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Search results - "Honorius"
honorius.jpg
30 viewsareich
Honorius.JPG
19 viewsHonorius, AD 393- 423, AE Follis, Constantinopolis Mint Jon the Lecturer
HONORIUS_AE_3_14mm_2_91gr_USS3_99.jpg
11 viewsAntonivs Protti
Honorius,_GLORIA_ROMANORVM,_three_emperors,_Cyzicus,_406-408_AD~0.JPG
14 viewsAntonivs Protti
HONORIUS_AE_3_14mm_2_91gr_USS3_99~0.JPG
8 viewsAntonivs Protti
Honorius_RIC-72.jpg
8 viewsQuant.Geek
Honorius_RIC-69e.jpg
5 viewsQuant.Geek
theo1225s.jpg
Honorius AE3, 395-401 AD. 28 viewsObverse: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Reverse: VIRTVS-EXERCITI, Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and
resting left hand on shield. Victory, standing beside him, crowns him with
a wreath held in her right hand.
SMKB in ex. Cyzicus mint. RIC X 68
NORMAN K
hon68.jpg
Honorius RIC 68 Cyzicus25 viewsHonorius bronze AE4
Obverse: D N HONORI-VS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VIRTVS-EXERCITI, Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and resting left hand on shield. Victory, standing beside him, crowns him with a wreath held in her right hand.
SMKB in ex. Cyzicus mint,14.9 mm, 2.0 g.
NORMAN K
hon123456.JPG
Honorius 393-423 CE.23 viewsHonorius bronze AE4
Obverse: D N HONORI-VS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM, Emperor standing left, head right, holding labarum & globe.
Uncertain mint,15.2 mm, 1.4g.
NORMAN K
hon403.jpg
Honorius RIC 403 Cyzicus41 viewsHonorius bronze AE4
Obverse: D N HONORIUS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, star in left field.
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM, Honorius and Theodosius II standing facing, heads confronted, each holding a spear vertically in outer hand and resting inner hand on shield. The emperor on the right is slightly smaller than the other.
SMK in ex. Cyzicus 15.24 mm, 2.0 g.
NORMAN K
Honorius-Constantinople RIC 61.JPG
Honorius-Constantinople RIC 6132 viewsAE3, Constantinople mint, 395-401 AD
Obverse: DN HONORIVS PF AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VIRTVS EXERCITI, Emperor standing facing in military uniform, being crowned from behind by Victory.
CONSA in exergue
RIC 61
16mm, 2.7gms.
Jerome Holderman
honorius-sil-votxmvltxv-milan.JPG
RIC.27b Honorius (Siliqua, Vot X Mvlt XV)7 viewsHonorius, western roman emperor (393-423)
Siliqua : Virtus exerciti (388-402, Milan mint)

silver, 16 mm diameter, 1.47 g, die axis: 7 h

A/ D N HONORI-VS P F AVG; pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
R/ VOT / X / MVLT / XVL, MDPS in exergue; in wreath

RIC.IX 27b(R4) or RIC.X 1225(R3)
Droger
honorius-virtus-exerciti-cons.JPG
RIC.61? Honorius (AE3, Virtus Exerciti)18 viewsHonorius, western roman emperor (393-423)
Nummus AE3 : Virtus exerciti (395-401, Constantinople mint)

bronze, 18 mm diameter, 2,31 g, die axis: 12 h

A/ D N HONORI-VS P F AVG; pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
R/ VIRTVS-EXERCITI/CONSΓ in exergue; Emperor standing facing in military uniform, being crowned by Victory
Droger
honorius.jpg
(0393) HONORIUS38 views393 - 423 AD
AE 22 mm 4.74 g
O: DN HONORIVS PF AVG
DIAD DR CUIR BUST R
R: HONORIUS STANDING HLDING LABARUM AND GLOBE
NICOMEDIA
laney
honorius_res~0.jpg
(0393) HONORIUS28 views393 - 423 AD
AE 13 mm max., 1.15 g
O: DN HONORIVS PF AVG, diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
R: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory advancing left holding trophy over right shoulder and dragging captive.
Chi-rho in left field; SMKA in exe
RIC IX Cyzicus 30c, (R2)
laney
honorius_res.jpg
(0393) HONORIUS25 views393 - 423 AD
AE 17 mm, 2.00 g
O: DN HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped & curiassed bust right
R: VIRTVS EXERCITI, emperor standing front, holding spear & resting hand on shield, with head turned right while Victory crowns him with wreath
Cyzicus mint; RIC 68
laney
theodosiusHeraclea.JPG
-Theodosius II AE3. Heraclea26 viewsTheodosius II, 10 January 402 - 28 July 450 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC X 398, VF, Heraclea mint, 13mm, 408 - 423 A.D.; obverse D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, star behind; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM, Theodosius II and Honorius standing facing. SMHA in ex; scarce type.ancientone
Personajes_Imperiales_12.jpg
12 - Personalities of the Empire49 viewsFlavius Victor, Arcadius, Eudoxia, Honorius, Gala Placidia, Johannes, Theodosius II, Aelia Pulcheria, Valentinianus III, Marcian, Leon I, Severus III, Zenon I and Anastasius I (pre-reform)mdelvalle
LarryW1801.jpg
120 Honorius, AD 393–423160 viewsGold solidus, 21.2mm, 4.43g, FDC
Struck c. 408-420 at Constantinople
D N HONORI—VS P F AVC, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over right shoulder and shield with horseman motif on left arm / CONCORDI—A AVCC Γ, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, right foot on ship's prow, holding scepter in right hand, Victory on globe in left. Star in left field, CON OB in exergue.
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
Ex: Forvm Ancient Coins
RIC X, 201; Cohen 3; DO 778v (off B)
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
150.jpg
150 Honorius. AE4 1.2gm15 viewsobv: DN HONORI_VS PF AVG pearl dia. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: SALVS REI_PVBLICAE Victory adv. l. holding trophy over shoulder and dragging captive, christogram in l. field
ex: AQS
hill132
Theo1Ae3Ant.jpeg
1505b, Theodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. (Antioch)70 viewsTheodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC 44(b), VF, Antioch, 2.17g, 18.1mm, 180o, 9 Aug 378 - 25 Aug 383 A.D. Obverse: D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: CONCORDIA AVGGG, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, r. foot on prow, globe in l., scepter in r., Q and F at sides, ANTG in ex; scarce.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.



Cleisthenes
Theod1GlrMan.jpg
1505c, Theodosius I, 379 - 395 A.D. (Constantinople)79 viewsTheodosius I (379 - 395 AD) AE3. 388-394 AD, RIC IX 27(a)3, Third Officina. Seventh Period. 20.27 mm. 4.8gm. Near VF with black and earthen patina. Constantinople. Obverse: DN THEODO-SIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right; Reverse: GLORIA-ROMANORVM, Theodosius I standing, facing, holding labarum and globe, CONSB in exergue (scarcer reverse). A Spanish find.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Flaccilla_AE-2_AEL-FLAC-CILLA-AVG_SALVS-REI-PVBLICAE_CON-Gamma_RIC-IX-55-p229_Constantinopolis_378-88-AD_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
161 Aelia Flaccilla (???- 386 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC IX 055-3, -/-//CONΓ, AE-1, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, #1286 views161 Aelia Flaccilla (???- 386 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC IX 055-3, -/-//CONΓ, AE-1, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, #1
Wife of Theodosius I and mother of Honorius and Arcadius.
avers:- AEL FLAC CILLA AVG, Draped bust right, wearing elaborate headdress, necklace, and mantle.
revers:- SALVS REI PVBLICAE, Victory seated right on throne, inscribing a Christogram on a shield set on a column.
exe: -/-//CONΓ, diameter: 22mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: 379-388 A.D., ref: RIC IX 55, p-229,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Flaccilla_AE-4_AEL-FLACILLA-AVG_SALVS-REIPVBLICAE_CON_RIC-IX-61-p229_Constantinopolis_379-88-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_10-10,5mm_0,80g-s.jpg
161 Aelia Flaccilla (???- 386 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC IX 061-3, -/-//CONE, AE-4, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, #196 views161 Aelia Flaccilla (???- 386 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC IX 061-3, -/-//CONE, AE-4, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, #1
Wife of Theodosius I and mother of Honorius and Arcadius.
avers:- AEL FLACILLA AVG, Diademed, draped bust bust right.
revers:- SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing Chi-Rho on shield.
exe: -/-//CONE, diameter: 10-10,5mm, weight: 0,80g, axis: 6h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: 379-388 A.D., ref: RIC IX 61-3, p-229,
Q-001
quadrans
Flaccilla_AE-4_AEL-FLAC-CILLA-AVG_SALVS-REI-PVBLICAE_SMHA_RIC-IX-17-1_p-196_Heraclea_378-83-AD_Q-001_11h_14-14,5mm_1,18g-s.jpg
161 Aelia Flaccilla (???- 386 A.D.), Heraclea, RIC IX 017-1, -/-//SMHA, AE-4, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, R!, #191 views161 Aelia Flaccilla (???- 386 A.D.), Heraclea, RIC IX 017-1, -/-//SMHA, AE-4, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, R!, #1
Wife of Theodosius I and mother of Honorius and Arcadius.
avers:- AEL FLAC CILLA AVG, Draped bust right, wearing elaborate headdress, necklace, and mantle.
revers:- SALVS REI PVBLICAE, Victory seated right on throne, inscribing a Christogram on a shield set on a column.
exe: -/-//SMHA, diameter: 14-14,5mm, weight: 1,18g, axis: 11h, R!
mint: Heraclea, date: 379-388 A.D., ref: RIC IX 17-1, p-196,
Q-001
quadrans
Honorius_AE-3_DN-HONORI-VS-PF-AVG_GLORI-A-ROMA-NORVM_Star_ALEA_RIC-X-157(Arcadius)-p-252_Alexandria_406-8-AD_Q-001_0h_13,7mm_1,66g-s.jpg
179 Honorius ( 393-423 A.D.), Alexandria, RIC X 157 (Arcadius), -/-//ALEA, AE-3, GLORIA ROMANORVM, Three emperors standing side by side, Scarce! #196 views179 Honorius ( 393-423 A.D.), Alexandria, RIC X 157 (Arcadius), -/-//ALEA, AE-3, GLORIA ROMANORVM, Three emperors standing side by side, Scarce! #1
avers:- D N HONORI VS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right, star behind head.
revers:- GLORI A ROMA NORVM, Three emperors ( Arcadius, Honorius, and Theodosius II ) standing side by side holding spears, the two outer ones taller, each resting hand on shield, the middle one holding a globe.
exerg: -/-//ALEA, diameter: 13,7 mm, weight: 1,66g, axes: 0h,
mint: Alexandria, date:406-408 A.D., ref: RIC X 157 (Arcadius), p-252, Scarce!
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Honorius_RIC-IX-027c_-6h_21mm_5,30g-s.jpg
179 Honorius ( 393-423 A.D.), Heraclea, RIC IX 027c-2, -/-//SMHB, AE-2, GLORIA ROMANORVM, Honorius standing, facing, #198 views179 Honorius ( 393-423 A.D.), Heraclea, RIC IX 027c-2, -/-//SMHB, AE-2, GLORIA ROMANORVM, Honorius standing, facing, #1
avers:- D N HONORIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- GLORIA ROMANORVM, Honorius standing, facing, holding labarum and globe.
exerg: -/-//SMHB, diameter: 21,0 mm, weight: 5,30g, axes: 6h,
mint: Heraclea, date: 393-395A.D., ref: RIC IX 027c-2, p-199,
Q-001
quadrans
Honorius_AE-10_DN-HONORIVS-PF-AVG_CONCOR-DIA-AVG-G-G_SMHA_RIC-X-124_Q-001_axis-6h_10-10,5mm_0,80g-s.jpg
179 Honorius ( 393-423 A.D.), Heraclea, RIC X 124, -/-//SMHA, AE-4, CONCORDIA AVG G G, Cross, Scarce, #194 views179 Honorius ( 393-423 A.D.), Heraclea, RIC X 124, -/-//SMHA, AE-4, CONCORDIA AVG G G, Cross, Scarce, #1
avers:- D N HONORI VS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right (H1/D3).
revers:- CONCOR DIA AVG G G, Cross,
exerg: -/-//SMHA, diameter: 10-10,5 mm, weight: 0,80g, axes: 6h,
mint: Heraclea, date: 404-406 A.D., ref: RIC X 124, p-250,
Q-001
quadrans
Honorius_AG-_DN-HONORIVS-PF-AVG_VIRTVS-ROMANORVM_RIC-X-1226-p-321-Q-001_6h_16mm_1,38gx-s.jpg
179 Honorius ( 393-423 A.D.), Roma, RIC X 1226, -/-//MDPS, AR-Siliqua, VIRTVS-ROMANORVM, Roma seated left, #1112 views179 Honorius ( 393-423 A.D.), Roma, RIC X 1226, -/-//MDPS, AR-Siliqua, VIRTVS-ROMANORVM, Roma seated left, #1
avers:- D N HONORIVS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right (H1/D3).
revers:- VIRTVS ROMANORVM, Roma seated left, holding Victory on globe and spear.
exerg: -/-//MDPS, diameter:14-16 mm, weight: 1,38g, axes: 6h,
mint: Roma, date: 404, 407-408 A.D., ref: RIC X 1226, p-321,
Q-001
quadrans
179_Honorius_(_393-423_A_D_),_Roma,_RIC_X_1357P,_AE-4,_Nummus,_D_N_HONORIVS_P_F_AVG,_VICTORIA_AVG_G,_P-,RM,_410-23_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_11-11,3mm,_1,11g-s.jpg
179 Honorius ( 393-423 A.D.), Roma, RIC X 1357P, P/-//RM, AE-4, Nummus, VICTORIA AVG G, Victory walking left, Rare! #189 views179 Honorius ( 393-423 A.D.), Roma, RIC X 1357P, P/-//RM, AE-4, Nummus, VICTORIA AVG G, Victory walking left, Rare! #1
avers: D N HONORIVS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: VICTORIA AVG G, Victory walking left, holding wreath and palm branch, P in the left field.
exergue: P/-//RM, diameter: 11,0-11,3 mm, weight: 1,11g, axes: 6h,
mint: Roma, date: 410-423 A.D., ref: RIC X Roma 1357P, Sear 21048, Late Roman Coins 732, C 39, LRBC 828-30, Rare!
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
TheodosAE4VotMult~0.jpg
1eu Theodosius25 views379-395

AE4

Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG
VOT V MVLT X within wreath, ASISC in ex

RIC 29d

Zosimus recorded: [Valentinian] commanded some legions from the stations in Pannonia and Moesia, to embark for Africa [to crush a rebellion]. On this the Sarmatians and the Quadi. . . , availing themselves, of the opportunity afforded by the departure of the legions for Africa, invaded the Pannonians and Moesians. . . . The barbarians therefore revenged themselves by plundering all the country along the Ister, carrying off all that they found in the towns. The Pannonians were by these means exposed to the cruelty of the barbarians, while the soldiers were extremely negligent in the defence of their towns, and committed as much mischief as the Barbarians themselves in all places on this side of the river. But Moesia was free from harm, because Theodosius, who commanded the forces there, courageously resisted the Barbarians, and routed them when they attacked him. By that victory he not only acquired great renown, but subsequently attained the imperial dignity. . . .

When the affairs of the empire were reduced to this low condition, Victor, who commanded the Roman cavalry, escaping the danger with some of his troops, entered Macedon and Thessaly. From thence he proceeded into Moesia and Pannonia, and informed Gratian, who was then in that quarter, of what had occurred, and of the loss of the emperor [Valens] and his army. Gratian received the intelligence without uneasiness, and was little grieved at the death of his uncle, a disagreement having existed between them. Finding himself unable to manage affairs, Thrace being ravaged by the Barbarians, as were likewise Pannonia and Moesia, and the towns upon the Rhine being infested by the neighbouring Barbarians without controul, he chose for his associate in the empire, Theodosius, who was a native of a town called Cauca, in the part of Spain called Hispania Callaecia, and who possessed great knowledge and experience of military affairs. Having given him the government of Thrace and the eastern provinces, Gratian himself proceeded to the west of Gaul, in order, if possible, to compose affairs in that quarter. . . .

During the stay of the new emperor, Theodosius, at Thesslonica, a great concourse arrived there from all parts of persons soliciting him on business, both public and private; who having obtained of him whatever he could conveniently grant, returned, to their homes. As a great multitude of the Scythians beyond the Ister, the Gotthi, and the Taiphali, and other tribes that formerly dwelt among them, had crossed the river, and were driven to infest the Roman dominions, because the Huns, had expelled them from their own country, the emperor Theodosius prepared for war with all his forces. . . . The army having made this good use of the occasion afforded by fortune, the affairs of Thrace, which had been on the brink of ruin, were now, the Barbarians being crushed beyond all hope, re-established in peace. . . .

