: Stag standing right; KOYΣI/NIOΣ above and EΦE below. TO - Δ across field.
References: RPC I 2624; SNG Copenhagen 373; BMC 205 pg. 73; Weber 5872.
Diameter: 20.5mm, Weight: 6.572g.
EB
Faustina_II_38~0.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 150/151, Faustina II, eagle 26 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAYCTIN CEBACTH (legend starting at 1 o'clock), draped bust right
Rev.. Eagle standing right, head left, wreath in beak
LIΔ= year 14 of Antoninus Pius (150/151).
Billon, 13.13g, 22.6mm
Ref.: Dattari 3275, Geißen 1951
1 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_64.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 163/164, Faustina II, Zeus21 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAVCTINA CEBACTH, draped bust left
Rev.: L Δ, laureate-headed and draped bust of Zeus, right (countermark)
Billon, 12.68g, 21.5mm
Ref.: Dattari-Savio Pl. 194, 9876 second (this coin), RPC online 16407 (this coin)
Ex Dattari Collection
Ex Naville Numismatics
1 commentsshanxi
FII_TOGETHER.jpg
Faustina II (Junior)RIC#502a31 viewsFaustina II Junior Silver Denarius 3.36g.,17mm, Rome mint, A.D. 154-156,

Obverse. FAVSTINA AVG-PIIAVGFIL Draped bust of Faustina right,

Reverse. CONC-O-RDIA, Concordia seated left, holding flower & resting left arm on cornucopiae set on globe below seat.

(RCV 4704; RIC 502a)
1 commentsPaul R3
FaustinaIIdenierIVNONI.jpg
Faustina II IVNONI REGINAE61 viewsFAUSTINA AVGVSTA
Draped bust right

R/ IVNONI REGINAE
Juno standing left holding patera in outstretched right hand and long sceptre in left hand; peacock at her feet.

Denarius struck 161 - 175 in Rom
Cohen 139 - RIC.696

FAUSTINA JUNIOR, daughter of Antoninus Pius and wife of Marcus Aurelius. Augusta 147-175 AD
1 commentsgb29400
Faustina2_b.jpg
Faustina II Junior denarius54 viewsFECVND AVGVSTAE
wife of Marcus Aurelius
1 commentsTibsi
Faustina_II_Juno_RIC_1651~0.JPG
Faustina II Juno RIC 165124 viewsFaustina Junior, Orichalcum Sestertius, Rome, Augusta 146 - winter 175/176 AD, 22.966g, 32.3mm, RIC III 1651, Cohen 142
OBV: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right
REV: IVNO REGINA S C, Juno standing left, patera in right,
long scepter vertical behind in left, peacock at feet left

EX: Forum Ancient Coins
Romanorvm
fauii.jpg
Faustina II RIC 140315 viewsFaustina Junior AE Dupondius
Obverse: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Reverse: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno veiled, standing left holding patera & scepter. Peacock at feet. S C in field
25.3 mm diam., 10.9 g
NORMAN K
Faustina_II_aeternitas_2_3.jpg
Faustina II Sestertius22 viewsAE Sestertius
Faustina II, 146-176 CE
Diameter: 30 mm, Weight: 25.16 grams, Die axis: 6h

Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA
Draped bust to right, hair tied in a bun at the back of neck.

Reverse: AETERNITAS SC
Aeternitas seated to left, holding phoenix atop globe in left hand, sceptre in right arm.

Mint: Rome

Notes:
- Issued by Marcus Aurelius after the death of his wife Faustina.

Ex World Coins Japan, 2006
Pharsalos
faustinajrpan.jpg
Faustina II Wife of Marcus Aurelius, 147 to 175 AD Rome mint.41 viewsOrichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1646, Sear RCV 5276, weight 21g, max. diameter 28.9 mm, Rome mint 161-175 AD; Obv. FAVSTINA AVGSTA, diademed and draped bust right; Rev. IVNO SC, Juno stg. left holding patera and scepter, peacock left at feet. Dark olive patina, large corrosion pit on shoulder on Obv. 3 commentsSteve E
faustina_juno.jpg
Faustina II, AD 161-1757 viewsAR denarius, 3.3g, 17mm, 6h; Rome mint.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA; diademed, draped bust right.
Rev.: IVNONI RE-GINAE; Juno seated left, holding patera and scepter, peacock at feet.
Reference: RIC III Faustina Junior 698, p. 270
Notes: ex-Stacks, Public Auction Sale, June 14-15, 1971, No. 659. Sold to RZaj, 10/19/15.
John Anthony
Faust2Pautal.JPG
Faustina II, AE 2238 viewsPAVCTINA CEBACTH
Bust draped, right
OVLPIAC PAVTALIAC
Tyche standing left holding rudder and cornucopeia
Moushmov 4114
whitetd49
FAUSTJR-33.jpg
Faustina II, Junior, daughter of Antoninus Pius, wife of Marcus Aurelius. Augusta, 147-175/6 CE.205 viewsAR denarius (17.8 mm, 3.27 gm).
Issued under Antoninus Pius, Rome mint, 157-161 CE.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Bare headed and draped bust, r.
Rev: AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing l., holding Victory and leaning left hand on shield set upon a helmet.
RIC 495a; Sear 4700; BMC 1099; Cohen 15.
EmpressCollector
FAUSTJR-28.jpg
Faustina II, Junior, wife of Marcus Aurelius. Augusta, 147-175/6 CE.243 viewsAR Denarius (18 mm), issued under husband, Marcus Aurelius.
Rome mint, 161-175 CE.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust, r.
Rev: HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing l., holding long palm and cornucopiae.
RIC 686; Sear 5254; BMC 100; Cohen 111.
1 commentsEmpressCollector
FAUSTJR-15.jpg
Faustina II, Junior, wife of Marcus Aurelius. Augusta, 147-175/6 CE.179 viewsAE As (26 mm, 15.5 gm). Issued under husband, Marcus Aurelius. Rome mint, 147-175 CE.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust, r.
Rev: FECVNDITAS SC, Fecunditas standing r., holding scepter and child.
RIC 1639; Sear 5295; BMC 980; Cohen 101.
EmpressCollector
FAUSTINA_JNR_PEACOCK~0.JPG
FAUSTINA II, JUNIOR. Commemorative denarius of Rome. Struck A.D.176-180 under Marcus Aurelius.144 viewsObverse: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA. Draped bust of Faustina Junior facing right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO. Peacock standing facing right.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 3.24gms | Die Axis: 12
RIC III : 744 | RSC : 71a

Annia Galeria Faustina was the youngest daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Senior. She married Marcus Aurelius in A.D.145 and was given the title of Augusta on the birth of her first child in A.D.146. She went on to have several more children, one of whom was the future emperor Commodus. In A.D.175 Faustina accompanied Marcus Aurelius on his journey to the East but she died at Halala, a village at the foot of the Taurus Mountains.
1 comments*Alex
017-faustina.jpg
Faustina Jr Sestertius30 viewsSestertiusTanit
010-faustina.jpg
Faustina Jr Sestertius21 viewsSestertiusTanit
009-faustina.jpg
Faustina Jr Sestertius25 viewsSestertius
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA ;dr. bust r.
Rev: SALVTI AVGVSTAE S C ; Salus std. l., using a patera to feed a snake arising from an altar.
Tanit
Faustina1.jpg
Faustina Jr Sestertius35 viewsFaustina Junior Æ Sestertius. ca 157-161 AD. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / FECVND AVGVSTAE S-C, Fecunditas standing left holding two infants, two children standing to either side.

RIC 1634 ; Cohen 93.

Scarce


Tanit
Sistertii_096.JPG
Faustina Jr. AR Denarius35 viewsFaustina Junior Denarius. 3.29 gr. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right/VESTA, Vesta seated left holding victory and sceptre. Antonio Protti
Faustina_Junior_RIC_1649.jpg
Faustina Junior26 viewsAE Sestertius ( 31mm - 22.2g)
obv. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
draped bust of Faustina Junior facing right
rev. IVNONI LVCINAE S C (in field)
Faustina as Juno, standing left, holding a child in her arms, two more standing left and right of her
RIC (Aurelius) 1649; Sear 2000 (RCV) 5277
HolgerG
0110800.jpg
Faustina Junior TEMPOR FELIC53 viewsAttribution: RIC III 347
Date: 161-176 AD
Obverse: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Reverse: TEMPOR FELIC SC, Fecunditas or Faustina standing left with four children and one in each arm
Size: 25 mm
Weight: 9.8 grams
newone
Faustine junior HS.jpg
Faustina Junior - sestertius16 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust r. wearing diadem.
FECVNDITAS / S C , Fecunditas standing r. holding scepter and small baby.
Minted in 161

RIC 1638
Ginolerhino
den1~0.jpg
Faustina Junior 161-180 AD Fecunditas21 viewsOb. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, diademed & draped bust right
Rev. FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, holding scepter and infant

Ref. RIC 677, RSC 99, BMC 91
Size 19mm

Wife of Marcus Aurelius
-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
Faustina Junior CONSECRATIO S C .JPG
Faustina Junior CONSECRATIO S C 33 viewsFaustina Junior, Augusta 146 - winter 175/176 A.D, wife of Marcus Aurelius

Obverse:
Draped bust right
DIVA FAVSTINA PIA

DIVA: Divine
FAVSTINA: Faustina
PIA:


Reverse:
CONSECRATIO S C

CONSECRATIO: Consecrate
S C: Senate Consultu, By decree of the Senate

Large altar

Domination: Bronze Sestertius, size 27 mm

Mint: Rom, during the years 161-180 A.D . BMC 1579; Coh. 76; RIC 1706.
John S
faustina.jpg
Faustina Junior Denarius35 viewsFaustina Junior Denarius

Obv: Bust of Faustina right, "FAVSTINA AVGVSTA"

Rev: Hilaritas standing left holding a long palm and cornucopiae, "HILARITAS"

RSC 111, 3.29gr
1 commentsAdrian S
seculi.jpg
Faustina Junior Denarius23 viewsFaustina Junior Denarius

Obv: Diademed and draped bust right, "FAVSTINA AVGVSTA

Rev: Pulvinar on which are the twins Commodus and Antoninus, SAECULI FELICIT.

18mm 3.4g, RIC 712
Adrian S
f21.jpg
Faustina Junior Denarius RIC III #712 RCS #19159 viewsObv:FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA
REV:SAECVLI FELICIT-Twins,(Commodus and his brother) on draped throne.
Celebrating the birth of twins by Faustina Jr.
A very pretty coin!
1 commentsnewone
20171004_135836.jpg
Faustina Junior Denarius/ Concordia, Rome20 viewsObv. draped bust of Faustina facing right, with legends FAVSTINA.AVG.PII.AVG.
Rev. Concordia seated left on low seat, resting left elbow on cornucopiae set on globe below seat. CONCORDIA.
References: RIC 502A, RSC-54.
17.5mm, 2.89g
1 commentsCanaan
Faustina Jr-.jpg
Faustina Junior Sestertius27 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA ; dr. bust r.
Rev: SIDERIBVS RECEPTA SC ; Diana Lucifera stg. r., holding a long torch

C. 215
Tanit
faust1.jpg
Faustina Junior Sestertius9 viewsFaustina II (wife of M. Aurelius) Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 162.

Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right
Rev.: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at her feet; S-C across fields.

RIC 1646.
1 commentsTanit
Faustina_Junior_venus.jpg
Faustina Junior VENVS28 viewsFaustina Junior, Augusta 146 - winter 175/176 A.D, wife of Marcus Aurelius

Obverse:
Draped bust right
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA

FAVSTINA: Faustina
AVGVSTA: Empress

Reverse:
VENVS

VENVS: Venus
Venus standing left, holding apple & sceptre.

Domination: Denarius (silver), size 15 mm

Mint: Rom,
John S
Faustina_Junior.jpg
Faustina Junior – RIC-507a (Pius)43 viewsFaustina Jr d. 175, Denarius (2.96g) Rome 148-152 AD Daughter of Antonius Pius and Faustina I, Wife of Marcus Aurelius and mother of Commodus. Head of Faustina Jr right. Her hair in a diadem "FAVSTINA AVG PII" Puducitia veiled standing front, head left drawing out her robe in front of her face, and gathering up her skirt. RIC 507a, RSC 176a, BMC 1051, RCV 47061 commentsBud Stewart
FAUSTINAJR5C.png
FAUSTINA JUNIOR, AE SESTERTIUS, ROME 161-164 CE15 viewsFaustina Junior Sestertius, struck under Marcus Aurelius
Obverse: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Reverse: IVNONI REGINAE, S C across lower field, Juno standing left, holding patera in right hand and scepter in left; at feet to left peacock.
RIC III 1645, Sear 5276
29.4 mm, 22.4g, Rome mint
NORMAN K
faustina444.jpg
Faustina Junior, Altar71 viewsAR Denarius

DIVA FAV-STINA PIA
Draped bust right

CONSECRA-TIO
unadorned large altar

RIC 746
2 commentsarizonarobin
2013-01-021.jpg
Faustina Junior, Altar47 viewsAr Denarius

DIVA FAVSTINA PIA
draped bust right

CONSECRATIO
Altar

RIC 746
1 commentsRobin Ayers
021-3-horz.jpg
Faustina Junior, AR Denarius15 viewsAD 147 – 175/6
Roman Mint
2.99 grams
Obv: FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL, Bust draped right with double circlet of pearls around head.
Rev: LAETITIAE PVBLICAE, Laetitia standing left, holding wreath and scepter
RSC II, 155a; RIC 506b; Sear #4705
Purchased on eBay
NGC AU; Strike 5/5; Surface 4/5
Richard M10
Faustina_Junior,_Augusta___Wife_of_Marcus_Aurelius.jpg
Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of emperor Marcus Aurelius64 viewsSilver Denarius, BMCRE II p. 404, 148; RSC II 195; SRCV II 5262; RIC III MA689 var. (no stephane); Hunter II 8 var. (same), Choice Very Fine , excellent centering, unusual artistic portrait for empress Faustina,toned, Rome mint, weight 2.655g, maximum diameter 17.8mm, die axis 0o, struck under Marcus Aurelius, 161 - 175 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, wearing stephane and earring, bun in the back; reverse SALVS, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising up from altar, from patera in right hand, resting left elbow on throne, feet on footstool.
Rare with this grade.

Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.

*The logo of Pharmacology was taken from Salus 's Patera and snake .

From The Sam Mansourati Collection. / Item number RI 75220 (F)/ 20469 (S).

Given as a souvenir to a dear friend and a great Pharmacist on 9/8/2017.
Sam
collage 8-26-2006 4-48-55 PM.jpg
Faustina Junior, Concordia189 viewsAr Denarius

FAVSTINAAVGPIIAVGFIL
Draped bust left

CONCORDIA
Concordia seated left, holding flower & resting left elbow on cornucopiae; globe under throne.

RIC 502b, RSC 55

I love this left facing portrait with quite a nice hair style for Faustina Junior
4 commentsarizonarobin
Faustinajr090308.jpg
Faustina Junior, Concordia100 viewsPurchased from the Forvm Ancient Coins:

Silver denarius, SRCV II 4703, RIC III Pius 500b (FAVSTINAE in error), gVF, Rome mint, 3.579g, 19.1mm, 180o, 152 - 154 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVG ANTONINI AVG PII FIL, draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA, Concordia standing half right, cornucopia in left, raising fold of skirt with right
4 commentsarizonarobin
0141-220.jpg
Faustina junior, Denarius 34 viewsRome mint, AD 161/175
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
DIANA LVCIF, Diana Lucifera standing left
Ref : RCV #5250
Potator II
2013-01-008.jpg
Faustina Junior, Empress on Peacock45 viewsFaustina Junior
Ae Sestertius; 24.20g; 30-32mm

DIVA FAV-STINA PIA
draped bust right

CONSECRATIO
Faustina on Peacock, flying right
S-C across fields

RIC 1702, Cohen 69, BMC 1570
4 commentsRobin Ayers
faustinajr1.jpg
Faustina Junior, Faustina and Children148 viewsO: FAVSTINA - AVGVSTA
Draped bust right

R: TEMPOR - FELIC S/C across fields
Faustina standing facing holding twin boys, four daughters standing at her feet

RIC 1675
Ae Dupon.; 11.78g; 27mm
3 commentsarizonarobin
fjr67.jpg
Faustina Junior, Fecunditas83 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA,
draped bust of Faustina Junior right

FECVNDITAS,
Fecunditas standing right, holding child in right hand and scepter in left

RIC 677
2 commentsarizonarobin
april_2012b.jpg
Faustina Junior, Fecunditas58 viewsFaustina Junior

FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Draped bust right

FECVND AVGVSTAE
Fecunditas standing left with four children
(commemorates Faustina and Marcus Aurelius fourth surviving child, a daughter0

BMCRE 89; Cohen 95; RIC 676
Ar Denarius
2 commentsRobin Ayers
2910426.jpg
Faustina Junior, Fecunditas85 viewsFaustina Junior. Augusta
AR Denarius 17mm, 3.25; Rome mint. Struck under Marcus Aurelius, AD 161-164.

FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Draped bust right

FECVND AVGVSTAE
Fecunditas standing left, holding two infants in her arms, between two girls.

