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Search results - "Gothicus"
CLAUD2-2.jpg
26 viewsCLAVDIVS II Gothicus - AE Antoninianus - Mediolanum mint, 268-270 AD
Obv.: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate draped bust right
Rev.:VICTORIA AVG, Victory running right holding wreath & palm, S in ex.
Gs. 2,9 mm. 21,2
Cohen 302, RIC 171
Maxentius
f_051.JPG
36 viewsRIC 156,P Claudius Gothicus AE Antoninianus. Milan, AD 268-270. IMP C CLAVDIVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PAX AVG, Pax standing left, holding olive branch and transverse sceptre. Officina letter P in ex. Antonivs Protti
clsud478.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 CE.25 viewsBronze Antoninianus, Minister 478
Obverse: DIVO CLAUVDIO, radiate head right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO, garlanded altar with flames above, no decoration on front. 16.7 mm., 1.8 g.
Note: Although a variation of this coin is in the RIC and Cohen, these sources generally refer to the type with a front divided into four sections (RIC 261). This type of garlanded altar, lit altar was not described and published until the discovery of the Minister Hoard, discovered after RIC was written.
NORMAN K
quin.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 CE., Commemorative issue by Quintillus27 viewsBronze Antoninianus, RIC V 261
Obverse: DIVO CLAUVDIO, radiate head right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO, flaming altar with four panels, each containing pellet.
16.1 mm., 2.2 g.
NORMAN K
18d3.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, RIC 110 Rome25 views
September 268 - August or September 270 CE
antoninianus, RIC V 110, Rome mint, 3.2g, 20.1mm,
Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VIRTUS AUGUSTI, Virtus helmeted and wearing military gear stands left, waving a branch of laurel in right hand and holding a spear in the left hand, at his feet to the left is his shield. Episilon in right field.
NORMAN K
clau261.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, RIC 261, Milan, 268-270 CE.22 viewsBronze Antoninianus, RIC 261 Milan
Obverse: DIVO CLAUVDIO, radiate head right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO, large flaming altar with four sections with a dot in each one. mintmark T, Milan mint. 16.5mm., 2.1 g.
NORMAN K
dcl.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 CE.20 viewsBronze Antoninianus, Minister 478
Obverse: DIVO CLAUVDIO, radiate head right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO, garlanded altar with flames above, no decoration on front. 16.7 mm., 1.8 g.
Note: Although a variation of this coin is in the RIC and Cohen, these sources generally refer to the type with a front divided into four sections (RIC 261). This type of garlanded altar, lit altar was not described and published until the discovery of the Minister Hoard, discovered after RIC was written.
NORMAN K
claud41a.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, RIC 41 Rome25 viewsBronze Antoninianus, Claudius II Gothis
Obverse: IMP CLAUVDIO AVG , radiate head right.
Reverse: FORTVNA, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia. Z in right field.
RIC 41, Rome. 20.5 mm., 3.1 g.
NORMAN K
2228b.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Rome20 viewsBronze Antoninianus, Rome
Obverse: IMP CLAUVDIO AVG, radiate head right.
Reverse: SECVRIT AVG, Securitas standing left, leaning on column, holding baton. XI in right field.
Cunetio hoard 2228, Appleshaw hoard 260. 16.9 mm., 2.1 g.
NORMAN K
P1019337.JPG
Claudius II Gothicus. 268-270 AD. AE18mm16 views Claudius II Gothicus. 268-270 AD.
Obv. IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. PA-X A-VG, Pax advancing left, holding transverse scepter in left hand and olive branch in right hand;
T in ex. Mediolanum (Milan) mint.
Ref. RIC 157
Ex Forvms Never-Ending Cleaning Competition.
Lee S
claudius_ii_aequitas_a.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II (GOTHICUS)40 views268 - 270 AD
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate,draped and cuirassed bust right.
R: AEQVITAS AVG: Aequitas standing left holding scales and cornucopiae
ROME
laney
CLAUDIUS_II.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II (GOTHICUS)27 views268 - 270 AD
AE ANT. 20.5 mm 3.75 g
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
RAD BUST R
R: MARS VLTOR
MARS WALKING R HOLDING SPEAR AND TROPHY
RIC 66 VAR.
laney
claudius_ii_gothicus_fides_mercury_b_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS26 views268 - 270 AD
AE 19.5 mm, 3.75 g
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped bust right, seen from the back
R: FIDES AVG, Mercury standing left, holding purse and caduceus; Z in exe
Antioch mint
RIC V 207, Antioch var. (bust type); Cohen 83
laney
claud_goth_conser_res~0.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS23 views268 - 270 AD
AE 20mm 3.13 g
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG radiate draped cuirassed bust right
R: CONSER AVG Serapis standing left with right hand raised, scepter in left; G in exe
Antioc RIC 201
laney
claudius_gothicus_fides_mercury_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS37 views268 - 270 AD
AE 19.5 mm, 3.75 g
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped bust right, seen from the back
R: FIDES AVG, Mercury standing left, holding purse and caduceus; Z in exe
Antioch mint
RIC V 207, Antioch var. (bust type); Cohen 83
laney
cl_goth_fides_1_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS22 views268 - 270 AD
Struck 268-269 (11th Officina, Issue IIb)
AE 18.5 mm max., 2.36 g
O:[IMP CLA]VDIVS AVG radiate and cuirassed bust right
R: [FIDE]S EXERCI Fides standing facing, head left, holding two signa, one transverse; XI in right field
Rome mint; RIC Vl 34/6
laney
claud_goth_pax_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS25 views268 - 270 AD
AE 20 mm 2.87 g
O: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG Radiate, draped bust r.
R: PAX AVG Pax walking l., holding olive branch and scepter; T in exe
Milan mint
RIC 157a
laney
clau_goth_fortuna_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS17 views268 - 270 AD
AE 19.5 mm, 2.73 g
O: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG radiate bust right
R: FORTVNA REDVX; Fortune standing left; SPQR in exe
Cyzicus mint
RIC 234
laney
clau_goth_fides_b_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS14 views268 - 270 AD
AE 21.5 mm, 2.49 g
O: IMP CLA[VDIVS PF] AVG Radiatedraped bust right
R: FIDES MILIT Fides standing left hold standard in each hand, D in right field
Milan mint; RIC 149
laney
clau_goth_cos_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS18 views268 - 270 AD
AE 19 mm, 2.08 g
O: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: P M TR P Ii COS P P, Claudius standing right, in military dress, transverse spear in right, globe in left D in right field
RIC V 12
laney
cl_goth_pax_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS21 views268 - 270 AD
AE 19 mm, 2.20 g
Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG Radiate, draped bust right
Reverse: PAX AVG Pax walking l., holding olive branch and scepter; T in exe.
Milan mint; RIC 157
(EB)
laney
cl_goth_cos_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS13 views268 - 270 AD
AE 18X21 mm, 2.45 g
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG radiate curissed bust right
R: [P M T]RP II COS P P Claudius, togate, holding olive-branch and scepter
(Scarce dated reverse legend for the period; civilian Emperor symbolism was also rather obsolete at the time, expecially with Claudius II)
cf. RIC 5 10ff

laney
cl_goth_uber_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS14 views268 - 270 AD
Silvered AE 17.5 mm 1.80 g
O: IMP CL[AVDIVS A]VG radiate cuirassed bust right
R: VBERITAS A[VG], Uberitas standing left holding purse and cornucopiae, T in right field
(extensive silvering intact)
laney
cl_goth_virt_left_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS20 views268 - 270 AD
AE 19 mm, 2.51 g
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS PF AVG Radiate head right
R: VIRTVS AVG Virtus standing left holding branch and spear.
Rome Mint; RIC V 109
laney
cl_goth_mars_ultor_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS21 views268 - 270 AD
AE 17.5 mm max. 2.47 g
O: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right;
R: MARS VLTOR, Mars walking right, holding spear in right hand and spear across shoulder in left, H in right field
Rome mint; RIC V 67
(EB)
laney
cl_goth_iovi_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS19 views268 - 270 AD
AE 21 mm 3.30 g
O: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG radiate draped cuirassed bust right
R: IOVI CONSERVATORI Jupiter standing left holding spear and thunderbolt, eagle at feet left
(Third--final--Emission. A few (4) are recorded by Gyssen in CENB 1999: Not in RIC)
Cyzicus mint.
laney
claud_ii_alexandria_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS59 views268 - 270 AD
Struck Sept. 268 - Aug. 269 AD (year 1)
Billon Tetradrachm 22 mm 8.62 g
O: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: Eagle standing R, looking back, holding wreath in beak, date AL (year 1) right;
Geissen 3015, Curtis 1670, BMC 2331
Alexandria, Roman Provincial Egypt
laney
claudius_ii_fides_2_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS23 views268 - 270 AD
Struck 268 - 269, 11th Officina, Issue IIb
AE Antoninianus 18.5 mm 2.36 g
O: [IMP CLA]VDIUS AVG Radiate and cuirassed bust right
R: [FIDE]S EXERCI Fides standing facing, head left, holding two signa, one transverse; XI in right field.
Rome RIC V 34/6
laney
claud_ii_prov_res.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS34 views268 - 270 AD
AE Double denarius, 19 mm, 3.26 g
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate cuirassed bust right.
R: PROVIDENT [AVG], Providentia standing left, leaning on column, holding sceptre and cornucopiae, globe at feet
laney
cl_goth_silvered_ant_virtus.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS11 views268 - 270 AD
Billon antoninianus, silvered. 17 X 19 mm; 2.27 g
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate draped bust right
R: VIRTVS AVG, Virtus (Mars) standing left, holding branch and sceptre, shield left at feet
Rome mint; cf RIC 109
laney
claud_goth_pax.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS11 views268-270 AD
AE Antoninianus 19 mm, 2.12 g
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: PAX AVG, Pax standing left, holding olive branch and transverse sceptre.
laney
claud_ii_snake.jpg
(0268) CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS / SALUS33 views268 - 270 AD
AE 18.5X21 mm 2.98 g
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
RAD DIAD BUST R, (PELLET BEHIND?)
R: [SALV]S AVG
SALUS STG L FEEDING SNAKE RISING FROM ALTAR
laney
Claudius_II_Gothicus1.jpg
*SOLD*15 viewsClaudius II Billon Antoninianus

Attribution: RIC 62 variant (scepter instead of cornucopia)
Date: AD 269-270
Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust r.
Reverse: LIBERT AVG, Libertas stg. facing, head l., holding pileum in her right hand and a tall scepter in her l., X in r. field. (Reverse of Gallienus - cf Sear5 11349)
Size: 18.9 mm
Noah
Claudgoth0530.jpg
006 - Claudius II Gothicus (268-270 AD), Antoninianus - RIC 9135 viewsObv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. PROVIDENT AVG, Providentia standing half left, leaning on column, holding cornucopia and rod over globe.
Minted in Rome.
pierre_p77
02-Claudius-II-The-26.jpg
02. Claudius II: Thessalonica fractional.19 viewsAE3 fractional (half follis?), 317-18, Thessalonica mint.
Obverse: DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP / Veiled bust of Claudius II, Gothicus.
Reverse: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM / Emperor seated on curule chair, raising right hand and holding sceptre.
Mint mark:: . TS . Γ .
1.35 gm., 16 mm.
RIC #26; PBCC #906; Sear #16399.

Around the years 317 - 318, Constantine issued commemorative coins honoring three deified emperors: Claudius II Gothicus, Constantius I, and Maximian. It is not real clear when these coins were issued, but RIC assigns them to the years 317-18 saying there is evidence they were issued near or at the end of the Sol coinage. They are small AE3 in size (16 mm), but on flans that are much thinner and weigh significantly less than other coins of the period. Therefore they are generally regarded as fractionals. They were minted at Treveri, Arelate, Rome, Aquileia, Siscia, and Thessalonica.

Why these three emperors? Constantine claimed Claudius II Gothicus was one of his ancestors (probably not true). Constantius I was Constantine's father, and Maximian was the father of Constantine's wife, Fausta.

Callimachus
Divoclavdio.jpg
020 - Claudius II Gothicus (268-270 AD), Antoninianus - RIC 26145 viewsObv: DIVO CLAVDIO. radiated bust right.
Rev: CONSECRATIO, large altar.
Minted in Milan(?), c 270 AD.

Commemorative coin struck after the emperors death.
pierre_p77
03-Constantius-The-25.jpg
03. Constantius I: Thessalonica fractional.21 viewsAE3 fractional (half follis?), 317-18, Thessalonica mint.
Obverse: DIVO CONSTANTIO PIO PRINCIPI / Veiled bust of Constantius I.
Reverse: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM / Emperor seated on curule chair, raising right hand and holding sceptre.
Mint mark: . T . SB .
1.78 gm., 16 mm.
RIC #25; PBCC #908; Sear unlisted.

Around the years 317 - 318, Constantine issued commemorative coins honoring three deified emperors: Claudius II Gothicus, Constantius I, and Maximian. It is not real clear when these coins were issued, but RIC assigns them to the years 317-18 saying there is evidence they were issued near or at the end of the Sol coinage. They are small AE3 in size (16 mm), but on flans that are much thinner and weigh significantly less than other coins of the period. Therefore they are generally regarded as fractionals. They were minted at Treveri, Arelate, Rome, Aquileia, Siscia, and Thessalonica.

Why these three emperors? Constantine claimed Claudius II Gothicus was one of his ancestors (probably not true). Constantius I was Constantine's father, and Maximian was the father of Constantine's wife, Fausta.

Callimachus
043.jpg
039 CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS9 viewsEMPEROR: Claudius II Gothicus
DENOMINATION: Antoninianus
OBVERSE: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right
REVERSE: AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing left holding scales and cornucopiae
DATE: 268-270 AD
MINT: Roma
WEIGHT: 3.03
RIC: 14
Barnaba6
04-Maximianus-Sis-41.jpg
04. Maximian: Siscia fractional.43 viewsAE3 fractional (half follis?), 317-18, Siscia mint.
Obverse: DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP / Veiled bust of Maximian.
Reverse: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM / Emperor seated on curule chair, raising right hand and holding sceptre.
Mint mark: SIS
1.61 gm., 15mm.
RIC #41; PBCC #838; Sear #16412.

Around the years 317 - 318, Constantine issued commemorative coins honoring three deified emperors: Claudius II Gothicus, Constantius I, and Maximian. It is not real clear when these coins were issued, but RIC assigns them to the years 317-18 saying there is evidence they were issued near or at the end of the Sol coinage. They are small AE3 in size (16 mm), but on flans that are much thinner and weigh significantly less than other coins of the period. Therefore they are generally regarded as fractionals. They were minted at Treveri, Arelate, Rome, Aquileia, Siscia, and Thessalonica.

Why these three emperors? Constantine claimed Claudius II Gothicus was one of his ancestors (probably not true). Constantius I was Constantine's father, and Maximian was the father of Constantine's wife, Fausta.

Callimachus
Claudius_Gothicus_Antoninianus.jpg
043. Claudius II Gothicus, A.D. 268-270.40 viewsAE Antoninianus. Mediolanum mint.

Obv: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.

Rev: FELIC TEMPO, Felicitas standing facing, head left, vertical sceptre in left hand, short caduceus in right hand, T in ex.

RIC V-1 145 Milan/Mediolanum.
LordBest
94.jpg
094 Claudius II Gothicus. bill. antoninianus13 viewsobv: IMP C CLADIUS AG rad. drp. bust r.
rev: SALVS AVG Isis std. l. holding sistrum and basket
ex: epsilon
hill132
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-,_D-5411,_Alexdr,Tyche_s_-l,LA_Q-001_0h_20-20,5mm_9,26g-s.jpg
104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-, D-5411, LA//--, Tyche seated left, #166 views104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-, D-5411, LA//--, Tyche seated left, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: LA above, Tyche reclining left on draped and garlanded couch, holding the rudder in right hand.
exergue: LA//--, diameter: 20-20,5mm, weight: 9,26g, axes: 0h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 268-269 A.D., Year 1. LA., ref: Geissen-, Dattari-5411, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.14-p-328,
Q-001
quadrans
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3015,_D-5414,_Alexandria,_Eagle_standing_right,_LA_in_left(Y-1,268_AD)_Q-001_0h_21-22,5mm_8,54g-s.jpg
104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3015, D-5414, -/LA//--, Eagle standing right, #1138 views104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3015, D-5414, -/LA//--, Eagle standing right, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped bust right.
reverse: Eagle standing right, head left with wreath in its beak, LA in the left field.
exergue: -/LA//--, diameter: 21,0-22,5mm, weight: 8,54g, axes: 0h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 268-269 A.D., Year 1. LA., ref: Geissen- 3015, Dattari-5414, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.01-p-327,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3015v,_D-5414v,_Alexandria,_Eagle_standing_right,_LA_in_left(Y-1,268_AD)_Q-001_11h_21,5mm_10,35g-s.jpg
104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3015v., D-5414v., -/LA//--, Eagle standing right, #1163 views104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3015v., D-5414v., -/LA//--, Eagle standing right, #1, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. (Bust variation!)
reverse: Eagle standing right, head left with wreath in its beak, LA in the left field.
exergue: -/LA//--, diameter: 21,5mm, weight: 10,35g, axes: 11h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 268-269 A.D., Year 1. LA., ref: Geissen- 3015v., Dattari-5414v., Kapmann-Ganschow-104.01v.-p-327,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3027,_D-5415,_Alexandria,_Eagle_standing_right,L-B_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3027, D-5415, L/B//--, Eagle standing right, #166 views104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3027, D-5415, L/B//--, Eagle standing right, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle standing right, head left with wreath in its beak, L-B across the field,
exergue: L/B//--, diameter: 21-22mm, weight: 11,21g, axes: 11 h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 269-270 A.D., Year 2. L-B., ref: Geissen- 3027, Dattari-5415, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.17-p-328,
Q-001
quadrans
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3028,_D-5417,_KG-104_16_Alexandria,_Eagle_standing_left,_L-B_,_269-270_(Y-2)-Q-001_0h_21-21,5mm_9,02g-s.jpg
104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3028, D-5417, L/B//--, Eagle standing left, #1114 views104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3028, D-5417, L/B//--, Eagle standing left, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle standing left, head right with wreath in its beak, L-B across the field,
exergue: L/B//--, diameter: 21-21,5mm, weight: 9,02g, axes: 0 h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 269-270 A.D., Year 2. L-B., ref: Geissen- 3028, Dattari-5418, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.16-p-328, Milne 4248, Curtis 1683, BMC-Alexandria 2333,
Q-001
quadrans
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3037-3038,_D-5392-5393,_Alexandria,_Bust_of_Hermanubis_right,_LB_to_left_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3037-3038, D-5392-5393, LB/-//--, Bust of Hermanubis right, #165 views104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3037-3038, D-5392-5393, LB/-//--, Bust of Hermanubis right, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Bust of Hermanubis right, wearing modius, lotus blossom to right, LB to left.
exergue: LB/-//--, diameter: 21mm, weight: 9,5g, axes: 0 h,
mint: Alexandria, date: 269-270 A.D., Year 2. LB., ref: Geissen- 3037-3038, Dattari-5392-5393, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.25-p-329,
Q-001
quadrans
104_Claudius_II__Gothicus,_Alexandria,_Potin,_Tetradrachm,_Nike,_Milne_4235_,_year-2,_269_AD__Q-001,_h,_20mm,_10,76g-s.jpg
104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3041, D-5402, -/LB//--, Nike advancing right, #190 views104p Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Egypt, Alexandria, Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3041, D-5402, -/LB//--, Nike advancing right, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Nike advancing right, holding wreath and palm, year LB in right field.
exergue: -/LB//--, diameter: 20,0mm, weight: 10,76g, axes: h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 269-270 A.D., Year 2. LB., ref: Milne 4235, Giessen-3041, Dattari-5402, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.29-p-329,
Q-001
quadrans
GI_122e_img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus - Billon tetradrachm - Milne 422611 viewsBillon tetradrachm
Obv:– AVT K KLAUDIOC CEB, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– None, Helmeted and cuirassed Ares (Mars) standing left, rests on spear and holds sword in sheath with chlamys
Minted in Alexandria (L | B). A.D. 268/269
Reference(s) – Milne 4226. Emmett 3871(2). Curtis 1661. BMC 2311. SNG Cop 839, Kampmann 104.20;
maridvnvm
RI_122p_img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus - RIC V Antioch 212 (bust left)21 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate head left
Rev:– IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, patera in right, scepter in left, peacock at feet left
Minted in Antioch. September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.
Reference:– RIC V 212
maridvnvm
RI_122q_img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus - RIC V Antioch 21318 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
Rev:– IVVENTVS AVG, Hercules standing facing, head turned right, holding club set on ground in right hand, apple in left
Minted in Antioch (//D). A.D. 68 - 270
Reference:– RIC 213
maridvnvm
RI_122n_img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus Ant. - RIC -29 viewsObv:– IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– APPOLINI CONS, Apollo standing left, holding laurel branch and lyre on rock
Minted in Rome (_ | H).
Reference(s) – Cohen -. RIC Unlisted (APPOLINI CONS listed with IMP CLAVDIVS AVG, this legend listed with APPOLI CONS!)
maridvnvm
RI 122f img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus Ant. - RIC 03629 viewsObv:– IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FIDES EXERCI, Fides standing right holding two standards, one transverse
Minted in Rome
Reference:– RIC 36
maridvnvm
RI 122c img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus Ant. - RIC 045 21 viewsObv:– IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, draped bust right
Rev:– GENIVS AVG, Genius standing left with patera & cornucopaie
Minted in Rome. A.D. 268-270
Reference:– RIC 45
maridvnvm
RI 122b img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus Ant. - RIC 05434 viewsObv:– IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI VICTORI, Jupiter standing left, holding staff and thunderbolt
Minted in Rome
Reference:– RIC 54
maridvnvm
RI 122l img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus Ant. - RIC 06665 viewsObv:– IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– MARS VLTOR, Mars advancing right, holding trophy and spear
Reference:– RIC 66
maridvnvm
RI 122a img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus Ant. - RIC 109a56 viewsObv:– IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, draped bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVG, Virtus standing left, holding branch and scepter; leaning on shield, left
Reference:– RIC 109a

Peculiar coloration caused by the toning process
maridvnvm
RI_122m_img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus Ant. - RIC 17243 viewsObv:– IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVG, Mars advancing right, holding trophy and spear
Minted in Milan. (P in exe)
Reference:– RIC 172. Cohen 315
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 122e img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus Ant. - RIC 234 33 viewsObv:– IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped bust right
Rev:– FORTVNA REDVX, Fortuna standing left holding rudder and cornucopiae
Minted in Cyzicus. A.D. 268-270
Reference:– Van Meter 14. RIC 234. Cohen 102
maridvnvm
GI 122b img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus, Billon tetradrachm, Alexandria, Eagle, Milne 429118 viewsBillon tetradrachm
Obv:– AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– None, Eagle standing right, wreath in beak, palm behind
Minted in Alexandria, L in left field, Г in right field (year 3). A.D. 269/270
Reference:– Curtis 1687, BMC 2336, Milne 4291
maridvnvm
GI 122a img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus, Billon tetradrachm, Alexandria, Nike right30 viewsBillon tetradrachm
Obv:– AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– None, Nike advancing right, holding wreath & palm, year
Minted in Alexandria, L in left field, B in right field (year 2). A.D. 268/269
Reference:– Curtis 1712, BMC 2321 Milne 4228
1 commentsmaridvnvm
IMG_3871~0.jpg
133. Claudius II Gothicus (268-270 A.D.)33 viewsAv.: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG
Rv.: VICTORIA AVG
Ex.: S

AE Antoninian Ø20 / 3,5g
RIC V-1 171 Milan, Cohen 302, Sear5 11379
Juancho
ClaudiusIIAntLiberalit.jpg
1di Claudius Gothicus26 views268-270

AE antoninianus

Radiate cuirassed bust right, IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Liberlitas stg, LIBERALITAS AVG

RIC 57

Zosimus recorded: When the troops were calmed by their commanders, Claudius was chosen emperor, having previously been designed for that dignity by general consent. Aureolus, who had for a long time kept himself out of the hands of Gallienus, presently sent agents to Claudius, to effect a peace. Surrendering himself, he was killed by the guards of the emperor, who still remembered the hatred they bore against him for his treachery.

The Scythians were by this time so elated by their former success, that they appointed a place of meeting with the Heruli, Peucae, and Gothi, near the river Tyra, which empties itself into the Pontus; where having built six thousand vessels, and put on board them three hundred and twenty thousand men, they sailed across the Pontus, and made an attempt on Tomes, a fortified town, but were repulsed from it. From thence they proceed to Marcianopolis, a city of Mysia, but failing there likewise in their attack on it, they took the opportunity of a favourable wind and sailed forward. . . . they passed through the Hellespont, and arrived at Mount Athos. Having there refitted and careened their vessels, they laid siege to Cassandria and Thessalonica, which they were near taking by means of machines which they raised against the walls. But hearing that the emperor was advancing with an army, they went into the interior, plundering all the neighbourhood of Doberus and Pelagonia. There they sustained a loss of three thousand men, who were met with by the Dalmatian cavalry, and with the rest of their force engaged the army of the emperor. Great numbers were slain in this battle on both sides, but the Romans, by a pretended flight, drew the Barbarians into an ambuscade and killed more than fifty thousand of them.

Egypt being thus reduecd by the Palmyrenians, the Barbarians, who survived the battle of Naissus between Claudius and the Scythians, defending themselves with their carriages which went before them, marched towards Macedon, but were so distressed by the want of necessaries, that many of them and of their beasts perished with hunger. They were met likewise by the Roman cavalry, who having killed many of them, drove the rest towards Mount Haemus; where being surrounded by the Roman army, they lost a vast number of men. But a quarrel ensuing between the Roman horse and foot soldiers, the emperor wishing the foot to engage the Barbarians, the Romans, after a smart engagement, were defeated with considerable loss, but the cavalry, coming up immediately, redeemed in some degree the miscarriage of the infantry. After this battle, the Barbarians proceeded on their march, and were pursued by the Romans. The pirates who cruized about Crete and Rhodes retired without doing any thing worthy of mention; and being attacked by the plague on their way home, some of them died in Thrace and some in Macedon. All that survived were either admitted into the Roman legions, or had lands assigned for them to cultivate and so become husbandmen. Nor was the plague confined to the Barbarians alone, but began to infest the Romans, many of whom died, and amongst the rest Claudius, a person adorned with every virtue. His death was a severe loss to his subjeets, and was consequently much regretted by them.
Blindado
22074.jpg
22074 CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS/Juno15 viewsCLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS/Juno
268-270 AD. Antoninianus
mint. Struck 268 AD.
Obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG,
radiate head left
Rev: IVNO R-EGINA,
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; peacock standing left at feet.
Mint: Antioch 19.8mm 3.5g
RIC V 212;
Blayne W
10885311_769549229748657_2090406297486556920_n.jpg
260 Claudius II18 viewsClaudius Gothicus AE Antoninianus. Rome, AD 268-270. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right / GENIVS AVG, Genius standing left, by altar, holding patera and cornucopiae. RIC 45Randygeki(h2)
ClaudiusII-Ric 66.jpg
268-270 AD - Claudius Gothicus - AE Antoninianus75 viewsIMP C CLAVDIVS AVG - Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust
MARS VLTOR - Mars striding right, spear in right hand, and trophy over left shoulder

References Ric V, part1, 66, Cohen 160

very pleasing example of this 'Martial" coin! (IMHO)
jimwho523
ClGtV18.jpg
268-270 AD - Claudius Gothicus - RIC V 018 - ANNONA AVG33 viewsEmperor: Claudius Gothicus (r. 268-270 AD)
Date: 268-270 AD
Condition: aFine
Denomination: Antoninianus

Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Imperator Caesar Claudius Emperor
Bust right; radiate and cuirassed

Reverse: ANNONA AVG
The Emperor provides wheat.
Annona standing left, foot on prow, holding ears of corn and cornucopiae.

Rome mint
RIC V Claudius Gothicus 18; VM 5
2.52g; 21.6mm; 0°
Pep
ClGtV32or33.jpg
268-270 AD - Claudius Gothicus - RIC V 032 or 033 - FELICITAS AVG27 viewsEmperor: Claudius Gothicus (r. 268-270 AD)
Date: 268-270 AD
Condition: Fine
Denomination: Antoninianus

Obverse: IMP (C?) CLAVDIVS AVG
Imperator Emperor Claudius
Head right; radiate

Reverse: FELICITAS AVG
The Emperor provides happiness and success.
Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopia.
"B" in right field (Rome mint, second officina)

RIC V 32 or 33, VM 10
2.47g; 21.8mm; 180°
Pep
ClGtV91or92.jpg
268-270 AD - Claudius Gothicus - RIC V 091 or 092 - PROVIDENT AVG30 viewsEmperor: Claudius Gothicus (r. 268-270 AD)
Date: 268-270 AD
Condition: Fair/VF
Denomination: Antoninianus

Obverse: IMP (C?) CLAVDIVS AVG
Imperator Emperor Claudius
Bust right; radiate and draped or cuirassed

Reverse: PROVIDENT AVG
The Emperor has foresight.
Providentia standing left, leaning on column.
"XII" in right field

Rome mint
RIC V Claudius Gothicus 91 or 92
3.72g; 18.1mm; 165°
Pep
ClGtV104.jpg
268-270 AD - Claudius Gothicus - RIC V 104 - VICTORIA AVG27 viewsEmperor: Claudius II Gothicus (r. 268-270 AD)
Date: 268-270 AD
Condition: Fine
Denomination: Antoninianus

Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Imperator Caesar Emperor Claudius
Bust right; radiate and cuirassed

Reverse: VICTORIA AVG
The Emperor is victorious.
Victory standing left, holding wreath and palm.