Meanwhile, the emperor Theodosius, residing in Thessalonica, was easy of access to all who wished to see him. Having commenced his reign in luxury and indolence, he threw the magistracy into disorder, and increased the number of his military officers. . . . As he squandered the public money without consideration, bestowing it on unworthy persons, he consequently impoverished himself. He therefore sold the government of provinces to any who would purchase them, without regard to the reputation or ablity of the persons, esteeming him the best qualified who brought him the most gold or silver. . . .

Maximus, who deemed his appointments inferior to his merits, being only governor of the countries formerly under Gratian, projected how to depose the young Valentinian from the empire. . . . This so much surprised Valentinian, and rendered his situation so desperate, that his courtiers were alarmed lest he should be taken by Maximus and put to death. He, therefore, immediately embarked,and sailed to Thessalonica with his mother Justina. . . . [A]rriving at Thessalonica, they sent messengers to the emperor Theodosius, intreating him now at least to revenge the injuries committed against the family of Valentinian. . . . The emperor, being delivered from this alarm, marched with great resolution with his whole army against Maximus. . . . Theodosius, having passed through Pannonia and the defiles of the Appennines, attacked unawares the forces of Maximus before they were prepared for him. A part of his army, having pursued them with the utmost speed, forced their way through the gates of Aquileia, the guards being too few to resist them. Maximus was torn from his imperial throne while in the act of distributing money to his soldiers, and being stripped of his imperial robes, was brought to Theodosius, who, having in reproach enumerated some of his crimes against the commonwealth, delivered him to the common executioner to receive due punishment. . . . The emperor Theodosius, having consigned Italy, Spain, Celtica, and Libya to his son Honorius, died of a disease on his journey towards Constantinople.
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1ex Eugenius26 views392-394

AR siliqua

Bearded, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust rightt, DN EVGENIVS PF AVG
Roma seated left on cuirass, MDPS below, VIRTVS ROMANORVM

RIC 32c

Zosimus reports: Eugenius became the sincere friend of Arbogastes, who had no secret which he did not confide to him. Recollecting Eugenius, therefore, at this juncture, who by his extraordinary learning and the gravity of his conversation seemed well-adapted for the management of an empire, he communicated to him his designs. But finding him not pleased with the proposals, he attempted to prevail on him by all the arts he could use, and entreated him not to reject what fortune so favourably offered. Having at length persuaded him, he deemed it advisable in the first place to remove Valentinian, and thus to deliver the sole authority to Eugenius. With this view he proceeded to Vienna, a town in Gaul, where the emperor resided; and as he was amusing himself near the town in some sports with the soldiers, apprehending no danger, Arbogastes gave him a mortal wound. To this audacious action the soldiers quietly submitted, not only because he was so brave and warlike a person, but because they were attached to him through his contempt of riches. As soon as he had performed this action, he declared Eugenius emperor, and infused into them the most favourable hopes that he would prove an excellent ruler, since he possessed such extraordinary qualifications. . . .

[Theodosius marched against Eugenius.] The emperor (having mourned for [his just deceased wife] a whole day, according to the rule of Homer), proceeded with his army to the war, leaving behind him his son Arcadius, who had some time previously been made emperor. This prince being young, his father, in order to amend the defects of his nonage, left with him Rufinus, who was prefect of the court, and acted as he pleased, even as much as the power of sovereignty enabled the emperor himself to do. Having done this, he took with him his younger son Honorius, quickly passed through the intermediate countries, and having exceded his expectations in crossing the Alps, arrived where the enemy was stationed : Eugenius being astonished at seeing him there whom he so little expected. But as he was arrived there, and consequently was under the necessity of engaging, he judged it most prudent to place the Barbarian troops in front, and to expose them first. He ordered Gaines with the troops under his command to make the first attack, and the other commanders of Barbarian soldiers to follow him, either cavalry, horse archers, or infantry. Eugenius then drew out his forces. When the two armies were engaged, so great an eclipse of the sun happened, that for more than half the time of the action it appeared rather to be night than day. As they fought therefore a kind of nocturnal battle, so great a slaughtor was made, that in the same day the greater part of the allies of Theodosius were slain, with their commander Bacurius, who fought very courageously at their head, while the other commanders escaped very narrowly with the remainder. When night came on and the armies had rallied, Eugenius was so elated with his victory, that he distributed money among those who had behaved with the greatest gallantry in the battle, and gave them time to refresh themselves, as if after such a defeat there was no probability of another engagement As they were thus solacing themselves, the emperor Theodosius about break of day fell suddenly on them with his whole forces, while they were still reclined |129 on the ground, and killed them before they knew of the approach of an enemy. He then proceeded to the tent of Eugenius, where he attacked those who were around him, killing many of them, and taking some of them in their flight, among whom was Eugenius. When they had got him in their power, they cut off his head, and carried it on a long spear around the camp, in order to shew those who still adhered to him, that it was now their interest to be reconciled to the emperor, inasmuch as the usurper was removed.
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ArcadiusAE4GlorRom.jpg
1ey Arcadius20 views383-408

AE4

Pearl-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, D N ARCADIVS P F AVG
Emperor advancing right, seizing bound captive by the hair & carrying labarum, BSISC in ex., GLORIA ROMANORVM

RIC 38c2

Zosimus recorded, [Theodosius] proceeded with his army to the war [against Eugenius], leaving behind him his son Arcadius, who had some time previously been made emperor. . . .

THE whole empire being vested in Arcadius and Honorius, they indeed appeared by their title to possess the sovereign authority, although the universal administration of affairs was under Rufinus in the east, and under Stilico in the west. By these all causes were determined, at their own pleasure; for whoever bribed plentifully, or by any other means of friendship or consanguinity could make the judge his advocate, was sure to succeed in the process. From hence it happened that most of those great estates, which cause the possessors to be generally esteemed fortunate, devolved to these two; since some endeavoured by gifts to avoid false accusations, and others relinquished all their possessions to obtain an office, or in any other manner to purchase the ruin of particular cities. While iniquity of every kind presided, therefore, in the respective cities, the money from all quarters flowed into the coffers of Rufinus and Stilico ; while on the reverse, poverty preyed on the habitations of those who had formerly been rich. Nor were the emperors acquainted with anything that was done, but thought all that Rufinus and Stilico commanded was done by virtue of some unwritten law. After they had amassed immense wealth, Rufinus began to concert the means of becoming emperor, by making his own daughter, who was now marriageable. . . . [A different cabal persuaded Arcadius to marry a different girl.]. . . .

Before this juncture a report had been circulated at Rome, that the emperor Arcadius was dead, which was confirmed after the departure of Arcadius for Ravenna. Stilico being at Ravenna while the emperor was at a city of Aemilia, called Bononia, about seventy miles distant, the emperor sent for him to chastise the soldiers, who mutinied amongst each other by the way. Stilico, therefore, having collected the mutinous troops together, informed them that the emperor had commanded him to correct them for their disobedience, and to punish them by a decimation, or putting to death every tenth man. At this they were in such consternation, that they burst into tears, and desiring him to have compassion on them, prevailed on him to promise them a pardon from the emperor. The emperor having performed what Stilico had promised, they applied themselves to public business. For Stilico was desirous of proceeding to the east to undertake the management of the affairs of Theodosius, the son of Arcadius, who was very young, and in want of a guardian. Honorius himself was also inclined to undertake the same journey, with a design to secure the dominions of that emperor. But Stilico, being displeased at that, and laying before the emperor a calculation of the immense sum of money it would require to defray the expence of such an expedition, deterred him from the enterprise.
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HonoriusAE3Emperors.jpg
1fa Honorius19 views393-423

AE3

RIC 403

Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right, DN HONORIVS PF AVG
Two emperors standing facing, heads turned to one another, each holding spear and resting hand on shield, GLORIA ROMANORVM. Mintmark SMKA.

Zosimus wrote: [Theodosius] proceeded with his army to the war [against Eugenius], leaving behind him his son Arcadius, who had some time previously been made emperor. . . . Having done this, he took with him his younger son Honorius, quickly passed through the intermediate countries, and having exceded his expectations in crossing the Alps, arrived where the enemy was stationed. . . . The emperor Theodosius after these successes proceeded to Rome, where he declared his son Honorius emperor, and appointing Stilico to the command of his forces there, left him as guardian to his son. . . . The emperor Theodosius, having consigned Italy, Spain, Celtica, and Libya to his son Honorius, died of a disease on his journey towards Constantinople. . . .

THE whole empire being vested in Arcadius and Honorius, they indeed appeared by their title to possess the sovereign authority, although the universal administration of affairs was under Rufinus in the east, and under Stilico in the west. By these all causes were determined, at their own pleasure; for whoever bribed plentifully, or by any other means of friendship or consanguinity could make the judge his advocate, was sure to succeed in the process. From hence it happened that most of those great estates, which cause the possessors to be generally esteemed fortunate, devolved to these two; since some endeavoured by gifts to avoid false accusations, and others relinquished all their possessions to obtain an office, or in any other manner to purchase the ruin of particular cities. While iniquity of every kind presided, therefore, in the respective cities, the money from all quarters flowed into the coffers of Rufinus and Stilico ; while on the reverse, poverty preyed on the habitations of those who had formerly been rich. Nor were the emperors acquainted with anything that was done, but thought all that Rufinus and Stilico commanded was done by virtue of some unwritten law. . . .

After the autumn was terminated, and winter had commenced, Bassus and Philippus being chosen consuls, the emperor Honorius, who had long before lost his wife Maria, desired to marry her sister Thermantia. But Stilico appeared not to approve of the match, although it was promoted by Serena, who wished it to take place from these motives. When Maria was about to be married to Honorius, her mother, deeming her too young for the marriage-state and being unwilling to defer the marriage, although she thought that to submit so young and tender a person to the embraces of a man was offering violence to nature, she had recourse to a woman who knew how to manage such affairs, and by her means contrived that Maria should live with the emperor and share his bed, but that he should not have the power to deprive her of virginity. In the meantime Maria died a virgin, and Serena, who, as may readily be supposed, was desirous to become the grandmother of a young emperor or empress, through fear of her influence being diminished, used all her endeavours to marry her other daughter to Honorius. This being accomplished, the young lady shortly afterwards died in the same manner as the former. . . . .

For Stilico was desirous of proceeding to the east to undertake the management of the affairs of Theodosius, the son of Arcadius, who was very young, and in want of a guardian. Honorius himself was also inclined to undertake the same journey, with a design to secure the dominions of that emperor. But Stilico, being displeased at that, and laying before the emperor a calculation of the immense sum of money it would require to defray the expence of such an expedition, deterred him from the enterprise. . . .

In the mean time, the emperor Honorius commanded his wife Thermantia to be taken from the imperial throne, and to be restored to her mother, who notwithstanding was without suspicion. . . . Alaric began his expedition against Rome, and ridiculed the preparations made by Honorius. . . . The emperor Honorius was now entering on the consulship, having enjoyed that honour eight times, and the emperor Theodosius in the east three times. At this juncture the rebel Constantine sent some eunches to Honorius, to intreat pardon from him for having accepted of the empire. When the emperor heard this petition, perceiving that it was not easy for him, since Alaric and his barbarians were so near, to prepare for other wars ; and consulting the safety of his relations who were in the hands of the rebel, whose names were Verenianus and Didymius; he not only granted his request, but likewise sent him an imperial robe. . . .

Note: No ancient source reports the sack of Rome by the Goths in 410, they having besieged the city three times, all while Honorius huddled in a besieged Ravenna. Honorius retained his nominal capacity until he died in 423.
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IMG_4294~0.jpg
200. Honorius (393-423 A.D.)49 viewsAv.: DN HONORIVS PF AVG
Rv.: GLORIA ROMANORVM
Right: star
Ex.: SMHB

AE Maiorina Ø22 / 4.8g
RIC IX 27c Heraclea
Juancho
BOTLAUREL_2016.JPG
201654 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
CLICK ON A COIN FOR ITS DETAILS

*Alex
rjb_2013_03_06.jpg
39236 viewsHonorius 392-423 AD
AE 3/4
Obv "DN HONORIVS PF AVG"
Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "GORIA ROMANORVM"
Emperor on horseback right with hand raised
Cyzicus mint
RIC 29c
1 commentsmauseus
HonVM48.jpg
393-423 AD - Honorius - Van Meter 48 - SALVS REIPVBLICAE32 viewsEmperor: Honorius (r. 393-423 AD)
Date: 393-423 AD
Condition: Fine/Fair
Size: AE4

Obverse: DN HONORIVS PF AVG
Our Lord Honorius Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE
The Republic is safe.
Victory advancing left, carrying trophy and dragging captive.
Exergue: unknown

VM 48
1.57g; 13.3mm; 330°
Pep
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515a. Aelia Flacilla33 viewsEmpress, wife of Theodosius the Great, died c. A. D. 385 or 386. Like Theodosius himself, his first wife, Ælia Flaccilla, was of Spanish descent. She may have been the daughter of Claudius Antonius, Prefect of Gaul, who was consul in 382. Her marriage with Theodosius probably took place in the year 376, when his father, the comes Theodosius, fell into disfavour and he himself withdrew to Cauca in Gallæcia, for her eldest son, afterwards Emperor Arcadius, was born towards the end of the following year. In the succeeding years she presented two more children to her husband Honorius (384), who later became emperor, and Pulcheria, who died in early childhood, shortly before her mother. Gregory of Nyssa states expressly that she had three children; consequently the Gratian mentioned by St. Ambrose, together with Pulcheria, was probably not her son. Flaccilla was, like her husband, a zealous supporter of the Nicene Creed and prevented the conference between the emperor and the Arian Eunomius (Sozomen, Hist. eccl., VII, vi). On the throne she was a shining example of Christian virtue and ardent charity. St. Ambrose describes her as "a soul true to God" (Fidelis anima Deo. — "De obitu Theodosii", n. 40, in P. L., XVI, 1462). In his panegyric St. Gregory of Nyssa bestowed the highest praise on her virtuous life and pictured her as the helpmate of the emperor in all good works, an ornament of the empire, a leader of justice, an image of beneficence. He praises her as filled with zeal for the Faith, as a pillar of the Church, as a mother of the indigent. Theodoret in particular exalts her charity and benevolence (Hist. eccles., V, xix, ed. Valesius, III, 192 sq.). He tells us how she personally tended cripples, and quotes a saying of hers: "To distribute money belongs to the imperial dignity, but I offer up for the imperial dignity itself personal service to the Giver." Her humility also attracts a special meed of praise from the church historian. Flaccilla was buried in Constantinople, St. Gregory of Nyssa delivering her funeral oration. She is venerated in the Greek Church as a saint, and her feast is kept on 14 September. The Bollandists (Acta SS., Sept., IV, 142) are of the opinion that she is not regarded as a saint but only as venerable, but her name stands in the Greek Menæa and Synaxaria followed by words of eulogy, as is the case with the other saints

Wife of Theodosius. The reverse of the coin is very interesting; a nice bit of Pagan-Christian syncretism with winged victory inscribing a chi-rho on a shield.
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516. Honorius45 viewsFlavius Honorius (September 9, 384–August 15, 423) was Emperor of the Western Roman Empire from 395 until his death. He was the younger son of Theodosius I and his first wife Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of the Eastern emperor Arcadius.

Honorius was declared Augustus in 393 by his father and became western emperor at the age of 10, following his father's death in January 395. For the first part of his reign he depended on the military leadership of the Vandal general Stilicho. To strengthen his bonds to the young emperor, Stilicho married his daughter Maria to him.

At first Honorius based his capital in Milan, but when the Visigoths entered Italy in 402 he moved his capital to the coastal city of Ravenna, which was protected by a ring of marshes and strong fortifications. While the new capital was easier to defend, it was poorly situated to allow Roman forces to protect central Italy from the barbarian incursions.

The most notable event of his reign was the assault and sack of Rome on August 24, 410 by the Visigoths under Alaric.

The city had been under Visigothic siege since shortly after Stilicho's deposition and execution in the summer of 408. Lacking a strong general to control the by-now mostly barbarian Roman Army, Honorius could do little to attack Alaric's forces directly, and apparently adopted the only strategy he could do in the situation: wait passively to Visigoths to grow weary and spend the time marshalling what forces he could. Unfortunately, this course of action appeared to be the product of Honorius' indecisive character and he suffered much criticism for it both from contemporaries and later historians.

Whether this plan could have worked is perhaps debatable, especially since he deprived himself of several skillful officers by only promoting Catholics to the top military positions. In any case it was overtaken by events. Stricken by starvation, somebody opened Rome's defenses to Alaric and the Goths poured in. The city had not been under the control of a foreign force since an invasion of Gallic Celts some seven centuries before. The victorious Visigoths did untold damage to the city and the shock of this event reverberated from Britain to Jerusalem, and inspired Augustine to write his magnum opus, The City of God.

The year 410 also saw Honorius reply to a British plea for assistance against local barbarian incursions. Preoccupied with the Visigoths and lacking any real capabilities to assist the distant province, Honorius told the Britons to defend themselves as best they could.

There is a story (which Gibbon disbelieved) that when he heard the news that Rome had "perished", Honorius was initially shocked; thinking the news was in reference to a favorite chicken he had named "Roma", he recalled in disbelief that the bird was just recently feeding out of his hand. It was then explained to him that the Rome in question was the city.

