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AELIA_FLAC_.jpg
(0383) AELIA FLACCILLA66 views(wife of Theodosius I)
383 - 388 AD
AE 2, 5.45 g
O: AEL FLACCILLA, DIAD DR BUST R, SEEN FROM FRONT
R: SALVS REIPVBLICAE, VICTORY SEATED R INSCRIBING CHI RHO ON SHIELD SUPPORTED BY COLUMN, "T" IN RIGHT FIELD
ANTE IN EXE
ANTIOCH RIC 61
(OFFICINA E = 5)
(ex HJBerk)
laney
144.jpg
144 Aeli Flaccilla. AE2 4.5gm13 viewsobv: AEL FLAC_CILLA AVG drp. with elaborate head dress, neckless and mantle
rev: SALVS REI_PVBLICAE Victory seated r. inscribing cristogram on shield that's resting on column
ex: TES(delta)
hill132
Theo1Ae3Ant.jpeg
1505b, Theodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. (Antioch)70 viewsTheodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC 44(b), VF, Antioch, 2.17g, 18.1mm, 180o, 9 Aug 378 - 25 Aug 383 A.D. Obverse: D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: CONCORDIA AVGGG, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, r. foot on prow, globe in l., scepter in r., Q and F at sides, ANTG in ex; scarce.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.



Cleisthenes
Theod1GlrMan.jpg
1505c, Theodosius I, 379 - 395 A.D. (Constantinople)79 viewsTheodosius I (379 - 395 AD) AE3. 388-394 AD, RIC IX 27(a)3, Third Officina. Seventh Period. 20.27 mm. 4.8gm. Near VF with black and earthen patina. Constantinople. Obverse: DN THEODO-SIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right; Reverse: GLORIA-ROMANORVM, Theodosius I standing, facing, holding labarum and globe, CONSB in exergue (scarcer reverse). A Spanish find.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Flaccilla_AE-2_AEL-FLAC-CILLA-AVG_SALVS-REI-PVBLICAE_CON-Gamma_RIC-IX-55-p229_Constantinopolis_378-88-AD_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
161 Aelia Flaccilla (???- 386 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC IX 055-3, -/-//CONΓ, AE-1, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, #1286 views161 Aelia Flaccilla (???- 386 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC IX 055-3, -/-//CONΓ, AE-1, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, #1
Wife of Theodosius I and mother of Honorius and Arcadius.
avers:- AEL FLAC CILLA AVG, Draped bust right, wearing elaborate headdress, necklace, and mantle.
revers:- SALVS REI PVBLICAE, Victory seated right on throne, inscribing a Christogram on a shield set on a column.
exe: -/-//CONΓ, diameter: 22mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: 379-388 A.D., ref: RIC IX 55, p-229,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Flaccilla_AE-4_AEL-FLACILLA-AVG_SALVS-REIPVBLICAE_CON_RIC-IX-61-p229_Constantinopolis_379-88-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_10-10,5mm_0,80g-s.jpg
161 Aelia Flaccilla (???- 386 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC IX 061-3, -/-//CONE, AE-4, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, #196 views161 Aelia Flaccilla (???- 386 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC IX 061-3, -/-//CONE, AE-4, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, #1
Wife of Theodosius I and mother of Honorius and Arcadius.
avers:- AEL FLACILLA AVG, Diademed, draped bust bust right.
revers:- SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing Chi-Rho on shield.
exe: -/-//CONE, diameter: 10-10,5mm, weight: 0,80g, axis: 6h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: 379-388 A.D., ref: RIC IX 61-3, p-229,
Q-001
quadrans
Flaccilla_AE-4_AEL-FLAC-CILLA-AVG_SALVS-REI-PVBLICAE_SMHA_RIC-IX-17-1_p-196_Heraclea_378-83-AD_Q-001_11h_14-14,5mm_1,18g-s.jpg
161 Aelia Flaccilla (???- 386 A.D.), Heraclea, RIC IX 017-1, -/-//SMHA, AE-4, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, R!, #191 views161 Aelia Flaccilla (???- 386 A.D.), Heraclea, RIC IX 017-1, -/-//SMHA, AE-4, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, R!, #1
Wife of Theodosius I and mother of Honorius and Arcadius.
avers:- AEL FLAC CILLA AVG, Draped bust right, wearing elaborate headdress, necklace, and mantle.
revers:- SALVS REI PVBLICAE, Victory seated right on throne, inscribing a Christogram on a shield set on a column.
exe: -/-//SMHA, diameter: 14-14,5mm, weight: 1,18g, axis: 11h, R!
mint: Heraclea, date: 379-388 A.D., ref: RIC IX 17-1, p-196,
Q-001
quadrans
IMG_4541.JPG
193. Aelia Flaccilla (Wife of Theodosius I)18 viewsAv.: AEL FLACCILLA AVG
Rv.: SALVS REIPVBLICAE
Ex.: CON ?

AE Maiorina Ø23 / 4.2g
RIC IX 55 Constantinople
Scarce!
Juancho
AeliaFlaccillaAE3SalPub.jpg
1ev Aelia Flaccila13 viewsAE4, small module

Diademed, draped bust right t, AEL FLACCILLA AVG
Victory seated right, inscribing chi-rho on shield set on cippus, SALVS REIPVBLICAE