Rome mint
RIC V Claudius Gothicus 104; VM 35
3.38g; 20.1mm; 0°
Pep
ClGtV187.jpg
268-270 AD - Claudius Gothicus - RIC V 187 - PROVIDEN AVG33 viewsEmperor: Claudius Gothicus (r. 268-270 AD)
Date: 268-270 AD
Condition: Fair
Denomination: Antoninianus

Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG
Imperator Claudius Emperor
Bust right; radiate and cuirassed

Reverse: PROVIDEN AVG
The Emperor has foresight.
Providentia standing left, holding baton and cornucopiae; at foot, globe.
"II" in right field

Siscia mint, second officina
RIC V Claudius Gothicus 187
2.83g; 21.0mm; 345°
Pep
claudius2 ant.jpg
268-270 AD - CLAUDIUS II (GOTHICUS) - AR antoninianus55 viewsobv: IMP.C.CLAVDIVS.AVG (radiate head right)
rev: LIBERALITAS AVG (Liberalitas standing left, holding coin counter and cornucopia)
ref: RIC57, C.144
mint: Rome, 3.08gms, struck 268-270 AD
This coin is AR!! Rare
berserker
claudiusII ant-.jpg
268-270 AD - CLAUDIUS II (GOTHICUS) AE antoninianus 29 viewsobv: IMP.CLAVDIVS.CAES.AVG (radiate bust right)
rev: RESTITVTOR.ORBIS (emperor standing left, sacrifacing at altar and holding sceptre)
ref: RIC189, C.247(20fr)
mint: Siscia, struck 268-270 AD
2.98gms, 19mm
Rare
Unusual and rare using the title Caesar!
berserker
divoclaudio_RIC266.jpg
268-270 AD - CLAUDIUS II (GOTHICUS) AE antoninianus58 viewsobv: DIVO CLAVDIO (radiate head right)
rev: CONSECRATIO (eagle standing front, wings spread, head right)
ref: RIC Vi 266 (C), Cohen 43
mint: Rome
3.36gms, 19mm

Claudius II issued after his death by Quintillus and later emperors.
History: Late in 269 Claudius was preparing to go to war against the german Vandals tribe, who were raiding in Pannonia. Next year the pannonian legions led by Claudius defeated the Vandals, but the Emperor fell victim to an epidemic of plague and died in Sirmium early in August of 270. The Senate immediately deified Claudius as "Divus Claudius Gothicus", making him one of the few Roman emperors of the period to be so honored.
berserker
quintillus ant-.jpg
270 AD - QUINTILLUS - AE antoninianus 19 viewsobv: IMP.C.M.AVR.CL.QVINTILLVS.AVG (radiate & draped bust right)
rev: FIDES.MILIT (Fides standing left, holding two standards)
ref: RIC52 (?)
mint: no mint-marks (Mediolanum without 'S' or unpublished Siscia),
3.03gms, 22mm
Quintillus had been emperor for only a few weeks after the death of Claudius Gothicus.
berserker
coin247.JPG
309. Gallienus33 viewsOne of the key characteristics of the Crisis of the Third Century was the inability of the Emperors to maintain their hold on the Imperium for any marked length of time. An exception to this rule was the reign of the Emperor Gallienus. The fact that Gallienus served as junior Emperor with his father, Valerian, from 253 to 260 may have had something to do with his successes. Father and son each wielded his authority over a smaller area, thus allowing for more flexible control and imperial presence. Another, more probable reason, lay in Gallienus's success in convincing Rome that he was the best man for the job. However, Gallienus had to handle many rebellions of the so-called "Gallienus usurpers".

In 260, Valerian was taken prisoner by Sapor, King of Persia while trying to negotiate a peace settlement. Although aware that his father had been taken alive (the only Emperor to have suffered this fate), Gallienus did not make public Valerian's death until a year later. His decision hinged on the fact that Romans believed that their fate rose and fell with the fate of the Emperor, which in turn depended upon his demonstrating the proper amount of piety (Latin pietas) to the gods and maintaining their favor. A defeated Emperor would surely have meant that the gods had forsaken Valerian and, by extension, Gallienus.

Gallienus's chief method of reinforcing his position is seen in the coinage produced during his reign (see Roman currency). The coinage provides clear evidence of a successful propaganda campaign. Gallienus took pains to make sure that he was regularly represented as victorious, merciful, and pious. The people who used these coins on a daily basis saw these messages and, with little evidence to the contrary, remained supportive of their Emperor.

There were, however, those who knew better. During Gallienus' reign, there was constant fighting on the western fringes of the Empire. As early as 258, Gallienus had lost control over a large part of Gaul, where another general, Postumus, had declared his own realm (typically known today as the Gallic Empire). As Gallienus' influence waned, another general came to the fore. In time-honored tradition, Claudius II Gothicus gained the loyalty of the army and succeeded Gallienus to the Imperium.

In the months leading up to his mysterious death in September of 268, Gallienus was ironically orchestrating the greatest achievements of his reign. An invasion of Goths into the province of Pannonia was leading to disaster and even threatening Rome, while at the same time, the Alamanni were raising havoc in the northern part of Italy. Gallienus halted the Allamanic progress by defeating them in battle in April of 268, then turned north and won several victories over the Goths. That fall, he turned on the Goths once again, and in September, either he or Claudius, his leading general, led the Roman army to victory (although the cavalry commander Aurelian was the real victor) at the Battle of Naissus.

At some time following this battle, Gallienus was murdered during the siege of usurper Aureolus in Mediolanum; many theories abound that Claudius and Aurelian conspired to have the emperor killed. Be that as it may, Claudius spared the lives of Gallienus' family — Gallienus' wife, Iulia Cornelia Salonina, had given him three sons: Valerianus (who died in 258), Saloninus (died in 260 after becoming co-emperor), and Egnatius Marinianus — and had the emperor deified.

Gallienus Antoninianus - Minerva
OBVERSE: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right
REVERSE: MINERVA AVG, Minerva standing right with spear and shield.
23mm - 3.7 grams
ecoli
IMG_9258.JPG
311a. Aureolus7 viewsAureolus. Romano-Gallic Usurper, AD 267-268. Antoninianus (19mm, 2.17 g, 7h). Struck in the name of Postumus. Mediolanum (Milan) mint, 2nd officina. 3rd emission, mid AD 268. Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Postumus right / Concordia standing left, holding patera and rudder; prow of galley to left; S. RIC V (Postumus) 373; Mairat 215-21; AGK (Postumus) 6b; RSC (Postumus) 19. Near VF, dark brown patina.

Aureolus was an extraordinarily capable general who served under Valerian and Gallienus. Around AD 258, Gallienus stationed a new cavalry unit at Mediolanum that was to serve as a quick reaction force against any new invasions along the frontier of the central empire. Aureolus was given command of this unit. In AD 260-261 his forces defeated the armies of the usurpers Ingenuus and Macrianus, and recovered the province of Raetia. Following these victories, Gallienus and Aureolus led a Roman army against the breakaway Gallic provinces under Postumus. Gallienus was forced to leave the field after being injured in battle, and left the campaign in the hands of Aureolus. Aureolus ended the campaign shortly thereafter, and while the reason is uncertain, the historical record suggests it was due to either his incompetence or else treachery (he had come to a secret agreement with Postumus). While the former seems unlikely, given Aureolus’ record, the latter is possible, as there are indications that he had been preparing for a revolt as early as AD 262. Regardless, at some point in AD 267, Aureolus revolted and established his base at Mediolanum, where Gallienus besieged him in AD 268. The details of the revolt are unclear, but it appears that Aureolus first appealed to Postumus for aid, and, failing to gain the Gallic Emperor’s support, declared himself emperor. About the same time, Gallienus was murdered, and was succeeded by Claudius II Gothicus, who continued to beseige Mediolanum. Soon, though, it appeared that an agreement was reached, and Aureolus emerged from the city to meet Claudius. Any such concord, however, was simply a ruse, as Aureolus was taken into custody and executed.
ecoli
coin254.JPG
313. Tetricus I27 viewsCaius Pius Esuvius Tetricus was emperor of the Gallic Empire from 270/271 to 273, following the murder of Victorinus. Tetricus, who ruled with his son, Tetricus II, was the last of the Gallic Emperors.

Tetricus was born to a noble family and held the administrative rank of praeses provinciae (provincial governor) of Aquitania at the time of Victorinus' death. Victorinus' mother, Victoria, paid the army heavily to declare Tetricus emperor near Burdigalia (Bordeaux, France), which was approved in Gaul and Britain. Following his appointment, Tetricus repelled Germanic tribes that took advantage of the confusion following the death of Victorinus to invade.

Tetricus installed his capital at Augusta Treverorum (present Trier, Germany, near the vital Rhine border, hence later seat of a Tetrarch) and appointed his son, Tetricus II, Caesar, i.e. junior emperor (273). Tetricus made no attempts to expand the Gallic Empire, other than southward, regaining Aquitania (which had rejoined the Roman empire during the reign of Claudius Gothicus).

In 273, Emperor Aurelian set out to reconquer the western Roman empire, following his victories in the east. Tetricus took his army southward from Trier to meet Aurelian, who was advancing into northern Gaul. The decisive battle took place near Châlons-sur-Marne, where Tetricus and his son surrendered to Aurelian.

According to literary sources, after being displayed as trophies at Aurelian's triumph in Rome, the lives of Tetricus and his son were spared by Aurelian and Tetricus was even given the title of corrector Lucaniae et Bruttiorum, that is governor of a region of Italia. Tetricus died at an unknown date living in Italy; he is listed as one of Rome's Thirty Tyrants in the Historia Augusta.
ecoli
coin508.JPG
314. Claudius II37 viewsMarcus Aurelius Claudius Gothicus (May 10, 213/214 - January, 270), more often referred to as Claudius II, ruled the Roman Empire for less than two years (268 - 270), but during that brief time, he was so successful and beloved by the people of Rome that he attained divine status.

His origin is uncertain. Claudius was either from Syrmia (Sirmium; in Pannonia Inferior) or from Dardania (in Moesia Superior). Claudius was the commander of the Roman army that defeated decisively the Goths at the battle of Naissus, in September 268; in the same month, he attained the throne, amid charges, never proven, that he murdered his predecessor Gallienus. However, he soon proved to be less than bloodthirsty, as he asked the Roman Senate to spare the lives of Gallienus' family and supporters. He was less magnanimous toward Rome's enemies, however, and it was to this that he owed his popularity.

Claudius, like Maximinus Thrax before him, was of barbarian birth. After an interlude of failed aristocratic Roman emperors since Maximinus's death, Claudius was the first in a series of tough soldier-emperors who would eventually restore the Empire from the Crisis of the third century.

At the time of his accession, the Roman Empire was in serious danger from several incursions, both within and outside its borders. The most pressing of these was an invasion of Illyricum and Pannonia by the Goths. Not long after being named emperor (or just prior to Gallienus' death, depending on the source), he won his greatest victory, and one of the greatest in the history of Roman arms.

At the Battle of Naissus, Claudius and his legions routed a huge Gothic army. Together with his cavalry commander, the future Emperor Aurelian, the Romans took thousands of prisoners, destroyed the Gothic cavalry as a force and stormed their chariot laager (a circular alignment of battle-wagons long favored by the Goths). The victory earned Claudius his surname of "Gothicus" (conqueror of the Goths), and that is how he is known to this day. More importantly, the Goths were soon driven back across the Danube River, and a century passed before they again posed a serious threat to the empire.

While this was going on, the Germanic tribe known as the Alamanni had crossed the Alps and attacked the empire. Claudius responded quickly and swiftly, routing the Alamanni at the Battle of Lake Benacus in the late fall of 268, a few months after the battle of Naissus. He then turned on the "Gallic Empire", ruled by a pretender for the past 15 years and encompassing Britain, Gaul and Spain. He won several victories and soon regained control of Spain and the Rhone river valley of Gaul. This set the stage for the ultimate destruction of the Gallic Empire under Aurelian.

However, Claudius did not live long enough to fulfill his goal of reuniting all the lost territories of the empire. Late in 269 he was preparing to go to war against the Vandals, who were raiding in Pannonia. However, he fell victim to an epidemic of plague and died early in January of 270. Before his death, he is thought to have named Aurelian as his successor, although Claudius' brother Quintillus briefly seized power.

The Senate immediately deified Claudius as "Divus Claudius Gothicus", making him one of the few Roman emperors of the period to be so honored.

Historia Augusta reports Claudius and Quintillus having another brother named Crispus and through him a niece. Said niece Claudia reportedly married Eutropius and was mother to Constantius Chlorus. Historians however suspect this account to be a genealogical fabrication by Constantine the Great.

Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus. Cyzicus mint. IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped bust right / FORTUNA REDUX, Fortuna standing left with rudder & cornucopiae. RIC 234, Cohen 88.
ecoli
Claudius-II-RIC-34.jpg
74. Claudius Gothicus.21 viewsAntoninianus, 268 - 270 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG / Radiate bust of Claudius.
Reverse: FIDES EXERCI / Fides standing, holding two standards.
3.10 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #34; Sear #11334.
Callimachus
Quintillus-RIC-18.jpg
76. Quintillus.20 viewsAntoninianus, 270 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP C M AVR CL QVINTILLVS AVG / Radiate bust of Quintillus.
Reverse: FIDES MILITVM / Fides standing, holding standard and spear. E in right field.
3.79 gm., 18.5 mm.
RIC #18; Sear #11440.

Many historians limit the reign of Quintillus to 17 days. However, the number of his coins that have survived seems to contradict this. This is corroborated by the fact that all the mints -- except Antioch -- that struck coins for his brother Claudius Gothicus also struck coins for him.
Callimachus
Antoniniano Claudio Gótico RIC 62.jpg
94-02 - CLAUDIO GÓTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)103 viewsAE Antoniniano 12.5 x 19 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "LIBERT AVG" - Libertas (La Libertad) de pié de frente viendo a izquierda portando Pileus en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y largo cetro vertical en izquierda.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión Set. 268 - Inicios 269 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 10 ma.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #62 Pag.216 - Cohen Vol.VI #152 Pag.145 - DVM #21 Pag.255 - Nor.#684
mdelvalle
RIC_62_Antoniniano_Claudio_II.jpg
94-02 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)16 viewsAE Antoniniano 12.5 x 19 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "LIBERT AVG" - Libertas (La Libertad) de pié de frente viendo a izquierda portando Pileus en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y largo cetro vertical en izquierda.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión Set. 268 - Inicios 269 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 10 ma.)

Referencias: RIC Va #62 (C) P.216, Cohen VI #152 P.145, DVM #21 P.255, Nor.#684, Sear RCTV III #11349 P.402
mdelvalle
RIC_66_Antoniniano_Claudio_II.jpg
94-03 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)15 viewsAE Antoniniano 12.5 x 19 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "IMP C C[LAVDIVS A]VG" - Busto radiado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "MARS [VLTOR]" - Marte avanzando a der., cargando trofeo de armas en hombro izq. y portando lanza en der.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión Set. 268 - Inicios 269 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 8va.)

Referencias: RIC Va #66 (C) P.216, RIC2 temp #242, Cohen VI #155 P.145, DVM #22 P.255, Nor.#669, Sear RCTV III #11350 P.402, La Venera #7406/18, Cunetio #1990-92, Normanby #669
mdelvalle
Antoniniano Claudio Gótico RIC 104.jpg
94-04 - CLAUDIO GÓTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)38 viewsAE Antoniniano 20 x 19 mm 3.4 gr.

Anv: "IMP C CLAV[DIVS AVG]" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VIC[TO]RIA AVG" - Victoria vestida, de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando una corona de laureles en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y una hoja de palma en izquierda. "A" en campo izq.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión Set. 268 - Inicios 269 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 1ra.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #104 Pag.219 (C) - Sear RCTV (1988) #3222 - Sear RCTV III #11378 Pag.404 - Cohen Vol.VI #293 Pag.158 - DVM #35 Pag.255 - Nor.#616 - Hunter #23
mdelvalle
RIC_104_Antoniniano_Claudio_II.jpg
94-04 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)11 viewsAE Antoniniano 20 x 19 mm 3.4 gr.

Anv: "IMP C CLAV[DIVS AVG]" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VIC[TO]RIA AVG" - Victoria vestida, de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando una corona de laureles en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y una hoja de palma en izquierda. "A" en campo izq.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión Set. 268 - Inicios 269 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 1ra.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #104 Pag.219 (C) - Sear RCTV (1988) #3222 - Sear RCTV III #11378 Pag.404 - Cohen Vol.VI #293 Pag.158 - DVM #35 Pag.255 - Nor.#616 - Hunter #23
mdelvalle
RIC_156_Antoniniano_Claudio_II.jpg
94-05 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)6 viewsAE Antoniniano 18 x 19 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PAX AVG" - Pax (La Paz), estante a izq. a izq., portando una rama de olivo en mano de der. y cetro largo vert. en izq. "P" en exergo.

Acuñada 1da. Emisión 269 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 1ra.)

Referencias: RIC Va #156 Pag.223 (C), Cohen VI #200 Pag.149, DVM #25 Pag.255 - Nor.#1031
mdelvalle
Antoniniano Claudio Gótico RIC 145.jpg
94-06 - CLAUDIO GÓTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)40 viewsAE Antoniniano 19 x 17 mm 4.1 gr.

Anv: "[IMP CLA]VDIVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y vestido, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FELIC TEMPO" - Felicitas (La Felicidad) de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando un Caduceo en mano derecha y un largo cetro vertical en izquierda. "T" en exergo.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión Set. 268 - Inicios 269 D.C.
Ceca: Mediolanum (Off. 3ra.) - Milan Italia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #145 Pag.223 - Cohen Vol.VI #74 Pag.138 - DVM #9 var Pag.255 - Nor.#1012
mdelvalle
RIC_109_Antoniniano_Claudio_II.jpg
94-07 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)9 viewsAE Antoniniano 19 x 21 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "IMP C CLAVD[IVS AV]G", Cabeza radiada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VIRTVS [AVG]", Virtus (La Virtud) estante a izq., portando rama de olivo en mano der.y lanza en izq., a su der. escudo apoyado en tierra.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión Set. 268 - Final 269 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 5ta.)

Referencias: RIC Va #109 (C) P.219, RIC2 temp #204, Cohen VI #313 P.160, DVM #39 P.255, Sear RCTV III #11383 P.404, Hunter #24, ES #69, La Venera #6794/6807, Cunetio #1969
mdelvalle
Antoniniano Claudio Gótico RIC 156.jpg
94-08 - CLAUDIO GÓTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)52 viewsAE Antoniniano 18 x 19 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y vestido, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PAX AVG" - Pax (La Paz) de pié a izquierda, portando ramo de hojas de olivo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y largo cetro vertical en izquierda. "P" en exergo.

Acuñada 2da. Emisión 269 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 1ra.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #156 Pag.223 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3215 - Cohen Vol.VI #200 Pag.149 - DVM #25 Pag.255 - Nor.#1031
mdelvalle
RIC_14_Antoniniano_Claudio_II.jpg
94-08 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)7 viewsAE Antoniniano 18 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "[IMP] C CLAVDIVS [AVG]", Busto radiado y acoraz., viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[AEQVIT]AS AVG]", Aequitas (La Equidad) estante a izq., portando balanza en mano der. y cornucopia en izq.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión Set. 268 - Fin 269 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 6ta.)

Referencias: RIC Va #14 (C) P.212, RIC2 temp #219, Cohen VI #9 P.131, DVM #3 P.255, Nor.#656, La Venera #7089/7161, Cunetio #1976/80, MRK #10412
mdelvalle
RIC_38_Antoniniano_Claudio_II.jpg
94-09 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)10 viewsAE Antoniniano 12.5 x 19 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "[IMP CL]AVDIVS [AVG]" - Cabeza radiada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FIDE[S MILITVM]", Fides (La Fidelidad) estante a izq., portando estandarte militar (Vexilum) en mano der. y largo cetro vert. en izq..

Acuñada 3ra. Emisión med. 270 - Ago. 270 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 5ta.)

Referencias: RIC Va #38 (C) P.214, RIC2 temp #471, Cohen VI #91 P.139, Nor.#940, Sear RCTV III #11336 P.401, Hunter #42, La Venera #7406/18, Cunetio #1990-92, Normanby #669
mdelvalle
Antoniniano Claudio Gótico RIC 192.jpg
94-10 - CLAUDIO GÓTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)52 viewsAE Antoniniano 20 x 17 mm 2.6 gr.

Anv: "IMP CLAVDIVS AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "TEMPORVM FELI" - Felicitas (La Felicidad) de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando un largo Caduceo en mano derecha y una cornucopia en izquierda.

Acuñada 4ta. Emisión finales 269 D.C.
Ceca: Siscia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #192 Pag.227 - Cohen Vol.VI #285 Pag.158 - Alföldi4 /34
mdelvalle
Antoniniano Claudio Gótico RIC 252.jpg
94-12 - CLAUDIO GÓTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)39 viewsAE Antoniniano 21 x 20 mm 4.4 gr.

Anv: "IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha. "··" debajo del busto.
Rev: "VICTORIAE GOTHIC" - Trofeo compuesto por una armadura (Cuerpo), un caso (Cabeza), dos escudos y dos lanzas cruzadas (Brazos). A sus piés un cautivo sentado a cada lado con sus brazos atados a la espalda. "SP[QR]" en exergo.
La acuñación refiere a la gran victoria sobre los Godos en los Balcanes en 269 D.C.

Acuñada 3ra. Emisión mediados 269 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (2do.Período Off.2da) - Balkiz Turquía
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #252 Pag.233 - Cohen Vol.VI #308 Pag.160 (20 fr) - Alföldi 31 /4 - DVM #37 Pag.255
mdelvalle
RIC_192_Antoniniano_Claudio_II.jpg
94-12 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)7 viewsAE Antoniniano 20 x 17 mm 2.6 gr.

Anv: "IMP CLAVDIVS AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "TEMPORVM FELI" - Felicitas (La Felicidad) de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando un largo Caduceo en mano derecha y una cornucopia en izquierda.

Acuñada 4ta. Emisión finales 269 D.C.
Ceca: Siscia

Referencias: RIC Va #192 (C) P.227, Cohen VI #285 P.158, Alföldi 4 /34, Sear RCTV III #11375 P.404, Hunter pl.lxxxii
mdelvalle
RIC_178_Antoniniano_Claudio_II.jpg
94-13 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)11 viewsAE Antoniniano 19 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "[IMP CLAVDIV]S CAES AVG", Busto radiado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha. Visto por detrás.
Rev: "[AE]QVITAS AVG", Aequitas (La Equidad) estante a izq., portando balanza en mano der. y cornucopia en izq.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión 1ra.Fase Final 268 D.C.
Ceca: Siscia (Off. 1ra.??)

Referencias: RIC Va #178var. (C) (Busto, leyenda y off.) P.226, RIC2 temp #566, DVM #3var. (Ley.) P.255, La Venera #9413, Alföldi 1964 #51553/5 p.16, Cunetio #2270
mdelvalle
RIC_193_Antoniniano_Claudio_II.jpg
94-15 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)9 viewsAE Antoniniano 18 mm 2.4 gr.

Anv: "IMP CLAVDIVS AVG", Busto radiado y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VBERITAS AVG", Uberitas estante a izq., portando bolsa/ubre en mano der. y cornucopia en izq..

Acuñada 4ta. Emisión inicio - Ago. 270 D.C.
Ceca: Siscia

Referencias: RIC Va #193 (C) P.227, RIC2 Temp #761, Cohen VI #286 P.158, Alföldi 4 /28, Sear RCTV III #11376 P.404, Hunter #72, La Venera #9813/54, Cunetio #2311, Normanby #1102
mdelvalle
RIC_145_Antoniniano_Claudio_II.jpg
94-17 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)7 viewsAE Antoniniano 19 x 17 mm 4.1 gr.

Anv: "[IMP CLA]VDIVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y vestido, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FELIC TEMPO" - Felicitas (La Felicidad) de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando un Caduceo en mano derecha y un largo cetro vertical en izquierda. "T" en exergo.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión Set. 268 - Inicios 269 D.C.
Ceca: Mediolanum (Off. 3ra.) - Milan Italia

Referencias: RIC Va #145 (C) P.223, Sear RCTV III #11330 P.400, Cohen VI #74 P.138, DVM #9 var (Ley.) P.255, Nor.#1012, Hunter #52
mdelvalle
Antoniniano Claudio Gótico RIC 261.jpg
94-20 - CLAUDIO GÓTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)80 viewsAE Minimus? (Pequeño módulo) 15 x 16 mm 1.2 gr.

Anv: "DIV[O CLAVDIO]" - Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[CONSEC]RATIO" - Altar llameante decorado con cuatro cajones y un punto en cada cajon.

IMITACIÓN ITALIANA, Después de la revuelta de Mont Caelius (Una de las 7 colinas de Roma, hoy Celio) de Roma en 271 D.C., los monetarios de la ciudad perdieron su estatus de monetarios oficiales, sin embargo continuaron acuñando moneda, indudablemente en Italia del norte, así pasaron a ser simples falsificadores.

Acuñada después de 271 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #259 Pag.233 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3228 - Cohen Vol.VI #50 Pag.135 - DVM #44/1 Pag.256 - Nor.#1829 - Göbl#99 mOa
1 commentsmdelvalle
Antoniniano Claudio Gótico RIC 266.jpg
94-21 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)69 viewsAE Minimus? (Pequeño módulo) 14 x 13 mm 2.2 gr.

Anv: "[DIVO CLAVDIO]" - Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[CONSE]CRATIO" - Aguila parada de frente con su cabeza hacia la derecha y sus alas extendidas.

IMITACIÓN ITALIANA, Después de la revuelta de Mont Caelius (Una de las 7 colinas de Roma, hoy Celio) de Roma en 271 D.C., los monetarios de la ciudad perdieron su estatus de monetarios oficiales, sin embargo continuaron acuñando moneda, indudablemente en Italia del norte, así pasaron a ser simples falsificadores.

Acuñada después de 271 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #266 Pag.234 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3227 -Cohen Vol.VI #41 Pag.134 - DVM #44/2 Pag.256 - Nor.#1115 - Göbl#98 mOa
mdelvalle
Antoniniano Claudio Gótico RIC 273.jpg
94-23 - CLAUDIO GÓTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)58 viewsAE Minimus? (Pequeño módulo) 14 mm 1.7 gr.

Anv: "[DIVO CLAVDIO]" - Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FIDES [MILITVM]" - Fides (La Fidelidad) de pié de frente, viendo a izquierda, portando un estandarte militar en mano derecha y una lanza en la izquierda.

IMITACIÓN ITALIANA, Después de la revuelta de Mont Caelius (Una de las 7 colinas de Roma, hoy Celio) de Roma en 271 D.C., los monetarios de la ciudad perdieron su estatus de monetarios oficiales, sin embargo continuaron acuñando moneda, indudablemente en Italia del norte, así pasaron a ser simples falsificadores.

Acuñada después de 271 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte I #273 Pag.235 - Cohen Vol.VI #94 Pag.139
mdelvalle
RIC_252_Antoniniano_Claudio_II.jpg
94-23 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)8 viewsAE Antoniniano 21 x 20 mm 4.4 gr.

Anv: "IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha. "··" debajo del busto.
Rev: "VICTORIAE GOTHIC" - Trofeo compuesto por una armadura (Cuerpo), un caso (Cabeza), dos escudos y dos lanzas cruzadas (Brazos). A sus piés un cautivo sentado a cada lado con sus brazos atados a la espalda. "SP[QR]" en exergo.
La acuñación refiere a la gran victoria sobre los Godos en los Balcanes en 269 D.C.

Acuñada 3ra. Emisión mediados 269 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (2do.Período Off.2da) - Balkiz Turquía

Referencias: RIC Va #252 (R) P.233, Cohen VI #308 P.160 (20 fr), Alföldi 4/31, DVM #37 P.255, Sear RCTV III #11381 P.404, Hunter #87
mdelvalle
RIC_Incierta_Minimus_Claudio_II_Fides.jpg
94-40 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)9 viewsANTIGUA FALSIFICACIÓN ó ACUÑACIÓN NO OFICIAL
AE Minimus? (Pequeño módulo) 14 mm 1.7 gr.

Anv: "[DI]VO CL[AVDIO]" - Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FIDES [MILITVM]" - Fides (La Fidelidad) de pié de frente, viendo a izquierda, portando un estandarte militar en mano derecha y una lanza en la izquierda.

IMITACIÓN ITALIANA, Después de la revuelta de Mont Caelius (Una de las 7 colinas de Roma, hoy Celio) de Roma en 271 D.C., los monetarios de la ciudad perdieron su estatus de monetarios oficiales, sin embargo continuaron acuñando moneda, en Italia del norte, así pasaron a ser simples falsificadores.
También se acuñaron en Las Galias e Hispania.

Acuñada después de 271 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: Sim. RIC Va #273 Pag.235 - Cohen Vol.VI #94 Pag.139 - Sear RCTV III Nota Pag.413
mdelvalle
RIC_Incierta_Minimus_Claudio_II_Aguila_1.jpg
94-45 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)9 viewsANTIGUA FALSIFICACIÓN ó ACUÑACIÓN NO OFICIAL
AE Minimus? (Pequeño módulo) 14 x 13 mm 2.2 gr.

Anv: "[DIVO CLAVDIO]", Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[CON]SEC[RATIO]", Aguila parada de frente con su cabeza hacia la derecha y sus alas extendidas

IMITACIÓN ITALIANA, Después de la revuelta de Mont Caelius (Una de las 7 colinas de Roma, hoy Celio) de Roma en 271 D.C., los monetarios de la ciudad perdieron su estatus de monetarios oficiales, sin embargo continuaron acuñando moneda, en Italia del norte, así pasaron a ser simples falsificadores.
También se acuñaron en forma irregular en Las Galias e Hispania.

Acuñada después de 271 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: Sim.RIC Va #266 P.234, Sim.Sear RCTV III #11459 P.412 y Nota P.413, Sim.Cohen VI #41 P.134, Sim.DVM #44/2 P.256
mdelvalle
RIC_Incierta_Minimus_Claudio_II_Aguila.jpg
94-46 - CLAUDIO GOTICO (268 - 270 D.C.)9 viewsANTIGUA FALSIFICACIÓN ó ACUÑACIÓN NO OFICIAL
AE Minimus? (Pequeño módulo) 14 x 13 mm 2.2 gr.

Anv: "[DIVO CLAVDIO]" - Cabeza radiada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[CONSE]CRATIO" - Aguila parada de frente con su cabeza hacia la derecha y sus alas extendidas.

IMITACIÓN ITALIANA, Después de la revuelta de Mont Caelius (Una de las 7 colinas de Roma, hoy Celio) de Roma en 271 D.C., los monetarios de la ciudad perdieron su estatus de monetarios oficiales, sin embargo continuaron acuñando moneda, en Italia del norte, así pasaron a ser simples falsificadores.
También se acuñaron en forma irregular en Las Galias e Hispania.

Acuñada después de 271 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: Sim.RIC Va #266 P.234, Sim.Sear RCTV III #11459 P.412 y Nota P.413, Sim.Cohen VI #41 P.134, Sim.DVM #44/2 P.256
mdelvalle
39713q00.jpg
AHG 562 . The Antioch Hoard of Gallienus . Claudius II Gothicus , September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.23 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.
Silvered antoninianus . 3.630g, 21.1mm, 0o, Antioch mint, 268 - 269 A.D
Obverse : IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind
Reverse : IVVENTVS AVG, Hercules standing slightly right, head left, nude, resting right on grounded club, lion skin in right, “D” in ex
RIC V 213, Cohen 137, SRCV III 11344 var, AHG 562 (this coin)
From the Antioch Hoard of Gallienus . Ex Forum
Vladislav D
25810_Claudius_II_antoninianus,_RIC_V_18,_VF,_Rome.jpg
ANNONA AVGG, RIC V 18 Rome21 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V 18, VF, Rome mint, 2.132g, 20.6mm, 180o, obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ANNONA AVG, Annona standing left, holding stalks of grain and cornucopia, right foot on prow; uneven strike, tough guy portrait. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Antoninien_de_Claudius_II_Gothicus,_268-270_AP__J-C!.jpg
Antoninien de Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 AP. J-C!36 views Antoninien de Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 AP. J-C! Rare, ref.: E9
21 mm, patine verte foncée, beau relief, billon, Etat: SUP Belle pièce.
Droit : IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG- tête couronée à droite;
Rev.: AEQUITAS AVG - Aequitas débout à gauche, tenant une balance et une cornucopie._1624

Antonio Protti
biz_023.JPG
Antoninien de Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 AP. J-C!28 viewsAntoninien de Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 AP. J-C! Rare, ref.: E9
21 mm, patine verte foncée, beau relief, billon, Etat: SUP Belle pièce.
Droit : IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG- tête couronée à droite;
Rev.: AEQUITAS AVG - Aequitas débout à gauche, tenant une balance et une cornucopie._1624

RIC 14 Claudius II Gothicus Silvered AE or Billon Antoninianus. Rome mint. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right / AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing left holding scales and cornucopiae. RIC 14, Cohen 6-7.
Antonivs Protti
rad_barb_clau_altar.jpg
BARBAROUS RADIATE18 views3rd Century AD
Barbarous imitative in the style of Claudius II Gothicus
AE 13 mm, 0.91 g
O: Radiate bust right
R: Altar
laney
Gothicus.jpg
Bronze coin of Caracalla9 viewsA nice sized bronze coin of Caracalla, minted in Nikopolis ad Istrum between 198-201 AD. 27.3 mm, 10.4 g.