His reign of twenty-eight years was one of the most disastrous in the Roman annals. Honorius' supposed weakness and timidity in the face of internal dissension and the attacks of the Visigoths and Vandals is often said to have contributed to the rapid disintegration of the western half of the empire.



RIC X Antioch 153
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516a Johannes42 viewsAfter the death of Honorius on August 15, 423, his closest male relative was Valentinian, son of Galla Placidia. Valentinian was currently at Constantinople. This power vacuum allowed Ioannes, the primicerius notariorum (chief notary) to seize power in the west. Virtually nothing is known of Ioannes himself, though he was said to have had a mild character. He was supported by the magister militum Castinus and by Aetius, son of the magister militum Gaudentius. After his acclamation at Rome, Ioannes transferred his capital to Ravenna. Ioannes' rule was accepted in Gaul, Spain and Italy, but not in Africa. Ioannes' attempts to negotiate with the eastern emperor Theodosius II were unsuccessful. He seems not to have had a firm grasp of power and this encouraged eastern intervention. In 425, Theodosius II sent an expedition under the command of Ardabur the Elder to install Valentinian as emperor in the west. Ardabur was captured, but treated well, as Ioannes still hoped to be able to negotiate with Theodosius. Ardabur, however, persuaded some of Ioannes' officials to betray him. After his capture, Ioannes was taken to Aquileia where he was mutilated, then executed. Three days after Ioannes's execution, one of his generals, Aetius, arrived in Italy with a large force of Huns. Rather than continue the war, Valentinian bought off the Huns with gold and Aetius with the office of comes.
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517. Arcadius32 viewsFlavius Arcadius (377/378–May 1, 408) was Roman Emperor in the Eastern half of the Roman Empire from 395 until his death.

Arcadius was the elder son of Theodosius I and Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of Honorius, who would become a Western Roman Emperor. His father declared him an Augustus in January, 383. His younger brother was also declared an Augustus in 393.

As Emperors, Honorius was under the control of the Romanized Vandal magister militum Flavius Stilicho while Arcadius was dominated by one of his ministers, Rufinus. Stilicho is alleged by some to have wanted control of both emperors, and is supposed to have had Rufinus assassinated by Gothic mercenaries in 395, but definite proof of these allegations is lacking. In any case, Arcadius' new advisor Eutropius simply took Rufinus' place as the power behind the Eastern imperial throne. Arcadius was also dominated by his wife Aelia Eudoxia, who convinced her husband to dismiss Eutropius in 399. Eudoxia was strongly opposed by John Chrysostom, the Patriarch of Constantinople, who felt that she had used her family's wealth to gain control over the emperor. Eudoxia used her influence to have Chrysostom deposed in 404, but she died later that year.

Arcadius was dominated for the rest of his rule by Anthemius, the Praetorian Prefect, who made peace with Stilicho in the West. Arcadius himself was more concerned with appearing to be a pious Christian than he was with political or military matters, and he died, only nominally in control of his empire, in 408.

Bronze AE 4, RIC 67d and 70a, choice aEF, 1.14g, 13.8mm, 180o, Antioch mint, 383-395 A.D.; obverse D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICE, Victory advancing left holding trophy over right shoulder, dragging captive with left, staurogram left, ANTG in ex; Ex Aiello; Ex Forum
ecoli
Honorius-Cyz-28c.jpg
78. Honorius.19 viewsAE 2, 393 - 395, Cyzicus mint.
Obverse: DN HONORIVS P F AVG / Diademed bust of Honorius.
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM / Honorius standing, holding globe and standard.
Mint mark: SMKB
5.14 gm., 20.5 mm.
RIC #28c; LRBC #2573; Sear #20988.

Honorius " . . . passed the slumber of his life a captive in his palace, a stranger in his country, and the patient, almost the indifferent spectator of the ruin of the western empire, . . . . In the eventful history of a reign of twenty eight years, it will seldom be necessary to mention the name of the emperor Honorius."
-- Edward Gibbon writing about Honorius (XXIX)
Callimachus
Decargiro Honorio RIC X Cyzicus 68 B.jpg
A149-02 - Honorio (393 - 423 D.C.)58 viewsAE3 Centenional ó Decárgiro 16 x 17 mm 2.2 gr.
Hijo menor de Teodosio I y Aelia Flaccila, Co-augusto de su padre y su sucesor al mando de las provincias occidentales.

Anv: "DN HONORI - VS PF AVG " - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VIRTVS EXERCITI" - Emperador vestido militarmente de pié de frente, viendo a derecha, portando lanza en mano derecha y descansando la izquierda en un escudo. La victoria, de pié a su lado lo corona con una corona que ella sostiene con su mano derecha, en la izquierda porta una hoja de palma. "SMKB" en exergo.

Acuñada 395 - 401 D.C.
Ceca: Cízico (Off.2da.) Acuñación Oriental de su hermano Arcadio en su nombre.
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.X (Cyzicus) #68 Pag.247 - DVM #44 Pag.318 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9433.d. Pag.304 - Cohen Vol.VIII #56 Pag.186 - Sear RCTV (1988) #4256 - Carson #2581
mdelvalle
2 Nummi Honorio RIC X Thessalonica 395.jpg
A149-12 - Honorio (393 - 423 D.C.)65 viewsAE3 Doble Nummi 14 mm 2.3 gr.
Hijo menor de Teodosio I y Aelia Flaccila, Co-augusto de su padre y su sucesor al mando de las provincias occidentales.

Anv: "DN H[ONORI - VS] PF AVG " - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha. " * " detrás del busto.
Rev: "GLORIA - ROMA - NORUM" Leyenda tipo A - Los dos emperador vestidos militarmente de pié de frente, viendo cada uno al otro, el derecho (Teodosio II) es mas pequeño, ambos portando lanza y descansando sobre su escudo. "TESA ó B ó Γ" en exergo. Estimo la ceca en función de la división en la leyenda del reverso Tipo A, única Tessalonica con esta leyenda.

Acuñada 408 - 423 D.C.
Ceca: Tessalonica (Off.Incierta) Acuñación Oriental de su Sobrino Teodosio II en su nombre.
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.X (Thessalonica) #395 Pag.271 - DVM #39 Pag.318 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9436.a. Pag.305 - Cohen Vol.VIII #26 Pag.181 - Carson #1876
mdelvalle
Aelia_Flaccilla~0.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla 226 viewsAelia Flaccilla AE2. Struck 383 AD, Constantinople mint.

AEL FLACCILLA AVG, mantled bust right in elaborate headdress & necklace / SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing a christogram on shield resting on small column. T in right field, mintmark CON Epsilon. RIC 81 var (RIC lists T in left field only).

FLACILLA (Aelia), the first wife of Theodosius the Great; born in Spain, daughter of Antonius, prefect of Gaul, she was celebrated for her piety, and for her benevolence to the poor. Arcadius and Honorius were her sons by the above named emperor, who married her before his accession to the imperial throne.

She died in Thrace, A. D. 388. Her brass coins are of the lowest degree of rarity, her gold and silver most rare.

A half aureus of this empress's, on which she is styled AEL FLACILLA AVG, bears her head crowned with a diadem enriched with precious stones. - SALVS REIPVBLICAE is the legend, and a victory inscribing on a shield the monogram of Christ, is the type of the reverse.
2 commentssuperflex
Honorius_-_SMKA.jpg
Arcadius - AE 410 viewsCyzicus
388-392 AD
pearl-didemed, draped and cuirassed bust right
D N ARCADIVS P F AVG
Victory dragging bounded captive left, trophy on shoulder
SALVS REI_PVBLICAE
(XP)
SMKA
RIC IX Cyzicus 26c/30b
0,89g
Johny SYSEL
Arcadius_Concordia~0.jpg
Arcadius Concordia29 viewsArcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.
Bronze AE 3, RIC X 85 (Arcadius) or 87 (Honorius), aVF, Constantinople mint, weight 2.235g, maximum diameter 15.5mm, die axis 180o, 401 - 403 A.D.;
OBV: D N [ARCADI?] - VS P F AVG, helmeted bust facing, diademed, cuirassed, spear in right over right shoulder behind head, shield decorated with a cross on left arm;
REV: CONCORDIA AVGG, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, long vertical scepter in right, Victory on globe in left, foot on prow, CONSA in exergue (off flan); scarce;

This reverse type combined with a facing military bust was struck by Arcadius at Constantinople in his own name and also for Honorius and Theodosius II. Since part of the obverse legend is off-flan, we cannot determine if the coin was struck by Arcadius in his own name or in the name of Honorius. Both types are scarce.
EX Forvm Ancient Coins

SCARCE
Romanorvm
Arcadius.jpg
Arcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.10 viewsBronze AE 4, RIC 65(c), Fair, Thessalonica, 1.301g, 13.9mm, 180o, 28 Aug 388 - spring 393 A.D.; obverse D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory advancing left carrying trophy and dragging captive, P in left field, TESG in exergue; scarce;

Flavius Arcadius was the son of Theodosius I and Aelia Flaccilla. Born in 377 A.D., Arcadius was raised to the rank of Augustus by his father at the age of six. Upon the death of Theodosius in 395 A.D., Arcadius was given the Eastern half of the Roman empire while his brother Honorius received the Western half. Arcadius inherited none of his great father's skills and was under the influence of variously Rufinus the Praetorian prefect, Eutropius a courtier eunuch, the Goth Gainas, Empress Eudoxia and another Praetorian prefect Anthemius. His greatest personal accomplishment in life was his beautiful handwriting. Arcadius died in 408 A.D. and was succeeded by his young son Theodosius II.
b70
P1019754.JPG
Arcadius, Honorius and Theodosius II. C.406 - 1 May 408 A.D. AE1313 viewsArcadius, Honorius and Theodosius II. C.406 - 1 May 408 A.D.

Obv. rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. GLORIA ROMANORVM, three emperors stand facing, two outermost taller with heads toward center holding spear & resting hand on shield, center holds spear in right and globe in left. Mint mark off flan.
Lee S
Arcadius- Virtus Exerciti 1.jpg
Arcadius- Virtus Exerciti85 viewsArcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.

Obverse:
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right

D N ARCADI-VS P F AVG

DN: Dominus Noster, our lord
ARCADIVS: Arcadius
PF: Pius Felix, Pious and happy
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
VIRTVS EXERCITI, Victory of the army. Referring to the courage of the army

VIRTVS: Victory
EXERCITI: Army

Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and shield, Victory right crowns him

Domination: Bronze AE 3, size 15 mm.

Mint: ANTΓ, Antioch,Γ Officina Gamma (Gamma, 3. rd), struck 395-401 A.D. RIC X 70

Comment:
This type was struck AD 395-401 for Arcadius and Honorius in Heraclea, Constantinopolis, Nicomedia, Cyzicus, Antiochia and Alexandria.
John Schou
Arcadius- Virtus Exerciti.jpg
Arcadius- VIRTVS EXERCITI114 viewsArcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.

Obverse:
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right

D N ARCADI-VS P F AVG

DN: Dominus Noster, our lord
ARCADIVS: Arcadius
PF: Pius Felix, Pious and happy
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
VIRTVS EXERCITI, Victory of the army. Referring to the courage of the army

VIRTVS: Victory
EXERCITI: Army

Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and shield, Victory left crowns him

Domination: Bronze AE 3, size 17mm.

Mint: SMNA, Nicomedia, Officina A (Alpha, 1 st.), struck 395-401 A.D

Comment:
This type was struck AD 395-401 for Arcadius and Honorius in Heraclea, Constantinopolis, Nicomedia, Cyzicus, Antiochia and Alexandria. With the mintmark I have problems. It could be Heraclea or Nikomedia. If it is Heraclea then it would be RIC X, 58. But that type has the dot on the right(!) field, what one can see on the pic pl.4 too! For Nicomedia I found the following footnote: SMNA, dot on right field (L.2440, Sardis 1981, 183 no.829) also cited; perhaps Heraclea misread, confirmation required.
Important for my coin is only the dot in the left rev. field. The other dots belong to the shield and the drapery of Victoria I think. So your type belongs to the series of AD 395-401, but with the dot in the left field it is not listed in RIC!
The ex. On my coin looks like SMNA . But the type of Nicomedia mentioned in the footnote of RIC has the dot in the right field too and RIC supposed that it is a misread SMHA. All other types listed for Nicomedia have no dots at all. So there are some mysteries around my coin!
1 commentsJohn Schou
Arcadius_AE_4,_Nicomedia.JPG
Arcadius: GLORIA ROMANORVM - Three emperors10 viewsArcadius AE4 - Three Emperors Standing, Mint: Nicomedia (SMN…), AE4, Obv: DN ARCADIVS PF AVG - Diad., dr. and cuir. bust r., Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM - Three emperors standing, with co-emperors Honorius and Theodosius II. ex oa, photo credit oa.Podiceps
Theodosius_I_37.jpg
C107 viewsTheodosius I AE4

Attribution: RIC IX 26a, Heraclea
Date: AD 379-395
Obverse: DN THEODOSIVS PF AVG; diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust r.
Reverse: SALVS REIPVBLICAE; Victory advancing l. dragging captive,
SMHA in exergue
Size: 13.1 mm
Weight: 1.6 grams

Emperor Gratian appointed Theodosius as co-emperor of the East until Gratian’s death in AD 383 during a rebellion. He then appointed his eldest son as co-emperor of the East, and later, after the death of Valentinian II, his son Honorius as co-emperor in the West. The reign of Theodosius was marked by dealing with the Goths, who now resided within the borders of the empire. The Goths within the Empire had, as a result of the treaties, military obligations to fight for the Romans as a national contingent, as opposed to being fully integrated into the Roman forces. However, many Goths would serve in Roman legions and others, as foederati, for a single campaign, while bands of Goths switching loyalties became a destabilizing factor in the internal struggles for control of the Empire. In AD 390 the population of Thessalonica rioted in complaint against the presence of the local Gothic garrison. The garrison commander was killed in the violence, so Theodosius ordered the Goths to kill all the spectators in the circus as retaliation; Theodoret, a contemporary witness to these events, reports:

“the anger of the Emperor rose to the highest pitch, and he gratified his vindictive desire for vengeance by unsheathing the sword most unjustly and tyrannically against all, slaying the innocent and guilty alike. It is said seven thousand perished without any forms of law, and without even having judicial sentence passed upon them; but that, like ears of wheat in the time of harvest, they were alike cut down.”

Interestingly, despite his often ruthless policies against rebellious groups and persons, Theodosius promoted Nicene Trinitarianism within Christianity and Christianity within the Empire. On February 27, AD 380, he declared "Catholic Christianity" the only legitimate imperial religion, ending state support for the traditional Roman religion.Theodosius I was the last emperor of a unified Roman Empire. He reunited the Easter and Western empires, yet they were split again upon his death. Towards the end of his reign, Theodosius saw the rise of a Gothic leader named Alaric. Alaric had participated in Theodosius’ campaign against the usurper Eugenius in AD 394, but rebelled against Arcadius soon after the death of the emperor.
2 commentsNoah
honorius.jpg
CONCORDIA AVGG, Cross9 viewsHONORIUS A.D. 393-423 Æ 4. Rev. CONCORDIA AVGG, Cross.Podiceps
hon.JPG
Flavius Honorius Augustus AE2 RIC IX Nicomedia 46c 30 viewsPearl diademed draped cuirassed bust right DN HONORIVS PF AVG/Honorius standing facing head right holding standard and globe. SMN Γ Nicomedia mint 392-5 AD

Accordingly John was invested with the episcopal dignity on the 26th of February, under the following consulate, which the Emperor Honorius celebrated with public games at Rome, and Eutychian, then Prætorian prefect, at Constantinople.
Socrates Scholasticus (c. 379-c. 450)
Ecclesiastical History

Bohemian
Honorius_-_Demi-Silique.png
Half Siliqua Arcadius21 viewsdemi-silique Arcadius A/ D N ARCADI-VS P F AVG, buste diadémé, drapé et cuirassé à droite R/ VICTORI-A AVGGG, Victoire allant à gauche tenant une couronne et une palme, MD à l’exergue – Milan – 394/395 – RIC.39 a (R4) – 0,95 g

http://www.nummus-bible-database.com/monnaie-7796.htm
nemesis25
180- Honorius.JPG
Honorius35 viewsAE4, Cyzicus mint, 392-395 AD
Obv: DN HONORIVS PF AVG, Diademmed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory advancing left dragging captive and carrying trophy. Chi Rho in field to left.
SMKA in exergue.
RIC 30c
12mm , 1.0gm.
jdholds
42806_3.jpg
Honorius16 viewsO: DN HONORI-VS (?)
R: (VIRTVS)-EXERCIT
E: ?N?
Pearl diademed , draped and cuirassed bust right; Honorius standing left, holding scepter and resting hand on shield, Victory to right crowning him
16mm, 2.84g
b70
theoB_copy.jpg
Honorius17 viewsAE 3, Honorius, ca. AD 400, Obv: DN HONORIVS PF AV; Rev: VIRTVS EXERCITI around Nike (?) crowning figure, ANTD in ex., aVF. RIC 0072.Molinari
coin24.JPG
Honorius10 viewsHonorius