RIC 35
First wife of Theodisius
Blindado
coin399.JPG
515a. Aelia Flacilla33 viewsEmpress, wife of Theodosius the Great, died c. A. D. 385 or 386. Like Theodosius himself, his first wife, Ælia Flaccilla, was of Spanish descent. She may have been the daughter of Claudius Antonius, Prefect of Gaul, who was consul in 382. Her marriage with Theodosius probably took place in the year 376, when his father, the comes Theodosius, fell into disfavour and he himself withdrew to Cauca in Gallæcia, for her eldest son, afterwards Emperor Arcadius, was born towards the end of the following year. In the succeeding years she presented two more children to her husband Honorius (384), who later became emperor, and Pulcheria, who died in early childhood, shortly before her mother. Gregory of Nyssa states expressly that she had three children; consequently the Gratian mentioned by St. Ambrose, together with Pulcheria, was probably not her son. Flaccilla was, like her husband, a zealous supporter of the Nicene Creed and prevented the conference between the emperor and the Arian Eunomius (Sozomen, Hist. eccl., VII, vi). On the throne she was a shining example of Christian virtue and ardent charity. St. Ambrose describes her as "a soul true to God" (Fidelis anima Deo. — "De obitu Theodosii", n. 40, in P. L., XVI, 1462). In his panegyric St. Gregory of Nyssa bestowed the highest praise on her virtuous life and pictured her as the helpmate of the emperor in all good works, an ornament of the empire, a leader of justice, an image of beneficence. He praises her as filled with zeal for the Faith, as a pillar of the Church, as a mother of the indigent. Theodoret in particular exalts her charity and benevolence (Hist. eccles., V, xix, ed. Valesius, III, 192 sq.). He tells us how she personally tended cripples, and quotes a saying of hers: "To distribute money belongs to the imperial dignity, but I offer up for the imperial dignity itself personal service to the Giver." Her humility also attracts a special meed of praise from the church historian. Flaccilla was buried in Constantinople, St. Gregory of Nyssa delivering her funeral oration. She is venerated in the Greek Church as a saint, and her feast is kept on 14 September. The Bollandists (Acta SS., Sept., IV, 142) are of the opinion that she is not regarded as a saint but only as venerable, but her name stands in the Greek Menæa and Synaxaria followed by words of eulogy, as is the case with the other saints

Wife of Theodosius. The reverse of the coin is very interesting; a nice bit of Pagan-Christian syncretism with winged victory inscribing a chi-rho on a shield.
1 commentsecoli
s49.JPG
516. Honorius45 viewsFlavius Honorius (September 9, 384–August 15, 423) was Emperor of the Western Roman Empire from 395 until his death. He was the younger son of Theodosius I and his first wife Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of the Eastern emperor Arcadius.

Honorius was declared Augustus in 393 by his father and became western emperor at the age of 10, following his father's death in January 395. For the first part of his reign he depended on the military leadership of the Vandal general Stilicho. To strengthen his bonds to the young emperor, Stilicho married his daughter Maria to him.

At first Honorius based his capital in Milan, but when the Visigoths entered Italy in 402 he moved his capital to the coastal city of Ravenna, which was protected by a ring of marshes and strong fortifications. While the new capital was easier to defend, it was poorly situated to allow Roman forces to protect central Italy from the barbarian incursions.

The most notable event of his reign was the assault and sack of Rome on August 24, 410 by the Visigoths under Alaric.

The city had been under Visigothic siege since shortly after Stilicho's deposition and execution in the summer of 408. Lacking a strong general to control the by-now mostly barbarian Roman Army, Honorius could do little to attack Alaric's forces directly, and apparently adopted the only strategy he could do in the situation: wait passively to Visigoths to grow weary and spend the time marshalling what forces he could. Unfortunately, this course of action appeared to be the product of Honorius' indecisive character and he suffered much criticism for it both from contemporaries and later historians.

Whether this plan could have worked is perhaps debatable, especially since he deprived himself of several skillful officers by only promoting Catholics to the top military positions. In any case it was overtaken by events. Stricken by starvation, somebody opened Rome's defenses to Alaric and the Goths poured in. The city had not been under the control of a foreign force since an invasion of Gallic Celts some seven centuries before. The victorious Visigoths did untold damage to the city and the shock of this event reverberated from Britain to Jerusalem, and inspired Augustine to write his magnum opus, The City of God.

The year 410 also saw Honorius reply to a British plea for assistance against local barbarian incursions. Preoccupied with the Visigoths and lacking any real capabilities to assist the distant province, Honorius told the Britons to defend themselves as best they could.

There is a story (which Gibbon disbelieved) that when he heard the news that Rome had "perished", Honorius was initially shocked; thinking the news was in reference to a favorite chicken he had named "Roma", he recalled in disbelief that the bird was just recently feeding out of his hand. It was then explained to him that the Rome in question was the city.

His reign of twenty-eight years was one of the most disastrous in the Roman annals. Honorius' supposed weakness and timidity in the face of internal dissension and the attacks of the Visigoths and Vandals is often said to have contributed to the rapid disintegration of the western half of the empire.



RIC X Antioch 153
ecoli
coin410.JPG
517. Arcadius32 viewsFlavius Arcadius (377/378–May 1, 408) was Roman Emperor in the Eastern half of the Roman Empire from 395 until his death.

Arcadius was the elder son of Theodosius I and Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of Honorius, who would become a Western Roman Emperor. His father declared him an Augustus in January, 383. His younger brother was also declared an Augustus in 393.

As Emperors, Honorius was under the control of the Romanized Vandal magister militum Flavius Stilicho while Arcadius was dominated by one of his ministers, Rufinus. Stilicho is alleged by some to have wanted control of both emperors, and is supposed to have had Rufinus assassinated by Gothic mercenaries in 395, but definite proof of these allegations is lacking. In any case, Arcadius' new advisor Eutropius simply took Rufinus' place as the power behind the Eastern imperial throne. Arcadius was also dominated by his wife Aelia Eudoxia, who convinced her husband to dismiss Eutropius in 399. Eudoxia was strongly opposed by John Chrysostom, the Patriarch of Constantinople, who felt that she had used her family's wealth to gain control over the emperor. Eudoxia used her influence to have Chrysostom deposed in 404, but she died later that year.

Arcadius was dominated for the rest of his rule by Anthemius, the Praetorian Prefect, who made peace with Stilicho in the West. Arcadius himself was more concerned with appearing to be a pious Christian than he was with political or military matters, and he died, only nominally in control of his empire, in 408.