Obverse: AU K M AUR ANTWNINOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind

Reverse: UPA OOU TERTULLOU NIKOPO POC ICT, Homonoia standing left, kalathos on head, sacrificing from patera in right over flaming altar at feet on left, cornucopia in right

Attribution: Nikopolis 2012 8.18.36.1 (R4), AMNG I/I 1527 var (no altar), Varbanov I 3103 var (same, R3), SNG Cop -
chuy1530
Caracallab.jpg
Bronze coin of Gothicus14 viewsA Roman bronze antoninianus of Claudius II Gothicus, minted in Rome between 268-270 AD. 20.3 mm, 2.8 g.

Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right

Reverse FIDES EXERCI, Fides standing left, vertical standard in right, transverse standard in left

Attribution: RIC V 36
chuy1530
Claudius II Gothicus- Fides Militum.jpg
Cladius II Gothicus- Fides Militum50 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.

Obverse:
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.

IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG

IMP: Imperator
Cladivs: Cladius
PF: Pius Felix, Pious and happy
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
FIDES MILI, Fidelity of the army

FIDES: Fidelity
MILIT: Army

Fides standing left holding two ensigns.

Domination: Bronze Antoninianus, AE 3, size 18mm

Mint: Mediolanum struck 238-270 A.D. RIC 149, common.
John Schou
1CONSECRATIO_unita.jpg
Claudio II il Gotico (Boyd collection) R/ CONSECRATIO58 viewsClaudio II il Gotico (Boyd collection)
Divus Claudius II Gothicus
AE Antoninianus. gr. 3,22, mm 16,5
D/ DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right
R/ CONSECRATIO, eagle standing facing with head right
RIC 266, Cohen 43.
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (28 dicembre 2009, numero archivio 6), ex W.C. Boyd collection (1842-1906), acquistata Boyd nel negozio Baldwin nel luglio 1890. Ex Baldwin's auction 42 2005, ex Lee Toone collection (Leeds, Uk) dal 2005 al 2009.
paolo
ex_Turner.jpg
Claudio II, radiato barbarico (minimus o conio Felicissimus). Ex William Turner Collection (1792-1867)32 viewsClaudius II Gothicus
Radiato imitativo (minimus), zecca non ufficiale (originale zecca di Roma), circa 270 d.C.
AE, 0,817 gr, 12,5 mm, 0°, F
D/ DIVO CLAVDIO, testa radiata a dx
R/ CONSECRATIO, altare fiammeggiante
cf SRCV III 11462 and RIC V 261 (ufficiale, zecca di Roma)
Provenienza: ex William Turner Collection, lotto 396 (questa moneta). Acquisita da Turner tra il 1812 e il 1817. Collezione lasciata in eredità nel 1867 al figlio Mansfield Turner, morto nel 1901. Poi rimasta in famiglia e dispersa dal pronipote di William Turner nel 1987. Ex Alex G Malloy collection, New York. Ex FAC, Morehead City, Usa. Acquisita nell'aprile 2012.
NOTA: peso e diametro sono compatibili con le coniazioni "barbariche minime", ma la qualità delle immagini e delle iscrizioni oltreché la provenienza mediorientale (la moneta è entrata nella collezione Turner tra il 1812 e il 1820 durante la sua permanenza nell'Impero Ottomano) inducono a considerare questo antoniniano come prodotto dalle zecche non ufficiali romane all'epoca di Felicissimus, regnante Aureliano.
paolo
Claudius.jpg
Claudius9 viewsClaudius II Gothicus (268-270 CE)
Radiate bust of Claudius II, right/Felicitas standing, left, holding caduceus and cornucopiae (obscured)
RIC 32, Cohen 79, Sear5 1131
AE Antoninianus
Belisarius
CLNVDIVS.JPG
Claudius (CLNVDIVS) II, R/ FIDES EXERCI, Normanby hoard. Barbarica?23 viewsClaudius Gothicus AE antoninianus. Rome, AD 268-270.
AE, 19,2 mm, 3,3 gr, BB
D/ IMP C CLNVDIVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
FIDES EXERCI, Fides standing left, holding one standard upright & the other transverse.
RIC V-I 36 (var) or RIC 34 (var)
Provenienza: ex Normanby hoard (1983), ex Wallace Katz collection (1995), ex Sotheby's, ex ArtAncient ltd (2012)
paolo
2Xsoa9xCZcA7D5wHqHL63tbFsS4nM8.jpg
Claudius 112 viewsClaudius 11 Gothicus, issued by Quintillus, circa 270 AD, Rome 19mm,2.69gm.Ancient Aussie
claud8.jpg
Claudius Gothicus108 viewsClaudius II --AE Antoninianus. R: Diana R, stag at feet. Cohen 67. 2 commentsfeatherz
Claudius II_5.jpg
Claudius Gothicus13 viewsAE Antoninianus
Obv: DIVO CLAVDIO
Rev: CONSECRATIO ; Altar
C.43
Tanit
Claudius II_2.jpg
Claudius Gothicus11 viewsAE Antoninianus
Obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Rev: NEPTVN AVG ; Neptune stg. l.
C.183
Tanit
Claudius II_3.jpg
Claudius Gothicus9 viewsAE Antoninianus
Obv: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG
Rev: VICTORIA GOTHIC ; trophy with two captives std. below
C.308
Tanit
Claudius II_4.jpg
Claudius Gothicus14 viewsAE Antoninianus
Obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Rev: FIDES EXERCI
Tanit
Claudius II.jpg
Claudius Gothicus9 viewsAntoninianus
Obv: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG
Rev: FIDES MILIT ; Fidesstg. l. holdind two standards
C.88
Tanit
Claudius_II_(2).jpg
Claudius Gothicus26 viewsreverse: pax standing L holding olive branch and transverse sceptorvacationchick
Claudius_II_(1).jpg
Claudius Gothicus37 viewsIMPCCLAVIDIVSAVG
reverse: FIDES EXERCI - Fides standing L, holding one standard upright and the other transverse
2 commentsvacationchick
Victorinus_REV.JPG
Claudius Gothicus Rev7 viewsClaudius II, Gothicus;268-270AD
Bronze; AE Antoninianus
OBV: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG; Draped Bust Right
REV: LAETITIA AVG; Laetitia standing left, holding wreath and anchor
(RIC 235)
Philip G
Claudius_Gothicus_(commemorative_struck_under_Constantine)_half-follis_(AE).png
Claudius Gothicus (commemorative struck under Constantine, reigned 268-270) half-follis (AE)13 viewsObv.: DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP (Veiled and laureate head of emperor) Rev.: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM (Emperor seated on curule chair, one arm raised, holding sceptre in other) Diameter: 15,92 mm Weight: 0,96 g Exergue: SIS RIC VII 43

The fact that Claudius Gothicus is commemorated on Constantinian coinage is rather interesting. According to the Historia Augusta, Claudius was the maternal great-uncle of Constantius Chlorus. This linked the Constantinian line with a well-loved emperor and may even be a case of genealogical fabrication.
Nick.vdw
213_Divus_Claudius_1273.jpg
Claudius Gothicus - AE antoninianus84 viewsMediolanum (Tarraco according Märkl)
c. end 270 - early 271 AD
Issue 1
radiate head right
DIVO CLAVDIO
altar with flames above, front divided into four sections with dot in each section
CONSECRATIO
T (3rd officina)
RIC V-1, 261, Göbl 23m3
http://www.ric.mom.fr/en/coin/1273
2,73g 19-18mm

only 5 other examples in www.ric.mom.fr !!!!!

Märkl states in his work "The Imperial Mints during the Reign of Claudius II. Gothicus and their Issues" that RIC attribute these coins wrongly to Milan (or Gallic mint) but they are in fact from Tarraco. No two mints in empire were allowed to strike same issue. Tarraco mint should have made "DIVO CLAVDIO GOTHICO" but this coin has only short (Siscian) legend: "DIVO CLAVDIO". Two known exemplars with short legend are mentioned by Märkl.
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
271_Claudius_II_unof_-_eagle.jpg
Claudius Gothicus - AE antoninianus12 viewsprobably unofficial
Rome
c. end 270 - 271 AD
Issue 1
radiate head right
DIVO CLAVDIO
eagle standing left, head right
CONSECRATIO
RIC V-1, 266 All mints; Normanby 1115
http://www.ric.mom.fr/en/coin/1278
2,46g
Johny SYSEL
gothicus.JPG
Claudius Gothicus AE Antoninianus35 viewsOBV: IMP CLAUDIUS AVG, Radiate head right.
REV: SECURIT AVG; Securitas, looking left, leaning on a column with legs crossed and holding a Baton. XI in Field.

Rome Mint. Not listed in RIC, Found in hoards (eg Cunettio 2228)and listed in Wildwinds as RIC V-1 101 Rome var.

A nice coin from a bad photo! The squared off letters III for M and II for V are typical of the Rome mint at this time. Later third century coins are often considered inferior to the grand style of the Ist and 2nd Century but they have a liveliness all their own, I think. This is a good example
daverino
gothicus~0.JPG
Claudius Gothicus AE Antoninianus, Rome mint246 viewsOBV: IMP CLAUDIUS AVG; Radiate head right
REV: SECURIT AVG; Securitas looking left, leaning on a column with legs crossed, baton in hand/ XI in field
Not listed in RIC , found in hoards (eg Cunettio 2228) and listed in Wildwinds as RIC V -I 101 Rome var.

The products of the Rome mint at this time have nearly vertical letter shapes eg 'M' is IIII, 'V' is almost II and 'A' appears like I-I or H
daverino
Claudius II~0.jpg
Claudius Gothicus Antoninianus17 viewsDivus Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus. Milan mint, ca 270 AD. DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right / CONSECRATIO, large flaming altar.

RIC 261, Cohen 50.
Tanit
059.jpg
Claudius Gothicus Antoninianus66 viewsRIC Vb 225 Antioch 268 A.D.
3.42 g, 20 mm x 21 mm
IMP C CLAVDIVS PF AVG, radiate head left
VIRTVS AVG, Minerva standing right, holding spear, resting hand on shield.
Fully Silvered
1 commentsMark Z2
moneta_575.jpg
Claudius Gothicus Antoninianus: Rome or Antioch? 204 viewsCurtis Clay posted on the discussion board: A. Markl, Mints and Issues of Claudius Gothicus (in German), Num. Zeitschrift 16, 1884, notes that Antioch and Rome share the same officina marks and some of the same rev. types, but the marked coins are easily separated, since Antioch always has obv. leg. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG and officina letter IN EXERGUE, whereas Rome-mint coins with letters in exergue only began in Issue 3 with shortened obv. leg. IMP CLAVDIVS AVG.

Moreover Rome and only Rome usually writes IIIIIP for IMP in obv. leg. (your coin has more IVI for the M, which Markl says also occurs at Antioch).

Finally Antioch coins "are usually on nicely rounded flans and are struck in better billon than the antoniniani of other mints, and are also found more often with an intact silver coating."

Markl, a retired army officer, was a specialist collector of Claudius and the first man to clearly distinguish the different mints of the antoniniani and to put the production of each mint in approximate chronological order.
Joe Sermarini
Claudius_Gothicus_Libertas.jpg
Claudius Gothicus Libertas 6036 viewsClaudius II Gothicus
AD 268-270
Billon Antoninianus
Rome Mint
RIC V-1, 60 Rome

O:IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate draped bust right

R: LIBERT AVG, Libertas standing left, holding pileus and scepter
1 commentsGao
Victorinus_OBV.JPG
Claudius Gothicus Obv7 viewsClaudius II, Gothicus;268-270AD
Bronze; AE Antoninianus
OBV: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG; Draped Bust Right
REV: LAETITIA AVG; Laetitia standing left, holding wreath and anchor
(RIC 235)
Philip G
Claudius Gothicus RIC 171.JPG
Claudius Gothicus RIC 17126 viewsAE Antoninianus, Mediolanum mint, 268-270 AD
Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG, Radiate , draped bust right
Reverse: VICTORIA AVG, Victory running right with wreath and palm. S in exergue.
RIC 171; Cohen 302
20mm , 4.6gms
Jerome Holderman
0470-310np_noir.jpg
Claudius Gothicus, Antoninianus 19 viewsIMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate and draped bust right
MARS VLTOR, Mars advancing right, holding spear and standard
3.49 gr
Ref : Cohen #160
Potator II
0470-320np_noir.jpg
Claudius Gothicus, Antoninianus - *83 viewsMediolanum mint, 1st officina, AD 268-270
IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
PROVID AVG, Providentia standing left, holding globe and cornucopiae. P at exergue
5.30 gr 18-21 mm
Ref : RIC V, Part 1, 163, RCV # 11361
Ex. Pscipio
2 commentsPotator II
Claudius Gothicus-Alexandria-Nike left.JPG
Claudius Gothicus-Alexandria-Nike left15 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, Potin Tetradrachm, 268-270 AD
Obverse: AV K KLAVDIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: Nike advancing left with wreath and palm, LB in field
Milne, 4238
20mm, 9.7gm
Jerome Holderman
Claudius Gothicus-Alexandria-Nike Right.JPG
Claudius Gothicus-Alexandria-Nike Right12 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, Potin Tetradrachm, 268-270 AD
Obverse: AV K KLAVDIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: Nike advancing right with wreath and palm, LB in field
Milne, 4235
21mm, 9.9gm
Jerome Holderman
Claudius Gothicus-Alexandria-Nike with shield.JPG
Claudius Gothicus-Alexandria-Nike with shield22 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, Potin Tetradrachm, 268-270 AD
Obverse:AVT K KLAVDIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: Nike facing right , inscribing LA on shield resting on an altar
Emmett, 3891
20mm, 9.5gm
Jerome Holderman
coin459.JPG
Claudius II9 viewsClaudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right / SPES PVBLICA, Spes walking left, holding flower & raising robe. RIC 102, Cohen 281.ecoli
z4~0.JPG
Claudius II11 viewsDivus Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus. DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right / CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right or left. RIC 266, Cohen 43.ecoli
coin256.JPG
Claudius II16 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, A.D. 268-270 AE Antoninianus Aequitas
OBVERSE: Radiate and cuirassed bust right; IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
REVERSE: Aequitas standing front holding scales and cornucopia AEQVITAS AVG
19 mm - 2.7 grams
ecoli
11.PNG
Claudius II3 viewsClaudius II Gothicus Antoninianus Roman Emperor: 268-270 AD. AE3 20mm (Thickness 1.1mm), weight ?g.

Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right

Reverse: FIDES MILIT, Fides standing left holding two Legionary ensigns
discwizard
Claudius_II_ant~0.JPG
Claudius II 'Gothicus' / Fortuna 71 views268-270 AD
AE Antoninianus (19mm, 2.21g)
O: Radiate and draped bust right; IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG.
R: Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia; FORTVNA RED.
RIC 40 / Sear 3203v
ex Jack H. Beymer
Enodia
0470-330.jpg
Claudius II "Gothicus", Antoninianus 55 viewsCyzicus mint, AD 269.
IMP CLAVDIUS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
VICTORIAE GOTHIC, Two captives leaning besides a trophy.
3.08 gr
Ref : RCV # 11381; RIC V pt. 1 # 252; Cohen # 308
This antoninianus comemorates Claudius II' victory against Goths at Naissus, thus becoming "Gothicus"
Potator II
5____1__Claudius_II_Gothicus_Ric_5-36.jpg
Claudius II ("Gothicus") 268-270 AD9 viewsRef: RIC V,1- 36
Denom: AE antoninianus; Mint: Rome
OBV: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
REV: FIDES EXERCI, Fides standing left, head right,
holding vertical standard in right and transverse standard in left
Size: 20mm
cleaned
brian l
O6_1_copy.jpg
Claudius II ("Gothicus") 268-270 AD10 viewsRef: RIC V,1-169
Denom: AE antoninianus; Mint: Milan
OBV: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG- Radiate, bust left
REV: SPES PVBLICA-Spes walking left,
holding flowers and hitching robe
Size: 21.5 mm
cleaned
brian l
1481.jpg
CLAUDIUS II (Gothicus)48 viewsAE antoninianus. Rome,268-269 AD. 2nd emission. 3,27 grs. Radiate,draped,and cuirassed bust right. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG. / Annona standing left,right foot on prow,holding grain ears and cornucopiae. ANNONA AVG.
RIC V (i) :18. Cunetio 1964, Normanby 638.
2 commentsbenito
00claudII.jpg
CLAUDIUS II (Gothicus) 83 viewsAE antoninianus. Rome 268-269 AD. 3,27 grs. Radiate,draped,and cuirassed bust right. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG. / Annona standing left,right foot on prow,holding grain ears and cornucopiae. ANNONA AVG.
RIC 18. C 21.
2 commentsbenito
Claudius_Gothicus.jpg
Claudius II (Gothicus)18 viewsObverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right
Reverse: SPES PVBLICA, Spes walking left, holding flower and raising robe
Size: 23mm Weight: 2.78 grams
Id: RIC 102, Cohen 281, cf Sear 11374
Mint: Rome, 268-269AD
ickster
Claudius.jpg
Claudius II (Gothicus)13 views268 - 270 CE

Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Radiate, draped bust right.

Reverse: SALVS AVG
Pericles J2
spes1.JPG
Claudius II (Gothicus) AE Antoninianus 268-270 AD41 viewsOBV: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate Cuirassed Bust Right
REV: SPES PVBLICA; Spes standing left, holding a flower with one hand and raising her robe with the other.

RIC 102 (Ref. W'winds) Rome mint. Nice obverse portrait on a rough flan - typical for the times.
daverino
Claudius_II_1_opt.jpg
CLAUDIUS II (Gothicus) AE Half Follis, Emperor Seated16 viewsOBV: DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP, veiled and laureate head right
REV: REQVIES OPTIMOR-VM MERITORVM, emperor seated in curule chair left with raised and sceptre, SIS in ex.
1.3g, 14mm

Minted at Siscia, 317-8 AD
Legatus
Claudius_II_opt.jpg
CLAUDIUS II (Gothicus) Antoninianus RIC 168, Spes25 viewsOBV: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped bust right
REV: SPES PVBLICA, Spes walking left, holding flower and raising robe, P in ex.
2.8g, 19.9mm

Minted at Mediolanum, 268-9 AD
Legatus
Claudius_II_4_opt.jpg
CLAUDIUS II (Gothicus) Antoninianus RIC 191, Spes22 viewsOBV: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate draped bust right
REV: SPES AVG, Spes walking left holding flower and raising hem of robe
4.0g, 19mm

Minted at Siscia, 268-69 AD
Legatus
Claudius_II_5.jpg
CLAUDIUS II (Gothicus) Antoninianus RIC 193, Uberitas7 viewsOBVERSE: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate cuirassed bust right
REVERSE: VBERITAS AVG, Uberitas standing left holding cornucopiae and purse
Struck at Siscia, 268-69 AD
3.1g, 20mm
RIC 193"
Legatus
Claudius_II_7_opt.jpg
CLAUDIUS II (Gothicus) Antoninianus RIC 266, Eagle27 viewsOBV: DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right
REV: CONSECRATIO, eagle standing facing with head right or left.


Minted at Rome, 270 AD
Legatus
Claudius II 5.jpg
Claudius II (Gothicus) RIC 13f16 viewsObv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Bust: Radiate & cuirassed bust right
Rev: ADVENTVS AVG
Claudius on horseback left, holding scepter and raising hand in salute.
Date: 268-270 AD
Denom: Antoninianus
Bluefish
Claudius II 133.jpg
Claudius II (Gothicus), RIC 157, Rome24 viewsObv: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG
Bust: Radiate and draped bust right
Rev: PAX AVG
PAX advancing left holding olive branch and scepter.
Exe: T
Date: 268-270 AD
Denom: Antoninianus
1 commentsBluefish
Claudius II 178.jpg
Claudius II (Gothicus), RIC 157, Unkn.26 viewsObv: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG
Bust: Radiate head right
Rev: PAX AVG
PAX advancing left holding branch and scepter.
Exe: T
Date: 268-270 AD
Denom: Antoninianus
Bluefish
Claudius II 145.jpg
Claudius II (Gothicus), RIC 56, Unknown15 viewsObv: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG
Bust: Radiate & cuirassed bust right
Rev: LAETITIA AVG
Laetitia, (personification of joy and good grace), standing left with wreath and cornucopia.
Exe: None
Date: 268-270 AD
Denom: Antoninianus
Bluefish
Claudius II 68.jpg
Claudius II (Gothicus), RIC 91a, Rome22 viewsObv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Bust: Radiate and draped bust right
Rev: PROVIDENT AVG
Providentia standing left leaning on column, holding wand over globe and cornucopia.
Exe: None
Date: 268-270 AD
Denom: Antoninianus
Bluefish
Claudius II 91.jpg
Claudius II (Gothicus), RIC VII 43, Siscia27 viewsObv: DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP
Bust: Veiled, laureate head right
Rev: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM
Emperor seated left, raising hand and holding scepter.
Exe: SIS
Date: 317-318 AD
Denom: As
1 commentsBluefish
X 15 D.jpg
Claudius II AE Antoninianus26 viewsAE Antoninianus. Claudius II Gothicus posthumous .
Obv.: DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right ;
Rev.: CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right or left.
Tanit
Claucius II AEQVITAS AVG RIC 197.jpg
Claudius II AEQVITAS AVG RIC V/1 197111 viewsAnt, 20mm, 3.02g.

Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate head R.

Reverse: AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing L with scales and cornucopia.

Antioch mint.

RIC V/1 197, Common.
2 commentsRobert_Brenchley
R-03.jpg
Claudius II “Gothicus” 268-270 CE, Cyzicus mint, Æ 20mm 3 gr., Antoninianus.16 viewsClaudius II “Gothicus” 268-270 CE, Cyzicus mint, Æ 20mm 3 gr., Antoninianus.

Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right

Reverse: FORTUNA REDUX, Fortuna standing left with rudder & cornucopia.

Reference: RIC 234, Sear 3203, Cohen 204
Daniel Friedman
claudius_II_Gothicus.jpg
claudius II Gothicus129 viewsObverse - IMPCCLAVDIVSAVG
Reverse - PROVID ENTAVG
19mm
b70
018.JPG
Claudius II Gothicus27 viewsRoman Provincial Egypt
268-270 A.D.
Potin-Billon tetradrachm, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
9.63 gm, 21.5 mm
Obv.: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB
Rev.: Eagle standing right, looking back, holding wreath in beak,
date A/L (year 1) right field
Alexandria mint, 268-269 A.D.
Geissen 3015, Curtis 1670, BMC 2331
Jaimelai
claudius.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus16 views268-270 A.D.
Silvered antoninianus, 2.40 gm, 22 mm
Radiate and draped bust right, two dots under bust
(Cyzicus second officina)
Obv.: IMP C M AVR CLAVDIVS AVG
Rev.: FORTVNA AVG
Fortuna standing left by altar,
with rudder in right hand and cornucopia in left
[SPQR] in exergue
RIC V-1, 231 var Cyzicus; NZ 16, p. 439
Jaimelai
Claudius_II_Gothicus_Posthumous~0.JPG
Claudius II Gothicus25 viewsDivo Claaudius II Gothicus, AE half follis, Struck by Constantine I, 1.63g,
OBV: DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP, veiled head of Claudius II right
REV: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM, SIS in Exergue, emperor veiled, seated left in curule chair, right hand raised, short sceptor in left
Struck by Constantine in honor of his ancestor, Claudius II.
"I honor my Grandfather, Claudius Gothicus," emperor from AD 268-270
RIC VII, Siscia 43

RARE (R3)
Romanorvm
Claudius_II_Gothicus_Virtus_Bust.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus56 viewsCut out from a picture of my coin using a photoshop type program. 1 commentsRomanorvm
00501q00.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus5 viewsAE-Antoninianus
IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust to left.
PROVIDENT AVG; Providentia stg. l., holding baton in r. hand and cornucopia in l. hand, leaning on column; globe at feet.
Ex: -
Rome
RIC 91 var.; RIC temp #286
Julianus of Pannonia
Claud_FAC.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus10 viewsAE-Antoninianus
VIRTVS CLAVDI AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding Horse on reins and globe.
VIRTVTI AVGVSTI; Hercules standing right, leaning on club and holding lion skin; M / C in fields.
Ex: -
Cyzicus
RIC temp #903
Julianus of Pannonia
00500q00.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus6 viewsAE-Antoninianus
IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust to right.
ORIENS AVG; Sol stg. holding globe and raising right hand.
Ex: P
Mediolanum
RIC 153
Julianus of Pannonia
00397q00.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus6 viewsAE-Antoninanus
IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate, heroically nude bust left, holding spear and aegis, seen from back.
PROVIDENT AVG; Providentia leaning left on column, holding cornucopia, pointing with staf on globe at her feet.
Ex: -
Rome
RIC temp #126
Julianus of Pannonia
00391q00.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus8 viewsAE-Antoninianus
IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG; Radiate anc cuirassed bust l. Holding spear over right shoulder.
PAX EXERC; Pax stg. l., holding olive branch and long transverse sceptre.
Ex: T
Milan
RIC 159 var.; RIC temp #18
Julianus of Pannonia
claudius.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus14 viewsAE Antoninianus, 20mm, 3.47g, 12h; Rome mint: 269-70
Obv.: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG; radiate and cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: GENIO EXERCI; Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae.
Reference: RIC 5a 48 (p. 215)
John Anthony
00398q00.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus8 viewsAE-Antoninianus
IMP C CLAVDIVS PF AVG; Radiate bust in imperial mantle to left, holding scepter and globe.
FIDES MILIT; Fides stg. holding two ensigns.
Ex: S
Mediolanum
RIC 149; RIC temp #44
Julianus of Pannonia
00395q00.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus8 viewsAE-Antoninianus
IMP CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust l., holding spear and shield, decorated with head of medusa.
VIRTVS AVG; Virtus stg. Left holding spear and resting on shield.
Ex: -
Siscia
RIC temp#704
Julianus of Pannonia
015HClaudiusGothicus.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus4 viewsBillon Antoninianus
Roman Imperial - The Crisis of the Third Century

Claudius II Gothicus

11th officina, Rome mint, Issue 1, c. Sep 268 – end 269
About Fine, tight flan
18.7 mm / 3.533 g / 180°

Obverse: "IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG", radiate head right.
Reverse: "FIDES EXERCI", Fides standing left, head left, holding vertical standard in right hand, transverse standard in left hand.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins 2015 (76518)

MER-RIC 281, Normanby Hoard 687, RIC V 36 var. (cuirassed), Cunetio 2006 var. (same), Hunter IV 26 var. (draped and cuirassed), SRCV III 11334
Scarce with this bust

MyID: 015H

Image Credit: Forvm Ancient Coins
TenthGen
00393q00.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus11 viewsAE-Antoninianus
IMP C M AVR CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust to left, holding spear and shield; shield decorated with head of gorgon.
VICTORIAE GOTHIC; Trophy between two captives.
Ex: SPQR
Cyzicus
RIC temp #916 (1ex.)
Julianus of Pannonia
00396q00.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus8 viewsAntoninianus
IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG; Radiate and cuirassed bust left; right hand raised.
VICTORIA AVG; Victoria walking left holding wreath and palm.
Ex: S
Mediolanum
RIC temp #15
Julianus of Pannonia
00392q00.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus21 viewsAE-Antoninianus
IMP C M AVR CLAVDIVS AVG; Heroically, radiate bust to left, seen from behind, holding spear and shield.
PAX AETERNA; Pax stg. facing left, holding transverse scepter and branch.
Ex: SPQR
Cyzicus
RIC 237var; RIC temp #936
Julianus of Pannonia
RIC_Claudius_II_Gothicus_RICV-1_261.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus (Marcus Aurelius Claudius) (268-270 A.D.)8 viewsRIC V-1 261, Sear 11462, Van Meter 44/1

BI Antoninianus, 2.50 g., 16.58 mm. max., 0°

Milan mint, struck posthumously in 270 A.D. under Quintillus and/or Aurelian

Obv: DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right.

Rev: CO[NSECR]ATIO, altar with flames above, front divided into four sections with dot in each section

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB2.
Stkp
Claudius_II~0.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus 268 - 270 A.D.9 viewsEGYPT. Alexandria. Claudius II Gothicus (268-270). BI Tetradrachm. 23 - 25.5mm. 7.42g. Dated L-Γ, Year 3 = 270 A.D. Obv: AYT K KΛAYΔIOC CEB. Obv: Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Rev: L-Γ. Eagle standing right, head left, holding wreath in beak. Emmett 3878. Curtis 1687, BMC 2336.ddwau
Claudius II Gothicus  4 D.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus23 viewsAE Antoninianus. Claudius II Gothicus posthumous .
Obv.: DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right ;
Rev.: CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right or left.
Tanit
claudius-spes-reshoot.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus, 268-270 AD17 viewsRoman Imperial, Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus, (268-270 AD), 4.1g, 19mm

Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG. Radiate, cuirassed, draped bust right.

Reverse: SPES AVG. Spes walking left, holding flower and raising hem of robe.

Reference: RIC 191

Ex: Bing
Gil-galad
claudius-ii-left-reshoot.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus, 268-270 AD, Antioch22 viewsRoman Imperial, Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus, (268-270 AD), Antioch mint, 3.8g, 20mm

Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate head left.

Reverse: AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing left holding scales and cornucopia.

Reference: RIC V-1 197

Ex: ECIN
Gil-galad
goth.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus.26 viewsIMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate draped bust right

GENIVS EXERCI, Genius standing left with patera & cornucopaie.

RIC 48, Cohen 114 Rome.
2 commentsGaiusCaligula
Claudius_II_Black_sml.png
Claudius II Gothicus Antoninianus27 viewsClaudius II Gothicus. 268–270 AD.

Rome. AD 268-AD 270.