RIC III 676 (Aurelius); RSC 95
EX-CNG Auction 291, lot426
3 commentsRobin Ayers
collage3~9.jpg
Faustina Junior, Funeral Pyre67 viewsDIVAE FAVSTIN AVG MATR CASTROR
Draped and veiled bust right

CONSE - CRATIO
Funerary monument of four stories, ornamented with garlands and statues

BMC698, C77, RIC747
2.75g; 17-19mm
1 commentsarizonarobin
faustina33.jpg
Faustina Junior, Hadrianopolis43 viewsThrace, Hadrianopolis
Faustina II, Wife of Marcus Aurelius

FAVCTEINA CEBACTH
Diademed and draped bust right

ADRIANOPOLEITWN
Hera standing left, holding patera and sceptre; altar before. Youroukova 79 (V54/R79); SNG

Copenhagen 559, Moushmov 2532
Æ 23 mm (5.12 g)
arizonarobin
faustinajr030802.jpg
Faustina Junior, Hilaritas59 viewsFaustina Junior

FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA
diademed draped bust right

HILA-RITAS
Hilaritas standing palm in right hand, cornucopiae in left

Ar 18mm; 3.24g
BMC 100, Coh. 111, RIC 686
arizonarobin
2013-01-19_newbrsetup.jpg
Faustina Junior, Hilaritas51 viewsAr Denarius

FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
draped bust right

HILARITAS
Hilaritas standing left, holding palm branch and cornucopia

RIC 686
2 commentsRobin Ayers
2569.jpg
Faustina Junior, Judaea70 viewsJUDAEA, Gaza.
Æ 16mm; 3.95 g

CEBACTH,
Draped bust right

GAZA
Herakles standing right, leaning on club, lion’s skin over arm; Marnas symbol to left.
date HKC at top left - Dated 228 (AD 167/168)

Mionnet V, 159 corr.; Rosenberger 105 var; SNG ANS 936 var (reverse legend).

From the J.S. Wagner Collection /Ex-CNG
wildwinds example (this coin)
arizonarobin
collage14.jpg
Faustina Junior, Juno59 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Draped bust right

IVNONI REGINAE
Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter; at her feet a peacock

AR Denarius;17 mm, 3.41g
RIC 696, RSC 139a
arizonarobin
faustina783.jpg
Faustina Junior, Juno52 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA
draped bust right wearing stephane

IVNONI REGINAE
Juno seated left, holding patera and sceptre; at her feet, peacock left, looking right

RIC 697
arizonarobin
2013-01-020~0.jpg
Faustina Junior, Juno53 viewsAr Denarius

FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
draped bust right

IVNO
Juno seated left holding patera and staff, peacock at her feet

RIC 689
1 commentsRobin Ayers
faustinajunior.jpg
Faustina Junior, Lycaonia13 viewsFaustina Junior
Ae 19mm; 6.39g
Lycaonia, Hyde

Draped bust right

River-god reclining left, holding reeds and leaning on overturned urn from which water flows
Robin Ayers
FaustinaJr1~0.jpg
Faustina Junior, Macedonia38 viewsAe24mm

Macedonia Under Rome
146-175 AD

Draped bust right; winged thunderbolt

Cop. 1349
arizonarobin
faustina100409.jpg
Faustina Junior, Neapolis49 viewsFaustina Junior
Samaria, Neapolis

FAVCTEINA CEB EY CE CEBAQUIGA
draped bust right

F L NEACPOLEW CYPIAC PALACT
Facing cult statue of Artemis Ephesia, holding two scepters topped with doves,
flanked by stags
date across L and R field

BMC 62, Ae 23-24mm; 6.84g
1 commentsarizonarobin
faustinajr092108a.jpg
Faustina Junior, Pautalia46 viewsFaustina
Pautalia, Thrace.

FAVCTINA- CEBACTH
Draped bust of Faustina right

OVLPIAC PAVTALIAC
Hygeia standing right, feeding serpent

Pautalia, Thrace. SNG Cop. 694, Moushmov 4115
Ae;21mm;5.44g
arizonarobin
faustinajr092108b.jpg
Faustina Junior, Pautalia37 viewsFaustina
Pautalia, Thrace.

FAVCTIN-A CEBACTH
Draped bust of Faustina right

OVLPIAC PAVTALIAC
Hygeia standing right, feeding serpent

SNG Cop. 694, Moushmov 4115
AE 22-23mm;7.08g
arizonarobin
faustina1.jpg
Faustina Junior, Peacock49 viewsDIVA FAVSTINA PIA
Draped bust right

CONSECRATIO
Peacock standing front, head right, tail feathers spread out behind

RIC 743, RSC 70, C 70
Ar Denarius
Not the most attractive portrait- but certainly a different style.
arizonarobin
faustinajr444.jpg
Faustina Junior, Peacock43 viewsDIVA FAV-STINA PIA
draped bust right

CONSE-CRATIO
Peacock standing facing


RIC 743, RSC 70, C 70
Ar Denarius
arizonarobin
2013-01-023.jpg
Faustina Junior, Peacock75 viewsDIVA FAVSTINA PIA
Draped bust at right

CONSECRATIO
Peacock standing right

RIC 744
2 commentsRobin Ayers
faustinajr99~0.jpg
Faustina Junior, Peacock & Throne70 viewsFaustina II Denarius. 176-180 AD. 2.7 gm.

DIVA FAVSTINA PIA
Draped bust right

CONSECRATIO
Throne with scepter across it, peacock below & standing right

RIC 745, Sear5 #5216, RSC 73
arizonarobin
collage7~1.jpg
Faustina Junior, Philippopolis50 viewsThrace, Philippopolis

FAVCTEINA CEBACTH
draped bust right

FILIPPOPOLEITWN
Artemis standing left holding corn ears & torch


AE25, 8.42g
Moushmov 5163, BMC 13
Prov. Harlan J. Berk
arizonarobin
FavjSe10-2.jpg
Faustina Junior, RIC (M. Aurelius) 1635, Sestertius of AD 161 (Emperor's growing family)40 viewsÆ Sestertius (28.3g, Ø35mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Fautina Junior facing right.
Rev.: FECVND AVGVSTA (around) S C (in field), Fecunditas standing left, holding two infants in her arms, two more standing left and right of her raising their right hands.
RIC (Aurelius) 1635; BMC 902; Cohen 96; Foss (RHC) 143:8

This type refers to the growing family of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Jr. The four children are four surviving girls (of a total of 8 children born) around late 160: they were at the time the dies were designed: Annia Galeria Aurelia Faustina (age 14), Lucilla (12) and Fadilla (1) and Cornifica (0).
Charles S
Favjse13-2.jpg
Faustina Junior, RIC (M. Aurelius) 1649, Sestertius of AD 161 (Emperor's growing family)53 viewsÆ Sestertius (23.38g, Ø31mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Fautina Junior facing right.
Rev.: IVNONI LVCINAE (around) S C (in field), Faustina as Juno, standing left, holding a child in her arms, two more standing left and right of her raising their right hands.
RIC (Aurelius) 1649; Sear 2000 (RCV) 5277
ex Byzantine Coin Store (via VCoins)

This type refers to the growing family of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Jr. The three girls represent the three surviving children (of a total of 7 born) around end of 159 to early 160: Annia Galeria Aurelia Faustina (age 14), Lucilla (12) and Fadilla (1).
Charles S
FAVJSE23-2.jpg
Faustina Junior, RIC (M. Aurelius) 1697 v., Sestertius of AD 176-18045 viewsÆ Sestertius (22,2g, Ø31mm, 6h). Rome, AD 176-180.
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right, hair knotted behind.
Rev.: AETERNITAS around, S C in field below, Faustina, seated left on throne with canopy, holding sceptre, between two dancing girls with veils flying above their heads.
RIC (Aurelius) 1697 var. (no canopy); BMCRE 1568 var. (same); Cohen 10 (30 fr.) var. (same); Banti 7 (5 spec.)
Ex ArtCoins Roma s.r.l. Auction 15 (April 2015).
2 commentsCharles S
FAVJSE25-1.jpg
Faustina Junior, RIC (M. Aurelius) 1702, Sestertius of AD 176-18074 viewsÆ Sestertius (26,18g). Rome, AD 176-180.
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right, hair knotted behind.
Rev.: CONSECRATIO around, S | C Faustina, veiled, holding scepter, seated on peacock flying right.
RIC (M. Aurelius) 1702 (S); BMC 1570; Cohen 69; Banti 38 (24 spec.)
Ex Künker eLive Auction 37, Oct. 2015
4 commentsCharles S
FAVJSe22-1.jpg
Faustina Junior, RIC (M. Aurelius) 1703, Sestertius of AD 175-176 (Peacock)24 viewsÆ Sestertius (21,34g, Ø 31mm, 8h). Rome mint. Struck AD 175-176.
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right, hair knotted behind.
Rev.: CONSECRATIO around, S C across field, Peacock turned left, spreading its tail.
RIC (M. Aurelius) 1703; BMCRE 1573; Cohen 72; Banti 41 (3 spec.)
Ex Roma Numismatics E-Sale 17 (April 2015).
Charles S
FAVJSE24-2.jpg
Faustina Junior, RIC (M. Aurelius) 1717, Sestertius of AD 176-180 (biga)62 viewsÆ Sestertius (28,76g, Ø 32mm, 12h). Rome, AD 176-180.
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right, hair knotted behind.
Rev.: SIDERIBVS RECEPTA around, S | C, Faustina, with veil flying behind head, in biga right.
RIC Marcus Aurelius 1717 (R); BMC 1591; Cohen 217 (25 fr.); Banti 123 (5 spec.)
Ex Boule (Paris), Mail Bid Auction 107, Oct. 2015

"Received amongst the stars".
1 commentsCharles S
Favjse12-2.jpg
Faustina Junior, RIC unlisted, Sestertius of AD 161 (Emperor's growing family)76 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.86g, Ø33mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Fautina Junior facing right.
Rev.: FECVND AVGVSTA (around) S C (in field), Fecunditas standing left, holding a child in her arms, two more standing left and right of her raising their right hands.
Strack 1335 (1 coll.: Naples); RIC (Aurelius) unlisted (legend corresponds to RIC 1635 and the representation to RIC 1649); Cohen: (idem with nos. 96 and 136)
ex Aeternitas Coins & Antiquities (via VCoins)

This type refers to the growing family of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Jr. The three girls represent the three surviving children (of a total of 7 born) around end of 159 to early 160: Annia Galeria Aurelia Faustina (age 14), Lucilla (12) and Fadilla (1).

Additional information from Curtis Clay through the forum discussion group: "This type commemorating the birth of a third survivng daughter usually has the legend IVNONI LVCINAE, whereas the type FECVND AVGVSTAE commemorates the birth of the next daughter about a year or so later and shows Fecunditas/Faustina holding two children in her arms while two more stand at her feet.

Strack 1335 knew a sestertius like yours in only one specimen, in Naples, but unfortunately does not illustrate the coin.

The Naples collection was stolen in 1977. Your coin is of nice quality, and has an old-collection look, lightly cleaned on the reverse. I would not be at all surprised if it is the actual Naples coin! "
Charles S
Faust2Ric744.JPG
Faustina Junior, Rome, 176-180 AD29 viewsDIVA FAVSTINA PIA
Bust right
CONSECRATIO
Peacock standing right
RIC 744, BMC 716, C 71
Wife of M. Aurelius, d. 175 AD
whitetd49
911125.jpg
Faustina Junior, Salus53 viewsFAVSTINA-AVGVSTA
draped bust right

S-A-LVS
Salus feeding snake rising from altar

BM 141-144, Cohen 197 (thank you Curtis for the correct ref!)
Ar Denarius; 19mm;3.22g
arizonarobin
faustinajr2.jpg
Faustina Junior, Salus122 viewsObv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust of Faustina right.
Rev: SALVS, Salus seated left feeding snake arising from altar

Rome mint: 161-175 A.D., RIC 714; Sear 5262
3 commentsarizonarobin
1_Faustina_minore.jpg
Faustina junior, sestertius (Boyd collection)38 viewsFaustina minore, figlia di Antonino Pio, moglie di Marco Aurelio e madre di Commodo. Zecca di Roma sotto Antonino Pio (161 d.C.)
AE, 20.43 gr., 29,5 mm, 0°, VF (BB)
D/ FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, busto drappeggiato di Faustina a dx
R/ LAETITIA S C, Laetitia stante a sx con corona e scettro
RIC 1653
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (10 marzo 2008, numero catalogo 35), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2005), ex Baldwin's Auctions 42 (London, 26 settembre 2005, parte del lotto 431), ex Sotheby's (London, 12 giugno 1891), ex W.C. Boyd collection (London, dal 12 giugno 1891).
paolo
collage2.jpg
Faustina Junior, Spes56 viewsFAVSTINA - AVGVSTA
Draped bust right

AVGVSTI - PII FIL
Spes standing left holding flower and lifting skirt

RIC-497, BMC 1106, RSC 24
Ar Denarius; 3.22g; 16.9mm
arizonarobin
collage3~10.jpg
Faustina Junior, tetradrachm Dikaiosyne80 viewsEGYPT, Alexandria
BI Tetradrachm (23mm, 13.77 g).
Dated RY 16 of Pius (AD 152/153)

Draped bust right / Dikaiosyne seated left, wearing chiton and peplos, holding scales and cornucopiae.

Köln 1967; Dattari 3240; Milne 2174; Emmett 1938. VF, large spot of red encrustation.
arizonarobin
2013-01-022.jpg
Faustina Junior, Twins42 viewsAr Denarius

FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Diademed bust of Faustina right

SAECVLI FELICIT
Two infants seated on a throne


1 commentsRobin Ayers
collage1~10.jpg
Faustina Junior, Twins reverse84 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA
draped bust right

SAECVLI FELICIT
draped throne on which there are two baby boys, Commodus and his brother

RIC 710, Sear'88 #1500, RSC 190
Denarius;3.45g; 17-18mm
3 commentsarizonarobin
collage5~5.jpg
Faustina Junior, Venus161 viewsFAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL
draped bust right

VENVS
Venus standing left, holding apple and rudder placed on dove.

RIC 517a, Sear5 #4708, RSC 266
AR Denarius;18mm;3.42g / Date: 149 - 156 A.D. Rome

(a bit different and nice hair style for Faustina Junior)
3 commentsarizonarobin
faustinajr030801.jpg
Faustina Junior, Venus70 viewsAr denarius; 3.13g; 16-17mm

FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA
draped bust left

AVGVSTI PII FIL
Venus standing left holding victory and resting
hand on shield set on helmet

RIC 495b, BMC 1105, RSC 15a
wildwinds example (this coin)
arizonarobin
2013-01-024.jpg
Faustina Junior, Venus74 viewsAr Denarius

FAVSTINAE AVG P II AVG FIL
draped bust right

VENVS
Venus standing left, holding rudder and apple

RIC 517c
5 commentsRobin Ayers
Faustina_Junior__Augusta.png
Faustina Junior. Augusta, AD 147-175. 25 viewsAR Denarius Struck under Marcus Aurelius.
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / C E RES, Ceres seated left, on chest, holding grain ears in right hand and long torch in left.
RIC III 669 (Aurelius); MIR 18, 2-4/10c; BMCRE 82;RSC 35a.
Ch VF , 19 mm, 3.47 Grams.
2 commentsHenriette A
Faustina_Sestertius.jpg
Faustina Junior. Augusta, AD 147-175. Æ Sestertius.42 viewsRome mint. Struck under Marcus Aurelius, circa AD 161-164.
Obverse ; FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, wearing stephane.
Reverse ; TEMPOR FELIC, Fecunditas standing left , S C , holding an infant on each arm; to either side below, two children standing facing her, the inner children raising their arms to her.
gVG.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
Lg3_quart_sm.jpg
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL / Ӕ As or Dupontius (156-161 A.D.)20 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half

Ӕ, 22.5-24+mm, 9.56g, die axis 11h

There may be a countermark across the front part of the face on obverse, but due to its location it is difficult to be sure and identify it.

AVGVSTI PII FIL(ia) = daughter of August Antoninus Pius, points out to the ruling of Fausta's father Antoninus Pius rather than her husband Marcus Aurelius. Reverse: Unlike Greek Aphrodite, in addition to her other aspects Roman Venus was also a goddess of victory, this embodied in her representation as Venus Victrix (Victorious) or Victris (of Victory), like in this case: she offers a little winged representation of victory, resting on defensive military attributes (as a female goddess, she represented passive, defensive aspects of war, active ones being the domain of male Mars). SC = [Ex] Senatus Consulto (Senatus is genitive, Consulto is ablative of Consultum) = by decree of the Senate, i. e. the authority of the Senate approved minting of this coin (necessary to justify issue of copper alloy coins for which the intrinsic value was not obvious).

Of two Ӕ coins with the same legends and Venus with shield, RIC 1367 and 1389a, the first is a sestertius and its typical dimensions are characteristic of the type: 30+ mm and 20+g. This one is definitely smaller. Material seems reddish, so this one is more likely an as. Minted in Rome. Some sources give issue dates as 156-161 (the end of Faustina's father's reign), others as 145-146 (her marriage).