Bronze AE 4, RIC 67d and 70a, choice aEF, 1.14g, 13.8mm, 180o, Antioch mint, 383-395 A.D.; obverse D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICE, Victory advancing left holding trophy over right shoulder, dragging captive with left, staurogram left, ANTG in ex; Ex Aiello; Ex Forum
ecoli
Ael-Flaccillia-Ant-62.jpg
71. Aelia Flaccilla.46 viewsAE 2, 383 - 386, Antioch mint.
Obverse: AEL FLACCILLA AVG / Diademed bust of Aelia Flaccilla.
Reverse: SALVS REIPVBLICAE / Empress standing, arms folded on breast.
Mint mark: ANTE
4.80 gm., 21.5 mm.
RIC #62; LRBC #2760; Sear #20621.
1 commentsCallimachus
Medio Centenional Aelia Flacila RIC IX Heraclea 17.jpg
A143-02 - Aelia Flaccilla (383 - 386 D.C.)33 viewsAE4 Medio Centenional 13 x 12 mm 0.9 gr.
Esposa de Teodosio I y madre de Arcadio y Honorio.

Anv: "[AEL FL]AC-CILLA AVG" - Busto con elaborado peinado con varias diademas de perlas, Collar de 1 hilo de perlas y manto sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SALVS REI-[PVB]LICAE" - Victoria sentada a derecha, dibujando el signo Chi-Ro en un escudo apoyado en una pequeña columna. "SMHA" en exergo.

Acuñada 383 - 386 D.C.
Ceca: Heraclea (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.IX (Heraclea) #17 Pag.196 - Cohen Vol.VIII #5 Pag.165 - DVM #6 Pag.313 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9245.c. Pag.290
mdelvalle
Medio Centenional Aelia Flacila RIC IX Heraclea 17_Dot.jpg
A143-03 - Aelia Flaccilla (383 - 386 D.C.)39 viewsAE4 Medio Centenional 14 mm 1.3 gr.
Esposa de Teodosio I y madre de Arcadio y Honorio.

Anv: "AEL FLAC-CILLA[ AVG]" - Busto con elaborado peinado con varias diademas de perlas, Collar de 1 hilo de perlas y manto sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SALVS REI-[PVBLI]CAE" - Victoria sentada a derecha, dibujando el signo Chi-Ro en un escudo apoyado en una pequeña columna. "•SMHA" en exergo.

Acuñada 383 - 386 D.C.
Ceca: Heraclea (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.IX (Heraclea) #17 Pag.196 - Cohen Vol.VIII #5 Pag.165 - DVM #6 Pag.313 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9245.c. Pag.290
mdelvalle
Medio Centenional Aelia Flacila RIC IX Constatinopla 61.jpg
A143-06 - Aelia Flaccilla (383 - 386 D.C.)46 viewsAE4 Medio Centenional 14x13 mm 1.3 gr.
Esposa de Teodosio I y madre de Arcadio y Honorio.

Anv: "AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG" - Busto con elaborado peinado con varias diademas de perlas, Collar de 1 hilo de perlas y manto sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SALVS REI-PVBLICAE" - Victoria sentada a derecha, dibujando el signo Chi-Ro en un escudo apoyado en una pequeña columna. "CONΕ" en exergo.

Acuñada 383 - 386 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.5ta.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IX (Constantinopolis) #61 Pag.229 - Cohen Vol.VIII #5 Pag.165 - DVM #6 Pag.313 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9245.d. Pag.290
mdelvalle
Maiorina_Aelia_Flacila_RIC_IX_Constatinopla_82.jpg
A143-15 - Aelia Flaccilla (383 - 386 D.C.)49 viewsAE2 Maiorina 23 mm 4.3 gr.
Esposa de Teodosio I y madre de Arcadio y Honorio.

Anv: "AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG" - Busto con elaborado peinado con varias diademas de perlas, Collar de 1 hilo de perlas y manto sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SALVS REI-PVBLICAE" – Emperatriz de pié de frente, viendo a su izquierda, sus brazos cruzados sobre su pecho. "CONSΕ" en exergo y ”+” en el campo derecho.

Acuñada: Probablemente Emisión póstuma 386 - 388 D.C.
Ceca: Constantinopla (Off.5ta.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IX (Constantinopolis) #82 Pag.233 tipo 2 - Cohen Vol.VIII #6 Pag.165 (6f) - DVM #5 Pag.313 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9246.b. Pag.290 – Sear RCTV (1988) #4193
mdelvalle
109- Aeliea Flaccilla.JPG
Aelia Flaccilla65 viewsAE4, 378-383 AD, Constantinople mint.
Obv-AEL FLACCILLA AVG, Diademmed , draped bust right.
Rev: SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated inscribing shield with Chi-Rho.
CONE in exergue
13mm.
RIC 61 , C
3 commentsjdholds
2540368.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla43 viewsAelia Flaccilla. Augusta, AD 379-386/8. Æ (22mm, 4.40 g, 6h). Constantinople mint. Diademed and draped bust right / Victory seated right, inscribing Christogram on shield set on column; CONЄ. RIC IX 55.5; LRBC 2149.4 commentsTLP
00501-AeliaFlaccilla.JPG
Aelia Flaccilla18 viewsAelia Flaccilla AE4
13 mm 1.04 gm
O: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG
Pearl-diademed and draped bust right
R: SALVS REIP-VBLICAE
Victory seated right, inscribing Christogram on shield;
Koffy
AEL_FLA-1-ROMAN.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla68 viewsAE4
Uncertain mint, 378-388 A.D.
13mm, 1.20g

Obverse:
AEL FLACCILLA AVG
Draped with elaborate head-dress, necklace, and mantle, bust right.