DN HONORI-VS PF AVG
VIRTVS-EXERCITI
No Mint Mark
ecoli
coin21.JPG
Honorius10 viewsHonorius AE3. Constantinople, AD 401-403. DN HONORIVS PF AVG, helmeted, diademed, cuirassed facing bust, spear across right shoulder, shield slung around back of left shoulder / CONCORDIA AVGG, Constantinopolis seated with head turned right, holding Victory on a globe & scepter; right foot set upon the stern of a galley, CONSA in ex. ecoli
coin34.JPG
Honorius8 viewsHonorius
DN HONORI-VS PF AVG
VIRTVS-EXERCITI
ANT gamma
RIC X 72 C3

ecoli
coin56.JPG
Honorius9 viewsDN HONORI-VS PF AVG
GLORI-A ROMA-NORVM
SMNB
RIC X Nicomedia 146 C
ecoli
00630-Honorius.JPG
Honorius 21 viewsHonorius Siliqua
19 mm 1.9 gm
O: D N HONORIVS P F AVG
Diademed draped bust right
R: VIRTVS ROMANORVM
Roma seated left on cuirass holding Victory & inverted spear, MDPS in ex
Koffy
onorio_antiochia.jpg
Honorius15 viewsThree emperors - Antiochia
antvwala
onorio_solido~0.jpg
Honorius98 viewssolidus
Ravenna
2 commentsantvwala
onorio_virtvs_romanorvm.jpg
Honorius24 viewssilicua
Virtvs Romanorvm
antvwala
01190q00.jpg
Honorius18 viewsHonorius, 393-423Solidus circa 404-416, AV 4.45 g. D N HONORI – VS P F AVG Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust r. Rev. VICTORI – A AVGGG R – M Emperor standing r., holding standard in r. hand and Victory on globe in l., spurning captive with his l. foot. In exergue, CONOB. C 44. RIC 1352. Depeyrot 34/2.1 commentsTLP
Honorius_RIC_X_Antioch__72_neu.jpg
Honorius23 viewsAE3 (1,8g - 16mm)
obv. DN HONORI-VS PF AVG
pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
rev. VIRTVS EXERCITI
Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and
resting left hand on shield. Victory, standing beside him crowns him
with a wreath held in her right hand
in erxergue ANTGamma
mint Antioch
RIC X Antioch 72
Holger G
Honorius_Gold_Solidus_Bust.jpg
Honorius12 viewsCut out from a picture of my coin using a photoshop type program. Romanorvm
Honorius_GLORIA_ROMANORVM.jpg
Honorius 23 viewsHonorius, 23 January 393 - 15 August 423 A.D.

Obverse:
Rosette diademed draped and cuirassed bust right

D N HONORIVS P F AVG

DN: Dominus Noster, Our Lord
HONORIVS: Honorius
PF: PIUS Felix, pious and happy
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:

GLORIA ROMANORVM, The Glory of the Romans

Emperor standing facing, head right holding standard and globe

Domination: Bronze AE 2, size 19 mm

Mint: ANTA in exergue (Antioch mint, A = alpha 1. st Offcina, 22 Jan 393 - 17 Jan 395 A.D)
John S
Honorius~0.JPG
Honorius12 viewsDN HONORIVSA PF AVG
GLORIA ROMANORVM
AE4, 16mm, 1.57g
Diademed, draped bust right, star in left field
Three emperors with spears
SMK in ex.
Cyzicus
novacystis
015CHonorius.jpg
Honorius9 viewsBronze Half Centenionalis
Roman Imperial - The Dominate

Honorius

Uncertain mint, c. 404 - 406 A.D.
Fair to fine, tight flan, reverse slightly off center.
11.0 mm / 1.091 g / 0°

Obverse: "DN HONORIVS PF AVG", pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: "CONCORDIA AVGGG", cross, mintmark (off flan) in exergue.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins 2015 (72473)
Ex Seaver Collection (Tag with "RL00809")

RIC X 124, 130, 133, or 137 (various mints). SRCV V 21035 ff

MyID: 015C

Image Credit: Forvm Ancient Coins
TenthGen
pjimage_(25).jpg
Honorius8 viewsAE3 Centenionalis,
Antioch Mint, Struck 395-401 AD
Obverse: D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VIRTVS EXERCITI, Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear in right hand and resting left on shield. Victory holding palm-branch in left hand, crowns him.
Exergue: ANTA
Reference: RIC X 72, LRBC II 2793
Justin L
00620.jpg
Honorius (RIC 153, Coin #620)9 viewsRIC 153 (C), AE4, Antioch, 406 - 408 AD.
OBV: D N HONORIVS P F AVG; Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, star left.
REV: GLORIA ROMANORVM (ANTA); Three emperors stand facing; two outer taller with heads toward center, each holding spear and resting hand on shield; emperor in center holds spear in right and globe in left.
SIZE: 13.5mm 1.76g
MaynardGee
honorius b com.JPG
Honorius RIC X 6350 viewsAE 16 mm 2.0 grams 395-401 AD
OBV :: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG. Pearled diadem draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: VIRTVS-EXERCITI.emperor standing left, head right, holding spear with left hand on shield. Victory, standing beside him crowning him with wreath
EX :: SMNB (Nicomedia)
RIC X 63
RIC rated C2
from uncleaned lot 11/2007
1 commentsJohnny
honorius com.JPG
Honorius Virtus Exerciti52 viewsAE 15 mm 3.0 grams 395-401
OBV :: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG. Pearle diadem, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: VIRTVS-EXERCITI. emperor standing left, head right, holding spear with left hand on shield. Victory, standing beside him crowning him with wreath
EX :: ALEA (Alexandria)
RIC X 76
RIC rated c2
from uncleaned lot 11/07
Johnny
honorius com~0.JPG
Honorius Virtus Exerciti RIC X Antioch 7257 viewsAE 15 mm 2.7 grams 395-401 AD
OBV :: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG. Pearled diadem, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: VIRTVS-EXERCITI. emperor standing facing, head right, holding spear with left hand on shield. Victory, standing beside him crowning him with wreath
EX :: ANT gamma ( Antioch )
RIC X Antioch 72
RIC rated C3
from uncleaned lot 11/2007
Johnny
honor.jpg
Honorius (392 - 395 A.D.)42 viewsÆ2
O: DN HONORIVS P F AVG; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R: GLORIA ROMANORVM; Emperor standing, facing head right, holding standard and globe. ANTΓ in ex.
Antioch Mint
22mm
5.8g
RIC IX Antioch 68e
3 commentsMat
HONORIUS-RIC1228.jpg
HONORIUS (393-423) - MILAN - RIC 1228d15 viewsSilique, 395-402, S
A/D N HONORI-VS P F AVG
Dominus Noster Honorius Pius Felix Augustus, Notre Maître Honorius Pieux et Heureux Auguste
Buste à droite, diadémé (Perles), drapé et cuirassé.
R/VIRTVS RO-MANORVM//MDPS
Virtus Romanorum, La vertu des romains
Rome casquée assise à gauche sur une cuirasse, tenant un globe nicéphore de la main droite et une lance renversée de la main gauche.
Argent - 1.04 gr - 17 mm - 12h
RIC X 1228d, RSC 59
Commentaires : un crochet sur la hampe
Siliquae
HONORIUS-RIC1228e.jpg
HONORIUS (393-423) - MILAN - RIC 1228e16 viewsSilique, 395-402, S
A/D N HONORI-VS P F AVG
Dominus Noster Honorius Pius Felix Augustus, Notre Maître Honorius Pieux et Heureux Auguste
Buste à droite, diadémé (Perles), drapé et cuirassé.
R/VIRTVS RO-MANORVM//MDPS
Virtus Romanorum, La vertu des romains
Rome casquée assise à gauche sur une cuirasse, tenant un globe nicéphore de la main droite et une lance renversée de la main gauche.
Argent - 1.3 gr - 16.5 mm - 12h
RIC X 1228e, RSC 59
Commentaires : Hampe lisse
Siliquae
HONORIUS-RIC26.jpg
HONORIUS (393-423) - MILAN - RIC 267 viewsSilique, 388-393, S
A/D N HONORI-VS P F AVG
Dominus Noster Honorius Pius Felix Augustus, Notre Maître Honorius Pieux et Heureux Auguste
Buste à droite, diadémé (Perles), drapé et cuirassé.
R/VOT/V/MVLT/X//MDPS
Votis quinquennalibus/Multis decennalibus, Vœux pour le cinquième anniversaire de règne et plus pour les dix ans à venir
Légende en 4 lignes dans une couronne de lauriers fermée.
Argent - 0.8 gr - 13 mm - 6h
RIC IX 26, RSC 63
Siliquae
HONORIUS-RIC3703.jpg
HONORIUS (393-423) - NARBONNE - RIC 370316 viewsSilique, 415-415, R4
A/D N HONORI-VS P F AVG
Dominus Noster Honorius Pius Felix Augustus, Notre Maître Honorius Pieux et Heureux Auguste
Buste à droite, diadémé (Perles), drapé et cuirassé.
R/VICTOR-IA AVGG//PSRV
Victoria Augustorum, La Victoire des Augustes
Rome casquée assise à gauche sur une cuirasse, tenant un globe nicéphore de la main droite et une lance renversée de la main gauche.
Argent - 1.03 gr - 14 mm - 12h
RIC X 3703, RSC 36
Siliquae
HONORIUS-RIC1316.jpg
HONORIUS (393-423) - RAVENNES - RIC 131620 viewsSilique, 408-423, R3
A/D N HONORI-VS P F AVG
Dominus Noster Honorius Pius Felix Augustus, Notre Maître Honorius Pieux et Heureux Auguste
Buste à droite, diadémé (Perles), drapé et cuirassé.
R/VRBS-ROMA//RVPS
Urbs Roma, La ville de Rome
Rome casquée assise à gauche sur un trône, tenant un globe nicéphore de la main droite et une lance renversée de la main gauche.
Argent - 2.04 gr - 16.8 mm - 6h
RIC X 1316, RSC 70b
Siliquae
HONORIUS-RIC1317.jpg
HONORIUS (393-423) - RAVENNES - RIC 131718 viewsSilique, 408-423, R5
A/D N HONORI-VS P F AVG
Dominus Noster Honorius Pius Felix Augustus, Notre Maître Honorius Pieux et Heureux Auguste
Buste à droite, diadémé (Perles), drapé et cuirassé.
R/VRBS-ROMA//RVPS
Urbs Roma, La ville de Rome
Rome casquée assise à gauche sur un trône, tenant un globe nicéphore de la main droite et une lance renversée de la main gauche. La cuirrasse est aussi visble.
Argent - 1.4 gr - 15.5 mm - 6h
RIC X 1317, RSC 70c
Siliquae
Honorius-virtus-victory.jpg
Honorius (395-401 AD) AE3, Antioch mint18 viewsRoman Imperial, Honorius (395-401 AD) AE3, Antioch mint

Obverse: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG, Pearl diadem, draped and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: VIRTVS-EXERCITI, Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and resting left hand on shield. Victory, standing beside him crowns him with a wreath which she holds in her right hand. Mintmark ANTΓ "Virtuous Performance"

Reference: RIC X 72; Sear 21031

Ex: Kayser-i Rum Numismatics
Gil-galad
honorius-victory-crowning.jpg
Honorius (395-401 AD) AE3, Heraclea mint - Victory crowning emperor.13 viewsRoman Imperial, Honorius (395-401 AD) AE3, Heraclea mint

Obverse: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: VIRTVS-EXERCITI, Emperor standing left, looking right, holding spear and resting left hand on shield, crowned by Victory standing beside him. Mintmark: SMHA.

Reference: RIC X Heraclea 57

Ex: Joshua Mark
Gil-galad
VT-07.jpg
Honorius (A.D. 393-423)15 viewsAR Siliqua, A.D. 395 - 402, Mediolanum, 16.4mm, 1.39g, 0°, RIC X 1228.
Obv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: VIRTVS ROMANORVM. Roma seated left holding victory on globe and spear; MDPS in ex.
Marti Vltori
00170.jpg
Honorius (Coin #170)16 viewsUnattributed, AE2, 392-395 AD.
Obv: DN HONORIVS PF AVG Rosette-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM (?) Emperor standing facing, head right holding standard and globe.
Size: 23.2mm 4.48gm
MaynardGee
RIC_Honorius_Gloria_Romanorum_RIC_IX_Nicomedia_46c.JPG
Honorius (Flavius Honorius) (393-423 A.D.)24 viewsRIC IX Nicomedia 46c

AE3, 18-20 mm

Nicomedia mint, third officina, struck 393-395 A.D.

Obv: DN HONORIVS PF AVG, pearl diadem, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Rev: GLORIA-ROMANORVM, emperor standing facing, head right holding standard and globe, SMNΓ in exergue.

RIC rarity c
Stkp
00466.jpg
Honorius (RIC 27c, Coin #466)23 viewsRIC 27c, AE2, Heraclea, 392 - 395 AD.
Obv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM (SMHB) Emperor standing facing, diademed, in military dress, head right, standard in right and globe in left.
Size: 23.0mm 4.42gm
MaynardGee
00408.jpg
Honorius (RIC 68e, Coin #408)16 viewsRIC 68e (C), AE2, Antioch, 392 - 395 AD.
Obv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM (ANT Gamma) Emporer standing with labarum and globe.
Size: 23.0mm 4.76gm
MaynardGee
00606.jpg
Honorius (RIC 72, Coin #606)13 viewsRIC 72 (C3), AE3, Antioch, 395 - 401 AD.
OBV: D N HONORIVS P F AVG; Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
REV: VIRTVS EXERCITI (ANT gamma); Emperor standing facing, spear in right, resting left on shield, Victory behind holds palm frond in left and crowing him with wreath in right.
SIZE: 15.3mm 2.64g
MaynardGee
00607.jpg
Honorius (RIC 72, Coin #607)9 viewsRIC 72 (C3), AE3, Antioch, 395 - 401 AD.
OBV: D N HONORIVS P F AVG; Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
REV: VIRTVS EXERCITI (ANT?); Emperor standing facing, spear in right, resting left on shield, Victory behind holds palm frond in left and crowing him with wreath in right.
SIZE: 14.4mm 2.24g
MaynardGee
00608.jpg
Honorius (RIC 76, Coin #608)8 viewsRIC 76 (C3), AE3, Antioch, 395 - 401 AD.
OBV: D N HONORIVS P F AVG; Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
REV: VIRTVS EXERCITI (ALEA); Emperor standing facing, spear in right, resting left on shield, Victory behind holds palm frond in left and crowing him with wreath in right.
SIZE: 14.1mm 2.54g
MaynardGee
Honorius_horseback_ab.jpg
Honorius (RIC IX Antioch 69e)80 viewsHonorius (384-423), Roman Emperor (393-395) and Western Roman emperor (395-423). Æ (13 mm, 1.98g), minted in Antioch 392-395. Obverse: DN HONORIVS PF AVG. Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM, Emperor on horseback advancing left, ANT gamma in exergue. RIC IX Antioch 69e, S.

Ex. Gitbud & Naumann 2010
1 commentsJan (jbc)
Honorius_ab.jpg
Honorius (RIC X 1355)40 viewsHonorius (384-423), Roman Emperor (393-395) and Western Roman emperor (395-423). Æ (15 mm, 2.16 g), Rome 408-423. Obverse: DN HONORI-VS P F AVG. Reverse: GLORIA RO-MANORVM, (SMRP) in exergue, Emperor standing right with head left, his right hand on the head of a kneeling captive, his left hand extended over a suppliant. RIC X 1355, S.

The type with the emperor suppressing a captive and raising a suppliant would be appropriate to the euphoria of 418 after the treaty with the Goths, ceding to them the south-western part of Gaul in a sort of feudal subordination to the empire of the West (RIC X).
Jan (jbc)
Honorius__ab.jpg
Honorius (RIC X 1357)70 viewsHonorius (384-423), Roman Emperor (393-395) and Western Roman emperor (395-423). Æ (11 mm, 1.15 g), Rome. Obverse: DN HONORI-(VS PF AVG). Reverse: (VICTOR)-IA AVGG, Victory advancing left with wreath and palm branch, RM in exergue, T in left field. RIC X 1357, C.jbc
Honorius_Lyon_2_ab.JPG
Honorius (RIC X 1361)41 viewsHonorius (384-423), Roman Emperor (393-395) and Western Roman emperor (395-423). Æ (1.63 g, 13 mm), minted in Lugdunum (Lyon) 411-423. Obverse: (DN H)ONORI-VS PF AVG. Reverse: GLORIA R-OVMAVM, emperor standing facing, head to right, holding standard and resting left hand on shield, LV(G) in exergue. Reverse legend GLORIA R-OMANORVM invariably garbled according to RIC X. RIC X 1361 (R4), LRBC 399.