Annia Galeria Faustina Minor (Minor is Latin for the Younger), Faustina Minor or Faustina the Younger (born probably 21 September c. 130 CE, died in winter of 175 or spring of 176 CE) was a daughter of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius and Roman Empress Faustina the Elder. She was a Roman Empress and wife to her maternal cousin Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius. She was held in high esteem by soldiers and her own husband and was given divine honours after her death. Faustina, named after her mother, was her parents' fourth and youngest child and their second daughter; she was also their only child to survive to adulthood. She was born and raised in Rome. Her great uncle, the emperor Hadrian, had arranged with her father for Faustina to marry Lucius Verus. On 25 February 138, she and Verus were betrothed. Verus’ father was Hadrian’s first adopted son and his intended heir; however, when Verus’ father died, Hadrian chose Faustina’s father to be his second adopted son, and eventually, successor. Faustina’s father ended the engagement between his daughter and Verus and arranged for Faustina's betrothal to her maternal cousin, Marcus Aurelius; Aurelius was also adopted by her father.

In April or May 145, Faustina and Marcus Aurelius were married, as had been planned since 138. Since Aurelius was, by adoption, Antoninus Pius' son, under Roman law he was marrying his sister; Antoninus would have had to formally release one or the other from his paternal authority (his patria potestas) for the ceremony to take place. Little is specifically known of the ceremony, but it is said to have been "noteworthy". Coins were issued with the heads of the couple, and Antoninus, as Pontifex Maximus, would have officiated. Marcus makes no apparent reference to the marriage in his surviving letters, and only sparing references to Faustina. Faustina was given the title of Augusta on 1 December 147 after the birth of her first child, Galeria Faustina (or Domitia? sources differ which of them was born in 147 and was the first child).

When Antoninus died on 7 March 161, Marcus and Lucius Verus ascended to the throne and became co-rulers. Faustina then became empress. Unfortunately, not much has survived from the Roman sources regarding Faustina's life, but what is available does not give a good report. Cassius Dio and the Augustan History accuse Faustina of ordering deaths by poison and execution; she has also been accused of instigating the revolt of Avidius Cassius against her husband. The Augustan History mentions adultery with sailors, gladiators, and men of rank; however, Faustina and Aurelius seem to have been very close and mutually devoted.

Faustina accompanied her husband on various military campaigns and enjoyed the love and reverence of Roman soldiers. Aurelius gave her the title of Mater Castrorum or ‘Mother of the Camp’. She attempted to make her home out of an army camp. Between 170–175, she was in the north, and in 175, she accompanied Aurelius to the east.

That same year, 175, Aurelius's general Avidius Cassius was proclaimed Roman emperor after the erroneous news of Marcus's death; the sources indicate Cassius was encouraged by Marcus's wife Faustina, who was concerned about her husband's failing health, believing him to be on the verge of death, and felt the need for Cassius to act as a protector in this event, since her son Commodus, aged 13, was still young. She also wanted someone who would act as a counterweight to the claims of Tiberius Claudius Pompeianus, who was in a strong position to take the office of Princeps in the event of Marcus’s death. The evidence, including Marcus's own Meditations, supports the idea that Marcus was indeed quite ill, but by the time Marcus recovered, Cassius was already fully acclaimed by the Egyptian legions of II Traiana Fortis and XXII Deiotariana. "After a dream of empire lasting three months and six days", Cassius was murdered by a centurion; his head was sent to Marcus Aurelius, who refused to see it and ordered it buried. Egypt recognized Marcus as emperor again by 28 July 175.

Faustina died in the winter of 175, after a somewhat suspicious accident, at the military camp in Halala (a city in the Taurus Mountains in Cappadocia). Aurelius grieved much for his wife and buried her in the Mausoleum of Hadrian in Rome. She was deified: her statue was placed in the Temple of Venus in Rome and a temple was dedicated to her in her honor. Halala’s name was changed to Faustinopolis and Aurelius opened charity schools for orphan girls called Puellae Faustinianae or 'Girls of Faustina'. The Baths of Faustina in Miletus are named after her.

In their thirty years of marriage, Faustina bore Marcus Aurelius thirteen children, of whom 6 reached adulthood and were significant in history. The best known are emperor Commodus and the closest to him sister Lucilla (both depicted in a very historically inaccurate movie "Gladiator" and, together with their parents, in a much more accurate 1st season "Reign of Blood" of the TV series "Roman Empire").
Yurii P
Lg004N_quad_sm.jpg
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL / Ӕ As or Dupontius (156-161 A.D.)11 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half.

Ӕ, 23-24mm, 9.15g, die axis 11h

Another of this type:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-151025
See more info there.

Their comparison:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-151893
Yurii P
FAUSTJR-4~0.jpg
Fecunditas, goddess of fertility268 viewsFaustina Junior, wife of Marcus Aurelius. Augusta, 147-175/6 CE.
AR Denarius (19mm, 3.16g), Rome mint, 161-175 CE.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, a double band of pearls around her head.
Rev: FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, holding scepter & child.
RIC 677; RSC 99; BMC 91; Sear 5252; Cohen 99.

Although many coin reference books classify Fecunditas as a personification of fertility rather than as an actual deity, Fecunditas was recognized as a Roman divinity by Nero, who erected a statue to her. Tacitus notes that upon the birth of Claudia Neronis, the senate decreed the construction of a temple of Fertility to be built at Antium.

Fecunditas is always portrayed as a female figure holding a child, or children and often a scepter, cornucopia, palm branch or caduceus. Sometimes the children are depicted standing at her feet. Coins portraying her usually advertise the fertility of the imperial family who issued the coin.
EmpressCollector
FAUSTJR-21.jpg
Fortuna, Personification of good luck294 viewsFaustina Junior, wife of Marcus Aurelius, Augusta 147-175/6 C.E.
AR Denarius (18.5 mm), Rome mint, 161-175 C.E.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Bare-headed & draped bust r.
Rev: FORTVNAE MVLIEBRI, Fortuna enthroned left, holding rudder and cornucopiae.
RIC-683; Sear-5253; BMC-96; Cohen-107.

This legend, unique to this empress, dedicates the type 'to the Fortune of Women'. Festus speaks of a statue of this goddess at the fourth milestone from Rome.

Fortuna personifies good fortune, luck and prosperity. She is usually depicted holding a rudder or cornucopiae; she sometimes holds a wheel at her side.
EmpressCollector
Coin1001_quad_sm.jpg
Galerius Concordia Militum Ӕ post-reform radiate fraction (295 - 299), Cyzicus mint6 viewsGAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, radiate, draped (?) and cuirassed bust right / CONCORDIA MI-LITVM + KB in lower centre, Prince (the left figure) standing right in military dress, holding parazonium or baton of imperium, receiving small Victory with a wreath and palm branch on globe from naked Jupiter (the right figure) standing left holding tall scepter.

Ӕ, 20mm, 2.36g, die axis 6h, base metal seems red, high copper content.

Galerius ruled as Caesar from 293 to 305, but most sources give minting years for this type of coin as 295-299.

RIC VI Cyzicus 19b (18b?), Sear 3713. 19b has cuirassed and draped bust, 18b -- only cuirassed. I think the edge of the military cape on the shoulder means it is draped in this case, but distinction seems very vague to me. Looking at coins identified as 18b and 19b I cannot see any clear pattern, it seems that many are confused in this respect just like myself.

GALerius VALerius MAXIMIANUS NOBilitas CAESar (in this era the title of "junior" emperor while Augustus was a "senior" one), CONCORDIA MILITVM = [Dedicated to] harmony with the soldiers, K = Kysikos (Cyzicus) mint, B = officina Beta (workshop #2). The figure to the right is naked except for a cape, so it is a god, the sceptre points to him being Jupiter, the ruler of gods. Jupiter is also typically associated with Victory, he was often depicted with Victory in the right hand and sceptre in the left. The line across his head probably designates a wreath, also a common feature of Jupiter. Victory holds her common attributes, the triumphal wreath and a palm branch, the orb she stands on represents the world (thus meaning dominion over it). Round Earth was a firmly established concept in Roman times. The left figure, the prince (Galerius in this case) is identified by his full battle dress and the hand-held short elongated shape, which is either the ivory baton of imperium (the high command) or, more likely, a parazonium, a long triangular dagger, typically cradled in the bearer's left arm. A Roman parazonium blade tended to be leaf shape and approximately 15"-19" long. It was a ceremonial weapon, a mark of high rank, used to rally the troops.

GALERIUS, * c. 250, near Serdica, Dacia Ripensis (Sofia, Bulgaria) or in a Dacian place later called Felix Romuliana (Gamzigrad, Serbia) † late Apr or early May 311 (aged ~60), Serdica, Dacia Ripensis (Sofia, Bulgaria) ‡ 1 Mar or 21 May 293 – 1 May 305 (as Eastern Caesar, under Diocletian), 1 May 305 – late Apr or early May 311 (as Eastern Augustus with many co-emperors).

Galerius was born of humble parentage and had a distinguished military career. On March 1, 293, he was nominated as Caesar by Diocletian, the supreme ruler of the empire, to help him govern the East. Galerius divorced his wife and married Diocletian’s daughter, Valeria. After ruling from Egypt from 293 to 295, Galerius assumed command of defensive operations against the Sasanians in 297. After being defeated, he then won a decisive victory that increased his influence with Diocletian. Galerius next proceeded to the Balkans and won numerous victories in the region. A staunch pagan, he persuaded the emperor to initiate the persecution of the Christians at Nicomedia in 303.

When Diocletian abdicated on May 1, 305, Galerius became Augustus of the East, ruling the Balkans and Anatolia. Since Galerius had arranged the appointment of two of his favourites, Maximinus (his nephew) and Flavius Valerius Severus, to be Caesars in both East and West, he was in effect the supreme ruler. When Constantius Chlorus died in 306, Galerius insisted that Severus govern the West as Augustus, but he grudgingly conceded the subordinate title of caesar to Chlorus’s son, Constantine, who was correctly suspected of Christian sympathies. Galerius’s supremacy was, however, short-lived. Severus was soon overthrown (306) and killed by Maxentius (son of the former emperor Maximian). Galerius invaded Italy but was forced to retreat. In 308 he induced Diocletian and Maximian to meet him at Carnuntum on the Danube and to declare Maxentius a usurper. On November 11, Galerius proclaimed as Augustus of the West his friend Licinius, who had effective control only in the region of the Danube.

A ruthless ruler, Galerius imposed the poll tax on the urban population and maintained the persecution of the Christians. In the winter of 310–311, however, he became incapacitated with a horrible disease. Fearing, perhaps, that his illness was the vengeance of the Christian God, he issued on April 30, 311, an edict grudgingly granting toleration. Shortly afterward he died. He was succeeded by his nephew Maximinus Daia.

Diocletian's money reform of 293.

Trying to fight the runaway inflation that he did not understand and to return people's faith in Roman coins, Diocletian did a complete overhaul of the Roman monetary system. He introduced a new theoretical base monetary unit called the denarius communis or d.c. (only rarely represented by actual coins, one example being old pre-Aurelian antoniniani still in circulation, valued now at 1 d. c., another – minted only on a small scale 1.5g coin with the reverse legend VTILITAS PVBLICA, "for public use"). Then he started minting new types of coins including a gold aureus of new purity and weight standard (1/60 pound of pure gold), a quality silver coin, argenteus, roughly similar to the early imperial denarius in size and weight, a new billon coin, of a copper alloy but with a small fraction of silver mostly in the form of coating, roughly similar to the old antoninianus when it was just introduced, however bearing now a laureate rather than a radiate bust. This type of coin is now commonly referred to as a follis or a nummus. Finally, a new radiate bronze coin, now referred to as a "radiate fraction" or a radiatus was introduced, similar to the early imperial aes in value, but much smaller in weight and size. There were also rare issues of ½ and ¼ nummus coins, mostly in connection to some celebration. Interestingly, the obverses of these new coins were chosen to represent some identical "generic" image of a "good emperor" independent of the actual likeness of the August or Caesar in whose name they were issued, thus affirming the unity of all the tetrarchy rulers. Very roughly one may think of a new radiatus as a price of one loaf of bread, a new argenteus as a very good daily wage, and a new aureus as a price of a good horse. An approximate relationship between these units was as follows: 1 aureus ≈ 20 argentei ≈ 1000 d.c. (some scholars prefer 25 argentei and 1250 d.c.); 1 argenteus ≈ 5 nummi ≈ 50 d.c.; 1 nummus ≈ 5 radiati ≈ 10 d.c.; 1 radiatus ≈ 2 d.c. Of course we know that this reform was ineffective and inflation continued, so all these values were constantly shifting due to changing markets. Diocletian himself stopped minting argenteus in c. 305, and Constantine in his monetary reforms only re-established a new and highly successful gold standard, solidus (1/72 pound of pure gold, surprisingly actually first introduced also by Diocletian in 301, but only as a pilot version). As for billon and bronze coins, "folles" or "nummi", they were minted in all shapes and sizes all over the 4th century, often horribly debased by inflation, and their values at each point can only be guessed. It seems that in later times up to 1000 small bronze coins were sealed in a leather pouch to produce a reasonable unit of payment, thus giving rise to the name follis (lit. "bag" in Latin), which is now anachronistically applied to many billon and bronze coins of the late 3d and 4th century.
Yurii P
PC200061_mod_frag.jpg
Generic Emperor of Late Diocletian Era7 viewsEnlarged bust from http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-155064

Although taken from a coin bearing the name of Galerius, this is in fact a "generic good emperor" portrait, that has nothing to do with the actual likeness of Galerius. To emphasize the universality of his tetrarchy, Diocletian minted the same portraits on all coins all over the empire, were they issued in his name, his co-Augustus Maximian, or their two junior co-emperors, Galerius and Constantius Chlorus.
Yurii P
Pompey_Jr_Sear53.jpg
Gnaeus Pompey Jr. - As - Sear Imperators 538 viewsObv: Laureate head of Janus, I above
Rev: Prow of galley r., I before, CN MAG (MA ligatured) above, IMP below
Size: 31 mm
Weight: 24,56 g
Mint: Corduba, Spain
Date: 46-45 BC
Ref: RPC 486, Crawford 471, Sydenham 1040, Sear Imperators 53
vs1969
B-faustina_01.jpg
Hybrid Faustina Junior / Marcus Aurelius Denarius70 viewsObv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA - Draped bust right.
Rev: P M TR P XVIII IMP II COS III / ARMEN - Armenia seated left, mourning, left hand resting on bow and quiver; before her, vexillum and shield.
Cat #: RIC.81 (reverse)
Weight: 4.25g
oa
FaustinaIIDenJuno.jpg
Juno7 viewsFaustina Junior
Denarius

Diademed, draped bust right, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Juno seated left, holding patera & sceptre; at feet a peacock, IVNONI REGINAE

RIC 698
Blindado
FAUSTJR-32.jpg
Laetitia, the personification of gladness and happiness.215 viewsFaustina Junior, wife of Marcus Aurelius. Augusta, 147-175/6 CE.

Æ As (25 mm, 8.6 gm), Rome mint, 161-175 CE.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, wearing circlet of pearls, hair in chignon behind.
Rev: LAETITIA SC, Laetitia standing right, holding scepter and wreath.
RIC-1657; Sear-5300; BMC-987; Cohen-152.

Laetitia personifies happiness, and as such, she resembles Hilaritas. There seems to be no set iconography for her and she has a variety of attributes: she may hold a scepter, ears of grain, a wreath, an anchor or a rudder on globe.

Jones (1990), p. 156, states that on the coins of empresses, Laetitia may signal a birth in the Imperial family.
EmpressCollector
Licinius_II.jpg
Licinius II22 viewsLicinius II Junior, Caesar 1 March 317 - 18 September 324 A.D.
Obverse: LICINIVS-NOB CAES, laureate head right
Reverse: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, VOT V surrounded by wreath, dot in circle at top of wreath, QA in ex.
Size: 19 mm Weight: 2.73 gm
Mint: QA = Arles Minted: 322 AD
Id: RIC VII Arles 231
Notes: Not a great example, but basically a free coin I acquired. I'll change it up for a much better example once it moves up the priority list. It is, however, a good example of what a coin that has electrolysis used on it with a touch of fake repatination looks like
ickster
normal_LicCaeTARLst.jpg
Licinius II Caesar, Arelate mint, 317-318 AD., Æ3, RIC 126. 13 viewsLicinius II Caesar, Arelate (Arles) mint, officina 3, 317-318 AD.,
Æ3 / Follis / Nummus ? (ø 18-20 mm / 3,31 g), bronze, axis about medal alignment ↑↑ (ca. 340°),
Obv.: VAL LICINIVS NOB CAES , his laureate, draped bust r. - son buste lauré et drapé à droite.
Rev.: IOVI CONSER - VATORI / R – S / T ARL , Jupiter standing half-naked left, holding a thunderbolt and leaning on a long scepter, his coat spread behind him, R - S in the fields, T ARL in the exergue - Jupiter à demi-nu debout à gauche tenant un foudre et un sceptre long, son manteau déployé derrière lui, R/S dans le champ, T ARL à l’exergue.
RIC VII, p. 246, no. 126 (R4) ; Ferrando I 551 ; Ferrando II 714 (R2) ; missing on www.nummus-bible-database.com .
Arminius
Licinius II Junior- ROMAE AETERNAE.jpg
Licinius II Junior- ROMAE AETERNAE46 viewsLicinius Junior, Caesar 1 March 317 - 18 September 324 A.D.