21mm., 2.77g.

IMP CLAVDIVS AVG. Bust of Claudius Gothicus, radiate, draped, right or head of Claudius Gothicus, radiate, right.

PAX AVGVSTI. Pax, draped, standing left, holding olive-branch in right hand and sceptre in left hand. Mintmark unread, either A/-//- or H/-//-

References: RIC V Claudius Gothicus 81

AAIT
1 commentsRL
AAGHb_small.png
Claudius II Gothicus Antoninianus9 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, 268–270 AD.

Antioch. 268-270 AD.

IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG. Bust of Claudius Gothicus, radiate, draped, right or head of Claudius Gothicus, radiate, right or head of Claudius Gothicus, radiate, left.

Legend: AEQVITAS AVG. Aequitas, draped, standing left, holding scales in right hand and cornucopiae in left hand. Mintmark H

References: RIC V Claudius Gothicus 197

AAGH
RL
AAFIb_small.png
Claudius II Gothicus Antoninianus7 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, 268–270 AD.

Rome. 268-270 AD.

20mm., 1.63g.

IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG. Bust of Claudius Gothicus, radiate, draped, right.

MARS VLTOR. Mars, helmeted, in military attire, standing left, holding parazonium in right hand and spear in left hand. H in left field.

References: RIC V Claudius Gothicus 68

AAFI
RL
Claudius_II.png
Claudius II Gothicus Antoninianus21 viewsClaudius II Gothicus Antoninianus

Obverse:
DIVO CLAVDIO
Radiate head right

Reverse:
CONSECRATIO
Altar, lit. 'T' in exergue
2 commentsHarry G
normal_claudius[1].jpg
Claudius II Gothicus Antoninianus 268-270 C.E.17 viewsObverse - IMP CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate bust right, cuirassed
Reverse - AEQVITAS AVG, Equity standing left, holding scales and cornucopia
Rome mint. 19 mm dia. RIC VI, 15f page212 Cohen 10
sold 2-2018
NORMAN K
AE 19 D.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus As27 viewsAE Antoninianus
Obv.: DIVO CLAVDIO GOTHICO ; Rev.: CONSECRATO ; altar.
Tanit
Claudius II Gothicus DIVO CLAVDIO.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus DIVO CLAVDIO52 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 AD

Obverse:
Radiate head right

DIVO CLAVDIO

DIVO, god

CLAVDIO, Cladius

Dot in right field

Reverse:
CONSECRATIO

Showing: eagle standing left, head right

Domination: Antoninianus, Copper, size 17 mm

Mint: ???

The Helvetica tables list this as RIC V (1) 266 this also according to The helvetica is the same reference number for all mints..
It lists 2 dots below on the obverse , but my coin shows the dots to the right if I see them correctly
I'm still not sure on the mint it's either Lyons, Rome or Aquileia .

Comment: Consecratio. In the first and second centuries when a popular emperor or their family member dies, they were consecrated as gods. Their successors built a personality cult around the dead emperor, serving as chief priest, and often dedicating temples to the dead. In the third century this custom faded out as the Cristian era evolved. Some common types of these depict a cult item or temple of the deified emperor. Some include: a cart drawing the cult image of the deified emperor, an emperor throne, a funeral pyre, an eagle, altar or peacock
John S
Claudius_II_Gothicus_Eagle.JPG
Claudius II Gothicus Eagle18 viewsClaudius II issued after his death by Quintillus and later emperors.
Postumous issue for the deified Claudius II Gothicus with legend DIVO CLAVDIO and eagle on reverse, legend CONSECRATIO. 16 - 18mm, 1.5g, RCV 3227 (1988 ed.), RIC vi 266, Cohen 43
Romanorvm
Claudius_II_Gothicus_Eagle_Alexandria_Tetradrachm~0.JPG
Claudius II Gothicus Eagle Alexandria Tetradrachm25 viewsEGYPT. Alexandria. Claudius II Gothicus. 268-270 AD. Billon Tetradrachm (21mm - 10.2g). Dated year 1 (268/9 AD). Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
Eagle standing right, head turned left, holding wreath in beak. Köln 3015; Dattari 5414; Milne 4225; Emmett 3878.
Romanorvm
Gothicus_Egypt.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus Egypt Bronze Tetradrachm100 viewsFirst ancient coin in my collection.1 commentsPtolemAE
combined~2.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus GENIVS AVG31 viewsObv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev: GENIVS AVG, Genius standing left by altar, holding
patera and cornucopiae.


Flamur H
Claudius_II_Gothicus_Jupitor_RIC_52.JPG
Claudius II Gothicus Jupitor RIC 5221 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, Antoninianus, Rome, 268 - 270 AD, 20, 2.9g, RIC 52, RSC 124
OBV: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
REV: IOVI STATORI, Jupiter standing left, head right, holding sceptre and thunderbolt
Romanorvm
Claudius_II_Gothicus_Nilus_and_Euthenia.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus Nilus and Euthenia22 viewsClaudius II Gothicus Billon tetradrachm, 269 - 270 AD, Alexandria Egypt, 21.5mm, 8.237g
OBV: ΑΥΤ Κ ΚΛΑΥ∆ΙΟC CΕΒ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right;
REV: jugate busts of bearded Nilus, crowned with lotus, cornucopia across shoulder and Euthenia, crowned with grain, wearing chiton, LB (year 2) in right field;
RCV III 11413, BMC Alexandria 2328, Curtis 1717, Milne 4244, Very Fine
Ex Forvm Ancient Coins

RARE
Romanorvm
claudiusII_193~0.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus RIC V, 19384 viewsClaudius II Gothicus 268 - 270
AR - Antoninian, 2.78g, 19mm
Siscia 1. officina
obv. IMP CLAVDIVS AVG
cuirassed bust, radiate head r.
rev. VBER[IT]AS AVG
Uberitas standing l., holding cornucopiae and purse
RIC V, 193; C.286
good F, portrait!
added to www.wildwinds.com
2 commentsJochen
claudiusII_201.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus RIC V, 20135 viewsClaudius II. Gothicus, AD 268-270
AE - Antoninianus, 2.91g, 22.42mm, 0°
Antiochia
obv. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. CONS - E - R AVG
Serapis in himation, wearing modius, stg. facing, head l., holding in l. arm long sceptre and raising r.
hand in greeting attitude
in ex. gamma
ref. RIC V/1, 201; C.58
S!, about VF
1 commentsJochen
Claudius_II_Gothicus_Salus_Aug.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus Salus Aug20 viewsCLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS, 268-270 AD. Antoninianus, 19mm, 3.2g, 268-269 AD, RIC V (vol. I), pg 229, #217
OBV: IMP C CLAUDIUS AVG, Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
REV: SALV-S AVG, Isis Faria standing left, holding sistrum and basket

Scarcer left facing bust
Romanorvm
IMG_4752.JPG
Claudius II Gothicus Silvered Antoninianus. September 268 – January 270. AE20MM11 viewsClaudius II Gothicus Silvered Antoninianus.Obv. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right.
Rev. AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing left holding scales and cornucopiae.
Ex. Forvm ancient coins.
Lee S
Claudius_II_Gothicus_Victoria.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus Victoria22 viewsClaudius II, Antoninianus, Mediolanum Mint (Milan), 268 - 270 AD, 18mm, 4.62g, Normanby hoard 1008 (RIC V-1, 171 Milan var - bust type) Cohen 302
OBV: IMPCLAVDIVSPFAVG - Radiate, draped bust from the rear
REV: VICTORIA AVG Exe: S - Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm branch, S in exergue
Romanorvm
Claudius_II_Gothicus_Virtus~0.JPG
Claudius II Gothicus Virtus44 viewsClaudius II Gothicus Silvered AE Antoninianus, 268 - 270 AD, Rome, 20mm, 2.2g, RIC 111
OBV: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
REV: VIRTVS AVG. Virtvs standing left, holding branch and spear, shield at feet.
Romanorvm
claudius_k.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, 268-2706 viewsBillon Antoninianus, 19mm, 3.6g, 12h; Rome mint, AD 268-9.
Obv.: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG; radiate bust right.
Rev.: GENIVS AVG; Genius standing left, by altar, holding patera and cornucopia, Γ in right field.
Reference: RIC Va 45, p. 215
John Anthony
claudius_k~0.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 AD 4 viewsÆ antoninianus, 20mm, 3.6g, 6h; Milan mint.
Obv.: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: DIANA LVCIF, Diana standing right, holding torch with both hands // P
Reference: RIC Va 144, p. 222
John Anthony
claud264.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 CE.18 viewsBronze Antoninianus, RIC 264 Milan
Obverse: DIVO CLAUVDIO, radiate head right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO, flaming altar with four sections with a dot in each one. mintmark T, Milan mint. 17.6mm., 2.6 g.
NORMAN K
claudius_spes_k.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, AD 268-1705 viewsÆ Antoninianus, 18mm, 3.8g, 12h; Mediolanum mint,
Obv.: CLAVDIVS PF AVG; Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: SPES PVBLICA; Spes standing left, holding flower and raising skirt // P
Reference: RIC Va 168, p. 224
John Anthony
gothicus_liber_k.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, AD 268-2705 viewsÆ Antoninianus, 21mm, 2.8g, 6h; Rome Mint.
Obv.: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Claudius right.
Rev.: LIBERALITAS AVG, Liberalitas standing left holding abacus and cornucopia.
Reference: RIC Va 57, p. 215
From the YOC Collection / 16-418-35
John Anthony
gothicus_oriens_k.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, AD 268-2705 viewsBillon antoninianus, 20mm, 3.0g, 6h; Milan mint, AD 268-270.
Obv.: IMP C CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: ORIENS AVG, Sol standing left, holding globe and raising right hand, in exergue P
Reference: RIC Va, 153, p. 223
From the YOC Collection
John Anthony
claud_iovi_k.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, AD 268-2709 viewsÆ Antoninianus, 17mm, 3.3g, 12h; Rome mint.
Obv.: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate and draped bust right.
Rev.: IOVI VICTORI; Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
Reference: RIC Va 54, p. 215
From the YOC Collection
John Anthony
ClaudGothVirtus.JPG
Claudius II Gothicus, AE Antoninianus33 viewsIMP CLAVDIVS AVG
Bust radiate, right
VIRTVS AVG
Mars standing left, holding branch and spear, shield at his feet
E in right field
RIC 110, Rome
whitetd49
ClaudGothLiber.JPG
Claudius II Gothicus, AE Antoninianus17 viewsIMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Bust radiate, cuirassed, right
LIBERALITAS AVG
Liberalitas standing left, holding counting board and cornucopeia
RIC 57F, C 144, Rome
whitetd49
1a.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Antiochia mint, R/NEPTVN AVG (Braithwell hoard)105 viewsClaudio il Gotico (268-270 d.C.), zecca di Antiochia, ex Braithwell hoard
AE, 2.53 gr.,19 mm, BB (VF)
D/ IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, busto radiato a dx
R/ NEPTVN AVG, Nettuno stante a sx. con delfino e tridente, B in ex
RIC 214; Cohen 183, Braithwell Report #128 (questa moneta)
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (3 novembre 2008, numero catalogo 23), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2007), ex CNG auction 176 (London, 2007), ex Braithwell hoard (Braithwell, South Yorkshire Uk, 2002).
paolo
4655_4656.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Antoninianus, ANNONA AVG10 viewsAE Antoninianus
Claudius II Gothicus
Augustus: 268 - 270AD
Issued: 268 - 270AD
20.0mm
O: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate, cuirassed bust, right.
R: ANNONA AVG; Annona standing left, stepping on galley prow, holding grain and cornucopia.
Exergue: Δ, right field.
Rome Mint
Aorta: 218: B20, O11, R7, T5, M6.
RIC V-1, 19, radiate, cuirassed, Δ.
paydav 271776985665
2/22/15 3/6/17
Nicholas Z
4649_4650.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Antoninianus, CONSACRATIO7 viewsAE Antoninianus
Claudius II Gothicus
Augustus: 268 - 270AD
Issued Posthumously: 270AD
18.5 x 12.5mm
O: DIVO CLAVDIO; Radiate head, right.
R: CONSACRATIO; Lighted altar with four panels, dot in each panel.
Exergue: Obverse, (dot)(dot).
Cyzicus Mint
LaVenera Vol. 1 10924; Goebl 288a1.
Aorta: 498: B14, O17, R135, T4, M3.
aitorazpeitia 321138576406
6/12/13 3/6/17
Nicholas Z
4647_4648.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Antoninianus, CONSECRATIO7 viewsAE Antoninianus
Claudius II Gothicus
Augustus: 268 - 270AD
Issued Posthumously: 270AD
15.8mm 3.08gr
O: DIVO CLAVDIO; Radiate head, right.
R: CONSECRATIO; Eagle standing left, head right.
Rome Mint
RIC 266; Cohen 43; Sear 11459.
Aorta: 505: B14, O17, R138, T29, M6.
davis-ancients 271220341622
6/16/13 3/6/17
Nicholas Z
claudio_2.JPG
Claudius II Gothicus, Antoninianus, Pax Aeterna2 viewsClaudius II Gothicus (268-270).

Antoninianus. Cyzicus.

Obv: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: PAX AETERNA / SPQR. Pax standing left, holding branch and sceptre.
RIC online 961

Weight: 3.5 g.
Diameter: 22 mm.
Jose Polanco
4651_4652.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Antoninianus, PAX AVG5 viewsAE Antoninianus
Claudius II Gothicus
Augustus: 268 - 270AD
Issued: 270AD
21.0 x 18.0mm
O: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate, cuirassed bust, right.
R: PAX AVG; Pax standing left, holding branch and scepter.
Siscia Mint
RIC V-1, 186, no field mark.
Aorta: 235: B20, O11, R83, T85, M7.
Holding History
3/6/17
Nicholas Z
4657_4658.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Antoninianus, SPES PVBLICA6 viewsAR Antoninianus
Claudius II Gothicus
Augustus: 268 - 270AD
Issued: 268 - 270AD
23.0 x 20.0mm
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust, right.
R: SPES PVBLICA; Spes holding flower, advancing left, raising skirt.
Rome Mint
Aorta: 269: B23, O4, R112, T109, M6.
RIC 102; Cohen 281; cf Sear 11374.
Josh Moran/CIVITAS Galleries
CICF 4/12/14 3/6/17
Nicholas Z
4653_4654.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Antoninianus, VIRTVS AVG13 viewsAE Antoninianus
Claudius II Gothicus
Augustus: 268 - 270AD
Issued: 268 - 270AD
20.5mm
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate, cuirassed bust, right.
R: VIRTVS AVG; Virtus left, holding branch in right hand, spear in left hand, shield on ground, left.
Rome Mint
RIC 109, radiate, cuirassed; Cohen 313; cf. Sear 11383.
Aorta: 206: B20, O4, R127, T126, M6. Aorta has this listed as "Virtus" on the reverse and "Mars" in a separate type listing, T73. Aorta also does not have a B20, O4, R127, T73, M6 grouping listed. Looking at Wildwinds, I believe that my coin depicts Mars with his helmet and have listed RIC 109 which uses Mars in the reverse description, Aorta notwithstanding.
aitorazpeitia 321138555629
6/12/13 3/6/17
Nicholas Z
111Braith_barbarica.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, barbarous imitative (Braithwell hoard)46 viewsBronze barbarous radiate
AE, 3.114 g, 20.8 mm, 0°, unofficial mint, Fair/aVF
D/ IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG (or similar), radiate head right
R/ PAX AVG, Pax standing left, branch? in right, rudder or anchor in left
Provenienza: collezione Fragiacomo, Trieste Italia (27 dicembre 2011); ex collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (2 marzo 2011, numero catalogo 124bis); ex FAC (Morehead City NC Usa, 2010); ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2007), ex CNG auction 176 (London, 2007), ex Braithwell hoard (Braithwell, South Yorkshire Uk, 2002).

paolo
GI_122d_img.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Billon tetradrachm, Alexandria, Year 2, Dikaiosyne 12 viewsObv:– AVT K KLAUDIOC CEB, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– None, Dikaiosyne seated left on throne, holding scales and cornucopia
Minted in Alexandria (LB | _). A.D. 268/269
Reference:– Milne 4231. Emmett 3875(2) R1. Curtis 1664. BMC 2316. Dattari 5386.
maridvnvm
18d2.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, RIC 104 Rome19 views
September 268 - August or September 270 CE
Silvered antoninianus, RIC V 104, Rome mint, 3.2g, 17.9mm,
Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VICTORIA AVG, Victory standing left holding palm in left and wreath raised in right.
NORMAN K
claud266.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, RIC 26616 viewsBronze Antoninianus, Claudius II Gothis Diefied under Quintillus
Obverse: DIVO CLAUVDIO , radiate head right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO, eagle standing facing, wings open, head right.
Spanish mint, 17 mm., 1.9 g.
NORMAN K
clad101.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, RIC 41 Rome, 269 CE11 viewsBronze Antoninianus, Claudius II Gothicus
Obverse: IMP CLAUVDIO AVG , radiate head right.
Reverse: FORTVNA, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia.
RIC 41, Rome. 19.75 mm., 4.4 g.
NORMAN K
111Claudio_II_Gotico.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Roma mint, R/ ANNONA AVG (Braithwell hoard)43 viewsClaudio II il Gotico (268-270 d.C.), antoniniano, zecca di Roma
Æ, 3.07gr., 24,0 mm; B (F-)
D/ IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, busto radiato e drappeggiato a dx
R/ ANNONA AVG, Annona stante a sx, piede su una prora, cereali alle orecchie e cornucopia
RIC 18; Cohen 21, Braithwell Report #75 (questa moneta)
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (19 aprile 2008, numero catalogo 44), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2007), ex CNG auction 176 (London, 2007, nel lotto 338), ex Braithwell hoard (Braithwell, South Yorkshire Uk, 2002).
paolo
Claudio_II_Genius_exerci.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Rome mint, R/GENIVS EXERCI (Braithwell hoard)32 viewsClaudio II il Gotico, antoniniano, zecca di Roma
AE , 2.101 gr, 19.6 mm, 180°, F
D/ IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, busto a dx radiato (e drappeggiato?)
R/ GENIVS EXERCI, Genius stante a sx, con patera nella dx e cornucopia nella sx
RIC V 48
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (30 aprile 2011, numero catalogo 136), ex FAC (Morehead City NC Usa, 2010); ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, Londra-New York, 2007); ex CNG (London, 2007); ex Braithwell hoard (Braithwell, South Yorkshire Uk, 2002).
paolo
Claudius_II_AE_Antoninianus.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.26 viewsSilvered antoninianus, MER-RIC 60, RIC V 157, Normanby 1031, Venera 9303 - 9364, Cunetio 2263, Hunter IV 58, SRCV III 3215, Cohen VI 202, Choice gVF, some silvering, 4.608g, 22.0mm, 315o, 3rd officina, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, issue 2, mid 269 - spring 270; obverse IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PAX AVG, Pax walking left, extending olive-branch in right hand, long transverse scepter in left, T in exergue.

Ex FORVM Ancient Coins

In 268, Gallienus was murdered by his senior officers while besieging the would-be usurper Aureolus in Mediolanum (Milan). The Senate charged Marcus Aurelius Claudius with Gallienus' murder but it was never proven. The accused became the new emperor, Claudius II.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
Claudius_II_Gothicus_Roman_Provincial_Egypt.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt.37 viewsBillon tetradrachm, Dattari 5392; Geissen 3038; BMC Alexandria p. 303, 2327; Milne 4240; Curtis 1701; SNG Cop 847; Kampmann-Ganschow 104.25; Emmett 3883, VF, well centered on a tight flan, attractive style, dark patina with coppery high points, 10.116g, 20.3mm, 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 269 - 28 Aug 270 A.D.; obverse AVT K KLAVDIOC CEB, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse bust of Hermanubis right, wearing modius with lotus-petal in front, himation over shoulder, date LB (year 2) in left field, winged caduceus over palm in right.
Anubis, represented as a jackal or as a man with the head of a jackal, was the Egyptian god of the dead. He presided over the embalming of the dead and conducted souls into the underworld. The Greeks and Romans often scorned Egypt's animal-headed gods as bizarre and primitive (they mockingly called Anubis the Barker) but they also identified Anubis with Hermes, morphing them into Hermanubis.
EX; FORVM Ancient Coins / The Sam Mansourati Collection.

**My comment; A Superb reverse . This is what I like to call, a forbidden to touch reverse for married gentelmen.
2 commentsSam
claudius_ii_eagle[1].jpg
CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS, SILVERED ANTONINIANUS, 268-270 C.E. 12 viewsSilvered antoninianus, RIC V 266, 3.5 g. 20mm dia.
Obverse - DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right
Reverse - CONSERATIO, eagle standing left, head right
Rome mint. strong strike on obverse but has worn die on reverse
NORMAN K
1rubata_Claudio_II.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Siscia mint, ex Braithwell hoard14 viewsClaudius II Gothicus (A.D.268-270), antoninianus, Siscia mint
AE, 3.31 gr. qBB
D/ IMP CLAVDIVS CAES AVG, draped radiate bust right,
R/ FORTVNA RED, Fortuna standing left,
RIC 180cf; Braithwell Report #124 (2 examples in the hoard)
NOTA: RUBATA DAL SERVIZIO POSTALE ITALIANO (Coin stolen by the Italian postal service)
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (19 febbraio 2011, numero catalogo S); ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2007); ex CNG auction 176 (London, 2007); ex Braithwell hoard (Braithwell, South Yorkshire Uk, 2002).
paolo
Claudio_II_Siscia_nuova.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Siscia mint, R/ PAX AVG (Braithwell hoard)27 viewsClaudius II "Gothicus". 268-270 AD. antoninianus, Siscia mint
AE, 18.5 mm, 2.91 gr.
D/ IMP CLAVDIVS AVG - Radiate bust right drapped
R/ PAX AVG - Pax standing left, holding olive branch and transverse sceptre.
RIC 186, Braithwell 127 (Siscia)
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (3 marzo 2011, numero catalogo 127); ex Alfredo De La Fe collection (Imperial Coins, New York Usa, 2010); ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2007), ex CNG auction 176 (London, 2007), ex Braithwell hoard (Braithwell, South Yorkshire Uk, 2002).
paolo
0470-410np_noir.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Tetradrachm38 viewsAlexandria mint, year 1 (AD 268/269)
AVKKLAVDIOCCEB, Laureate and draped bust right
Eagle standing right, head left, with wreath in beak. LA in right field
10.14 gr 21/22 mm
Ref : Emmett # 3878, RCV # 11407
Ex. Pscipio
Potator II
5170_5171.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, Tetradrachm, Elpis standing left12 viewsBI Tetradrachm
Claudius II Gothicus
Augustus: 268 - 270AD
Issued: 268AD
22.5 x 20.5mm 8.30gr
O: AYT K KΛΑνΔΙΟC CεΒ; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust, right.
R: NO LEGEND; Elpis standing left, flower in extended right hand, raising fold of skirt with left hand.
Exergue: L, left field; A, right field. (LA = Regnal Year 1 = 268AD)
Alexandria, Egypt Mint
Koln 3017; Dattari 5387; BMC 2317; Milne 4197 var (obv. type); Emmett 3881.
bronzemat
8/15/17 8/18/17
Nicholas Z
Claudius II Gothicus- Consecratio Altar new.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus- Consecratio Altar42 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.

Obverse:
Radiate head right

DIVO CLAVDIO

DIVO: God

CLAVDIO: Cladius

Reverse:
CONSECRATIO

CONSECRATIO: Divine

Showing: Altar with 4 "dots" and perhaps fire. The altar is reverse

Domination: Antoninianus, Copper, size 20 mm, Posthumous
John Schou
Claudius II Gothicus- Consecratio eagle new.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus- Consecratio Eagle40 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.

Obverse:
Radiate head right

DIVO CLAVDIO

DIVO, god

CLAVDIO, Cladius

Reverse:
CONSECRATIO

Showing: eagle standing left, head right

Domination: Antoninianus, Copper, size 19 mm

Mint: ???
John Schou
Gothicus_a-horz.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus. 268-270 AD.131 viewsIMPCMAVRCLAVDIVSAVG Exe: .. - Radiate, cuirassed bust right.
VICTORIAEGOTHIC Exe: SPQR - Trophy; seated captive on either side.
RIC 251v

This coin commemorates Roman victory at the Battle of Naissus (268 or 269 AD) and the defeat of a Gothic coalition by the Roman Empire under Emperor Claudius II near Naissus (Niš in present-day Serbia). The events around the invasion and the battle are an important part of the history of the Crisis of the Third Century.
The result was a great Roman victory which, combined with the effective pursuit of the invaders in the aftermath of the battle and the energetic efforts of the Emperor Aurelian, largely removed the threat from Germanic tribes in the Balkan frontier for the following decades.
The result was a great Roman victory which, combined with the effective pursuit of the invaders in the aftermath of the battle and the energetic efforts of the Emperor Aurelian, largely removed the threat from Germanic tribes in the Balkan frontier for the following decades.
Pedja R
20171009_121737.jpg
CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS. 268-270 AD. Antoninianus9 viewsObv. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head left
Rev. IVNO R-EGINA, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; peacock standing left at feet.
References: RIC V 212;
19mm, 2.8 grams, brown patina.
Canaan
Claudius_II.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus. AD 268-2707 viewsClaudius II. AE 21- 23mm. Weight 2.80g. Obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right /Rev: IOVI STATORI, Jupiter standing left, head right, holding sceptre and thunderbolt. RIC 52ddwau
claud_securitas_k.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus. AD 268-270 10 viewsÆ Antoninianus, 20mm, 3.0g, 6h; Rome mint.
Obv.: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG; Radiate head right.
Rev.: SECVRIT AVG; Securitas standing facing, head left, legs crossed, leaning on short column, holding scepter // XI
Reference: RIC Va 100, p. 218
From the YOC Collection / 17-87-35
John Anthony
gothicus_lg.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus. Eagle right, year 320 viewsClaudius II 'Gothicus'. A.D. 268-270. Æ tetradrachm (21 mm, 10.01 g, 12 h). Year 3 (A.D. 270). Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right …KΛAVΔIOC …/ Eagle standing right, holding wreath in beak; L-G across field. Milne 4291; Emmett 3877. Podiceps
35226_Claudius_II_tetradrachm,_SRCV_III_11418,_Milne_4247_eagle_year_2.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus. Eagle standing left, looking back, year 2, Milne 424727 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt. Billon tetradrachm, SRCV III 11418, Milne 4247, BMC 2333, VF, Alexandria mint, 8.459g, 21.1mm, 0o, 269 - 270 A.D.; obverse “ΑΥΤ Κ ΚΛΑΥΔΙΟ”C C“ΕΒ”, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse, eagle standing left, looking back, wreath in beak, L - B (year 2) across fields. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
claudius_goth_hermanibus.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus. Hermanibus, year 28 viewsClaudius II Gothicus. Alexandrian Tetradrachm. Year 2. Bust of Hermanibus right. Emmett 3883. Ex VauctionsPodiceps
7A419884-32FE-4F90-8A95-950BD5FCD85A.jpeg
Claudius II Gothicus/Eagle, Posthumous6 viewsBillon antoninianus. Remnants of original silvering. AE19, 1.6g. Obverse: DIVO CLAVDIO. Reverse: CONSECRATIO. RIC VI 261a.Celticaire
Claudius II SALVS AVG RIC 217.jpg
Claudius II SALVS AVG RIC V/1 217109 viewsAnt, 20mm, 3.77g.

Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate head L.

Reverse: SALVS AVG, Isis Faria standing L with sistrum and basket.

Antioch mint.

Ric V/1 217, Scarce.

The reverse is traditionally attributed to Isis Faria, but there's nothing on the coin to identify the figure specifically with the Pharos.
2 commentsRobert_Brenchley
Claudius II VICTORIA AVG RIC 104.jpg
Claudius II VICTORIA AVG RIC 10468 viewsAnt, 20mm, 2.59g.

Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: VICTORIA AVG, Victory standing L with wreath and palm.

Rome

RIC V/1 104 C.
Robert_Brenchley
Claudius II VICTORIA GOTHIC RIC 251.jpg
Claudius II VICTORIA AVG RIC V/1 25154 viewsAnt, 18x21mm, 3.44g.

Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG, Radiate & draped bust R.

Reverse: VICTORIA GOTHIC, trophy with a bound captive to each side.

Cyzicus

RIC V/1 251, R.

Traces of a clashed die can be seen on the reverse.
Robert_Brenchley
Claudius II VIRTVS AVG RIC 172.jpg
Claudius II VIRTVS AVG RIC V/1 17250 viewsAnt, 20, 4.44g.

Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS PF AVF, Radiate and draped bust R.

Reverse: VIRTVS AVG, Mars walking R with spear and trophy.

Exe: P.

Mediolanum.

RIC V/1 172, Common.

There's some very dark irridescent toning on this coin, which makes me think there's probably a good deal of silvering present, but it's toned black and thus invisible.
Robert_Brenchley
Claudius_II_RIC_104.JPG
Claudius II, "Gothicus," 268 - 270 AD26 viewsObv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust of Claudius II facing right.

Rev: (VIC)TORIA AVG, Victory standing left holding a wreath and palm frond.

Billon Antoninianus, Rome mint, 268 - 269 AD

3.1 grams, 20 mm, 180°

RIC Vi 104, S11379, VM 35
SPQR Coins
Claudius_II_R_I_C__V,_part_I,_252_variation.jpg
Claudius II, AE Antoninianus, RIC V, I 252 variation, Normanby hoard 1108A135 viewsClaudius II
Augustus, 268 – 270 A.D.

Coin: AE Antoninianus, commemorating Claudius' victory over the Goths at Naissus in Moesia, which earned him the cognomen "Gothicus".

Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust facing right. ●● beneath.
Reverse: VICTORIAE GOTHIC, two bound Gothic captives, beneath a Trophy.

Weight: 2.95 g, Diameter: 21.2 x 21.5 x 1 mm, Die axis: 200°, Mint: Cyzicus, struck between 269-270 A.D. Officina: 2nd (●●), References: RIC V, I 252 variation (no SPQR in exergue), Normanby hoard 1108A

Note: Bust more in the style of the previous Emperor, Gallienus.
1 commentsMasis
coin124.jpg
Claudius II, RIC 0207:E Gothicus Silvered Æ 19 viewsClaudius II, RIC 0207:E Gothicus Silvered Æ
Antoninianus. Antioch mint. IMP C CLAVDIVS
AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right /
FIDES AVG, Mercury standing left with purse &
cauduceus, E in ex. Cohen 83. Coin #124
cars100
claudius_year_1.jpg
Claudius II, year 117 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt. Billon tetradrachm, Geissen 3015, Curtis 1670, BMC Alexandria 2331, VF, Alexandria mint, 8.922g, 22.9mm, 0o, Sep 268 - 29 Aug 269 A.D.; obverse AVT K K“L”AV“D”IOC CEB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse , eagle standing right, looking back, holding wreath in beak, date AL (year 1) right. ex FORVMPodiceps
c_gothicus_year_1.jpg
Claudius II, year 1, eagle right, head left16 viewsClaudius II, 268-270 AD, AE tetradrachm 268-69, Alexandria, Egypt.
Dr., laur. and cuir.bust r. L-A; Eagle stg.r., head l., wreath in beak Emmett 3878. Ex Vauctions
Podiceps
Claudius_Goth_eagle_y_1.jpg
Claudius II, year 1, eagle right, head left20 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt. Billon tetradrachm, SRCV III 11407, BMC Alexandria 2331, Curtis 1670, Milne 4207, aVF, Alexandria mint, 7.925g, 21.1mm, 0o, 268 - 269 A.D.; obverse “ΑΥΤ Κ ΚΛΑΥΔΙΟ”C C“EB”, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse , A / L (year 1) in right field, eagle right, head turned back, wreath in beak. Ex FORVMPodiceps
1437.jpg
Claudius II- PAX AVG8 viewsClaudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus. Milan mint. IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right / PAX AVG, Pax advancing left holding olive branch and scepter, T in ex. 3.45g, 21mm.