Last Roman issue from Lugdunum. Bastien (1987) has suggested a date between the usurpations of Constantine III and Jovinus, while Kent (RIC X) suggests that the type is best placed in Honorius's later years when southern Gaul had been reorganized and was enjoying a temporary respite from invasions.
Ex Divus Numismatik 2010
Jan (jbc)
Honorius_three_emperors_ab.jpg
Honorius (RIC X 153)71 viewsHonorius (384-423), Roman Emperor (393-395) and Western Roman emperor (395-423). Æ (13 mm, 2.22 g), minted in Antioch 406-408. Obverse: DN HONORIVS PF AVG. Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM, Arcadius, Honorius and Theodosius II holding spears and shields; ANTA or ANT delta in exergue. RIC IX Antioch 153, C.
Jan (jbc)
Honorius_149.jpg
Honorius - AE 326 viewsCyzicus
406-408 AD
pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
D N HONORIVS P F AVG
*
Three emperors (Arcadius, Theodosius II, Honorius) standing, holding spears and shields
GLORI_A ROMA_NORVM
SMKB
RIC X Cyzicus 149
1,83 g 14,5-14 mm
Johny SYSEL
Honorius_ANTG.jpg
Honorius - AE 311 viewsAntioch
395-401 AD
pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
D N HONORI_VS P F AVG
Honorius standing, facing, holding labarum and resting hand on shield; being crowned by Victory to right, holding palm
VIRTVS_EXERCITI
ANTΓ
RIC X 72
2,14g
Johny SYSEL
X_Honorius_ANTA.jpg
Honorius - AE 36 viewsAntioch
406-408 AD
pearl-didemed, draped and cuirassed bust right
D N HONORI_VS P F AVG
*
Three emperors (Arcadius, Theodosius II, Honorius) standing, holding spears and shields
GLORI_A ROMA_NORVM
ANTA
RIC X Antioch 153
Johny SYSEL
26+ Honorius.jpg
Honorius - AE228 viewsAE2 Honorius
DN HONORI-VS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
GLORIA RO-MANORVM, Emperor standing facing, holding standard (often with chi-rho) and spear
Mintmark PCON
Ref RIC X Arles 1365, rated R2
395 AD
Tanit
Honorius 1.jpg
Honorius - AE2 of Antioch18 viewsD.N. HONORIVS P.F. AVG
GLORIA ROMANORVM , Honorius standing facing, head right, holding standard and globe ; exergue : ANTΔ (Antioch)
Ginolerhino
Honorius 2.jpg
Honorius - AE3 fromAntioch34 viewsD.N. HONORIVS P.F. AVG.
GLORIA ROMANORVM , Arcadius, Honorius and Theodosius II standing side by side ; exergue : ANTA (Antioch)
Ginolerhino
honorius.JPG
Honorius AE2 Cyzicus Mint40 viewsObv: D N HONORIVS PF AVG, Draped and cuirassed bust rt, Pearl diademed Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM, Emperor standing head rt, holding labarum and globe, SMKB in Exerguedaverino
Honorius_b.jpg
Honorius AE2 follis25 viewsGLORIA ROMANORVM / NHBTibsi
Honorius2_opt.jpg
HONORIUS AE2 RIC 68e, GLORIA ROMANORVM18 viewsOBV: D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: GLORIA ROMANORVM, emperor standing, head right, holding labarum & globe, ANT_ in ex.
3.8g, 23mm

Minted at Antioch, 392-5 AD
Legatus
Honorius3.jpg
HONORIUS AE2 RIC ?, GLORIA ROMANORVM30 viewsOBV: D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: GLORIA ROMANORVM, emperor standing, head right, holding labarum & globe, star in right field, SMNA in ex.


Minted at Nicomedia, 392-5 AD
Legatus
honorius-ae2-romanorvm-reshoot.jpg
Honorius AE2, 393-423 AD, Antioch23 viewsRoman Imperial, Honorius AE2, 393-423 AD, Antioch, 3.9g, 23.25mm

Obverse: D N HONORIVS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM, emperor standing, head right, holding labarum & globe, ANT_ in ex. "Glory of the Romans"

Reference: RIC IX Antioch 68e.
Gil-galad
Honorius.jpg
Honorius AE322 viewsHonorius AE3
Obv: HONORIVS DN PF AVG
Bust of Emperor, right, with pearl diadem, draped and cuirassed
Rev: GLORIA - ROMANORVM
Emperor on Horseback, raising right hand
CONS Δ in exergue
RIC vol. 9, 89c; Constantinopolis Mint
22 Jan. 393 - 17 Jan. 395
Rarity: R
Danny Jones
Honorius_Virtu.jpg
Honorius AE3 Antioch19 views Obv. DN HONORI-VS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev. VIRTVS EXERCITI, emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and resting left hand on shield. Victory, standing beside him crowns him with a wreath in her right hand
ANTB in exergue
1 commentsSkyler
honorius-front-facing-reshoot.jpg
Honorius AE3, Antioch, 393-423 AD23 viewsRoman Imperial, Honorius AE3, Antioch, 393-423 AD, 2.9g, 16.8mm

Obverse: D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, Helmeted, diademed, cuirassed bust facing with spear and shield.

Reverse: CONCORDI-A AVGG, Constantinopolis seated with head turned right, holding Victory, being crowned by Victory. Mintmark: ANTΓ. "Concord of Two Emperors"

Reference: RIC X Antioch 99
Gil-galad
Honorius 30+.jpg
Honorius AE428 viewsAE4
Obv: DN HONORIVS PF AVG
Rev: SALVS REI - PVBLICAE ;Victory walking l. , carrying trophy and dragging captive
Mint of Constantinopolis, 2nd officina (B), Tau-Rho in left rev. field.
Struck from 22 Jan. 393 - 17 Jan. 395
RIC IX, Constantinopolis 90(c); C.32; rare
Tanit
Honorius.jpg
Honorius AE429 viewsObv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, star left
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM, three emperors stand facing, two outer taller heads toward center holding spear & hand on shield, center holds spear in r. and globe in l., ANTD in ex
Size: 2.024g, 16.9mm, 0o
Mint: Antioch 406 - 1 May 408 A.D.
ID: RIC X 153
Notes: 1. Ex-Forum Ancient Coins 8 May 2011
2. Not the best example, but I'm a sucker for desert patina
1 commentsickster
arcadius-gloria-07-02-2018.jpg
Honorius AE4 (408-423 AD), Thessalonica mint13 viewsRoman Imperial, Honorius AE4 (408-423 AD), Thessalonica mint

Obverse: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped cuirassed bust right, star left.

Reverse: GLORIA ROMA-NORVM, Two emperors standing facing, heads turned to one another, each holding spear and resting hand on shield. The emperor on the right is smaller than the other. Mintmark: TESA.

Reference: RIC X Thessalonica 395; Sear 21013.

Ex: Kayser-i Rum Numismatics
Gil-galad
216HN002_Honorius_Victory_RIC9_Lyons_47b.jpg
Honorius AE4, Victory (RIC Lyons 47b)19 viewsLyons mint, 1st officina, 393-395. 13 mm, 1.32 g, 180º.

Obverse: D N HONORIVS P F AVG Honorius, draped and cuirassed, with pearl diadem, looking right.

Reverse: VICTORIA AVGGG Victory walking left, holding laurel wreath and palm leaf.

Exergue: LV(GP)

Reference: RIC IX Lyons 47b.
Manuel
P1019505.JPG
Honorius and Theodosius. c. 406 - 423 A.D. AE1310 viewsHonorius and Theodosius. c. 406 - 423 A.D.
Obv. D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, star left.
Rev. GLORIA ROMANORVM, Honorius and Theodosius standing facing, heads turned toward each other, each leaning on a spear in outer hand, inner hands rest on shields and hold a globe between them.
Lee S
coins440.JPG
Honorius Antioch CONCORDIA AVGG9 viewsRIC X 99 S

ecoli
coins429.JPG
Honorius Antioch GLORIA ROMANORVM10 viewsRIC IX Antioch 68f C
ecoli
ss12~0.JPG
Honorius Antioch VIRTVS EXERCITI16 viewsAntioch RIC X 72
ecoli
Honorius__ab_brockage.jpg
Honorius brockage31 viewsBrockage error on a late roman bronze coin (11 mm, 1.41 g), probably Honorius. The obverse design is mirrored on the reverse, which was caused by an already minted coin that stuck to the die and impressed onto another coin. jbc
Honorius Constantinople RIC 90C.JPG
Honorius Constantinople RIC 90C19 viewsAE4, Constantinople mint, 392-395 AD
Obverse, DN HONORIVS PF AVG, Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing left dragging captive and carrying trophy.
CONSA in exergue
12mm, 1.4gm
Jerome Holderman
coin277.JPG
Honorius Cyzicus GLORIA ROMANORVM8 viewsRIC X Cyzicus 403 C2
ecoli
w6~0.JPG
Honorius Cyzicus VIRTUS EXERCITI11 viewsRIC X 68
ecoli
Honorius_Gloria_Romanorum~0.JPG
Honorius Gloria Romanorum26 viewsHonorius, 4.2g, 22mm, 392 - 395 AD, Cyzicus,
OBV: DN HONORIVS PF AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: GLORIAROMANORVM Exe: SMKB - Honorius standing, facing, holding labarum and globe
RIC 28c, LRBC 2573
Romanorvm
Honorius_Gold_Solidus~0.JPG
Honorius Gold Solidus45 viewsHonorius Gold solidus, RIC X 1328, VF, Ravenna, 4.350g, 20.4mm, die axis 180o, 412 - 422 A.D.
OBV: D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right;
REV: VICTORI-A AVGGG, Honorius standing right, active stance, standard in right, Victory on globe in left, left foot treading on captive with bent knees;
R-V across fields, COMOB in ex;

EX: Forvm Ancient Coins
Romanorvm
Honorius Heraclea RIC 57.JPG
Honorius Heraclea RIC 5718 viewsAE3, Heraclea mint, 395-401 AD
Obverse: DN HONORIVS PF AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VIRTVS EXERCITI, Emperor standing facing in military uniform, being crowned from behind by Victory.
SMHA in exergue
RIC 57
17mm, 2.3gms.
Jerome Holderman
Honorius_Obv.JPG
Honorius Obv7 viewsHonorius; AD 393-423
AE3; 19mm/2.7g, Czyicus Mint
OBV; DN HONORIVS P M AVG; Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
REV: VIRTVS EXERCITI; Honorius standing facing right, holding spear and resting hand on shield, crowned by Victory standing L beside him; SMKB in exergue
(RIC X 68)
Philip G
Honorius_Rev.JPG
Honorius Rev9 viewsHonorius; AD 393-423
AE3; 19mm/2.7g, Czyicus Mint
OBV; DN HONORIVS P M AVG; Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
REV: VIRTVS EXERCITI; Honorius standing facing right, holding spear and resting hand on shield, crowned by Victory standing L beside him; SMKB in exergue
(RIC X 68)
Philip G
honorius  com.JPG
Honorius RIC IX Alexandria 21d34 viewsAE 20 - 21 mm 4.4 grams 392-395 AD
OBV :: DN HONORIVS PF AVGPearled diadem, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: GLORIA-ROMANORVM. Emperor standing, facing, holding standard and globe, chalmy over left arm
EX :: ALEA ( Alexandria )
RIC IX Alexandria 21d
RIC rated Scarce
from uncleaned lot 05/2008
Johnny
HONOR-1.jpg
Honorius RIC X 15218 viewsObv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG
pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev: GLORIA-ROMANORVM
three emperors standing side by side holding spears,
outermost ones rest hands on shields, the middle one
holds an orb.
ANTB in ex.
16mm 1.4 gm
OWL365
HONOR-2.jpg
Honorius RIC X 39516 viewsObv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG
pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev: GLORIA-ROMANORVM
Two emperors standing facing, looking at each other,
each holding spear and resting hand on shield.
TESA in ex.
15mm 2 gm
OWL365
arcadius.JPG
Honorius RIC X Alexandria 7639 viewsAE 16-17 mm 2.7 grams 395-401 AD
OBV :: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG. Pearled diadem, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: VIRTVS-EXERCITI. Victory crowning emperor
EX :: ALEA ( Alexandria )
RIC X Alexandria 76
RIC rated C2
from uncleaned lot 08/2008

Johnny
honorius_24.jpg
Honorius RIC X, Arcadius 24167 viewsHonorius, AD 393-423, son of Theodosius I
AV - Solidus, 4.47g, 21mm
Constantinopolis 7. officina, 402 - ca. 403
obv. DN HONORI - VS PF AVG
cuirassed bust, laureate, helmeted and pearl-diademed
head 3/4 r., with spear across r. shoulder and shield with
horseman spearing enemy at l. shoulder
rev. CONCORDI - A AVGGG
Constantinopolis sitting frontal, head r., with r. foot on prora,
holding sceptre in l. hand and in r. hand globe with Victory
holding wreath
field: l. star, r. reversed Z
exergue: CONOB
RIC X, Arcadius 24; C.3
R2; EF
added to www.wildwinds.com
PRORA, prow, is the symbol for Constantinopolis, as a city with access to the sea in contrast to Rome
2 commentsJochen
honorius_mediolanum_1206.jpg
Honorius RIC X, Mediolanum 1206109 viewsHonorius AD 393-423
AV - Solidus, 4.45g, 21.1mm
Mediolanum AD 395-402
obv. DN HONORI - VS PF AVG
bust, draped and cuirassed, pearl-diademed , r.
rev. VICTORI - A AVGGG
Emperor standing r., holding standard in r. and Victory on globe in l. hand,
treading on captive with r. foot
M-D across fields
exergue: COMOB
RIC X, Mediolanum 1206; DOCLR 712ff; Depeyrot 16/2
EF, mint luster
from Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!
2 commentsJochen
honorius_ravenna_1310.jpg
Honorius RIC X, Ravenna 1310162 viewsHonorius AD 393-423
AV - Solidus, 4.37g, 21mm
Ravenna, after the death of Arcadius AD 408-423
obv. DN HONORI - VS PF AVG
Bust helmeted r., draped, cuirassed and diademed, bearded, helmet with three stars
rev. VICTORI - A AVGGG
Emperor stg. facing, holding long staff topped by Tau-Rho and placing l. hand on hilt of
sword; he is crowned by the Hand of God and places r. foot on neck of prostrate
serpent-tailed lion.
in field: R/V
exergue: COB
RIC X, Ravenna 1310; C.43
Rare; nearly EF
added to www.wildwinds.com

This type was struck probably soon after the death of Arcadius. The uncharacteristically warlike effigy of Honorius may bee seen as a response to the threat posed by the usurpation of Constantine III and the mutinous state of the army. He is bearded, perhaps in mourning for his brother Arcadius. (RIC X)
3 commentsJochen
honorius_1340_3.jpg
Honorius RIC X, Ravenna 134051 viewsHonorius 393 - 423
AV - Tremissis, 1.41g, 12mm
Ravenna AD 408 - 423 (after death of Arcadius)
obv. DN HONORI - VS PF AVG
draped, cuirassed bust, rosette-diademed head r.
rev. VICTORIA - AVGVSTORV[M]
Victory in military dress advancing r., holding cross-globe li. and wreath r.
field: R and V
exergue: COMOB
RIC X, Ravenna 1340; C.47
Rare; about VF (obv. with scratches, rev. with dagger's marks, bended)
added to www.wildwinds.com

Die-links with Johannes RIC 1906 and Theodosius RIC 1339 and RIC 1802!
Jochen
Honorius2.jpg
Honorius Silver Not Official33 viewsAncient not official Silver Imitation of Gold Solidus.
(Size, 19.7 mm ; Weight: 1.6 g.)

Honorius. (393-423 AD). Gold solidus. Ravenna, 402-406 AD.
D N HONORI—VS P F AVG, bust draped, cuirassed right, seen from front, wearing pearl diadem / VICTORIA AVGGG, emperor standing right placing foot on captive and holding labarum and Victory on globe, R—V in fields, COMOB in exergue.