Obverse:
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right

LICINIVS IVN NOB C

LICINIVS: Licinius
IVN: Junior
NOB: Noble
C: Caesar

Reverse:
ROMAE AETERNAE [To everlasting Rome, fifteen yearly vows (quindecennalia)]

Roma standing right., shield in lap inscribed X/V

Domination: Bronze AE3, size 18 mm

Mint: In exergue R squiggle CS, Rom. RIC VII Rome 199 r3.
John Schou
Licinius_II_Jupitor_Heraclea.JPG
Licinius II Jupitor Heraclea18 viewsLicinius II 'Junior' - Roman Caesar: 317-324 A.D. -
Bronze AE3 19mm Heraclea mint: 321-324 A.D.
Reference: RIC 54 (Heraclea)
OBV: DNVALLICINLICINIVSNOBC - Helmeted, cuirassed bust left, holding spear over shoulder and shield.
REV: IOVICONSERVATORI Exe: X over IIΓ/SMHB - Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on globe and scepter; eagle with wreath in beak to left, seated captive to right.
Romanorvm
Rome 2 copy.jpg
Licinius II, Ae 3, struck 317-324 A.D. 2.65 grams, 18 mm62 viewsObverse/ LICINIUS IVN NOB C; laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Licinius Junior right.
Reverse/ VOT / XV FEL / XX RT in three lines within laurel wreath.
References/ RIC VII, p. 319 variant -- this officina not recorded; Cohen 77 varient.

Unfortunately this particular coin is no longer in my possesion; it came to me in a consignment lot of uncleaned coins from a friend in Europe. Once identified, the dealer wanted it back, much to my dismay. :-( Sometimes it really hurts being honest, doesn't it? I sent pix of the coin to David Sear and this is what he had to say: "Very rare and interesting, a previously unrecorded officina for this type (RIC notes only the first officina, 'P')" Hense, a unique example. SWEET!

Mayadigger
lic517.jpg
Licinius II, junior RIC VII 41 Thessalonica13 viewsLicinius II, AE 3, 318-319 CE.
Obverse: IMP LICINVS AVG, Laureate bust right.
Reverse: VOT V MVLT V, TSA below, all in wreath
Some silvering remaining
Thessalonica mint, 17.4 mm., 2.3 g.
NORMAN K
Licinius_II_ric_34.jpg
Licinius II: PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, Nicomedia, RIC 3410 viewsLicinius Junior, Caesar 1 March 317 - 18 September 324 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC VII 34, VF, Nicomedia mint, 4.086g, 19.0mm, 180o, 320 A.D.; obverse D N VAL LICIN LICINIVS NOB C, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe in right and scepter in left, palm frond left, • / S right, SMN in ex; obverse flan flaw. ex FORVMPodiceps
Lucius.jpg
Lucius Pomponius Cneo Filius2 viewsLucius Pomponius Cneo Filius. Serrated denarius.
Obv. Helmeted head of Roma right, L•POMPONI CN F, X behind head
Rev. naked gallic warrior in biga right, holding spear, shield and carnyx,
L•LIC•CN•DOM in exergue
20 mm. 3.86 g
Cr.282/4.

This issue with serratus edges, was minted at the newly-founded city of Narbo, the first Roman colony in gaul. The two principal magistrates Licinius Crassus and Domitius Ahenobarbus produced their coins in association with five junior colleagues, in this case L. Pomponius.

Marsman
B1668C12-53C1-415D-86AE-2C3696E2B043.jpeg
Lydia, Mostene; Claudius and Agrippina Jr.8 viewsLYDIA, Mostene. Claudius, with Agrippina Junior. AD 41-54. Æ (21mm, 6.06 g, 12h). Pedanius, magistrate. Jugate draped busts of Claudius, laureate, and Agrippina right / Hero riding horse right, holding bipennis. RPC I 2461; SNG Copenhagen 285. VF, green patina.ecoli
AntPiusSestBetrothal.jpg
MAFJ1 The Betrothal of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior38 viewsAntoninus Pius

Sestertius
ca 140

Laureate head of Antoninus Pius, right, ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TRP COS III
CONCORDIAE - Antoninus Pius standing right on left, holding Concordia, shaking hands with Faustina I to right; Marcus Aurelius and Faustina below in center, also shaking hands.

RIC 601

Marcus Annius Verus was born in Rome in 121. He was first betrothed to the daughter of Aelius Caesar, but after Aelius' death, Antoninus Pius adopted him. He took the name Marcus Aelius Aurelius Verus.

The Historia Augusta records: Marcus Antoninus was a man who devoted himself to philosophy throughout his life and he excels all the principles in purity of character. His father was Annius Verus, who died during his praetorship. . . . His mother was Domitia Lucilla, daughter of the consul Calvisius Tullus. . . .He was brought up partly in the place where he was born and partly in the house of his grandfather Verus, next to the Lateran Palace. He was to marry his first cousin, Annia Faustina. . . . He assumed the toga of manhood in his fifteenth year [134] and at once was betrothed, at Hadrian's wish, to the daughter of Lucius Commodus. . . . After Hadrian's death, Pius immediately got his wife to ask Marcus if he would break off his betrothal to the daughter of Lucius Commodus and marry their own daughter Faustina (whom Hadrian had wanted to marry Commodus' son, even though he was badly matched in age). After thinking the matter over, Marcus replied he was willing. When this was arranged, Pius designated Marcus to be consul with himself [139]. . . and gave him the name of Caesar.

Marcus, at least, was given a choice, and would already have known Faustina well. One can imagine that Faustina, if she was old enough to grasp the implications, was relieved at the prospect of marrying the studious young man rather than someone far older than her.
1 commentsBlindado
marcus_aurelius_sesterz.jpg
Marcus Aurelius as Caesar under Antoninus Pius, 139 - 161 A.D., Rome mint97 views Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III Pius 1325 b, weight 26.6 g, max. diameter 31.25 mm, Rome mint, 155 - 156 A.D.; obv. AVRELIVS CAES ANTON AVG PII F, bare headed bust r.draped on l. shoulder; rev. TR POT X COS II S C, Minerva standing left, owl in extended right, spear in left, shield at feet behind, Scarce. Olive-brown patina, some corrosion on one edge. Very fine style portrait!

Marcus Aurelius bore the junior rank of Caesar for the unusually long time of 22 years! He was about 35 years old when this coin was minted, about 5 years before he became Emperor.

Ex. Andreas Kohn

Photo by Andreas Kohn
5 commentsSteve E
byz_2_pan.jpg
Maurice Tiberius, 13 August 582 - 22 November 602 A.D.30 viewsBronze follis, (SBCV 494), weight 11.8g, max. diameter 31.9 mm, 2nd officina, Constantinople mint, 590 - 591 A.D.; Obv. D N mAVRC TIbER PP AVC, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, globus cruciger in right, shield in left, Rev. large M, cross above, ANNO left, σ I II (year 9) right, B (2nd officina) below, CON in exergue. Brown with dusty green desert patina.

Background Info courtesy Forvm Ancient Coins;

Joint rule with Theodosius (his son), 29 March 590 - 22 November 602 A.D.
Maurice Tiberius, a successful general, was selected by Tiberius II Constantine as his successor. Although he achieved a favorable peace in Persia and was able to stem the losses of territory in Italy and Africa, much of the Balkans were lost. Focas, a junior officer, led a military revolt against Maurice and was declared emperor in November 602. Maurice and Theodosius, his son and co-emperor, were captured and murdered.

Steve E
bigun_jg_01_smaller.jpg
MAXIMIANUS60 viewsMAXIMIANUS
28.6 mm, 180º,
Laureate head right / Fides standing left holding two standards.
Obverse legend: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG
Reverse legend: FIDES MILITVM AVGG ET CAESS NN
In ex.: AQP
-------------------------------------
RIC VI 60b p319
A reverse legend that appears only at Aquileia c. 305-306.

(Marcus Aurelius Valerianus Maximianus)
Junior co-Emperor of the First Tetrarchy
AD 286-305
Tkonnova
IMG_4483.JPG
Neapolis, Samaria. Faustina Jr., wife of Marcus Aurelius (138 - 161 AD).19 viewsNeapolis, Samaria. Faustina Jr., wife of Marcus Aurelius (138 - 161 AD).
AE (27.1 mm).
Bust of Faustina Junior r.; ΦΑΥCΤΕΙΝΑ CΕΒ ΕΥCΕ CΕΒΑ ΘΥΓΑ
Tyche wearing kalathos, standing facing looking l., holding cornucopia, and resting on rudder; ΦΛ ΝΕΑC ΠΟΛΕWC CΥΡΙΑC ΠΑΛΕCTI (Flavia Neapolis in Syria Palestina); in field, date: ΕΤ ΠΖ (year 87 = 158/9 AD). Sofaer pl. 48,46.
Maritima
0070-410np_noir.jpg
Nero and Agrippina, tetradrachm48 viewsAlexandria mint, AD 56-57
NEP KLAY KAIS SEB GEP AYTO, Laureate of Nero right
AGPITTTTINA SEBAETH, bust of Agrippina junior right LG in right field
12.5 gr
Ref : RCV # 1989
1 commentsPotator II
835_P__Porcius_Laeca.jpg
P. Porcius Laeca - AR denarius7 viewsRome
²107 BC
¹110-109 BC
helmeted head of Roma right
ROMA / P L(AE)CA
X
magistrate standing left in military dress with hand raised, citizen in toga before him, attendant behind magistrate with rod in right and two rods in left
PROVOCO
¹Crawford 301/1, SRCV I 178, Sydenham 571a, RSC I Porcia 4
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Rauch

Reverse commemorates the second Lex Porcia (Lex de Porcia de tergo civium) proposed by M. Porcius Cato (Cato the Elder), the junior consul in 195 BC which extended the right to provocatio (appeal) against flogging.
Johny SYSEL
Faustina_II_pompeiopolis.jpg
Paphlagonia, Pompeiopolis; Demeter standing l. AE 257 viewsFaustina Junior (died 176 A.D.) Pompeiopolis, Paphlagonia, 25mm, 8.14g. CEBACTH ΦAVCTEINA, draped bust right / MHTPO ΠOM-ΠHIOΠOΛIC, Demeter standing, holding ears of corn and scepter. Righetti 195, 6. Sear 1735 var (slightly different inscriptions).Podiceps
FAUSTJR-39.jpg
Peacock320 viewsDiva Faustina Junior -- Died 175/6 CE. Wife of Marcus Aurelius.
AR denarius (17.9 mm, 3.6 gm). Rome mint, 176-180 CE.
Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, Bare-headed & draped bust r.
Rev: CONSECRATIO, Peacock standing r., looking back.
RIC-744, BMC-716, Cohen-71a, Sear-5215.
EmpressCollector
fj2~0.jpg
PEACOCK259 viewsFaustina junior minted Rome after AD176 denarius
RCV 5215 3.09g
Head right with legend DIVA FAVSTINA PIA
Peacock standing right
Coincraft July 03 P245, No R896 £95
1 commentsmickdale
Philippe junior sesterce.jpg
Philip junior - sestertius29 viewsIMP. M. IVL. PHILIPPVS AVG.
LIBERALITAS AVGG. III / S C , Philip the Arab and Philip junior togate, seated left on curule chairs.
Ginolerhino
agg1a.jpg
Provinicial Nero & Agrippina, Ionia Smyrna, Struck 54-59 CE19 viewsIONIA. Smyrna. Nero (54-68). Ae. Aulos Gessios Philopatris, magistrate.
Obverse: NEPΩNA ΣEBAΣTON AΓPIΠΠINAN ΣEBAΣTHN
Confronted busts of Agrippina Junior, diademed and draped, at left and Nero, laureate, at right.
Reverse: AY ΓEΣΣIOΣ ΦIΛOΠATPIΣ / ΖMYP
Nemesis standing right, holding out fold of dress; & caduceus; serpent at feet to right.
sold 2-2018
SNG Cop 1352, SGI 646, RPC 2479.
NORMAN K
GORDIAN_III_AR_DENARIUS_SALUS.jpg
Roman Empire , Emperor Gordian III. AD 238-244. AR Denarius97 viewsGordian III. AD 238-244. AR Denarius (20 mm, 2.92 g, 1 h) . Rome mint, 4th officina. 7th emission, struck AD 240.

Obverse : Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right .
Reverse : Salus standing right, feeding serpent from patera.

References: RIC IV 129a; RSC 325.
Superb extremely fine .

Salus was a Roman goddess. She was the goddess of health and the daughter of Asclepius God of Medicine .
Hygieia for Ancient Greeks.

New Owner : Miss. Arianna Parrillo.

EX ; The Sam Mansourati Collection./ NO. RI 2032

Marcus Antonius Gordianus (January 20, 225 – February 11, 244), known in English as Gordian III, was a Roman Emperor from 238 to 244. Marcus Antonius Gordianus' mother was the daughter of Gordian I and the sister of Gordian II. This made him the grandson and nephew of the two Gordian emperors. His younger sister was called Gordiana. Gordian had assumed the name of his maternal grandfather in 238.
It was the public hostility towards the successors of the Gordian emperors which brought the thirteen year old boy to the attention of the Roman senate. Not only was he a Gordian and hence to the ordinary Roman people's liking, but so too was his family very rich. Rich enough to finance a bonus payment to the people.So Gordian III became Caesar (junior emperor) alongside the two new Augusti Balbinus and Pupienus. But only a few months after this, Balbinus and Pupienus was murdered by the praetorian guard.This left Gordian III accede to the throne as emperor.
In 241 Gordian married Furia Sabinia Tranquillina, the daughter of Timesitheus. Gordian joined Timesitheus who was campaigning against the Persians. When Timesitheus died of an illness, he was replaced by Philip the Arab who was to become emperor when Gordian III died in 244. How Gordian died is not known, although Philip blamed it on an illness and it is thought that Philip engineered a mutiny. Gordian III was deified after his death. Gordian ruled from 238-244.

Gordian III is considered one of the most powerful men in the world.
1 commentsSam
MVC-B7924s.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - FAUSTINA JUNIOR19 viewsFaustina Jr Denarius. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Spes, draped, standing left, holding flower & gathering up fold of skirt. RSC 24. RIC 497, Cohen 24 dpaul7
ConsJunioror.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine II AE3 Heraclea19 viewsAE3 16.4x17.7mm
Obv. CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
Bust right, laureate
Rev. GLOR_IA EXER_CITVS
Two soldiers flanking two standards
Ex. dot SMHgamma dot
Heraclea mint, third officina
Ca. 330-335 AD
gparch
12946q00~7.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.28 viewsType:

Ruler / Years: Constantine II 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Denomination: AE 3

Metal Type: Bronze

Size / Weight: 2.764g, 18.9mm

Orientation: 180 deg.

Condition: VF

Obverse Description: laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left

Obverse Legend: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C

Reverse Description: VOT X in wreath laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left

Reverse Legend: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM

Exergue: TSBVI Thessalonica mint,

Attributes: RIC 128

Notes: Constantine II was the son of Constantine I, the eldest with his second wife, Fausta. He was born in Arles (which was renamed Constantia in his honor in 328, explaining the CON mintmarks for Arles) and was made Caesar before he was a year old in 316 A.D. Upon his father`s death, Constantine II inherited the Western part of the empire. After quarrelling with his brother Constans, he invaded his territory, only to be killed in an ambush near Aquileia. His coins often include "IVN" in the legend, an abbreviation for junior.

Scott M
Faustina.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina II8 viewsFaustina junior, the reverse is Juno -Jupiters wife, she holds a patera(a small dish used for drinking or pouring of libations) and a scepter. A peacock at her feet.jessvc1
FAUSTINA_JNR_DIVA_Denarius_PEACOCK.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, FAUSTINA II (JUNIOR). Commemorative denarius of Rome. Struck A.D.176-180 under Marcus Aurelius16 viewsObverse: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA. Draped bust of Faustina Junior facing right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO. Peacock standing facing right.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 3.2grms | Die Axis: 12
RIC III : 744

Annia Galeria Faustina was the youngest daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Senior. She married Marcus Aurelius in A.D.145 and was given the title of Augusta on the birth of her first child in A.D.146. She went on to have several more children, one of whom was the future emperor Commodus. In A.D.175 Faustina accompanied Marcus Aurelius on his journey to the East but she died at Halala, a village at the foot of the Taurus Mountains.
1 comments*Alex
8691.jpeg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina II, Silver Denarius, RIC 686, RSC 111114 viewsFaustina Junior, died 176 A.D., wife of Marcus Aurelius, Silver denarius.
RIC 686, Sear 4254, RSC 111, BMC 100, HRIC 15, Cohen 111,
2.92g, 16.6mm, 180o, Rome mint.

FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left holding palm branch and cornucopia;
1 commentsPetrus Blasimus
1025LG.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina Jr., Rome - RIC III 71192 viewsFaustina Junior, (A.D. 161-175) Under M. Aurelius, AR Denarius (17 mm, 3.13 g), Rome Mint, Struck 161 A.D.

RIC 711 (Volume III, page 271); Sear 5260;

Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev: SAECVLI FELICIT, Infants seated on ornamented and draped throne vis-à-vis, each raising hand.