RIC 157, Cohen 202.
SkySoldier
coin26.jpg
CLAUDIUS II. GOTHICUS (268 - 270) RIC 215 var. C.14 viewsCLAUDIUS II. GOTHICUS (268 - 270) RIC 215 var. C.
239 var. 3,71g Obv. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG radiate,
draped bust right / Rev. REGI - ARTIC Vulcan with
hammer and nails. Z in Ex. minted in Antiochia ad
Orontem in mid 269 CE. 7th officina. The god Vulcan
(Greek Hephaistos) is called in the reverse "King of Arts"
a title much more frequent about Apollo. This reverse
is one of the rarest in Clavdivs "Gothicvs" coin #26
cars100
Claudius_II_Gothicus_b.jpg
Claudius II. Gothicus AE antoninianus87 viewsVICTORIA AVG1 commentsTibsi
s42.JPG
Crispus ALAMANNIA DEVICTA Sirmium39 viewsThe Alamanni were continually engaged in conflicts with the Roman Empire. They launched a major invasion of Gaul and northern Italy in 268, when the Romans were forced to denude much of their German frontier of troops in response to a massive invasion of the Goths. Their depredations in the three parts of Gaul remained traumatic: Gregory of Tours (died ca 594) mentions their destructive force at the time of Valerian and Gallienus (253–260), when the Alemanni assembled under their "king", whom he calls Chrocus, "by the advice, it is said, of his wicked mother, and overran the whole of the Gauls, and destroyed from their foundations all the temples which had been built in ancient times. And coming to Clermont he set on fire, overthrew and destroyed that shrine which they call Vasso Galatae in the Gallic tongue," martyring many Christians (Historia Francorum Book I.32–34). Thus 6th century Gallo-Romans of Gregory's class, surrounded by the ruins of Roman temples and public buildings, attributed the destruction they saw to the plundering raids of the Alemanni.

In the early summer of 268, the Emperor Gallienus halted their advance in Italy, but then had to deal with the Goths. When the Gothic campaign ended in Roman victory at the Battle of Naissus in September, Gallienus' successor Claudius II Gothicus turned north to deal with the Alamanni, who were swarming over all Italy north of the Po River.

After efforts to secure a peaceful withdrawal failed, Claudius forced the Alamanni to battle at the Battle of Lake Benacus in November. The Alamanni were routed, forced back into Germany, and did not threaten Roman territory for many years afterwards.

Their most famous battle against Rome took place in Argentoratum (Strasbourg), in 357, where they were defeated by Julian, later Emperor of Rome, and their king Chnodomar ("Chonodomarius") was taken prisoner.

On January 2, 366 the Alamanni crossed the frozen Rhine in large numbers, to invade the Gallic provinces.

In the great mixed invasion of 406, the Alamanni appear to have crossed the Rhine river, conquered and then settled what is today Alsace and a large part of Switzerland. Fredegar's Chronicle gives an account. At Alba Augusta (Aps) the devastation was so complete, that the Christian bishopric was removed to Viviers, but Gregory's account that at Mende in Lozère, also deep in the heart of Gaul, bishop Privatus was forced to sacrifice to idols in the very cave where he was later venerated may be a generic literary trope epitomizing the horrors of barbarian violence.

Sirmium RIC 49

Crispus AE3. 324-325 AD. FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate head right / ALAMANNIA DEVICTA, Victory advancing right, holding trophy & palm, treading upon bound captive on right, .SIRM. in ex.

need new pic
ecoli
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Divo Claudio Gothico, Milan mint, R/ CONSECRATIO (Braithwell hoard)64 viewsDivus Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 d.C., antoniniano di bronzo coniato da Aureliano (270 d.C.)
Zecca di Milano. Ex Braithwell hoard
AE, 17.5 mm, 2.32 gr., MB
D/ DI[VO CLAV]DIO, busto radiato a dx
R/ CONSE[CRATIO], altare con fiamme
RIC 261, Cohen 50, Braithwell 129 (4 esemplari nell'hoard)
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (2 maggio 2008, numero catalogo 46), ex Alfredo De La Fe collection (Imperial coins, New York, 2008), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2007), ex CNG auction 176 (London, 2007), ex Braithwell hoard (Braithwell, South Yorkshire Uk, 2002).
1 commentspaolo
Divus_Claudius_Gothicus_R_CONSECRATIO_eagle.jpg
Divo Claudio Gothico, Roma mint, R/CONSECRATIO eagle (Braithwell hoard)64 viewsDivus Claudius Gothicus (A.D.268-270), antoninianus, zecca di Roma
AE, 1.63 gr, 18 mm, qBB
D/ DIVO CLAVDIO, busto drappeggiato e radiato a dx
R/ CONSECRATIO, aquila
RIC 266; Braithwell Report #131 (5 esemplari nell' hoard)
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (23 dicembre 2008, numero catalogo 22), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2007), ex CNG auction 176 (London, 2007), ex Braithwell hoard (Braithwell, South Yorkshire Uk, 2002).
paolo
divoclav01b.jpg
Divo Claudius, Claudius II Gothicus26 viewsClaudius II Gothicus
AE Antoninianus, 18-19mm
Commemorative issued by Quintillus or Aurelian
Ob: DIVO CLAVDIO, Radiate head right
Rv: CONSECRATIO, flaming altar
Ex: S
Ref: RIC V (1) 261 Mediolanum

Scotvs Capitis
gothico.jpg
Divus Claudius Gothicus32 viewsObv: DIVO CLAVDIO GOTHICO
Radiate head right,
Rev: CONSECRATIO
Altar, with flame above, divided in four squares with a dot inside of each square.
Base Antoninianus, traces of silvering (3.09g).
RIC Milan 264; Normanby 1141; Cunetio 2317; [Online RIC temp. #1272].
Quite possibly the finest known!
OldMoney
Claud.PNG
DIVUS CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS (Died 270). Antoninianus Imitation9 viewsObv: DIVO CLAVDIO. Radiate head right.
Rev: CONSECRATIO. Altar.
15mm and 1.74 grams.
Canaan
Divus_Claudius_II,_317-318_AD,_Rome.JPG
Divus Claudius II, 317-318 AD, Rome21 viewsClaudius II Gothicus
AE3 – 18mm
Rome, 317-318
veiled, laureate head r.
DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP
Emperor seated left
REQVIES OPTIMOR MERIT
RS in ex.
RIC VII Rome 106
Ardatirion
EB0653_scaled.JPG
EB0653 Claudius II Gothicus / Poseiden9 viewsClaudius II Gothicus 268-270, billon tetradrachm of Alexandria, year 2 = 269-270.
Obverse: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, laurate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: Poseidon standing left, right foot resting on dolphin, holding grain ear in right hand and trident in left, L-B ( year 2 ).
References: Dattari 5407, Milne 4254, Köln 3045, Emmett 3893.
Diameter: 23mm Weight: 10.59g
EB
EB0654_scaled.JPG
EB0654 Claudius II Gothicus / Eagle7 viewsClaudius II Gothicus 268-270, billon tetradrachm of Alexandria, year 2 = 269-270.
Obverse: AVT K KΛΑVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: Eagle standing right, head left, holding wreath in beak; L-B.
References: Köln 3027; Dattari 5415; Kampmann & Ganschow 104.17.
Diameter: 22mm Weight: 9.61g
EB
EB0655_extra.JPG
EB0655 Claudius II Gothicus / Nike9 viewsClaudius II Gothicus 268-270, billon tetradrachm of Alexandria, year 2 = 269-270.
Obverse: AVT K KΛΑVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: Nike alighting right, holding wreath and filleted palm; LB in right field.
References: Milne 4228; Dattari 5402; Geissen 3041; SNG Cop 843.
Diameter: 21mm Weight: 8.821g
EB
EB0656_scaled.JPG
EB0656 Claudius II Gothicus / Eagle9 viewsClaudius II Gothicus 268-270, billon tetradrachm of Alexandria, year 1 = 268-269.
Obverse: AVT K KΛΑVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: Eagle standing right, head left, with wreath in its beak, LA to right.
References: Dattari 5414; Milne 4205; BMC 2331.
Diameter: 21mm Weight: 9.95g
EB
EB0657_scaled.JPG
EB0657 Claudius II Gothicus / Eagle10 viewsClaudius II Gothicus 268-270, billon tetradrachm of Alexandria, year 2 = 269-270.
Obverse: AVT K KΛΑVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: Eagle standing right, head left, with wreath in its beak, L-B.
References: Dattari 5415.
Diameter: 21mm Weight: 8.59g
EB
EB0852_scaled.JPG
EB0852 Claudius Gothicus / Securitas6 viewsClaudius Gothicus 268-270, AE Antoninianus, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head right.
Reverse: SECVRIT AVG, Securitas standing front, looking left, legs crossed, leaning on column and holding short sceptre. XI in right field.
References: Cunetio hoard 2231, Appleshaw hoard 259; RIC V-1, 100 Rome var (obv legend and fieldmark).
Diameter: 19.5mm, Weight: 2.905g.
EB
EB0853_scaled.JPG
EB0853 Claudius Gothicus / Spes5 viewsClaudius Gothicus 268-270, AE Antoninianus, Milan mint, 268-269 AD.
Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped (cuirassed?) bust right.
Reverse: SPES PVBLICA, Spes walking left, holding flower and raising robe, S in ex.
References: RIC 168 var (bust type); Cunetio 2240; Normanby 1004; Sear 11374 var (bust type).
Diameter: 19.5mm, Weight: 4.1g.
EB
Alex_Q-001_axis-0h_20-20,5mm_9,26g-s.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-, D-5411, LA//--, Tyche seated left, #170 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-, D-5411, LA//--, Tyche seated left, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: LA above, Tyche reclining left on draped and garlanded couch, holding the rudder in right hand.
exergue: LA//--, diameter: 20-20,5mm, weight: 9,26g, axes: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 268-269 A.D., Year 1. LA., ref: Geissen-, Dattari-5411, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.14-p-328,
Q-001
quadrans
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3015,_D-5414,_Alexandria,_Eagle_standing_right,_LA_in_left(Y-1,268_AD)_Q-001_0h_21-22,5mm_8,54g-s~0.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3015, D-5414, -/LA//--, Eagle standing right, #1145 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3015, D-5414, -/LA//--, Eagle standing right, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped bust right.
reverse: Eagle standing right, head left with wreath in its beak, LA in the left field.
exergue: -/LA//--, diameter: 21,0-22,5mm, weight: 8,54g, axes: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 268-269 A.D., Year 1. LA., ref: Geissen- 3015, Dattari-5414, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.01-p-327,
Q-001
quadrans
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3015v,_D-5414v,_Alexandria,_Eagle_standing_right,_LA_in_left(Y-1,268_AD)_Q-001_11h_21,5mm_10,35g-s~0.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3015v., D-5414v., -/LA//--, Eagle standing right, #1160 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3015v., D-5414v., -/LA//--, Eagle standing right, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. (Bust variation!)
reverse: Eagle standing right, head left with wreath in its beak, LA in the left field.
exergue: -/LA//--, diameter: 21,5mm, weight: 10,35g, axes: 11h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 268-269 A.D., Year 1. LA., ref: Geissen- 3015v., Dattari-5414v., Kapmann-Ganschow-104.01v.-p-327,
Q-001
quadrans
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3027,_D-5415,_Alexandria.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3027, D-5415, L/B//--, Eagle standing right, #1104 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3027, D-5415, L/B//--, Eagle standing right, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle standing right, head left with wreath in its beak, L-B across the field,
exergue: L/B//--, diameter: 21-22mm, weight: 11,21g, axes: 11 h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 269-270 A.D., Year 2. L-B., ref: Geissen- 3027, Dattari-5415, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.17-p-328,
Q-001
quadrans
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3028,_D-5417,_KG-104_16_Alexandria,_Eagle_standing_left,_L-B_,_269-270_(Y-2)-Q-001_0h_21-21,5mm_9,02g-s~0.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3028, D-5417, L/B//--, Eagle standing left, #1117 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3028, D-5417, L/B//--, Eagle standing left, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Eagle standing left, head right with wreath in its beak, L-B across the field,
exergue: L/B//--, diameter: 21-21,5mm, weight: 9,02g, axes: 0 h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 269-270 A.D., Year 2. L-B., ref: Geissen- 3028, Dattari-5418, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.16-p-328, Milne 4248, Curtis 1683, BMC-Alexandria 2333,
Q-001
quadrans
104_Claudius-II__Gothicus_(268-270_A_D_),_Bi-Tetradrachm,_G-3037-3038,_D-5392-5393,_Alexandria.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3037-3038, D-5392-5393, LB/-//--, Bust of Hermanubis right, #1145 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3037-3038, D-5392-5393, LB/-//--, Bust of Hermanubis right, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Bust of Hermanubis right, wearing modius, lotus blossom to right, LB to left.
exergue: LB/-//--, diameter: 21mm, weight: 9,5g, axes: 0 h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 269-270 A.D., Year 2. LB., ref: Geissen- 3037-3038, Dattari-5392-5393, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.25-p-329,
Q-001
quadrans
104_Claudius_II__Gothicus,_Alexandria,_Potin,_Tetradrachm,_Nike,_Milne_4235_,_year-2,_269_AD__Q-001,_h,_20mm,_10,76g-s~0.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3041, D-5402, -/LB//--, Nike advancing right, #183 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, 104 Claudius-II. Gothicus (268-270 A.D.), Bi-Tetradrachm, G-3041, D-5402, -/LB//--, Nike advancing right, #1
avers: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, Laureate and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Nike advancing right, holding wreath and palm, year LB in right field.
exergue: -/LB//--, diameter: 20,0mm, weight: 10,76g, axes: h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 269-270 A.D., Year 2. LB., ref: Milne 4235, Giessen-3041, Dattari-5402, Kapmann-Ganschow-104.29-p-329,
Q-001
quadrans
Claudius_Gothicus_2.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 269/270, Claudius Gothicus, Alexandria12 viewsClaudius Gothicus
Egypt, Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachme, AD 269/270
Obv.: AVT KΛAV∆IOC CEB, laureate and cuirassed bust right
Rev.: bust of Alexandria right wearing turreted cap, earring, and chiton L - B (year 2) flanking across field
AE, , 9.66g, maximum diameter 20.7mm, die axis 0deg
Ref.: Milne 4246, Geissen 3030, Dattari 5383, SNG Cop 849, BMC 2330, Kampmann-Ganschow 104.19, Emmett 3869 (R2)
Ex Forvm Ancient Coins Shop
shanxi
Claudius_Gothicus_1.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 270/271, Claudius Gothicus, Eagle19 viewsClaudius Gothicus
Egypt, Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachme, AD 270/271
Obv.: ΑVT K KΛAVΔIOC CЄB, Draped, cuirassed and laureate bust right
Rev.: Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head reverted, wreath in beak, in field date L - Γ (year 3)
Billon, 10.4g, 20.3mm
Ex Lanz Numismatik
shanxi
alexandria_claudiusII_Milne4226.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, Claudius II Gothicus, Milne 422636 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, AD 268-270
AE - Billon tetradrachm, 9.50g, 22mm
struck 268/9 (year 2)
obv. AVT K KLAV - DIOC CEB
Bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. Ares, wearing military cloak, cuirassed and helmeted, chlamys over l. arm, holding spear in raised r. hand and parazonium in l. arm
across the field L - B (year 2)
ref. Milne 4226; Emmett 3871; Curtis 1661; BMC 2311
good VF, some roughness, some silvering
Pedigree:
ex Keith Emmett coll.
1 commentsJochen
alexandria_claudiusII_BMC2321.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, Claudius II Gothicus, Milne 4235 cf.41 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, AD 268-270
AE - billon tetradrachm, 9.25g, 21.5mm
struck 269/70 (year 2)
obv. AVT K KLAV - DIOC CEB
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. Nike, advancing r., clad in chiton with diplois; holding wreath and palm bound with fillets
in l. and r. field L - B
ref. BMC 2321; without fillets and LB in rt. field: cf. Milne 4235, cf. Dattari 5402, cf. Geissen 3041, cf. SNG Copenhagen 843
very rare, VF+, dark-brown patina

The fillets are separated from the B by a dot!
2 commentsJochen
alexandria_claudiusII_Milne4240.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, Claudius II Gothicus, Milne 424038 viewsClaudius II Gothicus AD 268-270
AE - Potin tetradrachm, 20.5mm, 10.97g
struck 269/270 (year 2)
obv. AVT K KLA - VDIOC CEB
Bust, draped and laureate, r.
rev. Youthful bust of Hermanubis, draped, wearing kalathos, lotos blossom at fore-
head, r.
combination of kerykeion and palm before
LB behind (for year 2)
Milne 4240; Curtis 1701; Köln 3037
VF+, matt dark-brown patina

Hermanubis was the Greek name for the Egyptian god Anubis combined with the Greek Hermes, both acting as Psychopompos.
For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
Jochen
41922_Claudius_II_milan_145_FELIC_TEMPO.jpg
FELIC TEMPO, RIC V 145 Mediolanum11 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D. Silvered antoninianus, SRCV III 11330, RIC V 145, C 74, VF, Mediolanum mint, 3.291g, 20.9mm, 0o, 268 - 269 A.D.; obverse IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FELIC TEMPO, Felicitas standing half left, caduceus in right, scepter in left, T in ex; nicely centered, dark green patina. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
41933_Claudius_II_ant_RIC_V_32,_C_79,_VF,_Rome.jpg
FELICITAS AVG, RIC V 32 Rome9 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D. Bronze antoninianus, SRCV II 11331, RIC V 32, C 79, VF, Rome mint, 2.830g, 19.8mm, 0o, 268 - 269 A.D.; obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse FELICITAS AVG, Felicitas standing half left, long caduceus vertical in right, cornucopia in left. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
22795_Claudius_II_ric_36.jpg
FIDES EXERCI, RIC 369 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V 36, EF, flat strike areas, Rome mint, 3.315g, 19.6mm, 180o, obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse FIDES EXERCI, Fides standing half left, vertical standard in right, transverse standard in left. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
claudius_II.jpg
FIDES MILITVM, RIC 2309 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D. Bronze antoninianus, RIC V 230, F, Cyzicus mint, 3.599g, 19.6mm, 180o, obverse IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, standard in right, transverse scepter in left. Ex FORVMPodiceps
41920_Claudius_II_goth_antoninianus,_RIC_V_234,_VF_Fair,_Cyzicus.jpg
FORTVNA REDVX, RIC V 23410 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D. Bronze antoninianus, RIC V 234, VF/Fair, Cyzicus mint, 3.575g, 21.0mm, 180o, obverse IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FORTVNA REDVX, Fortuna standing right, rudder in right, cornucopia in left, S P Q R in ex. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
coin_1_quart.jpg
GALLIENVS AVG / FIDES MILIT AE/Bi. antoninianus (260-268 A.D.)23 viewsGALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right, one ribbon behind, one forward across shoulder/ FIDES MILIT, Fides Militum standing left, holding vexillum and long scepter, MP or MD in exergue.

AE3, 17mm, 1.27g, die axis 6 (coin alignment), material: bronze/copper-based alloy

AVG = Augustus. Fides was the Roman goddess of trustworthiness and good faith. Fides Militum = "Military confidence" or "Army's loyalty". Sceptres, often two to three foot ivory rods topped with a globe or an eagle, were introduced by Augustus as a symbol of Rome's power. They would be carried by emperors while riding in chariots to celebrate military victories and thus a scepter is a symbol of emperor's leadership and victory. Vexillum -- ensign of a section of legion. MD may mean Mediolanum mint, MP may mean Mediolanum pecunia (coin) or Mediolanum mint, prima officina (workshop #1). Either way, it was probably minted at Mediolanum.

Very similar to a coin (with MP mintmark), listed at WildWinds with references to RIC V-1, Milan 481K; Goebl 1370a; Sear 10214. http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/ric/gallienus/RIC_0481.jpg

Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus Augustus. The son of emperor Valerian and his wife Mariniana. Born c. 218. Co-emperor with his father since Oct 253. His sons Valerian II and Saloninus were named his co-emperors and heirs, but both died early (Valerian II in 258 and Saloninus in 260). His father was infamously captured after the Battle of Edessa by Sassanian Persian king Shapur I, also in 260, leaving Gallienus a sole ruler. His whole career was spent dealing with innumerable invasions and revolts, which speaks to his credit, because despite this he managed to stay in power for so long. Famous for his military reforms and the first decree of tolerance of Christianity. Despite this some martyrologies mention his as a persecutor, probably mistaking him for his father's actions during their joint reign. Infamous for losing Gaul and Palmyra. Died in Sept 268 in Mediolanum as a result of yet another military coup, Fides Militum finally failed him. Succeeded by one of his generals Claudius Gothicus, later known as Claudius II. There were some rumors that Claudius was the one who murdered Gallienus, but this was never proved.
Yurii P
41917_Claudius_II_45_GENIVS_AVG.jpg
GENIVS AVG, RIC V 45 Rome14 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D. Bronze antoninianus, RIC V 45, SRCV III 11339, VF, reverse flatly struck, Rome mint, 2.030g, 19.5mm, 180o, 268 - 269 A.D.; obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse GENIVS AVG, Genius standing left, sacrificing out of patera in right over altar, cornucopia in left. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
41936_Claudius_II_antoninianus,_RIC_V_45,_VF,_Rome.jpg
GENIVS AVG, RIC V 45 Rome8 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D. Bronze antoninianus, RIC V 45, VF, Rome mint, 2.703g, 19.1mm, 180o, obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse GENIVS AVG, Genius standing left, sacrificing out of patera in right over altar, cornucopia in left; tight flan, nice green patina. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
julia.jpg
Julia Domna30 viewsOb. IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev. IVNO REGINA, Juno, veiled, standing left holding patera and sceptre; peacock to left
Mint (possibly) Laodicea
Heavily toned

Ref. RIC 640, RSC 97, BMC 601

Juno was a favourite patroness of the empresses and the only Emperor showing this reverse was Claudius Gothicus

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
Claudius_II_GIC_4741.JPG
Marcus Aurelius Claudius II, "Gothicus," 268 - 270 AD41 viewsObv: AVT K KΛAVΔIOC CEB, laureate, cuirassed bust of Claudius facing right, seen from the front.

Rev: No legend, Nike advancing right holding up a laurel wreath in her right hand and a palm in her left, LB, reginal year two in right field.

Billon Tetradrachm, Alexandria mint, Reginal year two 269 AD

10.2 grams, 20.5 mm, 0°

GIC 4741 (var.), S11404 (var.)
1 commentsSPQR Coins
gothicus_rome_67.jpg
MARS VLTOR, RIC 67 Rome13 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D. Bronze antoninianus, RIC V 67, VF, Rome mint, 2.029g, 18.5mm, 180o, obverse IMP CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse MARS VLTOR, Mars walking right, transverse spear in right, trophy over shoulder in left; nice portrait. Refers to Claudius' great victory over the Goths at Naissus in Northern Greece. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years. Ex FORVMPodiceps
E96EAA37-65F0-4C39-89B0-6DF16BA344A9.jpeg
Pisidia, Antioch; Claudius II Gothicus 8 viewsAntioch, Pisidia. 268-270 AD. IMP CAES-CLAVDIV, radiate, draped bust right / ANTI-OCHI, Vexillum between two standards, two badges on standards. SR in exergue. ecoli
seleukeia_pisidia_Claud_II.jpg
PISIDIA, Seleuceia; Tyche standing left30 viewsClaudius II Gothicus. PISIDIA, Seleuceia. A.D. 268-270. Æ 31mm. Laureate and cuirassed bust right / Tyche standing left, holding rudder on globe and cornucopia. SNG France 1907; Von Aulock, Pisidiens II 2067. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
Claudius_Gothicus_-_Providentia.jpeg
PROVIDENT AVG, RIC 91 Rome19 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D. Obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Rev: PROVIDENT AVG, Providentia standing left, leaning on column, holding baton and cornucopia, globe at foot. Minted in Rome. Reference: RIC V Pt. 1 91. Ex Maridvnvm, photo credit MaridvnvmPodiceps
Quintillus_29.jpg
Quintillus, RIC V, 2960 viewsQuintillus, AD 270, brother of Claudius II Gothicus
AE antoninianus, 18mm, 3.28g
Rome, AD 270, 6th officina
obv. IMP CM AVR CL QUINTILLVS AVG
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. PROVIDENT AVG
Providentia, stg. l., holding sceptre in l. hand and in r. hand wand over globe a
her feet.
Digamma in r. field
RIC V/1, 29; C.61
about EF, rev. excentric
2 commentsJochen
coin78.jpg
RIC 214 Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus.9 viewsRIC 214 Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus.
Antioch mint. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate
head left / NEPTVN AVG, Neptune standing left
with dolphin & trident. Cohen 183, Sear'88 #3213
Coin #78
cars100
Claudius_II_R693_fac~0.jpg
RIC 5a, p.228, 205 - Claudius II Gothicus, Diana11 viewsClaudius II Gothicus
AR-Antoninian, 268-270 AD, Antioch
Obv.: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG Bust radiate, draped, cuirassed right
Rev.: DIANAE - VICTR Diana standing r. holding bow and drawing arrow from quiver, before her stag standing r. and looking back at her, H = officina 8 in exergue.
Ag, 21mm, 4.24g, 12h
Ref.. RIC 205
Ex London Ancient Coins
shanxi
claudius gothicus mars svltor.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS40 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS (268-270) "MARS VLTOR" AE Antoninianus Obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG - Radiate bust right, draped. Rev: MARS VLTOR – Mars advancing right, holding trophy and spear. Mint: Rome. RIC VI 66; , 3.25 g.
1 commentsdpaul7
CLAUDIUS_II_FIDES_EXERCI.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus15 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus (268-270 AD) AE antoninianus. Rome mint, AD 268-270. Obv.: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate head right. Rev.: Legend should read FIDES EXERCI - note: Mis-spelling [EXNRCI] Fides standing left, holding one standard upright and the other transverse. Reference: RIC 35 vardpaul7
claudius_gothicus_vict.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS21 viewsROMAN EMPIRE- CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS (AD 268-270) Billon Ant ONINIANUS. Obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG - Radiate bust right, cuirassed Rev: VICTORIA AVG - Victory standing left, holding wreath and palm. Rome mint AD 268-270 = RIC Vi, p. 219, 104F; Cohen 293, 2.39 g.
dpaul7
CLAUDIUS_GOTHICUS_VIRTUS.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS23 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS (AD 268-270) Billon Antoninianus. Obv: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG - Radiate bust right, draped Rev: VIRTVS AVG – Mars advancing right, holding trophy and spear. Exe: P Mediolanum mint AD 268-270 = RIC Vi, p. 225, 172; Cohen 315. , 3.33 g. dpaul7
claudius_ii_gothicus_pax_avg.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus21 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus (AD 268-270) AE Antoninianus Obv: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG - Radiate bust right, draped. Rev: PAX AVG – Pax advancing left, holding branch and transverse scepter Exe: T Mediolanum (Milan) mint.RIC Vi, p. 223, 157; Cohen 202. , 4.03 g. dpaul7
claud_ii_gothicus_fides_mil.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus23 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus (AD 268-270) AE Antoninianus. Obv: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG - Radiate bust right, draped Rev: FIDES MILIT - Fides standing left holding two Legionary ensigns. Exe: S Mediolanum mint: AD 268-270 = RIC Vi, p. 223, 149 var.; Cohen 88, Rare! 4.64 g. dpaul7
claudius_ii_gothicus_laetitia.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus28 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus (AD 268-270) AE Antoninianus. Obv: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG - Radiate cuirassed bust right, Rev: LAETITIA AVG - Laetitia standing left, hold wreath and cornucopia Siscia mint AD 268-270 = RIC Vi, p. 226, 181F; Cohen 139, 3.28 g. dpaul7
claudius_ii_gothicus_divo_claudio.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus22 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus (AD 268-270) AE Antoninianus. Obv: DIVO CLAVDIO - Radiate head right Rev: CONSECRATIO is normal legend -- this LOOKS like a scarce variety reading CONSACRATIO (better seen in the hand) – Altar. Exe: P -- Listed in RIC as Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, now known to be Siscia. AD 270 = RIC Vi, p. 233, 261K, 2.16 g. dpaul7
claudius_ii_pax_milan_ric157.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus26 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus (AD 268-270) AE Antoninianus "Pax" Obv: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG - Radiate bust right, draped Rev: PAX AVG – Pax advancing left, holding branch and scepter Exe: T Mediolanum (Milan) mint AD 268-270 = RIC Vi, p. 223, 157; Cohen 202. , 3.67 g. dpaul7
claudius_ii_pax_avg.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS17 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS (268-270 AD) AE Antoninianus. Obv.: Radiate bust right; IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG. Rev.: Soldier standing left holding branch & spear; shield at foot. VIRTVS AVG. Rome mint. Reference: RIC V-1, 109 Rome.dpaul7
CLAUDIUS_II_GOTHICUS_GENIVS_EXERCI_ISSUE_.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus22 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Claudius II Gothicus (268-270 AD) AE Antoninianus. Rome MINT, 269 AD. Obv.: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate draped bust right. Rev.: GENIVS EXERCI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae. ; Weight: 2,5g, Diameter: 22 mm; NOTE: Detector-Find from Portugal. References: Sear5 11340, RIC 48.dpaul7
CLAUDIUS_II_DIVO.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE -- Claudius II Gothicus106 viewsROMAN EMPIRE -- Claudius II Gothicus - Posthumous Issue Antoninianus (270 AD) Milan mint. Obv.: Radiate bist right. DIVO CLAVDIO Rev.: Plain altar with flames above. CONSECRATION. Reference: RIC V-1, 261 Milan.dpaul7
Claudius_II_Gothicus_AE_Antoninianus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE / Emperor Claudius II Gothicus ( AD 268-270 ) 24 viewsAE Antoninianus , with a superb portrait.
Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right
Reverse: FIDES MILIT, Fides ( goddess of trust ) standing left holding two Legionary ensigns. S in Exergue.
Mediolanum ( Milan ) mint AD 268-270.
Weight: 3.4 gr. Diameter: 18 mm.
Reference: RIC VI 149 Mediolanum.