RIC 1287. Cohen 44
1 commentsTanit
HonorioVictoria.JPG
Honorius solidus46 viewsObserve: D.N. HONORIVS P.F. AVG.
Reverse: VICTORIA AVGGG. Inthe field M.D. In the exergue COMOB
Mint: Mediolanvm
Weight: 4,5 gr.
Corduba
104A.jpg
Honorius Solidus53 viewsRIC X 1206 Mediolanum, DOCLR 712ff, 395-423 A.D., struck 394-402 A.D.
21 mm, 4.43 gm
D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right VICTORI-A AVCCC Honorius standing right, holding standard and Victory on globe, spurning captive seated left
M-D in fields
COMOB in exergue
("Most likely a single coin find in the Netherlands." Lars Rutten)
Ex: Old Dutch Coll., Rutten & Wieland
3 commentsMark Z
coins443.JPG
Honorius three emperor Antioch13 viewsDN HONORI-VS PF AVG
GLORI-A ROMA-NORVM
ANT

RIC X Antioch 153
ecoli
e11.JPG
Honorius VIRTVS EXERCITI Constantinople22 viewsDN HONORI-VS PF AVG
VIRTVS-EXERCITI
CONSA
RIC X 61 r
ecoli
Honorius.jpg
Honorius, 23 January 393 - 15 August 423 A.D.16 viewsHonorius 393 - 423AD. Ae 17 2.08g. Obv: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right. Rev: VIRTVS-EXERCITI, emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and resting left hand on shield. Victory, standing beside him crowns him with a wreath which she holds in her right hand.1 commentsddwau
honoriusff.jpg
Honorius, 395-42321 viewsAE3, 18mm, 1.9g; Nicomedia mint
Obv.: D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed facing bust holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with cross.
Rev.: CONCORDI-A AVGG, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head left, holding scepter and Victory // SMNK
Reference: RIC X, 92 (p. 248)
Notes: sold to Eng, 11/15
John Anthony
H_Crowned.jpg
Honorius, AD 393-42311 viewsÆ17, 3g, 12h; Antioch mint, 395-401
Obv.: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG; Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: VIRTVS EXERCITI; Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and resting left hand on shield. Victory, holding palm branch in left hand, crowns him // ANTΓ
Reference: RIX X 72 (p. 247)
Notes: eBay sale, 7/24/15, andy_coins, 9.
John Anthony
6068_6069.jpg
Honorius, AE2, GLORIA ROMANORVM1 viewsAE2
Honorius
Augustus: 393 - 423AD
Issued: 393 - 395AD
20.0 x 18.0mm
O: DN HONORIVS PF AVG; Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust, right.
R: GLORIA ROMANORVM; Honorius standing facing, holding labarum and globe.
Exergue: ANTΓ
Antioch Mint
Aorta: 150: B2, O3, R8, T10, M2.
SR 4252V
2013 1/29/17
Nicholas Z
6066_6067.jpg
Honorius, AE3, GLORIA ROMANORVM2 viewsAE3
Honorius
Augustus: 393 - 423AD
Issued: 402 - 408AD
14.0 x 12.0mm
O: DN HONORIVS PF AVG; Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust, right.
R: GLORIA ROMANORVM; Honorius, Theodosius and Arcadius standing facing, each holding a scepter.
Exergue: (Star), behind bust, obverse; SMKA, below line, reverse.
Cyzicus Mint
Aorta: 219: B2, O3, R8, T21, M6.
RIC X Cyzicus 149; Sear 21010.
happybear123 361080089256
11/12/14 1/29/17
Nicholas Z
honorius.jpg
Honorius, AE3,Antioch RIC IX 69e, Γ ,RARE21 viewsHonorius, AE3, Antioch. AD 392-395. DN HONORIVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / GLORIA-ROMANORVM, emperor on horseback riding right, raising right hand. Mintmark ANTΓ. RIC IX Antioch 69e; Sear 20999. RAREBritanikus
Honorius, Antioch.JPG
Honorius, Antioch15 viewsHonorius, AE3, Antioch Mint, 395-401AD
Obverse: DN HONORIUS PF AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: VIRTVS EXERCITI, Emperor standing left, being crowned by Victory who stands on his right.
ANT(Delta) in exergue, Antioch mint, RIC 72
17mm, 3.1gm
Jerome Holderman
HONOR-4-ROMAN.jpg
Honorius, Antioch RIC X-07212 viewsAE3
Antioch mint, 395-401 A.D.
17mm, 1.98g
RIC X-72, RCVv.5-21031

Obverse:
D N HONORIVS P F AVG
Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse:
VIRTVS EXERCITI
ANT Δ
Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and resting left hand on shield. Victory, holding palm-branch in left, crowns him.
Will J
HONOR-2-ROMAN.jpg
Honorius, Cyzicus RIC X-06811 viewsAE3
Cyzicus mint, 395-401 A.D.
18mm, 2.08g
RIC X-68

Obverse:
D N HONORIVS P F AVG
Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse:
VIRTVS EXERCITI
SM K B
Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and resting left hand on shield. Victory, holding palm-branch in left, crowns him.
rubadub
Honorius,_GLORIA_ROMANORVM,_three_emperors,_Cyzicus,_406-408_AD.JPG
Honorius, GLORIA ROMANORVM, three emperors, Cyzicus, 406-408 AD28 viewsRIC X Cyzicus 149
1.8g / 14mm _632

Antonivs Protti
onorio_glroman.jpg
Honorius, Gloria Romanorvm, Vattelapesca16 viewsantvwala
Honorius,_GLORIA_ROMANORVM,_with_globe,_Antioch,_392-395_AD.jpg
Honorius, GLORIA ROMANORVM, with globe, Antioch, 392-395 AD12 viewsRIC IX Antioch 68e
4.4g / 22.2mm _634
Antonivs Protti
Gratianus_AE2.JPG
Honorius, GLORIA ROMANORVM, with globe, Antioch, 392-395 AD5 viewsRIC IX Antioch 68e
4.4g / 22.2mm _634
Antonivs Protti
HONOR-1-ROMAN.jpg
Honorius, Heraclea RIC X-05912 viewsAE3
Hearclea mint, 395-401 A.D.
18mm, 1.64g
RIC X-59

Obverse:
D N HONORIVS P F AVG
Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse:
VIRTVS EXERCITI
. in right field
SM H A
Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and resting left hand on shield. Victory, holding palm-branch in left, crowns him.
rubadub
HONOR-3-ROMAN.jpg
Honorius, Heraclea RIC X-39712 viewsAE3
Heraclea mint, 408-423 A.D.
16mm, 1.92g
RIC X-397

Obverse:
D N HONORIVS P F AVG
* behind head
Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse:
GLORIA ROMANORVM
SM H A
Two emperors standing facing, heads turned to one another, each holding spear and resting hand on shield.
rubadub
coin91.JPG
Honorius, Nicomedia9 viewsDN HONORIVS PF AVG
GLORIA-ROMANORVM
SMN gamma
RIC IX Nicomedia 46c
ecoli
Honorius 123.jpg
Honorius, RIC 61, Constantinople15 viewsObv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG
Bust: Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: VIRTVS EXERCITI
Emperor standing left holding scepter and leaning on shield, being crowned by Victory at right.
Exe: CONSB
Date: 393-423 AD
Demon: Ae3
Bluefish
hn1.jpg
Honorius, RIC IX 88c Constantinople 392-395 CE.13 views
Obverse: DN HONORIVS PF AVG (no obv. break), pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLORIA-ROMANORVM, Emperor standing facing, head right, holding standard and globe.Cross to left and right.
Mintmark CONSA. Constantinople mint 22,9 mm,3.9 g.
NORMAN K
hRICX63_OR.jpg
Honorius, RIC X Nicomedia 6317 viewsNicomedia mint, Honorius, 395-401 A.D. AE, 18.5mm 2.74g, RIC X Nicomedia 63
O: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed
R: VIRTVS-EXERCITI Victory facing l., crowning Emperor
Ex: SMNA
casata137ec
onorio_salreip_aquileia.jpg
Honorius, Salvs Reipvblicae, Aquileia22 viewsantvwala
0760-210np_noir.jpg
Honorius, Siliqua79 viewsMediolanum mint, 2nd officina
DN HONORIVS PF AVG, diademed draped and cuirassed bust right
VIRTVS RO - MANORVM, Roma seated left, holding victory and sceptre, MDPS at exergue
2.09 gr
Ref : Cohen # 59, Roman coins # 4250
Potator II
onorio_solido.jpg
Honorius, solidus, Victoria Avggg, Ravenna42 views2 commentsantvwala
Honorius,_VIRTVS_EXERCITI,_victory_crowning_emperor,_395-401_AD.JPG
Honorius, VIRTVS EXERCITI, victory crowning emperor, 395-401 AD19 views2.1g / 16mm _260

Antonivs Protti
Honorius,_VIRTVS_EXERCITI,_victory_crowning,_Constantinople,_395-401_AD.jpg
Honorius, VIRTVS EXERCITI, victory crowning, Constantinople, 395-401 AD9 viewsRIC X 61
2.5g / 18mm _633
Antonivs Protti
Honorius, Gloria Romanorvm.jpg
Honorius- VM 3961 viewsobv: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG
rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM
unknown mint
VM 39- VB2

Quite a nice coin in person... -proceeds to smack scanner-
wolfgang336
Honorius-AE21-GLORIA-ROMANORVM-SMKA-Cyzicus-5-63-grams-21mm.jpg
Honorius-AE21-GLORIA-ROMANORVM-SMKA20 viewsFirst Late Roman via eBay - fvrivs.rvfvs 1 commentsRiViERA
Honorius-Cyzicus RIC 68.JPG
Honorius-Cyzicus RIC 6818 viewsAE3, Cyzicus mint, 395-401 AD
Obverse: DN HONORIVS PF AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VIRTVS EXERCITI, Emperor standing facing in military uniform, being crowned from behind by Victory.
SMKA in exergue
RIC 68
16mm, 2.5gms.
Jerome Holderman
21320341.jpg
Italy, Ravenna, Mausoleum of Galla Placidia64 viewsit is describbed as "the earliest and best preserved of all mosaic monuments, and at the same time one of the most artistically perfect"

The building was formerly the oratory of the Church of the Holy Cross and now contains three sarcophagi. The largest sarcophagus was thought to contain the remains of Galla Placidia (died 450). Other is attributed to her husband, Emperor Constantius III. The last sarcophagus is attributed to Galla's son, Emperor Valentinian III, or to her brother, Emperor Honorius.
Johny SYSEL
21320354.jpg
Italy, Ravenna, Mausoleum of Galla Placidia138 viewsit is describbed as "the earliest and best preserved of all mosaic monuments, and at the same time one of the most artistically perfect"

The building was formerly the oratory of the Church of the Holy Cross and now contains three sarcophagi. The largest sarcophagus was thought to contain the remains of Galla Placidia (died 450). Other is attributed to her husband, Emperor Constantius III. The last sarcophagus is attributed to Galla's son, Emperor Valentinian III, or to her brother, Emperor Honorius.
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
21320438.jpg
Italy, Ravenna, Mausoleum of Galla Placidia140 viewsit is describbed as "the earliest and best preserved of all mosaic monuments, and at the same time one of the most artistically perfect"

The building was formerly the oratory of the Church of the Holy Cross and now contains three sarcophagi. The largest sarcophagus was thought to contain the remains of Galla Placidia (died 450). Other is attributed to her husband, Emperor Constantius III. The last sarcophagus is attributed to Galla's son, Emperor Valentinian III, or to her brother, Emperor Honorius.
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
21320330.jpg
Italy, Ravenna, Mausoleum of Galla Placidia62 viewsThe building was formerly the oratory of the Church of the Holy Cross and now contains three sarcophagi. The largest sarcophagus was thought to contain the remains of Galla Placidia (died 450). Other is attributed to her husband, Emperor Constantius III. The last sarcophagus is attributed to Galla's son, Emperor Valentinian III, or to her brother, Emperor Honorius.Johny SYSEL
coin231.jpg
RIC 157 Honorius AE3. 406-8 AD.13 viewsRIC 157 Honorius AE3. 406-8 AD. D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped bust right / GLORIA ROMANORVM, Arcadius, Honorius, & Theodosius II standing side by side, ALEA in ex. Coin #231
cars100
coin145.jpg
RIC 68 Honorius AE3. Cyzicus mint, 395-401 AD. 11 viewsRIC 68 Honorius AE3. Cyzicus mint, 395-401 AD.
D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped
& curiassed bust right / VIRTVS EXERCITI, emperor
standing front, holding spear & resting hand on shield,
with head turned right while Victory crowns him with
wreath, SMKG in ex. Coin #145
cars100
HONORIUS.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - HONORIUS19 viewsStruck off flan - obv: DN HONORIVS PF AVG Pearl diademed bust right with star* behind
rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM - 2 Emperors standing and holding shield with spears. size: 15 mm AE4
393 - 423 AD
dpaul7
ROME_HONORIUS_GLORIA_ROMANORUM.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Honorius12 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Honorius (393-423 AD) AE-2. Obv.: Bust right with pearl diadem, draped, cuirassed. DN HONORIVS PF AVG Rev.: GLORIA - ROMANORVM Emperor standing facing, head right holding standard and globe. SMNΓ in exergue= Nicodemia mint. Minted 392-395. Reference: RIC IX Nicomedia 46c.dpaul7
bpLRE1M5AeliaFlac.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Aelia Flaccilla, Ae4, Nicomedia, RIC 36 (R), LRBC 2386, 383-86 AD49 viewsObv: AEL FLACCILA AVG
Draped bust, right, with elaborate head-dress, wearing necklace and mantle.
Rev: SALVS REIPVBLICAE
Victory seated, right, inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus.
1.1 gm 12 mm Exergue: SMNЄ
Comment: First wife of Theodosius I and mother of Arcadius and Honorius.
Massanutten
moneta 551 small.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Aelia Flaccilla, Heraclea207 viewsAelia Flaccilla AE4
obv: AEL FLACCILLA AVG. Diademed and draped bust right, wearing knecklace
rev: SALVS REIPVBLICAE. Victory seated right, inscribing a chi-rho on shield resting on small column
exergue: dot S (?)
Struck at 383-386 A.D. at Heraclea
Van Meter 6
Note: Wife of Theodosius I, mother of Arcadius and Honorius
Jericho
P5231834.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius 395-423 Constantinople161 viewsObv: D N HONORI-VS P F AVG
Rev: Victory Crowning Emperor, VIRTVS EXERCITI
RIC X 61(c)
3 commentsLaetvs
Honorius_GLOR-ROM_2_soldiers_SMKA~0.JPG
Roman Empire, HONORIUS AE3 of Cyzicus. Struck A.D.408 - 42324 viewsObverse: D N HONORIVS P F AVG. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius facing right; behind head, star.
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM. Two emperors standing facing, each holding a spear and shield; in exergue, SMKA.
RIC X : 403
*Alex
norm_HonoriusFoureeSolidusPNG.png
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius Fouree Solidus (Holed-Perhaps that's how it was detected? : )328 viewsHonorius AV Fouree Solidus. Struck circa 397-402 AD. Constantinople mint? Maybe??!?!. D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, diademed & helmeted three-quarter facing bust, holding spear over right shoulder & shield with horseman motif on left arm / CONCORDI-A AVGG, Constantinopolis, helmeted, seated facing, head right, right foot on prow, holding scepter in left hand, globe in right; S/CONOB. Courtesy Wildwinds.com! Gunner
104A~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius Solidus74 viewsRIC X 1206 Mediolanum, DOCLR 712ff, 395-423 A.D., struck 394-402 A.D.
21 mm, 4.43 gm
D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right VICTORI-A AVCCC Honorius standing right, holding standard and Victory on globe, spurning captive seated left
M-D in fields
COMOB in exergue
("Most likely a single coin find in the Netherlands." Lars Rutten)
Ex: Old Dutch Coll., Rutten & Wieland
Mark Z
bpLRE1P4Honorius.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius, Ae2, Cyzicus, RIC 28(c) (C), LRBC 2573, 393-95 AD54 viewsObv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG
Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust, right.
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM
Honorius standing facing, head right, holding standard and globe.
4 gm 20.5 mm Exergue: SMKB
Massanutten
bpLRE1P5Honorius.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius, Ae2, Heraclea, RIC 27(c) (C), LRBC 1991, 393-95 AD42 viewsObv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG
Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust, right.
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM
Honorius standing facing, head right, holding standard and globe.
5.1 gm 20.5 mm Exergue: SMHB/*
Massanutten
HonRIC399.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius, AE3, A.D.395-423 Constantinople (CONS)115 viewsObv: D N HONORI-VS P F AVG
Rev: Two Emperors, GLORIA ROMANORVM
RIC X 399
1 commentsLaetvs
honorius_ae17.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius, AE3/416 viewsHonorius

AE 17mm
1 commentsseaotter
bpLRE1P1Honorius.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius, Ae4, 402-08 AD49 viewsObv: D N HONORIVS AVG
Pearl diademed and draped bust, right. Star to left.
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM
Arcadius, Theodosius II (aged between two and seven) and Honorius standing side by side and facing.
2.3 gm 14 mm
Massanutten
HonoriusRIC90(c).JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius, AE4, A.D.395-423 Constantinople (CONSA)70 viewsObv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG
Rev: Victory Dragging Captive, SALVS REIPVBLICAE
RIC IX 90(c)
Laetvs
bpLRE1P7Honorius.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius, Ae4, Cyzicus, LRBC 2595, 402-08 AD57 viewsObv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG
Pearl diademed and draped bust, right.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVGGG
Large cross.
1 gm 11.9 mm Exergue: SMKA
Massanutten
honorius solidus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius, AV Solidus152 viewsGold solidus, RIC 1206, aEF, 4.429g, 21.2mm, 180o, Mediolanum (Milan) mint, 395 - 402 A.D.; obverse D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORI-A AVGGG, Honorius treading on captive with r. foot, standard in r. and Victory on globe in l., M-D across fields, COMOB in ex.
3 commentssseverus
moneta 332.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius, Cyzicus - RIC 2854 viewsHonorius AE2
obv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG. Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM. Emp stg. facing, head right, holding globe and standard.
exergue: SMKB
Struck 393-423 A.D. at Cyzicus
RIC 28c
Van Meter 38
2 commentsJericho
moneta 736 smaller.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius, Nicomedia - RIC 46c38 viewsAE3
obv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM. Honorius standing, facing, holding labarum and globe.
exergue: SMNB
Struck 392-395 A.D. at Nicomedia
RIC 46c
Jericho
Honorius_Ric_30.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Honorius, Solidus, RIC 3018 views4.43 gramsRichard T3
Honorius_facing_Cyzicus.JPG
Roman Empire, HONORIUS. AE3 of Cyzicus. Struck A.D.393 - 42324 viewsObverse: D N HONORIVS P F AVG. Helmeted and cuirassed facing bust of Honorius holding spear and shield.
Reverse: CONCORDIA AVGG. Constantinopolis seated facing, head right, holding Victory and sceptre; in exergue, SMKΓ.
RIC X : 95
SCARCE
*Alex
158.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Imitation Arcadius/Honorius145 viewsObv: Diademed Bust Right
Rev: Victory Crowning Emperor
Almost looks good enough to be official except for the garbled legend, and the flan is about as ragged as they come.
Laetvs
THEODOSIUS_II_URBS_ROMA_FELIX.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, THEODOSIUS II. AE3 of Rome. Struck c.A.D.404 - 408. 51 viewsObverse: D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Theodosius facing right.
Reverse: VRBS ROMA FELIX. Roma standing facing, head right, holding spear with trophy attached in her right hand and Victory on globe in her left; at feet, shield. In exergue, SMROM; across field, OF - Q.
RIC X : 1283 under Honorius. Also see RIC IX : 67a under Theodosius I and RIC X p130
VERY RARE
1 comments*Alex
Screenshot_2019-05-13_17_45_07.png
Roman Imperial, Honorius as Augustus, AE2.6 viewsAntioch 393-395 A.D. 4.12g - 21.6mm, Axis 9h.