An important historical type, commemorating the birth of Commodus and his twin brother, Antoninus, in 161 AD.
1 commentsJericho
Faustina.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, FAUSTINA JUNIOR Denarius. RIC III : 712. 758 viewsObv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA. Diademed bust of Faustina facing right.
Rev: SAECVLI FELICIT. Two children, Commodus and Antoninus, seated on throne, with globe between them.
8 commentsthe_Apostate
bpAnto1E6FausJr.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina Junior, AE Sestertius36 viewsObv: FAUSTINA AVGVSTA
Bare headed and draped bust, right.
Rev: FECVNDITAS
Fecunditus standing, right, resting on sceptre and holding child on left palm.
Sestertius, 17.6 gm, 28 mm, RIC 1638
Massanutten
FAUSTINE.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina Junior, AE Sestertius14 viewsSesterce de Faustine Jeune. RIC 1667.
Avers: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA. Buste de Faustine Jeune à droite
Revers: SALVTI AVGVSTAE / SC. La Santé assise tenant une patère de la main droite et nourissant un serpent.
Kenobi O
bpAnto1E3FausJr.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina Junior, AR Denarius38 viewsObv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Bare headed and draped bust, right.
Rev: IVNO
Juno standing front, head left, holding sceptre and patera. Peacock at feet.
Denarius, 3.4 gm, 17.9 mm, RIC 688
Massanutten
Faustina sestertius IVNONI LVCINAE.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina Junior, Sestertius44 viewsRIC 1650? (listed as a dupondius on Wildwinds, but at 30mm this is definitely a sestertius)
Rev: IVNONI LVCINAE, Juno standing left between two infants, holding a third infant.
E Pinniger
Favjse12-2~0.jpg
Roman Empire, Faustina Junior, Sestertius of AD 161, RIC (M.Aurelius) unlisted 151 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.86g, Ø33mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Fautina Junior facing right.
Rev.: FECVND AVGVSTA (around) S C (in field), Fecunditas standing left, holding a child in her arms, two more standing left and right of her raising their right hands.
RIC (Aurelius) unlisted, legend corresponds to RIC 1635 and the representation to RIC 1649
ex Aeternitas Coins & Antiquities (via VCoins)

This type refers to the growing family of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Jr. The three girls represent the three surviving children (of a total of 7 born) around end of 159 to early 160: Annia Galeria Aurelia Faustina (age 14), Lucilla (12) and Fadilla (1).

Additional information provided by Curtis Clay (19 july 2012): "This type commemorating the birth of a third survivng daughter usually has the legend IVNONI LVCINAE, whereas the type FECVND AVGVSTAE commemorates the birth of the next daughter about a year or so later and shows Fecunditas/Faustina holding two children in her arms while two more stand at her feet.

Strack 1335 knew a sestertius like yours in only one specimen, in Naples, but unfortunately does not illustrate the coin.

The Naples collection was stolen in 1977. Your coin is of nice quality, and has an old-collection look, lightly cleaned on the reverse. I would not be at all surprised if it is the actual Naples coin! ..."
Charles S
liciniusIItreves.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, LICINIUS II VIRTUS EXERCIT348 viewsLICINIVS IVN NOB C
Radiated, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/VIRTVS EXERCIT
Standerd inscribed VOT / XX with captives on ground on either side.
STR in ex.

Aes reduced follis struck 320 in Trier
RIC.271 R4
7 commentsgb29400
Licinius II RIC 29 obv and rev.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, LICINIUS II (Junior) RIC 2951 viewsLICINIUS II
AE3
Antioch Mint. 317-320 A.D.
17.7mm. 3.23g.
Die Alignment: 150 degrees
Obv: D N VAL LICIN LICINIVS NOB C - Diademed bust left, wearing imperial cloak, holding mappa, sceptre and globe.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI CAESS - Jupiter standing left, chlamys acrcoss shoulder, leaning on sceptre, holding Victory on a globe, captive at feet.
Exergue: SMANT
Gamma in right field
Ref: RIC 29. Sear '64 3717. Sear '88 3817. C32. VM 6.
seraphic
33183q00.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Nero and Agrippina Junior, 55 A.D., Gold aureus14 viewsSH33183. Gold aureus, SRCV I 2042, BnF II 10, RIC I 6, BMCRE I 7, Cohen I 3, VF, scratches and dings, ex jewelry with mounting marks, weight 7.733 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, c. Jan - Nov 55 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD DIVI F CAES AVG GERM IMP TR P COS, conjoined bare headed busts of Nero and Agrippina Junior (draped) right; reverse AGRIPP AVG DIVI CLAVD NERONIS CAES MATER, seated statues of Divus Augustus and Claudius on car drawn to left by four elephants, EX S C in field; ex G. Marchesi collection (Bologna, c. 1990); rare (R3)Joe Sermarini
0442-520~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, VALERIAN II, ANTONINIANUS, RIC # 2434 viewsRome mint, AD 258
DIVO CAES VALERIANO, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Valerianus junior right
CONSECRATIO, altar
2.88 gr
Ref : RCV # 10608, RIC # 24, RSC # 13
Potator II
ValentinianII_RIC-45b.jpg
Roman Imperial: Valentinian II (375-392 CE) AE3 Centenionalis, Antioch (RIC 45b; LRBC 2696)10 viewsObv: D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG; pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Valentinian Junior right
Rev: CONCORDIA AVGGG; Roma, helmeted, seated facing, head left, left leg bared, holding globe and scepter; Θ in left field; Φ/K in right field; ΑΝΤΒ in exergue
Quant.Geek
34079_Roman_Empire,_Lead_Bulla_Seal,_Late_4th_-_Early_5th_Century_A_D_.jpg
Roman Lead Bulla Seal, Late 4th - Early 5th Century A.D. Three male facing diademed busts39 viewsRoman Empire, Lead Bulla Seal, Late 4th - Early 5th Century A.D. Lead seal, Bulla seal, possibly imperial, gVF, 7.885g, 18.4mm, obverse three male facing diademed busts, the left one smallest, stars above the two larger ones; reverse, no stamp. Interesting seal, perhaps depicting two senior Augusti (center and right) and a junior Augustus (smaller bust left). Two likely combinations are Valentinian I, Valens and Gratian (367 - 375 A.D.) and Theodosius I, Arcadius und Honorius (393 - 395 A.D.). Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Rare_Roman_Republic_Denarius.jpg
Roman Republic, M. Aemilius Lepidus, 61 B.C.55 viewsSilver denarius, RSC Aemilia 24, Sydenham 832, Crawford 419/2, RBW Collection -, F, rough, burnished, both sides off center, Rome mint, weight 3.435g, maximum diameter 18.0mm, die axis 180o, 61 B.C.; obverse head of Alexandria right, wearing turreted crown, ALEXANDREA below; reverse M. Lepidus, togate, standing facing, head left, crowning the young figure of Ptolemy V, standing facing, holding scepter, S·C above, TVTOR·REG downward on left, PONF·MAX· upward on right, M LEPIDVS in exergue; this is the first example of this rare type ever handled by Forum; rare;

This coin records an alleged guardianship of the moneyer's ancestor, Marcus Lepidus, over the young king of Egypt, Ptolemy V. Neither Polybius nor Livy make any mention of it. The story is likely an exaggeration, invented by the later Lepidi. In 201 B.C., Lepidus was sent to deliver the ultimatum to Philip ordering him to cease attacking his Greek neighbors, and return the Ptolemy's possessions. He was also a member of the embassy sent to Ptolemy V (and Antiochos III) to gain support should Rome and Macedonia declare war. But Lepidus was a junior member of the embassy, which included two ex-consuls, thus it is unlikely he would have been a guardian of the Ptolemaic king.

EX; FORVM Ancient Coins.

*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
1 commentsSam
BrutusLictorsCombined.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, M. Junius Brutus, AR Denarius - Crawford 433/126 viewsRome, The Republic.
M. Junius Brutus, 54 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.79g; 20mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Head of Libertas, facing right, her hair up, wearing necklace of pendants and cruciform earing; LIBERTAS behind.

Reverse: L. Junius Brutus walking left with two lictors and an accensus; BRVTVS in exergue.

References: Crawford 433/1; Sydenham 906; BMCRR 3862; Junia 31.

Provenance: Ex Dr. Michael Phillip Collection [Stack's Bowers 2016 NYINC Auction (12 Jan 2016) Lot 31131]; Stack's Auction, 7-8 Dec 1989, Lot 3233; Frederick S. Knobloch Collection [Stack's (3-4 May 1978), Lot 511].

Struck by chief assassin of Caesar during his early political career. At this time, Brutus was in opposition to Pompey, and it's likely that this coin type is intended to remind the general public of Brutus' pedigree against tyranny. Brutus’ ancestor, Lucius Junius Brutus, overthrew the Etruscan kings of Rome and helped form the Republic, becoming one of the first Consuls in 509 BCE. The reverse of this coin shows Lucius Junius Brutus, as Consul, walking with his attendant lictors and accensus. Liberty on the obverse alludes to the overthrow of the monarchy – a role that the moneyer himself would play 10 years after this coin was struck.

A few words on those men accompanying Brutus on the reverse:

The lictors were attendants who carried fasces and accompanied the consuls at all times. They proceeded before the senior consul and cleared his path and they walked behind the junior consul. They also made arrests, summonses and executions. A consul had twelve lictors.

The accensi were civil servants that also accompanied the magistrates in addition to lictors and acted as heralds. They typically walked behind the magistrate, but an early custom had them precede the consul in the months when the lictors did not walk before him. This appears to be the scene depicted on this coin – the accensus precedes Brutus and one of the lictors is behind him.
5 commentsCarausius
LucillaSestVenus~0.jpg
Roman, Lucilla124 viewsWife of Lucius Verus, executed 182 AD

Sestertius

Draped bust, right, LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Venus standing facing left holding apple, drawing out robe, VENUS

Daughter of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior, she married Lucius Verus in 164. She was implicated in a plot against her brother Commodus and dispatched.

RIC 1767
1 commentsBlindado
Faustina_II_35.jpg
RPC - Asia Minor, Kilikia, Hieropolis-Kastabala, Faustina II as Selene, Helios 25 viewsFaustina II
Kilikia, Hieropolis-Kastabala
Obv.: ΦΑΥСΤƐΙΝΑ СƐΒΑСΤΗ, Draped bust of Faustina (as Selene) right; crescent on forehead, countermark T
Rev.: IEPOΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ, Radiate and draped bust of Helios left (portrait assimilated to Marcus Aurelius)
AE, 11.32g, 24.5mm
Ref.: SNG France 2231-2232, SNG Levante 1587, Howgego 686 (for countermark)
Ex Künker
shanxi
Faustina_II_50~1.jpg
RPC - Asia Minor, Lydia, Hierocaesarea, Faustina II, Artemis, Perseus 18 viewsLydia, Hierocaesarea
Faustina II
Mènodôros the Second, strategos
Obv.: ΦAVCTEINA CEBACTH, draped bust of Faustina left.
Rev.: [EΠI CTPA M]HNOΔ[ΩPOY B.], [IЄ]POKAI[CAPЄΩN] in exerque; nude hero (Perseus) standing right, seen from the back, Artemis standing left, holding bow, having quiver at shoulder; both clasping hands over lighted altar
AE, 38.14g, 36mm
Ref.: RPC IV.2 11395 (temporary) - This Coin
shanxi
Faustina_II_37.jpg
RPC - Egypt, Alexandria, AD 148/149, Faustina II, Eusebeia 19 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAYCTIN CEBACTH (legend starting at 1 o'clock), draped bust right
Rev.: LΔWΔEKATV= year 12 of Antoninus Pius (148/149), Eusebeia seated left, holding patera over lighted altar, and long sceptre
Billon, 13.68g, 23mm
Ref.: D 3247 var., Geissen 1945 var. (reverse legend/missing O)
shanxi
Faustina_II_54.jpg
RPC - Egypt, Alexandria, AD 149/150, Faustina II, Nike14 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAVCTINA CEBACTH, draped bust right
Rev.: Nike on globe right, holding wreath and palm branch, L IΓ = year 13 of Antoninus Pius (AD 149/150).
Billon, 13.57g, 22mm
Ref.: Dattari 3251
shanxi
Faustina_II_38.jpg
RPC - Egypt, Alexandria, AD 150/151, Faustina II, Eagle15 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAYCTIN CEBACTH (legend starting at 1 o'clock), draped bust right
Rev.. Eagle standing right, head left, wreath in beak
LIΔ= year 14 of Antoninus Pius (150/151).
Billon, 13.13g, 22.6mm
Ref.: Dattari 3275, Geißen 1951
shanxi
Faustina_II_3.jpg
RPC - Egypt, Alexandria, AD 151/152, Faustina II, Dikaiosyne 24 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAVCTIN CEB CEB EVCEB ΘVΓ (legend starting at 1 o'clock), draped bust right
Rev.: Dikaiosyne standing, facing, head, l., holding scales and cornucopia
L IE= year 15 of Antoninus Pius (151/152).
Billon, 12.91g, 23mm
Ref.: Geißen: 1959. Kampmann/Ganschow 38.65
Ex Dionysos Numismatik
1 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_39.jpg
RPC - Egypt, Alexandria, AD 153/154, Faustina II, Isis Pharia24 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAVCTINA CEBACTH, draped bust right
Rev.: Isis Pharia standing, r., holding sail and sistrum, L I Z = year 17 of Antoninus Pius (AD 153/154).
Billon, 11.75g, 22mm
Ref.: Dattari 3250
1 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_45.jpg
RPC - Egypt, Alexandria, AD 154/155, Faustina II, Serapis seated, Kerberos8 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAVCTINA CEBACTH, draped bust right
Rev.: L IΘ = year 19 (AD 155/156 ), Draped figure of Serapis, seated on high backed throne to left, holding long sceptre in his left hand and extending his right to touch Kerberos
Billon, 11.48g, 22mm
Ref.: Dattari 3267
shanxi
Faustina_II_40.jpg
RPC - Egypt, Alexandria, AD 155/156, Faustina II, bust of Nilus10 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAYCTIN CEBACTH (legend starting at 1 o'clock), diademed, draped bust right
Rev.. L I Θ=year19 (155/156), bust of Nilus right, cornucopiae with small genius in front
Billon, 12.0g, 22mm
Ref.: Dattari 3257
shanxi
Faustina_II_64~0.jpg
RPC - Egypt, Alexandria, AD 163/164, Faustina II, Zeus 11 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAVCTINA CEBACTH, draped bust left
Rev.: L Δ, laureate-headed and draped bust of Zeus, right (countermark)
Billon, 12.68g, 21.5mm
Ref.: Dattari-Savio Pl. 194, 9876 second (this coin), RPC online 16407 (this coin)
Ex Dattari Collection
Ex Naville Numismatics
shanxi
Faustina_II_44.jpg
RPC - Egypt, Alexandria, AD 164/165, Faustina II, Aphrodite 7 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAVCTINA CEBACTH, draped bust right
Rev.: L Є = year 5 (AD 164/165 ), Aphrodite standing left, holding helm and shield set on column on which is inscribed ΔV/NA/MIC,
Billon, 13.55g, 23mm
Ref.: Geißen 2113, Dattari 3606
shanxi
Faustina_II_R606_fac.jpg
RPC - Thrace, Augusta Traiana, Faustina II, Artemis20 viewsFaustina Junior
Thrace, Augusta Traiana
AE26
Obv.: ΦΑVСΤΕΙΝΑ СΕΒΑСΤΗ, draped bust of Faustina II right.
Rev.: ΑVΓΟVСΤΗС ΤΡΑΙΑΝΗС, Artemis advancing, r., drawing arrow from quiver at shoulder, holding bow; to right, dog running right
Ae, 10.05g, 26 mm
Ref.: RPC Vol. 4, № 10333 (temporary), Mouchmov 2982
shanxi
Faustina_II_R690_fac.jpg
RPC - Thrace, Augusta Traiana, Faustina II, Demeter27 viewsFaustina Junior
Thrace, Augusta Traiana
AE25
Obv.: ΦΑVСΤΕΙΝΑ СΕΒΑСΤΗ, draped bust of Faustina II right.
Rev.: ΑVΓΟVСΤΗС ΤΡΑΙΑΝΗС, veiled Demeter standing, facing, head, l., holding two ears of corn and long torch
Ae, 7.87g, 25 mm
Ref.: RPC Vol. 4, № 9375 (temporary)
1 commentsshanxi
R666_Faustina_II_fac.jpg
RPC - Thrace, Bizya, Faustina II, Artemis8 viewsFaustina Junior
Thrace, Bizya
AE23
Obv.: ΦΑVСΤΕΙИΑ СΕΒΑСΤΗ, Draped bust right.
Rev.: ΒΙΖVΗΝΩΝ, Artemis standing left, holding torch and arrow over stag to left
Ae, 7.25g, 23mm
Ref.: RPC IV online 9308.
shanxi
Faustina_II_73.jpg
RPC - Thrace, Hadrianopolis, Faustina II, Homonoia14 viewsFaustina Junior
Thrace, Hadrianopolis
AE22
Obv.: ΦΑVСΤΕΙΝΑ СΕΒΑСΤΗ, draped bust of Faustina II right.
Rev.: ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟΠΟΛΕΙΤΩΝ, Homonoia standing left, wearing kalathos, holding patera over altar and cornucopia
Æ, 22mm, 7.34g
Ref.: BMC 6, SNG Cop 559, RPC IV, №3916 (temporary)
shanxi
Faustina_II_26.jpg
RPC - Thrace, Philippopolis, Faustina II, Demeter22 viewsFaustina Junior
Thrace, Philippopolis
Obv: ΦΑΥCTEINA CEBACTH, Draped bust right.
Rev: ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΠΟΛΕΙTΩΝ, Demeter standing left, holding two grain ears and long torch.
AE, 12.93g, 25.6mm
Ref.: Mouchmov, Philip. 133, 139-40 and 142
Ex Pecunem 33, Lot 292
2 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_25.jpg
RPC - Thrace, Plotinopolis, Faustina II44 viewsFaustina Junior
Thrace, Plotinopolis
AE23
Obv: ΦAVCTEINA CEBACTH, Draped bust right.
Rev: ΠΛΩΤΕΙΝΟΠΟΛΕΙΤΩΝ, Hera? standing left, holding patera and sceptre.
AE, 8.19g, 22.7mm
Ref.: BMC 5
Ex Pecunem Gitbud&Naumann auction 32, Lot 285
3 commentsshanxi
Faustina_55.jpg
RPC - Thrace, Traianopolis, Faustina II, Tyche14 viewsFaustina Junior
Thrace, Traianopolis
AE23
Obv.: ΦΑVСΤΕΙΝΑ СΕΒΑСΤΗ, draped bust of Faustina II right.
Rev.: ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟΠΟΛΕΙΤΩΝ, Tyche standin left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Ae, 7.08 g, 22.5 mm
Ref.: Varbanov 2730, RPC Vol. 4, № 10358 (temporary)
shanxi
Mn_Aquillius~0.jpg
RRC 401/1 (Mn. Aquillius Mn. F. Mn. N.) Serrate denarius49 viewsObv. Helmeted and draped bust of Virtus right, VIRTVS before, IIIVIR behind, border of dots
Rev. Consul Mn. Aquillius in military dress standing facing, head left, holding shield in left, raising the female figure of Sicily slumped at his feet, facing right; MN AQVIL before, MN. F. MN.N behind (Mn. in ligature three times), SICIL in exergue, border of dots
Rome, 71 B.C. or 65 B.C.
Serrate; 19 mm, 3,88 g
References: RRC 401/1, Sear 336, RSC Aquillia 2