Coin is listed as a masterpiece ;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-126910

**The Golden Legend of 1260 AD recounts how St. Valentine refused to deny Christ before the "Emperor Claudius" in 270 AD ( in some ref ; 269 AD as he was beheaded in that year 269 AD ,per Sam) and as a result was beheaded. Since then, February 14 marks Valentine's Day, a day set aside by the Christian church in memory of the Roman priest and physician.
Sam
moneta 469.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Claudius II Gothicus, Egypt, Alexandria, Tetradrachm33 viewsobv: Laureate bust right
rev: Eagle standing right, holding wreath in beak; palm over shoulder. L to left, Gamma to right.
Struck 270 A.D. at Alexandria, Egypt
Milne 4291?
Jericho
CLAUDIUS_II_Tetradrachm.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS. AE TETRADRACHM of Alexandria. Struck A.D.268 - 26915 viewsObverse: AVT K KLAVΔIOC CEB. Laureate and cuirassed bust of Claudius II facing right.
Reverse: Eagle standing facing left, head looking back to right, holding wreath in beak; in field L B (= regnal year 2 = A.D.268-269).
Not in GICV.

Ex Harlan J Berk
*Alex
Claudius II 5ob.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius Gothicus558 viewsObv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Bust: Radiate & cuirassed bust right
Rev: ADVENTVS AVG
Claudius on horseback left, holding scepter and raising hand in salute.
Date: 268-270 AD
Denom: Antoninianus
RIC 13f
2 commentsBluefish
moneta 482.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius Gothicus, Antioch49 viewsClaudius Gothicus Antoninianus
obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
rev: CONSER AVG. Serapis standing left, raising right hand, holding sceptre in left.
Struck 268-270 A.D. at Antioch
RIC-V (Part 1) 201
Van Meter 6
Jericho
moneta 651.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius Gothicus, Antonianus44 viewsobv: Radiate, draped and cuirsassed bust right
rev: Libertas standing, holding tesera (plochka) and cornucopiae
Struck at unknown mint
Jericho
bpS1P9ClaudiusII.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II (Gothicus)49 viewsObv: DIVO CLAVDIO
Radiate head right.
Rev: CONSECRATIO
Eagle standing left, head turned.
Billon Antoninianus, 2.15 gm, 18.3 mm, Rome Sear 3227
Comment: Issued during the short reign of his brother, Quintillus or possibly under Aurelian.
Massanutten
bpS1P5ClaudiusII.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II (Gothicus)61 viewsObv: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust, right.
Rev: PAX AVG
Pax standing left, holding olive branch and transverse sceptre.
Antoninianus, 3.2 gm, 20.1 mm, Siscia RIC 186
ex-Forum
Massanutten
bpS1P6ClaudiusII.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II (Gothicus)54 viewsObv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Radiate and draped bust right
Rev: SALVS AVG
Salus standing left, feeding serpent raising from low altar.
Billon Antoninianus, 2.2 gm, 19 mm, Siscia Sear 3219
1 commentsMassanutten
bpS1P8ClaudiusII.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II (Gothicus)87 viewsObv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev: LIBERALITAS AVG
Liberalitas standing left, holding coin counting board (abacus) and cornucopiae.
Billon Antoninianus, 2 gm, 19.4 mm, Rome RIC 57
Massanutten
bpS1P7ClaudiusII22.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II (Gothicus)41 viewsObv: DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP
Laureate and draped head, right.
Rev: REQVIES OPTIMOR MERITORVM
Divus Claudius seated left on curule chair.
Ae4, 1.6 gm, 12.1 mm, Thessalonica RIC 26
Comment: Issued by Constantine. Unlisted in RIC for officina B.
Massanutten
bpS1P7ClaudiusII22XX.jpg
Roman Empire, Claudius II (Gothicus)446 viewsObv: DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP
Laureate and draped bust, right.
Rev: REQVIES OPTIMOR MERITORVM
Divus Claudius seated left on curule chair.
1.6 gm, 12.1 mm, Thessalonica RIC 26
Mintmark •TS•B•
Comment: Unlisted in RIC for officina B.
Previously attested on Forum ID Board.
Issued by Constantine the Great in 317-18.
Submitted by Massanutten
Massanutten
bpS1P4ClaudiusII.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II (Gothicus)79 viewsObv: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust, right.
Rev: ANNONA AVG
Annona standing left, right foot on prow, holding corn ears and cornucopia.
Billon Antoninianus, 3.3 gm, 19 mm, Rome RIC 18
Ex Martin Griffiths
Massanutten
C_Obv and Rev_1.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II billion Ant 27 viewsClaudius II Gothicus Billion Antoninianus A.D. 268-270 struck at Antioch
Obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate head left
Rev: VIRTVS AVG, Minerva standing right, resting on shield and holding spear, blank in ex
RIC Vi : 225
1 commentsdanikshin
7MG_0994_Claudius_Avers_320_320.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus39 viewsClaudius II Gothicus ニ Antoninianus. Antioch Mint. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head left / IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left holding patera and scepter, peacock at feet, B in ex. RIC 212, Cohen 133.

dupondius
6MG_1008_Claudius_left_black_Avers_640_320.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus36 viewsClaudius II AE Antoninianus. Antioch, AD 268-270. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head left / IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, peacock at her feet. Cohen 133. RIC 212L

*AAH* Claudius II AE Ant "Juno" *FTN Claudius II "Gothicus" AD 268-270 AE Antoninianus "Claudius is a strong and valiant leader." Obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG - Radiate head left Rev: IVNO REGINA- Juno standing left, peacock at her feet. Antioch mint: AD 268-270 = RIC Vi, 212L, page 229 - Cohen 133 *FTN = First time notice of the listing of this RIC type by AAH (02July04)2.80g.
dupondius
Picture_4.png
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus 10 viewsClaudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus. Rome mint RIC 111 , 268-270 AD. IMP CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head right / VIRTVS AVG, soldier leaning on shield, holding spear. there is what looks like a very faint Epsilon in right field going off the planchet to the right of the midsection on the reverse.jessvc1
Claudius_ges~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus12 viewsFranz-Josef M
388_claudius_gothicus_ges.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus8 viewsClaudius Gothicus
268 - 270
Antoninian
Avers: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG
Revers: PAX AVG
weight: 2,8 g
diameter: 19 - 20 mm
RIC: 79 ff.
Franz-Josef M
DivusClaudiusII0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus - AE antoninianus264 viewsTarraco or Mediolanum
end 270 - early 271 AD
radiate head right
DIVO CLAVDIO
altar with flames above, front divided into four sections with dot in each section
CONSECRATIO
(3. officina) T
RIC V-1, 261
2,73 g 19-18 mm

very rare !!!!
http://www.ric.mom.fr/en/coin/1273

Märkl states in his work "The Imperial Mints during the Reign of Claudius II. Gothicus and their Issues" that RIC attribute these coins wrongly to Milan (or Gallic mint) but they are in fact from Tarraco. No two mints in empire were allowed to strike same issue. Tarraco mint should have made "DIVO CLAVDIO GOTHICO" but this coin has only short (Siscian) legend: "DIVO CLAVDIO". Two known exemplars with short legend are mentioned by Märkl.
2 commentsJohny SYSEL
mars_ultor_mini.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus12 viewsobv. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG,
radiate draped bust right
rev. MARS VLTOR,
Mars walking right, holding spear and trophy.
Ref.: RIC 66A(?)

Claudius Gothicus (aka Claudius II) was the first of the soldier-emperors. He ruled for less than two years (268–270 AD). His destruction of the Gothic cavalry earned him the name of Gothicus. He died of smallpox in January 270 AD.
Jani
glaudius_mini.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus AE antoninianus 269 AD10 viewsobv. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG,
radiate bust right
rev. IOVI STATORI,
Jupiter standing, looking right, holding thunderbolt and spectre
Ref.: RIC V-1, 52 Rome
18-22 mm, 2.98 g.
JaniO
059A.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus Antoninianus73 viewsRIC Vb 225 Antioch 268 A.D.
3.42 g, 20 mm x 21 mm
IMP C CLAVDIVS PF AVG, radiate head left
VIRTVS AVG, Minerva standing right, holding spear, resting hand on shield
Mark Z
Clavdivs-II-Gothicus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus Antoninianus September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.20 viewsClaudius II Gothicus Antoninianus
September 268 - August or September 270 A.D. - died from plague


From Helvetica's RIC Lists:

IMP CM AVR CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right, two dots below/

SALVS AVG, Salus standing right, feeding serpent in arms, SPQR in exe. RIC 242 variation.

Serdica mint.

Numismatische Zeitschrift No.16, pg 439.

Scarce

"Under Claudius Serdica struck in three officinae and marked their coins, as mentioned
above, with 1, 2, or 3 dots •, ••, ••• beneath the bust, although unmarked coins are
know to exist. However, whether a coin really is unmarked can only be checked on
really well preserved, unworn coins, as the dot was very small and could be worn away
fairly quickly. "

"We will also point out that the letters SPQR in the exergue are not really a mintmark
but the continuation i.e. the end of the reverse legend. "


"This mint only made one issue and that comprised entirely of devalued Antoniniani."

Thanks to Will Hooton for his assistance
George
Photo_2006_6_12_21_5_13_edited.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus FORTVNAE RED51 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, 268-270 A.D., Milan mint.
OBV: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG, radiate, draped bust right.
REV: FORTVNAE RED, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia, S in exergue.
ancientcoins
coins1 246.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus VICTORIA AVG44 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, 268-70 A.D.
OBV: IMP C CLAVDIUS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right.
REV: VICTORIA AVG, Victoria standing left with wreath and cornucopia.

Not the best example, but it has a decent portrait.
ancientcoins
moneta 575.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus, Antioch98 viewsClaudius Gothicus Antoninianus
obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG. Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
rev: AEQVITAS AVG. Aequitas standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae
Struck 268-270 A.D. at Antioch
RIC V (pt 1) 197
Van Meter 3
1 commentsJericho
claudius_ges.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus, Antoninianus, Fides Exerci15 viewsFranz-Josef M
claudius_.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus, Consecratio11 viewsFranz-Josef M
moneta 500b black.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus, Double-strike (both sides)39 viewsobv: Radiate bust right
rev: Fides standing, holding two standards

Double-struck on both sides.
Jericho
CLAUDIUS_II_DIVO_USTRINUM.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS. Commemorative AE Antoninianus of Cyzicus. Struck A.D.270 - 271, probably under Aurelian20 viewsObverse: DIVO CLAVDIO. Radiate head of Claudius II Gothicus facing right, three pellets below.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO. Ustrinum or pyre of three storeys, arch in lowest storey, uppermost storey flanked by two statues, flames (or perhaps an eagle) rising from summit.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 2.9gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC V : 267
RARE
*Alex
gothico~0.jpg
Roman Empire, CLAUDIUS II Gothicus. Commemorative AE Posthumous Antoninianus of Mediolanum, struck 270 - 271.511 viewsDivus Claudius Gothicus
Obv: DIVO CLAVDIO GOTHICO
Radiate head right,
Rev: CONSECRATIO
Altar, with flame above, divided in four squares with a dot inside of each square.
Base Antoninianus, traces of silvering (3.09g).
RIC Milan 264; Normanby 1141; Cunetio 2317; [Online RIC temp. #1272].
Quite possibly the finest known!
5 commentsOldMoney
CLAUDIUS_II_DIVO_CONSTANTINE~0.JPG
Roman Empire, CLAUDIUS II Gothicus. Commemorative AE3 of Thessalonika. Struck A.D.317 - 318 under Constantine I. 35 viewsObverse: DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP. Laureate and veiled head of Claudius facing right.
Reverse: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM. Claudius seated facing left on curule chair, raising right hand and holding sceptre in left; in exergue, •TS•Γ•.
RIC VII : 26 (r5)
EXTREMELY RARE
*Alex
ClaudiusAor.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II, Gothicus34 viewsAntoninianus 18x19.8 mm
268-270 AD
Obv. IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG
Bust right, radiate
Rev. FIDES MILIT
Fides standing left between
two standards. S in exergue.
gparch
Screenshot_2019-04-12_14_07_49.png
Roman Imperial, Claudius II Gothicus as Augustus, AE Antoninianus. Added to the Wildwinds site.11 viewsCyzicus 268-270 A.D. 4.12g - 20.3mm, Axis 12h.

Obv: IMP CLAVDIVS PF AVG - Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right. No dots beneath bust.

Rev: FORTVNA REDUX - Fortuna standing left with rudder and cornucopiae. No Mintmark.

RIC V-I 234.
Christian Scarlioli
RIC_Online_982.jpg
Roman Imperial: Claudius II Gothicus (268-270 CE) Æ Antoniniani, Cyzicus (RIC Online 982; RIC 230)5 viewsObv: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG; Bust right, radiate, cuirassed
Rev: FIDES MILITVM; Fides standing left, holding standard in right hand and long transverse scepter in left hand

Extremely rare with this bust; third known specimen
Quant.Geek
RIC_Online_106.jpg
Roman Imperial: Claudius II Gothicus (268-270 CE) Æ Antoniniani, Rome (RIC Online 106)8 viewsObv: IMP C M AVR CLAVDIVS P F AVG; Bust right, radiate, cuirassed and draped with paludamentum, seen from rear
Rev: PROVIDENT AVG; Providentia standing left, holding baton in right hand and cornucopiae in left hand, with left elbow leaning on column; at feet to left globe

Classified as Rare
Quant.Geek
4050502.jpg
Roman Imperial: Claudius II Gothicus (268-270 CE) Æ Antoninianus, Antioch 6 viewsObv: IMP C M AVR CLAVDIVS P F AVG; radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: SALVS AVG; Isis standing left, holding sistrum and bucket
Quant.Geek
Claudius_II_Gothicus_RIC_VII-26.jpg
Roman Imperial: Divus Claudius II Gothicus (268-270 CE) Æ Fractional Follis, Thessalonica (RIC VII 26)6 viewsObv: DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP; laureate and veiled head right
Rev: REQVIES OPTIM-ORVM MERITORVM; Divus Claudius seated left on curule chair, raising hand and holding scepter; •TS•Γ• in exergue

Quant.Geek
RI_122m_obv.jpg
Roman, Claudius II Gothicus256 viewsA nice strike with decent centering leading to a nice portrait overall.1 commentsmaridvnvm
Claudius_II_Gothicus_AE_Antoninianus~0.jpg
ROMAN, Emperor Claudius II Gothicus ( AD 268-270 )170 viewsAE Antoninianus , with a superb portrait , (as found patina)
Obverse: IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right 
Reverse: FIDES MILIT, Fides ( goddess of trust )standing left holding two Legionary ensigns. S in Exergue.
Mediolanum ( Milan ) mint AD 268-270.
Weight: 3.4 gr. Max Diameter: 18 mm.
Reference: RIC VI 149 Mediolanum.



**The Golden Legend of 1260 AD recounts how St. Valentine refused to deny Christ before the "Emperor Claudius" in 270 AD ( in some ref ; 269 AD as he was beheaded in that year 269 AD ,per Sam) and as a result was beheaded. Since then, February 14 marks Valentine's Day, a day set aside by the Christian church in memory of the Roman priest and physician.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
4 commentsSam
CLAUD2_TET_LB.JPG
Struck A.D.268 - 269. CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS. Billon Tetradrachm of Alexandria. 11 viewsObverse: AVT K KLAVΔIOC CEB. Laureate and cuirassed bust of Claudius II facing right.
Reverse: No legend. Eagle standing facing left, head looking back to right, holding wreath in beak; in field L B (= regnal year 2 = A.D.268-269).
Diameter: 20mm | Weight: 10.20gms | Die Axis: 12
Curtis : 1683 | BMC : 2333
Ex Harlan J Berk (USA)
*Alex
Claudius_2_Liberitas.JPG
Struck A.D.268. CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS. AE Antoninianus of Siscia6 viewsObverse: IMP CLAVDIVS AVG. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Claudius II facing right.
Reverse: LIBERITAS AVG. Liberitas standing facing left, holding cap of liberty (pileus) in right hand and cornucopiae in left; in right field, S.
Diameter: 20mm | Weight: 2.5gms | Die Axis: 12
RIC V i : 184
*Alex
Claudius_II_Gothicus_Eagle.JPG
Struck A.D.270 - 271, probably under Aurelian. DIVUS CLAUDIUS II. Commemorative AE Antoninianus of Rome7 viewsObverse: DIVO CLAVDIO. Radiate head of Claudius II facing right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO. Eagle standing facing left, head turned right.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 3.0gms | Die Axis: 12
RIC V i : 266
*Alex
CLAUDIUS_II_DIVO_USTRINUM_(Pyre).JPG
Struck A.D.270 - 271, probably under Aurelian. DIVUS CLAUDIUS II. Commemorative AE Antoninianus of Cyzicus13 viewsObverse: DIVO CLAVDIO. Radiate head of Claudius II Gothicus facing right, three pellets below.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO. Ustrinum or pyre of three storeys, arch in lowest storey, uppermost storey flanked by two statues, flames or smoke (or possibly an eagle) rising from circular opening at summit.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 2.9gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC V i : 267 (RIC mentions only two pellets, but this might simply be an error)
VERY RARE
1 comments*Alex
tetricusI_barbaric.jpg
Tetricus I, barbarous radiate, Nobilitas38 viewsAE 3, 16mm, 2.58g
struck c. AD 270-280
obv. [IMP C T]ETRICVS P A
bearded bust, draped and radiate, r.
rev. NOBI[LITAS AGG]
Nobilitas, stg. r., with sceptre and globe
very rare, light brown patina
from a hoard in Northern France

The NOBILITAS type is rare and so is this imitation. These barbarious radiates have been struck between Claudius II Gothicus and c.270 when Aurelian has forbidden the usage of these small coins in the Empire.
Jochen
claudiusII_193.jpg
Uberitas254 viewsClaudius II Gothicus 268 - 270
AR - Antoninian, 2.78g, 19mm
Siscia 1. officina
obv. IMP CLAVDIVS AVG
cuirassed bust, radiate head r.
rev. VBER[IT]AS AVG
Uberitas standing l., holding cornucopiae and purse
RIC V, 193; C.286
good F, portrait!
UBERITAS, personification of richness and abundance,
go on from the idea of fertility goddesses. Introduced AD 249
by Decius. The object in her r. hand is interpreted as
1 purse,
2 bundle of grapes, or
3 udder of a cow
Jochen
CLAUDIUS_II_USTRINUM.JPG
USTRINUM (PYRE), CLAUDIUS II66 viewsCommemorative AE Antoninianus of Cyzicus, struck A.D.270 - 271, probably under Aurelian.
Obverse: DIVO CLAVDIO. Radiate head of Claudius II Gothicus facing right, three pellets below.
Reverse: CONSACRATIO. Ustrinum or pyre of three storeys, arch in lowest storey, uppermost storey flanked by two statues, flames rising from circular opening at summit.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 2.9gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC V i : 267
(RIC mentions only two pellets, but this might simply be an error)
*Alex
TrajanDeciusRIC11b.jpg
[1108a] Trajan Decius, July 249 - June or July 251 A.D. 144 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC 11b, RSC 4, choice EF, Rome mint, 3.923g, 23.3mm, 0o, 249 - 251 A.D.; Obverse: IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, from behind; Reverse: ADVENTVS AVG, Trajan Decius on horseback left, raising right hand and holding scepter. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Trajan Decius (249-251 A.D.) and Usurpers During His Reign

Geoffrey Nathan and Robin McMahon

Geoffrey Nathan
San Diego State University



Early Life and Public Career

Any discussion of Decius (and for most third century emperors) must be prefaced by an understanding that the historical tradition is incomplete, fragmentary, and not wholly trustworthy. Any reconstruction of his life and reign will therefore be to some degree speculative. With that caveat in mind, Gaius Messius Quintus Decius was born, to a provincial yet aristocratic Senatorial family during the transitional Severan age, possibly in 201. His family may have been from Italian stock, although that is by no means certain. Attempts to describe his life previous to the consulship are problematic, although he did serve as governor in Moesia in the mid-230's. That also means that Decius probably had been a member of the Senate for some time. We know little else about his early life, other than at some point he married Herennia Cupressenia Etruscilla, apparently from the Senatorial ordo as well. His political fortunes rose in the troubled 240's. As instability grew in the mid-third century, Philip the Arab charged Decius, suffect consul for 249, with restoring order along the Danubian frontier. In addition to the border unrest, a low-level army officer, Tiberius Claudius Marinus Pacatianus, had led a rebellion of the armies in Pannonia and Moesia. For a short time, Marinus apparently claimed the imperial purple and along with movements of the Gepidae, represented a clear threat to the stability of Philip's rule.

Philip's decision to send Decius was perhaps more motivated by political expediency than by any great confidence in his military abilities. Decius had an aristocratic pedigree, and so was likely to have been a popular choice with a Senate that was increasingly doubtful of Philip's abilities. He was also a native of Sirmium in Pannonia Inferior, and so was likely familiar with the intricacies of life and politics in the region. Finally, he had, of course, served as governor of the wayward province, and thus undoubtedly had connections there among the civil and military curia--ones that Philip hoped Decius could exploit. Thus, the consul was charged with restoring order along one of the Empire's most problematic borders. Accompanied by his son, Herennius, Decius traveled to Moesia, probably to reclaim the Legio IV Flavia Felix and possibly the Legio XI, both of which were stationed in that province.

Shortly before his arrival, Marinus was killed and local troops quickly named Decius emperor, encouraging him to assert this newfound responsibility in a war against Philip. Philip's inability to deal decisively with the worsening military crises on the borders, the fear of punishment, and the opportunity for enrichment no doubt motivated the soldiers to place the purple on a local leader--a now increasingly common practice. Decius' lineage also probably appealed to traditionalists in Rome, who begrudged Philip his humble origins and his possible involvement in the death of Gordian III. Philip led out an army in June of 249 to meet his newest rival for the purple and at an unknown location (possibly Verona or Beroea) lost the battle. Whether Philip died in the fighting or was assassinated by his own troops--another increasingly common practice--is unknown. Philip's son, Philip Junior, recently made an Augustus, was quickly put to death by the Praetorian Guard in Rome. Decius was the first emperor to come from the Balkans region. How much he wanted to serve is unknown. While this account undoubtedly contains fictional elements, with several popular literary topoi, the rough outlines of the story are undoubtedly true: we have epigraphic evidence in July for support among the Pannonian Legio X, suggesting that Decius owed his accession in no small part to local troops

Publicity and Power
The victory of an established Senatorial aristocrat was one that seemed to reassert the authority and place of traditional political power, despite the means of Decius' ascension. The new emperor, no doubt aware of the perils of his position, seems to have embarked upon a highly conservative program of imperial propaganda to endear himself to the Roman aristocracy and to the troops who had thrust the purple upon him. One of his earliest acts was to take the honorific name of Trajan, whose status as the greatest of all emperors after Augustus was now becoming firmly established. The fact that Trajan had commanded legions in Upper Germany and had close links to both Pannonia and Moesia at the time of his accession invited the comparison. The name was cleverly chosen: Trajan had been an active and successful general throughout his reign, but had also established a reputation for a widely popular civil government.

Decius also served as consul in every year of his reign and took for himself traditional republican powers, another way to underscore his authority and conservatism. He even tried to revive the long defunct office of censor in 251, purportedly offering it to the future emperor, Valerian. Decius moreover portrayed himself as an activist general and soldier. In addition to leading military campaigns personally, he often directly bestowed honors upon his troops, high and low alike. He also holds the dubious distinction of being the first emperor to have died fighting a foreign army in battle. Finally, in 250, he associated his sons Herennius and Hostilianus in his rule by making them Caesars, eventually raising the former (and elder) to Augustus. Undoubtedly, Decius sought to create a dynasty in much the same way the Gordians had in the previous decade. This traditionalism may to be a large extent, however, a construction rather than a reality. When we abandon the literary tradition and look instead at other forms of evidence, his imperial aims are less clear. The legal record, extremely thin, is only vaguely supportive of a conservative policy: most of his surviving enactments deal with private law issues consistent with earlier Severan jurisprudence.

On the other hand in late 249, when Decius returned to Rome, he embarked upon an active building program in the capital. After a destructive fire, he extensively restored the Colosseum. He later commissioned the opulent Decian Baths along the Aventine. He perhaps also was responsible for the construction of the Decian Portico. Such activities contrasted to a twenty-year period of relative building inactivity. Both the kind of building projects and their stylistic qualities suggest an attempt to recall the glories of the past. The numismatic evidence also suggests some degree of traditionalism. It is there that we see the first references to Trajan Decius, as well as an association with both Pannonia and Dacia. His Liberitas and Uberitas issues, combined with his wife's Pudicitia and his sons' Princeps Iuventi coins, all seem to rearticulate traditional ideology. Legends tend to be conservative, so this is hardly surprising, but there were no great innovations to suggest a new set of ideological principles. In sum, while the literary reconstructions of Decius' life are problematic, it seems clear that traditionalism was an important factor in his administration, especially in the wake of Philip's reign.

The Persecution of Christians
Another possible aspect of this conservatism was a reported wide-scale attack on the growing Christian minority. The third century saw the slow creation of sizeable communities in the Empire's urban populations. For the first time, if we are to believe Christian sources, an Empire-wide persecution of Christians was begun under Decius. The state required all citizens to sacrifice to the state gods and be in receipt of a libellus, a certificate from a temple confirming the act. The rationale for the emperor's actions, however, is not entirely clear. Eusebius writes he did so because he hated Philip, who purportedly was a secret Christian. Probably the enmity was real, but it seems unconnected to the introduction of these policies. More likely, if Decius did indeed seek to persecute Christians, he was reacting to the growing visibility of the religion, especially in the city of Rome itself. One of the more prominent martyrs of the age was Fabian, the bishop of the imperial capital.

But the new policy of public religiosity was much more probably a program to reassert traditional public piety, consistent with some of the other conservative initiatives introduced during the emperor's short reign. The libelli themselves were largely generalized in nature and language, and there is no implication that they were directed at any one group per se. Whatever intended effect it may have had on Christianity was thus to a degree unplanned. Christians would have no doubt seen it differently. It is possible then that fourth and fifth century Christian polemicists have misinterpreted (whether purposefully or not) Decius' libelli. In the particular cases of Eusebius and Lactantius, both wrote in the wake of the great persecution of Diocletian and no doubt magnified upon the theme of the tyrant-persecutor. A hostile tradition notwithstanding, the new requirements did impact Christians most acutely, causing considerable division in the growing ranks of the new religion.

Imperial and Military Problems
Like other third century emperors, Decius was not free of threats to his authority, either from within or without. The revolt of Jotapianus, either in Syria or Cappadocia, had actually begun in Philip's reign, but was quickly quelled after Decius' accession. Probably the usurper's own soldiers murdered the would-be emperor, since the accounts state that his body was delivered to Decius while still in Rome in the summer of 249.
A potentially more serious revolt broke out while Decius was out of Rome in 250 fighting the Goths. Julius Valens Licinianus, also a member of the Senatorial aristocracy with some popular support, took the purple at the Empire's capital. It appears to have been relatively short-lived grab for power, ending in a few days with his execution. The governor of Macedon, Titus Julius Priscus, also permitted himself to be proclaimed Augustus at Philippopolis towards the end of 251, probably with Gothic collusion. The Senate declared him a public enemy almost as soon as he chose usurpation. He probably survived Decius, but is likely to have perished when Gallus became emperor.

Of greater concern than sporadic rebellions, which were relatively minor, were the vitreous northern borders. For the first time, a new and aggressive Germanic people, the Goths, crossed into and raided Roman territory in the 250's. At the time of Decius' forced accession, the Gepidae and the Carpi were both raiding deep into the Moesian provinces. They, along with the Goths, raided Pannonia and Dacia as well. Decius was forced to fight campaigns each year of his reign, doing his best to keep the borders stable.

His final campaign in 251 led to the death of his son, Herennius, and to his own. Decius led a successful attack on the Carpi, pushing them out of Dacia. But Moesia Inferior had been left largely undefended and Cniva, king of the Goths, led a sizeable portion of his army into the province. The emperor, after chasing the Germanic force around the region, engaged Cniva's forces outside of Philippopolis, which had recently been sacked by the king and held by the rebel, Priscus. It was here that his elder son was slain by an arrow and the emperor, seeking to reassure his troops, famously proclaimed that the death of one soldier was not a great loss to the Republic. Cniva then led his troops homeward, laden with the spoils of war. The loss became Decius' undoing. Trebonianus Gallus, one of the emperor's commanders, may have revolted, although it is not entirely clear. Instead of regrouping his forces and re-securing the borders, Decius unwisely sought to chase down Cniva before he left Roman territory. His decision may have been motivated by his son's death (despite his insistence otherwise) or it may have been an attempt to salvage what had been a failed campaign. In either case, it was ill-advised.

It was at Abrittus, about 100 kilometers northeast of Nicopolis that Decius finally met his death. Hoping to cut off Cniva's escape route (and perhaps minimize any help from Gallus), Decius' army was itself cut off in the marshy terrain. The details are sketchy, but Cniva divided his seventy thousand man army into three groups and surrounded the emperor's force. On July 1st, the emperor and most of his troops were slain. In the aftermath, the survivors named Trebonianus Gallus emperor, a decision subsequently confirmed by the Senate. Some contemporaries called the death tragic; others heroic. An Altar of Decius was erected where the emperor fell, still apparently famous two centuries later. Decius and Herennius may have even been deified. Christian polemicists, as might be expected, took pleasure in describing Decius' body being stripped and left on the battlefield to be devoured by animals. Whatever else, his was the first death of an emperor at the hands of an enemy of Rome. But even the account of his death, along with that of his son, must be looked on suspiciously. Their deaths bring to mind the sacrificial devotions of the famous Republican Decii father and son, P. Decius Mus senior and junior. The circumstances of Decius' death, therefore, are perhaps as opaque as those of his accession.

Assessment
In spite of gaining some modicum of praise from both ancient and modern observers, Decius' reign was not well-suited to the demands of a rapidly changing empire. Conservatism may have been popular among a certain portion of the Roman elite, but the old aristocracy's power and influence all but disappeared in the third century. Decius clearly had a broader vision of what he wanted to accomplish in his reign than many of his contemporaries, and certainly he was vigorous, but he was also a man who was not sufficiently flexible when the moment called for it. His religious policy caused major disruptions in Rome and; in contrast to some of the other barracks emperors, Decius proved himself less than apt when dealing with Rome's Germanic foes. His death may have been heroic, but it was unnecessary and unsuccessful. This best sums up Decius Trajan's reign.

Ancient Sources

Relatively little remains about Decius' reign. If there were a biography of Decius in the SHA, it no longer survives, although there are scattered references to his rule in the biographies of Claudius II Gothicus and Aurelian. Zosimus, i: 21-23, Aurelius Victor, 29-30, Zonaras 12, Eutropius 9, Jordanes Get. 17-8, and Sylvius Polemius 37-40 have brief accounts of his reign. There are fragments in John of Antioch, fr. 148 and Dexippus, fr. 18. Eusebius, vi: 39-41, vii:1, 11, 22, and viii:4, discusses his persecution, and there are passing references to his persecution in Socrates and Lactantius. Inscriptions and coinage are relatively abundant.