Obv: D N HONORIVS P F AVG - Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM - Emperor standing facing, head right, holding standard and globe. Mintmark ANTΓ.

RIC IX 68f.
scarli
34079_Roman_Empire,_Lead_Bulla_Seal,_Late_4th_-_Early_5th_Century_A_D_.jpg
Roman Lead Bulla Seal, Late 4th - Early 5th Century A.D. Three male facing diademed busts39 viewsRoman Empire, Lead Bulla Seal, Late 4th - Early 5th Century A.D. Lead seal, Bulla seal, possibly imperial, gVF, 7.885g, 18.4mm, obverse three male facing diademed busts, the left one smallest, stars above the two larger ones; reverse, no stamp. Interesting seal, perhaps depicting two senior Augusti (center and right) and a junior Augustus (smaller bust left). Two likely combinations are Valentinian I, Valens and Gratian (367 - 375 A.D.) and Theodosius I, Arcadius und Honorius (393 - 395 A.D.). Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Seal005.jpg
ROMAN LEAD SEAL140 viewsFacing bust, flanked by two profile busts, all draped and wearing cuirass; Above, DDD[NNN] ('Dominorum Nostrorum')

16x15x5mm

2.58g

very fine, rough spot

Note: On a number of occasions three emperors ruled the Roman empire. This seal might well belong to the joint reign of Arcadius, Honorius and Theodosius II.

Early 5th century.

From the Gert Boersema files
Jay GT4
Valentinian_I_AE1~1.JPG
Roman, VALENTINIAN I92 viewsFrom an AE1 of Heraclea, struck between A.D.364 and 367.
RIC IX : 2
Extremely Rare

The Colossus of Barletta is a large bronze statue of a Roman Emperor, nearly three times life size currently located in the coastal town of Barletta, Italy. The legs and hands were replaced in the 15th Century, but the 5-metre-high statue is still a powerful reminder of the later days of the Roman Empire.
There are many different versions of the story of this statue, the most popular being that the statue washed up on the shore after a Venetian ship sank returning from the sack of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade, but if that was indeed the case it is not impossible that the statue had been sent to Constantinople much earlier. The identity of the Emperor is uncertain, the most likely subjects appear to be Valentinian I (A.D.364–375), Honorius (A.D.393–423), Theodosius II (A.D.408–450), Marcian (A.D.450–457), Leo I (A.D.457–474) and Justinian I (A.D.527–565). The facial features on my coin seem to me to closely resemble those on the statue, so Valentinian I would be my own personal choice as to the identity of the emperor.
*Alex
aelia_f.jpg
SALVS REIPVBLICAE, CONE10 viewsAELIA FLACCILLA (wife of Theodosius I, mother of Arcadius and Honorius) Æ 4. Rev. SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus, CONE in exergue, mint of Constantinople. 1.2g 14mm RIC 61(3). Podiceps
roman_imitative_sri_lanka_Jarman118.jpg
Sri Lanka, Roman imitative, Jarman coin 11813 viewsAE 12, 0.51g, 12.48mm, 30°
struck in Sri Lanka 5th century AD during the time between Valentinian and Honorius AD 364-423
obv. Bust, draped, laureate, r.; smal dots representing the legend
rev. Imitation of the "Fallen Horseman type
Pedigree:
ex coll Dr.Francis Jarman, coin 118

These small coins were found in great hoards in Sri Lanka. Probably they were used as temple donations or as payments made to soldiers. They are the historical proof of the Roman trade with India.
Jochen
roman_imitative_sri_lanka_Jarman9.jpg
Sri Lanka, Roman imitative, Jarman coin 924 viewsAE 14, 0.9g, 13.96mm, 90°
struck in Sri Lanka 5th century AD during the time between Valentinian and Honorius AD 364-423
obv. Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.; smal lines representing the legend
rev. 3 stiff figures with raised arms
Pedigree:
ex coll Dr.Francis Jarman, coin 9

These small coins were found in great hoards in Sri Lanka. Probably they were used as temple donations or as payments made to soldiers. They are the historical proof of the Roman trade with India.
Jochen
VALENTINIAN_AE1_SMHA.JPG
Struck A.D.364 - 367. VALENTINIAN I. AE1 of HERACLEA16 viewsObverse: D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Valentinian facing right.
Reverse: RESTITVTOR REIPVBLICAE. Valentinian standing facing, head right, holding standard and Victory; in exergue, SMHA.
Diameter: 26mm | Weight: 6.7gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC IX : 2.
Extremely Rare

The Colossus of Barletta is a large bronze statue of a Roman Emperor, nearly three times life size currently located in the coastal town of Barletta, Italy. The legs and hands were replaced in the 15th Century, but the 5-metre-high statue is still a powerful reminder of the later days of the Roman Empire.
There are many different versions of the story of this statue, the most popular being that the statue washed up on the shore after a Venetian ship sank returning from the sack of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade, but if that was indeed the case it is not impossible that the statue had been sent to Constantinople much earlier. The identity of the Emperor is uncertain, the most likely subjects appear to be Valentinian I (A.D.364–375), Honorius (A.D.393–423), Theodosius II (A.D.408–450), Marcian (A.D.450–457), Leo I (A.D.457–474) and Justinian I (A.D.527–565). The facial features on my coin seem to me to closely resemble those on the statue, so Valentinian I would be my own personal choice as to the identity of the emperor.
*Alex
Aelia_Flaccilla_Salus-R_ANTE.JPG
Struck A.D.383 - 386. AELIA FLACCILLA (Wife of Theodosius I). AE2 of Antioch31 viewsObverse: AEL FLACCILLA AVG. Pearl-diademed and draped bust of Aelia Flaccilla, wearing pearl necklace and earring, facing right.
Reverse: SALVS REIPVBLICAE. Victory seated on cippus facing right and inscribing Christogram (Chi-Rho) on shield which is also set on a short column (cippus). In right field, T; in exergue, ANTE.
RIC IX : 61
RARE

Aelia Flaccilla was the wife of Theodosius I, and the mother of Arcadius and Honorius. She died in A.D.386.
4 comments*Alex
Honorius_facing.JPG
Struck A.D.393 - 423. HONORIUS. AE3/4 of Cyzicus4 viewsObverse: D N HONORIVS P F AVG. Helmeted and cuirassed facing bust of Honorius holding spear and shield.
Reverse: CONCORDIA AVGG. Constantinopolis seated facing, head right, holding Victory and sceptre; in exergue, SMKΓ.
RIC X : 95
SCARCE
*Alex
Honorius_Emperor_crowned_by_Victory_Alexandria.JPG
Struck A.D.395 - 401. HONORIUS. AE3/4 of Alexandria6 viewsObverse: D N HONORIVS P F AVG. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius facing right.
Reverse: VIRTVS EXERCITI. Honorius, standing facing, head right, holding spear and resting his left hand on shield, being crowned by Victory standing facing left beside him; in exergue, ALE-.
Weight 2.2gms
RIC X : 76
*Alex
URBS_ROMA_FELIX.JPG
Struck A.D.404 - 408. THEODOSIUS II. AE3 of Rome. 8 viewsObverse: D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Theodosius facing right.
Reverse: VRBS ROMA FELIX. Roma standing facing, head right, holding spear with trophy attached in her right hand and Victory on globe in her left; at feet, shield. In exergue, SMROM; across field, OF - Q.
RIC X : 1283 under Honorius. Also see RIC IX : 67a under Theodosius I and RIC X p130
VERY RARE
*Alex
Honorius_GLOR-ROM_2_soldiers_SMKA.JPG
Struck A.D.408 - 423. HONORIUS. AE3 of Cyzicus7 viewsObverse: D N HONORIVS P F AVG. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius facing right; behind head, star.
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM. Two emperors standing facing, each holding a spear and shield; in exergue, SMKA.
RIC X : 403
*Alex
Theodosius_II_RIC_X_Antioch_155.jpg
Theodosius II36 viewsAE3 (1,9g - 12mm)
rev.DN THEODO-SIVS PF AVG
pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, star behind head
obv.GLORI-A ROMA-NORVM
the three emperors Arcadius, Honorius and Theodosius standing facing, all holding spears, the two outermost also resting hand on shields
in exergue ANTGamma
mint Antioch
Struck 406-408 AD
RIC X Antioch 155

Holger G
00605.jpg
Theodosius II (RIC 398, Coin #605)10 viewsRIC 398 (C2), AE3, Heraclea, 408 - 423 AD.
OBV: D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG; Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right, star left.
REV: GLORIA ROMANORVM (SMHA); Theodosius II and Honorius standing facing, heads to center, each holding spear and shield on ground.
SIZE: 15.2mm 1.70g
MaynardGee
coin14.JPG
Theodosius II VRBS ROMA FELIX56 viewsVRBS ROMA FELIX

This type was originally thought to have been issued by Arcadius and Honorius in conjunction with Theodosius I, but it came to be realized that "Theodosius" was really Theodosius II. Thus it is included in RIC IX under the earlier erroneous attribtution with an erroneous early date (AD 394-395) and then again in RIC X with a corrected attribution and date (404-408, given on page 130). "
ecoli
ss13~0.JPG
Unknown(Theo I, Arcadius and Honorius), unknown, URBS ROMA FELIX27 viewsRIC IX, Rome 67 or 68ecoli
Valentinian II- Victoria.jpg
Valentinian II- SALVS REI PVBLICAE54 viewsValentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D.


Obverse:
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.

DN VALENTINI - ANVS PF AVG

DN: Dominus Noster, our lord

VALENTINIANVS: Valentinian

PF, PIUS FELIX, piteous and happy

AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
SALVS REI PVBLICAE, Health of the republic

SALVS: Health
REI PVBLICAE: Republic

Victory advancing left, holding standard over shoulder and dragging captive

Domination: Copper, AE4, size 12 mm

Mint: Aquileia or Rome .

Comment:
This is the SALVS REI PVBLICAE type. This type was not struck for Valentininan I but only for Valentininan II. (and Theodosius I, Arcadius and Honorius). IF the obv. legend of the coin is broken DN VALENTINI - ANVS PF AVG then the mint is Aquileia or Rome. All other mints have unbroken obv. legends.
Source: Guido Bruck, Die spätrömische Kupferprägung, Graz/Austria 1961
John Schou
Honorius_Vandal.jpg
Vandals (imitation of Honorius) - AE 49 viewsAfrica - Carthage?
c. 440-490 AD (Gaiseric)
pearl-didemed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius right
D N HONORI_VS P F AVG
Victory facing, head left, holding wreath in each hand
VICTORI_A AVGGG
P
RM
BMC Vandals, p. 17, 1-3
ex Savoca
Johny SYSEL
Honorius_sil.jpg
Vandals Honorus Gaiseric Siliqua32 viewsSiliqua (Silver, struck in the name of Honorius, Carthage, after 439.
DN HONORIVS P F AVG; Diademed bust right. Rev. VRBS ROMA ;Roma seated left.

BMCV 6-9. MEC 1-3. C. Morrisson and J.H. Schwartz, Vandal Silver Coinage in the Name of Honorius, ANSMN 27 (1982), 5 var.
Tanit
MEC-1.jpg
Vandals: Anonymous (440-490) AR Siliqua, i.n.o Honorius, Africa (RIC X 3801; MEC 1-3; BMC 6-9)3 viewsObv: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius right
Rev: [VRBS] ROMA, Roma seated left on cuirass, holding Victory on globe and inverted spear; RVPS in exergue

Size: 15mm
Wgt: 1.65
SpongeBob
gordianIII_6~0.jpg
Virtus (female)287 viewsGordian III Pius, AD 238-244
AR - Antoninian, 4.84g, 22mm
Rome 1st emission, 5th officina, July 238 - July 239
obv. IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG
Bust draped, cuirassed, radiate r.
rev. VIRTVS AVG
Virtus in military dress, standing front, head l., resting r. hand on oval shield,
set on ground, holding vertical spear in l.
RIC IV/3, 6; C.381
about EF, mint luster

VIRTVS, personification of military virtue, a female figur, here shown clearly by her bare breast r., so looking like an Amazon, helmeted and with military cloak. From the time of the Civil Wars AD 69 until the time of Honorius she played a big role in the imperial coinage. Later often as VIRTVS MILITVM or VIRTVS EXERCITI.
Jochen
honorius~0.jpg
VIRTVS EXERCITI, RIC X 68 Cyzicus11 viewsHONORIUS A.D. 393-423. Æ 3. 1.7g, 17mm. Obv. D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right. Rev. VIRTVS EXERCITI, Emperor standing left, head right holding spear and leaning on shield, crowned by Victory. SMKA in exergue. RIC X 68 Cyzicus.Podiceps
Visigoths_Honorius_ab.jpg
Visigoths in Gaul (RIC X 3703)180 viewsVisigoths in Gaul, circa 415-423 (Athaulf - Theodoric I), AR siliqua (13mm, 0.99 g). Minted in Narbonne(?), Gaul. Obverse: D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right. Reverse: [VICTOR] IA AVGG, Roma seated left on cuirass, holding Victory on globe and spear; PSRV in exergue. RIC X 3703, rare.

After sacking Rome in 410 the Visigoths settled in southern Gaul. The successive kings of the Visigoths were Athaulf (410-415), Sigeric (415, only seven days), Wallia (415-419), and Theodoric I (419-451). The Visigoths minted issues in the name of Priscus Attalus (RIC X 3701-2) around 415 during an attempt to resurrect their candidate for Western emperor. Kent (NC 149 [1989], pp. i-xvi) dated the present related issue to circa 418-423 when the Visigoths made peace with Honorius and became official foederati.
2 commentsJan (jbc)
ARI-Honorius-3.jpg
Western Roman Empire , Honorius, AD 393-423 18 viewsAR Siliqua, Milan Mint, RIC X 1228

Grade: Ch AU: Strike 5/5: Surface 4/5

Obv. :D N HONORIVS P F AVG, diademed draped bust right.