Reverse:
SALVS REIPVBLCAE
Victory seated right, writing Chi-Rho on shield resting on small column.
rubadub
aeliia_ae2.JPG
Aelia Flaccilla12 viewsRIC 62 (Antiochia), LRBC 2760 AE2 Obv: AELFLACCILLAAVG - Diademed, draped bust right.
Rev: SALVSREIPVBLICAE Exe: ANTE - Aelia Flaccilla standing facing, holding scroll with both hands. 383-388 (Antioch).
James b4
Aelia_Flaccilla.JPG
Aelia Flaccilla811 viewsAelia Flaccilla AE4.
SMHA Mint, 13mm, 1.04g
Obv: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG, draped bust right with elaborate headdress,
necklace and mantle
Rev: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory seated right, writing chi-rho on shield
resting on small column.
RIC IX Heraclea 17

RARE
Romanorvm
Aelia_Flaccilla~0.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla 226 viewsAelia Flaccilla AE2. Struck 383 AD, Constantinople mint.

AEL FLACCILLA AVG, mantled bust right in elaborate headdress & necklace / SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing a christogram on shield resting on small column. T in right field, mintmark CON Epsilon. RIC 81 var (RIC lists T in left field only).

FLACILLA (Aelia), the first wife of Theodosius the Great; born in Spain, daughter of Antonius, prefect of Gaul, she was celebrated for her piety, and for her benevolence to the poor. Arcadius and Honorius were her sons by the above named emperor, who married her before his accession to the imperial throne.

She died in Thrace, A. D. 388. Her brass coins are of the lowest degree of rarity, her gold and silver most rare.

A half aureus of this empress's, on which she is styled AEL FLACILLA AVG, bears her head crowned with a diadem enriched with precious stones. - SALVS REIPVBLICAE is the legend, and a victory inscribing on a shield the monogram of Christ, is the type of the reverse.
2 commentssuperflex
118~1.JPG
Aelia Flaccilla AD 379-386 Antioch (ANTE)161 viewsObv: AELFLAC-CILLAAVG
Rev: Empress Standing, Holding Scroll
SALVS REIPVBLICAE
RIC IX 62
Laetvs
flac~0.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla (379 - 386 A.D.)59 viewsÆ2
O: AEL FLACCILLA AVG, Diademed and draped bust right.
R: SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Empress standing with hands folded on her chest. SMKr" in exergue.
Cyzicus mint
5.5g
RIC IX 24; LRBC 2567
4 commentsMat
00579.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla (RIC 61, Coin #579)16 viewsAelia Flaccilla, RIC 61, AE4, Constantinople, 378 - 383 AD.
Obv: AEL FLACCILLA AVG Draped bust right with elaborate head-dress, necklace and mantle.
Rev: SALVS REIPVBLICAE (CONЄ) Victory seated right inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus.
Size: 13.3mm 1.40g
MaynardGee
00715.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla (RIC 62, Coin #715)24 viewsRIC 62 (Scarce), AE Maiorina, Antioch, 383-386 AD.
OBV: AEL FLACCILLA AVG; Draped bust right with an elaborate head dress, necklace and mantle.
REV: SALVS REIPVBLICAE (ANTE); Aelia Flaccilla standing facing, head right, arms folded on breast.
SIZE: 23.9mm, 5.68g
1 commentsMaynardGee
W3.png
Aelia Flaccilla (wife of Theodosius I) Æ Centenionalis. 9 viewsAntioch, AD 383-388. AEL FLACCILLA AVG, draped bust right, with elaborate head-dress, necklace and mantle / SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Empress standing facing, head right, with arms folded; ANTЄ in exergue. RIC 62. 5.56g, 22mm, 11h. Very Fine.Chris C2
1298_Aelia_Flaccilla_SMKG.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla - AE 25 viewsCyzicus
25 Aug 383 - 386 AD
diademed and draped bust right
AEL FLAC_CILLA AVG
Aelia Fllaccila facing, head right, draped, arms folded on breast
SALVS REI_PVBLICAE
SMKΓ
RIC IX Cyzicus 24 (R), LRBC II 2567, SRCV V 20620, Cohen VIII 6
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
Aelia Flacilla1.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla - AE 2 of Constantinople16 viewsAEL. FLACCILLA AVG.
SALVS REIPVBLICAE , victory seated right inscribing christogram on a shield ; exergue CONA (Constantinople)
Ginolerhino
1299_Aelia_Flaccilla_CONG.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla - AE 43 viewsConstantinople
25 Aug 383 - 386 AD
diademed and draped bust right
AEL FLAC_CILLA AVG
Victory seated right, inscribing christogram on shield set on cippus
SALVS REI_PVBLICAE
CONΓ
RIC IX Constantinople 61.2, LRBC II 2162, SRCV V 20626, Cohen VIII 5
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
Aelia Flacilla 2.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla - AE215 viewsAEL. FLACCILLA AVG.
SALVS REIPVBLICAE , Aelia Flaccilla standing facing ; exergue ANTE (Antioch)
Ginolerhino
Aelia_Flaccila.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla 383-388 A.D. 9 viewsAelia Flaccilla 383-388 A.D. Ae 15.6~16.8mm. 1.72g. Obv: AEL FLAC-CILLA, draped bust with elaborate headdress, necklace and mantle. Rev: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing a chi-rho on shield set on narrow column.ddwau
Aelia_Flaccilla_1_opt.jpg
AELIA FLACCILLA AE2, RIC 62, SALVS REIPVBLICAE48 viewsOBV: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG, diademed & draped bust right
REV: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Empress standing left, holding scroll, ANTЄ in ex.


Minted at Antiochia, 379-385 AD
Legatus
Aelia_Flaccilla_b.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla AE445 viewsfirst wife of Theodosius I.
SALVS REIPVBLICAE
Tibsi
afae4.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla AE4 383 CE.17 viewsObverse: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG, draped bust with elaborate headdress, necklace and mantle.
Reverse: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing chi-rho symbol on shield resting on a small column.
Uncertain mint. 12.43 mm., 1.2 g.
NORMAN K
Aelia-Flaccilla.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla AE4, Antioch. Victory27 viewsRoman Imperial, Aelia Flaccilla AE4, Antioch, AD 383-388, 1.7g, 12mm

Obverse: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG, Diademed and draped bust right.