Copyright (C) 2002, Geoffrey Nathan and Robin McMahon. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of the Roman Emperors and their Families; http://www.roman-emperors.org/decius.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
GalllienusRIC163.jpg
[1113a] Gallienus, August 253 - 24 March 268 A.D.72 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC 163, RSC 72, choice EF, Rome mint, 3.716g, 21.6mm, 180o, 268 A.D.; Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; Reverse: APOLLINI CONS AVG, centaur walking right drawing bow, Z in exergue; struck on a full and round flan, rare this nice. Commemorates vows to Apollo invoking his protection against the revolt of Aureolus. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian (A.D. 253-260) and Gallienus (A.D. 253-268)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University


P. Licinius Valerianus, or Valerian, was unusual for his time period in that he was an emperor who came from an old Roman senatorial family. He was likely born shortly before 200 A.D., but little is known of his early life. Valerian married Egnatia Mariniana and had two sons, Gallienus and Valerian Junior. Gallienus was born around 218. Valerian makes his first appearance in the sources in 238 A.D. as an ex-consul and princeps senatus negotiating with (more likely than serving on) the embassy sent to Rome by Gordian I's African legions to secure senatorial approval of Gordian's rebellion against and replacement of Maximinus Thrax as emperor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae probably report accurately that Trajan Decius, on the recommendation of the Senate, offered Valerian the censorship in 251. Although the senatus consultum cited and the specific office are of doubtful authenticity, the high reputation Valerian possessed in the Senate and his association with the government under Decius probably are truthful aspects of the story. In 253 Valerian was apparently commanding in Raetia and Noricum when Trebonianus Gallus sent him to bring legions from Gaul and Germany to Italy for the struggle with the forces of Aemilianus. After Gallus' troops killed him and his son and joined Aemilianus, Valerian's men proclaimed their general emperor and their arrival in Italy caused Aemilianus' soldiers to desert and kill their commander and join Valerian's forces in acclaiming Valerian as emperor.

The Senate presumably was pleased to ratify the position of Valerian, one of their own, as emperor and they also accepted his son and colleague, P. Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, as Augustus, rather than just as Caesar. Valerian apparently realized the necessity of sharing power equally with his son and of dividing their efforts geographically, with Gallienus responsible for the West and Valerian himself concentrating on the East. The biographies of Valerian and Gallienus in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, attributed to Trebellius Pollio, are not especially helpful in putting together an account of their joint reign. The life of Valerian is fragmentary and that of Gallienus projects an extremely biased negative interpretation of his career.

Gallienus in the early years of the joint reign concentrated, with some success, on protecting Gaul and the Rhine frontier by driving back Germanic tribes and fortifying cities such as Cologne and Trier. In a move which would characterize later diplomacy with Germans, Gallienus concluded an alliance with one of their chieftains, presumably to assist the Romans in protecting the empire from other Germanic tribes. The invasions increased in number around 257-258 as the Franks entered Gaul and Spain, destroying Tarraco (Tarragona), and the Alamanni invaded Italy. Gallienus defeated the Alamanni at Milan, but soon was faced with the revolts in Pannonia and Moesia led first by his general there, Ingenuus, and then by Regalianus, commander in Illyricum. Gallienus put down these rebellions by 260 and secured stability in the region by concluding an alliance with the Marcomannic king, whose daughter Pipa the emperor apparently accepted as his concubine although he was still married to Cornelia Salonina.

In the East, Valerian had succeeded by A.D. 257 in rescuing Antioch in Syria from Persian control, at least temporarily, but was soon faced with a major invasion of the Goths in Asia Minor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae biography of Aurelian has Valerian appear to speak in the Baths at Byzantium to publicly commend Aurelian for his success in driving back the Goths and reward him with the consulship and even with adoption as imperial successor. However, it is not clear that Valerian even reached Byzantium because he sent Felix to that city while he remained to protect the eastern section of Asia Minor and then returned to Antioch to guard it against renewed Persian attacks. It was at this point, around 259, that Valerian moved to defend Edessa and his troops lost significant numbers to the plague. Valerian tried to negotiate a peace with the Persian king, Sapor, but was captured by treachery and taken into captivity. The ultimate humiliation of a Roman emperor by a foreign leader was enacted through Sapor's use of Valerian as a human stepping-stool to assist the Persian king in mounting his horse and Valerian's body was later skinned to produce a lasting trophy of Roman submission.

Eusebius discusses the policy of Valerian toward the Christians and says that, after initially treating them most positively, Valerian was persuaded by Macrianus to lead another persecution against them. Valerian in fact after his brutal imprisonment and death in Persia would serve as a negative moral exemplum for some Latin Christian writers who gleefully pointed out that those who oppose the true God receive their just desserts.

Eusebius also credits Gallienus with reversing his father's policy and establishing peace with the Church, citing imperial edicts which established freedom of worship and even restored some lost property. Paul Keresztes claims that Gallienus in fact established a peace with Christians that lasted for forty-three years, from A.D. 260 until 303, and gave the community a kind of legal status which they had previously lacked.

Andreas Alföldi details a growing separation between Gallienus and his father which goes well beyond the geographical one which had developed out of military necessity. In addition to the strikingly different policies, just described, which they pursued toward the Christians, Gallienus began to make his military independence clear through changes in coin inscriptions and by 258 he had created his central cavalry unit and stationed it at Milan. This independent force, which was under the command of a man of equestrian rank and soon stood on a level at least equal to that of the Praetorian Guard, would play a significant role in Gallienus' upcoming battles and, of course, was a foretoken of a new trend for military organization in the future. Alföldi cites as evidence of the increasing separation between the joint emperors the statement that Gallienus did not even seek his father's return from captivity, which Lactantius of course interpreted as part of Valerian's divine punishment, but one wonders what indeed Gallienus might have done and his "indifference" may have been instead his attempt to reassert confidence in his armies and not dwell on the depressing and humiliating servitude and ultimate death of Valerian. Another reform which Alföldi discusses as part of Gallienus' independent stand is his exclusion of the senatorial class from major military commands. H.M.D. Parker credits Gallienus with beginning to separate the civil and military functions of Rome's provincial governors, thus making senatorial governors purely civil administrators and starting to replace them even in this reduced role by equestrians. The disappearance in this period of the S.C. stamp of senatorial authority on bronze coins was probably also seen as an attack on the prestige of the order, although the debasement of the silver coinage had by this time practically reached the point where the "silver" coins were themselves essentially bronze and the change may have been more for economic than for political reasons. Gallienus' exclusion of senators from military command further broke down class distinctions because sons of centurions were by this time regularly given equestrian rank and the move further accelerated the alienation of Rome as center of the Empire. In addition, the bitterness of the senatorial class over Gallienus' policy most likely explains the hatred of Latin writers toward this particular emperor.

Although Gallienus' military innovations may have made his forces more effective, he still had to face numerous challenges to his authority.In addition to systemic invasions and revolts, the plague wreaked havoc in Rome and Italy and probably in several provinces as well. It must have seemed that every commander he entrusted to solve a problem later used that authority to create another threat. When Gallienus was involved in putting down the revolt of Ingenuus in Pannonia, he put Postumus in charge of the armies guarding the Rhine and Gaul. There is some doubt about which of Gallienus' sons, Cornelius Valerianus or P. Cornelius Licinius Saloninus, was left in Cologne under the care of the Praetorian Prefect Silvanus and perhaps also Postumus. In any case, when Postumus revolted and proclaimed his independent Gallic Empire, Silvanus and one of the emperor's sons were killed. Gallienus probably restricted Postumus' expansion, but he never gained the personal revenge that, according to one source, drove him to challenge Postumus to single combat. While Gallienus was thus engaged, and after Valerian's capture by the Persians, Macrianus had his soldiers proclaim his sons, Macrianus and Quietus, emperors in Syria, Asia Minor, and Egypt. Gallienus sent Aureolus to defeat Macrianus and one son in the area of Illyria and Thrace; Odenathus of Palmyra defeated the other son and restored stability in Syria and, with Gallienus' approval, followed that up with a victory over the Persians. After Odenathus' assassination ca. 267, his wife Zenobia continued to rule the independent Palmyrene section of the Empire.

In A.D. 262 Gallienus concluded his tenth year in office by celebrating in Rome his Decennalia with a spectacular procession involving senators, equestrians, gladiators, soldiers, representatives of foreign peoples, and many other groups. This festival included feasts, games, entertainment, and spectacle which probably reminded Romans of the millennial Secular Games celebrations of Philip I and likely were intended to secure popular support at home for Gallienus. Over the next five years little is known about specific activities of the emperor and he presumably spent more time in Rome and less along the frontiers.

Gallienus and Salonina as rulers patronized a cultural movement which collectively is known as the Gallienic Renaissance. The imperial patrons are most directly connected with the philosophical aspects of this movement because Porphyry testifies to their friendship for the Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus. Porphyry goes on to say that Plotinus asked Gallienus to rebuild an abandoned former city of philosophers in Campania, rename it Platonopolis, and govern it as a kind of Platonic Republic, but that the jealousy and spite of others at court scuttled the plan. In addition to Neoplatonic philosophy, according to Gervase Matthew, the Gallienic Renaissance included the "upward glance" and other stylistic changes in imperial sculpture and religious beliefs that were characterized by "an overwhelming sense of the transcendent and immutable." Matthew points out both the return to artistic models of Augustus, Hadrian, and even Severus Alexander and also "a new Romantic tension" which breaks with the past and points toward a new and very different world. The Hellenic character of much of the Gallienic Renaissance is also stressed in the emperor's trip to Athens where he, likely in imitation of Hadrian, became eponymous archon and received initiation into the Eleusinian cult of Demeter.

Late in his reign, Gallienus issued a series of coins in Rome which honored nine deities as Conservator Augusti or protector of the emperor by pairing his portrait with reverses picturing an animal or animals symbolic of each deity. Included in this group of celestial guardians are Apollo, Diana, Hercules, Jupiter, Juno, Liber Pater, Mercury, Neptune, and Sol. For example, Apollo's coin-types portray a centaur, a gryphon, or Pegasus; Hercules is represented by either the lion or the boar. It appears that Gallienus was issuing the "animal series" coins both to secure, through some religious festival, the aid of Rome's protective gods against continuing invasions, revolts, and plague and to entertain the Roman populace with pageantry and circus games, thus to divert their attention away from the same problems and maintain the security of the regime in power.

In A.D. 268, Gallienus saw his third son, Marinianus, become consul, but in the spring another Gothic invasion brought the emperor back to Greece. He defeated the invaders at Naissus in Moesia , but was deterred from pursuing them further by a revolt of the commander of his elite cavalry, Aureolus. He besieged this last rebel emperor in Milan, but a plot involving his Praetorian Prefect and two future emperors, Claudius and Aurelian, all three men Illyrians popular with many of the soldiers, lured Gallienus away from the city on a false pretext and assassinated him.The emperor's brother Valerian and young son Marinianus were also murdered. In spite of the bitter resentment which many of the senators must have felt toward the dead emperor and his reform policies, Claudius II, perhaps only to legitimize his own reign, persuaded the Senate to deify Gallienus.

Copyright (C) 1998, Richard D. Weigel. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/gallval.htm. Used by permission.


Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus was born in about AD 213. This means that he was about 40 years old when his father Valerian, in AD 253, was hailed emperor by his troops in Raetia. Gallienus was made Caesar immediately by his father. But within a month, when Valerian got to Rome, Gallienus received the rank of Augustus.

Compared to other Roman emperors of the age, Gallienus was an exception, as far as he was not a soldier-emperor. He was rather a thoughtful, intellectual ruler, possessing sophisticated Greek tastes. However, this made him deeply unpopular with the gritty Danubian generals, who very much understood it as their right to choose a leader among their own ranks to rule the empire.

If the Danubian military elite didn't like Gallienus, then he certainly soon proved that he was a capable military leader. Between AD 254 to AD 256 he campaigned along the Danube, securing this troubled frontier against the barbarians. In AD 256 he then moved west to fight the Germans along the Rhine.

Then by autumn AD 260 the message of Valerian's capture by the Persians reached Gallienus. If Gallienus had always been unpopular among the military leaders, then now with his father gone and Roman authority crumbling, rebellion was in the air.

On a night in September, AD 268, at the siege of Mediolanum (Milan), an alarm was suddenly raised in the camp of the emperor. In the brief moment of confusion, Gallienus was struck down in the dark as he emerged from his tent.

During his reign, Gallienus began numerous reforms and military campaigns to defend the empire, as much from usurpers as from barbarians. In doing so, he perhaps saved the empire from oblivion. At the same time he presided over perhaps the last flowering of classical Roman culture, patronizing poets, artists and philosophers.

As a last gesture of disrespect to this, most unfortunate of emperors, the Romans should lay Gallienus to rest not in one of the great mausoleums in Rome, but in a tomb nine miles south of the capital, along the Via Appia.

Ironically, he was deified by the senate at the request of Claudius II Gothicus, one of the men who must be held accountable for the assassination of Gallienus.
See: http://www.roman-empire.net/decline/gallienus.html


Gallienus was the son of Valerian I and was named Caesar at his father's accession to the throne in 253 A.D. Upon his father's capture by the Parthians he assumed the rank of Augustus and began numerous reforms and military campaigns to defend the empire, as much from usurpers as from barbarians. At the same time he presided over perhaps the last flowering of classical Roman culture, patronizing poets, artists and philosophers. Gallienus was assassinated while besieging Milan. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
CIIGRICV197unlistedvar.jpg
[1114a] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.58 viewsSilvered antoninianus, RIC V 197 var (pellet in exergue), aEF, 3.880g, 21.1mm, 0o, Antioch mint, 268 - 270 A.D.; Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing left, scales in right, cornucopia in left, • in exergue; full silvering, bold strike, excellent centering and eastern style, rare this nice; rare variety. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Senate to deify Gallienus is more difficult to assess. It is true that securing divine status for one's predecessor is generally seen as a pious act (e.g. Antoninus Pius requesting deification of Hadrian) that reflects positively on the initiator and the story, recorded only in Aurelius Victor, could just be a fabrication used to build up Claudius' moral reputation. What is difficult to penetrate is the biased condemnation of Gallienus that particularly dominates the Latin sources. They make it hard to see why anyone would want to deify Gallienus and so the story seems out of place. However, deification of a predecessor could also be interpreted as the expected thing to do and the act could have fostered legitimacy of the new emperor and gained support from those who were still loyal to Gallienus so it may well have taken place.

The first major challenge facing the new emperor was that of the Alemanni, who had invaded Raetia and Italy. After an early defeat, Claudius replaced some irresponsible officers and soldiers, designated Aurelian as cavalry commander, and led the army to a decisive victory over the Alemanni. This victory earned Claudius the title of Germanicus Maximus and several of his coin-types appear to refer to victory over the Germans.

In 269 Claudius served as consul with Paternus. This year would also feature his major campaign against the Goths. There are indications that Spain separated itself from the Gallo-Roman Empire of Postumus and Tetricus and recognized Claudius, at least nominally, as emperor. In addition, rebellion within Gaul itself demonstrated the weakening of this independent state, although Claudius avoided engagement at Augustodunum and chose only to send a small force to protect Narbonese Gaul. While Claudius concentrated on protecting Roman territory against the Alemanni and Goths, Zenobia extended her Palmyrene Empire by taking Antioch, parts of Asia Minor, and most of Egypt. Although Eusebius and Sulpicius Severus portray the period between the reign of Valerian and that of Diocletian as a peaceful pause in the persecution of Christians, the Acts of the Martyrs does list some individuals allegedly martyred during Claudius II's reign.

The coins issued by Claudius II provide some limited insight into his reign. In addition to the standard "personified virtues" coins that are common with most emperors of the second and third centuries, Claudius struck coin-types proclaiming the security of the Empire (SECVRITAS PERPETVA and PAX AETERNA), the fidelity of the army (FIDES MILITVM), and military victories over the Germans and Goths (VICTORIA GERMAN and VICTORIAE GOTHIC). In addition, Claudius Gothicus' mints struck some other interesting and unusual coin-types. For example, Claudius is one of very few emperors who issued coins portraying the god Vulcan. These must have been limited issues because they are struck only by the Antioch mint and are very rare. The type shows Vulcan standing, with his special tools, the hammer and tongs, and features the unique inscription REGI ARTIS. A variant type with a similar image has been described as carrying another unique coin inscription, DEO CABIRO, and interpreted as depicting one of Vulcan's sons, the Cabiri, with the same tools. However, the existence of this variant type is doubtful. Although the reason for honoring Vulcan (and his sons?) with these coins is unclear, there may be a connection to the fact that the Cabiri were patron gods of Thessalonica who had protected that city against an attack by the Goths. Although a connection between Claudius Gothicus and the Cabiri as defenders against Gothic attacks is relatively attractive, it is weakened somewhat by the fact that Valerian and Gallienus had also issued coins with Vulcan in a temple so there may be some other reason for his reappearance on coins in this period.

Claudius II issued an unusual and scarce series of coins that features a pair of deities, who are presumably conservatores Augusti, on each reverse. The AETER AVG type depicts Apollo and Diana, who, as gods of the sun and moon, are associated with the concept of aeternitas. A type featuring Serapis and Isis is combined with a CONSER AVG inscription and one of Hercules and Minerva with one of CONSERVATORES AVG. Apollo and Diana are depicted with a SALVS AVG inscription, Aesculapius and Salus with one of SPES PVBLIC, and Vulcan and Minerva with VIRT AVG. The general message is that these deities will protect the future of the empire and the emperor.

Other unusual coin-types include MARS VLTOR, the god Augustus had honored with a temple for securing revenge for Caesar's assassination. This deity had appeared on Roman coins in the reigns of Galba and Severus Alexander. Claudius II also minted coins with rarely-seen NEPTVN AVG [see this reverse type in my collection] and SOL AVG types. The latter coin indicates some early interest in the god who would become so dominant a few years later on the coins of Aurelian, yet Claudius also used the INVICTVS AVG inscription that Gallienus had paired with an image of Sol with one of Hercules. ROMAE AETERNAE coin-types were fairly common in the mid-third century, but Claudius II issued an unusual variant type on an aureus that showed the goddess in her temple and echoed the SAECVLVM NOVVM images associated with Philip I. In addition, Claudius introduced a IOVI VICTORI reverse combined with the image normally paired with a IOVI STATORI inscription and a IOVI FVLGERAT reverse inscription, both of which had not been used by any of his predecessors. Andreas Alföldi suggested that Claudius' GENIVS SENATVS type signified improvement of the relationship between emperor and Senate following the senatorial hostility toward Gallienus.

Claudius Gothicus also produced coin-types with reverses of goddesses customarily found paired on coins with images of the Roman empresses. The deities portrayed include Ceres, Diana, Diana Lucifera, and Diana Victrix, Minerva, Venus, and the goddess naturally associated with the image of an empress, Juno Regina. One might suggest that Claudius issued these images because he had no empress with which to pair them, but an examination of other emperors' reigns during this period reveals that those emperors who did not issue coins bearing the empress' image also did not strike these particular goddess types. Although Ceres and Venus images are sometimes paired with an emperor's portrait, Diana Lucifera is rarely found on emperors' coins and Claudius II is the only emperor paired on coins with Juno Regina. In addition, Claudius was the first emperor to issue imperial coins that featured an isolated image of the exotic Egyptian goddess, Isis Faria.

Claudius II's short reign was vulnerable to internal as well as external attack. There may have been a revolt in 269-270 led by a Censorinus, although the date and even the existence of this usurper remain in doubt. The SHA includes him as the last of the "thirty tyrants" and lists a whole series of offices for him, including two consulships, but no other record exists to confirm such service. The SHA account states that he was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers, but soon afterwards killed by them because of his enforcement of strict discipline. His tomb is listed as being in Bologna, which may provide some idea of the location for the revolt. Henry Cohen dates the revolt to the beginning of the year 270, perhaps on the basis of a reference in the Epitome de Caesaribus, but suggests that coins attributed to Censorinus in earlier works may not exist.

The Gothic challenge in 269 proved to be the greatest that Claudius II would face. The Goths assembled a large invading force, reportedly amounting to 320,000 men transported on a fleet of at least 2,000 ships, and first attacked coastal cities along the Black Sea in Moesia. After passing into the Aegean the Goths besieged Thessalonica. At this point, in 269, Claudius left Rome to stop the invasion. The Goths then sent the larger segment of their troops on land toward the Danube, while the fleet took the remaining group to continue the naval attack on Aegean coastal cities. Claudius sent Aurelian's cavalry to Macedonia to protect Illyria from attack, while he commanded the forces blocking the route to the Danube. In the area of Doberus and Pelagonia, the Goths lost 3,000 men to Aurelian's cavalry. At Naissus in Moesia, Claudius' force succeeded in killing some 50,000 Goths. There were follow-up operations on both land and sea, but the Gothic War had essentially been won. Staving off the attacks of the Goths was a major contribution to the survival of the Roman Empire. It was a significant step leading to the subsequent success of Aurelian and the resurrection of the Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. When the Goths eventually succeeded in taking parts of the western Empire in the fifth century, their disruption to the course of civilization was likely much less violent than it would have been had they succeeded in the third century.

In addition to bad weather, a lack of supplies, and hunger, plague was a major factor in the defeat of the Goths. Many of the Gothic prisoners were either impressed into Roman military service or settled on farms as coloni. Claudius received the title Gothicus in recognition of his triumph over the Goths. At some point he had also been given the title Parthicus, but the unlikelihood of any conflict with the Parthians in his short reign makes this difficult to explain. Perhaps Damerau was correct in his suggestion that a Parthian unit may have been involved in one of the battles with the Palmyrenes, although on this front there were few achievements to claim. In any case, Claudius' victory over the Goths was short-lived. The emperor himself caught the plague and died at Sirmium early in 270. He was 56 years old. Claudius' brother, Quintillus, became emperor briefly before losing out to Aurelian. Claudius also had another brother, Crispus, and the SHA traces the link to Constantius through Crispus' daughter Claudia.

The Roman Senate showed its respect for Claudius Gothicus by setting up a gold portrait-shield in the Curia and by approving his deification. He was also honored with a golden statue in front of the great temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and a silver statue set on a column on the Rostra.

In many ways, Claudius II received more adulation and honor in his Nachleben than he had during his lifetime. In the fourth century, attempts to link Constantine's family to Claudius resulted in the phrases of adoration and outright fabrication that dominate the SHA life and most of our other sources. Constantine even issued commemorative coins honoring Claudius. These carried inscriptions such as: DIVO CLAVDIO OPT[IMO] IMP[ERATORI], MEMORIAE AETERNAE, and REQVIES OPT[IMORVM] ME[RITORVM]. A tradition grew that changed the story of Claudius' death in some sources. In this version, Claudius, instead of dying from the plague, had actually performed a devotion, in response to an oracle found in the Sibylline Books, and sacrificed his life so that Rome could win the Gothic War. One of the most surprising things about the SHA account is that it ignores this more dramatic tradition and has Claudius simply dying from the plague.

One must, of course, reject the excessive claims of the SHA to the effect that Claudius II was "destined to rule for the good of the human race" and would, had he lived longer, "…by his strength, his counsel, and his foresight have restored to us the Scipios, the Camilli, and all those men of old." However, Claudius Gothicus was clearly a good emperor who made a significant contribution to protecting and restoring the Empire. In the third century there aren't too many emperors who merit such an assessment.

Copyright (C) 2001, Richard D. Weigel. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/claudgot.htm


Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemani tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=741&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
CIIGRICV214.jpg
[1114b] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.53 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC V 214, VF, 2.930g, 20.3mm, 180o, Antioch mint; Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate bust right; Reverse: NEPTVN AVG, Neptune standing left, dolphin in right, trident in left hand, • in exergue; excellent centering. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Senate to deify Gallienus is more difficult to assess. It is true that securing divine status for one's predecessor is generally seen as a pious act (e.g. Antoninus Pius requesting deification of Hadrian) that reflects positively on the initiator and the story, recorded only in Aurelius Victor, could just be a fabrication used to build up Claudius' moral reputation. What is difficult to penetrate is the biased condemnation of Gallienus that particularly dominates the Latin sources. They make it hard to see why anyone would want to deify Gallienus and so the story seems out of place. However, deification of a predecessor could also be interpreted as the expected thing to do and the act could have fostered legitimacy of the new emperor and gained support from those who were still loyal to Gallienus so it may well have taken place.

The first major challenge facing the new emperor was that of the Alemanni, who had invaded Raetia and Italy. After an early defeat, Claudius replaced some irresponsible officers and soldiers, designated Aurelian as cavalry commander, and led the army to a decisive victory over the Alemanni. This victory earned Claudius the title of Germanicus Maximus and several of his coin-types appear to refer to victory over the Germans.

In 269 Claudius served as consul with Paternus. This year would also feature his major campaign against the Goths. There are indications that Spain separated itself from the Gallo-Roman Empire of Postumus and Tetricus and recognized Claudius, at least nominally, as emperor. In addition, rebellion within Gaul itself demonstrated the weakening of this independent state, although Claudius avoided engagement at Augustodunum and chose only to send a small force to protect Narbonese Gaul. While Claudius concentrated on protecting Roman territory against the Alemanni and Goths, Zenobia extended her Palmyrene Empire by taking Antioch, parts of Asia Minor, and most of Egypt. Although Eusebius and Sulpicius Severus portray the period between the reign of Valerian and that of Diocletian as a peaceful pause in the persecution of Christians, the Acts of the Martyrs does list some individuals allegedly martyred during Claudius II's reign.

The coins issued by Claudius II provide some limited insight into his reign. In addition to the standard "personified virtues" coins that are common with most emperors of the second and third centuries, Claudius struck coin-types proclaiming the security of the Empire (SECVRITAS PERPETVA and PAX AETERNA), the fidelity of the army (FIDES MILITVM), and military victories over the Germans and Goths (VICTORIA GERMAN and VICTORIAE GOTHIC). In addition, Claudius Gothicus' mints struck some other interesting and unusual coin-types. For example, Claudius is one of very few emperors who issued coins portraying the god Vulcan. These must have been limited issues because they are struck only by the Antioch mint and are very rare. The type shows Vulcan standing, with his special tools, the hammer and tongs, and features the unique inscription REGI ARTIS. A variant type with a similar image has been described as carrying another unique coin inscription, DEO CABIRO, and interpreted as depicting one of Vulcan's sons, the Cabiri, with the same tools. However, the existence of this variant type is doubtful. Although the reason for honoring Vulcan (and his sons?) with these coins is unclear, there may be a connection to the fact that the Cabiri were patron gods of Thessalonica who had protected that city against an attack by the Goths. Although a connection between Claudius Gothicus and the Cabiri as defenders against Gothic attacks is relatively attractive, it is weakened somewhat by the fact that Valerian and Gallienus had also issued coins with Vulcan in a temple so there may be some other reason for his reappearance on coins in this period.

Claudius II issued an unusual and scarce series of coins that features a pair of deities, who are presumably conservatores Augusti, on each reverse. The AETER AVG type depicts Apollo and Diana, who, as gods of the sun and moon, are associated with the concept of aeternitas. A type featuring Serapis and Isis is combined with a CONSER AVG inscription and one of Hercules and Minerva with one of CONSERVATORES AVG. Apollo and Diana are depicted with a SALVS AVG inscription, Aesculapius and Salus with one of SPES PVBLIC, and Vulcan and Minerva with VIRT AVG. The general message is that these deities will protect the future of the empire and the emperor.

Other unusual coin-types include MARS VLTOR, the god Augustus had honored with a temple for securing revenge for Caesar's assassination. This deity had appeared on Roman coins in the reigns of Galba and Severus Alexander. Claudius II also minted coins with rarely-seen NEPTVN AVG [see this reverse type in my collection] and SOL AVG types. The latter coin indicates some early interest in the god who would become so dominant a few years later on the coins of Aurelian, yet Claudius also used the INVICTVS AVG inscription that Gallienus had paired with an image of Sol with one of Hercules. ROMAE AETERNAE coin-types were fairly common in the mid-third century, but Claudius II issued an unusual variant type on an aureus that showed the goddess in her temple and echoed the SAECVLVM NOVVM images associated with Philip I. In addition, Claudius introduced a IOVI VICTORI reverse combined with the image normally paired with a IOVI STATORI inscription and a IOVI FVLGERAT reverse inscription, both of which had not been used by any of his predecessors. Andreas Alföldi suggested that Claudius' GENIVS SENATVS type signified improvement of the relationship between emperor and Senate following the senatorial hostility toward Gallienus.

Claudius Gothicus also produced coin-types with reverses of goddesses customarily found paired on coins with images of the Roman empresses. The deities portrayed include Ceres, Diana, Diana Lucifera, and Diana Victrix, Minerva, Venus, and the goddess naturally associated with the image of an empress, Juno Regina. One might suggest that Claudius issued these images because he had no empress with which to pair them, but an examination of other emperors' reigns during this period reveals that those emperors who did not issue coins bearing the empress' image also did not strike these particular goddess types. Although Ceres and Venus images are sometimes paired with an emperor's portrait, Diana Lucifera is rarely found on emperors' coins and Claudius II is the only emperor paired on coins with Juno Regina. In addition, Claudius was the first emperor to issue imperial coins that featured an isolated image of the exotic Egyptian goddess, Isis Faria.

Claudius II's short reign was vulnerable to internal as well as external attack. There may have been a revolt in 269-270 led by a Censorinus, although the date and even the existence of this usurper remain in doubt. The SHA includes him as the last of the "thirty tyrants" and lists a whole series of offices for him, including two consulships, but no other record exists to confirm such service. The SHA account states that he was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers, but soon afterwards killed by them because of his enforcement of strict discipline. His tomb is listed as being in Bologna, which may provide some idea of the location for the revolt. Henry Cohen dates the revolt to the beginning of the year 270, perhaps on the basis of a reference in the Epitome de Caesaribus, but suggests that coins attributed to Censorinus in earlier works may not exist.

The Gothic challenge in 269 proved to be the greatest that Claudius II would face. The Goths assembled a large invading force, reportedly amounting to 320,000 men transported on a fleet of at least 2,000 ships, and first attacked coastal cities along the Black Sea in Moesia. After passing into the Aegean the Goths besieged Thessalonica. At this point, in 269, Claudius left Rome to stop the invasion. The Goths then sent the larger segment of their troops on land toward the Danube, while the fleet took the remaining group to continue the naval attack on Aegean coastal cities. Claudius sent Aurelian's cavalry to Macedonia to protect Illyria from attack, while he commanded the forces blocking the route to the Danube. In the area of Doberus and Pelagonia, the Goths lost 3,000 men to Aurelian's cavalry. At Naissus in Moesia, Claudius' force succeeded in killing some 50,000 Goths. There were follow-up operations on both land and sea, but the Gothic War had essentially been won. Staving off the attacks of the Goths was a major contribution to the survival of the Roman Empire. It was a significant step leading to the subsequent success of Aurelian and the resurrection of the Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. When the Goths eventually succeeded in taking parts of the western Empire in the fifth century, their disruption to the course of civilization was likely much less violent than it would have been had they succeeded in the third century.