Mn. Aquillius chose to represent his father who was responsible for crushing the slave rebellion in Sicily in 101 B.C. If the date of 71 B.C. for this coin can be upheld, then the image was a commentary on the moneyer's own time - 71 B.C. was the last year of the Third Servile War (the Spartacus uprising). Mn. Aquillius may have found it opportune to remind people of his ancestors deed during the previous slave rebellion - Crassus must have been seething, with Pompey stealing his victory and a junior magistrate putting in his two cent as well.

The obverse is to be read in combination with the reverse, as Aquillius pater was famous for his Virtus. Despite being shown as raising Sicily, he was actually accused of maladminisration of the province (with good cause, says Cicero), but his laywer exposed his war-wounds, and had Aquillius acquitted because of his military Virtus. (Diod. Sicil. 36.10.3; Cicero, pro Flacco, 98 de Oratore 47).

Mn. Aquilius came to a horrid end, in 88 B.C. when he was betrayed by Mytilene and delivered to Mithridates of Pontus, to be executed in Pergamum by having molten gold poured down his throat.

This coin was also the first where the title of IIIVir occured.
3 commentsSyltorian
salonina_congiunte_1_(1).jpg
Salonina, antoniniano, ex Hatfield hoard35 viewsSalonina Billon Antoninianus. Rome mint, 256-257 AD.
AE, mm 21,0 gr. 3,1, B
D/ SALONINA AVG, diademed and draped bust right on crescent
R/ PIETAS AVGG, Salonina seated left, reaching down to two children standing before her, a third child at her side. (Valerian II, Saloninus and Gallienus Junior)
RIC V-1, 35 Rome; Göbl 229b; RSC 84; Sear 10647.
Provenienza: ex Hatfield hoard (settembre 1993), ex Coin uk trust-Pineapple (2012)
paolo
Valerian Junior 40.jpg
Saloninus - UNIFACE PLASTER CAST72 viewsObv:- LIC COR SAL VALERIANVS N CAES, Draped, bare headed bust right

Cast of a silvered AE Medallion,
Gnecchi 3.
Reverse is PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS, Saloninus in military attire left with globe and spear, captive at feet.
There are three originals known, this one in Paris (41 mm / 60 gr).

UNIFACE PLASTER CAST
maridvnvm
AE_31_19_82.jpg
Serdica Faustina Junior Cl. Appius Martialus 40 viewsSerdica

Faustina Junior

AE 32 19.82

Cl. Appius Martialus (161-169 AD)

Ob: ΦAVCTEINA | CEBACTH
Draped bust right

Rev: HΓE KΛ AΠΠIOV| MAPTIAΛOV
Ex: CEPΔΩN
Asklepios standing facing, holding serpent entwined staff in right hand

Nice brown patina with some red spots

Varbanov (E) III -; Hr/J -; Mionnet Supp. II -; BMC -; Ruzicka -; Mushmov monnaies et les ateliers monetaires de Serdica –

Reverse type common (cf. Varbanov (E) III # 1892 depicted), but this rx die unpublished. Only one obverse die for Faustina

Mionnet erroneously corrects this governor’s name to MAPTIΛΛOV throughout cf. p. 484 #1652
Petrus Elmsley
faustina_II_tempor_felic.jpg
Sestertius; TEMPOR FELIC S C, RIC Marcus Aurelius 167326 viewsFaustina Junior, Sestertius, Rome, 32mm, 24.3g. 
Obverse: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA 
Draped bust right. 
Reverse: TEMPOR FELIC S C 
Faustina (perhaps as Fecunditas) standing facing, head left; two infants in her arms, and four girls of varying sizes standing two to either side. 
Reference: Sear RCV (2002) 5284 var (no diadem); RIC III Marcus Aurelius 1673Podiceps
faustina_II_sesterz.jpg
Sestertius; TEMPOR FELIC S C, RIC Marcus Aurelius 167329 viewsFaustina Junior, Sestertius, Rome, 31x32mm, 21.72g. 
Obverse: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA 
Draped bust right. 
Reverse: TEMPOR FELIC S C 
Faustina (perhaps as Fecunditas) standing facing, head left; two infants in her arms, and four girls of varying sizes standing two to either side. 
Reference: Sear RCV (2002) 5284 var (no diadem); RIC III Marcus Aurelius 1673. Ex MoremothPodiceps
DIV-FAUSTINA2_PEACOCK.JPG
Struck A.D.176-180 under Marcus Aurelius. DIVA FAUSTINA JUNIOR. Commemorative denarius of Rome10 viewsObverse: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA. Draped bust of Faustina Junior facing right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO. Peacock standing facing right.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 3.24gms | Die Axis: 12
RIC III : 744 | RSC : 71a

Annia Galeria Faustina was the youngest daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Senior. She married Marcus Aurelius in A.D.145 and was given the title of Augusta on the birth of her first child in A.D.146. She went on to have several more children, one of whom was the future emperor Commodus. In A.D.175 Faustina accompanied Marcus Aurelius on his journey to the East but she died at Halala, a village at the foot of the Taurus Mountains.
1 comments*Alex
Faustina_II_Diva_Altar~0.JPG
Struck A.D.176-180 under Marcus Aurelius. DIVA FAUSTINA JUNIOR. Commemorative denarius of Rome7 viewsObverse: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA. Draped bust of Faustina Junior facing right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO. Altar-enclosure with closed doors.
Diameter: 19mm
RIC III : 746

Annia Galeria Faustina was the youngest daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Senior. She married Marcus Aurelius in A.D.145 and was given the title of Augusta on the birth of her first child in A.D.146. She went on to have several more children, one of whom was the future emperor Commodus. In A.D.175 Faustina accompanied Marcus Aurelius on his journey to the East but she died at Halala, a village at the foot of the Taurus Mountains.
*Alex
ABILA.JPG
SYRIA, Decapolis. Abila . Faustina Junior. Augusta, AD 147-175. Æ 15100 viewsSYRIA, Decapolis. Abila . Faustina Junior. Augusta, AD 147-175. Æ 15

Obv.: ΦAVCTЄINA CЄBACTH, draped bust right.
Rev.: CЄΛЄYK ABIΛA SKC (date) in legend. Spijkerman 6; Rosenberger 3; SNG ANS 1120.
3 commentsMaritima
Tetricus II 3.jpg
Tetricus junior - antoninianus29 viewsC. PIV. ESV. TETRICVS CAES.
PIETAS AVGVSTOR. , sacrificial implements

RIC 258
1 commentsGinolerhino
Tetricus II 2.jpg
Tetricus junior - antoninianus8 views[C. PIV. ESV. TETR]ICVS CAES.
PIE[TAS AVGVSTOR.] , sacrificial implements.

RIC 259
Ginolerhino
Tetricus II 1.jpg
Tetricus junior - antoninianus67 viewsC. PIV. ESV. TETRICVS CAES.
SPES AVGG. , Spes walking left

RIC 270
Ginolerhino
coin453.JPG
Thrace, Pautalia; Faustina Jr.25 viewsTHRACE, Pautalia. Faustina Junior. Augusta, AD 147-175. Æ 22mm Draped bust right / Tyche standing left, holding rudder and cornucopiae. Ruzicka 138.ecoli
faustina_II_plotinopolis.jpg
THRACE, PLOTINOPOLIS, Æ 25, Athena feeding snake27 viewsFaustina Junior, THRACE, PLOTINOPOLIS, Æ 25, 8.3g Rev. ΠΛΩΤΕΙΝΟΠ(ΟΛΕΙΤΩΝ), Athena standing right feeding snake twined around olive tree, shield at side. Varbanov 1829 Podiceps
drusas02-2.jpg
Tiberius, RIC 45, for Drusus Junior, As of AD 22 (large S C)24 viewsÆ As (10.7g, Ø29mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 22.
TObv.: DRVSVS CAESAR TI·AVG·F·DIVI·AVG·N, bare head of Drusus facing left
Rev,: PONTIF·TRIBVN·POTEST·ITER around large S·C.
RIC (Tiberius) 45; Cohen 2; Foss (RHC) 58:22

On this type, the titles of Drusus appear on the obverse. His titles also appear on the reverse of the Pietas dupondius and on the sestertius with the twins heads on crossed cornucopiae. Drusus died in A.D. 23, poisoned by his wife, Livilla. The reverse of this coin refers to Tiberius' award of the tribunician power in A.D. 22.
Charles S
titus as caesar mars.JPG
Titus as Caesar RIC 94884 viewsAR Denarius, 2.87g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS VI; Mars stg. l., with spear and trophy
RIC 948 (C). BMC 221. RSC 65. BNC 195.

Another reverse of Titus' which copies a Vespasian reverse. Both father and son shared the same types, one would think it was to strengthen the fact that Titus was the joint ruler and heir. Domitian on the other hand never shared the same types as Vespasian or Titus, highlighting his junior status.

An excellent denarius with a good portrait. Nice metal too.
1 commentsVespasian70
FII-x.jpg
Traiana AE 2024 viewsFaustina Junior, Traiana, Thrace. Bronze AE 20, Varbanov II 889, rough VF, Augusta Traiana mint, 6.885 grams, 24.6 mm, die axis 225o, obverse “FAVCTEINA CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse AVGOCTHC TPAIANHC, Demeter seated left holding grain-ears and scepter; ex FORVM.Podiceps
VALENTINIEN_II-RIC43.jpg
VALENTINIEN II (375-392) - TREVES - RIC 43-215 viewsSilique, 375-378, C1
A/D N VALENTINIANVS IVN P F AVG
Dominus Noster Valentinianus Junior Pius Felix Augustus, Notre Seigneur Valentinien le jeune Pieux Heureux Auguste
Buste à droite, diadémé (Perles), drapé et cuirassé. N et P ligaturés.
R/VICTOR-IA AVGGG//TRPS
Victoria Augustorum, La Victoire des 3 Augustes
La victoire debout de face, tournée à gauche, tenant une couronne de la main droite et une branche de palme de la main gauche.
Argent - 1.76 gr - 17.5 mm - 12h
RIC IX 43-2, RSC 40a
Commentaires :
Le revers de notre monnaie avec trois G peut faire référence à Valens, Gratien et Valentinien II ou bien après 378 à Gratien, Valentinien II et Théodose avant la nomination d'Arcadius.
Le N et le P sont "ligaturés". On peut trouver une ligature soit NP, soit AV
Siliqua S
Valerian I- Sol.jpg
Valerian I- Sol42 viewsValerian I, c. September 253 - April, May or June 260 A.D.

Obverse:
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right

IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS P F AVG

IMP: Imperator, leader of the troops or general.
C: Caesar, usually means a junior in rank to Augustus and is usually designated as the heir apparent.
P: Princeps, means leader, or the first among equals, but carries the meaning of Prince or Caesar.
LIC: Licinius, one of his given names.
VALERIANVS: Valerianus
PF: Pius Felix
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
ORIENS AVGG

ORIENS: Rising sun
AVGG: Augustus, emperors

Sol advancing left, raising right hand and holding whip in left


Domination: Bronze/ Billion Antoninianus, size 20 mm.

Mint: Rome, Göbl, in MIR 36, catalogs it as 110b, mint of Rome. Poor quality billon rather than bronze, though the color may have browned over the years. Officina ??
John Schou
0442-520.jpg
Valerian II, Antoninianus - *48 viewsRome mint, AD 258
DIVO CAES VALERIANO, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Valerianus junior right
CONSECRATIO, altar
2.88 gr
Ref : RCV # 10608, RIC # 24, RSC # 13
2 commentsPotator II
0442-220.jpg
Valerian II, antoninianus - 005085 viewsCologne mint, AD 257-258
VALERIANVS CAES, radiate and draped bust of Valerian junior right
IOVI CRESCENTI, Young Jupiter on back of goat Amalthea right
3.66 gr
Ref : RCV # 10731, Cohen #26
1 commentsPotator II
Vitellius_dynastic_smalljpg.jpg
Vitellius RIC 010170 viewsVitellius (AD 69). AR denarius
(18mm, 2.95 gm, 5h).
NGC VG 4/5 - 4/5. Rome.
Obv: A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TR P, laureate head of Vitellius right
Rev: LIBERI IMP GERM AVG, bareheaded and draped busts of the children of Vitellius (Aulus Vitellius Germanicus Junior and Vitellia), facing one another.
RIC I 101. Rare.
Ex: Heritage Auctions November 29, 2018 Lot 65074
5 commentsorfew
TrajanDeciusRIC11b.jpg
[1108a] Trajan Decius, July 249 - June or July 251 A.D. 144 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC 11b, RSC 4, choice EF, Rome mint, 3.923g, 23.3mm, 0o, 249 - 251 A.D.; Obverse: IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, from behind; Reverse: ADVENTVS AVG, Trajan Decius on horseback left, raising right hand and holding scepter. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Trajan Decius (249-251 A.D.) and Usurpers During His Reign

Geoffrey Nathan and Robin McMahon

Geoffrey Nathan
San Diego State University



Early Life and Public Career

Any discussion of Decius (and for most third century emperors) must be prefaced by an understanding that the historical tradition is incomplete, fragmentary, and not wholly trustworthy. Any reconstruction of his life and reign will therefore be to some degree speculative. With that caveat in mind, Gaius Messius Quintus Decius was born, to a provincial yet aristocratic Senatorial family during the transitional Severan age, possibly in 201. His family may have been from Italian stock, although that is by no means certain. Attempts to describe his life previous to the consulship are problematic, although he did serve as governor in Moesia in the mid-230's. That also means that Decius probably had been a member of the Senate for some time. We know little else about his early life, other than at some point he married Herennia Cupressenia Etruscilla, apparently from the Senatorial ordo as well. His political fortunes rose in the troubled 240's. As instability grew in the mid-third century, Philip the Arab charged Decius, suffect consul for 249, with restoring order along the Danubian frontier. In addition to the border unrest, a low-level army officer, Tiberius Claudius Marinus Pacatianus, had led a rebellion of the armies in Pannonia and Moesia. For a short time, Marinus apparently claimed the imperial purple and along with movements of the Gepidae, represented a clear threat to the stability of Philip's rule.

Philip's decision to send Decius was perhaps more motivated by political expediency than by any great confidence in his military abilities. Decius had an aristocratic pedigree, and so was likely to have been a popular choice with a Senate that was increasingly doubtful of Philip's abilities. He was also a native of Sirmium in Pannonia Inferior, and so was likely familiar with the intricacies of life and politics in the region. Finally, he had, of course, served as governor of the wayward province, and thus undoubtedly had connections there among the civil and military curia--ones that Philip hoped Decius could exploit. Thus, the consul was charged with restoring order along one of the Empire's most problematic borders. Accompanied by his son, Herennius, Decius traveled to Moesia, probably to reclaim the Legio IV Flavia Felix and possibly the Legio XI, both of which were stationed in that province.