Rev.: VIRTVS ROMANORVM, Roma seated left holding Victory & inverted spear, Mintmark MDPS

Honorius was Western Roman Emperor from 393 to 423. He was the younger son of emperor Theodosius I and his first wife Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of Arcadius, who was the Eastern Emperor from 395 until his death in 408.
Richard M10
LarryW1808.jpg
X, 1206 Honorius, 393-42345 viewsAV solidus, 20.9mm, 4.42g, gVF
Struck c. 395-402 at Milan
DN HONORI-VS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius facing right / VICTORI-A AVGGG, emperor standing right holding standard and Victory on globe, with his left foot he spurns a seated bound captive with knee bent, M in left field, D in right field, COMOB in exg.
RIC X, 1206
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1810.jpg
X, 1215 Honorius, 393-42352 viewsAV tremissis, 13mm, 1.49g, ChEF
Struck 398 at Milan
DN HONORI-VS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory advancing right, holding wreath and globus cruciger. M - D in fields, CON in exg.
Consigned to Forvm
RIC X, 1215
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1814.jpg
X, 1287 Honorius, 393-42367 viewsAV solidus, 20mm, 4.45g, gVF
Struck 402-408 at Ravenna
DN HONORI-VS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORI-A AVGGG, Honorius standing right, holding labarum and Victory on globe, foot set on captive. R - V in fields, COMOB in exg.
RIC X 1287; Depeyrot 7/1; DOCLR 735; Cohen 44
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1817.jpg
X, 1328 Honorius, 393-42339 viewsAV solidus, 21.2mm, 4.34g, EF
Struck 412-422 at Ravenna
DN HONORI-VS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius facing right / VICTORI-A AVGGG, emperor standing right, in active posture, holding standard and Victory on globe, with his left foot he spurns a seated bound captive with knee bent. R - V in fields, COMOB in exg.
RIC X, 1328
Consigned to Forvm
Lawrence Woolslayer
TheodosiusRIC83b.jpg
[1601a] Theodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. 67 viewsBronze AE 2, RIC 83(b), EF, Constantinople mint, 4.389g, 22.1mm, 180o, 25 Aug 383 - 28 Aug 388 A.D.; Obverse: D N THEODO-SIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: VIRTVS E-XERCITI, Emperor standing right holding standard and globe, foot on captive, cross in left field, CONSA in exergue. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
ArcadiusManusDei.jpg
[1601b] Arcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.63 viewsARCADIUS AE2. Struck at Constantinople, 378-383 AD. Obverse: D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, holding spear and shield, Hand of God above holding wreath; Reverse - GLORIA ROMANORVM, emperor standing facing, head left, holding standard & resting shield at side, bound captive seated on ground to left, head right, CONG in exergue. RIC 53b. Scarce. Extremely Fine, some roughness and corrosion.


De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families


Arcadius (395-408 A.D.)

Geoffrey S. Nathan
University of California at Los Angeles

Introduction and Early Life
The ineffectual life and reign of Flavius Arcadius are of considerably less importance than the quite significant developments that occurred during his reign. Born either in 377 or 378 to then general Theodosius and Aelia Flavia Flacilla, he and his younger brother, Honorius, ruled the eastern and western halves of the Roman Empire respectively from 395.

Shortly after his birth, his father was raised to the imperial purple in 379. Events in Illyricum with the massive influx of Ostrogothic and Visigothic peoples had resulted in the defeat of the Roman army and the death of the emperor, Valens. Theodosius' first task was to confront the Visigoths who had been ravaging the Balkans. Perhaps in the wake of this difficult and almost insurmountable task, the emperor wanted to insure that his infant son would bear some legitimacy should he die on campaign. Whatever the reason, Arcadius was proclaimed Augustus in January of 383 at the age of five or six. In the following year, his younger brother was born and it seems as if Theodosius initially had been interested in preserving the theoretical position of his elder son. While Arcadius enjoyed the status of Augustus, Honorius only achieved the office of consul posterior in 386. Perhaps the eastern emperor had wanted to avoid the possible conflicts that arose earlier in the century with the family of Constantine. Recent events in the west with the assassination of Gratian by Magnus Maximus may have also played a part: Theodosius initially had to leave the murder of his imperial colleague unavenged and leave the boy- emperor, Valentinian II, largely undefended. The profusion of emperors may well have been seen by Theodosius as kindling for civil war. His own autocratic tendencies may have also meant that he saw only one possible successor for himself.

Nevertheless, Theodosius gave Arcadius very little independence in early life. When he went to campaign against Magnus in the late 380's, he placed his son under the Praetorian Prefect of the East, Tatian, who was the de facto emperor in Theodosius' absence. This began a long series of regencies for Arcadius. The strength of Tatian's position with the eastern governing class made the office of Praetorian Prefect all the more powerful in Constantinople, which in turn made it easier to dominate future emperors. When Theodosius replaced Tatian with the more malleable and more ambitious Rufinus in 392, he had appointed a minister who would centralize even greater authority under the prefecture.

By 393, the emperor's situation had changed radically. When events in the west demanded his attention again, Theodosius was in a much stronger position. The ascendancy of the general, Arbogast, and his own puppet emperor, Eugenius, in the west provided Theodosius an opportunity and, indeed, the obligation to take full control of the Empire. The chance for having his own two sons ruling both halves of Rome not only seemed practical and feasible, but such an arrangement would establish himself as the head of a new dynasty. With thoughts in that direction, Honorius was made Augustus in 393 and accompanied his father west in the summer of 394. Arcadius, although near his majority, was nevertheless placed again under the guardianship (epitropos) of the Prefect of the East. In January of 395, Theodosius the Great died and his two sons took theoretical control of the two halves of the Roman Empire.

Early Reign and the Dominance of Rufinus and Eutropius (395-399)
Arcadius was eighteen when he assumed the throne in the east. We do not know whether or not he was ready for the responsibilities. During the mid-380's, the young emperor had been educated in part by Themistius, a famous pagan statesman, philosopher, and speaker. In what way he affected Arcadius is impossible to say, but surely his teachings must have included statecraft. Perhaps because of this influence, the new emperor's attempt to establish himself as an independent force can be seen in a series of laws passed at his accession. In contrast to trying to create a military image for himself, which would not be allowed either by Rufinus or by the eastern court, he attempted to portray himself as a pious Christian emperor. He enacted several comprehensive laws against heresy and paganism.

This was not necessarily an ineffectual strategy. By celebrating his religious piety, he expressed his power in the only way available to an emperor largely controlled by his ministers. He also perhaps sought to gain support and power from the local governing and religious hierarchies in Constantinople. Arcadius also perhaps thought that he was carrying on in the tradition of his father and so, by extension, might share in some of his glory. Rufinus in contrast wanted to tie himself to the emperor through a marriage connection to his daughter. But in April of 395, Arcadius had taken advantage of the Prefect's temporary absence to marry Aelia Eudoxia, whose guardian, the general, Promotus, had been a bitter enemy of Rufinus. Arcadius had been aided in this move by his own grand chamberlain (praepositus sacri cubiculi), Eutropius, and it perhaps indicated the degree to which he wanted to be free of any regent.

But in reality, Arcadius gained little if any power. Rufinus assumed full control of the east, and the Vandal Stilicho, Theodosius' closest advisor and general, took control of Honorius in the west. The tension between east and west quickly grew when Stilicho, in command of all the eastern and western armies, tried to press his guardianship over Arcadius as well. Moreover, there was considerable resentment against Rufinus in the east for using his office to greatly enrich himself and perhaps, too, because he was a westerner. Rufinus, understanding the perils around him, acted quickly. He had Arcadius demand the return of the eastern armies at once. Stilicho acquiesced, perhaps because the general was basing his claim of guardianship on his own legitimacy: to have taken control of the east and Arcadius by force would have undermined his position there and perhaps in the west. The soldiers returned under the command of the Gothic general, Gainas. With the control of the field army, it seemed as if Rufinus was going to be more thoroughly in control of the east and over Arcadius.

He did not long enjoy his victory. When Arcadius and Rufinus came to greet the armies at Hebdoman near Constantinople in November of 395, the soldiers turned on the Praetorian Prefect and cut him down in front of the emperor. Whether Stilicho instigated the assassination is a matter of some debate, but if he did, he received no benefit from it. The armies remained and Arcadius soon fell under the sway of other ministers. Nevertheless, despite the shock and fear Arcadius may have felt at witnessing such a brutal murder, he probably missed Rufinus' presence not at all and even thought it might provide an opportunity to assert his own authority. For the bureaucracy, the death meant that maintaining civilian control over the army was paramount to their own survival.

Soon thereafter, Eutropius assumed Rufinus' place in dominating Arcadius. Since the grand chamberlain could control access to the emperor and commanded the powerful palace bureaucracy, he was well-placed to dictate what and whom the emperor saw and heard. Military officers--frequently Germanic--who dominated the western government, were held suspect by fearful and jealous civil administrators in Constantinople. Eutropius used that fear to his advantage and froze out any access they may have had to the circles of power. His decision to effectively eliminate the military's input in decision-making would eventually lead to his demise.

It is difficult to determine how popular Eutropius was either with Arcadius or with the wider population. As a eunuch and a former slave, the sources generally portray him very negatively. He nevertheless seems to have enjoyed some support from the emperor, likely aided by Eudoxia with whom the grand chamberlain had close ties. The emperor happily took annual vacations in Galatia, apparently upon the Eutropius' suggestion. Moreover, the chamberlain showed great personal courage and talent in leading a campaign against invading Huns in 397/8, for which he won the consulship and the rank of patrician in the following year of 399. He also seems to have gained considerable support from the local clergy by procuring the patriarchate of Constantinople in 398 for John Chrysostom.

Despite Eutropius' rise to power, however, eastern policy changed little. The religious policies of Theodosius and Arcadius continued, including the forced closure of pagan temples in Gaza. More significantly, tension between the two halves of the empire persisted as Stilicho continued to press for his position as guardian. Although Stilicho led periodic raids into Greece and Thrace to attack the new Visigothic king, Alaric, his victories were incomplete and were more likely meant to keep the Germanic people out of western territory. This meant, among other things, that the Visigoths were an enduring problem for the east. Eutropius in turn supported the revolt of the Count Gildo in Africa, which was under western control, in an attempt to destabilize Stilicho's control and further eastern domains.

The failure of the revolt in 398 was the first step in Eutropius' downfall. The decision to exclude the military men of the period, particularly among the growing importance of Germanic officers, created a dangerous situation. By 399, the dissatisfaction with east-west affairs and the Gildo fiasco resulted in a revolt by the Gothic count, Tribigild. He was apparently in collusion with Gainas, who had taken advantage of the crisis to be named chief general in the east (magister utriusque militiae). Gainas quickly reached an agreement with the rebel and part of the settlement was the dismissal of Eutropius, to which Arcadius--at Eudoxia's urging--agreed. The chamberlain took refuge in the Hagia Sophia, and was exiled to Cyprus. But shortly thereafter, in the autumn of 399, Eutropius was recalled, tried and executed in Chalcedon.

The Age of Eudoxia (400-404)
The death of Eutropius precipitated a serious crisis. Gainas, who had wanted high office for years, now tried to force the hand of Arcadius. Having come to a quick resolution with Tribigild, he moved from Thrace towards Constantinople in 400. With the Germanic troops supporting him, Gainas tried for six months to initiate his own primacy-- including seizing the imperial palace--but which failed. He was forced to withdraw personally from the city to regroup and planned to use his troops remaining there to seize the entire city. But they were slaughtered by the inhabitiants and he fled first to Thrace and then to Asia. Eventually Gainas was killed by the Huns later in that year. His attempted coup ensured that Germanic officers would never again be trusted by the eastern government and would forever be kept out of any important decision-making roles.

The likely successor to Eutropius had been the anti-Germanic leader, Aurelianus, who had succeeded to the Prefecture of the East in 399. But Gainas had exiled him, having forced Arcadius to hand him over, and although Aurelianus returned triumphantly after Gainas' departure, he appears to have lost his hold over the emperor. In the meantime, Aelia Eudoxia had done much to forward her own place in the government. In January of 400, she had been named Augusta, a singular distinction offered to only three other women in the previous century. Her position thus gained a semi-official legitimacy afforded to very few Roman empresses. It has been assumed that because of her beauty, her intelligence, and her fecundity (she bore Arcadius five children), she was able to assert her influence to a point where she was the new power behind the throne.

That assessment, while held by many scholars, is not entirely accurate. While there were several events in which she played a crucial part, they were not terribly important moments during Arcadius' reign. But because Eudoxia was enormously wealthy, because she delivered a male heir in 401, and because she was involved in a highly publicized and drawn out political fight with John Chrysostom, this belief that there was an assumption of power is based more on the notoriety of her acts than on actual control. The fact that there was no one clearly dominating the government nor the emperor during this time implies perhaps that Arcadius had more power during these five years of his reign than at any other time.

There are several indications that he did try to improve and assert his own position. The emperor and his court immediately came to some understanding with the west. The east at the very least gave Honorius and Stilicho moral support in their increasing problems with Alaric. In 402, the feeling of goodwill was sealed by a joint consulship between Arcadius and his brother. The emperor also sought to establish his own military prowess and Christian piety with the erection of a column set up in the Hippodrome of Constantinople in 402/3. The column depicted his military victory over Gainas, crowned with a capital emblazoned with the Greek letters chi-rho, symbolizing his devotion to Christ. Arcadius' son, Theodosius II, was born in 401, and was quickly made Augustus at the age of eight months. The eastern ruler was thus interested in assuring his own dynasty.

In all these things, the emperor was largely successful, but they were largely overshadowed by the feud between his empress and the bishop of Constantinople. Eudoxia had already shown herself able in pushing her interests during the baptism of her son. The Bishop of Constantinople, however, was a much tougher opponent than her husband. John Chrysostom, a strong believer in social justice, had boorishly attacked Eudoxia and many of her friends for the conspicuous luxury in which they lived and displayed themselves. At the height of these attacks, John compared the empress to Jezebel. Eudoxia in turn used her considerable influence to inflame hostility among the clergy against the bishop. Working through Bishop Theophilus of Alexandria, in 403 Chrysostom was deposed and forced into exile at a Church council convened by the emperor (the Synod of the Oak at Chalcedon). However, there was soon such turmoil and uproar in the imperial city that the bishop was recalled a few days later. But the public feuding between Eudoxia and Chrysostom continued until at last she had him banished again in 404, this time permanently. Among other things, it caused a breach between Arcadius and his brother, who had, with Pope Innocent I, tried to support Chrysostom.

Eudoxia's victory was short-lived, however. In October of 404, the Augusta died of a miscarriage. Her death was seen by some as retribution for dismissing John. Whatever the reason, her end also signaled a complete retreat into the background by the emperor and no further initiatives seem to have been pushed by the 27-year-old Augustus.

The Final Years: Anthemius and Death (404-408)
The last years of Arcadius' reign were completely dominated by his Praetorian Prefect of the East, Anthemius. It was perhaps fitting that when the emperor seems to have been most retiring, the most able and energetic of his high ministers came to power. Anthemius worked hard to solve a series of governmental abuses, continue to push for Christianization, and secure the east from attack.

Anthemius first seems to have tried to reconcile with the west, so much so that there was a joint consulship between Anthemius and Stilicho in 405. This might have also been meant to symbolize the Prefect's new dominance, however. Additionally, a number of new laws were passed, curtailing paganism, Judaism and heresy. He tried to make use of the continuing problem of incoming Germanic peoples to combat the Isaurian tribes which had been plaguing Asia Minor since 403. While it failed to halt either group's incursions, it was nevertheless a practical and intelligent strategy. As a means of protecting the imperial capital, Anthemius also strengthened the walls around Constantinople. Our records for the last years of Arcadius' rule are quite spotty, but the emperor himself seems to have completely vanished, even symbolically, from the political scene.

In May of 408, Flavius Arcadius died at the age of 31 of unknown causes. Our only physical description of Arcadius is heavily influenced by the generally low regard in which he was held. The emperor was supposedly short, thin and dark-complected. A more kindly correspondent described him as good-natured and temperate. His son succeeded him without any controversy and the government remained unchanged. Arcadius thus left the world much as he entered it: without much significance and overshadowed by more powerful forces.

Assessment
Despite the ineffectual nature of Arcadius and his rule, a number of significant changes occurred during his stewardship of the eastern empire. His inability to forcefully or at least effectively govern meant that there were few consistent or long-range goals of his administration. With the exception of trying to emphasize the emperor's piety, an important development in the history of the Byzantine monarchy, Arcadius and his ministers were for the most part simply reacting to events.

The emperor became an even more remote figure to the general public. Even in the capital city itself, he was rarely seen: we read in one account that people came running to see the emperor for the first time when he happened to be praying in a local church. A series of "orientalizing" court practices no doubt continued in order to emphasize the symbolic separation of the emperor from the rest of society. The hieratic, almost semi- divine nature of the imperial person, also became a feature of the eastern ruler.

Perhaps of greatest importance was the political and cultural split between east and west. With the death of Theodosius, the two halves of the Roman Empire increasingly went their separate ways. For the most part, the west was thrown back upon its own resources, unable to deal with the problems of the fifth century. The east proved more compact and more resilient: it largely weathered the political storms from without and within.

Moreover, Constantinople fully became the imperial capital of the east, a Roma nova. The emperor rarely left the city and the palace officials became more influential than many of the more theoretically important ministers outside the city. Constantinople was also made an archepiscopate and Chrysostom and others started to push strongly for its primacy in the east. Both public and private building projects beautified and enlarged the city. Under Arcadius' reign, it truly became the second city of the Roman Empire.
Finally, the hard stance against Germanic officers in Roman government became a central feature in the east. While the reasons for this development were inspired largely out of fear and perhaps racism, the eastern Roman Empire did manage to avoid the largely detrimental succession of Germanic generalissimos who controlled the west in the fifth century. It also encouraged the eastern rulers in the following century to take hard lines against other peoples, including the Isaurians, the Huns and the Persians. Taken in all, the era of Arcadius was far more important than Arcadius himself. He perhaps had his father's pretensions, but none of the skills or powers necessary to leave his mark on the Empire.

By Geoffrey S. Nathan, University of California at Los Angeles
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
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