In addition to bad weather, a lack of supplies, and hunger, plague was a major factor in the defeat of the Goths. Many of the Gothic prisoners were either impressed into Roman military service or settled on farms as coloni. Claudius received the title Gothicus in recognition of his triumph over the Goths. At some point he had also been given the title Parthicus, but the unlikelihood of any conflict with the Parthians in his short reign makes this difficult to explain. Perhaps Damerau was correct in his suggestion that a Parthian unit may have been involved in one of the battles with the Palmyrenes, although on this front there were few achievements to claim. In any case, Claudius' victory over the Goths was short-lived. The emperor himself caught the plague and died at Sirmium early in 270. He was 56 years old. Claudius' brother, Quintillus, became emperor briefly before losing out to Aurelian. Claudius also had another brother, Crispus, and the SHA traces the link to Constantius through Crispus' daughter Claudia.

The Roman Senate showed its respect for Claudius Gothicus by setting up a gold portrait-shield in the Curia and by approving his deification. He was also honored with a golden statue in front of the great temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and a silver statue set on a column on the Rostra.

In many ways, Claudius II received more adulation and honor in his Nachleben than he had during his lifetime. In the fourth century, attempts to link Constantine's family to Claudius resulted in the phrases of adoration and outright fabrication that dominate the SHA life and most of our other sources. Constantine even issued commemorative coins honoring Claudius. These carried inscriptions such as: DIVO CLAVDIO OPT[IMO] IMP[ERATORI], MEMORIAE AETERNAE, and REQVIES OPT[IMORVM] ME[RITORVM]. A tradition grew that changed the story of Claudius' death in some sources. In this version, Claudius, instead of dying from the plague, had actually performed a devotion, in response to an oracle found in the Sibylline Books, and sacrificed his life so that Rome could win the Gothic War. One of the most surprising things about the SHA account is that it ignores this more dramatic tradition and has Claudius simply dying from the plague.

One must, of course, reject the excessive claims of the SHA to the effect that Claudius II was "destined to rule for the good of the human race" and would, had he lived longer, "…by his strength, his counsel, and his foresight have restored to us the Scipios, the Camilli, and all those men of old." However, Claudius Gothicus was clearly a good emperor who made a significant contribution to protecting and restoring the Empire. In the third century there aren't too many emperors who merit such an assessment.

Copyright (C) 2001, Richard D. Weigel. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/claudgot.htm


Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemani tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=741&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
ClaudiusIIGothicusRIC34.jpg
[1114c] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.51 viewsAntoninianus. RIC 34. Weight, Size. F. Rome mint. Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, draped bust right; Reverse: FIDES EXERCI, Fides standing left, holding two standards. Ex Maridvnvm


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Senate to deify Gallienus is more difficult to assess. It is true that securing divine status for one's predecessor is generally seen as a pious act (e.g. Antoninus Pius requesting deification of Hadrian) that reflects positively on the initiator and the story, recorded only in Aurelius Victor, could just be a fabrication used to build up Claudius' moral reputation. What is difficult to penetrate is the biased condemnation of Gallienus that particularly dominates the Latin sources. They make it hard to see why anyone would want to deify Gallienus and so the story seems out of place. However, deification of a predecessor could also be interpreted as the expected thing to do and the act could have fostered legitimacy of the new emperor and gained support from those who were still loyal to Gallienus so it may well have taken place.

The first major challenge facing the new emperor was that of the Alemanni, who had invaded Raetia and Italy. After an early defeat, Claudius replaced some irresponsible officers and soldiers, designated Aurelian as cavalry commander, and led the army to a decisive victory over the Alemanni. This victory earned Claudius the title of Germanicus Maximus and several of his coin-types appear to refer to victory over the Germans.

In 269 Claudius served as consul with Paternus. This year would also feature his major campaign against the Goths. There are indications that Spain separated itself from the Gallo-Roman Empire of Postumus and Tetricus and recognized Claudius, at least nominally, as emperor. In addition, rebellion within Gaul itself demonstrated the weakening of this independent state, although Claudius avoided engagement at Augustodunum and chose only to send a small force to protect Narbonese Gaul. While Claudius concentrated on protecting Roman territory against the Alemanni and Goths, Zenobia extended her Palmyrene Empire by taking Antioch, parts of Asia Minor, and most of Egypt. Although Eusebius and Sulpicius Severus portray the period between the reign of Valerian and that of Diocletian as a peaceful pause in the persecution of Christians, the Acts of the Martyrs does list some individuals allegedly martyred during Claudius II's reign.

The coins issued by Claudius II provide some limited insight into his reign. In addition to the standard "personified virtues" coins that are common with most emperors of the second and third centuries, Claudius struck coin-types proclaiming the security of the Empire (SECVRITAS PERPETVA and PAX AETERNA), the fidelity of the army (FIDES MILITVM), and military victories over the Germans and Goths (VICTORIA GERMAN and VICTORIAE GOTHIC). In addition, Claudius Gothicus' mints struck some other interesting and unusual coin-types. For example, Claudius is one of very few emperors who issued coins portraying the god Vulcan. These must have been limited issues because they are struck only by the Antioch mint and are very rare. The type shows Vulcan standing, with his special tools, the hammer and tongs, and features the unique inscription REGI ARTIS. A variant type with a similar image has been described as carrying another unique coin inscription, DEO CABIRO, and interpreted as depicting one of Vulcan's sons, the Cabiri, with the same tools. However, the existence of this variant type is doubtful. Although the reason for honoring Vulcan (and his sons?) with these coins is unclear, there may be a connection to the fact that the Cabiri were patron gods of Thessalonica who had protected that city against an attack by the Goths. Although a connection between Claudius Gothicus and the Cabiri as defenders against Gothic attacks is relatively attractive, it is weakened somewhat by the fact that Valerian and Gallienus had also issued coins with Vulcan in a temple so there may be some other reason for his reappearance on coins in this period.

Claudius II issued an unusual and scarce series of coins that features a pair of deities, who are presumably conservatores Augusti, on each reverse. The AETER AVG type depicts Apollo and Diana, who, as gods of the sun and moon, are associated with the concept of aeternitas. A type featuring Serapis and Isis is combined with a CONSER AVG inscription and one of Hercules and Minerva with one of CONSERVATORES AVG. Apollo and Diana are depicted with a SALVS AVG inscription, Aesculapius and Salus with one of SPES PVBLIC, and Vulcan and Minerva with VIRT AVG. The general message is that these deities will protect the future of the empire and the emperor.

Other unusual coin-types include MARS VLTOR, the god Augustus had honored with a temple for securing revenge for Caesar's assassination. This deity had appeared on Roman coins in the reigns of Galba and Severus Alexander. Claudius II also minted coins with rarely-seen NEPTVN AVG [see this reverse type in my collection] and SOL AVG types. The latter coin indicates some early interest in the god who would become so dominant a few years later on the coins of Aurelian, yet Claudius also used the INVICTVS AVG inscription that Gallienus had paired with an image of Sol with one of Hercules. ROMAE AETERNAE coin-types were fairly common in the mid-third century, but Claudius II issued an unusual variant type on an aureus that showed the goddess in her temple and echoed the SAECVLVM NOVVM images associated with Philip I. In addition, Claudius introduced a IOVI VICTORI reverse combined with the image normally paired with a IOVI STATORI inscription and a IOVI FVLGERAT reverse inscription, both of which had not been used by any of his predecessors. Andreas Alföldi suggested that Claudius' GENIVS SENATVS type signified improvement of the relationship between emperor and Senate following the senatorial hostility toward Gallienus.

Claudius Gothicus also produced coin-types with reverses of goddesses customarily found paired on coins with images of the Roman empresses. The deities portrayed include Ceres, Diana, Diana Lucifera, and Diana Victrix, Minerva, Venus, and the goddess naturally associated with the image of an empress, Juno Regina. One might suggest that Claudius issued these images because he had no empress with which to pair them, but an examination of other emperors' reigns during this period reveals that those emperors who did not issue coins bearing the empress' image also did not strike these particular goddess types. Although Ceres and Venus images are sometimes paired with an emperor's portrait, Diana Lucifera is rarely found on emperors' coins and Claudius II is the only emperor paired on coins with Juno Regina. In addition, Claudius was the first emperor to issue imperial coins that featured an isolated image of the exotic Egyptian goddess, Isis Faria.

Claudius II's short reign was vulnerable to internal as well as external attack. There may have been a revolt in 269-270 led by a Censorinus, although the date and even the existence of this usurper remain in doubt. The SHA includes him as the last of the "thirty tyrants" and lists a whole series of offices for him, including two consulships, but no other record exists to confirm such service. The SHA account states that he was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers, but soon afterwards killed by them because of his enforcement of strict discipline. His tomb is listed as being in Bologna, which may provide some idea of the location for the revolt. Henry Cohen dates the revolt to the beginning of the year 270, perhaps on the basis of a reference in the Epitome de Caesaribus, but suggests that coins attributed to Censorinus in earlier works may not exist.

The Gothic challenge in 269 proved to be the greatest that Claudius II would face. The Goths assembled a large invading force, reportedly amounting to 320,000 men transported on a fleet of at least 2,000 ships, and first attacked coastal cities along the Black Sea in Moesia. After passing into the Aegean the Goths besieged Thessalonica. At this point, in 269, Claudius left Rome to stop the invasion. The Goths then sent the larger segment of their troops on land toward the Danube, while the fleet took the remaining group to continue the naval attack on Aegean coastal cities. Claudius sent Aurelian's cavalry to Macedonia to protect Illyria from attack, while he commanded the forces blocking the route to the Danube. In the area of Doberus and Pelagonia, the Goths lost 3,000 men to Aurelian's cavalry. At Naissus in Moesia, Claudius' force succeeded in killing some 50,000 Goths. There were follow-up operations on both land and sea, but the Gothic War had essentially been won. Staving off the attacks of the Goths was a major contribution to the survival of the Roman Empire. It was a significant step leading to the subsequent success of Aurelian and the resurrection of the Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. When the Goths eventually succeeded in taking parts of the western Empire in the fifth century, their disruption to the course of civilization was likely much less violent than it would have been had they succeeded in the third century.

In addition to bad weather, a lack of supplies, and hunger, plague was a major factor in the defeat of the Goths. Many of the Gothic prisoners were either impressed into Roman military service or settled on farms as coloni. Claudius received the title Gothicus in recognition of his triumph over the Goths. At some point he had also been given the title Parthicus, but the unlikelihood of any conflict with the Parthians in his short reign makes this difficult to explain. Perhaps Damerau was correct in his suggestion that a Parthian unit may have been involved in one of the battles with the Palmyrenes, although on this front there were few achievements to claim. In any case, Claudius' victory over the Goths was short-lived. The emperor himself caught the plague and died at Sirmium early in 270. He was 56 years old. Claudius' brother, Quintillus, became emperor briefly before losing out to Aurelian. Claudius also had another brother, Crispus, and the SHA traces the link to Constantius through Crispus' daughter Claudia.

The Roman Senate showed its respect for Claudius Gothicus by setting up a gold portrait-shield in the Curia and by approving his deification. He was also honored with a golden statue in front of the great temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and a silver statue set on a column on the Rostra.

In many ways, Claudius II received more adulation and honor in his Nachleben than he had during his lifetime. In the fourth century, attempts to link Constantine's family to Claudius resulted in the phrases of adoration and outright fabrication that dominate the SHA life and most of our other sources. Constantine even issued commemorative coins honoring Claudius. These carried inscriptions such as: DIVO CLAVDIO OPT[IMO] IMP[ERATORI], MEMORIAE AETERNAE, and REQVIES OPT[IMORVM] ME[RITORVM]. A tradition grew that changed the story of Claudius' death in some sources. In this version, Claudius, instead of dying from the plague, had actually performed a devotion, in response to an oracle found in the Sibylline Books, and sacrificed his life so that Rome could win the Gothic War. One of the most surprising things about the SHA account is that it ignores this more dramatic tradition and has Claudius simply dying from the plague.

One must, of course, reject the excessive claims of the SHA to the effect that Claudius II was "destined to rule for the good of the human race" and would, had he lived longer, "…by his strength, his counsel, and his foresight have restored to us the Scipios, the Camilli, and all those men of old." However, Claudius Gothicus was clearly a good emperor who made a significant contribution to protecting and restoring the Empire. In the third century there aren't too many emperors who merit such an assessment.

Copyright (C) 2001, Richard D. Weigel. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/claudgot.htm


Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemani tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=741&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
TacitusRIC210.jpg
[1117] Tacitus, 25 September 275 - 12 April 276 A.D.51 viewsSilvered Antoninianus. RIC 210. Weight, Size. aVF. Minted in Antioch. Obverse:– IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse:– CLEMENTIA TEMP, Emperor standing right receiving globe from Jupiter, both holding scepters, Z below figures; XXI in exegrue. Ex Maridvnvm.


De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Tacitus (275-276 A.D.)

Robin Mc Mahon
New York University

Full name, Marcus Claudius Tacitus; name as Emperor, Imperator Caesar Marcus Claudius Tacitus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus. We have no reliable information on the earlier career of the Emperor Tacitus. All that is known with any degree of certainty is that in 273 he was consul along with Julius Placidianus. All the statements in the Historia Augusta regarding Tacitus' earlier career, including the claim he was related to the historian Tacitus, have been rejected by historians as fictitious. The most reliable sources for Tacitus' reign, Zosimus and Zonaras, state that he was chosen Emperor by the army following the assassination of Aurelian in the fall of 275, most likely in November. At the time of his elevation he was in Interamna (modern Terni, about 60 miles north of Rome). From there he made his way to Rome where he was confirmed as Emperor by the Senate. Tradition has it that he was 75 years old at the time, but there is no way to confirm this.

As Emperor, Tacitus first had Aurelian deified, then seized and executed many individuals involved in plotting Aurelian's murder. Tacitus then turned his attention to the defense of the Empire. Although the Franks, Alamanni, and Longiones posed threats in the north, Tacitus determined that the greater danger lay in the East. Aurelian had enlisted the aid of several barbarian tribes, including the Heruli and Maeotidae (referred to as Scythians in the sources), for a projected invasion of Parthia. Aurelian's murder cancelled these plans. Feeling cheated of their opportunity for plunder, the tribes attacked the Roman provinces in Asia Minor, overrunning Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia and Cilicia, and caused terrible destruction. Tacitus appointed his half-brother Florian Praetorian Prefect. They campaigned in the East against the invaders, winning Tacitus the title Gothicus Maximus.

Tacitus, however, did not long enjoy his victory: on his way back to Europe, he died. Zosimus and Zonaras preserve the report that Tacitus had appointed a relative of his, Maximinus, as governor of Syria. Maximinus was murdered; then the assassins, fearing Tacitus's reaction, murdered him. It was alleged that some of them had also had a hand in murdering Aurelian. The Historia Augusta more eccentrically reports that Tacitus became ill with a fever and started showing signs of megalomania: but as the month September Tacitus allegedly wanted named after himself dates his accession incorrectly, the story appears to be a fabrication. Tacitus died some time in June of 276. His memory was neither condemned nor deified.

Tacitus held the consulship at least twice, first in 273 and again in 276. There is numismatic evidence of a third consulship but there is no record of a third in any of the fasti, that is, the lists of consuls. Because of the paucity of the sources and the brevity of his reign, little can be said of his policies. It is unlikely that the military would choose as Emperor anyone like the contemplative, abstemious civilian the Historia Augusta portrays. A hint may be given by the fact that Tacitus's colleague in the consulship of 273, Julius Placidianus, commanded an army corps in Narbonensis and later went on to be a Praetorian Perfect. Nevertheless, some numismatic and epigraphic evidence suggests that Tacitus sought to strike a milder tone than his predecessor. Prominent among his coin legends is Clementia Temporum [the reverse type in my collection]. Unlike both Aurelian and Tacitus' successor, Probus, Tacitus did not take the title, deus et dominus natus ["born god and master"]. He also issued no Sol Invictus coins honoring Aurelian's favorite deity. Some of his coins revive the SC (senatus consulto) marking senatorial authority for the issue, which had been missing in previous reigns. Tacitus also used the Genius Senatus, inscriptions which had disappeared under Valerian. Further, in some inscriptions he is styled auctor verae libertatis ["originator of true liberty"], and on coins restitutor rei publicae ["restorer of the state"].

Historiography

Tacitus largely fell out of the ancient historiographical record. The best sources are Zosimus and Zonaras. The Historia Augusta creates its own fiction of Tacitus out of forged documents, bogus names and faulty chronology. Tacitus deserved better than oblivion or fabrication, having halted potentially serious raiding in the East.

Two problems emerge from the evidence for Tacitus's short reign. The first is the six-month interregnum said to have intervened between the death of Aurelian and Tacitus' accession. The years 260-285 have been the subject of close chronological scrutiny, and it has been shown that, although there might have been a brief interval between emperors (something not uncommon), amounting to a few weeks, anything longer is not possible. The error appears to have originated in the Latin historians, who confused the duration of Tacitus' and Florian's reign with the brief period between the reigns of Aurelian and Tacitus.

The second question is whether or not the edict of the Emperor Gallienus, which had excluded senators from military commands and any other dealings with the military, was set aside during the reigns of Tacitus and Florian. Aurelius Victor reports that Gallienus, acting largely through fear of revolts and usurpation, replaced the senators in military offices with Equites. Several passages in the Historia Augusta claim that these edicts were suspended for the duration of the reigns of Tacitus and Florian. The overwhelming consensus among historians, however, is that the passages in the Historia Augusta are unhistorical: no credible evidence suggests that Gallienus' edicts were even temporarily set aside.

Copyright (C) 2000, Robin Mc Mahon. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/tacitus.htm

Tacitus was an elderly senator in the reign of Aurelian, and after the latter's death was selected as Augustus by the senate. After personally leading his army in a successful campaign against a Gothic invasion, the emperor, aged around 75, died (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=747&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).


Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.




Cleisthenes
Z1546TN.jpeg
[1119a] Probus, Antoninianus, 276-282 A.D.84 viewsProbus (AD 276-282) AE Antoninianus; Obverse: Radiate bust, left, wearing imperial mantel and holding scepter surmounted by eagle IMP. PROBVS P. F. AVG. Reverse: Cult image of Roma seated within six column temple ROMAE AETER. R thunderbolt A in exergue; Rome mint 21mm x 22mm, 3.59g; VF; RIC, Vol. 5. Part 2, #183.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Probus (276-282 A.D.) and Rival Claimants (Proculus, Bonosus, and Saturninus)of the 280s

Robin Mc Mahon
New York University

Probus's Background
M. Aurelius Probus was most likely born in Sirmium in 232 A.D. It is difficult to reconstruct Probus' career before he became emperor because of the unreliable nature of the account in the Historia Augusta, but it is certainly possible that he was a tribune under Valerian. Perhaps all that can be said with any reliability is that he served in the military and was on Aurelian's staff during his Eastern campaigns. There is a certain amount of confusion in the sources about him because of the fact that he has often been confused with a certain Tenagino Probus, who served as prefect in Egypt under Claudius II Gothicus.

Accession to Power
After the murder of Aurelian, the Senate chose as his successor the septuagenarian senator, Tacitus, who took up the burdens of state and headed with the army to the East. The Eruli had overrun Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia and finally Cilicia, where Tacitus, with help from his half-brother Florianus, defeated them. Tacitus, however, either died of an illness or was killed by his own troops; he was succeeded by Florianus. In the meantime, Probus had been declared Emperor by his own troops in mid-276, and prepared to meet Florianus, who was marching from the Bosporus, having broken off his victorious engagement against the Eruli. Florianus was acknowledged in Rome and was supported by Gaul, Spain, Britain, and Italy; Probus was supported by Syria, Phoenicia, Palestine and Egypt. The two fought a desultory campaign near Tarsus. With a much smaller force, Probus decided his best strategy would be to avoid a pitched battle and let the heat overcome the troops of Florianus. The latter, having reigned barely two months, was murdered by his own troops. Probus became sole Emperor, possibly by August 276.
Probus in the West: 276-279
His first order of business was to punish the murderers of Aurelian, who may have also had a hand in the murder of Tacitus. On the basis of numismatic evidence, Probus appears to have traveled from the east across the Propontis, and then through the provinces of Thrace, Moesia and Pannonia. It is at this time that he must have defeated the Goths because he already had the title Gothicus by 277 A.D. Shortly after he arrived at the Rhine River he made a trip to Rome to have his powers ratified by the Senate.

Following the death of Postumus in 258, the situation in Gaul had rapidly deteriorated and numerous bands of invaders had swept across the Rhine. In the south, the Longiones, together with the Alamanni, had advanced through the Neckar valley into Gaul. The Franks had crossed the Rhine further north. In order to meet this simultaneous threat, Probus divided his forces having his generals campaign against the Franks, while he himself fought against the Longiones and Alamanni. Both Probus and his generals were victorious; in fact, Probus even captured Semnon, the leader of the Longiones, with his son. Both groups of invaders agreed to terms and booty and prisoners were returned; in the end, Probus allowed Semnon and his son their freedom.

Probus is next reported to have fought victoriously against the Burgundians and to have secured his victory with some ingenuity. Because his forces were smaller than those of the invaders, he wanted to engage the enemy on terms as favorable as possible; the Romans were on one side of the river and the barbarians were on the other. Probus was able to induce them to cross the river by having his soldiers hurl insults at them, and being enraged, they began crossing the river. Before the barbarians were able to organize themselves, the Roman army soundly routed them. Smarting from their defeat, the enemy did not live up to their end of the treaty, with the result that, in a second battle, they were again worsted by Probus. The barbarians who were taken prisoner were enrolled in the Roman Army and sent to Britain.

Not content with merely defeating the barbarians along the Rhine, Probus took important steps to secure the boundary for the future. He planned and constructed a series of forts and depots on the German side of the Rhine at various crossing points, which he garrisoned with troops. Further, Probus apparently took measures to restore economic stability to Gaul by encouraging the planting of vineyards. Probus' titles Gothicus Maximus and Germanicus Maximus suggest claims to the success of his operations in the area.

Events in the East 279-280
The sources do not give many details of Probus's activities in Raetia and Illyricum, but Zosimus does say he repulsed an invasion of Vandals from Illyricum in a battle along a river generally identified as the Lech. In 279, theatre of operations was Lycia. Zosimus records the curious story of the adventures and death of a robber chieftain name Lydius who may be the same individual called Palfuerius in the Historia Augusta. In order to prevent further troubles, Probus constructed fortresses, and settled large groups of veterans in this area, giving them land in exchange for the promise that their sons would also serve in the legions when they were old enough.

Probus's Military and Economic Activities In Egypt
Meanwhile, Probus had sent his generals to Egypt, where the Blemmyes were stirring up trouble in 280; they had broken through the border, advanced up the Nile, and, in league with the city of Ptolemais, captured the city of Koptus. They were eventually expelled and order was restored by Probus' generals. Once Probus had restored order, he set about the task of a large-scale reconstruction of the dikes, canals, and bridges along the Nile, something which not been done since it had been undertaken by Augustus in the years 27-25 B.C. More specifically, the Vita Probi notes, "On the Nile, moreover, he did so much that his sole efforts added greatly to the tithes of grain. He constructed bridges and temples porticos and basilicas, all by the labour of the soldiers, he opened up many river-mouths, and drained many marshes, and put in their place grain-fields and farms"(9.3-4). The importance of this type of work cannot be underestimated since a large percentage of the food supply for Rome came from Egypt and the African provinces.

The Revolts of Proculus, Bonosus, and Saturninus
According to the Historia Augusta, although the Persian King, Vahram II, had made peaceful overtures, Probus had rejected these and was planning to push the war forward when he was faced with a series of revolts both in the West and East. It is difficult to place them in their exact time-frame since the sources do not agree. Nevertheless, the situation was serious enough for Probus to cancel his plans for war with Persia and hurry back to the West. On his return Probus settled large numbers of barbarians in the Empire. Perhaps this was done to repopulate areas which had been left abandoned by the effects of invasions and plague. This policy, which Probus did not begin, and which was continued by his successors was, however, destined to bring trouble to Rome in the future.

The writer of the Vita Probi in the Historia Augusta indicates that in 280 A.D. Proculus revolted in the vicinity of the city of Lugdunum, which had been severely dealt with by Aurelian and, for reasons not given, spurred on by this fear, had adopted a hostile attitude towards Probus. Proculus apparently had some connections to the Franks and he had hoped to rally them to his cause. They appear, however, to have handed him over to Probus when he arrived on the scene. Probably at the same time, Bonosus revolted. His rebellion seems to have been serious as it appears to have required considerable force to be suppressed. Bonosus, an officer in charge of the Rhine fleet, had somehow let the Germans slip over the border and burn the fleet. Fearful of retribution, he apparently took shelter in proclaiming himself emperor. He was, in spite of his lapse with the fleet, an excellent soldier. The fighting was only stopped when Bonosus, despairing of his position, hanged himself. Probus spared the lives of his sons as well as that of his wife.

Julius Saturninus, one of Probus 's commanders in Syria, probably seized power in the year 281. A close friend and associate of Probus, he may have been compelled to adopt the purple by his unruly troops. Although he initially rejected a request of the people of Alexandria to put on the purple, he later changed his mind and proclaimed himself Augustus. In any case, Probus planned to put down the rebellion. However, Saturninus was killed by his own troops before Probus had a chance to act.

The sources do not provide much in the way of material to analyze the extent of these revolts and how widespread the feeling was against Probus in the West. There are indications that the revolts were more than local affairs because inscriptions from as far away as Spain have been found where Probus's name has been erased.

In 281 Probus was in Rome to celebrate his victories. Although the Historia Augusta goes into great detail to describe the events of Probus’s triumph and celebrations of his victories in respect to the number of animals and prisoners involved, there may be some truth to its description because Zosimus states there was a uprising which at this time required a force of soldiers to suppress. On a more substantial note, Probus completed the wall around Rome which had been begun by Aurelian.

Probus' Assassination
Probus was too anxious to push ahead with his plans for an invasion of Persia, which had been postponed due to the revolts and unrest in the West, and, to this end, he left Rome in 282 and proceeded first to his native town of Sirmium when news came that M. Aurelius Carus, Perfect of the Guard, had been proclaimed emperor. When troops sent by Probus to quell the rebellion went over to Carus, Probus' remaining troops killed the emperor. His death occurred sometime between September or October 282.
Copyright (C) 1999, Robin Mc Mahon. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of the Roman Emperors and their Families; http://www.roman-emperors.org/probus.htm. Used by permission.

Probus started as a simple soldier but advanced to general and was declared emperor after the death of Tacitus. Florian's murder left him as undisputed ruler. His leadership brought peace and prosperity but he was murdered by mutinous soldiers, enraged at being employed on public building projects. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Tetri.jpg
[1206] Tetricus I, mid 271 - spring 274 A.D. (Mainz or Trier)45 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC 88, S 11239, aVF, Mainz or Trier, 2.151g, 18.0mm, 0o, 273 - 274 A.D.; obverse IMP TETRICVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse LAETITIA AVGG, Laetitia standing left, wreath in right, anchor in left.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Tetricus (271-274 AD)

Michel Polfer
Centre Universitaire de Luxembourg

Of noble origin, C. Pius Esuvius Tetricus was the last emperor of the so-called imperium Galliarum. According to Eutropius (Eutrop. 9.10), he had senatorial rank and occupied the post of praeses provinciae Aquitaniae at the time when Victorinus was murdered at Cologne in early 271 AD. Through the influence of Victoria, the mother of Victorinus, who bribed the troops in his favour, Tetricus, although absent, was proclaimed emperor and took the purple near Burdigalia (Bordeaux) (Eutrop. 9.10) in spring of the same year.

Tetricus I was recognised as legitimate emperor in Gaul and Britain, but not in Spain. On his way from Burdigalia to Augusta Treverorum (Trier), he fought a successful campaign against Germanic hordes which had taken the opportunity offered by the murder of Victorinus to cross the Rhine frontier and to plunder. Installed in his capital only at the end of 271 AD, Tetricus I again had to engage the Germans early in the following year. At the end of this campaign, in late 272 AD, he returned to establish himself in Trier, which remained his capital until his overthrow by the emperor Aurelian. It was in Trier that he celebrated his entry into his second consulship on 1 January 273 and that he elevated, probably in late spring or early summer of the same year, his son Tetricus II to the rank of Caesar.

Tetricus I took no steps to extend the authority of his Gallic Empire beyond Gaul and Britain, thus leaving the initiative to the legitimate emperor Aurelian. While Aurelian was still campaigning in the East, Tetricus I was, however, able to restore the authority of the Gallic Empire in south-eastern Aquitania and western Narbonensis, which had since the reign of Claudius Gothicus been controlled by the Empire.

On his victorious return from the eastern part of the empire in 273 AD, Aurelian immediately set out for the reconquest of the western part of the Empire. Tetricus I and his son - who had spent late 273 and early 274 AD in Trier and had entered there upon their first joint consulship on 1 January 274 AD - had to move southwards to meet Aurelian and his army advancing into northern Gaul. The decisive battle took place in February or March 274 AD, near Châlons-sur-Marne. During the battle, Tetricus I and his son Tetricus II surrendered to Aurelian, while their troops, left to fend for themselves, continued to fight in despair, thus causing heavy losses on both sides.

According to some literary sources (SHA Tyr. Trig. 24. 3; Eutrop. 9.13.2; Aurel. Vict. 35.4), Tetricus I, wearied by the insubordination of his soldiers and facing the revolt of Faustinus, had previously offered to betray his army if Aurelian would come to his rescue, quoting Vergil in his letter to Aurelian: "eripe me his, invicte, malis" (Vergil, Aen. VI, 365). The victorious Aurelian spared the life of both Tetricus I and his son Tetricus II.

In spring of 274 AD, both Tetrici were put on display in Rome during Aurelian's triumph, but Aurelian kept his side of the bargain and pardoned them. Tetricus I was even given the office of corrector Lucaniae (Aurel. Vict. 35.5; Eutrop 9.13) and quietly ended his life in Italy, where he died at an advanced age at an unknown date (Eutrop. 9.13).

It is, however, likely that this account of the end of the Gallic Empire only reflects the position of the Aurelianic propaganda and it is therefore open to suspicion. There is good evidence to suggest that Tetricus I remained resolute and confident in his political and military strength to the last and did not betray his troops. After his military defeat at Châlons-sur-Marne and his subsequent humiliation, he would thus have owed his life not to his own previous treachery, but rather to Aurelian's need to establish and stabilise his own administration in the western part of the empire.

Copyright by Michel Polfer, Centre Universitaire de Luxembourg; published on De ImperatoribusRomanis, An Online Encyclopedia of the Roman Emperors and their Families; http://www.roman-emperors.org/tetrici.htm.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
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