Reverse: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing Chi-Rho onto shield set on column. Mintmark ANƐ. "Health of the Republic"

Reference: RIC IX Antioch 64

Ex: Aegean Numismatics +photo
Gil-galad
a1_(2).jpg
Aelia Flaccilla AE4.21 views AEL FLAC-CILLA, draped bust with elaborate headdress, necklace and mantle / SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing a chi-rho on shield set on narrow column.ancientone
Aelia_Faccilla.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla AE4. Constantinopla.17 views13 mm., 1.06g _2200E

Aelia Flacilla AE 22mm. 378-388 AD. Draped bust right, in elaborate headdress, necklace, & mantle / Victory seated right on throne, inscribing a Christogram on a shield set on a column. Mintmark CONA. RIC IX Constantinople 55; Sear 20611.
Antonivs Protti
salvsreipvblicaeORweb.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla Æ, Constantinople mint21 viewsO: AEL FLACCILLA AVG, mantled bust right in elaborate headdress & necklace
R: SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing a christogram on shield resting on small column
CONSE in ex.
15mm .83g
casata137ec
Aelia Flaccilla Heraclea RIC 17.JPG
Aelia Flaccilla Heraclea RIC 1713 viewsAE4, Heracle mint, 383-388 AD
Obverse: AEL FLACCILLA AVG, Diademed and mantled bust right
Reverse: SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right inscribing shield on her knee
.SMHA in exergue, Heraclea mint, RIC 17
13mm, 1.6gm
Jerome Holderman
Aelia Flaccilla RIC 61.JPG
Aelia Flaccilla RIC 6117 viewsAE4, Constantinople mint, 383-388 AD
Obverse: AEL FLACCILLA AVG, Diademed, draped bust right.
Reverse: SALVS REIPVBLICAE: Victory seated right inscribing Chi Rho on shield which rests in her lap.
CONE in exergue
13mm , 0.9gm
Jerome Holderman
0751-310np_noir.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla, AE2 - *144 viewsConstantinople mint, 5th officina
AEL FLAC CILLA, diademed and draped bust right
SALVS REI PVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing ChiRo on a shield. CON epsilon at exergue
4.75 gr
Ref : Cohen # 4, LRBC # 2167
1 commentsPotator II
Aelia Flaccilla- Antioch.JPG
Aelia Flaccilla, AE2, Antioch19 viewsAE2, 379-395 AD, Antioch mint
Obverse: AEL FLACCILLA AVG, Diademed and draped bust right.
Reverse: SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated inscribing Christogram on shield which sits on a low column. Hammer? in field.
ANT(Gamma) in exergue
21mm , 5.1gms
Jerome Holderman
aelia43.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla, Antioch95 viewsAEL FLAC-CILLA,
draped bust with elaborate headdress, necklace and mantle

SALVS REI-PVBLICAE,
Victory seated right, inscribing a chi-rho on shield resting on small column.

ANT(gamma)
Antioch Mint

Ae 21mm
2 commentsarizonarobin
AELIA FLACILLA.JPG
Aelia Flaccilla, Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 or 388 A.D., wife of Theodosius I36 views11099. Bronze AE 2, S 4193, VF, 4.764g, 23.22mm, 0o, uncertain mint, 25 Aug 383 - 28 Aug 388 A.D.; obverse AEL FLACCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE, empress standing facing, head right, arms folded on breast; partially uncleaned1 commentsMarjan E
AeliaFlaccilla2.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla, Constantinople253 viewsAEL FLAC-CILLA AVG
Bust draped with elaborate headdress, necklace and mantle
SALVS REI-PVBLICAE
Empress standing, facing, head right, arms folded at breast
CONSΕ Large Chi-rho in right field
Constantinopolis year 383-388

RIC IX Constantinopolis 82; Cohen 6
Ae2; 21-22mm; 3.88g


One of my favorite examples of desert pantina
7 commentsarizonarobin
collage~11.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla, Constantinople53 viewsAEL FLAC-CILLA AVG
Diademed & draped bust right

SALVS REI-PVBLICAE
Victory seated right, inscribing Chi-Rho onto shield

CONS
Constantinople Mint

Ae;1.29g;13-14mm
1 commentsarizonarobin
collage3~0.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla, Cyzicus46 viewsAEL FLAC-CILLA AVG
Bust draped with elaborate headdress, necklace and mantle

SALVS REI-PVBLICAE
Empress standing facing, head right, hands folded at breast

E: SMKΓ
Cyzicus Mint

RIC 24
Ae2; 22mm; 5.17g
arizonarobin
Aelia_Flaccilla_RIC_28.JPG
Aelia Flaccilla, RIC 2810 viewsAEL FLACCILLA AVG
SALUS REIPVBLICAE
AE4, 10mm, 1.15g
Diademed, draped bust right
Victory seated right on cuirass, pointing one hand at shield inscribed with Chi-Rho, balanced atop a column
SMNΓ in ex.
Nicomedia mint
novacystis
aelia_flaccilla_Heraclea_25.2.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla, RIC IX, Heraclea 2582 viewsAelia Flaccilla AD 379-388, 1st wife of Theodosius I
AE- AE 2, 4.73g
Heraclea 1st officina, 25 Aug. 383 - 28 Aug. 388
obv. AEL FLAC - CILLA AVG
Bust, draped with elaborate headdress, necklace and mantle, r.
rev. SALVS REI - PVBLICAE
Empress standing frontal, head r., with arms crossed before breast
in ex. dot SMHA
star in l. field, cross in r. field
RIC IX, Heraclea 25 type 2; C.6
scarce, good VF, green patina