Shortly before his arrival, Marinus was killed and local troops quickly named Decius emperor, encouraging him to assert this newfound responsibility in a war against Philip. Philip's inability to deal decisively with the worsening military crises on the borders, the fear of punishment, and the opportunity for enrichment no doubt motivated the soldiers to place the purple on a local leader--a now increasingly common practice. Decius' lineage also probably appealed to traditionalists in Rome, who begrudged Philip his humble origins and his possible involvement in the death of Gordian III. Philip led out an army in June of 249 to meet his newest rival for the purple and at an unknown location (possibly Verona or Beroea) lost the battle. Whether Philip died in the fighting or was assassinated by his own troops--another increasingly common practice--is unknown. Philip's son, Philip Junior, recently made an Augustus, was quickly put to death by the Praetorian Guard in Rome. Decius was the first emperor to come from the Balkans region. How much he wanted to serve is unknown. While this account undoubtedly contains fictional elements, with several popular literary topoi, the rough outlines of the story are undoubtedly true: we have epigraphic evidence in July for support among the Pannonian Legio X, suggesting that Decius owed his accession in no small part to local troops

Publicity and Power
The victory of an established Senatorial aristocrat was one that seemed to reassert the authority and place of traditional political power, despite the means of Decius' ascension. The new emperor, no doubt aware of the perils of his position, seems to have embarked upon a highly conservative program of imperial propaganda to endear himself to the Roman aristocracy and to the troops who had thrust the purple upon him. One of his earliest acts was to take the honorific name of Trajan, whose status as the greatest of all emperors after Augustus was now becoming firmly established. The fact that Trajan had commanded legions in Upper Germany and had close links to both Pannonia and Moesia at the time of his accession invited the comparison. The name was cleverly chosen: Trajan had been an active and successful general throughout his reign, but had also established a reputation for a widely popular civil government.

Decius also served as consul in every year of his reign and took for himself traditional republican powers, another way to underscore his authority and conservatism. He even tried to revive the long defunct office of censor in 251, purportedly offering it to the future emperor, Valerian. Decius moreover portrayed himself as an activist general and soldier. In addition to leading military campaigns personally, he often directly bestowed honors upon his troops, high and low alike. He also holds the dubious distinction of being the first emperor to have died fighting a foreign army in battle. Finally, in 250, he associated his sons Herennius and Hostilianus in his rule by making them Caesars, eventually raising the former (and elder) to Augustus. Undoubtedly, Decius sought to create a dynasty in much the same way the Gordians had in the previous decade. This traditionalism may to be a large extent, however, a construction rather than a reality. When we abandon the literary tradition and look instead at other forms of evidence, his imperial aims are less clear. The legal record, extremely thin, is only vaguely supportive of a conservative policy: most of his surviving enactments deal with private law issues consistent with earlier Severan jurisprudence.

On the other hand in late 249, when Decius returned to Rome, he embarked upon an active building program in the capital. After a destructive fire, he extensively restored the Colosseum. He later commissioned the opulent Decian Baths along the Aventine. He perhaps also was responsible for the construction of the Decian Portico. Such activities contrasted to a twenty-year period of relative building inactivity. Both the kind of building projects and their stylistic qualities suggest an attempt to recall the glories of the past. The numismatic evidence also suggests some degree of traditionalism. It is there that we see the first references to Trajan Decius, as well as an association with both Pannonia and Dacia. His Liberitas and Uberitas issues, combined with his wife's Pudicitia and his sons' Princeps Iuventi coins, all seem to rearticulate traditional ideology. Legends tend to be conservative, so this is hardly surprising, but there were no great innovations to suggest a new set of ideological principles. In sum, while the literary reconstructions of Decius' life are problematic, it seems clear that traditionalism was an important factor in his administration, especially in the wake of Philip's reign.

The Persecution of Christians
Another possible aspect of this conservatism was a reported wide-scale attack on the growing Christian minority. The third century saw the slow creation of sizeable communities in the Empire's urban populations. For the first time, if we are to believe Christian sources, an Empire-wide persecution of Christians was begun under Decius. The state required all citizens to sacrifice to the state gods and be in receipt of a libellus, a certificate from a temple confirming the act. The rationale for the emperor's actions, however, is not entirely clear. Eusebius writes he did so because he hated Philip, who purportedly was a secret Christian. Probably the enmity was real, but it seems unconnected to the introduction of these policies. More likely, if Decius did indeed seek to persecute Christians, he was reacting to the growing visibility of the religion, especially in the city of Rome itself. One of the more prominent martyrs of the age was Fabian, the bishop of the imperial capital.

But the new policy of public religiosity was much more probably a program to reassert traditional public piety, consistent with some of the other conservative initiatives introduced during the emperor's short reign. The libelli themselves were largely generalized in nature and language, and there is no implication that they were directed at any one group per se. Whatever intended effect it may have had on Christianity was thus to a degree unplanned. Christians would have no doubt seen it differently. It is possible then that fourth and fifth century Christian polemicists have misinterpreted (whether purposefully or not) Decius' libelli. In the particular cases of Eusebius and Lactantius, both wrote in the wake of the great persecution of Diocletian and no doubt magnified upon the theme of the tyrant-persecutor. A hostile tradition notwithstanding, the new requirements did impact Christians most acutely, causing considerable division in the growing ranks of the new religion.

Imperial and Military Problems
Like other third century emperors, Decius was not free of threats to his authority, either from within or without. The revolt of Jotapianus, either in Syria or Cappadocia, had actually begun in Philip's reign, but was quickly quelled after Decius' accession. Probably the usurper's own soldiers murdered the would-be emperor, since the accounts state that his body was delivered to Decius while still in Rome in the summer of 249.
A potentially more serious revolt broke out while Decius was out of Rome in 250 fighting the Goths. Julius Valens Licinianus, also a member of the Senatorial aristocracy with some popular support, took the purple at the Empire's capital. It appears to have been relatively short-lived grab for power, ending in a few days with his execution. The governor of Macedon, Titus Julius Priscus, also permitted himself to be proclaimed Augustus at Philippopolis towards the end of 251, probably with Gothic collusion. The Senate declared him a public enemy almost as soon as he chose usurpation. He probably survived Decius, but is likely to have perished when Gallus became emperor.

Of greater concern than sporadic rebellions, which were relatively minor, were the vitreous northern borders. For the first time, a new and aggressive Germanic people, the Goths, crossed into and raided Roman territory in the 250's. At the time of Decius' forced accession, the Gepidae and the Carpi were both raiding deep into the Moesian provinces. They, along with the Goths, raided Pannonia and Dacia as well. Decius was forced to fight campaigns each year of his reign, doing his best to keep the borders stable.

His final campaign in 251 led to the death of his son, Herennius, and to his own. Decius led a successful attack on the Carpi, pushing them out of Dacia. But Moesia Inferior had been left largely undefended and Cniva, king of the Goths, led a sizeable portion of his army into the province. The emperor, after chasing the Germanic force around the region, engaged Cniva's forces outside of Philippopolis, which had recently been sacked by the king and held by the rebel, Priscus. It was here that his elder son was slain by an arrow and the emperor, seeking to reassure his troops, famously proclaimed that the death of one soldier was not a great loss to the Republic. Cniva then led his troops homeward, laden with the spoils of war. The loss became Decius' undoing. Trebonianus Gallus, one of the emperor's commanders, may have revolted, although it is not entirely clear. Instead of regrouping his forces and re-securing the borders, Decius unwisely sought to chase down Cniva before he left Roman territory. His decision may have been motivated by his son's death (despite his insistence otherwise) or it may have been an attempt to salvage what had been a failed campaign. In either case, it was ill-advised.

It was at Abrittus, about 100 kilometers northeast of Nicopolis that Decius finally met his death. Hoping to cut off Cniva's escape route (and perhaps minimize any help from Gallus), Decius' army was itself cut off in the marshy terrain. The details are sketchy, but Cniva divided his seventy thousand man army into three groups and surrounded the emperor's force. On July 1st, the emperor and most of his troops were slain. In the aftermath, the survivors named Trebonianus Gallus emperor, a decision subsequently confirmed by the Senate. Some contemporaries called the death tragic; others heroic. An Altar of Decius was erected where the emperor fell, still apparently famous two centuries later. Decius and Herennius may have even been deified. Christian polemicists, as might be expected, took pleasure in describing Decius' body being stripped and left on the battlefield to be devoured by animals. Whatever else, his was the first death of an emperor at the hands of an enemy of Rome. But even the account of his death, along with that of his son, must be looked on suspiciously. Their deaths bring to mind the sacrificial devotions of the famous Republican Decii father and son, P. Decius Mus senior and junior. The circumstances of Decius' death, therefore, are perhaps as opaque as those of his accession.

Assessment
In spite of gaining some modicum of praise from both ancient and modern observers, Decius' reign was not well-suited to the demands of a rapidly changing empire. Conservatism may have been popular among a certain portion of the Roman elite, but the old aristocracy's power and influence all but disappeared in the third century. Decius clearly had a broader vision of what he wanted to accomplish in his reign than many of his contemporaries, and certainly he was vigorous, but he was also a man who was not sufficiently flexible when the moment called for it. His religious policy caused major disruptions in Rome and; in contrast to some of the other barracks emperors, Decius proved himself less than apt when dealing with Rome's Germanic foes. His death may have been heroic, but it was unnecessary and unsuccessful. This best sums up Decius Trajan's reign.

Ancient Sources

Relatively little remains about Decius' reign. If there were a biography of Decius in the SHA, it no longer survives, although there are scattered references to his rule in the biographies of Claudius II Gothicus and Aurelian. Zosimus, i: 21-23, Aurelius Victor, 29-30, Zonaras 12, Eutropius 9, Jordanes Get. 17-8, and Sylvius Polemius 37-40 have brief accounts of his reign. There are fragments in John of Antioch, fr. 148 and Dexippus, fr. 18. Eusebius, vi: 39-41, vii:1, 11, 22, and viii:4, discusses his persecution, and there are passing references to his persecution in Socrates and Lactantius. Inscriptions and coinage are relatively abundant.

Copyright (C) 2002, Geoffrey Nathan and Robin McMahon. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of the Roman Emperors and their Families; http://www.roman-emperors.org/decius.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
Valerian1RIC232.jpg
[1112a] Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.70 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC 232, RSC 10, VF, worn die reverse, Mediolanum mint, 3.909g, 22.2mm, 180o, 257 A.D.; Obverse: IMP VALERIANVS P AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: AETERNITATI AVGG, Sol standing left, raising right, globe in left; nice portrait, good silver for the reign. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian (A.D. 253-260) and Gallienus (A.D. 253-268)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University


P. Licinius Valerianus, or Valerian, was unusual for his time period in that he was an emperor who came from an old Roman senatorial family. He was likely born shortly before 200 A.D., but little is known of his early life. Valerian married Egnatia Mariniana and had two sons, Gallienus and Valerian Junior. Gallienus was born around 218. Valerian makes his first appearance in the sources in 238 A.D. as an ex-consul and princeps senatus negotiating with (more likely than serving on) the embassy sent to Rome by Gordian I's African legions to secure senatorial approval of Gordian's rebellion against and replacement of Maximinus Thrax as emperor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae probably report accurately that Trajan Decius, on the recommendation of the Senate, offered Valerian the censorship in 251. Although the senatus consultum cited and the specific office are of doubtful authenticity, the high reputation Valerian possessed in the Senate and his association with the government under Decius probably are truthful aspects of the story. In 253 Valerian was apparently commanding in Raetia and Noricum when Trebonianus Gallus sent him to bring legions from Gaul and Germany to Italy for the struggle with the forces of Aemilianus. After Gallus' troops killed him and his son and joined Aemilianus, Valerian's men proclaimed their general emperor and their arrival in Italy caused Aemilianus' soldiers to desert and kill their commander and join Valerian's forces in acclaiming Valerian as emperor.

The Senate presumably was pleased to ratify the position of Valerian, one of their own, as emperor and they also accepted his son and colleague, P. Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, as Augustus, rather than just as Caesar. Valerian apparently realized the necessity of sharing power equally with his son and of dividing their efforts geographically, with Gallienus responsible for the West and Valerian himself concentrating on the East. The biographies of Valerian and Gallienus in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, attributed to Trebellius Pollio, are not especially helpful in putting together an account of their joint reign. The life of Valerian is fragmentary and that of Gallienus projects an extremely biased negative interpretation of his career.

Gallienus in the early years of the joint reign concentrated, with some success, on protecting Gaul and the Rhine frontier by driving back Germanic tribes and fortifying cities such as Cologne and Trier. In a move which would characterize later diplomacy with Germans, Gallienus concluded an alliance with one of their chieftains, presumably to assist the Romans in protecting the empire from other Germanic tribes. The invasions increased in number around 257-258 as the Franks entered Gaul and Spain, destroying Tarraco (Tarragona), and the Alamanni invaded Italy. Gallienus defeated the Alamanni at Milan, but soon was faced with the revolts in Pannonia and Moesia led first by his general there, Ingenuus, and then by Regalianus, commander in Illyricum. Gallienus put down these rebellions by 260 and secured stability in the region by concluding an alliance with the Marcomannic king, whose daughter Pipa the emperor apparently accepted as his concubine although he was still married to Cornelia Salonina.

In the East, Valerian had succeeded by A.D. 257 in rescuing Antioch in Syria from Persian control, at least temporarily, but was soon faced with a major invasion of the Goths in Asia Minor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae biography of Aurelian has Valerian appear to speak in the Baths at Byzantium to publicly commend Aurelian for his success in driving back the Goths and reward him with the consulship and even with adoption as imperial successor. However, it is not clear that Valerian even reached Byzantium because he sent Felix to that city while he remained to protect the eastern section of Asia Minor and then returned to Antioch to guard it against renewed Persian attacks. It was at this point, around 259, that Valerian moved to defend Edessa and his troops lost significant numbers to the plague. Valerian tried to negotiate a peace with the Persian king, Sapor, but was captured by treachery and taken into captivity. The ultimate humiliation of a Roman emperor by a foreign leader was enacted through Sapor's use of Valerian as a human stepping-stool to assist the Persian king in mounting his horse and Valerian's body was later skinned to produce a lasting trophy of Roman submission.

Eusebius discusses the policy of Valerian toward the Christians and says that, after initially treating them most positively, Valerian was persuaded by Macrianus to lead another persecution against them. Valerian in fact after his brutal imprisonment and death in Persia would serve as a negative moral exemplum for some Latin Christian writers who gleefully pointed out that those who oppose the true God receive their just desserts.

Eusebius also credits Gallienus with reversing his father's policy and establishing peace with the Church, citing imperial edicts which established freedom of worship and even restored some lost property. Paul Keresztes claims that Gallienus in fact established a peace with Christians that lasted for forty-three years, from A.D. 260 until 303, and gave the community a kind of legal status which they had previously lacked.

Andreas Alföldi details a growing separation between Gallienus and his father which goes well beyond the geographical one which had developed out of military necessity. In addition to the strikingly different policies, just described, which they pursued toward the Christians, Gallienus began to make his military independence clear through changes in coin inscriptions and by 258 he had created his central cavalry unit and stationed it at Milan. This independent force, which was under the command of a man of equestrian rank and soon stood on a level at least equal to that of the Praetorian Guard, would play a significant role in Gallienus' upcoming battles and, of course, was a foretoken of a new trend for military organization in the future. Alföldi cites as evidence of the increasing separation between the joint emperors the statement that Gallienus did not even seek his father's return from captivity, which Lactantius of course interpreted as part of Valerian's divine punishment, but one wonders what indeed Gallienus might have done and his "indifference" may have been instead his attempt to reassert confidence in his armies and not dwell on the depressing and humiliating servitude and ultimate death of Valerian. Another reform which Alföldi discusses as part of Gallienus' independent stand is his exclusion of the senatorial class from major military commands. H.M.D. Parker credits Gallienus with beginning to separate the civil and military functions of Rome's provincial governors, thus making senatorial governors purely civil administrators and starting to replace them even in this reduced role by equestrians. The disappearance in this period of the S.C. stamp of senatorial authority on bronze coins was probably also seen as an attack on the prestige of the order, although the debasement of the silver coinage had by this time practically reached the point where the "silver" coins were themselves essentially bronze and the change may have been more for economic than for political reasons. Gallienus' exclusion of senators from military command further broke down class distinctions because sons of centurions were by this time regularly given equestrian rank and the move further accelerated the alienation of Rome as center of the Empire. In addition, the bitterness of the senatorial class over Gallienus' policy most likely explains the hatred of Latin writers toward this particular emperor.

Although Gallienus' military innovations may have made his forces more effective, he still had to face numerous challenges to his authority.In addition to systemic invasions and revolts, the plague wreaked havoc in Rome and Italy and probably in several provinces as well. It must have seemed that every commander he entrusted to solve a problem later used that authority to create another threat. When Gallienus was involved in putting down the revolt of Ingenuus in Pannonia, he put Postumus in charge of the armies guarding the Rhine and Gaul. There is some doubt about which of Gallienus' sons, Cornelius Valerianus or P. Cornelius Licinius Saloninus, was left in Cologne under the care of the Praetorian Prefect Silvanus and perhaps also Postumus. In any case, when Postumus revolted and proclaimed his independent Gallic Empire, Silvanus and one of the emperor's sons were killed. Gallienus probably restricted Postumus' expansion, but he never gained the personal revenge that, according to one source, drove him to challenge Postumus to single combat. While Gallienus was thus engaged, and after Valerian's capture by the Persians, Macrianus had his soldiers proclaim his sons, Macrianus and Quietus, emperors in Syria, Asia Minor, and Egypt. Gallienus sent Aureolus to defeat Macrianus and one son in the area of Illyria and Thrace; Odenathus of Palmyra defeated the other son and restored stability in Syria and, with Gallienus' approval, followed that up with a victory over the Persians. After Odenathus' assassination ca. 267, his wife Zenobia continued to rule the independent Palmyrene section of the Empire.