Usually all coins of Aelia Flaccilla are not common
4 commentsJochen
Aelia Flaccilla- Antioch-2.JPG
Aelia Flaccilla- Antioch-224 viewsAE2, 383-388 AD Antioch mint
Obverse: AEL FLACCILLA AVG, Diademmed and draped bust right.
Reverse: SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscriping Chi Rho on a shield she holds in her lap. T in right field
ANT(Gamma) in exergue
21mm, 4.09gm
RIC 61.2
Jerome Holderman
flacillaex.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla-Salvs Reipvblicae AE2154 views Attribution-RIC IX Constantinople 55.5 LRBC 2149

Obv. AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG
Rev. SALVS REI-PVBLICAE
Rf. T
Ex. CON epsilon
black-prophet
flaccillaNicoB.jpg
Aelia Flaccilla-Salvs Reipvblicae AE2-Not in RIC144 viewsAttribution-Aelia Flaccilla 378-388 AD. Van Meter 5

Obv.AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG- Draped bust right, in elaborate headdress, necklace,
& mantle
REV. SALVS REI-PVBLICAE- Empress standing facing, arms folded over chest
LF. Branch
EX. SMNB
black-prophet
00615-AeliaVerina.JPG
Aelia Verina20 viewsAelia Verina AE2
13 mm 1.04 gm
O: AEL FLACCILLA AVG
Pearl-diademed and draped bust right
R: SALVS REIPVBLICAE
Victory seated right, inscribing Christogram on shield; CONE
Koffy
Arcadius.jpg
Arcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.10 viewsBronze AE 4, RIC 65(c), Fair, Thessalonica, 1.301g, 13.9mm, 180o, 28 Aug 388 - spring 393 A.D.; obverse D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory advancing left carrying trophy and dragging captive, P in left field, TESG in exergue; scarce;

Flavius Arcadius was the son of Theodosius I and Aelia Flaccilla. Born in 377 A.D., Arcadius was raised to the rank of Augustus by his father at the age of six. Upon the death of Theodosius in 395 A.D., Arcadius was given the Eastern half of the Roman empire while his brother Honorius received the Western half. Arcadius inherited none of his great father's skills and was under the influence of variously Rufinus the Praetorian prefect, Eutropius a courtier eunuch, the Goth Gainas, Empress Eudoxia and another Praetorian prefect Anthemius. His greatest personal accomplishment in life was his beautiful handwriting. Arcadius died in 408 A.D. and was succeeded by his young son Theodosius II.
b70
EB0813_scaled.JPG
EB0813 Aelia Flaccilla / SALVS REIPVBLICAE11 viewsAelia Flaccilla (wife of Theodosius I died 386), AE 2, Heraclea 383-388 AD.
Obverse: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG, draped bust right wearing headdress, necklace and mantle.
Reverse: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Empress standing facing, head right, hands crossed on breast. Star in left field, Cross in right field. Mintmark dot SMHA.
References: RIC IX Heraclea 25.
Diameter: 23.5mm, Weight: 4.195g.
EB
EB0814_scaled.JPG
EB0814 Aelia Flaccilla / Victory7 viewsAelia Flaccilla (wife of Theodosius I died 386), AE 4.
Obverse: Diademed head of Aelia Flaccilla right.
Reverse: Victory seated right inscribing a Christogram on a shield.
References: -.
Diameter: 16.5mm, Weight: 2.157g.
EB
EB0815_scaled.JPG
EB0815 Aelia Flaccilla / SALVS REIPVBLICAE9 viewsAelia Flaccilla, AE 2, Antioch.
Obverse: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG, diademed & draped bust right.
Reverse: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Empress standing left, holding scroll. Mintmark ANT [?].
References: RIC IX Antioch 62.
Diameter: 21.5mm, Weight: 4.903g.
EB
Aelia_Flacilla_1.jpg
RIC 9, p.291, 62 - Aelia Flacilla Antiochia31 viewsAelia Flacilla
Syria, Antiochia
Obv.: AEL FLACCILLA AVG , Draped bust right
Rev.: SALVS REI PVBLICAE Aelia Flacilla standing facing head right, ANTE
Ae, 5.55g, 21.7mm
Ref.: RIC.62 pl. 14/17
1 commentsshanxi
ROMAN_EMPIRE_-_Aellia_Flacilla.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE -- AELIA FLACCILLA, AUGUSTA 91 viewsROMAN EMPIRE -- AELIA FLACCILLA, AUGUSTA (379-386 AD) AE2. Made 383-388 AD. Obv.: Bust draped with elaborate headdress, necklace and mantle faces right; AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG Rev.: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE with CON epsilon in exergue, Empress standing facing, head right, arms folded on breast. T in right field. Constantinople mint. Reference: RIC IX Constantinople 82.dpaul7
Aelia Flaccilla RIC 35.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Aelia Flaccilla - AE4 - RIC 35 (Siscia)320 viewsAE 4 of Aelia Flaccilla, 1.05g, minted in Siscia, 383-392 A.D.; obverse: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG, draped bust with elaborate headdress, necklace and mantle; reverse: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing a chi-rho on shield resting on small column; mintmark ASIS.3 commentsPriscian
Aelia Flacilla~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Aelia Flaccilla AE2. Constantinopolis. RIC IX : 551428 viewsObv: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG. Diademed and draped bust right.
Obv: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE. Victory seated right on throne, writing Christogram on shield held on small column. In exergue, CON Epsilon (fifth officina).
11 commentsthe_Apostate
Aelia_Flaccilla.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Aelia Flaccilla AE48 viewsAelia Flaccilla AE4. Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 or 388 A.D., wife of Theodosius I
Obv: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG, draped bust right with elaborate headdress, necklace and mantle
Rev: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory seated right, writing chi-rho on shield resting on small column; in ex. 'dot' SMHA.
RIC IX Heraclea 17,
Rare
George
Aelia_Flaccilla_Heraclea_mint.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Aelia Flaccilla Augusta, 379 - 386 or 388. Heraclea mint36 viewsAE 4, 1.180 g, 14.0 mm. gVF. Obv: diademed and draped bust right; AEL FLACCILLA AVG. Rev: Victory seated right inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus, SALVS REIPVBLICAE. Ex: •SMH[A]. Ref: RIC 17, S 4194. RAREBard Gram O
Aelia_Flaccilla.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Aelia Flaccilla, AE252 viewsAelia Flaccilla AE2. Struck 383 AD, Constantinople mint. AEL FLACCILLA AVG, mantled bust right in elaborate headdress & necklace / SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right, inscribing a christogram on shield resting on small column. T in right field, mintmark CON Epsilon. RIC 81 var (RIC lists T in left field only).
1 commentssuperflex
bpLRE1M5AeliaFlac.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Aelia Flaccilla, Ae4, Nicomedia, RIC 36 (R), LRBC 2386, 383-86 AD49 viewsObv: AEL FLACCILA AVG
Draped bust, right, with elaborate head-dress, wearing necklace and mantle.
Rev: SALVS REIPVBLICAE
Victory seated, right, inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus.
1.1 gm 12 mm Exergue: SMNЄ
Comment: First wife of Theodosius I and mother of Arcadius and Honorius.
Massanutten
moneta 551 small.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Aelia Flaccilla, Heraclea207 viewsAelia Flaccilla AE4
obv: AEL FLACCILLA AVG. Diademed and draped bust right, wearing knecklace
rev: SALVS REIPVBLICAE. Victory seated right, inscribing a chi-rho on shield resting on small column
exergue: dot S (?)
Struck at 383-386 A.D. at Heraclea
Van Meter 6
Note: Wife of Theodosius I, mother of Arcadius and Honorius
Jericho
Ael-Flaccilla-Salvs-Antioch.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Aelia Flaccilla-Salvs Reipvblicae AE2-Not in RIC?35 viewsAelia Flaccilla Æ2 22mm.
OBV- AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG, diademed & draped bust right
REV- SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Empress standing left, holding scroll
EX- ANT?-not sure on officina,although it does not appear to be epsilon.

If officina is epsilon than it will be attributed as RIC IX Antioch 62
black-prophet
AEL FLA-2.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Aelia Flaccilla. wife of Theodosius I. Augusta, 379-386/8 CE.153 viewsÆ 2 (4.74 grams, 23.4mm). Constantinople mint, 383-386 CE.
Obv: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG, Draped bust right with elaborate head-dress and necklace.
Rev: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Flaccilla standing facing, head right, arms folded on breast. Christogram in right field, CONSE in exergue.
RIC IX 82; Sear 4193 (var); Cohen 6.
EmpressCollector
Screenshot_2019-07-11_12_23_31.png
Roman Imperial, Aelia Flaccilla as Augusta, AE2. Provenance: Ex Derek Aldred collection 1993, coin came with old collection ticket. Added to the Wildwinds site.9 viewsAntioch 383-388 A.D. 4.52g - 23.3mm, Axis 11h.

Obv: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG - Diademed and draped bust right.

Rev: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE - Victory seated right, inscribing a Chi-rho on a shield set on a short column, T in right field. Mintmark ANTΓ.

RIC IX 61; Γ.
scarli
Sear-20616.jpg
Roman Imperial: Aelia Flaccilla (378-383 CE) AE Follis, Antioch (Sear 20616; RIC IX 61)35 viewsObv: AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG; diademed & draped bust right
Rev: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE; Victory seated right, inscribing Chi-Rho onto shield set on column, T in right field, ANTB in exergue
2 commentsQuant.Geek
CJSII-0414 obv.JPG
Roman, Aelia Flaccilla1040 viewsex FORVM - 2243. Bronze AE2, RIC 43, gVF, 3.1g, 20.8mm, 180o, Nicomedia mint, 25 Aug 383 - 386 A.D.; obverse AEL FLAC-CILLA AVG, draped bust right with an elaborate head dress, necklace and mantle; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Aelia Flacilla standing facing head right, arms folded on breast, SMN[ in ex; irregular flan, excellent portrait, black patina beautifully highlighted by read earthen fill, this is the most elaborate hairstyle we have seen on this type; very rare7 commentscscoppa
aelia_f.jpg
SALVS REIPVBLICAE, CONE10 viewsAELIA FLACCILLA (wife of Theodosius I, mother of Arcadius and Honorius) Æ 4. Rev. SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right inscribing Christogram on shield set on cippus, CONE in exergue, mint of Constantinople. 1.2g 14mm RIC 61(3). Podiceps
Aelia_Flaccilla_Salus-R_ANTE.JPG
Struck A.D.383 - 386. AELIA FLACCILLA (Wife of Theodosius I). AE2 of Antioch31 viewsObverse: AEL FLACCILLA AVG. Pearl-diademed and draped bust of Aelia Flaccilla, wearing pearl necklace and earring, facing right.
Reverse: SALVS REIPVBLICAE. Victory seated on cippus facing right and inscribing Christogram (Chi-Rho) on shield which is also set on a short column (cippus). In right field, T; in exergue, ANTE.
RIC IX : 61
RARE

Aelia Flaccilla was the wife of Theodosius I, and the mother of Arcadius and Honorius. She died in A.D.386.
4 comments*Alex
The_Ladies_opt.jpg
The Ladies of Rome53 viewsFaustina I
Faustina II
Lucilla
Julia Soaemias
Julia Domna
Julia Maesa
Helena
Herennia Etruscilla
Salonina
Severina
Fausta
Aelia Flaccilla
Legatus
ARI-Honorius-3.jpg
Western Roman Empire , Honorius, AD 393-423 18 viewsAR Siliqua, Milan Mint, RIC X 1228

Grade: Ch AU: Strike 5/5: Surface 4/5

Obv. :D N HONORIVS P F AVG, diademed draped bust right.