In A.D. 262 Gallienus concluded his tenth year in office by celebrating in Rome his Decennalia with a spectacular procession involving senators, equestrians, gladiators, soldiers, representatives of foreign peoples, and many other groups. This festival included feasts, games, entertainment, and spectacle which probably reminded Romans of the millennial Secular Games celebrations of Philip I and likely were intended to secure popular support at home for Gallienus. Over the next five years little is known about specific activities of the emperor and he presumably spent more time in Rome and less along the frontiers.

Gallienus and Salonina as rulers patronized a cultural movement which collectively is known as the Gallienic Renaissance. The imperial patrons are most directly connected with the philosophical aspects of this movement because Porphyry testifies to their friendship for the Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus. Porphyry goes on to say that Plotinus asked Gallienus to rebuild an abandoned former city of philosophers in Campania, rename it Platonopolis, and govern it as a kind of Platonic Republic, but that the jealousy and spite of others at court scuttled the plan. In addition to Neoplatonic philosophy, according to Gervase Matthew, the Gallienic Renaissance included the "upward glance" and other stylistic changes in imperial sculpture and religious beliefs that were characterized by "an overwhelming sense of the transcendent and immutable." Matthew points out both the return to artistic models of Augustus, Hadrian, and even Severus Alexander and also "a new Romantic tension" which breaks with the past and points toward a new and very different world. The Hellenic character of much of the Gallienic Renaissance is also stressed in the emperor's trip to Athens where he, likely in imitation of Hadrian, became eponymous archon and received initiation into the Eleusinian cult of Demeter.
Late in his reign, Gallienus issued a series of coins in Rome which honored nine deities as Conservator Augusti or protector of the emperor by pairing his portrait with reverses picturing an animal or animals symbolic of each deity. Included in this group of celestial guardians are Apollo, Diana, Hercules, Jupiter, Juno, Liber Pater, Mercury, Neptune, and Sol. For example, Apollo's coin-types portray a centaur, a gryphon, or Pegasus; Hercules is represented by either the lion or the boar. It appears that Gallienus was issuing the "animal series" coins both to secure, through some religious festival, the aid of Rome's protective gods against continuing invasions, revolts, and plague and to entertain the Roman populace with pageantry and circus games, thus to divert their attention away from the same problems and maintain the security of the regime in power.

In A.D. 268, Gallienus saw his third son, Marinianus, become consul, but in the spring another Gothic invasion brought the emperor back to Greece. He defeated the invaders at Naissus in Moesia , but was deterred from pursuing them further by a revolt of the commander of his elite cavalry, Aureolus. He besieged this last rebel emperor in Milan, but a plot involving his Praetorian Prefect and two future emperors, Claudius and Aurelian, all three men Illyrians popular with many of the soldiers, lured Gallienus away from the city on a false pretext and assassinated him.The emperor's brother Valerian and young son Marinianus were also murdered. In spite of the bitter resentment which many of the senators must have felt toward the dead emperor and his reform policies, Claudius II, perhaps only to legitimize his own reign, persuaded the Senate to deify Gallienus.

Copyright Richard D. Weigel, 2007. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian I was proclaimed emperor after the death of Trajan Decius. He successfully repulsed many barbarian incursions but the standard of living declined and would never recover. In 260 A.D., after four years of war during which Roman forces suffered great losses in battle and to plague, he arranged for peace talks. He set off with a small group to discuss terms with the Sassinian emperor Sapor and was never seen again. The date of his death is unknown, but in Rome it was rumored that he had been murdered and that Sapor was using his stuffed body as a footstool. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
GalllienusRIC163.jpg
[1113a] Gallienus, August 253 - 24 March 268 A.D.72 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC 163, RSC 72, choice EF, Rome mint, 3.716g, 21.6mm, 180o, 268 A.D.; Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; Reverse: APOLLINI CONS AVG, centaur walking right drawing bow, Z in exergue; struck on a full and round flan, rare this nice. Commemorates vows to Apollo invoking his protection against the revolt of Aureolus. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian (A.D. 253-260) and Gallienus (A.D. 253-268)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University


P. Licinius Valerianus, or Valerian, was unusual for his time period in that he was an emperor who came from an old Roman senatorial family. He was likely born shortly before 200 A.D., but little is known of his early life. Valerian married Egnatia Mariniana and had two sons, Gallienus and Valerian Junior. Gallienus was born around 218. Valerian makes his first appearance in the sources in 238 A.D. as an ex-consul and princeps senatus negotiating with (more likely than serving on) the embassy sent to Rome by Gordian I's African legions to secure senatorial approval of Gordian's rebellion against and replacement of Maximinus Thrax as emperor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae probably report accurately that Trajan Decius, on the recommendation of the Senate, offered Valerian the censorship in 251. Although the senatus consultum cited and the specific office are of doubtful authenticity, the high reputation Valerian possessed in the Senate and his association with the government under Decius probably are truthful aspects of the story. In 253 Valerian was apparently commanding in Raetia and Noricum when Trebonianus Gallus sent him to bring legions from Gaul and Germany to Italy for the struggle with the forces of Aemilianus. After Gallus' troops killed him and his son and joined Aemilianus, Valerian's men proclaimed their general emperor and their arrival in Italy caused Aemilianus' soldiers to desert and kill their commander and join Valerian's forces in acclaiming Valerian as emperor.

The Senate presumably was pleased to ratify the position of Valerian, one of their own, as emperor and they also accepted his son and colleague, P. Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, as Augustus, rather than just as Caesar. Valerian apparently realized the necessity of sharing power equally with his son and of dividing their efforts geographically, with Gallienus responsible for the West and Valerian himself concentrating on the East. The biographies of Valerian and Gallienus in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, attributed to Trebellius Pollio, are not especially helpful in putting together an account of their joint reign. The life of Valerian is fragmentary and that of Gallienus projects an extremely biased negative interpretation of his career.

Gallienus in the early years of the joint reign concentrated, with some success, on protecting Gaul and the Rhine frontier by driving back Germanic tribes and fortifying cities such as Cologne and Trier. In a move which would characterize later diplomacy with Germans, Gallienus concluded an alliance with one of their chieftains, presumably to assist the Romans in protecting the empire from other Germanic tribes. The invasions increased in number around 257-258 as the Franks entered Gaul and Spain, destroying Tarraco (Tarragona), and the Alamanni invaded Italy. Gallienus defeated the Alamanni at Milan, but soon was faced with the revolts in Pannonia and Moesia led first by his general there, Ingenuus, and then by Regalianus, commander in Illyricum. Gallienus put down these rebellions by 260 and secured stability in the region by concluding an alliance with the Marcomannic king, whose daughter Pipa the emperor apparently accepted as his concubine although he was still married to Cornelia Salonina.

In the East, Valerian had succeeded by A.D. 257 in rescuing Antioch in Syria from Persian control, at least temporarily, but was soon faced with a major invasion of the Goths in Asia Minor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae biography of Aurelian has Valerian appear to speak in the Baths at Byzantium to publicly commend Aurelian for his success in driving back the Goths and reward him with the consulship and even with adoption as imperial successor. However, it is not clear that Valerian even reached Byzantium because he sent Felix to that city while he remained to protect the eastern section of Asia Minor and then returned to Antioch to guard it against renewed Persian attacks. It was at this point, around 259, that Valerian moved to defend Edessa and his troops lost significant numbers to the plague. Valerian tried to negotiate a peace with the Persian king, Sapor, but was captured by treachery and taken into captivity. The ultimate humiliation of a Roman emperor by a foreign leader was enacted through Sapor's use of Valerian as a human stepping-stool to assist the Persian king in mounting his horse and Valerian's body was later skinned to produce a lasting trophy of Roman submission.

Eusebius discusses the policy of Valerian toward the Christians and says that, after initially treating them most positively, Valerian was persuaded by Macrianus to lead another persecution against them. Valerian in fact after his brutal imprisonment and death in Persia would serve as a negative moral exemplum for some Latin Christian writers who gleefully pointed out that those who oppose the true God receive their just desserts.

Eusebius also credits Gallienus with reversing his father's policy and establishing peace with the Church, citing imperial edicts which established freedom of worship and even restored some lost property. Paul Keresztes claims that Gallienus in fact established a peace with Christians that lasted for forty-three years, from A.D. 260 until 303, and gave the community a kind of legal status which they had previously lacked.

Andreas Alföldi details a growing separation between Gallienus and his father which goes well beyond the geographical one which had developed out of military necessity. In addition to the strikingly different policies, just described, which they pursued toward the Christians, Gallienus began to make his military independence clear through changes in coin inscriptions and by 258 he had created his central cavalry unit and stationed it at Milan. This independent force, which was under the command of a man of equestrian rank and soon stood on a level at least equal to that of the Praetorian Guard, would play a significant role in Gallienus' upcoming battles and, of course, was a foretoken of a new trend for military organization in the future. Alföldi cites as evidence of the increasing separation between the joint emperors the statement that Gallienus did not even seek his father's return from captivity, which Lactantius of course interpreted as part of Valerian's divine punishment, but one wonders what indeed Gallienus might have done and his "indifference" may have been instead his attempt to reassert confidence in his armies and not dwell on the depressing and humiliating servitude and ultimate death of Valerian. Another reform which Alföldi discusses as part of Gallienus' independent stand is his exclusion of the senatorial class from major military commands. H.M.D. Parker credits Gallienus with beginning to separate the civil and military functions of Rome's provincial governors, thus making senatorial governors purely civil administrators and starting to replace them even in this reduced role by equestrians. The disappearance in this period of the S.C. stamp of senatorial authority on bronze coins was probably also seen as an attack on the prestige of the order, although the debasement of the silver coinage had by this time practically reached the point where the "silver" coins were themselves essentially bronze and the change may have been more for economic than for political reasons. Gallienus' exclusion of senators from military command further broke down class distinctions because sons of centurions were by this time regularly given equestrian rank and the move further accelerated the alienation of Rome as center of the Empire. In addition, the bitterness of the senatorial class over Gallienus' policy most likely explains the hatred of Latin writers toward this particular emperor.

Although Gallienus' military innovations may have made his forces more effective, he still had to face numerous challenges to his authority.In addition to systemic invasions and revolts, the plague wreaked havoc in Rome and Italy and probably in several provinces as well. It must have seemed that every commander he entrusted to solve a problem later used that authority to create another threat. When Gallienus was involved in putting down the revolt of Ingenuus in Pannonia, he put Postumus in charge of the armies guarding the Rhine and Gaul. There is some doubt about which of Gallienus' sons, Cornelius Valerianus or P. Cornelius Licinius Saloninus, was left in Cologne under the care of the Praetorian Prefect Silvanus and perhaps also Postumus. In any case, when Postumus revolted and proclaimed his independent Gallic Empire, Silvanus and one of the emperor's sons were killed. Gallienus probably restricted Postumus' expansion, but he never gained the personal revenge that, according to one source, drove him to challenge Postumus to single combat. While Gallienus was thus engaged, and after Valerian's capture by the Persians, Macrianus had his soldiers proclaim his sons, Macrianus and Quietus, emperors in Syria, Asia Minor, and Egypt. Gallienus sent Aureolus to defeat Macrianus and one son in the area of Illyria and Thrace; Odenathus of Palmyra defeated the other son and restored stability in Syria and, with Gallienus' approval, followed that up with a victory over the Persians. After Odenathus' assassination ca. 267, his wife Zenobia continued to rule the independent Palmyrene section of the Empire.

In A.D. 262 Gallienus concluded his tenth year in office by celebrating in Rome his Decennalia with a spectacular procession involving senators, equestrians, gladiators, soldiers, representatives of foreign peoples, and many other groups. This festival included feasts, games, entertainment, and spectacle which probably reminded Romans of the millennial Secular Games celebrations of Philip I and likely were intended to secure popular support at home for Gallienus. Over the next five years little is known about specific activities of the emperor and he presumably spent more time in Rome and less along the frontiers.

Gallienus and Salonina as rulers patronized a cultural movement which collectively is known as the Gallienic Renaissance. The imperial patrons are most directly connected with the philosophical aspects of this movement because Porphyry testifies to their friendship for the Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus. Porphyry goes on to say that Plotinus asked Gallienus to rebuild an abandoned former city of philosophers in Campania, rename it Platonopolis, and govern it as a kind of Platonic Republic, but that the jealousy and spite of others at court scuttled the plan. In addition to Neoplatonic philosophy, according to Gervase Matthew, the Gallienic Renaissance included the "upward glance" and other stylistic changes in imperial sculpture and religious beliefs that were characterized by "an overwhelming sense of the transcendent and immutable." Matthew points out both the return to artistic models of Augustus, Hadrian, and even Severus Alexander and also "a new Romantic tension" which breaks with the past and points toward a new and very different world. The Hellenic character of much of the Gallienic Renaissance is also stressed in the emperor's trip to Athens where he, likely in imitation of Hadrian, became eponymous archon and received initiation into the Eleusinian cult of Demeter.

Late in his reign, Gallienus issued a series of coins in Rome which honored nine deities as Conservator Augusti or protector of the emperor by pairing his portrait with reverses picturing an animal or animals symbolic of each deity. Included in this group of celestial guardians are Apollo, Diana, Hercules, Jupiter, Juno, Liber Pater, Mercury, Neptune, and Sol. For example, Apollo's coin-types portray a centaur, a gryphon, or Pegasus; Hercules is represented by either the lion or the boar. It appears that Gallienus was issuing the "animal series" coins both to secure, through some religious festival, the aid of Rome's protective gods against continuing invasions, revolts, and plague and to entertain the Roman populace with pageantry and circus games, thus to divert their attention away from the same problems and maintain the security of the regime in power.

In A.D. 268, Gallienus saw his third son, Marinianus, become consul, but in the spring another Gothic invasion brought the emperor back to Greece. He defeated the invaders at Naissus in Moesia , but was deterred from pursuing them further by a revolt of the commander of his elite cavalry, Aureolus. He besieged this last rebel emperor in Milan, but a plot involving his Praetorian Prefect and two future emperors, Claudius and Aurelian, all three men Illyrians popular with many of the soldiers, lured Gallienus away from the city on a false pretext and assassinated him.The emperor's brother Valerian and young son Marinianus were also murdered. In spite of the bitter resentment which many of the senators must have felt toward the dead emperor and his reform policies, Claudius II, perhaps only to legitimize his own reign, persuaded the Senate to deify Gallienus.

Copyright (C) 1998, Richard D. Weigel. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/gallval.htm. Used by permission.


Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus was born in about AD 213. This means that he was about 40 years old when his father Valerian, in AD 253, was hailed emperor by his troops in Raetia. Gallienus was made Caesar immediately by his father. But within a month, when Valerian got to Rome, Gallienus received the rank of Augustus.

Compared to other Roman emperors of the age, Gallienus was an exception, as far as he was not a soldier-emperor. He was rather a thoughtful, intellectual ruler, possessing sophisticated Greek tastes. However, this made him deeply unpopular with the gritty Danubian generals, who very much understood it as their right to choose a leader among their own ranks to rule the empire.

If the Danubian military elite didn't like Gallienus, then he certainly soon proved that he was a capable military leader. Between AD 254 to AD 256 he campaigned along the Danube, securing this troubled frontier against the barbarians. In AD 256 he then moved west to fight the Germans along the Rhine.

Then by autumn AD 260 the message of Valerian's capture by the Persians reached Gallienus. If Gallienus had always been unpopular among the military leaders, then now with his father gone and Roman authority crumbling, rebellion was in the air.

On a night in September, AD 268, at the siege of Mediolanum (Milan), an alarm was suddenly raised in the camp of the emperor. In the brief moment of confusion, Gallienus was struck down in the dark as he emerged from his tent.

During his reign, Gallienus began numerous reforms and military campaigns to defend the empire, as much from usurpers as from barbarians. In doing so, he perhaps saved the empire from oblivion. At the same time he presided over perhaps the last flowering of classical Roman culture, patronizing poets, artists and philosophers.

As a last gesture of disrespect to this, most unfortunate of emperors, the Romans should lay Gallienus to rest not in one of the great mausoleums in Rome, but in a tomb nine miles south of the capital, along the Via Appia.

Ironically, he was deified by the senate at the request of Claudius II Gothicus, one of the men who must be held accountable for the assassination of Gallienus.
See: http://www.roman-empire.net/decline/gallienus.html


Gallienus was the son of Valerian I and was named Caesar at his father's accession to the throne in 253 A.D. Upon his father's capture by the Parthians he assumed the rank of Augustus and began numerous reforms and military campaigns to defend the empire, as much from usurpers as from barbarians. At the same time he presided over perhaps the last flowering of classical Roman culture, patronizing poets, artists and philosophers. Gallienus was assassinated while besieging Milan. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
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