Rev.: VIRTVS ROMANORVM, Roma seated left holding Victory & inverted spear, Mintmark MDPS

Honorius was Western Roman Emperor from 393 to 423. He was the younger son of emperor Theodosius I and his first wife Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of Arcadius, who was the Eastern Emperor from 395 until his death in 408.
Richard M10
TheodosiusRIC83b.jpg
[1601a] Theodosius I, 19 January 379 - 17 January 395 A.D. 67 viewsBronze AE 2, RIC 83(b), EF, Constantinople mint, 4.389g, 22.1mm, 180o, 25 Aug 383 - 28 Aug 388 A.D.; Obverse: D N THEODO-SIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: VIRTVS E-XERCITI, Emperor standing right holding standard and globe, foot on captive, cross in left field, CONSA in exergue. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

THEODOSIUS I (379-395 A.D.)
David Woods
University College of Cork


Origin and Early Career
Flavius Theodosius was born at Cauca in Spain in about 346 to Thermantia and Theodosius the Elder (so-called to distinguish him from his son). Theodosius the Elder was a senior military officer serving in the Western empire and rose to become the magister equitum praesentalis under the emperor Valentinian I from late 368 until his execution in early 375. As the son of a soldier, Theodosius was legally obliged to enter upon a military career. He seems to have served under his father during his expedition to Britain in 367/8, and was the dux Moesiae Primae by late 374. Unfortunately, great controversy surrounds the rest of his career until Gratian had him hailed as his imperial colleague in succession to the emperor Valens at Sirmium on 19 January 379. It is clear that he was forced to retire home to Spain only to be recalled to active service shortly thereafter, but the circumstances of his forced retirement are shrouded in mystery. His father was executed at roughly the same time, and much speculation has centred on the relationship between these events.

[For a very detailed and interesting discussion of the Foreign Policy of Theodosius and the Civil Wars that plagued his reign, please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/theo1.htm]

Family and Succession
Theodosius married twice. His first wife was the Spanish Aelia Flavia Flaccilla. She bore him Arcadius ca. 377, Honorius on 9 September 384, and Pulcheria ca. 385. Theodosius honoured her with the title of Augusta shortly after his accession, but she died in 386. In late 387 he married Galla, daughter of Valentinian I and full-sister of Valentinian II. She bore him Gratian ca. 388, Galla Placidia ca. 388/390, and died in childbirth in 394, together with her new-born son John. Of his two sons who survived infancy, he appointed Arcadius as Augustus on 19 January 383 and Honorius as Augustus on 23 January 393. His promotion of Arcadius as a full Augustus at an unusually young age points to his determination right from the start that one of his own sons should succeed him. He sought to strengthen Arcadius' position in particular by means of a series of strategic marriages whose purpose was to tie his leading "generals" irrevocably to his dynasty. Hence he married his niece and adoptive daughter Serena to his magister militum per Orientem Stilicho in 387, her elder sister Thermantia to a "general" whose name has not been preserved, and ca. 387 his nephew-in-law Nebridius to Salvina, daughter of the comes Africae Gildo. By the time of his death by illness on 17 January 395, Theodosius had promoted Stilicho from his position as one of the two comites domesticorum under his own eastern administration to that of magister peditum praesentalis in a western administration, in an entirely traditional manner, under his younger son Honorius. Although Stilicho managed to increase the power of the magister peditum praesentalis to the disadvantage of his colleague the magister equitum praesentalis and claimed that Theodosius had appointed him as guardian for both his sons, this tells us more about his cunning and ambition than it does about Theodosius' constitutional arrangements.

Theodosius' importance rests on the fact that he founded a dynasty which continued in power until the death of his grandson Theodosius II in 450. This ensured a continuity of policy which saw the emergence of Nicene Christianity as the orthodox belief of the vast majority of Christians throughout the middle ages. It also ensured the essential destruction of paganism and the emergence of Christianity as the religion of the state, even if the individual steps in this process can be difficult to identify. On the negative side, however, he allowed his dynastic interests and ambitions to lead him into two unnecessary and bloody civil wars which severely weakened the empire's ability to defend itself in the face of continued barbarian pressure upon its frontiers. In this manner, he put the interests of his family before those of the wider Roman population and was responsible, in many ways, for the phenomenon to which we now refer as the fall of the western Roman empire.


Copyright (C) 1998, David Woods.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

There is a nice segue here, as we pick-up John Julius Norwich's summation of the reign of Theodosius, "Readers of this brief account of his career may well find themselves wondering, not so much whether he deserved the title of 'the Great' as how he ever came to acquire it in the first place. If so, however, they may also like to ask themselves another question: what would have been the fate of the Empire if, at that critical moment in its history after the battle of Adrianople, young Gratian had not called him from his Spanish estates and put the future of the East into his hands? . . . the probability is that the whole Empire of the East would have been lost, swallowed up in a revived Gothic kingdom, with effects on world history that defy speculation.

In his civil legislation he showed, again and again, a consideration for the humblest of his subjects that was rare indeed among rulers of the fourth century. What other prince would have decreed that any criminal, sentenced to execution, imprisonment or exile, must first be allowed thirty days' grace to put his affairs in order? Or that a specified part of his worldly goods must go to his children, upon whom their father's crimes must on no account be visited? Or that no farmer should be obliged to sell his produce to the State at a price lower than he would receive on the open market?

Had he earned his title? Not, perhaps, in the way that Constantine had done or as Justinian was to do. But, if not ultimately great himself, he had surely come very close to greatness; and had he reigned as long as they did his achievements might well have equalled theirs. He might even have saved the Western Empire. One thing only is certain: it would be nearly a century and a half before the Romans would look upon his like again" (Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium, the Early Centuries. London: Penguin Group, 1990. 116-7;118).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
 
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